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Sample records for ampt-induced monoamine depletion

  1. The combined depletion of monoamines alters the effectiveness of subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, Emilie; Delaville, Claire; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-01

    Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are under-studied and therefore not well treated. Here, we investigated the role of combined depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and/or serotonin in the manifestation of motor and non-motor deficits in the rat. Then, we studied the impact of these depletions on the efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). We performed selective depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, and the behavioral effects of different combined depletions were investigated using the open field, the elevated plus maze and the forced swim test. Bilateral dopamine depletion alone induced locomotor deficits associated with anxiety and mild "depressive-like" behaviors. Although additional depletions of norepinephrine and/or serotonin did not potentiate locomotor and anxiety disorders, combined depletions of the three monoamines dramatically exacerbated "depressive-like" behavior. STN-DBS markedly reversed locomotor deficits and anxiety behavior in animals with bilateral dopamine depletion alone. However, these improvements were reduced or lost by the additional depletion of norepinephrine and/or serotonin, indicating that the depletion of these monoamines may interfere with the antiparkinsonian efficacy of STN-DBS. Furthermore, our results showed that acute STN-DBS improved "depressive-like" disorder in animals with bilateral depletion of dopamine and also in animals with combined depletions of the three monoamines, which induced severe immobility in the forced swim test. Our data highlight the key role of monoamine depletions in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive-like disorders and provide the first evidence of their negative consequences on the efficacy of STN-DBS upon the motor and anxiety disorders in the context of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26206409

  2. Metyrapone attenuates the sequential learning deficits but not monoamine depletions following d,l-fenfluramine administration to adult rats.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Matthew R; Blankenmeyer, Tracy L; Gudelsky, Gary A; Brown-Strittholt, Carrie A; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2004-12-15

    Fenfluramine (FEN) is a substituted amphetamine known for its anorectic effects, without the stimulatory or abuse potential associated with other amphetamine derivatives. FEN is a potent serotonin (5-HT) releaser and reuptake inhibitor and has been shown to cause depletions of 5-HT that can last days and even weeks after administration. Administration of FEN four times on a single day also causes a prolonged increase of corticosterone (CORT) that lasts approximately 72 h following the first FEN dose. This dosing regimen also produces deficits in sequential learning as measured in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). Adrenalectomy blocks this effect but removes more than CORT. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether inhibiting glucocorticoid production, by administration of the 11 beta-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone (MET), will similarly attenuate or eliminate the sequential learning deficits seen with FEN exposure. MET (50 mg/kg) injections were administered 90 min prior to and for 3 days after FEN (four doses given at 2-h intervals). Animals pretreated with MET and treated with FEN showed no sequential learning deficits when tested 1 week following FEN administration compared to FEN alone. The depletions of monoamines were similar following FEN administration, regardless of MET treatment. Taken together, this suggests that a potential mechanism for the sequential learning deficits in FEN-treated animals is a result of prolonged increases in CORT output. PMID:15484208

  3. Brain α2-adrenoceptors in monoamine-depleted rats: increased receptor density, G coupling proteins, receptor turnover and receptor mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Catalina; Miralles, Antonio; Busquets, Xavier; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the molecular and cellular events involved in the up-regulation (and receptor supersensitivity) of brain α2-adrenoceptors as a result of chronic depletion of noradrenaline (and other monoamines) by reserpine. Chronic reserpine (0.25 mg kg−1 s.c., every 48 h for 6 – 14 days) increased significantly the density (Bmax values) of cortical α2-adrenoceptor agonist sites (34 – 48% for [3H]-UK14304, 22 – 32% for [3H]-clonidine) but not that of antagonist sites (11 – 18% for [3H]-RX821002). Competition of [3H]-RX821002 binding by (−)-adrenaline further indicated that chronic reserpine was associated with up-regulation of the high-affinity state of α2-adrenoceptors. In cortical membranes of reserpine-treated rats (0.25 mg kg−1 s.c., every 48 h for 20 days), the immunoreactivities of various G proteins (Gαi1/2, Gαi3, Gαo and Gαs) were increased (25 – 34%). Because the high-affinity conformation of the α2-adrenoceptor is most probably related to the complex with Gαi2 proteins, these results suggested an increase in signal transduction through α2-adrenoceptors (and other monoamine receptors) induced by chronic reserpine. After α2-adrenoceptor alkylation, the analysis of receptor recovery (Bmax for [3H]-UK14304) indicated that the increased density of cortical α2-adrenoceptors in reserpine-treated rats was probably due to a higher appearance rate constant of the receptor (Δr=57%) and not to a decreased disappearance rate constant (Δk=7%). Northern- and dot-blot analyses of RNA extracted from the cerebral cortex of saline- and reserpine-treated rats (0.25 mg kg−1, s.c., every 48 h for 20 days) revealed that reserpine markedly increased the expression of α2a-adrenoceptor mRNA in the brain (125%). This transcriptional activation of the receptor gene expression appears to be the cellular mechanism by which reserpine induces up-regulation in the density of brain α2-adrenoceptors

  4. Monoamines and sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nall, Aleksandra; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-06-01

    Sleep is an important physiological state, but its function and regulation remain elusive. Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model organism for studying sleep because it has a well-established diurnal activity pattern, including consolidated periods of quiescence that share many characteristics with human sleep. Sleep behavior is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes and is modulated by environmental and physiological context cues. These cues are communicated to sleep circuits by neurohormones and neuromodulators. A major class of neuromodulators, monoamines, has been found to be essential in various aspects of sleep regulation. Dopamine promotes arousal and sleep-dependent memory formation as well as daily activity. Octopamine, the insect homolog of norepinephrine, promotes wake and may play a role in circadian clock-dependent sleep and arousal. Serotonin promotes sleep and modulates circadian entrainment to light. The different monoamines each signal through multiple receptors in various brain regions in response to different conditions. How these separate circuits integrate their inputs into a single program of behavior is an open field of study for which Drosophila will continue to be a useful model. Monoamine biosynthetic pathways and receptors are conserved between flies and humans, and, thus far, their roles in modulating sleep also appear to be conserved. PMID:24886188

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Vuorenpää, Anne; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jørgensen, Trine N; Gether, Ulrik

    2016-09-01

    The high affinity transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, play a key role in controlling monoaminergic neurotransmission. It is believed that the transporters (DAT, NET and SERT, respectively) are subject to tight regulation by the cellular signaling machinery to maintain monoaminergic homeostasis. Kinases constitute a pivotal role in cellular signaling, however, the regulation of monoamine transporters by the entire ensemble of kinases is unknown. Here, we perform a whole human kinome RNA interference screen to identify novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation in HEK 293 cells transiently expressing DAT, SERT or NET. Subsequently, three kinases; salt inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PKA C-α) and protein kinase X-linked (PrKX); were selected for additional exploration in catecholaminergic CATH.a differentiated cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and

  7. Behavioral effects of bidirectional modulation of brain monoamines by reserpine and d-amphetamine in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kyzar, Evan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Landsman, Samuel; Collins, Christopher; Gebhardt, Michael; Robinson, Kyle; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain monoamines play a key role in the regulation of behavior. Reserpine depletes monoamines, and causes depression and hypoactivity in humans and rodents. In contrast, d-amphetamine increases brain monoamines’ levels, and evokes hyperactivity and anxiety. However, the effects of these agents on behavior and in relation to monoamine levels remain poorly understood, necessitating further experimental studies to understand their psychotropic action. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are rapidly emerging as a promising model organism for drug screening and translational neuroscience research. Here, we have examined the acute and long-term effects of reserpine and d-amphetamine on zebrafish behavior in the novel tank test. Overall, d-amphetamine (5 and 10 mg/L) evokes anxiogenic-like effects in zebrafish acutely, but not 7 days later. In contrast, reserpine (20 and 40 mg/L) did not evoke overt acute behavioral effects, but markedly reduced activity 7 days later, resembling motor retardation observed in depression and/or Parkinson’s disease. Three-dimensional ‘temporal’ (X, Y, Time) reconstructions of zebrafish locomotion further supports these findings, confirming the utility of 3D-based video-tracking analyses in zebrafish models of drug action. Our results show that zebrafish are highly sensitive to drugs bi-directionally modulating brain monoamines, generally paralleling rodent and clinical findings. Collectively, this emphasizes the potential of zebrafish tests to model complex brain disorders associated with monoamine dysregulation. PMID:23827499

  8. Genetics of monoamine neurotransmitter disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are a heterogeneous group of inherited neurological disorders involving defects in the metabolism of dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine and serotonin. The inheritance of these disorders is mostly autosomal recessive. The neurological symptoms are primarily attributable to cerebral deficiency of dopamine, serotonin or both. The clinical presentations were highly variable and substantial overlaps exist. Evidently, laboratory investigations are crucial for accurate diagnosis. Measurement of neurotransmitter metabolites in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is the key to delineate the metabolic defects. Adjuvant investigations including plasma phenylalanine, urine pterins, urine 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and serum prolactin are also helpful to establish the diagnosis. Genetic analyses are pivotally important to confirm the diagnosis which allows specific treatments, proper genetic counselling, prognosis prediction, assessment of recurrent risk in the family as well as prenatal diagnosis. Early diagnosis with appropriate treatment is associated with remarkable response and favourable clinical outcome in several disorders in this group. PMID:26835371

  9. Genetics of monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

    PubMed

    Siu, Wai-Kwan

    2015-04-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are a heterogeneous group of inherited neurological disorders involving defects in the metabolism of dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine and serotonin. The inheritance of these disorders is mostly autosomal recessive. The neurological symptoms are primarily attributable to cerebral deficiency of dopamine, serotonin or both. The clinical presentations were highly variable and substantial overlaps exist. Evidently, laboratory investigations are crucial for accurate diagnosis. Measurement of neurotransmitter metabolites in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is the key to delineate the metabolic defects. Adjuvant investigations including plasma phenylalanine, urine pterins, urine 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and serum prolactin are also helpful to establish the diagnosis. Genetic analyses are pivotally important to confirm the diagnosis which allows specific treatments, proper genetic counselling, prognosis prediction, assessment of recurrent risk in the family as well as prenatal diagnosis. Early diagnosis with appropriate treatment is associated with remarkable response and favourable clinical outcome in several disorders in this group. PMID:26835371

  10. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions. PMID:26944656

  11. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui; He, Xin-Hua; Yuan, Li; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yong, Zheng; Yu, Gang; Fan, Shi-Yong; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5-20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo. PMID:26318675

  12. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  13. Safflower extracts functionally regulate monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Zheng, Xiang-Wei; Gai, Yue; Chu, Wen-Jing; Qin, Guo-Wei; Guo, Li-He

    2009-07-01

    Safflower (HH), the dry flower of Carthamus tinctorius L., has long been used to empirically treat neuropsychological disorders such as stroke and major depression in traditional Chinese medicine, and recently been proven effective for regulating levels of dopamine and serotonin in new-born rat brain. The present study assessed whether HH would be bioactive for functionally regulating monoamine transporters using in vitro drug-screening cell lines. Our current results showed that all solvent-extracted HH fractions, in different degrees, markedly increased both dopamine uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing dopamine transporter (DAT) and norepinephrine uptake by CHO cells expressing norepinephrine transporter (NET), and also showed that chloroform (HC), ethyl acetate (HE), and n-butyl alcohol extract strikingly depressed serotonin uptake by CHO cells expressing serotonin transporter (SERT); wherein, the potencies of ethanol extract, HC, HE, and aqueous extract to up-regulate dopamine/norepinephrine uptake and potency of HE to inhibit serotonin uptake were relatively stronger. Further investigation revealed that the enhancement of dopamine/norepinephrine uptake by HC and HE was dependent of DAT/NET activity, and the HE-induced inhibition of serotonin uptake was typical of competition. Thus, HH extracts are novel monoamine transporter modulators functioning as DAT/NET activators and/or SERT inhibitors, and would likely improve neuropsychological disorders through regulating monoamine-transporter activity. PMID:19527825

  14. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  15. Effect of contraceptive steroids on monoamine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Collins, G. G. S.; Pryse-Davies, J.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Cyclical variations in monoamine oxidase activity during the human menstrual cycle, specific to the endometrium and modified in women undergoing contraceptive steroid treatment, may reflect changes in hormonal environment. Treatment of rats with individual constituents of the contraceptive pill causes analogous changes: oestrogens inhibit and progestogens potentiate uterine monoamine oxidase activity. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3

  16. Molecular aspects of monoamine oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Rona R

    2016-08-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAO) influence the monoamine levels in brain by virtue of their role in neurotransmitter breakdown. MAO B is the predominant form in glial cells and in platelets. MAO B structure, function and kinetics are described as a background for the effect of alterations in its activity on behavior. The need to inhibit MAO B to combat decreased brain amines continues to drive the search for new drugs. Reversible and irreversible inhibitors are now designed using data-mining, computational screening, docking and molecular dynamics. Multi-target ligands designed to combat the elevated activity of MAO B in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases incorporate MAO inhibition (usually irreversible) as well as iron chelation, antioxidant or neuroprotective properties. The main focus of drug design is the catalytic activity of MAO, but the imidazoline I2 site in the entrance cavity of MAO B is also a pharmacological target. Endogenous regulation of MAO B expression is discussed briefly in light of new studies measuring mRNA, protein, or activity in healthy and degenerative samples, including the effect of DNA methylation on the expression. Overall, this review focuses on examples of recent research on the molecular aspects of the expression, activity, and inhibition of MAO B. PMID:26891670

  17. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  18. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  19. Regulation of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2: a novel mechanism for cocaine and other psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Brown, J M; Hanson, G R; Fleckenstein, A E

    2001-03-01

    The plasmalemmal dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) is a principal site of action for cocaine. This report presents the novel finding that in addition to inhibiting DAT function, cocaine administration rapidly alters vesicular DA transport. Specifically, cocaine treatment abruptly and reversibly increased both the V(max) of DA uptake and the B(max) of vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) ligand (dihydrotetrabenazine) binding, as assessed ex vivo in purified rat striatal synaptic vesicles. Selective inhibitors of the DAT (amfonelic acid and GBR12935), but not the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter (fluoxetine), also increased vesicular DA uptake. Moreover, DA depletion resulting from administration of the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine had cocaine-like effects. Conversely, administration of the DA-releasing agent methamphetamine rapidly decreased vesicular uptake. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time ex vivo that cocaine treatment rapidly alters vesicular monoamine transport, and suggest that alterations in cytoplasmic DA concentrations contribute to stimulant-induced changes in vesicular DA uptake. Hence, the VMAT-2 may be an important target for developing strategies to treat not only cocaine addiction but also other disorders involving alterations in neuronal DA disposition, including Parkinson's disease. PMID:11181904

  20. Comparison of the effects of eleven histamine H1-receptor antagonists on monoamine turnover in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Shishido, S; Yamori, M; Saeki, K

    1994-02-01

    To compare in vivo effects of eleven compounds of different classes of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (alcoholamines: diphenhydramine, carbinoxamine, and clemastine; ethylenediamines: mepyramine, tripelennamine, and clemizole; alkylamines: triprolidine and chlorpheniramine; piperazines: meclizine and homochlorcyclizine; phenothiazines: promethazine) on neuronal uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), the effects on the turnover of these monoamines were examined in the mouse brain, based on the alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine-induced depletion of DA and NA or probenecid-induced accumulation of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The DA turnover was reduced remarkably by diphenhydramine, tripelennamine, and promethazine, and also significantly by chlorpheniramine, mepyramine, clemizole, and homochlorcyclizine, at doses used in the ordinary animal experiments. The 5-HT turnover was reduced markedly by mepyramine, tripelennamine, and chlorpheniramine. In contrast, the NA turnover was increased by promethazine and homochlorcyclizine, possibly due to their antagonistic effects on alpha-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that (1) the degree of inhibition of the uptake of DA and 5-HT by histamine H1-receptor antagonists is considerably different, (2) most H1-antagonists have little influence on NA uptake and some compounds enhance NA release, and that (3) carbinoxamine, clemastine, triprolidine, and meclizine have comparatively weak influences on monoamine metabolism. These effects on brain monoamine systems may be related to some central actions of histamine H1-receptor antagonists, such as an addiction to these compounds combined with opioids. PMID:7513381

  1. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  2. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  4. Bupropion increases striatal vesicular monoamine transport.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kristi S; Birdsall, Elisabeth; Hanson, Jarom E; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Carroll, F Ivy; Wilkins, Diana G; Gibb, James W; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2005-11-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) is principally involved in regulating cytoplasmic dopamine (DA) concentrations within terminals by sequestering free DA into synaptic vesicles. This laboratory previously identified a correlation between striatal vesicular DA uptake through VMAT-2 and inhibition of the DA transporter (DAT). For example, administration of methylphenidate (MPD), a DAT inhibitor, increases vesicular DA uptake through VMAT-2 in a purified vesicular preparation; an effect associated with a redistribution of VMAT-2 protein within DA terminals. The purpose of this study was to determine if other DAT inhibitors, including bupropion, similarly affect VMAT-2. Results revealed bupropion rapidly, reversibly, and dose-dependently increased vesicular DA uptake; an effect also associated with VMAT-2 protein redistribution. The bupropion-induced increase in vesicular DA uptake was prevented by pretreatment with eticlopride, a DA D2 receptor antagonist, but not by SCH23390, a DA D1 receptor antagonist. We previously reported that MPD post-treatment prevents persistent DA deficits associated with multiple methamphetamine (METH) administrations. Although bupropion attenuated the METH-induced reduction in VMAT-2 activity acutely, it did not prevent the long-term dopaminergic toxicity or the METH-induced redistribution of VMAT-2 protein. The findings from this study demonstrate similarities and differences in the mechanism by which MPD and bupropion affect striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals. PMID:16005476

  5. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  6. Therapeutic potential of monoamine transporter substrates.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Baumann, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine transporter proteins are targets for many psychoactive compounds, including therapeutic and abused stimulant drugs. This paper reviews recent work from our laboratory investigating the interaction of stimulants with transporters in brain tissue. We illustrate how determining the precise mechanism of stimulant drug action (uptake inhibitor vs. substrate) can provide unique opportunities for medication discovery. An important lesson learned from this work is that drugs which display equipotent substrate activity at dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) transporters have minimal abuse liability and few stimulant side-effects, yet are able to suppress ongoing drug-seeking behavior. As a specific example, we describe the development of PAL-287 (alpha-methylnapthylethylamine), a dual DA/5-HT releasing agent that suppresses cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys, without the adverse effects associated with older phenylethylamine 5-HT releasers (e.g., fenfluramine) and DA releasers (e.g., amphetamine). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of developing non-amphetamine releasing agents as potential treatments for substance abuse disorders and other psychiatric conditions. PMID:17017961

  7. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  8. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  9. Monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates as treatments for stimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Howell, Leonard L; Negus, S Stevens

    2014-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters, in general, and dopamine transporters, in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination, and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use. PMID:24484977

  10. Monoamine Transporter Inhibitors and Substrates as Treatments for Stimulant Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Leonard L.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters in general, and dopamine transporters in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability, and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use. PMID:24484977

  11. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    PubMed

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values <1 μM for the inhibition of MAO-B, with all compounds exhibiting higher affinities for MAO-B compared to the MAO-A isoform. The most potent MAO-B inhibitor (4h) displays an IC50 value of 0.067 μM while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor (4e) exhibits an IC50 value of 3.81 μM. It was further established that selected heterocyclic chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26432037

  12. Effect of Alkaloids Isolated from Phyllodium pulchellum on Monoamine Levels and Monoamine Oxidase Activity in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lu; Wang, Chao; Dong, Pei-pei; Zhang, Bao-jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Huang, Shan-shan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Sheng-ming; Zhong, Ming; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodium pulchellum (P. pulchellum) is a folk medicine with a significant number of bioactivities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects displayed by alkaloids fractions, isolated from the roots of P. pulchellum, on neurotransmitters monoamine levels and on monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Six alkaloids, which had indolealkylamine or β-carboline skeleton, were obtained by chromatographic technologies and identified by spectroscopic methods such as NMR and MS. After treatment with alkaloids of P. pulchellum, the reduction of DA levels (54.55%) and 5-HT levels (35.01%) in rat brain was observed by HPLC-FLD. The effect of alkaloids on the monoamines metabolism was mainly related to MAO inhibition, characterized by IC50 values of 37.35 ± 6.41 and 126.53 ± 5.39 μg/mL for MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. The acute toxicity indicated that P. pulchellum extract was nontoxic. PMID:27195015

  13. Expression cloning of a reserpine-sensitive vesicular monoamine transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, J D; Eiden, L E; Hoffman, B J

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA for a rat vesicular monoamine transporter, designated MAT, was isolated by expression cloning in a mammalian cell line (CV-1). The cDNA sequence predicts a protein of 515 amino acids with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains. The characteristics of [3H]serotonin accumulation by CV-1 cells expressing the cDNA clone suggested sequestration by an intracellular compartment. In cells permeabilized with digitonin, uptake was ATP dependent with an apparent Km of 1.3 microM. Uptake was abolished by the proton-translocating ionophore carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone and with tri-(n-butyl)tin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The rank order of potency to inhibit uptake was reserpine > tetrabenazine > serotonin > dopamine > norepinephrine > epinephrine. Direct comparison of [3H]monoamine uptake indicated that serotonin was the preferred substrate. Photolabeling of membranes prepared from CV-1 cells expressing MAT with 7-azido-8-[125I]iodoketanserin revealed a predominant tetrabenazine-sensitive photolabeled glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 75 kDa. The mRNA that encodes MAT was present specifically in monoamine-containing cells of the locus coeruleus, substantia nigra, and raphe nucleus of rat brain, each of which expresses a unique plasma membrane reuptake transporter. The MAT cDNA clone defines a vesicular monoamine transporter representing a distinct class of neurotransmitter transport molecules. Images PMID:1438304

  14. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  15. The Designer Methcathinone Analogs, Mephedrone and Methylone, are Substrates for Monoamine Transporters in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-01-01

    The nonmedical use of ‘designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study. PMID:22169943

  16. The designer methcathinone analogs, mephedrone and methylone, are substrates for monoamine transporters in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-04-01

    The nonmedical use of 'designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study. PMID:22169943

  17. Alteration of enteric monoamines with monoamine receptors and colonic dysmotility in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Yun; Liu, Chenzhe; Fan, Ruifang; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Lifei; Hong, Feng; Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yue; Li, Lisheng; Zhu, Jinxia

    2015-08-01

    Constipation is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), in which monoamines (dopamine [DA], norepinephrine [NE], and 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) play an important role. Rats microinjected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral substantia nigra (SN) exhibit constipation, but the role of monoamines and their receptors is not clear. In the present study, colonic motility, monoamine content, and the expression of monoamine receptors were examined using strain gauge force transducers, ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. The 6-OHDA rats displayed a significant reduction in dopaminergic neurons in the SN and a decreased time on rota-rod test and a marked decrease in daily fecal production and fecal water content. The amplitude of colonic spontaneous contraction was obviously decreased in 6-OHDA rats. Blocking D1-like receptor and β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) significantly reduced the inhibition of DA and NE on the colonic motility, respectively, whereas the 5-HT and 5-HT4 receptor agonists promoted the colonic motility. Moreover, DA content was increased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. The protein expression of β3-ARs was notably upregulated, but 5-HT4 receptors were significantly decreased in the colonic muscularis externa of 6-OHDA rats. We conclude that enhanced DA and β3-ARs and decreased 5-HT4 receptors may be contributed to the colonic dysmotility and constipation observed in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:25766133

  18. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine ☆

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H+ Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1). PMID:23506877

  19. Designing modulators of monoamine transporters using virtual screening techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole V.; Kortagere, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    The plasma-membrane monoamine transporters (MATs), including the serotonin (SERT), norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine (DAT) transporters, serve a pivotal role in limiting monoamine-mediated neurotransmission through the reuptake of their respective monoamine neurotransmitters. The transporters are the main target of clinically used psychostimulants and antidepressants. Despite the availability of several potent and selective MAT substrates and inhibitors the continuing need for therapeutic drugs to treat brain disorders involving aberrant monoamine signaling provides a compelling reason to identify novel ways of targeting and modulating the MATs. Designing novel modulators of MAT function have been limited by the lack of three dimensional structure information of the individual MATs. However, crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homolog of MATs, in a substrate-bound occluded, substrate-free outward-open, and an apo inward-open state and also with competitive and non-competitive inhibitors have been determined. In addition, several structures of the Drosophila DAT have also been resolved. Together with computational modeling and experimental data gathered over the past decade, these structures have dramatically advanced our understanding of several aspects of SERT, NET, and DAT transporter function, including some of the molecular determinants of ligand interaction at orthosteric substrate and inhibitor binding pockets. In addition progress has been made in the understanding of how allosteric modulation of MAT function can be achieved. Here we will review all the efforts up to date that has been made through computational approaches employing structural models of MATs to design small molecule modulators to the orthosteric and allosteric sites using virtual screening techniques. PMID:26483692

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  1. Structures and Mechanism of the Monoamine Oxidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Gaweska, Helena; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the monoamine oxidase family of flavoproteins catalyze the oxidation of primary and secondary amines, polyamines, amino acids, and methylated lysine side chains in proteins. The enzymes have similar overall structures, with conserved FAD-binding domains and varied substrate-binding sites. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for the catalytic reactions of these enzymes. The present review compares the structures of different members of the family and the various mechanistic proposals. PMID:22022344

  2. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  3. Role of monoamine transporters in mediating psychostimulant effects.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Evan L; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2005-01-01

    Monoamine transporters such as the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) are critical regulators of DA disposition within the brain. Alterations in DA disposition can lead to conditions such as drug addiction, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia, a fact that underscores the importance of understanding DAergic signaling. Psychostimulants alter DAergic signaling by influencing both DAT and VMAT-2, and although the effects of these drugs result in increased levels of synaptic DA, the mechanisms by which this occurs and the effects that these drugs exert on DAT and VMAT-2 vary. Many psychostimulants can be classified as releasers (ie, amphetamine analogs) or uptake blockers (ie, cocaine-like drugs) based on the mechanism of their acute effects on neurotransmitter flux through the DAT. Releasers and uptake blockers differentially modulate the activity and subcellular distribution of monoamine transporters, a phenomenon likely related to the neurotoxic potential of these drugs to DAergic neurons. This article will review some of the recent findings whereby releasers and uptake blockers alter DAT and VMAT-2 activity and how these alterations may be involved in neurotoxicity, thus providing insight on the neurodegeneration observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:16594636

  4. Monoamine mediation of the morphine-induced activation of mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernard J.; Sharp, Peter T.

    1972-01-01

    1. The dose-response relationship for hyperactivity in grouped mice following the injection of morphine sulphate has been established. 2. The activation response can be modified by drugs which affect either catecholamines or indoleamines. 3. The monoamine precursors L-DOPA and 5-hydroxytryptophan potentiate the response. 4. The monoamine synthesis inhibitors α-methyl-p-tyrosine and p-chlorophenylalanine reduce the response. 5. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase activity by pargyline caused a great increase in the response. The simultaneous administration of reserpine resulted in a further potentiation. 6. Reserpine blocked the response whenever it was given alone, either before, with or after the injection of morphine. 7. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors with phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine reduced the response. 8. Blockade of tryptaminergic receptors with methysergide or cinanserin also antagonized the response. 9. The major tranquillizers haloperidol and chlorpromazine reduced the response. Haloperidol was especially effective in this regard. 10. The tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine potentiated the response. 11. The morphine antagonist nalorphine completely prevented the response. 12. The anticholinergic agent atropine and the antihistaminic drug mepyramine did not affect the response. 13. We conclude that dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine are all involved in the normal activation response of grouped mice to morphine, with dopaminergic mechanisms being of primary importance. PMID:4263794

  5. Olfactory bulb monoamine concentrations vary with time of day.

    PubMed

    Corthell, J T; Stathopoulos, A M; Watson, C C; Bertram, R; Trombley, P Q

    2013-09-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) has been recently identified as a circadian oscillator capable of operating independently of the master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. OB oscillations manifest as rhythms in clock genes, electrical activity, and odor sensitivity. Dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin have been shown to modulate olfactory information processing by the OB and may be part of the mechanism that underlies diurnal changes in olfactory sensitivity. Rhythmic release of these neurotransmitters could generate OB rhythms in electrical activity and olfactory sensitivity. We hypothesized that these monoamines were rhythmically released in the OB. To test our hypotheses, we examined monoamine levels in the OB, over the course of a day, by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. We observed that dopamine and its metabolite, 3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, rhythmically fluctuate over the day. In contrast, norepinephrine is arrhythmic. Serotonin and its metabolite hydroxyindoleacetic acid appear to rhythmically fluctuate. Each of these monoamines has been shown to alter OB circuit behavior and influence odor processing. Rhythmic release of serotonin may be a mechanism by which the suprachiasmatic nuclei communicate, indirectly, with the OB. PMID:23727009

  6. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos.

    PubMed

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-12-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos. PMID:25606465

  7. Monoamines in the brain cerebrospinal fluid of facial pain patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bouckoms, A. J.; Sweet, W. H.; Poletti, C.; Lavori, P.; Carr, D.; Matson, W.; Gamache, P.; Aronin, N.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assay monoamines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the trigeminal cistern of 64 patients with intractable facial pain. The CSF was analyzed for homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), end-product markers of activity for the dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine systems, respectively. HVA averaged 121 ng/mL in these facial pain patients, compared to 150 to 550 ng/mL in 10 studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and pain patients. 5-HIAA averaged 29 to ng/mL in our facial pain patients compared to 60 to 120 ng/mL in nine studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and neurological patients. Trigeminal cistern CSF MHPG averaged 9 ng/mL, similar to the range of 13 studies of lumbar CSF of assorted psychiatric and pain diagnoses. These results indicate that (1) the electrochemical detection method provides a unique way of accurately measuring nanogram concentrations of multiple monoamines in a little as 0.25 mL of CSF; (2) trigeminal cistern and posterior fossa brain CSF monoamine metabolites reflect a different profile of dopaminergic and serotonergic functioning in these facial pain patients from that previously reported with lumbar CSF measurements of other patients; and (3) trigeminal sensory ganglion or brain dopamine and serotonin systems may be concomitantly dysfunctional in intractable facial pain. PMID:7504420

  8. "Ping-pong gaze" secondary to monoamine oxidase inhibitor overdose.

    PubMed

    Attaway, Amy; Sroujieh, Laila; Mersfelder, Tracey L; Butler, Christopher; Ouellette, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An infrequent manifestation of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) toxicity is "ping-pong gaze" (PPG). We describe the case of a 26-year-old female who was found unresponsive after taking 40 tablets of phenelzine. On presentation to the hospital, her eyes were moving in characteristic "ping pong" fashion. After 6 hours her gaze terminated. The following day her neurologic exam was benign and she had no long-term sequelae. While the etiology of PPG is unknown, it is most often seen with irreversible structural brain damage. However, a detailed literature review revealed that previous cases of MAOI toxicity where the patient survived have all had complete neurologic recovery. PMID:27127395

  9. The Role of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in Current Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Swartz, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The use of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) by psychiatrists has declined over the past several decades with the expansion of psychiatrists’ pharmacologic armamentarium. This trend has also been driven by concern about food and drug interactions and side effects, as well as waning physician experience with these medications. Many psychiatrists, in fact, never prescribe MAOIs. Recent research has liberalized the MAOI diet and identified symptom presentations more likely to respond to these medications. Thus, clinicians must continue to familiarize themselves with the properties of and indications for prescribing MAOIs. PMID:15552546

  10. The genetics of major depression: Moving beyond the monoamine hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Shyn, Stanley I.; Hamilton, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Efforts to unlock the biology of major depressive disorder (MDD) are proceeding on multiple fronts. In this article, we review our current understanding of epidemiologic evidence for a heritable component to MDD risk, as well as recent advances in linkage, candidate gene, and genome-wide association analyses of MDD and related disease subtypes and endophenotypes. While monoamine signaling has preoccupied the bulk of scientific investigation to date, non-traditional gene candidates such as PCLO and GRM7 are now emerging and beginning to change the landscape for future human and animal research on depression. PMID:20159343

  11. Proteins interacting with monoamine transporters: current state and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jonathan J; Torres, Gonzalo E

    2011-08-30

    Plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for the biogenic amines, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, represent a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the regulation of neurotransmission. Clinically, mono amine transporters are the primary targets for the actions of many therapeutic agents used to treat mood disorders, as well as the site of action for highly addictive psychostimulants such as cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. Over the past decade, the use of approaches such as yeast two-hybrid and proteomics has identified a multitude of transporter interacting proteins, suggesting that the function and regulation of these transporters are more complex than previously anticipated. With the increasing number of interacting proteins, the rules dictating transporter synthesis, assembly, targeting, trafficking, and function are beginning to be deciphered. Although many of these protein interactions have yet to be fully characterized, current knowledge is beginning to shed light on novel transporter mechanisms involved in monoamine homeostasis, the molecular actions of psychostimulants, and potential disease mechanisms. While future studies resolving the spatial and temporal resolution of these, and yet unknown, interactions will be needed, the realization that monoamine transporters do not work alone opens the path to a plethora of possible pharmacological interventions. PMID:21797260

  12. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  13. Monoamine oxidase A mediates prostate tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Shi, Changhong; Li, Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yin, Fei; Liao, Chun-Peng; Stiles, Bangyan L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Shih, Jean C.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors from patients with high-grade aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) exhibit increased expression of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades monoamine neurotransmitters and dietary amines. Despite the association between MAOA and aggressive PCa, it is unclear how MAOA promotes PCa progression. Here, we found that MAOA functions to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stabilize the transcription factor HIF1α, which mediates hypoxia through an elevation of ROS, thus enhancing growth, invasiveness, and metastasis of PCa cells. Knockdown and overexpression of MAOA in human PCa cell lines indicated that MAOA induces EMT through activation of VEGF and its coreceptor neuropilin-1. MAOA-dependent activation of neuropilin-1 promoted AKT/FOXO1/TWIST1 signaling, allowing FOXO1 binding at the TWIST1 promoter. Importantly, the MAOA-dependent HIF1α/VEGF-A/FOXO1/TWIST1 pathway was activated in high-grade PCa specimens, and knockdown of MAOA reduced or even eliminated prostate tumor growth and metastasis in PCa xenograft mouse models. Pharmacological inhibition of MAOA activity also reduced PCa xenograft growth in mice. Moreover, high MAOA expression in PCa tissues correlated with worse clinical outcomes in PCa patients. These findings collectively characterize the contribution of MAOA in PCa pathogenesis and suggest that MAOA has potential as a therapeutic target in PCa. PMID:24865426

  14. Brain monoamine oxidase A activity predicts trait aggression.

    PubMed

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-05-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), an enzyme that breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, Mendelian Inheritance in Men database number 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy nonsmoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the multidimensional personality questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions, the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than one-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  15. Methamphetamine administration reduces hippocampal vesicular monoamine transporter-2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kristi S; Birdsall, Elisabeth; Volz, Trent J; Riordan, James A; Baucum, Anthony J; Adair, Brian P; Bitter, Rebecca; Gibb, James W; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2006-08-01

    Repeated high-dose injections of methamphetamine (METH) rapidly decrease dopamine uptake by the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) associated with dopaminergic nerve terminals, as assessed in nonmembrane-associated vesicles purified from striata of treated rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether METH similarly affects vesicular uptake in the hippocampus; a region innervated by both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons and profoundly affected by METH treatment. Results revealed that repeated high-dose METH administrations rapidly (within 1 h) reduced hippocampal vesicular dopamine uptake, as assessed in vesicles purified from treated rats. This reduction was likely associated with serotonergic nerve terminals because METH did not further reduce vesicular monoamine uptake in para-chloroamphetamine-lesioned animals. Pretreatment with the serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine blocked both this acute effect on VMAT-2 and the decrease in serotonin content observed 7 days after METH treatment. In contrast, there was no conclusive evidence that METH affected vesicular dopamine uptake in noradrenergic neurons or caused persistent noradrenergic deficits. These findings suggest a link between METH-induced alterations in serotonergic hippocampal vesicular uptake and the persistent hippocampal serotonergic deficits induced by the stimulant. PMID:16687477

  16. Brain Monoamine Oxidase-A Activity Predicts Trait Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W.; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A, an enzyme which breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine) produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, MIM 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in-vivo in healthy non-smoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than a third of the variability. Since trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  17. BEHAVIORAL OUTCOMES OF MONOAMINE OXIDASE DEFICIENCY: PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Bortolato, Marco; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) isoenzymes A and B are mitochondrial-bound proteins, catalyzing the oxidative deamination of monoamine neurotransmitters as well as xenobiotic amines. Although they derive from a common ancestral progenitor gene, are located at X-chromosome and display 70% structural identity, their substrate preference, regional distribution, and physiological role are divergent. In fact, while MAO-A has high affinity for serotonin and norepinephrine, MAO-B primarily serves the catabolism of 2-phenylethylamine (PEA) and contributes to the degradation of other trace amines and dopamine. Convergent lines of preclinical and clinical evidence indicate that variations in MAO enzymatic activity—due to either genetic or environmental factors—can exert a profound influence on behavioral regulation and play a role in the pathophysiology of a large spectrum of mental and neurodegenerative disorders, ranging from antisocial personality disorder to Parkinson’s disease. Over the past few years, numerous advances have been made in our understanding of the phenotypical variations associated with genetic polymorphisms and mutations of the genes encoding for both isoenzymes. In particular, novel findings on the phenotypes of MAO-deficient mice are highlighting novel potential implications of both isoenzymes in a broad spectrum of mental disorders, ranging from autism and anxiety to impulse-control disorders and ADHD. These studies will lay the foundation for future research on the neurobiological and neurochemical bases of these pathological conditions, as well as the role of gene × environment interactions in the vulnerability to several mental disorders. PMID:21971001

  18. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Kushal, Swati; Wang, Weijun; Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M; Shih, Jean C

    2016-03-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  19. A review of monoamine transporter-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Immadisetty, Kalyan; Madura, Jeffry D

    2013-12-01

    Transporters of the monoamines serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine are plasma membrane proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter sodium symporter family (NSS). Monoamine transporters (MATs) by facilitating reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve terminal, regulate neurotransmitter chemical signaling and maintain homeostasis. MATs are targets for several psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine; and also for drugs treating several psychiatric disorders such as depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Since, currently available treatment has several limitations and side effects, novel treatment is highly desired. Efforts to develop better treatment have been hampered by the lack of crystal structures for MATs. However, leucine transporter (LeuTAa), a bacterial protein from Aquifex aeolicus, belonging to the same NSS family as MATs has recently been crystallized. LeuTAa is used as a template to develop homology models of MATs, which facilitates understanding of the structure, function and pharmacology of MATs. Experimental methods for drug discovery demand a significant amount of time, effort and money. Efficient utilization of computational techniques hastens the process of drug discovery and also significantly reduces the cost. Assessing the binding affinity of drugs to the receptors is a key aspect of drug design. Free energy calculations compliment the experiment by quantitatively assessing the affinity of ligands to receptors. These methods are highly beneficial in the lead identification and optimization stages of rational drug design. We review the currently available free energy methods to treat protein-ligand interactions along with several free energy studies performed on MATs. PMID:24138394

  20. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  1. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  2. Changes in monoamine concentrations in mouse brain associated with ethanol dependence and withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P.J.; Littleton, J.M.; Ortiz, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Chronic administration of ethanol to mice by inhalation induced tolerance to ethanol and produced an increase in the concentration of brain monoamines. 2 Withdrawal of ethanol from dependent mice caused behavioural changes associated with a further transient rise in brain monoamine concentrations which then declined to control levels. 3 Inhibition of the withdrawal syndrome by the administration of ethanol postponed the changes in monoamines associated with withdrawal. 4 Administration of inhibitors of catecholamine synthesis before withdrawal of ethanol modified the withdrawal syndrome. PMID:4475606

  3. Effects of high-dose fenfluramine treatment on monoamine uptake sites in rat brain: Assessment using quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Contrera, J.F.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative that in humans is used primarily as an anorectic agent in the treatment of obesity. In rats, subchronic high-dose d,l-fenfluramine treatment (24 mg/kg subcutaneously, twice daily for 4 days) causes long-lasting decreases in brain serotonin (5HT), its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and high-affinity 5HT uptake sites. Moreover, this high-dose treatment regimen causes both selective long-lasting decreases in fine-caliber 5HT-immunoreactive axons and appearance of other 5HT-immunoreactive axons with morphology characteristic of degenerating axons. Determination of the potential neurotoxic effects of fenfluramine treatment using immunohistochemistry is limited from the perspectives that staining is difficult to quantify and that it relies on presence of the antigen (in this case 5HT), and the 5HT-depleting effects of fenfluramine are well known. In the present study, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to assess, in detail, the density and regional distribution of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT and (3H)mazindol-labeled catecholamine uptake sites in response to the high-dose fenfluramine treatment described above. Because monoamine uptake sites are concentrated on monoamine-containing nerve terminals, decreases in uptake site density would provide a quantitative assessment of potential neurotoxicity resulting from this fenfluramine treatment regimen. Marked decreases in densities of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT uptake sites occurred in brain regions in which fenfluramine treatment decreased the density of 5HT-like immunostaining when compared to saline-treated control rats. These included cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and medial hypothalamus.

  4. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects. PMID:25542076

  5. Quantitative structure-activity studies on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C L

    1976-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity studies were carried out on a series of N-isopropylaryl hydrazides which inhibits monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibitory potencies of these compounds of MAO were found to correlate with the electron-withdrawing capacity of the aryl ring substituents as estimated by both empirical Hammet sigma constants and electronic indices from molecular orbital calculations. Based on these correlations and previously published data on other classes of MAO inhibitors, a general model for the inhibitor pharmacophore is proposed: potent MAO of an aromatic ring; electron-withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring or replacing the phenyl ring with certain types of heterocyclic rings will tend to increase the potency. PMID:1271400

  6. Aggression and personality: association with amino acids and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E; Mortensen, E L; Breum, L; Alling, C; Larsen, O G; Bøge-Rasmussen, T; Jensen, C; Bennicke, K

    1996-03-01

    Associations in 52 normal individuals were examined between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine, and concentrations of monoamine metabolites in the CSF, and scores on an aggression questionnaire, the Kinsey Institute Reaction List II, and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. There was a significantly positive correlation between CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and extroverted aggression scores, and a significantly negative correlation between CSF 5-HIAA levels and introverted aggression scores. Males showed higher plasma Trp concentrations than females, and significantly positive correlations between plasma Trp concentrations and scores on extroverted aggression and the Eysenck E scale. Males, furthermore, showed a significantly negative correlation between CSF Trp levels and scores on the Eysenck P scale, and a significantly positive correlation between concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol in CSF and scores on moral aggression. These results suggest that central serotonin influences aggression in normal individuals through effects on personality. PMID:8685288

  7. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, P.J.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Hamilton, S.J.; Buhl, K.J.; Summers, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48??h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01-2.36??mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  9. Disruption of subcellular Arc/Arg 3.1 mRNA expression in striatal efferent neurons following partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa L.; Oldenburger, Katharina; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is provocative in the context of neuroplasticity because of its experience-dependent regulation and mRNA transport to and translation at activated synapses. Normal rats have more preproenkephalin-negative (ppe-neg; presumed striatonigral) neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA than ppe-positive (ppe-pos; striatopallidal) neurons, despite equivalent numbers of these neurons showing novelty-induced transcriptional activation of Arc. Furthermore, rats with partial monoamine loss induced by methamphetamine (METH) show impaired Arc mRNA expression in both ppe-neg and ppe-pos neurons relative to normal animals following response-reversal learning. In this study, Arc expression induced by exposure to a novel environment was used to assess transcriptional activation and cytoplasmic localization of Arc mRNA in striatal efferent neuron subpopulations subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Partial monoamine depletion significantly altered Arc expression. Specifically, basal Arc expression was elevated, but novelty-induced transcriptional activation was abolished. Without novelty-induced Arc transcription, METH-pretreated rats also had fewer neurons with cytoplasmic Arc mRNA expression, with the effect being greater for ppe-neg neurons. Thus, METH-induced neurotoxicity substantially alters striatal efferent neuron function at the level of Arc transcription, suggesting a long-term shift in basal ganglia neuroplasticity processes subsequent to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Such changes potentially underlie striatally-based learning deficits associated with METH-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22978492

  10. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  11. Depleted uranium disposal options.

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B. M.; Ranek, N. L.; Goldberg, M.; Avci, H. I.

    2000-04-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been produced in the United States since the 1940s as part of both the military program and the civilian nuclear energy program. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the agency responsible for managing most of the depleted UF{sub 6} that has been produced in the United States. The total quantity of depleted UF{sub 6} that DOE has to or will have to manage is approximately 700,000 Mg. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the various alternatives for managing this material. This paper evaluates and summarizes the alternative of disposal as low-level waste (LLW). Results of the analysis indicate that UF{sub 6} needs to be converted to a more stable form, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, before disposal as LLW. Estimates of the environmental impacts of disposal in a dry environment are within the currently applicable standards and regulations. Of the currently operating LLW disposal facilities, available information indicates that either of two DOE facilities--the Hanford Site or the Nevada Test Site--or a commercial facility--Envirocare of Utah--would be able to dispose of up to the entire DOE inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}.

  12. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  13. Regulation of Monoamine Transporters: Role of Transporter Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2010-01-01

    Presynaptic biogenic amine transporters mediate reuptake of released amines from the synapse, thus regulating serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine neurotransmission. Medications utilized in the treatment of depression, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders possess high affinity for amine transporters. In addition, amine transporters are targets for psychostimulants. Altered expression of biogenic amine transporters has long been implicated in several psychiatric and degenerative disorders. Therefore, appropriate regulation and maintenance of biogenic amine transporter activity is critical for the maintenance of normal amine homoeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that cellular protein kinases and phosphatases regulate amine transporter expression, activity, trafficking and degradation. Amine transporters are phosphoproteins that undergo dynamic control under the influence of various kinase and phosphatase activities. This review presents a brief overview of the role of amine transporter phosphorylation in the regulation of amine transport in the normal and diseased brain. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphorylation events affect amine transporter activity is essential for understanding the contribution of transporter phosphorylation to the regulation of monoamine neurotransmission and for identifying potential new targets for the treatment of various brain diseases. PMID:20951731

  14. Monoamine oxidases and alcoholism. II. Studies in alcoholic families

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.L.; Parsian, A.; Cloninger, C.R.

    1995-10-09

    Thirty-five alcoholic families have been studied to investigate the relationship between DNA markers at the monoamine oxidase (MAO) loci and (1) platelet activity levels and (2) alcoholism. A quantitative linkage analysis failed to reveal any evidence that the variation in activity levels cosegregates with the DNA markers. A sib-pair analysis did not reveal a significant excess of MAO haplotype sharing among alcoholic sibs, although the deviation from random sharing was in the direction consistent with an X-linked component. A reanalysis of platelet MAO activity levels in a subset of these families revealed that the lower levels previously found in alcoholics is more likely due to the differences between males and females. Only among males and only when a {open_quotes}broad{close_quotes} definition of alcoholism is used (and MAO activity levels are transformed to normality) does it appear that alcoholics have depressed activities compared to nonalcoholics. Finally, when the confounding due to gender difference is removed, no differences between type I and type II alcoholics are found in these families. 63 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. 2-Benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nel, Magdalena S; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a series of twenty-two 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives were synthesised and evaluated as inhibitors of recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. The 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives are structurally related to a series of benzylideneindanone derivatives which has previously been found to be MAO-B inhibitors. This study finds that the 2-benzylidene-1-indanones are MAO-B specific inhibitors with IC50 values <2.74μM. Among the compounds evaluated, twelve compounds exhibited IC50<0.1μM and may be considered as high potency inhibitors. The 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives also inhibited MAO-A with the most potent inhibition exhibited by 5g (IC50=0.131μM). An analysis of the structure-activity relationships for MAO-B inhibition show that substitution on the A-ring with a 5-hydroxy group and on the B-ring with halogens and the methyl group yield high potency inhibition. It may therefore be concluded that 2-benzylidene-1-indanone analogues are promising leads for design of therapies for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:27578245

  16. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems

    PubMed Central

    Miczek, Klaus A.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Hwa, Lara S.; Newman, Emily L.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically-established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals that are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption. PMID:26285061

  17. Cataplexy and monoamine oxidase deficiency in Norrie disease.

    PubMed

    Vossler, D G; Wyler, A R; Wilkus, R J; Gardner-Walker, G; Vlcek, B W

    1996-05-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is an X-linked recessive disorder causing ocular atrophy, mental retardation, deafness, and dysmorphic features. Virtually absent monoamine oxidase (MAO) type-A and -B activity has been found in some boys with chromosome deletions. We report the coexistence of cataplexy and abnormal REM sleep organization with ND. Three related boys, referred for treatment of medically refractory atonic spells and apneas, underwent extended EEG-video-polysomnographic monitoring. They demonstrated attacks of cataplexy and inappropriate periods of REM sleep during which they were unarousable. One boy also had generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Previous testing revealed that all three have complete ND gene deletions. In all subjects, platelet MAO-B activity was absent, serum serotonin levels were markedly increased, and plasma catecholamine levels were normal. Data from the canine narcolepsy syndrome model implicate abnormal catecholaminergic and cholinergic activities in the pathogenesis of cataplexy. Our findings suggest that abnormal MAO activity or an imbalance between serotonin and other neurotransmitter levels may be involved in the pathogenesis of human cataplexy. PMID:8628463

  18. 3-Coumaranone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyk, Adriaan S; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory properties of a series of 20 3-coumaranone [benzofuran-3(2H)-one] derivatives. The 3-coumaranone derivatives are structurally related to series of α-tetralone and 1-indanone derivatives, which have recently been shown to potently inhibit MAO, with selectivity for MAO-B (in preference to the MAO-A isoform). 3-Coumaranones are similarly found to selectively inhibit human MAO-B with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.004–1.05 µM. Nine compounds exhibited IC50<0.05 µM for the inhibition of MAO-B. For the inhibition of human MAO-A, IC50 values ranged from 0.586 to >100 µM, with only one compound possessing an IC50<1 µM. For selected 3-coumaranone derivatives, it is established that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition are reversible since dialysis of enzyme–inhibitor mixtures almost completely restores enzyme activity. On the basis of the selectivity profiles and potent action, it may be concluded that the 3-coumaranone derivatives are suitable leads for the development of selective MAO-B inhibitors as potential treatment for disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26491258

  19. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  20. Low monoamine oxidase B in peripheral organs in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Telang, Frank; Zhu, Wei; Franceschi, Dinko; Pappas, Naomi; Ferrieri, Richard; Shea, Colleen; Garza, Victor; Xu, Youwen; Schlyer, David; Gatley, S. John; Ding, Yu-Shin; Alexoff, David; Warner, Donald; Netusil, Noelwah; Carter, Pauline; Jayne, Millard; King, Payton; Vaska, Paul

    2003-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms for terminating the actions of catecholamines and vasoactive dietary amines is oxidation by monoamine oxidase (MAO). Smokers have been shown to have reduced levels of brain MAO, leading to speculation that MAO inhibition by tobacco smoke may underlie some of the behavioral and epidemiological features of smoking. Because smoking exposes peripheral organs as well as the brain to MAO-inhibitory compounds, we questioned whether smokers would also have reduced MAO levels in peripheral organs. Here we compared MAO B in peripheral organs in nonsmokers and smokers by using positron emission tomography and serial scans with the MAO B-specific radiotracers,l-[11C]deprenyl and deuterium-substituted l-[11C]deprenyl (l-[11C]deprenyl-D2). Binding specificity was assessed by using the deuterium isotope effect. We found that smokers have significantly reduced MAO B in peripheral organs, particularly in the heart, lungs, and kidneys, when compared with nonsmokers. Reductions ranged from 33% to 46%. Because MAO B breaks down catecholamines and other physiologically active amines, including those released by nicotine, its inhibition may alter sympathetic tone as well as central neurotransmitter activity, which could contribute to the medical consequences of smoking. In addition, although most of the emphases on the carcinogenic properties of smoke have been placed on the lungs and the upper airways, this finding highlights the fact that multiple organs in the body are also exposed to pharmacologically significant quantities of chemical compounds in tobacco smoke. PMID:12972641

  1. Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) predicts behavioral aggression following provocation

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Rose; Tingley, Dustin; Cowden, Jonathan; Frazzetto, Giovanni; Johnson, Dominic D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) has earned the nickname “warrior gene” because it has been linked to aggression in observational and survey-based studies. However, no controlled experimental studies have tested whether the warrior gene actually drives behavioral manifestations of these tendencies. We report an experiment, synthesizing work in psychology and behavioral economics, which demonstrates that aggression occurs with greater intensity and frequency as provocation is experimentally manipulated upwards, especially among low activity MAOA (MAOA-L) subjects. In this study, subjects paid to punish those they believed had taken money from them by administering varying amounts of unpleasantly hot (spicy) sauce to their opponent. There is some evidence of a main effect for genotype and some evidence for a gene by environment interaction, such that MAOA is less associated with the occurrence of aggression in a low provocation condition, but significantly predicts such behavior in a high provocation situation. This new evidence for genetic influences on aggression and punishment behavior complicates characterizations of humans as “altruistic” punishers and supports theories of cooperation that propose mixed strategies in the population. It also suggests important implications for the role of individual variance in genetic factors contributing to everyday behaviors and decisions. PMID:19168625

  2. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems.

    PubMed

    Miczek, Klaus A; DeBold, Joseph F; Hwa, Lara S; Newman, Emily L; de Almeida, Rosa M M

    2015-09-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals who are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption. PMID:26285061

  3. Early attempts to visualize cortical monoamine nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Hökfelt, Tomas

    2016-08-15

    The Falck-Hillarp, formaldehyde fluorescence method for the demonstration of monoamine neurons in a microscope was established in Lund, Sweden and published in 1962. In the same year Hillarp moved to Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. Two years later Dahlström and Fuxe published the famous supplement in Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, describing the distribution of the dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin cell groups in the rat brain. This landmark paper also represented an important contribution to an emerging discipline in neuroscience - chemical neuroanatomy. During the following years several modifications of the original method were developed, attempting to solve some shortcomings, one being the reproducible demonstration of noradrenaline nerve terminals in cortical regions. One result was the paper focused on in the present article, which also describes other efforts in the same direction going on in parallel, primarily, in Lund and Stockholm. As a result there was, in the mid 1970s, a fairly complete knowledge of the catecholamine systems in the rat brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. PMID:26806405

  4. Monoamine Oxidase-A Occupancy by Moclobemide and Phenelzine: Implications for the Development of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chiuccariello, Lina; Cooke, Robert G; Miler, Laura; Levitan, Robert D; Baker, Glen B; Kish, Stephen J; Kolla, Nathan J; Rusjan, Pablo M; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are being developed for major depressive disorder, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s Disease. Newer MAOIs have minimal sensitivity to tyramine, but a key limitation for optimizing their development is that standards for in vivo monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) occupancy in humans are not well established. The objectives were to determine the dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide and the occupancy of phenelzine at typical clinical dosing. Methods: Major depressive episode (MDE) subjects underwent [11C]harmine positron emission tomography scanning prior to and following 6 weeks of treatment with moclobemide or phenelzine. Results: Mean brain MAO-A occupancies were 74.23±8.32% for moclobemide at 300–600mg daily (n = 11), 83.75±5.52% for moclobemide at 900–1200mg daily (n = 9), and 86.82±6.89% for phenelzine at 45–60mg daily (n = 4). The regional dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide fit a hyperbolic function [F(x) = a(x/[b + x]); F(1,18) = 5.57 to 13.32, p = 0.002 to 0.03, mean ‘a’: 88.62±2.38%, mean ‘b’: 69.88±4.36 mg]. Multivariate analyses of variance showed significantly greater occupancy of phenelzine (45–60mg) and higher-dose moclobemide (900–1200mg) compared to lower-dose moclobemide [300–600mg; F(7,16) = 3.94, p = 0.01]. Conclusions: These findings suggest that for first-line MDE treatment, daily moclobemide doses of 300–600mg correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of 74%, whereas for treatment-resistant MDE, either phenelzine or higher doses of moclobemide correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of at least 84%. Therefore, novel MAO inhibitor development should aim for similar thresholds. The findings provide a rationale in treatment algorithm design to raise moclobemide doses to inhibit more MAO-A sites, but suggest switching from high-dose moclobemide to phenelzine is best justified by binding to additional targets. PMID:26316187

  5. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  6. The effects of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Fumiko; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Satoh Hisashi Kamimura, Kanako

    2007-03-22

    We developed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale method for determining the re-uptake and release of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine) using rat brain synaptosomes. These assays were then applied to study the effects of different kinds of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine re-uptake and release. The phenethylamine derivatives, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 2-methylamino-3,4-methylene-dioxy-propiophenone (methylone), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (BDB), and N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), had strong inhibitory effects on the re-uptake of dopamine, 5-HT and norepinephrine. 4-Fluoroamphetamine, methylone and BDB also strongly increased the release of the three monoamines, but MBDB increased 5-HT and norepinephrine release, but had little effect on dopamine release. However, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2) and 2,4,6-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-6), which are methoxylated phenethylamine derivatives, slightly influenced the re-uptake and release of monoamines. Alpha-metyltryptamine (AMT), a tryptamine derivative, was one of the strongest re-uptake inhibitors and releasers of the three monoamines. The tryptamine derivative, 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT), also strongly inhibited re-uptake and increased the release of the three monoamines. N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) inhibited monoamine re-uptake, but had a few effects on monoamine release. 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (3CPP) and 1-(methoxyphenyl)piperazine (4MPP), which are piperazine derivatives, inhibited monoamine re-uptake and accelerated their release. The results suggest that some designer drugs strongly act on the central nerve system to the same

  7. Effects of serotonin and catecholamine depletion on interleukin-6 activation and mood in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ben J; Olver, James S; Norman, Trevor R; Nathan, Pradeep J

    2002-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that depression and related neurotic illnesses are associated with alterations in immune function that may contribute to their pathogenesis. For example, clinical and experimental studies have shown that abnormal HPA-axis activation and monoamine neurotransmission may be related to an increased release of proinflammatory cytokines from stimulated lymphocytes in the periphery and brain. In the present investigation, the effects of tryptophan depletion (TD) on unstimulated plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations were investigated in order to determine whether acute changes in serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission would induce a proinflammatory response in healthy individuals. The effects of TD were compared with the analogous procedure of tyrosine depletion (TPD), which reduces catecholamine metabolism in humans. Thirteen female participants completed three experimental sessions: TD, TPD and a balanced-control condition (B). Mood-ratings and blood sampling were performed at baseline and 5 h after the administration of the mixtures. Analyses revealed that TD and TPD markedly reduced tryptophan and tyrosine/phenylalanine levels, respectively. No changes in plasma IL-6 production or ratings of lowered mood were observed, however, subjects did report feeling more fatigued after TD. These findings indicate that a transient disruption in global monoamine function does not stimulate a proinflammatory response of IL-6 in normal volunteers. PMID:12404674

  8. Monoamines and their metabolites in the avian brain.

    PubMed

    Juorio, A V; Vogt, M

    1967-04-01

    1. In the avian brain, a high concentration of dopamine was found in a sharply contoured region of the nucleus basalis which may or may not have included the nucleus entopeduncularis, and therefore lay within the palaeostriatum of the nomenclature of Crosby and Huber. This was thus the only region which may be considered biochemically homologous to the mammalian corpus striatum. For purposes of macroscopic identification only, the region is described here as the ;anterior part of the nucleus basalis'. The concentration of dopamine was 3 mug/g in the pigeon, about the same in the duck and chicken, and 7.5 mug/g in the finch. In the pigeon this region also contained some noradrenaline; the quantity of 5-hydroxytryptamine (1.4 mug/g) and 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid (0.6 mug/g) was larger than in any other part of the brain.2. In the brain of the pigeon and the chicken, the highest concentrations of noradrenaline (1.5 and 1.4 mug/g) were found in the hypothalamus.3. The concentration of adrenaline was higher in the avian than in the mammalian brain. In the hypothalamus, it ranged from 0.4 mug/g in the pigeon to 1 mug/g in the chicken.4. Fluorescence microscopy, using the formaldehyde condensation method, showed, in the anterior part of the nucleus basalis, a large area of diffuse green-yellow fluorescence, similar in appearance to the fluorescence of the striatum of the rat. In addition this part of the brain contained a small region of fluorescent fibres and varicosities. It is suggested that the diffuse fluorescence was produced by dopamine. It was absent from brains of reserpine-treated pigeons.5. In the pigeon, reserpine, tetrabenazine and prenylamine produced a decrease in the concentration of brain monoamines, an effect which was comparable to that seen in mammals. Yet, none of these drugs raised the concentration of homovanillic acid, but they increased that of 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid; these drugs raise the concentration of both acids in mammalian brain.6

  9. Greater Monoamine Oxidase A Binding in Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brittany A.; Kish, Stephen J.; Xu, Xin; Boileau, Isabelle; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Wilson, Alan A.; DiGiacomo, Dan; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence (AD) is a multiorgan disease in which excessive oxidative stress and apoptosis are implicated. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is an important enzyme on the outer mitochondrial membrane that participates in the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial toxicity. It is unknown whether MAO-A levels are abnormal in AD. We hypothesized that MAO-A VT, an index of MAO-A level, is elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during AD, because markers of greater oxidative stress and apoptosis are reported in the brain in AD and a microarray analysis reported greater MAO-A messenger RNA in the PFC of rodents exposed to alcohol vapor. Methods Sixteen participants with alcohol dependence and 16 healthy control subjects underwent [11C]-harmine positron emission tomography. All were nonsmoking, medication- and drug-free, and had no other past or present psychiatric or medical illnesses. Results MAO-A VT was significantly greater in the PFC (37%, independent samples t test, t30 = 3.93, p < .001), and all brain regions analyzed (mean 32%, multivariate analysis of variance, F7,24 = 3.67, p = .008). Greater duration of heavy drinking correlated positively with greater MAO-A VT in the PFC (r = .67, p = .005) and all brain regions analyzed (r = .73 to .57, p = .001–.02). Conclusions This finding represents a new pathological marker present in AD that is therapeutically targetable through direct inhibition or by novel treatments toward oxidative/pro-apoptotic processes implicated by MAO-A overexpression. PMID:24269057

  10. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  11. Mesocorticolimbic monoamine correlates of methamphetamine sensitization and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Lominac, Kevin D.; McKenna, Courtney L.; Schwartz, Lisa M.; Ruiz, Paige N.; Wroten, Melissa G.; Miller, Bailey W.; Holloway, John J.; Travis, Katherine O.; Rajasekar, Ganesh; Maliniak, Dan; Thompson, Andrew B.; Urman, Lawrence E.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Szumlinski, Karen K.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive psychomotor stimulant, with life-time prevalence rates of abuse ranging from 5–10% world-wide. Yet, a paucity of research exists regarding MA addiction vulnerability/resiliency and neurobiological mediators of the transition to addiction that might occur upon repeated low-dose MA exposure, more characteristic of early drug use. As stimulant-elicited neuroplasticity within dopamine neurons innervating the nucleus accumbens (NAC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) is theorized as central for addiction-related behavioral anomalies, we used a multi-disciplinary research approach in mice to examine the interactions between sub-toxic MA dosing, motivation for MA and mesocorticolimbic monoamines. Biochemical studies of C57BL/6J (B6) mice revealed short- (1 day), as well as longer-term (21 days), changes in extracellular dopamine, DAT and/or D2 receptors during withdrawal from 10, once daily, 2 mg/kg MA injections. Follow-up biochemical studies conducted in mice selectively bred for high vs. low MA drinking (respectively, MAHDR vs. MALDR mice), provided novel support for anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine as a correlate of genetic vulnerability to high MA intake. Finally, neuropharmacological targeting of NAC dopamine in MA-treated B6 mice demonstrated a bi-directional regulation of MA-induced place-conditioning. These results extend extant literature for MA neurotoxicity by demonstrating that even subchronic exposure to relatively low MA doses are sufficient to elicit relatively long-lasting changes in mesocorticolimbic dopamine and that drug-induced or idiopathic anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine may underpin vulnerability/resiliency to MA addiction. PMID:24847220

  12. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  13. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  14. Influence of Momordica charantia on oxidative stress-induced perturbations in brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Naga; Babu, S. Manohar; Rao, M.E. Bhanoji

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the antistress activity of Momordica charantia (MC) fruit extract on stress-induced changes in albino rats and also to explore attenuating effects of MC on in vitro lipid peroxidation in rat brain. Materials and Methods: In this study, Wistar albino rats (180–200 g) were used. Plasma corticosterone and monoamines—5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and dopamine (DA) in cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus regions of brain were determined in animals under different stressful conditions. Ethanolic fruit extract of MC, at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, was used. The oxidative stress paradigms used in in vivo models were acute stress (AS) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Panax quinquefolium (PQ) was used as a standard in in vivo models and ascorbic acid was used as a reference standard in the in vitro method. Results: Subjecting the animals to AS (immobilization for 150 min once only) resulted in significant elevation of plasma corticosterone levels and brain monoamine levels. Pretreatment with MC at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. significantly countered AS-induced changes and a similar effect was exhibited by PQ at 100 mg/kg p.o. In the CUS regimen (different stressors for 7 days), plasma corticosterone levels were significantly elevated whereas the levels of 5-HT, NE, E, and DA were depleted significantly. Pretreatment with MC (200 and 400 mg/kg) attenuated the CUS-induced changes in the levels of above monoamines in cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus regions of brain and plasma corticosterone in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, MC extract (1000–5000 μg/mL) exhibited a significant quenching effect on in vitro lipid peroxidation indicating its strong antioxidant activity which was compared with ascorbic acid. Conclusions: This study reveals the antistress activity of MC as it significantly reverted the stress-induced changes, and the activity might be attributed

  15. Catalytic Amine Oxidation under Ambient Aerobic Conditions: Mimicry of Monoamine Oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander T; Dowley, Myles J H; Pradaux-Caggiano, Fabienne; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Fielding, Alistair J; Tuna, Floriana; Hendon, Christopher H; Walsh, Aron; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; John, Matthew P; Carbery, David R

    2015-07-27

    The flavoenzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) regulates mammalian behavioral patterns by modulating neurotransmitters such as adrenaline and serotonin. The mechanistic basis which underpins this enzyme is far from agreed upon. Reported herein is that the combination of a synthetic flavin and alloxan generates a catalyst system which facilitates biomimetic amine oxidation. Mechanistic and electron paramagnetic (EPR) spectroscopic data supports the conclusion that the reaction proceeds through a radical manifold. This data provides the first example of a biorelevant synthetic model for monoamine oxidase B activity. PMID:26087676

  16. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  17. Monoamine Oxidase a Promoter Gene Associated with Problem Behavior in Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Michael E.; Srour, Ali; Hedges, Lora K.; Lightfoot, David A.; Phillips, John A., III; Blakely, Randy D.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2009-01-01

    A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A has been associated with problem behavior in various populations. We examined the association of MAOA alleles in adult males with intellectual/developmental disabilities with and without established histories of problem behavior. These data were compared with a…

  18. INVESTIGATIONS OF AMITRAZ NEUROTOXICITY IN RATS. III. EFFECTS ON MOTOR ACTIVITY AND INHIBITION OF MONOAMINE OXIDASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formamidine pesticide amitraz (AMZ) produces many behavioral and physiological changes in rats. o explore possible neurochemical mechanisms for the behavioral effects of AMZ, we examined the dose effect and time course of AMZ on motor activity, monoamine oxidase (MAO) and ace...

  19. Whole brain monoamine detection and manipulation in a stalk-eyed fly.

    PubMed

    Bubak, Andrew N; Swallow, John G; Renner, Kenneth J

    2013-09-30

    Understanding the physiological mechanisms that influence conflict resolution is of great importance because the outcome of contests over limited resources such as mates, territories, and food has significant fitness consequences. Male stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni) compete over territory and mates and provide an excellent model system to study aggression. To investigate potential effects of serotonin (5-HT) on aggressive behavior in these flies, we developed a dissection and sample preparation method sufficiently sensitive to measure monoamine concentrations from whole brain samples of small insects. This new method allows the detection of monoamines from a single fly brain using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The method allows for the detection and quantification of octopamine (OA), 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), tyramine (TA), and serotonin (5-HT) and provides a means for assessing changes in stalk-eyed fly brain monoamine concentrations in response to drug administration in food media. We successfully elevated 5-HT levels approximately 8-fold that of control levels in stalk-eyed fly brains by oral administration of the 5-HT precursor 5-HTP. Furthermore, in size-matched competitions for a food resource, flies that had elevated 5-HT in response to 5-HTP pretreatment exhibited a high probability of winning the contests. These results suggest that 5-HT enhances aggression in the stalk-eyed fly and highlight the potential of our method for testing putative roles of monoamines in modulating self and rival assessment in conflict resolution. PMID:23891953

  20. Beyond Monoamines-Novel Targets for Treatment-Resistant Depression: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblat, Christian; McIntyre, Roger S.; Alves, Gilberto S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Carvalho, André F.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Current first line therapies target modulation of the monoamine system. A large variety of agents are currently available that effectively alter monoamine levels; however, approximately one third of MDD patients remain treatment refractory after adequate trials of multiple monoamine based therapies. Therefore, patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) may require modulation of pathways outside of the classic monoamine system. The purpose of this review was thus to discuss novel targets for TRD, to describe their potential mechanisms of action, the available clinical evidence for these targets, the limitations of available evidence as well as future research directions. Several alternate pathways involved in the patho-etiology of TRD have been uncovered including the following: inflammatory pathways, the oxidative stress pathway, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the metabolic and bioenergetics system, neurotrophic pathways, the glutamate system, the opioid system and the cholinergic system. For each of these systems, several targets have been assessed in preclinical and clinical models. Preclinical models strongly implicate these pathways in the patho-etiology of MDD. Clinical trials for TRD have been conducted for several novel targets; however, most of the trials discussed are small and several are uncontrolled. Therefore, further clinical trials are required to assess the true efficacy of these targets for TRD. As well, several promising novel agents have been clinically tested in MDD populations, but have yet to be assessed specifically for TRD. Thus, their applicability to TRD remains unknown. PMID:26467412

  1. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  2. Resting-state functional connectivity and presynaptic monoamine signaling in Alcohol Dependence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Dutta, Nisha; Helton, Sarah G; Schwandt, Melanie; Yan, Jia; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Cortes, Carlos R; Kerich, Mike; Hall, Samuel; Sun, Hui; Phillips, Monte; Momenan, Reza; Lohoff, Falk W

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol Dependence (AD) is a chronic relapsing disorder with high degrees of morbidity and mortality. While multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved in the complex symptomatology of AD, monoamine dysregulation and subsequent neuroadaptations have been long postulated to play an important role. Presynaptic monoamine transporters, such as the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), are likely critical as they represent a key common entry point for monoamine regulation and may represent a shared pathway for susceptibility to AD. Excessive monoaminergic signaling as mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1 might affect functional brain connectivity in particular in alcoholics compared to controls. We conducted resting-state fMRI functional connectivity (FC) analysis using the independent component analysis (ICA) approach in 68 AD subjects and 72 controls. All subjects were genotyped for the Thr136Ile (rs1390938) variant in VMAT1. Functional connectivity analyses showed a significant increase of resting-state FC in 4 networks in alcoholics compared to controls (P < 0.05, corrected). The FC was significantly positively correlated with Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS). The hyperfunction allele 136Ile was associated with a significantly decreased FC in the Default Mode Network, Prefrontal Cortex Network, and Executive Control Network in alcohol dependent participants (P < 0.05, corrected), but not in controls. Our data suggest that increased FC might represent a neuroadaptive mechanism relevant to AD that is furthermore mediated by genetic variation in VMAT1. The hyperfunction allele Thr136Ile might have a protective effect that is, in particular, relevant in AD by mechanism of increased monoamine transport into presynaptic storage vesicles. PMID:26368063

  3. Alterations in central monoamine systems after postnatal lead acetate treatment in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luthman, J. Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO ); Lindqvist, E.; Olson, L. ); Gerhardt, G.A.; Hoffer, B.H. )

    1994-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of postnatal lead exposure on central monoamine systems. Newborn male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1 or 8 mg/kg lead acetate intraperitoneally for 20 days postnatally. Two groups of control rats received sodium acetate, or sodium acetate in oversized litters to compensate for lead-induced malnutrition in the high lead dose group, while nontreated animals also served as controls. At Day 21 or 51 regional tissue levels of monoamines were determined using HPLC techniques. No major changes were seen after the lead exposures in the levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin, or metabolites of dopamine and serotonin, when compared to respective control groups. On the other hand, in the control group given sodium acetate in oversized litters some alterations of the monoamine levels were observed in frontal cortex and striatum at Day 21 compared to controls. At Day 51, the striatal homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels were higher in the low lead dose group compared to those in the controls, No other changes in the monoamine levels were seen at Day 51. At 50-70 days postnatally, potassium-stimulated dopamine overflow was studied in striatum with in vivo chronoamperometry. In the high lead dose group the amplitudes of signals were lower in both the dorsal and ventral striatum compared to the controls, while no difference was seen in the clearance time of dopamine. The capacity of the dopamine terminals to respond to repeated stimulation was not affected by the lead exposure. Thus, the steady-state levels of monoamines were essentially unaltered after postnatal lead exposure in rats, while functional aspects of striatal dopamine transmission were affected after exposure to the higher dose of lead. These findings support the hypothesis that lead-induced changes in motor skills and exploratory behavior may be related to altered dopamine neurotransmission. 77 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  6. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Validity of urinary monoamine assay sales under the “spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model”

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Uncini, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Spot baseline urinary monoamine assays have been used in medicine for over 50 years as a screening test for monoamine-secreting tumors, such as pheochromocytoma and carcinoid syndrome. In these disease states, when the result of a spot baseline monoamine assay is above the specific value set by the laboratory, it is an indication to obtain a 24-hour urine sample to make a definitive diagnosis. There are no defined applications where spot baseline urinary monoamine assays can be used to diagnose disease or other states directly. No peer-reviewed published original research exists which demonstrates that these assays are valid in the treatment of individual patients in the clinical setting. Since 2001, urinary monoamine assay sales have been promoted for numerous applications under the “spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model”. There is no published peer-reviewed original research that defines the scientific foundation upon which the claims for these assays are made. On the contrary, several articles have been published that discredit various aspects of the model. To fill the void, this manuscript is a comprehensive review of the scientific foundation and claims put forth by laboratories selling urinary monoamine assays under the spot baseline urinary neurotransmitter testing marketing model. PMID:21912487

  10. Desmodeleganine, a new alkaloid from the leaves of Desmodium elegans as a potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kang-Kang; Yang, Zhong-Duo; Shi, Dan-Feng; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Ming-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Desmodeleganine (1), a new potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor, along with three known alkaloids, bufotenin (2), hydroxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine N(12)-oxide (3), 2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-N, and N-dimethylethylamine (4) were isolated from the leaves of Desmodium elegans. Their structures were elucidated by IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectra. 1 showed strong monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 13.92 ± 1.5 μM, when the IC50 value of iproniazid as a standard was 6.5 ± 0.5 μM. The molecular modeling was also performed to explore the binding mode of compounds 1, 2 at the active site of MAO-A and MAO-B. PMID:25102471

  11. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland. PMID:26016648

  12. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Metabolite profiling of antidepressant drug action reveals novel drug targets beyond monoamine elevation

    PubMed Central

    Webhofer, C; Gormanns, P; Tolstikov, V; Zieglgänsberger, W; Sillaber, I; Holsboer, F; Turck, C W

    2011-01-01

    Currently used antidepressants elevate monoamine levels in the synaptic cleft. There is good reason to assume that this is not the only source for antidepressant therapeutic activities and that secondary downstream effects may be relevant for alleviating symptoms of depression. We attempted to elucidate affected biochemical pathways downstream of monoamine reuptake inhibition by interrogating metabolomic profiles in DBA/2Ola mice after chronic paroxetine treatment. Metabolomic changes were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling and group differences were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistics. Pathways affected by antidepressant treatment were related to energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism and hormone signaling. The identified pathways reveal further antidepressant therapeutic action and represent targets for drug development efforts. A comparison of the central nervous system with blood plasma metabolite alterations identified GABA, galactose-6-phosphate and leucine as biomarker candidates for assessment of antidepressant treatment effects in the periphery. PMID:22832350

  14. Abnormal behavior associated with a point mutation in the structural gene for monoamine oxidase A

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G. ); Nelen, M.; Ropers, H.H.; van Oost, B.A. )

    1993-10-22

    Genetic and metabolic studies have been done on a large kindred in which several males are affected by a syndrome of borderline mental retardation and abnormal behavior. The types of behavior that occurred include impulsive aggression, arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Analysis of 24-hour urine samples indicated markedly disturbed monoamine metabolism. This syndrome was associated with a complete and selective deficiency of enzymatic activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In each of five affected males, a point mutation was identified in the eighth exon of the MAOA structural gene, which changes a glutamine to a termination codon. Thus, isolated complete MAOA deficiency in this family is associated with a recognizable behavioral phenotype that includes disturbed regulation of impulsive aggression.

  15. Coumarins with monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity and antioxidative coumarino-lignans from Hibiscus syriacus.

    PubMed

    Yun, B S; Lee, I K; Ryoo, I J; Yoo, I D

    2001-09-01

    A previously undescribed coumarin and a new coumarino-lignan, together with the known compounds scopoletin and cleomiscosins A, C, and D, have been isolated from the root bark of Hibiscus syriacus, and their structures were assigned on the basis of various spectral studies. The coumarin analogue and scopoletin inhibited monoamine oxidase with moderate IC(50) values. The new coumarino-lignan and cleomiscosin C showed lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity comparable to vitamin E. PMID:11575966

  16. Altered monoamine and acylcarnitine metabolites in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects with depression

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a frequent comorbidity in HIV infection that has been associated with worse treatment outcomes and increased mortality. Recent studies suggest that increased innate immune activation and tryptophan catabolism are associated with higher risk of depression in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms leading to depression remain poorly understood. Methods The severity of depressive symptoms was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory or Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Untargeted metabolomic profiling of plasma from 104 subjects (68 HIV-positive and 36 HIV-negative) across three independent cohorts was performed using liquid or gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was by Bioplex array. Bioinformatic analysis was performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results Decreased monoamine metabolites (phenylacetate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate) and acylcarnitines (propionylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, isovalerylcarnitine, 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine) in plasma distinguished depressed subjects from controls in HIV-positive and HIV-negative cohorts, and these alterations correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HIV-positive subjects, acylcarnitines and other markers of mitochondrial function correlated inversely with tryptophan catabolism, a marker of IFN responses, suggesting inter-relationships between inflammatory pathways, tryptophan catabolism, and metabolic alterations associated with depression. Altered metabolites mapped to pathways involved in monoamine metabolism, mitochondrial function, and inflammation, suggesting a model in which complex relationships between monoamine metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics contribute to biological mechanisms involved in depression that may be augmented by inflammation during HIV infection. Conclusions Integrated approaches targeting inflammation, monoamine metabolism, and mitochondrial pathways may be important for

  17. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter by HIV Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haichuan; Hu, Tao; Foti, Robert S; Pan, Yongmei; Swaan, Peter W; Wang, Joanne

    2015-11-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a major uptake-2 monoamine transporter that shares extensive substrate and inhibitor overlap with organic cation transporters 1-3 (OCT1-3). Currently, there are no PMAT-specific inhibitors available that can be used in in vitro and in vivo studies to differentiate between PMAT and OCT activities. In this study, we showed that IDT307 (4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide), a fluorescent analog of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), is a transportable substrate for PMAT and that IDT307-based fluorescence assay can be used to rapidly identify and characterize PMAT inhibitors. Using the fluorescent substrate-based assays, we analyzed the interactions of eight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) with human PMAT and OCT1-3 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with individual transporters. Our data revealed that PMAT and OCTs exhibit distinct sensitivity and inhibition patterns toward HIV PIs. PMAT is most sensitive to PI inhibition whereas OCT2 and OCT3 are resistant. OCT1 showed an intermediate sensitivity and a distinct inhibition profile from PMAT. Importantly, lopinavir is a potent PMAT inhibitor and exhibited >120 fold selectivity toward PMAT (IC₅₀ = 1.4 ± 0.2 µM) over OCT1 (IC₅₀ = 174 ± 40 µM). Lopinavir has no inhibitory effect on OCT2 or OCT3 at maximal tested concentrations. Lopinavir also exhibited no or much weaker interactions with uptake-1 monoamine transporters. Together, our results reveal that PMAT and OCTs have distinct specificity exemplified by their differential interaction with HIV PIs. Further, we demonstrate that lopinavir can be used as a selective PMAT inhibitor to differentiate PMAT-mediated monoamine and organic cation transport from those mediated by OCT1-3. PMID:26285765

  18. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent. PMID:25275517

  19. Transcranial light affects plasma monoamine levels and expression of brain encephalopsin in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Flyktman, Antti; Mänttäri, Satu; Nissilä, Juuso; Timonen, Markku; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-15

    Encephalopsin (OPN3) belongs to the light-sensitive transmembrane receptor family mainly expressed in the brain and retina. It is believed that light affects mammalian circadian rhythmicity only through the retinohypothalamic tract, which transmits light information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. However, it has been shown that light penetrates the skull. Here, we present the effect of transcranial light treatment on OPN3 expression and monoamine concentrations in mouse brain and other tissues. Mice were randomly assigned to control group, morning-light group and evening-light group, and animals were illuminated transcranially five times a week for 8 min for a total of 4 weeks. The concentrations of OPN3 and monoamines were analysed using western blotting and HPLC, respectively. We report that transcranial light treatment affects OPN3 expression in different brain areas and plasma/adrenal gland monoamine concentrations. In addition, when light was administered at a different time of the day, the response varied in different tissues. These results provide new information on the effects of light on transmitters mediating mammalian rhythmicity. PMID:25805701

  20. Effect of MCI-186 on ischemia-induced changes in monoamine metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Itoh, Y; Nishibori, M; Watanabe, T; Nishi, H; Saeki, K

    1989-11-01

    We examined the effects of MCI-186 (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a novel free radical scavenger and an inhibitor of ischemia-induced brain edema, on monoamine metabolism in the brains of both normal and ischemic rats. In normal rats, 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186, a dose that prevents ischemic brain edema, had no significant effect on brain concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or their metabolites. After the injection of 5 microliters of 3% polyvinyl acetate into the left internal carotid artery, concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid markedly increased, but that of norepinephrine decreased, in the left telencephalon of embolized rats compared with control rats injected with vehicle; the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid also increased slightly. These effects were maximal 2 hours after embolization. The turnover rate of dopamine between 6 and 8 hours after embolization was significantly higher but that of norepinephrine was slightly lower than that in vehicle-treated rats. When rats were treated with 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186 immediately after the injection of polyvinyl acetate, the embolization-induced changes in monoamine metabolism were less marked. Our results suggest that MCI-186 attenuates ischemia-induced changes in brain monoamine metabolism, probably due to its free radical scavenging action, although it has no marked effect in normal rats. PMID:2815191

  1. Vesicular Monoamine and Glutamate Transporters Select Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Onoa, Bibiana; Li, Haiyan; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A.; Elias, Laura A. B.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has characterized the properties of neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, but we know remarkably little about the properties of monoamine release because these neuromodulators do not generally produce a fast ionotropic response. Since dopamine and serotonin neurons can also release glutamate in vitro and in vivo, we have used the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2 and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1 to compare the localization and recycling of synaptic vesicles that store, respectively, monoamines and glutamate. First, VMAT2 segregates partially from VGLUT1 in the boutons of midbrain dopamine neurons, indicating the potential for distinct release sites. Second, endocytosis after stimulation is slower for VMAT2 than VGLUT1. During the stimulus, however, the endocytosis of VMAT2 (but not VGLUT1) accelerates dramatically in midbrain dopamine but not hippocampal neurons, indicating a novel, cell-specific mechanism to sustain high rates of release. On the other hand, we find that in both midbrain dopamine and hippocampal neurons, a substantially smaller proportion of VMAT2 than VGLUT1 is available for evoked release, and VMAT2 shows considerably more dispersion along the axon after exocytosis than VGLUT1. Even when expressed in the same neuron, the two vesicular transporters thus target to distinct populations of synaptic vesicles, presumably due to their selection of distinct recycling pathways. PMID:20534840

  2. Biogenic monoamine uptake by rat brain synaptosomes during aging. Effects of nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Stancheva, S L; Alova, L G

    1994-09-01

    1. In experiments on young (3-5-month-old), adult (10-11-month-old) and old (21-22-month-old) rats, it was found that significant age-related changes occurred in the high-affinity uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) by cortical and striatal synaptosomes. 2. Changes in DA, NA and 5-HT uptake during aging are suggested to be neurochemical correlates of cognition and memory deficits that develops in senescence. 3. The in vitro effects of the nootropic drugs piracetam, aniracetam, meclofenoxate and adafenoxate on the DA, NA and 5-HT uptake by cortical and striatal synaptosomes from young rats were studied. Administered in increasing concentrations (1 x 10(-4) to 5 x 10(-3) M) these drugs inhibited monoamine uptake. 4. Adafenoxate proved to be a more potent monoamine uptake inhibitor than the other three drugs; it inhibited the uptake in the frontal cortex and striatum without selectivity for either monoaminergic system. It is suggested that adafenoxate affects cognition through the involvement of central neurotransmission and particularly through the inhibition of monoamine uptake systems. PMID:7835648

  3. Cognitive abnormalities and hippocampal alterations in monoamine oxidase A and B knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chanpreet; Bortolato, Marco; Bali, Namrata; Godar, Sean C.; Scott, Anna L.; Chen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard F.; Shih, Jean C.

    2013-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase isoenzymes (MAOs) A and B play important roles in the homeostasis of monoaminergic neurotransmitters. The combined deficiency of MAO A and B results in significantly elevated levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), norepinephrine, dopamine, and β-phenylethylamine; in humans and mice, these neurochemical changes are accompanied by neurodevelopmental perturbations as well as autistic-like responses. Ample evidence indicates that normal levels of monoamines in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex, and cerebellum are required for the integrity of learning and memory. Thus, in the present study, the cognitive status of MAO A/B knockout (KO) mice was examined with a wide array of behavioral tests. In comparison with male wild-type littermates, MAO A/B KO mice exhibited abnormally high and overgeneralized fear conditioning and enhanced eye-blink conditioning. These alterations were accompanied by significant increases in hippocampal long-term potentiation and alterations in the relative expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunits. Our data suggest that chronic elevations of monoamines, because of the absence of MAO A and MAO B, cause functional alterations that are accompanied with changes in the cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The characteristics exhibited by MAO A/B KO mice highlight the potential of these animals as a useful tool to provide further insight into the molecular bases of disorders associated with abnormal monoaminergic profiles. PMID:23858446

  4. Inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine does not result in flavin attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, R.B.; Hiebert, C.K.; Vazquez, M.L.

    1985-11-25

    (1-TH)Allylamine was synthesized by sodium boro(TH)hydride reduction of acrolein followed by direct conversion of the (1-TH)allyl alcohol to N-allylphthalimide with triphenylphosphine, diethylazodicarboxylate, and phthalimide. The protecting group was removed with hydrazine. Inactivation of beef liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase with (1-TH)allylamine led to incorporation of 1-6 eq of inactivator/active site depending upon the length of incubation time. Inactivation and radioactivity incorporation coincided; however, after 1 eq of tritium was incorporated and 5% enzyme activity remained, additional radioactivity continued to become incorporated into the enzyme. The optical spectrum of the FAD coenzyme changed during inactivation from that of oxidized to reduced flavin. Following dialysis of the inactivated enzyme, the spectrum remained reduced, but denaturation in urea rapidly resulted in reoxidation of the flavin. Under these same denaturing conditions, 96% of the radioactivity associated with the enzyme remained bound, therefore indicating that allylamine attachment is not to the flavin coenzyme but rather to an active site amino acid residue. The adduct also was stable to base and, to a lesser degree, acid treatment. Although allylamine and N-cyclopropylbenzylamine appear to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase to give 3-(amino acid residue) propanal adducts, two different amino acids seem to be involved because of a difference in stability of the adducts. The mechanisms for inactivation of monoamine oxidase by allylamine and reactivation by benzylamine are discussed in relation to previously reported results.

  5. SDS-resistant aggregation of membrane proteins: application to the purification of the vesicular monoamine transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Sagné, C; Isambert, M F; Henry, J P; Gasnier, B

    1996-01-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter, which catalyses a H+/ monoamine antiport in monoaminergic vesicle membrane, is a very hydrophobic intrinsic membrane protein. After solubilization, this protein was found to have a high tendency to aggregate, as shown by SDS/PAGE, especially when samples were boiled in the classical Laemmli buffer before electrophoresis. This behavior was analysed in some detail. The aggregation was promoted by high temperatures, organic solvents and acidic pH, suggesting that it resulted from the unfolding of structure remaining in SDS. The aggregates were very stable and could be dissociated only by suspension in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid. This SDS-resistant aggregation behaviour was shared by very few intrinsic proteins of the chromaffin granule membrane. Consequently, a purification procedure was based on this property. A detergent extract of chromaffin granule membranes enriched in monoamine transporter was heated and the aggregates were isolated by size-exclusion HPLC in SDS. The aggregates, containing the transporter, were dissociated in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid and analysed on the same HPLC column. This strategy might be of general interest for the purification of membrane proteins that exhibit SDS-resistant aggregation. PMID:8670158

  6. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) knockdown elicits anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yali; Li, Siyue; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Zhong, Zhao-Min; Wang, Han; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-02-19

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (Vmat2) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, and responsible for uptaking transmitters into the vesicles. However, whether Vmat2-deficiency is related to the anxiety is rarely investigated, especially in zebrafish. Here, we reported Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish displayed anxiety-like behavior. The mutants spent less time in the top area and took longer latency to the top in the novel tank test. Consistently, they showed dark avoidance in the light/dark box test, with longer duration in the light zone and increased number of crossing between the two zones. Monoamine concentration analysis showed that the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters including dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), as well as their metabolites were decreased in VMAT mutants. Taken together, these findings suggest that Vmat2 heterzygous mutant zebrafish may serve as a new model of anxiety, which may be related with the low level of DA, 5-HT and NE. PMID:26801555

  7. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt's method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  8. A Peroxidase-linked Spectrophotometric Assay for the Detection of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Kangkang; Yang, Zhongduo; Sheng, Jie; Shu, Zongmei; Shi, Yin

    2016-01-01

    To develop a new more accurate spectrophotometric method for detecting monoamine oxidase inhibitors from plant extracts, a series of amine substrates were selected and their ability to be oxidized by monoamine oxidase was evaluated by the HPLC method and a new substrate was used to develop a peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. 4-(Trifluoromethyl) benzylamine (11) was proved to be an excellent substrate for peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay. Therefore, a new peroxidase-linked spectrophotometric assay was set up. The principle of the method is that the MAO converts 11 into aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. In the presence of peroxidase, the hydrogen peroxide will oxidize 4-aminoantipyrine into oxidised 4-aminoantipyrine which can condense with vanillic acid to give a red quinoneimine dye. The production of the quinoneimine dye was detected at 490 nm by a microplate reader. The ⊿OD value between the blank group and blank negative control group in this new method is twice as much as that in Holt’s method, which enables the procedure to be more accurate and avoids the produce of false positive results. The new method will be helpful for researchers to screening monoamine oxidase inhibitors from deep-color plant extracts. PMID:27610153

  9. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists. PMID:11425504

  10. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  11. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  12. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  13. Depletable externalities and Pigouvian taxation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.M. III

    1984-06-01

    In their book Baumol and Oates (The Theory of Environmental Policy: Externalities, Public Outlays, and the Quality of Life; Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (1975).) argue that whether an externality is depletable (private) or undepletable (public) is the key characteristic in determining the optimal pricing pattern. They argue that unlike the undepletable case a negative depletable externality requires not only a charge or tax on the generator of the externality but a payment or compensation to the victim in order to achieve Pareto optimality. It is shown that the key characteristic determining whether compensation of victims is required for efficiency is not the depletability of the externality but whether the victim can costlessly control or limit the amount of the damaging substance received. 6 references.

  14. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  15. Ginsenoside rb1 modulates level of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice frontal cortex and cerebellum in response to immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hee; Hur, Jinyoung; Lee, Eunjoo H; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2012-09-01

    Cerebral monoamines play important roles as neurotransmitters that are associated with various stressful stimuli. Some components such as ginsenosides (triterpenoidal glycosides derived from the Ginseng Radix) may interact with monoamine systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether ginsenoside Rb1 can modulate levels of the monoamines such as dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 5-hydorxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-hydroxindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in mice frontal cortex and cerebellum in response to immobilization stress. Mice were treated with ginsenoside Rb1 (10 mg/kg, oral) before a single 30 min immobilization stress. Acute immobilization stress resulted in elevation of monoamine levels in frontal cortex and cerebellum. Pretreatment with ginsenoside Rb1 attenuated the stress-induced changes in the levels of monoamines in each region. The present findings showed the anti-stress potential of ginsenoside Rb1 in relation to regulation effects on the cerebral monoaminergic systems. Therefore, the ginsenoside Rb1 may be a useful candidate for treating several brain symptoms related with stress. PMID:24009838

  16. Effect of mealing on plasma and brain amino acid, and brain monoamine in rats after oral aspartame.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was investigated for its ability to alter brain amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume commercial diets for 60 minutes. In addition, the effects of mealing on the changes in plasma and brain amino acids and brain monoamines induced by glucose and/or insulin, and known pharmacologically active compounds, were studied. The consumption of the commercial chow largely prevented changes in blood glucose and amino acids, and brain amino acids and the monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin that might be expected to occur following glucose with or without insulin. Feeding failed to prevent changes in the above parameters when 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, p-chlorophenylalanine and reserpine were administered. The oral administration of up to 250 mg/kg BW APM with water or glucose followed by free feeding failed to alter brain monoamines. These studies demonstrate the potent ability of food to normalize biochemical parameters in blood and brain that otherwise might occur, and clearly show the lack of effect on brain monoamine levels of abuse doses of APM when administered with food. PMID:2940610

  17. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  18. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Partilla, John S; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Newman, Amy Hauck; Sitte, Harald H

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation. PMID:26519222

  19. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system. PMID:12660312

  20. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    PubMed

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism. PMID:26653793

  1. Changes of brain monoamine levels and physiological indexes during heat acclimation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hikaru; Matsumura, Takeru; Suzuki, Kota; Ninomiya, Chisa; Ishiwata, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Brain monoamines, such as noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT), regulate many important physiological functions including thermoregulation. The purpose of this study was to clarify changes in NA, DA, and 5-HT levels in several brain regions in response to heat acclimation while also recording body temperature (Tb), heart rate (HR), and locomotor activity (Act). Rats were exposed to a heated environment (32°C) for 3h (3H), 1 day (1D), 7 days, 14 days (14D), 21 days, or 28 days (28D). After heat exposure, each of the following brain regions were immediately extracted and homogenized: the caudate putamen (CPu), preoptic area (PO), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), frontal cortex (FC), and hippocampus (Hip). NA, DA, and 5-HT levels in the extract were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Although Tb increased immediately after heat exposure, it decreased about 14D later. HR was maintained at a low level throughout heat exposure, and Act tended to increase near the end of heat exposure. After 3H, we observed a marked increase in NA level in the CPu. Although this response vanished after 1D, the level increased again after 28D. DA level in the CPu decreased significantly from 1D to 28D. 5-HT level in the PO and DMH decreased from 1D to 14D. It returned to control levels after 28D with increment of DA level. 5-HT level in the FC decreased at the start of heat exposure, but recovered after 28D; a time point at which DA level also increased. Monoamine levels in the Hip were unchanged after early heat exposure, but both 5-HT and DA levels increased after 28D. These results provide definitive evidence of changes in monoamines in individual brain regions involved in thermoregulation and behavioral, cognitive, and memory function during both acute and chronic heat exposure. PMID:27157329

  2. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Partilla, John S.; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation. PMID:26519222

  3. X-linked borderline mental retardation with prominent behavioral disturbance: Phenotype, genetic localization, and evidence for disturbed monoamine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G.; Nelen, M.R.; Zandvoort, P. van; Abeling, N.G.G.M.; Gennip, A.H. van; Ropers, H.H.; Oost, B.A. van ); Wolters, E.C.; Kuiper, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors have identified a large Dutch kindred with a new form of X-linked nondysmorphic mild mental retardation. All affected males in this family show very characteristic abnormal behavior, in particular aggressive and sometimes violent behavior. Other types of impulsive behavior include arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Attempted suicide has been reported in a single case. The locus for this disorder could be assigned to the Xp11-21 interval between DXS7 and DXS77 by linkage analysis using markers spanning the X chromosome. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.69 was obtained at the monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) monoamine metabolism. These data are compatible with a primary defect in the structural gene for MAOA and/or monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB). Normal platelet MAOB activity suggests that the unusual behavior pattern in this family may be caused by isolated MAOA deficiency. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. An antifungal gamma-pyrone and xanthones with monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity from Hypericum brasiliense.

    PubMed

    Rocha, L; Marston, A; Kaplan, M A; Stoeckli-Evans, H; Thull, U; Testa, B; Hostettmann, K

    1994-08-01

    A new gamma-pyrone (hyperbrasilone), three known xanthones (1,5-dihydroxyxanthone, 5-hydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone and 6-deoxyjacareubin) and betulinic acid have been isolated from a dichloromethane extract of stems and roots of Hypericum brasiliense. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods (UV, EI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR) and that of the gamma-pyrone was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Hyperbrasilone and the xanthones were all antifungal against Cladosporium cucumerinum, while the three xanthones showed differing degrees of inhibition of monoamine oxidase A and B. PMID:7765428

  5. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  6. Sex-dependent effects of maternal separation on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamines in response to chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, S E; Quadros, I M H; Machado, R B; Suchecki, D

    2013-12-01

    Prolonged and repeated periods of maternal separation produce behavioral phenotype of increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders and drug abuse. Most of the changes in behavior, corticosterone (CORT) and monoamine levels induced by long maternal separation (LMS) are observed after a challenge, but not in basal conditions. LMS increases ethanol-induced locomotor response and self-administration, possibly due to changes in CORT release and/or monoamine concentrations. This study examined the effects of LMS in association with chronic ethanol treatment on plasma CORT and brain monoamine concentrations in male and female Swiss mice, which were kept undisturbed (animal facility rearing - AFR) or separated from their mothers for 3h/day, from 2 to 14 days of age (LMS). As adults, one set of male and female mice received no drug treatment to assess the effect of LMS per se. Another set of animals received saline injections for 20 days and one ethanol injection (2.2g/kg, i.p.) on day 21 (acute) or ethanol for 21 days (chronic). Locomotor activity, plasma CORT levels and monoamines in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus of AFR and LMS mice were evaluated in non-treated, acute and chronic ethanol-treated animals. In non-treated mice, no differences were found in CORT or locomotor activity, with small changes in monoamines content. In LMS females, chronic ethanol increased dopamine and serotonin concentrations in the frontal cortex, relative to acute ethanol LMS and to chronic ethanol-treated AFR groups (p<0.05). In LMS males, chronic ethanol increased hippocampal noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and metabolites when compared to respective AFR controls, as well as acute LMS. Moreover, chronic ethanol treatment resulted in higher CORT concentrations in LMS than in AFR males. Overall, these results indicate that LMS mice were more susceptible to the effects of chronic ethanol administration on CORT and brain monoamine concentrations, and that these effects

  7. Effect of dichloromethane fraction of Areca catechu nut on monoamines associated behaviors and tyramine pressor sensitivity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shagufta; Abbas, Ghulam; Ahmed, Fahad Shabbir; Rahman, Attaur; Dar, Ahsana

    2014-03-01

    The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of Areca catechu nut dichloromethane fraction (7 mg/kg) on monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) modulation (5-hydroxytryptophan-induced tremors and phenylethylamine-induced stereotypes) and its interaction with tyramine (cheese effect). The dichloromethane fraction caused pronounced increase in 5-HTP-induced tremors (50%) with negligible PEA-induced stereotypes (20%). Additionally, it did not produce a significant increase in the tyramine pressor effects. These results suggest that the dichloromethane fraction of A. catechu nut primarily elevates serotonin levels (probably via monoamine oxidase A inhibition) and does not induce cheese effect. PMID:24577919

  8. Elevated Levels of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter and a Novel Repetitive Behavior in the Drosophila Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, John M.; Vanlandingham, Phillip A.; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is characterized by mental impairment and autism in humans, and it often features hyperactivity and repetitive behaviors. The mechanisms for the disease, however, remain poorly understood. Here we report that the dfmr1 mutant in the Drosophila model of FXS grooms excessively, which may be regulated differentially by two signaling pathways. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling enhances grooming in dfmr1 mutant flies, whereas blocking the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) suppresses excessive grooming. dfmr1 mutant flies also exhibit elevated levels of VMAT mRNA and protein. These results suggest that enhanced monoamine signaling correlates with repetitive behaviors and hyperactivity associated with FXS. PMID:22087250

  9. SCISAT to study ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT satellite began its mission to study the depletion of the ozone layer, following a successful launch on 12 August.The goal for the atmospheric chemistry experiment, which is SCISAT's mission, is to improve the scientific understanding of the complex chemical changes occurring in the upper atmosphere, particularly in the far north, according to Canada's Minister of Industry, Allan Rock.

  10. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Øverli, Ø.

    2008-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. PMID:19129105

  11. (+)-Methamphetamine-induced monoamine reductions and impaired egocentric learning in adrenalectomized rats is independent of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Herring, Nicole R; Gudelsky, Gary A; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2010-10-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is widely abused and implicated in residual cognitive deficits. In rats, increases in plasma corticosterone and egocentric learning deficits are observed after a 1-day binge regimen of MA (10 mg/kg x 4 at 2-h intervals). The purpose of this experiment was to determine if adrenal inactivation during and following MA exposure would attenuate the egocentric learning deficits in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM). In the first experiment, the effects of adrenalectomy (ADX) or sham surgery (SHAM) on MA-induced neurotoxicity at 72 h were determined. SHAM-MA animals showed typical patterns of hyperthermia, whereas ADX-MA animals were normothermic. Both SHAM-MA- and ADX-MA-treated animals showed increased neostriatal glial fibrillary acidic protein and decreased monoamines in the neostriatum, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. In the second experiment, SHAM-MA- and ADX-MA-treated groups showed equivalently impaired CWM performance 2 weeks post-treatment (increased latencies, errors, and start returns) compared to SHAM-saline (SAL) and ADX-SAL groups with no effects on novel object recognition, elevated zero maze, or acoustic startle/prepulse inhibition. Post-testing, monoamine levels remained decreased in both MA-treated groups in all three brain regions, but were not as large as those observed at 72-h post-treatment. The data demonstrate that MA-induced learning deficits can be dissociated from drug-induced increases in plasma corticosterone or hyperthermia, but co-occur with dopamine and serotonin reductions. PMID:20698032

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolite concentrations as intermediate phenotypes between glutamate-related genes and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Söderman, Erik; Axelsson, Tomas; Sedvall, Göran C; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G

    2015-09-30

    Glutamate-related genes have been associated with schizophrenia, but the results have been ambiguous and difficult to replicate. Homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) are the major degradation products of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and noradrenaline, respectively, and their concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), mainly HVA, have been associated with schizophrenia. In the present study, we hypothesized that CSF HVA, 5-HIAA and MHPG concentrations represent intermediate phenotypes in the association between glutamate-related genes and psychosis. To test this hypothesis, we searched for association between 238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ten genes shown to be directly or indirectly implicated in glutamate transmission and CSF HVA, 5-HIAA and MHPG concentrations in 74 patients with psychotic disease. Thirty-eight nominally significant associations were found. Further analyses in 111 healthy controls showed that 87% of the nominal associations were restricted to the patients with psychosis. Some of the psychosis-only-associated SNPs found in the d-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA) and the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) genes have previously been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. The present results suggest that CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations may represent intermediate phenotypes in the association between glutamate-related genes and psychosis. PMID:26142836

  13. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats. PMID:3714850

  14. An HPLC-ECD method for monoamines and metabolites quantification in cuttlefish (cephalopod) brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Bidel, Flavie; Corvaisier, Sophie; Jozet-Alves, Christelle; Pottier, Ivannah; Dauphin, François; Naud, Nadège; Bellanger, Cécile

    2016-08-01

    The cuttlefish belongs to the mollusk class Cephalopoda, considered as the most advanced marine invertebrates and thus widely used as models to study the biology of complex behaviors and cognition, as well as their related neurochemical mechanisms. Surprisingly, methods to quantify the biogenic monoamines and their metabolites in cuttlefish brain remain sparse and measure a limited number of analytes. This work aims to validate an HPLC-ECD method for the simultaneous quantification of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine and their main metabolites in cuttlefish brain. In comparison and in order to develop a method suitable to answer both ecological and biomedical questions, the validation was also carried out on a phylogenetically remote species: mouse (mammals). The method was shown to be accurate, precise, selective, repeatable and sensitive over a wide range of concentrations for 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, serotonin, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and norepinephrine in the both extracts of cuttlefish and mouse brain, though with low precision and recovery for 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylethylene glycol. Homovanillic acid, accurately studied in rodents, was not detectable in the brain of cuttlefish. Overall, we described here the first fully validated HPLC method for the routine measurement of both monoamines and metabolites in cuttlefish brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26613377

  15. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Overli, O.

    2009-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  16. Monoamine oxidase B and free radical scavenging activities of natural flavonoids in Melastoma candidum D. Don.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Lin, R D; Shen, L Y; Yang, L L; Yen, K Y; Hou, W C

    2001-11-01

    Monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) activity and free radicals are elevated in certain neurological diseases. Four natural flavonoids, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, rutin, and quercetin, were isolated for the first time from the leaves of Melastoma candidum D. Don. They exhibited an inhibitory effect on MAO-B. These potent flavonoids were purified using bioassay-guided fractionation and were separated by Diaion, Sephadex LH-20, and MCI CHP20P columns. The IC(50) values of the four potent flavonoids, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, rutin, and quercetin on monoamine oxidase were 19.06, 11.64, 3.89, and 10.89 microM and enzyme kinetics analysis revealed apparent inhibition constants (K(i)) of 21.01, 2.72, 1.83, and 7.95 microM, respectively, on the substrate, benzylamine. The four potent compounds also exhibited hydroxyl radical scavenging activity as determined using a spin trapping electron spin resonance method. This suggests that the four flavonoids from M. candidum possess both MAO-B inhibitory and free radical scavenging activities. These important properties may be used for preventing some neurodegenerative diseases in the future. PMID:11714358

  17. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of amphetamine analogs that release monoamines in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Heather L; Manvich, Daniel F; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens; Howell, Leonard L

    2009-12-01

    To date, there are no effective pharmacotherapies for treating psychostimulant abuse. Previous preclinical and clinical studies have shown that continuous treatment with the monoamine releaser amphetamine reduces cocaine self-administration, but amphetamine selectively targets the dopamine system and is reinforcing. In the present study, we examined the consequences of administration of amphetamine and three structurally related analogs that vary in their potencies for releasing dopamine and serotonin on behavioral-stimulant effects and nucleus accumbens dopamine levels in squirrel monkeys. Amphetamine and PAL-353, which have relatively high selectivity for releasing dopamine vs. serotonin, increased accumbens dopamine levels and induced stimulant effects on behavior maintained by a fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement. PAL-313, which has a relatively low selectivity for releasing dopamine vs. serotonin, increased dopamine levels, but did not induce behavioral-stimulant effects. PAL-287, which is relatively nonselective in releasing dopamine and serotonin, did not increase dopamine levels or induce behavioral-stimulant effects. These results demonstrate that increasing serotonergic activity attenuates dopamine release and dopamine-mediated behavioral effects of monoamine releasers. In addition, these results support further investigation of PAL-313 and similar compounds as a potential medication for treating psychostimulant abuse. PMID:19766133

  18. Cough and cold remedies: a potential danger to patients on monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, M F; Greenberg, M P; Morley, S W

    1969-02-15

    Experiments have been carried out in healthy volunteers to study the effects of phenylpropanolamine on the blood pressure and possible interactions with monamine oxidase inhibitors.In three subjects 50 mg. of phenylpropanolamine taken orally produced a modest rise of systolic pressure. Two proprietary preparations containing this dose in a slow-release form had no significant effect on the blood pressure. In all three subjects 100 mg. of phenylpropanolamine taken orally caused a more pronounced rise of systolic pressure and a rise of diastolic pressure.In contrast, 50 mg. of phenylpropanolamine orally caused a rapid and potentially dangerous rise of blood pressure in a subject taking the monamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine, and a similar acute rise of blood pressure occurred in this subject when given a proprietary cough linctus containing the same dose of phenylpropanolamine. These and other results suggest that severe hypertensive episodes are more likely to occur when preparations containing phenylpropanolamine in a free form, rather than in slow-release form, are taken by patients being treated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.The acute rise of blood pressure due to the interaction of phenylpropanolamine and monoamine oxidase inhibitors was reversed by intramuscular injection of phentolamine. PMID:5763957

  19. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  20. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  1. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  2. Identification of conformationally sensitive residues essential for inhibition of vesicular monoamine transport by the noncompetitive inhibitor tetrabenazine.

    PubMed

    Ugolev, Yelena; Segal, Tali; Yaffe, Dana; Gros, Yael; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2013-11-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) transports monoamines into storage vesicles in a process that involves exchange of the charged monoamine with two protons. VMAT2 is a member of the DHA12 family of multidrug transporters that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of secondary transporters. Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is a non-competitive inhibitor of VMAT2 that is used in the treatment of hyperkinetic disorders associated with Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Previous biochemical studies suggested that the recognition site for TBZ and monoamines is different. However, the precise mechanism of TBZ interaction with VMAT2 remains unknown. Here we used a random mutagenesis approach and selected TBZ-resistant mutants. The mutations clustered around the lumenal opening of the transporter and mapped to either conserved proline or glycine, or to residues immediately adjacent to conserved proline and glycine. Directed mutagenesis provides further support for the essential role of the latter residues. Our data strongly suggest that the conserved α-helix breaking residues identified in this work play an important role in conformational rearrangements required for TBZ binding and substrate transport. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanism of transport and TBZ binding by VMAT2. PMID:24062308

  3. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Klouche, Mounia S.; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle. PMID:26349428

  4. Combining Stimulants and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Reexamination of the Literature and a Report of a New Treatment Combination

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the medical literature on combining stimulants with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. A case is also presented documenting successful treatment of major depressive disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using the previously undocumented combination of transdermal selegiline and lisdexamfetamine. This combination should be used cautiously and with ongoing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. PMID:27057401

  5. Combining Stimulants and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: A Reexamination of the Literature and a Report of a New Treatment Combination.

    PubMed

    Israel, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the medical literature on combining stimulants with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. A case is also presented documenting successful treatment of major depressive disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using the previously undocumented combination of transdermal selegiline and lisdexamfetamine. This combination should be used cautiously and with ongoing monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure. PMID:27057401

  6. Effects of ractopamine feeding, gender and social rank on aggressiveness and monoamine concentrations in different brain areas of finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of the feed additive ractopamine (RAC), gender and social rank on aggressiveness and brain monoamines levels of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), their metabolites, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP) in finishing pigs. Thirty-two pigs (16 barrows/16 gilts) were a...

  7. Effects of delayed treatment with nafronyl oxalate on microsphere embolism-induced changes in monoamine levels of rat brain regions.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, N.; Miyake, K.; Ohiwa, A.; Nukaga, R.; Takeo, S.

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of delayed treatment with nafronyl oxalate (nafronyl), a cerebral vasodilator, on monoamine neurotransmitters of brain regions in the microsphere-embolized rat. 2. Microsphere embolism was induced by injecting 900 microspheres with a diameter of 48 microns into the right internal carotid artery of rats. Microsphere-embolized rats were treated with nafronyl, 15 mg kg-1, i.p., twice daily from the first to the 5th day. Levels of monoamines and their metabolites in the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were measured on days 3 and 5 after the operation by a high-performance liquid chromatograph with electrochemical detection. In vivo tyrosine or tryptophan hydroxylation was estimated by measurement of the accumulation of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or 5-hydroxy-1-tryptophan after administration of 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase. 3. Microsphere embolism induced decreases in dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in three brain regions of the right hemisphere on days 3 and 5. In the left hemisphere, the monoamines were reduced, but to a lesser degree than in the right hemisphere. On days 3 and 5, the decrease in the monoamines of the right hemisphere was attenuated by nafronyl treatment except for noradrenaline on day 3. The decrease in the monoamines levels in the left hemisphere was almost completely prevented by nafronyl treatment. 4. On day 3 after microsphere embolism, in vivo tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylation was lower than the pre-embolic value in all three brain regions. Treatment of the embolized rats with nafronyl significantly attenuated the decrease in in vivo tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylation in the ipsilateral hemisphere, but not hippocampal tryptophan hydroxylation. 5. The results suggested that treatment with nafronyl improves or attenuates changes in monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism of the brain regions

  8. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  9. Effects of developmental methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on monoamine neurochemistry of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Panos, John J; O'Callaghan, James P; Miller, Diane B; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2014-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is estimated to affect 4-5% of the adult human population (Kessler et al., 2006; Willcutt, 2012). Often prescribed to attenuate ADHD symptoms (Nair and Moss, 2009), methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) can have substantial positive effects. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding its use during pregnancy. Thus, adult women with ADHD face a difficult decision when contemplating pregnancy. In this study, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated a total of 0 (water), 6 (low), 18 (medium), or 42 (high) mg MPH/kg body weight/day (divided into three doses) on gestational days 6-21 (i.e., the low dose received 2 mg MPH/kg body weight 3×/day). Offspring were orally treated with the same daily dose as their dam (divided into two doses) on postnatal days (PNDs) 1-21. One offspring/sex/litter was sacrificed at PND 22 or PND 104 (n=6-7/age/sex/treatment group) and the striatum was quickly dissected and frozen. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a Photo Diode Array detector (PDA) was used to analyze monoamine content in the striatum of one side while a sandwich ELISA was used to analyze tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) from the other side. Age significantly affected monoamine and metabolite content as well as turnover ratios (i.e., DA, DOPAC, HVA, DOPAC/DA, HVA/DA, 5-HT and 5-HIAA); however, there were no significant effects of sex. Adult rats of the low MPH group had higher DA levels than control adults (p<0.05). At both ages, subjects of the low MPH group had higher TH levels than controls (p<0.05), although neither effect (i.e., higher DA or TH levels) exhibited an apparent dose-response. PND 22 subjects of the high MPH treatment group had higher ratios of HVA/DA and DOPAC/DA than same-age control subjects (p<0.05). The increased TH levels of the low MPH group may be related to the increased DA levels of adult rats. While developmental MPH treatment appears to have some effects on monoamine

  10. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion. PMID:25009523

  11. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  12. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  13. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion: Comparison with previous year depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Stolarski, R.S.; Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15% during September 1988 compared to nearly 50% during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30{degree}-60{degree}S. The standard deviation also correlates with the QBO cycling of the tropical winds. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  14. “Ping-pong gaze” secondary to monoamine oxidase inhibitor overdose

    PubMed Central

    Attaway, Amy; Sroujieh, Laila; Mersfelder, Tracey L.; Butler, Christopher; Ouellette, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An infrequent manifestation of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) toxicity is “ping-pong gaze” (PPG). We describe the case of a 26-year-old female who was found unresponsive after taking 40 tablets of phenelzine. On presentation to the hospital, her eyes were moving in characteristic “ping pong” fashion. After 6 hours her gaze terminated. The following day her neurologic exam was benign and she had no long-term sequelae. While the etiology of PPG is unknown, it is most often seen with irreversible structural brain damage. However, a detailed literature review revealed that previous cases of MAOI toxicity where the patient survived have all had complete neurologic recovery. PMID:27127395

  15. Improved method for HPLC analysis of polyamines, agmatine and aromatic monoamines in plant tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Flores, H. E.; Galston, A. W.; Weinstein, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method of Flores and Galston (1982 Plant Physiol 69: 701) for the separation and quantitation of benzoylated polyamines in plant tissues has been widely adopted by other workers. However, due to previously unrecognized problems associated with the derivatization of agmatine, this important intermediate in plant polyamine metabolism cannot be quantitated using this method. Also, two polyamines, putrescine and diaminopropane, also are not well resolved using this method. A simple modification of the original HPLC procedure greatly improves the separation and quantitation of these amines, and further allows the simulation analysis of phenethylamine and tyramine, which are major monoamine constituents of tobacco and other plant tissues. We have used this modified HPLC method to characterize amine titers in suspension cultured carrot (Daucas carota L.) cells and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissues.

  16. Capillary electrochromatography using monoamine- and triamine-bonded silica nanoparticles as pseudostationary phases.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuto; Hayashi, Yuka; Utamura, Naonori; Takamoto, Chise; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Sachio; Hayakawa, Takao; Suzuki, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine- and triamine-bonded silica nanoparticles were prepared using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and N(1)-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine, respectively, and used as pseudostationary phases for capillary electrochromatography. The amine-bonded silica nanoparticles were tightly adsorbed on the inner wall of a capillary and generated fast electro-osmotic flow (2.59 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) toward the anode in an electric field. The electro-osmotic velocities obtained with 20 nm triamine-bonded silica were three to five times larger than those generated by a fused silica capillary and two times faster than those for the commercial cationic polymer-modified capillary. Fast electro-osmotic flow enables rapid analysis. This method was applied to hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) mode separation of various samples including the size separation of glucose oligomer derivatives and the resolution of four nucleic acid bases. PMID:26700155

  17. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R.; Wang, Zhe Wu

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  18. A cerium method for the ultracytochemical localization of monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, T; Inomata, K; Ogawa, K

    1982-01-01

    A cytochemical method based on the complex formation between cerous ions and hydrogen peroxide is described for the ultrastructural localization of monoamine oxidase (MAO). First, the residual MAO activity after fixation was measured by a radiochemical assay technique and was found to be sufficiently retained for cytochemical detection. Although the Tris buffer used in the present method was found to be inhibitory to MAO, considerable activity was still retained after fixation and incubation in Tris. MAO activity, detected as precipitates of cerium perhydroxide, was observed in the mitochondrial outer compartment, mitochondrial cristae and perinuclear space of myocardial cells and endothelial cells of rat heart. MAO activity was also found along the plasma membrane of capillary endothelia. Omission of substrate from the incubation medium or pre-incubation with pargyline, a specific MAO inhibitor, drastically reduced the amount of deposits. The present cerium method seems promising because of its reproducibility and the high electron density of the reaction products. PMID:6174485

  19. Parkin degrades estrogen-related receptors to limit the expression of monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Ma, Dingyuan; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Feng, Jian

    2011-03-15

    Parkin, whose mutations cause Parkinson disease (PD), controls oxidative stress by limiting the expression of monoamine oxidases (MAO)--mitochondrial enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of dopamine. Here, we show that parkin performed this function by increasing the ubiquitination and degradation of estrogen-related receptors (ERR), orphan nuclear receptors that play critical roles in the transcription regulation of many nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. All three ERRs (α, β and γ) increased the transcription of MAOs A and B; the effects were abolished by parkin, but not by its PD-linked mutants. Parkin bound to ERRs and increased their ubiquitination and degradation. In fibroblasts from PD patients with parkin mutations or brain slices from parkin knockout mice, degradation of ERRs was significantly attenuated. The results reveal the molecular mechanism by which parkin suppresses the transcription of MAOs to control oxidative stress induced by dopamine oxidation. PMID:21177257

  20. Parkin degrades estrogen-related receptors to limit the expression of monoamine oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Ma, Dingyuan; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Feng, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Parkin, whose mutations cause Parkinson disease (PD), controls oxidative stress by limiting the expression of monoamine oxidases (MAO)—mitochondrial enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of dopamine. Here, we show that parkin performed this function by increasing the ubiquitination and degradation of estrogen-related receptors (ERR), orphan nuclear receptors that play critical roles in the transcription regulation of many nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. All three ERRs (α, β and γ) increased the transcription of MAOs A and B; the effects were abolished by parkin, but not by its PD-linked mutants. Parkin bound to ERRs and increased their ubiquitination and degradation. In fibroblasts from PD patients with parkin mutations or brain slices from parkin knockout mice, degradation of ERRs was significantly attenuated. The results reveal the molecular mechanism by which parkin suppresses the transcription of MAOs to control oxidative stress induced by dopamine oxidation. PMID:21177257

  1. The reaction pathway of membrane-bound rat liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Houslay, Miles D.; Tipton, Keith F.

    1973-01-01

    1. A preparation of a partly purified mitochondrial outer-membrane fraction suitable for kinetic investigations of monoamine oxidase is described. 2. An apparatus suitable for varying the O2 concentration in a spectrophotometer cuvette is described. 3. The reaction catalysed by the membrane-bound enzyme is shown to proceed by a double-displacement (Ping Pong) mechanism, and a formal mechanism is proposed. 4. KCN, NaN3, benzyl cyanide and 4-cyanophenol are shown to be reversible inhibitors of the enzyme. 5. The non-linear reciprocal plot obtained with impure preparations of benzylamine, which is typical of high substrate inhibition, is shown to be due to aldehyde contamination of the substrate. PMID:4778271

  2. A mutation in the enzyme monoamine oxidase explains part of the Astyanax cavefish behavioural syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elipot, Yannick; Hinaux, Hélène; Callebert, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Blin, Maryline; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We use Astyanax mexicanus, a single species with surface-dwelling forms (SF) and blind de-pigmented cave forms (CF), to study mechanisms underlying the evolution of brain and behaviour. In CF, the origin of changes in complex motivated behaviours (social, feeding, sleeping, exploratory) is unknown. Here we find a hyper-aminergic phenotype in CF brains, including high levels and neurotransmission indexes for serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline, and low monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. Although MAO expression is unchanged in CF, a pro106leu mutation is identified in the MAO coding sequence. This mutation is responsible for low MAO activity and high serotonin neurotransmission index in CF brains. We find the same mutated allele in several natural CF populations, some being independently evolved. Such occurrence of the same allele in several caves may suggest that low MAO activity is advantageous for cave life. These results provide a genetic basis for several aspects of the cavefish 'behavioural syndrome'. PMID:24717983

  3. Monoamine oxidase: an important intracellular regulator of gastrin release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dial, E J; Huang, J; Delansorne, R; Lichtenberger, L M

    1986-04-01

    The role of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in the meal-induced or amino acid-induced release of gastrin was investigated. Rats that were pretreated with the nonspecific MAO inhibitor nialamide (200 mg/kg) showed a greater rise in meal-induced serum gastrin than did untreated controls. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gastrin secretion from dispersed antral G cells in response to a stimulatory dose of phenylalanine or methylbenzylamine (10 mM) was markedly enhanced if the cells were treated with nialamide. Studies with the more specific MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl indicated that antral mucosa contained predominantly type A activity. Inhibition of MAO type A with clorgyline, both in vivo and in vitro, resulted in a greater release of gastrin after stimulation by a meal or phenylalanine. It is concluded that MAO may play an important role in the regulation of gastrin release from the G cell by partially controlling the level of amines within the cell. PMID:3081396

  4. DRD4 dopamine receptor genotype and CSF monoamine metabolites in Finnish alcoholics and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.D.; Dean, M.; Goldman, D.

    1995-06-19

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is thus far unique among neurotransmitter receptors in having a highly polymorphic gene structure that has been reported to produce altered receptor functioning. These allelic variations are caused by a 48-bp segment in exon III of the coding region which may be repeated from 2-10 times. Varying the numbers of repeated segments changes the length, structure, and, possibly, the functional efficiency of the receptor, which makes this gene an intriguing candidate for variations in dopamine-related behaviors, such as alcoholism and drug abuse. Thus far, these DRD4 alleles have been investigated for association with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson`s disease, and chronic alcoholism, and all have been largely negative for a direct association. We evaluated the DRD4 genotype in 226 Finish adult males, 113 of whom were alcoholics, many of the early onset type with features of impulsivity and antisocial traits. Genotype frequencies were compared to 113 Finnish controls who were free of alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and major mental illness. In 70 alcoholics and 20 controls, we measured CSF homovanillic acid (HVA), the major metabolite of dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No association was found between a particular DRD4 dopamine receptor allele and alcoholism. CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites showed no significant difference among the DRD4 genotypes. This study of the DRD4 dopamine receptor in alcoholics is the first to be conducted in a clinically and ethnically homogeneous population and to relate the DRD4 genotype to CSF monoamine concentrations. The results indicate that there is no association of the DRD4 receptor with alcoholism. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Corticotropin releasing factor influences aggression and monoamines: Modulation of attacks and retreats

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Russ E.; Korzan, Wayne J.; Bockholt, Craig; Watt, Michael J.; Forster, Gina L.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2009-01-01

    Salmonids establish social hierarchies as a result of aggressive social interactions. The establishment of dominant or subordinate status is strongly linked to neuroendocrine responses mediated through the stress axis. In this study, we tested the effects of icv CRF on the behavioral outcome, plasma cortisol and monoamine function in trout subjected to a socially aggressive encounter. Rainbow trout were treated with an icv injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), 500 or 2000 ng ovine CRF, or not injected. Fish were allowed to interact with a similarly sized conspecific for 15 minutes. Following the behavioral interaction, plasma cortisol and central monoamine concentrations were analyzed. Trout treated with CRF were victorious in approximately 60% of the aggressive encounters against aCSF treated opponents. Trout injected with CRF exhibited a reduction in the total number of attacks and decreased latency to attack. When trout were divided winners and losers, only victorious CRF-treated fish exhibited a reduced latency to attack and fewer retreats. Social stress increased cortisol levels in both winners and losers of aggressive interaction. This effect was enhanced with the additional stress incurred from icv injection of aCSF. However, icv CRF in addition to social stress decreased plasma cortisol in both winners and losers. While aggression stimulated significant changes in serotonergic and dopaminergic activity, the magnitude and direction were dependent on limbic brain region, CRF dose, and outcome of social aggression. With broad effects on aggressive behavior, anxiety, stress responsiveness, and central monoaminergic activity, CRF plays an important role modulating the behavioral components of social interaction. PMID:18992791

  6. [Effects of Kaixin San formulas on behavioristics and central monoamine neurotransmitters of chronic stress rats].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-wan; Xu, Lu; Dong, Xian-zhe; Tan, Xiao; Wang, Shi; Zhu, Wei-yu; Liu, Ping

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of Chinese herbal formula in treating depression has been proved in many studies. In this study, six different Kaixin San formulas were compared to investigate their effects on central monoamine neurotransmitters of chronic stress rats and against depression based on their different components in plasma, in order to discuss the efficacy-comparability relationship and the possible efficacy mechanism. The classic isolation method and the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) depression model were combined to investigate the changes in contents in hippocampus and monoamine neurotransmitters (NE, DA, 5-HT) and the components of some formulas in plasma with HPLC and UPLC-Q-TOF-MSE methods. As a result, Dingzhi Xiaowan recorded in Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand significantly increased the behavioral scores, NE and 5-HT contents in hippocampus and NE, DA and 5-HT contents in cortex, with the best anti-depressant effect. Dingzhi Xiaowan recorded in Complete Records of Ancient and Modern Medical Works showed a notable increase in sucrose preference and open field score in model rats, NE content in hippocampus and NE, DA and 5-HT contents in cortex, with a certain anti anti-depressant effect. Kaixin San recorded in Ishinpo showed remarkable rise in weight of model rats. NE content in hippocampus and DA content in cortex. Puxin Decoction recorded in A Supplement to Recipes Worth A Thousand Gold showed 5-HT content in hippocampus and DA content in cortex. Kaixin San recorded in Yimenfang only showed DA content in cortex. Kaixin Wan recorded in Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth A Thousand did not mention the antidepressant effect. According to the results, the formulas' different anti-depressant effects may be related to the different plasma components. PMID:26552177

  7. Reduced vesicular monoamine transport disrupts serotonin signaling but does not cause serotonergic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Shawn P.; Stout, Kristen A.; Lohr, Kelly M.; Taylor, Tonya N.; Shepherd, Kennie R.; Wang, Minzheng; Guillot, Thomas S.; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice with reduced expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 LO) undergo age-related degeneration of the catecholamine-producing neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and locus ceruleus and exhibit motor disturbances and depressive-like behavior. In this work, we investigated the effects of reduced vesicular transport on the function and viability of serotonin neurons in these mice. Adult (4–6 months of age), VMAT2 LO mice exhibit dramatically reduced (90%) serotonin release capacity, as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry. We observed changes in serotonin receptor responsivity in in vivo pharmacological assays. Aged (months) VMAT2 LO mice exhibited abolished 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity, as determined by 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg) induction of hypothermia. When challenged with the 5HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (1 mg/kg), VMAT2 LO mice exhibited a marked increase (50%) in head twitch responses. We observed sparing of serotonergic terminals in aged mice (18–24 months) throughout the forebrain by SERT immunohistochemistry and [3H]-paroxetine binding in striatal homogenates of aged VMAT2 LO mice. In contrast to their loss of catecholamine neurons of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus, aged VMAT2 LO mice do not exhibit a change in the number of serotonergic (TPH2 +) neurons within the dorsal raphe, as measured by unbiased stereology at 26–30 months. Collectively, these data indicate that reduced vesicular monoamine transport significantly disrupts serotonergic signaling, but does not drive degeneration of serotonin neurons. PMID:26428905

  8. A brief history of the development of antidepressant drugs: From monoamines to glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Hillhouse, Todd M.; Porter, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a chronic, recurring, and debilitating mental illness that is the most common mood disorder in the United States. It has been almost 50 years since the monoamine hypothesis of depression was articulated, and just over 50 years since the first pharmacological treatment for MDD was discovered. Several monoamine-based pharmacological drug classes have been developed and approved for the treatment of MDD; however, remission rates are low (often less than 60%) and there is a delayed onset before remission of depressive symptoms is achieved. As a result of a “proof-of-concept” study in 2000 with the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist ketamine, a number of studies have examined the glutamatergic systems as viable targets for the treatment of MDD. This review will provide a brief history on the development of clinically available antidepressant drugs, and then review the possible role of glutamatergic systems in the pathophysiology of MDD. Specifically, the glutamatergic review will focus on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the efficacy of drugs that target the NMDA receptor for the treatment of MDD. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, which has consistently produced rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in MDD patients in a number of clinical studies, has shown the most promise as a novel glutamatergic-based treatment for MDD. However, compounds that target other glutamatergic mechanisms, such as GLYX-13 (a glycine-site partial agonist at NMDA receptors) appear promising in early clinical trials. Thus, the clinical findings to date are encouraging and support the continued search for and the development of novel compounds that target glutamatergic mechanisms. PMID:25643025

  9. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  10. Forebrain-specific Expression of Monoamine Oxidase A Reduces Neurotransmitter Levels, Restores the Brain Structure, and Rescues Aggressive Behavior in Monoamine Oxidase A-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Cases, Olivier; Rebrin, Igor; Wu, Weihua; Gallaher, Timothy K.; Seif, Isabelle; Shih, Jean Chen

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have established that abrogation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A expression leads to a neurochemical, morphological, and behavioral specific phenotype with increased levels of serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine, and dopamine, loss of barrel field structure in mouse somatosensory cortex, and an association with increased aggression in adults. Forebrain-specific MAO A transgenic mice were generated from MAO A knock-out (KO) mice by using the promoter of calcium-dependent kinase IIα (CaMKIIα). The presence of human MAO A transgene and its expression were verified by PCR of genomic DNA and reverse transcription-PCR of mRNA and Western blot, respectively. Significant MAO A catalytic activity, autoradiographic labeling of 5-HT, and immunocytochemistry of MAO A were found in the frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus but not in the cerebellum of the forebrain transgenic mice. Also, compared with MAO A KO mice, lower levels of 5-HT, norepinephrine, and DA and higher levels of MAO A metabolite 5-hydroxyin-doleacetic acid were found in the forebrain regions but not in the cerebellum of the transgenic mice. These results suggest that MAO A is specifically expressed in the forebrain regions of transgenic mice. This forebrain-specific differential expression resulted in abrogation of the aggressive phenotype. Furthermore, the disorganization of the somatosensory cortex barrel field structure associated with MAO A KO mice was restored and became morphologically similar to wild type. Thus, the lack of MAO A in the forebrain of MAO A KO mice may underlie their phenotypes. PMID:17090537

  11. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  12. The state of the art of pyrazole derivatives as monoamine oxidase inhibitors and antidepressant/anticonvulsant agents.

    PubMed

    Secci, D; Bolasco, A; Chimenti, P; Carradori, S

    2011-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase plays a significant role in the control of intracellular concentration of monoaminergic neurotransmitters or neuromodulators and dietary amines. The rapid degradation of these molecules ensures the proper functioning of synaptic neurotransmission and is critically important for the regulation of emotional and other brain functions. The development of human MAO inhibitors led to important breakthroughs in the therapy of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Different families of heterocycles containing 2 or 4 nitrogen atoms have been used as scaffolds for synthesizing selective monoamine oxidase inhibitors, but the early period of the MAO-inhibitors started with hydrazine derivatives. Pyrazole, pyrazoline, and pyrazolidine derivatives can be considered as a cyclic hydrazine moiety. This scaffold also displayed promising antidepressant and anticonvulsant properties as demonstrated by different and established animal models. Diversely substituted pyrazoles, embedded with a variety of functional groups, are important biological agents and a significant amount of research activity has been directed towards this chemical class. PMID:22050759

  13. Comparison of time-dependent effects of (+)-methamphetamine or forced swim on monoamines, corticosterone, glucose, creatine, and creatinine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Tang, Peter H; Skelton, Matthew R; Lucot, James P; Gudelsky, Gary A; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use is a worldwide problem. Abusers can have cognitive deficits, monoamine reductions, and altered magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings. Animal models have been used to investigate some of these effects, however many of these experiments have not examined the impact of MA on the stress response. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated (+)-MA-induced neurotoxicity and monoamine reductions, however the effects of MA on other markers that may play a role in neurotoxicity or cell energetics such as glucose, corticosterone, and/or creatine have received less attention. In this experiment, the effects of a neurotoxic regimen of (+)-MA (4 doses at 2 h intervals) on brain monoamines, neostriatal GFAP, plasma corticosterone, creatinine, and glucose, and brain and muscle creatine were evaluated 1, 7, 24, and 72 h after the first dose. In order to compare MA's effects with stress, animals were subjected to a forced swim test in a temporal pattern similar to MA administration [i.e., (30 min/session) 4 times at 2 h intervals]. Results MA increased corticosterone from 1–72 h with a peak 1 h after the first treatment, whereas glucose was only increased 1 h post-treatment. Neostriatal and hippocampal monoamines were decreased at 7, 24, and 72 h, with a concurrent increase in GFAP at 72 h. There was no effect of MA on regional brain creatine, however plasma creatinine was increased during the first 24 h and decreased by 72 h. As with MA treatment, forced swim increased corticosterone more than MA initially. Unlike MA, forced swim reduced creatine in the cerebellum with no change in other brain regions while plasma creatinine was decreased at 1 and 7 h. Glucose in plasma was decreased at 7 h. Conclusion Both MA and forced swim increase demand on energy substrates but in different ways, and MA has persistent effects on corticosterone that are not attributable to stress alone. PMID:18513404

  14. Discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride: substitution studies with monoamine uptake inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kantak, K M; Edwards, M A; Wilcox, K M; Kitchel, E

    1997-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that magnesium chloride may have discriminative stimulus effects that partially overlap with those of noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists as well as certain monoamine uptake inhibitors. In our study, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mg/kg magnesium chloride from saline and its discriminative stimulus effects were characterized with respect to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and monoamine transporter functions in substitution tests. The discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride were acquired within a moderate number of training sessions and showed dose-related substitution after either subcutaneous (3-300 mg/kg) or intracerebroventricular (0.3-300 microg) administration. The intracerebroventricular administration of magnesium chloride was over 4000 times more potent than its s.c. administration. The monoamine uptake inhibitors cocaine, GBR 12909, talsupram and citalopram fully substituted (> or =90% magnesium-appropriate responses) for magnesium chloride in the majority of subjects tested and the group averages reached a maximum of 72 to 82% responses on the magnesium-appropriate lever. Based on relative potency analysis, the rank order of potency of these four drugs for producing magnesium-appropriate responses was talsupram = cocaine > citalopram = GBR 12909. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists dizocilpine, phencyclidine and NPC 17742 engendered maximum group averages of 49 to 65% responses on the magnesium-appropriate lever. The results suggest that the centrally mediated discriminative stimulus effects of magnesium chloride may be more directly related to interactions with monoamine neurotransmitter functions than to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade. PMID:9336325

  15. Distinct pharmacological properties and distribution in neurons and endocrine cells of two isoforms of the human vesicular monoamine transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, J D; Schafer, M K; Bonner, T I; Eiden, L E; Weihe, E

    1996-01-01

    A second isoform of the human vesicular monoamine transporter (hVMAT) has been cloned from a pheochromocytoma cDNA library. The contribution of the two transporter isoforms to monoamine storage in human neuroendocrine tissues was examined with isoform-specific polyclonal antibodies against hVMAT1 and hVMAT2. Central, peripheral, and enteric neurons express only VMAT2. VMAT1 is expressed exclusively in neuroendocrine, including chromaffin and enterochromaffin, cells. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are coexpressed in all chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. VMAT2 alone is expressed in histamine-storing enterochromaffin-like cells of the oxyntic mucosa of the stomach. The transport characteristics and pharmacology of each VMAT isoform have been directly compared after expression in digitonin-permeabilized fibroblastic (CV-1) cells, providing information about substrate feature recognition by each transporter and the role of vesicular monoamine storage in the mechanism of action of psychopharmacologic and neurotoxic agents in human. Serotonin has a similar affinity for both transporters. Catecholamines exhibit a 3-fold higher affinity, and histamine exhibits a 30-fold higher affinity, for VMAT2. Reserpine and ketanserin are slightly more potent inhibitors of VMAT2-mediated transport than of VMAT1-mediated transport, whereas tetrabenazine binds to and inhibits only VMAT2. N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, phenylethylamine, amphetamine, and methylenedioxymethamphetamine are all more potent inhibitors of VMAT2 than of VMAT1, whereas fenfluramine is a more potent inhibitor of VMAT1-mediated monamine transport than of VMAT2-mediated monoamine transport. The unique distributions of hVMAT1 and hVMAT2 provide new markers for multiple neuroendocrine lineages, and examination of their transport properties provides mechanistic insights into the pharmacology and physiology of amine storage in cardiovascular, endocrine, and central nervous system function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8643547

  16. Linezolid-induced serotonin toxicity in a patient not taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors or serotonin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jacob; Stroup, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic with weak monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A and MAO type B inhibitory effects. Linezolid has been associated with serotonin toxicity when used concomitantly with multiple medications that are known to increase serotonin concentrations. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with signs and symptoms of serotonin toxicity following administration of linezolid for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. PMID:27034576

  17. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  18. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  19. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Social Defeat Stress Alters Anxiety, Contextual Fear Extinction, and Limbic Monoamines in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Davies, Daniel R; Olson, Dawne; Meyer, Danielle L; Scholl, Jamie L; Watt, Michael J; Manzerra, Pasquale; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM), or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 h after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes. PMID:27147992

  20. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-01-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion. PMID:1709421

  1. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate. PMID:24508677

  2. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Social Defeat Stress Alters Anxiety, Contextual Fear Extinction, and Limbic Monoamines in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Daniel R.; Olson, Dawne; Meyer, Danielle L.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Watt, Michael J.; Manzerra, Pasquale; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM), or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 h after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes. PMID:27147992

  3. Chronic α-Tocopherol Increases Central Monoamines Synthesis and Improves Cognitive and Motor Abilities in Old Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramis, Margarita R; Sarubbo, Fiorella; Terrasa, Juan L; Moranta, David; Aparicio, Sara; Miralles, Antonio; Esteban, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Limiting enzymes in the synthesis of brain monoamines seems to be susceptible to oxidative damage, one of the most important factors in aging. It has been suggested that the use of anti-oxidants can reduce the rate of free radical production related with aging and the associated damage. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the effects of the chronic treatments with the anti-oxidant α-tocopherol (vitamin E) on central monoamines (high-performance liquid chromatography [HPLC] analysis) mediating cognitive functions, as well as on the evaluation of memory and motor abilities in old rats measured by radial maze, Barnes maze, novel object recognition test, and rotarod test. Results show that α-tocopherol significantly increased in a dose- and/or time-dependent manner the synthesis rate and the levels of monoaminergic neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline) in the hippocampus and striatum, brain regions involved in memory processing and motor coordination. These positive neurochemical effects, largely due to an increased activity of the limiting enzymes in monoamines synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase, were accompanied by an improvement in cognitive and motor abilities in old rats. Altogether these findings suggest that α-tocopherol exhibits neuroprotective actions in old rats; thus, diets with α-tocopherol might represent a promising strategy to mitigate or delay the cognitive and motor decline associate with aging and related-diseases. PMID:26414867

  4. Blood Levels of Monoamine Precursors and Smoking in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashwin Jacob; Kanwar, Jyoti; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Fuchs, Dietmar; Lowry, Christopher A.; Peng, Xiaoqing; Giegling, Ina; Hartmann, Annette M.; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Gragnoli, Claudia; Reeves, Gloria M.; Groer, Maureen W.; Rosenthal, Richard N.; Rujescu, Dan; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and exerts a negative impact on cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Smoking has complex interactions with monoamine metabolism through the ability of cigarette smoke to suppress Type 1 T helper cell (Th1) type immunity, the immunophenotype that is implicated in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) dysfunction and tryptophan (Trp) breakdown to kynurenine (Kyn) via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Nicotine also induces tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression, leading to increased synthesis of catecholamines. Furthermore, there is evidence for PAH dysfunction in schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare the plasma levels of selected monoamine precursors and their metabolites in smokers vs. non-smokers in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia. We measured plasma phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), Trp, and Kyn levels using high-performance liquid chromatography and calculated Phe:Tyr and Kyn:Trp ratios in 920 patients with schizophrenia. Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses were used to compare these endpoints between three groups of patients with schizophrenia: (1) current smokers, (2) past smokers, and (3) non-smokers. There were significant differences among the three groups with regards to Tyr levels [F(2,789) = 3.77, p = 0.02], with current smokers having lower Tyr levels when compared with non-smokers (p = 0.02). Kyn levels and Kyn:Trp ratio were different among the three groups [F(2,738) = 3.17, p = 0.04, F(2,738) = 3.61, p = 0.03] with current smokers having lower Kyn levels (p = 0.04) and higher Kyn:Trp ratio (p = 0.02) when compared with past smokers. These findings need to be replicated with protocols that include healthy controls to further elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of altered Tyr and Kyn levels in smokers. Results do suggest potential molecular links between schizophrenia and smoking that may represent biomarkers and

  5. Monoamine Oxidase and Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Inhibitors from the Fruits of Gardenia jasminoides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Gun Hee; Hwang, Keum Hee

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed to determine what components of Gardenia jasminoides play a major role in inhibiting the enzymes related antidepressant activity of this plant. In our previous research, the ethyl acetate fraction of G. jasminosides fruits inhibited the activities of both monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), and oral administration of the ethanolic extract slightly increased serotonin concentrations in the brain tissues of rats and decreased MAO-B activity. In addition, we found through in vitro screening test that the ethyl acetate fraction showed modest inhibitory activity on dopamine-β hydroxylase (DBH). The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of five bio-active compounds, protocatechuic acid (1), geniposide (2), 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide (3), 3,5-d-ihydroxy-1,7-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) heptanes (4), and ursolic acid (5), from the ethyl acetate fraction of G. jasminoides fruits. The isolated compounds showed different inhibitory potentials against MAO-A, -B, and DBH. Protocatechuic acid showed potent inhibition against MAO-B (IC50 300 μmol/L) and DBH (334 μmol/L), exhibiting weak MAO-A inhibition (2.41 mmol/L). Two iridoid glycosides, geniposide (223 μmol/L) and 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide (127μmol/L), were selective MAO-B inhibitor. Especially, 6'-O-trans-p-coumaroylgeniposide exhibited more selective MAO-B inhibition than deprenyl, well-known MAO-B inhibitor for the treatment of early-stage Parkinson’s disease. The inhibitory activity of 3,5-di-hydroxy-1,7-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) heptane was strong for MAO-B (196 μmol/L), modest for MAO-A (400 μmol/L), and weak for DBH (941 μmol/L). Ursolic acid exhibited significant inhibition of DBH (214 μmol/L), weak inhibition of MAO-B (780 μmol/L), and no inhibition against MAO-A. Consequently, G. jasminoides fruits are considerable for development of biofunctional food materials for the combination treatment of depression and neurodegenerative disorders

  6. Blood Levels of Monoamine Precursors and Smoking in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Ashwin Jacob; Kanwar, Jyoti; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Fuchs, Dietmar; Lowry, Christopher A; Peng, Xiaoqing; Giegling, Ina; Hartmann, Annette M; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Gragnoli, Claudia; Reeves, Gloria M; Groer, Maureen W; Rosenthal, Richard N; Rujescu, Dan; Postolache, Teodor T

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and exerts a negative impact on cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Smoking has complex interactions with monoamine metabolism through the ability of cigarette smoke to suppress Type 1 T helper cell (Th1) type immunity, the immunophenotype that is implicated in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) dysfunction and tryptophan (Trp) breakdown to kynurenine (Kyn) via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Nicotine also induces tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression, leading to increased synthesis of catecholamines. Furthermore, there is evidence for PAH dysfunction in schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare the plasma levels of selected monoamine precursors and their metabolites in smokers vs. non-smokers in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia. We measured plasma phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), Trp, and Kyn levels using high-performance liquid chromatography and calculated Phe:Tyr and Kyn:Trp ratios in 920 patients with schizophrenia. Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses were used to compare these endpoints between three groups of patients with schizophrenia: (1) current smokers, (2) past smokers, and (3) non-smokers. There were significant differences among the three groups with regards to Tyr levels [F (2,789) = 3.77, p = 0.02], with current smokers having lower Tyr levels when compared with non-smokers (p = 0.02). Kyn levels and Kyn:Trp ratio were different among the three groups [F (2,738) = 3.17, p = 0.04, F (2,738) = 3.61, p = 0.03] with current smokers having lower Kyn levels (p = 0.04) and higher Kyn:Trp ratio (p = 0.02) when compared with past smokers. These findings need to be replicated with protocols that include healthy controls to further elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of altered Tyr and Kyn levels in smokers. Results do suggest potential molecular links between schizophrenia and smoking that may represent biomarkers and

  7. [18F]CFT synthesis and binding to monoamine transporters in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We present the electrophilic synthesis of [18F]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluoro)tropane [[18F]CFT] and the pharmacological specificity and selectivity of [18F]CFT for monoamine transporters in the brain and peripheral organs of rats. The human radiation dose is extrapolated from the animal data. Methods [18F]CFT was synthesized by electrophilic fluorination of a stannylated precursor by using post-target-produced [18F]F2 as a fluorinating agent. The ex vivo 18F-activity biodistribution of [18F]CFT in the brain of rats was studied by autoradiography. The binding of [18F]CFT to the monoamine transporters was studied using in vivo blocking experiments with dopamine transporter [DAT], norepinephrine transporter [NET], or serotonin transporter [SERT] inhibitors. In vivo animal positron emission tomography was used as a comparative method to determine tracer kinetics. Human radiation dose was assessed using OLINDA software. Results The radiochemical yield of [18F]CFT from the initial [18F]F-, decay corrected to the end of bombardment, was 3.2 ± 1.0%. The specific activity [SA] was 14.5 ± 3.4 GBq/μmol, decay corrected to the end of synthesis. Radiochemical purity exceeded 99%. DAT-specific binding was found in the striatum, locus coeruleus, and pancreas. NET-specific binding was found in the locus coeruleus. SERT-specific binding was not found in any of the studied organs. Effective dose equivalent [EDE] estimated for the standard human model was 12.8 μSv/MBq. Effective dose [ED] was 9.17 μSv/MBq. Conclusions Post-target-produced high-SA [18F]F2 was used to incorporate18F directly into the phenyl ring of [18F]CFT. The final product had high radiochemical and chemical purities and a high SA for DAT and NET studies in vivo. In periphery, [18F]CFT showed a specific uptake in the pancreas. EDE and ED corresponded well with other18F-radioligands. PMID:22277306

  8. Genetic KCa3.1-Deficiency Produces Locomotor Hyperactivity and Alterations in Cerebral Monoamine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula; Ditzel, Nicholas; Sevelsted-Møller, Linda Maria; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Rabjerg, Maj; Wulff, Heike; Köhler, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Background The calmodulin/calcium-activated K+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1−/− mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1+/+) and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1+/+). Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1−/− mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1+/+ but not in KCa3.1−/− mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1−/− mice were hyperactive (≈+60%) in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1+/+ but not in KCa3.1−/− mice. Conclusions/Significance KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders. PMID:23077667

  9. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  10. Concentrations of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents trends in global concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) from 1992 to 2009. This trend is an important environmental issue, because ODSs can deplete the atmosphere's ability to shield the Earth from harmful ultraviolet rays.

  11. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  12. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  13. Naproxen, a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Can Affect Daily Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Alterations of Monoamine Levels in Different Areas of the Brain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ananda Raj; Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-06-01

    Goswami, Ananda Raj, Goutam Dutta, and Tusharkanti Ghosh. Naproxen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug can affect daily hypobaric hypoxia-induced alterations of monoamine levels in different areas of the brain in male rats. High Alt Med Biol. 17:133-140, 2016.-The oxidative stress (OS)-induced prostaglandin (PG) release, in hypobaric hypoxic (HHc) condition, may be linked with the changes of brain monoamines. The present study intends to explore the changes of monoamines in hypothalamus (H), cerebral cortex (CC), and cerebellum (CB) along with the motor activity in rats after exposing them to simulated hypobaric condition and the role of PGs on the daily hypobaric hypoxia (DHH)-induced alteration of brain monoamines by administering, an inhibitor of PG synthesis, naproxen. The rats were exposed to a decompression chamber at 18,000 ft for 8 hours per day for 6 days after administration of vehicle or naproxen (18 mg/kg body wt.). The monoamine levels (epinephrine, E; norepinephrine, NE; dopamine, DA; and 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in CC, CB, and H were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection, and the locomotor behavior was measured by open field test. The NE and DA levels were decreased in CC, CB, and H of the rat brain in HHc condition. The E and 5-HT levels were decreased in CC, but in H and CB, they remained unaltered in HHc condition. These DHH-induced changes of monoamines in brain areas were prevented after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The locomotor behavior remained unaltered in HHc condition and after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The DHH-induced changes of monoamines in the brain in HHc condition are probably linked with PGs that may be induced by OS. PMID:26894935

  14. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ORGANOTYPIC CO-CULTURES: EXPERIMENTAL DOPAMINE DEPLETION PREVENTS REDUCTIONS IN GABA

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, Gregory D.; Seegal, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that have been demonstrated to be toxic to the dopamine (DA) systems of the central nervous system. One proposed mechanism for PCB-induced DA neurotoxicity is inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT); such inhibition results in increased levels of unsequestered DA and DA metabolism leading to oxidative stress. We have used an organotypic co-culture system of developing rat striatum and ventral mesencephalon (VM) to determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting from PCB exposure and consequent induction of oxidative stress, leads to GABA and DA neuronal dysfunction. 24 hr exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs reduced tissue DA and GABA concentrations, increased medium levels of DA and measures of oxidative stress in both the striatum and VM. Alterations in neurochemistry and increases in measures of oxidative stress were blocked in the presence of n-acetylcysteine (NAC). Although NAC treatment did not alter PCB-induced changes in DA neurochemistry, it did protect against reductions in GABA concentration. To determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA were responsible for PCB-induced oxidative stress and consequent reductions in GABA levels, we depleted DA from the co-cultures using α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). AMPT reduced striatal and VM DA levels by 90% and 70%, respectively. PCB exposure, following DA depletion, neither increased levels of oxidative stress nor resulted in GABA depletion. These results suggest that PCB-induced alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting in increased levels of unsequestered DA, leads to increased oxidative stress, depletion of tissue glutathione, and consequent reductions in tissue GABA concentrations. PMID:18262273

  15. The MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl reduces the oral tremor and the dopamine depletion induced by the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine.

    PubMed

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Yohn, Samantha E; Dortche, Kristina; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-02-01

    Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is prescribed for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington's disease. Via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2), TBZ blocks dopamine (DA) storage and depletes striatal DA; this drug also has been shown to induce Parkinsonian motor side effects in patients. Recently, TBZ was shown to induce tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) in rats and mice. TJMs are an oral tremor that has many of the characteristics of Parkinsonian tremor in humans. The present study focused upon the ability of the well-established antiparkinsonian agent deprenyl to attenuate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of 2.0mg/kg TBZ. Deprenyl is a selective and irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B, and administration of deprenyl produced a dose-related suppression of TBZ-induced TJMs. A second experiment employed in vivo microdialysis to examine extracellular DA levels in the ventrolateral striatum, the neostriatal region most closely associated with the production of TJMs, after administration of TBZ and deprenyl. Consistent with the behavioral data, TBZ alone produced a biphasic effect on extracellular DA, with an initial increases followed by a prolonged decrease during the period in which TJMs are displayed. Co-administration of deprenyl with TBZ increased DA levels compared to rats treated with TBZ alone. These results provide support for use of TBZ as a rodent model of Parkinsonism, and future studies should utilize this model to evaluate putative anti-Parkinsonian agents. PMID:26590367

  16. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes. PMID:20012186

  17. Simultaneous determination of cadaverine and putrescine using a disposable monoamine oxidase based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Henao-Escobar, Wilder; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Asunción Alonso-Lomillo, M; Julia Arcos-Martínez, M

    2013-12-15

    The selective and simultaneous amperometric determination of putrescine (Put) and cadaverine (Cad) has been carried out using a novel design of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) with two working electrodes connected in array mode. A mixture of 3% of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), as mediator, and carbon ink was used for the construction of the screen-printed working electrode. The employment of different amounts of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme on these modified TTF/SPCEs and the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) allowed performing the simultaneous determination of both analytes. The amperometric detection has been performed by measuring the oxidation current of the mediator at a potential of+250 mV vs. screen-printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A linear response in the Cad concentration range from 19.6 till 107.1 µM and from 9.9 till 74.1 μM for Put was obtained at the MAO/AuNPs/TTF/SPCE biosensor. This device showed a capability of detection of 9.9 and 19.9±0.9 µM (n=4 α=β=0.05) and a precision of 4.9% and 10.3% in terms of relative standard deviation for Put and Cad, respectively. The developed biosensor was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of Put and Cad in octopus samples. PMID:24209360

  18. An Adrenal Mass and Increased Catecholamines: Monoamine Oxidase or Pheochromocytoma Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; Wentholt, Iris M.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Nieveen van Dijkum, Els J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Hormonal evaluation in patients with an adrenal incidentaloma can be difficult in patients with comorbidities or in patients using interfering drugs. We present a case of a 54-year-old man who was evaluated for an adrenal mass. The medical history reported treatment with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor for recurrent psychoses. Hormonal screening showed elevated levels of normetanephrine and metanephrine in plasma and urine, suggesting a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and an adrenalectomy was performed. Histologic examination showed that the tumor had an origin of the adrenal cortex. MAO inhibitors are also known to cause elevated levels of catecholamines. In this case, a PHEO seemed more likely the cause due to repeatedly elevated levels of metanephrines and normal levels of catecholamines. Since the tumor had an origin of the adrenal cortex, the use of MAO inhibitors was the most likely explanation for the elevated levels of metanephrines. This case illustrated the difficulties in diagnosing PHEO, especially in patients with comorbidities and interfering drugs. PMID:25584109

  19. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts.

    PubMed

    Duicu, O M; Lighezan, R; Sturza, A; Balica, R; Vaduva, A; Feier, H; Gaspar, M; Ionac, A; Noveanu, L; Borza, C; Muntean, D M; Mornos, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs) have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1) Control (CTRL), valvular patients without CHD; (2) CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3) CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM. PMID:27190576

  20. New Water Vapor Barrier Film Based on Lamellar Aliphatic-Monoamine-Bridged Polysilsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Ce; Ding, Ruimin; Cui, Xinmin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Qinghua; Xu, Yao

    2016-06-15

    Siloxane-based hybrid lamellar materials with ordered nanostructure units paralleling to the substrate have been widely used for water vapor barrier. However, it is very difficult to control the orientation of the lamellar units at molecular level. In this Research Article, a new lamellar bridged polysilsesquioxane (BPSQ) film, whose voids between lamellae were filled by pendant alkyl chains in the organic bridge, was prepared via the stoichiometric reaction between 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and aliphatic monoamine at 60 °C without catalyst. Experimental evidence obtained from FT-IR, MS, NMR, and GIXRD techniques suggested that the as-prepared BPSQ films were constructed by lamellar units with disordered orientation. Nonetheless, they possessed satisfactory water vapor barrier performance for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) optical crystals, and the water vapor transmission rate through BPSQ film with thickness of 25 μm was as low as 20.3 g·m(-2)·d(-1). Those results proved that filling the voids between molecular lamellae with alkyl chains greatly weakened the effect of lamellar unit orientation on the vapor barrier property of BPSQ film. PMID:27224032

  1. Effect of PCB and DES on rat monoamine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, testosterone, and estradiol ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, D.R.; Bradshaw, W.S.; Booth, G.M.; Seegmiller, R.E.; Allen, S.D.

    1992-06-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) have been documented as potentially hazardous environmental agents. In utero exposure to DES produces human vaginal adenocarcinoma, male reproductive tract lesions in mice, and has been correlated with personality changes in human males. PCB (Kanechlor) was found to be the major toxin in the {open_quotes}Yusho{close_quotes} rice oil poisoning in Japan in 1968. Other investigators have shown in rats that PCB (Arochlor) causes liver adenofibrosis, thyroid dysfunction, atypical mitochondria, and dilation of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Matthews et al. (1978) also reported that 4, 4{prime} chlorinated biphenyl was the most potent inducer of monooxygenases, irrespective of chlorination at other sites. Although these compounds have been studied extensively in mammals, there is a paucity of data examining their effects when non-fetotoxic amounts are administered chronically and orally during gestation. The present study is part of a larger effort designed to establish a protocol for testing the developmental effects of xenobiotics such as DES and PCB. Levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were measured as an indicator of the integrity of nerve transmission in the central nervous system. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a marker for the outer mitochondrial membrane and is an important amine metabolizing enzyme. Testosterone and estradiol are important sex steroids in mammals, and effects upon levels of the two hormones may signal anomalies in development of sex characteristics. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  3. Evaluation of Natural and Synthetic 1,4-naphthoquinones as Inhibitors of Monoamine Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2016-05-01

    Previous reports have documented that 1,4-naphthoquinones act as inhibitors of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. In particular, fractionation of the extracts of cured tobacco leafs has led to the characterization of 2,3,6-trimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, a non-selective MAO inhibitor. To derive structure-activity relationships for MAO inhibition by the 1,4-naphthoquinone class of compounds, this study investigates the human MAO inhibitory activities of fourteen structurally diverse 1,4-naphthoquinones of natural and synthetic origin. Of these, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was found to be the most potent inhibitor with an IC50 value of 0.860 μm for the inhibition of MAO-B. A related compound, shikonin, inhibits both the MAO-A and MAO-B isoforms with IC50 values of 1.50 and 1.01 μm, respectively. It is further shown that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition by these compounds is reversible by dialysis. In this respect, kinetic analysis suggests that the modes of MAO inhibition are competitive. This study contributes to the discovery of novel MAO inhibitors, which may be useful in the treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease, depressive illness, congestive heart failure and cancer. PMID:26684482

  4. Functional variation in promoter region of monoamine oxidase A and subtypes of alcoholism: haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Parsian, Abbas; Cloninger, C Robert; Sinha, Rashmi; Zhang, Zhen Hua

    2003-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the degradation of certain neurotransmitter amines. MAO-A, due to its function in central nervous system, has been one of the important candidate genes involved in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAO-A gene has been identified. This variation affects the transcriptional efficiency of the gene. To determine the role of this MAO-A functional polymorphism in the development of subtypes of alcoholism, a sample of alcoholics and normal controls were screened with this marker. The allele frequency differences between total alcoholics, Types I and II alcoholics, and normal controls was not significant. Comparison of male alcoholics to male normal controls for the frequencies of two-loci and three-loci haplotypes was statistically significant. After Bonferroni's correction for multiple tests none of the results remained significant at P < 0.05. Our results indicate that MAO-A may play a role in the development of alcoholism but the gene effect is very small. PMID:12555234

  5. Release of (/sup 3/H)-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-03-05

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10/sup -7/ - 10/sup -5/M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of (/sup 3/H)5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of (/sup 3/H)DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both (/sup 5/H)5HT and (/sup 3/H)DA was Ca/sup 2 +/-independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)(/sup 3/H)MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA.

  6. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Duicu, O. M.; Lighezan, R.; Sturza, A.; Balica, R.; Vaduva, A.; Feier, H.; Gaspar, M.; Ionac, A.; Noveanu, L.; Borza, C.; Muntean, D. M.; Mornos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs) have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1) Control (CTRL), valvular patients without CHD; (2) CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3) CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM. PMID:27190576

  7. An evaluation of synthetic indole derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chirkova, Zhanna V; Kabanova, Mariya V; Filimonov, Sergey I; Abramov, Igor G; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P; Suponitsky, Kyrill Yu

    2016-05-01

    In a recent study we have shown that several indole-5,6-dicarbonitrile derivatives are potent inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. To expand on these results and to further determine structure-activity relationships (SARs) for MAO inhibition by this chemical class, the present study investigates the MAO inhibition properties of additional indole-5,6-dicarbonitriles and related indole-5,6-dicarboxylic acid and pyrrolo[3,4-f]indole-5,7-dione derivatives. Among the active compounds two pyrrolo[3,4-f]indole-5,7-dione derivatives inhibited MAO-A (4g) and MAO-B (4d) with IC50 values of 0.250 and 0.581μM, respectively. In general indole-5,6-dicarbonitriles, however, exhibit higher MAO inhibition potencies while indole-5,6-dicarboxylic acids are weak MAO inhibitors. Active MAO inhibitors such as 4g and 4d may be used as leads for the development of drugs for the treatment of disease states such as Parkinson's disease and depression. MAO inhibitors are also under investigation as potential agents for the treatment of prostate cancer, certain types of cardiomyopathies and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27020523

  8. Monoamine oxidase inhibition prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients with collagen VI myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sorato, E.; Menazza, S.; Zulian, A.; Sabatelli, P.; Gualandi, F.; Merlini, L.; Bonaldo, P.; Canton, M.; Bernardi, P.; Di Lisa, F.

    2014-01-01

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a crucial role in several types of muscular dystrophy (MD), whether a causal link between these two alterations exists remains an open question. We have documented that mitochondrial dysfunction through opening of the permeability transition pore plays a key role in myoblasts from patients as well as in mouse models of MD, and that oxidative stress caused by monoamine oxidases (MAO) is involved in myofiber damage. In the present study we have tested whether MAO-dependent oxidative stress is a causal determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. We find that upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide or the MAO substrate tyramine myoblasts from patients upregulate MAO-B expression and display a significant rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with concomitant mitochondrial depolarization. MAO inhibition by pargyline significantly reduced both ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction, and normalized the increased incidence of apoptosis in myoblasts from patients. Thus, MAO-dependent oxidative stress is causally related to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in myoblasts from patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, and inhibition of MAO should be explored as a potential treatment for these diseases. PMID:25017965

  9. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  10. Red emission fluorescent probes for visualization of monoamine oxidase in living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Ling; Li, Kun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Hao-Ran; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report two novel red emission fluorescent probes for the highly sensitive and selective detection of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with large Stokes shift (227 nm). Both of the probes possess solid state fluorescence and can accomplish the identification of MAO on test papers. The probe MAO-Red-1 exhibited a detection limit down to 1.2 μg mL(-1) towards MAO-B. Moreover, the cleavage product was unequivocally conformedby HPLC and LCMS and the result was in accordance with the proposed oxidative deamination mechanism. The excellent photostability of MAO-Red-1 was proved both in vitro and in vivo through fluorescent kinetic experiment and laser exposure experiment of confocal microscopy, respectively. Intracellular experiments also confirmed the low cytotoxity and exceptional cell imaging abilities of MAO-Red-1. It was validated both in HeLa and HepG2 cells that MAO-Red-1 was capable of reporting MAO activity through the variation of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27499031

  11. Determination of the rate constant for neuronal and extra-neuronal monoamine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cassis, L.; Ludwig, J.; Trendelenburg, U.

    1986-03-01

    In the rat vas deferens, neuronal deamination of /sup 3/H-(-) noradrenaline (/sup 3/H-NA) to /sup 3/H-dihydroxyphenethylglycol (/sup 3/HDOPEG) cannot be inhibited by pretreatment with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. However, in the extraneuronal compartment of the rat heart, inhibition of MAO abolishes the formation of /sup 3/HDOPEG. To clarify this discrepancy, the authors determined the rate constant for MAO (/sup k/mao/) neuronally (rat vas deferens) and extraneuronally (rat heart). For neuronal /sup k/mao, vasa deferentia were incubated with /sup 3/HNA for 300 minutes, and the cumulative formation of /sup 3/HDOPEG measured. The delay in time before /sup 3/HDOPEG achieves steady state (/sup tau/system), is inversely proportional to /sup k/mao. Because /sup tau/system is very short for neuronal MAO, an appreciable delay was only achieved after partial inhibition of MAO with various parglyline concentrations. To relate to the uninhibited enzyme, the percentage inhibition by pargyline was then determined in homogenate preparations. For extraneuronal MAO, a similar procedure was performed in perfused rat hearts. Results show a significantly greater /sup k/mao of neuronal origin, (/sup k/mao = .57min/sup -/1) which when related to the fractional size of the neuronal compartment suggests a very high activity of neuronal MAO.

  12. Social challenge increases cortisol and hypothalamic monoamine levels in matrinxã (Brycon amazonicus).

    PubMed

    Wolkers, Carla Patrícia Bejo; Serra, Mônica; Urbinati, Elisabeth Criscuolo

    2015-12-01

    The neural circuitry for social behavior and aggression appears to be evolutionarily conserved across the vertebrate subphylum and involves a complex neural network that includes the hypothalamus as a key structure. In the present study, we evaluated the changes in monoamine levels in the hypothalamus and on serum cortisol and plasma glucose of resident matrinxã (Brycon amazonicus) submitted to a social challenge (introduction of an intruder in their territory). The fight promoted a significant increase in hypothalamic 5-HT, NA and DA levels and on the metabolites 5-HIAA and DOPAC, and decreased 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios in resident fish. Furthermore, an increase in serum cortisol and plasma glucose was also observed after the fight. Resident fish presented a high aggressiveness even with increased 5-HT levels in the hypothalamus. The alteration in hypothalamic monoaminergic activity of matrinxã suggests that this diencephalic region is involved in aggression and stress modulation in fish; however, it does not exclude the participation of other brain areas not tested here. PMID:26205527

  13. A Novel Potential Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent for Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zih-Rou; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Huang, Ya-Yao; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, 9-(+)-11C-dihydrotetrabenazine (9-(+)-11C-DTBZ) was shown to be a useful positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we described the radiosynthesis and evaluation of the 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ analog, 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ, as a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) imaging agent and compare it with 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ. 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ was obtained by 11C-MeI methylation with its 10 hydroxy precursor in the presence of 5 M NaOH. It had a slightly better average radiochemical yield of 35.3 ± 3.6% (decay-corrected to end of synthesis (EOS)) than did 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ (30.5 ± 2.3%). MicroPET studies showed that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ had a striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 3.74 ± 0.21 at 40 min post-injection, while the ratio of 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ was 2.50 ± 0.33. This indicated that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ has a higher specific uptake in VMAT2-rich brain regions, and 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ may be a potential VMAT2 radioligand. Our experiment is the first study of 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ to include dynamic brain distribution in rat brains. PMID:27612194

  14. Monoamine-Sensitive Developmental Periods Impacting Adult Emotional and Cognitive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Deepika; Teixeira, Cátia M; Cagliostro, Martha K Caffrey; Mahadevia, Darshini; Ansorge, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Development passes through sensitive periods, during which plasticity allows for genetic and environmental factors to exert indelible influence on the maturation of the organism. In the context of central nervous system development, such sensitive periods shape the formation of neurocircuits that mediate, regulate, and control behavior. This general mechanism allows for development to be guided by both the genetic blueprint as well as the environmental context. While allowing for adaptation, such sensitive periods are also vulnerability windows during which external and internal factors can confer risk to disorders by derailing otherwise resilient developmental programs. Here we review developmental periods that are sensitive to monoamine signaling and impact adult behaviors of relevance to psychiatry. Specifically, we review (1) a serotonin-sensitive period that impacts sensory system development, (2) a serotonin-sensitive period that impacts cognition, anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, and (3) a dopamine- and serotonin-sensitive period affecting aggression, impulsivity and behavioral response to psychostimulants. We discuss preclinical data to provide mechanistic insight, as well as epidemiological and clinical data to point out translational relevance. The field of translational developmental neuroscience has progressed exponentially providing solid conceptual advances and unprecedented mechanistic insight. With such knowledge at hand and important methodological innovation ongoing, the field is poised for breakthroughs elucidating the developmental origins of neuropsychiatric disorders, and thus understanding pathophysiology. Such knowledge of sensitive periods that determine the developmental trajectory of complex behaviors is a necessary step towards improving prevention and treatment approaches for neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25178408

  15. Red emission fluorescent probes for visualization of monoamine oxidase in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-Ling; Li, Kun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Hao-Ran; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report two novel red emission fluorescent probes for the highly sensitive and selective detection of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with large Stokes shift (227 nm). Both of the probes possess solid state fluorescence and can accomplish the identification of MAO on test papers. The probe MAO-Red-1 exhibited a detection limit down to 1.2 μg mL−1 towards MAO-B. Moreover, the cleavage product was unequivocally conformedby HPLC and LCMS and the result was in accordance with the proposed oxidative deamination mechanism. The excellent photostability of MAO-Red-1 was proved both in vitro and in vivo through fluorescent kinetic experiment and laser exposure experiment of confocal microscopy, respectively. Intracellular experiments also confirmed the low cytotoxity and exceptional cell imaging abilities of MAO-Red-1. It was validated both in HeLa and HepG2 cells that MAO-Red-1 was capable of reporting MAO activity through the variation of fluorescence intensity. PMID:27499031

  16. beta-Carboline alkaloids in Peganum harmala and inhibition of human monoamine oxidase (MAO).

    PubMed

    Herraiz, T; González, D; Ancín-Azpilicueta, C; Arán, V J; Guillén, H

    2010-03-01

    Peganum harmala L. is a multipurpose medicinal plant increasingly used for psychoactive recreational purposes (Ayahuasca analog). Harmaline, harmine, harmalol, harmol and tetrahydroharmine were identified and quantified as the main beta-carboline alkaloids in P. harmala extracts. Seeds and roots contained the highest levels of alkaloids with low levels in stems and leaves, and absence in flowers. Harmine and harmaline accumulated in dry seeds at 4.3% and 5.6% (w/w), respectively, harmalol at 0.6%, and tetrahydroharmine at 0.1% (w/w). Roots contained harmine and harmol with 2.0% and 1.4% (w/w), respectively. Seed extracts were potent reversible and competitive inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase (MAO-A) with an IC(50) of 27 microg/l whereas root extracts strongly inhibited MAO-A with an IC(50) of 159 microg/l. In contrast, they were poor inhibitors of MAO-B. Inhibition of MAO-A by seed extracts was quantitatively attributed to harmaline and harmine whereas inhibition by root extracts came from harmine with no additional interferences. Stems and leaves extracts were poor inhibitors of MAO. The potent inhibition of MAO-A by seed and root extracts of P. harmala containing beta-carbolines should contribute to the psychopharmacological and toxicological effects of this plant and could be the basis for its purported antidepressant actions. PMID:20036304

  17. Plant observation report and evaluation, Pennwalt Corporation, secondary and tertiary aliphatic monoamines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-27

    A site visit was made to the amine manufacturing facility of the Pennwalt Corporation, Wyandotte, Michigan, to evaluate the facility in regard to the Secondary and Tertiary Aliphatic Monoamines Criteria Document. A total of 21 people were directly in contact with the amine production process. Two to four of the maintenance personnel may also come in contact with the process. Maintenance workers ran the risk of exposure not only to primary, secondary and tertiary amine compounds, but also to several other chemicals being used in the process. The processes used to unload raw materials are described, along with reactor operations, decanter and recycling operations, distillation operations, product storage and shipping. Medical monitoring at the facility included chest x-ray, respiratory function tests, sight screening, urinalysis, and back x-rays. Restricted and potentially hazardous area signs were clearly posted. Employees wore hard hats and safety glasses on the job as well as gloves, rubber boots, face shields, goggles, and respirators as necessary. Emergency procedures are described, including fire protection. Sanitation and personal hygiene are discussed, along with monitoring of the workplace conditions.

  18. Transformation of heterocyclic reversible monoamine oxidase-B inactivators into irreversible inactivators by N-methylation.

    PubMed

    Ding, C Z; Silverman, R B

    1993-11-12

    3-[4-[(3-Chlorophenyl)methoxy]phenyl]-5-[(methylamino)methyl]- 2-oxazolidinone (1) is a secondary amine known to be a potent time-dependent irreversible inactivator of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B). The primary amine analogues of derivatives of 1, as well as of the corresponding dihydrofuranone and pyrrolidinone, had been shown to be time-dependent, but reversible, inhibitors of MAO-B. Here it is shown that the primary amine analogue of 1 is a time-dependent reversible inhibitor of MAO-B and that the secondary and tertiary amine analogues of the corresponding oxazolidinone, dihydrofuranone, and pyrrolidinone are time-dependent irreversible inhibitors of MAO-B. The reaction leading to the irreversible enzyme adduct formation with 1 can be reversed by increasing the temperature. These results are consistent with a stabilizing stereoelectronic effect on the enzyme adduct caused by N-methylation which hinders free rotation and prevents the sp3-orbital containing the nitrogen nonbonded electrons from being trans to the active site amino acid leaving group. PMID:8246228

  19. Selective inhibition of monoamine oxidase B by aminoethyl substituted benzyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Woodroofe, C C; Mostashari, R; Lu, X; Ramsay, R R; Silverman, R B

    2000-01-01

    Aminoethyl 3-chlorobenzyl ether was shown previously (Ding, C.Z. and Silverman, R.B. (1993). Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 3, 2077-2078) to be a potent and selective time-dependent, but reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO B). Based on this result, a series of novel aminoethyl substituted benzyl ethers was synthesized and the compounds were examined as potential inhibitors of both isozymic forms of MAO. Each compound in the series inhibits both MAO A and MAO B competitively, and IC50 values for each compound were determined. In general, the B isozyme is much more sensitive to these inhibitors than the A isozyme (except for the o- and p-substituted nitro analogues), in some cases by more than two orders of magnitude. The selectivity in favor of MAO B inhibition is relatively high for all of the meta-substituted analogues and quite low for all of the ortho-substituted analogues. Having the substituent at the ortho-position is most favorable for MAO A inhibition. With MAO B the meta-analogues were, in general, more potent than the corresponding ortho- and para-analogues with respect to their reversible binding constants. The meta-iodo analogue is the most potent analogue. PMID:10850952

  20. Selective Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase B by Aminoethyl Substituted Benzyl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Woodroofe; Mostashari; Lu; Ramsay; Silverman

    1999-11-01

    Aminoethyl 3-chlorobenzyl ether was shown previously (Ding, C.Z. and Silverman, R.B. (1993). Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 3, 2077-2078) to be a potent and selective time-dependent, but reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO B). Based on this result, a series of novel aminoethyl substituted benzyl ethers was synthesized and the compounds were examined as potential inhibitors of both isozymic forms of MAO. Each compound in the series inhibits both MAO A and MAO B competitively, and IC(50) values for each compound were determined. In general, the B isozyme is much more sensitive to these inhibitors than the A isozyme (except for the o- and p-substituted nitro analogues), in some cases by more than two orders of magnitude. The selectivity in favor of MAO B inhibition is relatively high for all of the meta-substituted analogues and quite low for all of the ortho-substituted analogues. Having the substituent at the ortho-position is most favorable for MAO A inhibition. With MAO B the meta-analogues were, in general, more potent than the corresponding ortho- and para-analogues with respect to their reversible binding constants. The meta-iodo analogue is the most potent analogue. PMID:10938531

  1. Discovery of 3-Hydroxy-3-phenacyloxindole Analogues of Isatin as Potential Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rati K P; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Ayyannan, Senthil R

    2016-01-01

    A series of 3-hydroxy-3-phenacyloxindole analogues of isatin were designed, synthesized, and evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity toward monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. Most of the synthesized compounds proved to be potent and selective inhibitors of MAO-A rather than MAO-B. 1-Benzyl-3-hydroxy-3-(4'-hydroxyphenacyl)oxindole (compound 18) showed the highest MAO-A inhibitory activity (IC50 : 0.009 ± 0.001 μM, Ki : 3.69 ± 0.003 nM) and good selectivity (selectivity index: 60.44). Kinetic studies revealed that compounds 18 and 16 (1-benzyl-3-hydroxy-3-(4'-bromophenacyl)oxindole) exhibit competitive inhibition against MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that the 3-hydroxy group is an essential feature for these analogues to exhibit potent MAO-A inhibitory activity. Computational studies revealed the possible molecular interactions between the inhibitors and MAO isozymes. The computational data obtained are congruent with experimental results. Further studies on the lead inhibitors, including co-crystallization of inhibitor-MAO complexes and in vivo evaluations, are essential for their development as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of MAO-associated neurological disorders. PMID:26592797

  2. The role of monoamine oxidase A in aggression: Current translational developments and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Godar, Sean C; Fite, Paula J; McFarlin, Kenneth M; Bortolato, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Drawing upon the recent resurgence of biological criminology, several studies have highlighted a critical role for genetic factors in the ontogeny of antisocial and violent conduct. In particular, converging lines of evidence have documented that these maladaptive manifestations of aggression are influenced by monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), the enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine. The interest on the link between MAOA and aggression was originally sparked by Han Brunner's discovery of a syndrome characterized by marked antisocial behaviors in male carriers of a nonsense mutation of this gene. Subsequent studies showed that MAOA allelic variants associated with low enzyme activity moderate the impact of early-life maltreatment on aggression propensity. In spite of overwhelming evidence pointing to the relationship between MAOA and aggression, the neurobiological substrates of this link remain surprisingly elusive; very little is also known about the interventions that may reduce the severity of pathological aggression in genetically predisposed subjects. Animal models offer a unique experimental tool to investigate these issues; in particular, several lines of transgenic mice harboring total or partial loss-of-function Maoa mutations have been shown to recapitulate numerous psychological and neurofunctional endophenotypes observed in humans. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the link between MAOA and aggression; in particular, we will emphasize how an integrated translational strategy coordinating clinical and preclinical research may prove critical to elucidate important aspects of the pathophysiology of aggression, and identify potential targets for its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26776902

  3. Memory impairment induced by sodium fluoride is associated with changes in brain monoamine levels.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcela; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Losso, Estela M; Chioca, Lea R; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Andreatini, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that sodium fluoride (NaF) can impair performance in some memory tasks, such as open-field habituation and two-way active avoidance. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of NaF intake (100 ppm in drinking water for 30 days) and its short-term (15 days) withdrawal on open-field habituation and brain monoamine level. Adult male rats were allocated to three groups: tap water (NaF 1.54 ppm) for 45 days (control group); 15 days of tap water followed by NaF for 30 days; and NaF for 30 days followed by 15 days of tap water. The results showed that NaF impairs open-field habituation and increases noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the striatum, hippocampus and neocortex. Dopamine (DA) increase was restricted to the striatum. Short-term NaF withdrawal did not reverse these NaF-induced changes, and both NaF treatments led to a mild fluorosis in rat incisors. No treatment effect was seen in body weight or fluid/water consumption. These results indicate that sodium fluoride induces memory impairment that outlasts short-term NaF withdrawal (2 weeks) and may be associated with NA and 5-HT increases in discrete brain regions. PMID:19957215

  4. Monoamine oxidases are novel sources of cardiovascular oxidative stress in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sturza, Adrian; Duicu, Oana M; Vaduva, Adrian; Dănilă, Maria D; Noveanu, Lavinia; Varró, András; Muntean, Danina M

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is widely recognized as the most severe metabolic disease associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major event causally linked to the development of cardiovascular complications throughout the evolution of DM. Recently, monoamine oxidases (MAOs) at the outer mitochondrial membrane, with 2 isoforms, MAO-A and MAO-B, have emerged as novel sources of constant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in the cardiovascular system via the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines and neurotransmitters. Whether MAOs are mediators of endothelial dysfunction in DM is unknown, and so we studied this in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes. MAO expression (mRNA and protein) was increased in both arterial samples and hearts isolated from the diabetic animals. Also, H2O2 production (ferrous oxidation - xylenol orange assay) in aortic samples was significantly increased, together with an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation (organ-bath studies). MAO inhibitors (clorgyline and selegiline) attenuated ROS production by 50% and partially normalized the endothelium-dependent relaxation in diseased vessels. In conclusion, MAOs, in particular the MAO-B isoform, are induced in aortas and hearts in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model and contribute, via the generation of H2O2, to the endothelial dysfunction associated with experimental diabetes. PMID:25996256

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of Ferulic Acid Amides: Curcumin-Based Design and Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Badavath, Vishnu N; Baysal, İpek; Uçar, Gülberk; Mondal, Susanta K; Sinha, Barij N; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid has structural similarity with curcumin which is being reported for its monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity. Based on this similarity, we designed a series of ferulic acid amides 6a-m and tested for their inhibitory activity on human MAO (hMAO) isoforms. All the compounds were found to inhibit the hMAO isoforms either selectively or non-selectively. Nine compounds (6a, 6b, 6g-m) were found to inhibit hMAO-B selectively, whereas the other four (6c-f) were found to be non-selective. There is a gradual shift from hMAO-B selectivity (6a,b) to non-selectivity (6c-f) as there is an increase in chain length at the amino terminus. In case of compounds having an aromatic nucleus at the amino terminus, increasing the carbon number between N and the aromatic ring increases the potency as well as selectivity toward hMAO-B. Compounds 6f, 6j, and 6k were subjected to membrane permeability and metabolic stability studies by in vitro assay methods. They were found to have a better pharmacokinetic profile than curcumin, ferulic acid, and selegiline. In order to understand the structural features responsible for the potency and selectivity of 6k, we carried out a molecular docking simulation study. PMID:26592858

  6. (E)-3-Heteroarylidenechroman-4-ones as potent and selective monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Nicoletta; Proietti Monaco, Luca; Fioravanti, Rossella; Biava, Mariangela; Yáñez, Matilde; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco

    2016-07-19

    A series of (E)-3-heteroarylidenechroman-4-ones (1a-r) was designed, synthesized and investigated in vitro for their ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both human monoamine oxidase (hMAO) isoforms, hMAO-A and hMAO-B. All the compounds were found to be selective hMAO-B inhibitors showing IC50 values in the nanomolar or micromolar range. (E)-5,7-Dichloro-3-{[(2-(dimethylamino)pyrimidin-5-yl]methylene}chroman-4-one (1c) was the most interesting compound identified in this study, endowed with higher hMAO-B potency (IC50 = 10.58 nM) and selectivity (SI > 9452) with respect to the reference selective inhibitor selegiline (IC50 = 19.60 nM, IC50 > 3431). Molecular modelling studies were performed for rationalizing at molecular level the target selective inhibition of our compounds, revealing a remarkable contribution of hydrogen bond network and water solvent. PMID:27135371

  7. Defining the Role of the Monoamine Oxidase-B Inhibitors for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne; Fahn, Stanley

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) occupy an important place in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Selegiline was the first MAO-B to be used therapeutically, while rasagiline is a second-generation drug with higher potency and selectivity. Safinamide is an investigational MAO-B inhibitor with non-dopaminergic properties that may provide advantages over its predecessors. As a class, MAO-B inhibitors are safe and well tolerated and provide symptomatic benefit both as monotherapy and in combination with other antiparkinsonian medications from early to late stages of disease. In combination with levodopa, MAO-B inhibitors may improve motor fluctuations and allow for lower total doses of levodopa. Patient characteristics and preferences can be important factors in deciding between agents. As a class, MAO-B inhibitors have shown promise as disease-modifying agents, but the clinical trial evidence to date has not been strong enough to afford them such a label. Future research may help further elucidate their relative merits and clarify their role in altering disease progression. PMID:26164425

  8. Acute effects of a bicyclophosphate neuroconvulsant on monoamine neurotransmitter and metabolite levels in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J W; Jung, A E; Narayanan, T K; Ritchie, G D

    1998-07-10

    Naive male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with the bicyclophosphate convulsant trimethylolpropane phosphate (TMPP) at dose levels from 0.2 to 0.6 mg/kg. Rats were observed for convulsive activity, and were sacrificed 15 min posttreatment. Levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) and the major metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were assayed in forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain, cerebellum and brainstem regions. Neurotransmitter and metabolite levels were compared between control rats and rats that did and did not experience seizures. TMPP administration induced significant decreases in levels of measured neurotransmitters that varied as a function of brain region, dose, and expression of the seizure activity. These results show that tonic or tonic-clonic seizures induced by TMPP administration (0.6 mg/kg) are reliably associated with regional decreases in serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Convulsive activity resulting from lower dose administrations (0.2-0.4 mg/kg) of TMPP result only in decreased regional levels of serotonin. PMID:9650574

  9. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  10. Microspectrofluorometric study of monoamines in the auricle of the heart of Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, D W; Stilman, C; Reinhold, C; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1981-01-01

    The auricle of the heart of Protopterus aethiopicus contains large numbers of chromaffin cells, often lying immediately adjacent to the endothelium and displaying a bright blue-white fluorescence characteristic for catecholamines after formaldehyde treatment (Falck and Owman 1965). These results combined with X-ray microanalysis after initial fixation with glutaraldehyde and subsequent treatment with dichromate established that these chromaffin cells are the storage site of primary catecholamines (Scheuermann 1978, 1979, 1980; Scheuermann et al. 1980). The aim of the present pilot study was to demonstrate in these cells noradrenaline (NA) or dopamine (DA), or a mixture of both. The evaluation of the excitation spectra of the catecholamine fluorophore transformed by treatment with HCl vapour (excitation maxima at 320 and 370 nm) and the excitation-peak ratio analysis (peak ratio 370/320 nm = 1.05-1.5; and 320/280 nm greater than 1.5) identify DA as the primary catecholamine stored in these chromaffin cells. The low fading rate of the monoamine fluorescence after acidification confirms the presence of DA. These microspectrofluorometric findings demonstrate that chromaffin cells in the auricle of the Protopterus heart, which are a part of the medullary homologue of the adrenal gland of higher vertebrates, contain a primary catecholamine, namely DA. PMID:7237540

  11. A parallel algorithm for implicit depletant simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Jens; Karas, Andrew S.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-11-01

    We present an algorithm to simulate the many-body depletion interaction between anisotropic colloids in an implicit way, integrating out the degrees of freedom of the depletants, which we treat as an ideal gas. Because the depletant particles are statistically independent and the depletion interaction is short-ranged, depletants are randomly inserted in parallel into the excluded volume surrounding a single translated and/or rotated colloid. A configurational bias scheme is used to enhance the acceptance rate. The method is validated and benchmarked both on multi-core processors and graphics processing units for the case of hard spheres, hemispheres, and discoids. With depletants, we report novel cluster phases in which hemispheres first assemble into spheres, which then form ordered hcp/fcc lattices. The method is significantly faster than any method without cluster moves and that tracks depletants explicitly, for systems of colloid packing fraction ϕc < 0.50, and additionally enables simulation of the fluid-solid transition.

  12. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  13. Online micro-solid-phase extraction based on boronate affinity monolithic column coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke

    2014-05-16

    Quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters is very important in diagnosing and monitoring of patients with neurological disorders. We developed an online analytical method to selectively determine urinary monoamine neurotransmitters, which coupled the boronate affinity monolithic column micro-solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The boronate affinity monolithic column was prepared by in situ polymerization of vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAA) in a stainless capillary column. The prepared monolithic column showed good permeability, high extraction selectivity and capacity. The column-to-column reproducibility was satisfactory and the enrichment factors were 17-243 for four monoamine neurotransmitters. Parameters that influence the online extraction efficiency, including pH of sample solution, flow rate of extraction and desorption, extraction volume and desorption volume were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method exhibited low limit of detection (0.06-0.80μg/L), good linearity (with R(2) between 0.9979 and 0.9993). The recoveries in urine samples were 81.0-105.5% for four monoamine neurotransmitters with intra- and inter-day RSDs of 2.1-8.2% and 3.7-10.6%, respectively. The online analytical method was sensitive, accurate, selective, reliable and applicable to analysis of trace monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine sample. PMID:24703360

  14. Comparison of the monoamine oxidase inhibiting properties of two reversible and selective monoamine oxidase-A inhibitors moclobemide and toloxatone, and assessment of their effect on psychometric performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, I; Zimmer, R; Thiede, H M; Payan, C; Hergueta, T; Robin, L; Puech, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of two reversible, predominantly monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors, moclobemide (150 mg three times daily) and toloxatone (400-200-400 mg day-1) on monoamine metabolites and psychometric performance were compared in a double-blind placebo controlled crossover study in 12 healthy subjects. 2. After 7 days of moclobemide/toloxatone/placebo administration subjects were hospitalized for 24 h on day 8. Blood samples were drawn every 2 h for determination of plasma noradrenaline (NA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA). Urine was collected for measurements of normetanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine excretion. Psychometric performance (short- and long-term memory, critical flicker fusion frequency, choice reaction time) and subjective feelings were assessed before each drug intake (in the morning, at noon, in the evening). 3. Compared with placebo, both reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors decreased the plasma concentration of DHPG and HVA. The overall fall in DHPG (AUC from 0 to 24 h) was 44% during moclobemide and 12% during toloxatone (P less than 0.001) and the overall decrease in HVA was 38% and 20% (P less than 0.005) on moclobemide and toloxatone, respectively. 4. Before the next drug intake, MAO-A inhibition, as judged by the decrease of plasma DHPG concentration, was significantly different from placebo with moclobemide but not with toloxatone. 5. Moclobemide, but not toloxatone, exerted a moderate, but significant inhibition of the deamination of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as judged by the fall in plasma 5-HIAA concentration. Neither drug influenced plasma NA concentration. 6. A significant rise in urinary excretion of normetanephrine was observed on moclobemide and to a lesser extent on toloxatone. The urinary excretion of 3-methoxytyramine was significantly raised by moclobemide but not by toloxatone. 7. Neither moclobemide nor toloxatone altered memory function, vigilance

  15. Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.W.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

  16. A definition of depletion of fish stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1949-01-01

    Attention was focused on the need of a common and better understanding of the term depletion as applied to the fisheries in order to eliminate if possible the existing inexactness of thought on the subject. Depletion has been confused at various times with at least ten different ideas associated with it but which, as has has heen pointed out, are not synonymous at all. In defining depletion we must recognize that the term represents a condition and must not he confounded with the cause (overfishing) that leads to this condition or with the symptoms that identify it. Depletion was defined as a reduction, through overfishing, in the level of abundance of the exploitable segment of a stock that prevents the realization of the maximum productive capacity.

  17. Silicon Depletion in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, U.; Parvathi, V. S.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Murthy, J.; Sofia, U. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report interstellar silicon (Si) depletion and dust-phase column densities of Si along 131 Galactic sight lines using archival observations. The data were corrected for differences in the assumed oscillator strength. This is a much larger sample than previous studies but confirms the majority of results, which state that the depletion of Si is correlated with the average density of hydrogen along the line of sight (< n({{H}})> ) as well as the fraction of hydrogen in molecular form (f(H2)). We also find that the linear part of the extinction curve is independent of Si depletion. Si depletion is correlated with the bump strength (c3/RV) and the FUV curvature (c4/RV) suggesting that silicon plays a significant role in both the 2175 Å bump and the FUV rise.

  18. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  19. Exhaustible Resource Depletion: A Modified Graphical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisato, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Presents a graphical analysis of the exhaustible resource depletion problem. Applies Hotelling's "r percent rule" as a new approach that operates in an "N"-period context. Includes two figures illustrating the approach. (CFR)

  20. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  1. A new definition of maternal depletion syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Winkvist, A; Rasmussen, K M; Habicht, J P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although the term "maternal depletion syndrome" has been commonly used to explain poor maternal and infant health, whether such a syndrome actually exists remains unclear. This uncertainty may be due to the lack of a clear definition of the syndrome and the absence of theoretical frameworks that account for the many factors related to reproductive nutrition. METHODS. We propose a new definition of maternal depletion syndrome within a framework that accounts for potential confounding factors. RESULTS. Our conceptual framework distinguishes between childbearing pattern and inadequate diet as causes of poor maternal health; hence, our definition of maternal depletion syndrome has both biological and practical meaning. The new definition is based on overall change in maternal nutritional status over one reproductive cycle in relation to possible depletion and repletion phases and in relation to initial nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS. The empirical application of this approach should permit the testing of the existence of maternal depletion syndrome in the developing world, and the distinction between populations where family planning will alleviate maternal depletion and those in which an improved diet is also necessary. PMID:1566948

  2. Synthetic and Natural Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors as Potential Lead Compounds for Effective Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Srivastava, Amit K; Singour, Pradeep K; Gouda, Panchanan

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO-A and B) play a critical role in the metabolism of intracellular neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. For decades, MAO inhibitors have proven their clinical efficacy as potential drug targets for several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Use of first generation non selective MAO inhibitors as neuropsychiatric drugs elicited several side effects like hypertensive crisis and cheese reaction. Therefore their use is now limited due to non-selectivity towards MAO isoforms and inhibition of metabolizing enzymes like cytochrome P450. Development of selective and specific MAO inhibitors like moclobemide, toloxatone improves their efficacy as disease-modifying effects in monotherapy as well as adjunctive therapy. Recently a lot of research has been done to elucidate the pharmacological potential of medicinal plants and their isolated bioactive constituents having MAO inhibitory activity. Herbs containing MAO inhibitors are extensively used for the development of potent synthetic drugs and as safe and effective alternatives to the available synthetic drugs in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as depression, Parkinson and Alzheimer's. In several diseases like Parkinson natural MAO inhibitors prevented the neuron denaturalization by their dual action via enhancing neurotransmission of dopamine as well as lowering the generation of free radicals and toxins. Currently development of selective MAO inhibitors is still under study to achieve more effective therapies by using Computer Aided Drug Designing, Ligand-based models and structure-activity hypothesis. These approaches also facilitate understanding the interaction of newly designed molecule with MAO enzymes and the rationalization of probable mechanisms of action. PMID:26104056

  3. Evaluation of the Isoflavone Genistein as Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and -B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective therapeutic drugs for managing Parkinson's disease (PD) and depression. However, their irreversibility may lead to rare but serious side effects. As finding safer and reversible MAOIs is our target, we characterized the recombinant human (h) MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition potentials of two common natural isoflavones, genistein (GST) and daidzein (DZ) using luminescence assay. The results obtained showed that DZ exhibits partial to no inhibition of the isozymes examined while GST inhibited hMAO-B (IC50 of 6.81 μM), and its hMAO-A inhibition was more potent than the standard deprenyl. Furthermore, the reversibility, mode of inhibition kinetics, and tyramine oxidation of GST were examined. GST was a time-independent reversible and competitive hMAO-A and hMAO-B inhibitor with a lower Ki of hMAO-B (1.45 μM) than hMAO-A (4.31 μM). GST also inhibited hMAO-B tyramine oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production more than hMAO-A. Docking studies conducted indicated that the GST reversibility and hMAO-B selectivity of inhibition may relate to C5-OH effects on its orientation and its interactions with the threonine 201 residue of the active site. It was concluded from this study that the natural product GST has competitive and reversible MAOs inhibitions and may be recommended for further investigations as a useful therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27118978

  4. Effects of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibition on the Reinforcing Properties of Low-Dose Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracy T; Rupprecht, Laura E; Cwalina, Samantha N; Onimus, Matthew J; Murphy, Sharon E; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2016-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the authority to regulate cigarette smoke constituents, and a reduction in nicotine content might benefit public health by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Research suggests that cigarette smoke constituents that inhibit monoamine oxidase (MAO) may increase the reinforcing value of low doses of nicotine. The aim of the present experiments was to further characterize the impact of MAO inhibition on the primary reinforcing and reinforcement enhancing effects of nicotine in rats. In a series of experiments, rats responded for intravenous nicotine infusions or a moderately-reinforcing visual stimulus in daily 1-h sessions. Rats received pre-session injections of known MAO inhibitors. The results show that (1) tranylcypromine (TCP), a known MAO inhibitor, increases sensitivity to the primary reinforcing effects of nicotine, shifting the dose-response curve for nicotine to the left, (2) inhibition of MAO-A, but not MAO-B, increases low-dose nicotine self-administration, (3) partial MAO-A inhibition, to the degree observed in chronic cigarette smokers, also increases low-dose nicotine self-administration, and (4) TCP decreases the threshold nicotine dose required for reinforcement enhancement. The results of the present experiments suggest cigarette smoke constituents that inhibit MAO-A, in the range seen in chronic smokers, are likely to increase the primary reinforcing and reinforcement enhancing effects of low doses of nicotine. If the FDA reduces the nicotine content of cigarettes, then variability in constituents that inhibit MAO-A could impact smoking. PMID:26955970

  5. Reducing the Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Major Depressive Disorder: Revisiting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Difficult-to-treat depression (eg, depression with atypical or anxious symptoms, treatment-resistant depression, or depression with frequent recurrence) is a challenging real-world health issue. This critical review of the literature focuses on monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) therapy and difficult-to-treat forms of depression. Data Sources: A PubMed literature search was performed in November 2012 and refreshed through January 2013 with no date restrictions using key search terms including MAO inhibitor therapy or MAOI and depression and anxiety, atypical, treatment-resistant, recurrent, relapse, or refractory. Study Selection: Articles were selected to summarize the current needs in difficult-to-treat depression as well as the use of MAOI therapies in this area. Results: Two strategies have fallen out of favor in the care of patients with major depressive disorder. The first is the use of MAOI therapy and the second is the proactive recognition of difficult-to-treat depression that may not respond as well to more frequently used antidepressants. The infrequent use of MAOIs stems from the perception that other oral therapies for depression are safer and easier to use than oral MAOIs; however, transdermal delivery is one potential strategy to improve the safety of this class of agents. Although food-related interactions with transdermal delivery of MAOI therapy can be lessened, clinicians still need to be vigilant for drug-drug interactions and serotonin syndrome. Conclusions: Clinicians should consider MAOIs for patients who have had several unsuccessful trials of antidepressants. Guidelines generally reserve MAOIs as third- and fourth-line treatments due to concerns over safety and tolerability; however, transdermal delivery of an MAOI may allay some of the safety and tolerability concerns. Patients should be provided education about MAOIs and their risks. PMID:24511450

  6. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and nerve injury: restoring an imbalance between descending monoamine inhibitions and facilitations.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Kirsty; Patel, Ryan; Goncalves, Leonor; Townson, Louisa; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNICs) utilize descending inhibitory controls through poorly understood brain stem pathways. The human counterpart, conditioned pain modulation, is reduced in patients with neuropathy aligned with animal data showing a loss of descending inhibitory noradrenaline controls together with a gain of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated facilitations after neuropathy. We investigated the pharmacological basis of DNIC and whether it can be restored after neuropathy. Deep dorsal horn neurons were activated by von Frey filaments applied to the hind paw, and DNIC was induced by a pinch applied to the ear in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. Spinal nerve ligation was the model of neuropathy. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control was present in control rats but abolished after neuropathy. α2 adrenoceptor mechanisms underlie DNIC because the antagonists, yohimbine and atipamezole, markedly attenuated this descending inhibition. We restored DNIC in spinal nerve ligated animals by blocking 5-HT3 descending facilitations with the antagonist ondansetron or by enhancing norepinephrine modulation through the use of reboxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, NRI) or tapentadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist and NRI). Additionally, ondansetron enhanced DNIC in normal animals. Diffuse noxious inhibitory controls are reduced after peripheral nerve injury illustrating the central impact of neuropathy, leading to an imbalance in descending excitations and inhibitions. Underlying noradrenergic mechanisms explain the relationship between conditioned pain modulation and the use of tapentadol and duloxetine (a serotonin, NRI) in patients. We suggest that pharmacological strategies through manipulation of the monoamine system could be used to enhance DNIC in patients by blocking descending facilitations with ondansetron or enhancing norepinephrine inhibitions, so possibly reducing chronic pain. PMID:26010460

  7. Monoamine Oxidase B Prompts Mitochondrial and Cardiac Dysfunction in Pressure Overloaded Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Carpi, Andrea; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Zhu, Guangshuo; Lai, Edwin W.; Bedja, Djahida; De Mario, Agnese; Chen, Kevin; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Lindsey, Merry L.; Pacak, Karel; Takimoto, Eiki; Shih, Jean C.; Kass, David A.; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) are mitochondrial flavoenzymes responsible for neurotransmitter and biogenic amines catabolism. MAO-A contributes to heart failure progression via enhanced norepinephrine catabolism and oxidative stress. The potential pathogenetic role of the isoenzyme MAO-B in cardiac diseases is currently unknown. Moreover, it is has not been determined yet whether MAO activation can directly affect mitochondrial function. Results: In wild type mice, pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) resulted in enhanced dopamine catabolism, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and dysfunction. Conversely, mice lacking MAO-B (MAO-B−/−) subjected to TAC maintained concentric hypertrophy accompanied by extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation, and preserved LV function, both at early (3 weeks) and late stages (9 weeks). Enhanced MAO activation triggered oxidative stress, and dropped mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin both in neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes. The MAO-B inhibitor pargyline completely offset this change, suggesting that MAO activation induces a latent mitochondrial dysfunction, causing these organelles to hydrolyze ATP. Moreover, MAO-dependent aldehyde formation due to inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity also contributed to alter mitochondrial bioenergetics. Innovation: Our study unravels a novel role for MAO-B in the pathogenesis of heart failure, showing that both MAO-driven reactive oxygen species production and impaired aldehyde metabolism affect mitochondrial function. Conclusion: Under conditions of chronic hemodynamic stress, enhanced MAO-B activity is a major determinant of cardiac structural and functional disarrangement. Both increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of aldehyde intermediates are likely liable for these adverse morphological and mechanical changes by directly targeting mitochondria. Antioxid. Redox

  8. Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Graham, Devon L.; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M.; Braun, Amanda A.; Grace, Curtis E.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Erikson, Keith M.; Aschner, Michael; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn) or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P)4–28. Within each litter two males and 2 females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle), 50, or 100 mg/kg Mn by oral gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water). Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic), and sex. PMID:25574457

  9. The monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity of essential oils obtained from Eryngium species and their chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz Carlos; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Tasso de Souza, Tiago Juliano; Gobbi de Bitencourt, Fernanda; Salton, Juliana; de Loreto Bordignon, Sérgio Augusto; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha

    2016-06-01

    Context Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are used in the treatment of depression, anxiety disorders, and the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Eryngium, the most representative of the Apiaceae family, is well known for the presence of essential oils (EOs), which have already demonstrated MAO inhibitory potential. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the MAO inhibitory capacity of the EOs obtained from Eryngium floribundum Cham. & Schlecht. (EF), E. eriophorum Cham. & Schlecht. (EE), E. nudicaule Lam. (EN), E. horridum Malme (EH), and E. pandanifolium Cham. & Schlecht. (EP). Materials and methods EOs were obtained from fresh whole plants by hydrodistillation (3 h). Chemical analyses were performed by GC/MS using apolar and polar columns, with oven temperature from 60 to 300 °C at 3 °C/min. The MAO-A and -B activities were evaluated in vitro by an end-point method using kynuramine as the substrate and mitochondrial suspension or human recombinant enzymes as the enzymatic source. DMSO 2%, clorgyline 10(-7) M, and pargyline 10(-6) M were used as controls. Results and discussion EFEO, EEEO, ENEO, EHEO, and EPEO GC/MS analysis showed (E)-caryophyllene (4.9-10.8%), germacrene D (0.6-35.1%), bicyclogermacrene (10.4-17.2), spathulenol (0.4-36.0%), and globulol (1.4-18.6%) as main constituents. None of the EOs inhibited MAO-A activity (4 and 40 μg/mL). However, EHEO inhibited MAO-B activity with an IC50 value of 5.65 μg/mL (1-200 μg/mL). Pentadecane (10 μM), its major constituent (53.5%), did not display significant MAO-B inhibition. Conclusion The study demonstrates the promising application of Eryngium species as a source of potential central nervous system bioactive secondary metabolites, specially related to neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26810928

  10. Increased Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2) Protects against Methamphetamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Wang, Minzheng; Salahpour, Ali; Guillot, Thomas S.; Miller, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is highly addictive and neurotoxic to dopamine terminals. METH toxicity has been suggested to be due to the release and accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol of these terminals. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2) is a critical mediator of dopamine handling. Mice overexpressing VMAT2 (VMAT2-HI) have an increased vesicular capacity to store dopamine, thus augmenting striatal dopamine levels and dopamine release in the striatum. Based on the altered compartmentalization of intracellular dopamine in the VMAT2-HI mice, we assessed whether enhanced vesicular function was capable of reducing METH-induced damage to the striatal dopamine system. While wildtype mice show significant losses in striatal levels of the dopamine transporter (65% loss) and tyrosine hydroxylase (46% loss) following a 4 × 10 mg/kg METH dosing regimen, VMAT2-HI mice were protected from this damage. VMAT2-HI mice were also spared from the inflammatory response that follows METH treatment, showing an increase in astroglial markers that was approximately one-third of that of wildtype animals (117% vs 36% increase in GFAP, wildtype vs VMAT2-HI). Further analysis also showed that elevated VMAT2 level does not alter the ability of METH to increase core body temperature, a mechanism integral to the toxicity of the drug. Finally, the VMAT2-HI mice showed no difference from wildtype littermates on both METH-induced conditioned place preference and in METH-induced locomotor activity (1 mg/kg METH). These results demonstrate that elevated VMAT2 protects against METH toxicity without enhancing the rewarding effects of the drug. Since the VMAT2-HI mice are protected from METH despite higher basal dopamine levels, this study suggests that METH toxicity depends more on the proper compartmentalization of synaptic dopamine than on the absolute amount of dopamine in the brain. PMID:25746685

  11. NMDARs mediate the role of monoamine oxidase A in pathological aggression.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Marco; Godar, Sean C; Melis, Miriam; Soggiu, Alessio; Roncada, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Flore, Giovanna; Chen, Kevin; Frau, Roberto; Urbani, Andrea; Castelli, M Paola; Devoto, Paola; Shih, Jean C

    2012-06-20

    Converging evidence shows that monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), the key enzyme catalyzing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) degradation, is a primary factor in the pathophysiology of antisocial and aggressive behavior. Accordingly, male MAO A-deficient humans and mice exhibit an extreme predisposition to aggressive outbursts in response to stress. As NMDARs regulate the emotional reactivity to social and environmental stimuli, we hypothesized their involvement in the modulation of aggression mediated by MAO A. In comparison with WT male mice, MAO A KO counterparts exhibited increases in 5-HT and NE levels across all brain regions, but no difference in glutamate concentrations and NMDAR binding. Notably, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of MAO A KO mice exhibited higher expression of NR2A and NR2B, as well as lower levels of glycosylated NR1 subunits. In line with these changes, the current amplitude and decay time of NMDARs in PFC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the currents of these receptors were hypersensitive to the action of the antagonists of the NMDAR complex (dizocilpine), as well as NR2A (PEAQX) and NR2B (Ro 25-6981) subunits. Notably, systemic administration of these agents selectively countered the enhanced aggression in MAO A KO mice, at doses that did not inherently affect motor activity. Our findings suggest that the role of MAO A in pathological aggression may be mediated by changes in NMDAR subunit composition in the PFC, and point to a critical function of this receptor in the molecular bases of antisocial personality. PMID:22723698

  12. Exploration of chlorinated thienyl chalcones: A new class of monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bijo; Haridas, Abitha; Uçar, Gülberk; Baysal, Ipek; Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S; Joy, Monu; Mathew, Githa Elizabeth; Lakshmanan, Baskar; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-10-01

    Chalcone has been reported to be a valid scaffold for the design of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. This scenario has amplified the momentum for the discovery of heteroaryl based chalcone MAO inhibitors. In the present study, we have synthesized a series of eleven chlorinated thienyl chalcone derivatives substituted with a different functional groups at the para- position on the ring B and investigated for their ability to inhibit human MAO-A and -B. With the exception of compound (2E)-1-(4-chlorocyclopenta-1,3-dien-1-yl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (TC7), which was a selective MAO-A inhibitor, all the other derivatives inhibited hMAO-B potently and selectively with competitive mode of inhibition. The most potent compound (2E)-1-(4-chlorocyclopenta-1,3-dien-1-yl)-3-(4-ethylphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (TC6) was found to be the best activity and higher selectivity towards hMAO-B with Ki and SI values of 0.31±0.02μM and 16.84, respectively. All the compounds presented in the current study are completely non-toxic with 74-88% viable cells to hepatic cells at 100μM concentration. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out using Autodock-4.2 and Amber 14 to understand the molecular level interaction and energy relation of MAO isoforms with selective MAO-B inhibitor TC6. PMID:27262516

  13. A new stress model, a scream sound, alters learning and monoamine levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Song, Tusheng; Hou, Ni; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Wang, Lumin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen

    2014-01-17

    Most existing animal models for stress involve the simultaneous application of physical and psychological stress factors. In the current study, we described and used a novel psychological stress model (scream sound stress). To study the validity of it, we carried out acute and chronic scream sound stress. First, adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into white noise, stress and background groups. The white noise group and stress group were treated with white noise and scream sound for 4h in the morning respectively. Compared with white noise and background groups, exposure to acute scream sound increased corticosterone (CORT) level and decreased latency in Morris water maze (MWM) test. The levels of noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were altered in the striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of stress rats. Second, adult SD rats were randomly divided into background and stress groups, which were treated with scream sound for three weeks. Exposure to chronic scream sound suppressed body weight gain, increased corticosterone (CORT) level, influenced the morphology of adrenal gland, improved spleen and thymus indices, and decreased latency in MWM test. NE, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA levels were also altered in the brain of stress rats. Our results suggested that scream sound, as a novel stressor, facilitated learning ability, as well as altered monoamine levels in the rat brain. Moreover, scream sound is easy to apply and can be applied in more animals at the same time. PMID:24096192

  14. High throughput screening of CO2 solubility in aqueous monoamine solutions.

    PubMed

    Porcheron, Fabien; Gibert, Alexandre; Mougin, Pascal; Wender, Aurélie

    2011-03-15

    Post-combustion Carbon Capture and Storage technology (CCS) is viewed as an efficient solution to reduce CO(2) emissions of coal-fired power stations. In CCS, an aqueous amine solution is commonly used as a solvent to selectively capture CO(2) from the flue gas. However, this process generates additional costs, mostly from the reboiler heat duty required to release the carbon dioxide from the loaded solvent solution. In this work, we present thermodynamic results of CO(2) solubility in aqueous amine solutions from a 6-reactor High Throughput Screening (HTS) experimental device. This device is fully automated and designed to perform sequential injections of CO(2) within stirred-cell reactors containing the solvent solutions. The gas pressure within each reactor is monitored as a function of time, and the resulting transient pressure curves are transformed into CO(2) absorption isotherms. Solubility measurements are first performed on monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, and methyldiethanolamine aqueous solutions at T = 313.15 K. Experimental results are compared with existing data in the literature to validate the HTS device. In addition, a comprehensive thermodynamic model is used to represent CO(2) solubility variations in different classes of amine structures upon a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. This model is used to fit the experimental data and to calculate the cyclic capacity, which is a key parameter for CO(2) process design. Solubility measurements are then performed on a set of 50 monoamines and cyclic capacities are extracted using the thermodynamic model, to asses the potential of these molecules for CO(2) capture. PMID:21341690

  15. Insights into enzyme point mutation effect by molecular simulation: phenylethylamine oxidation catalyzed by monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Oanca, Gabriel; Purg, Miha; Mavri, Janez; Shih, Jean C; Stare, Jernej

    2016-05-21

    The I335Y point mutation effect on the kinetics of phenylethylamine decomposition catalyzed by monoamine oxidase A was elucidated by means of molecular simulation. The established empirical valence bond methodology was used in conjunction with the free energy perturbation sampling technique and a classical force field representing the state of reactants and products. The methodology allows for the simulation of chemical reactions, in the present case the breaking of the α-C-H bond in a phenylethylamine substrate and the subsequent hydrogen transfer to the flavin cofactor, resulting in the formation of the N-H bond on flavin. The empirical parameters were calibrated against the experimental data for the simulated reaction in a wild type protein and then used for the calculation of the reaction free energy profile in the I335Y mutant. In very good agreement with the measured kinetic data, mutation increases the free energy barrier for the rate limiting step by slightly more than 1 kcal mol(-1) and consequently decreases the rate constant by about an order of magnitude. The magnitude of the computed effect slightly varies with simulation settings, but always remains in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Analysis of trajectories reveals a major change in the interaction between phenyl rings of the substrate and the neighboring Phe352 residue upon the I335Y mutation due to the increased local polarity, leading to an attenuated quadrupole interaction between the rings and destabilization of the transition state. Additionally, the increased local polarity in the mutant allows for a larger number of water molecules to be present near the active site, effectively shielding the catalytic effect of the enzyme and contributing to the increased barrier. PMID:27121693

  16. Developmental manganese exposure in combination with developmental stress and iron deficiency: Effects on behavior and monoamines.

    PubMed

    Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Davenport, Laurie L; Gutierrez, Arnold; Hufgard, Jillian R; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element but neurotoxic at higher exposures, however, Mn exposure seldom occurs in isolation. It often co-occurs in populations with inadequate dietary iron (Fe) and limited resources that result in stress. Subclinical FeD affects up to 15% of U.S. children and exacerbates Mn toxicity by increasing Mn bioavailability. Therefore, we investigated Mn overexposure (MnOE) in rats in combination with Fe deficiency (FeD) and developmental stress, for which we used barren cage rearing. For barren cage rearing (BAR), rats were housed in cages with a wire grid floor or standard bedding material (STD) from embryonic day (E)7 through postnatal day (P)28. For FeD, dams were fed a 90% Fe-deficient NIH-07 diet from E15 through P28. Within each litter, different offspring were treated with 100mg/kg Mn (MnOE) or vehicle (VEH) by gavage every other day from P4-28. Behavior was assessed at two ages and consisted of: open-field, anxiety tests, acoustic startle response (ASR) with prepulse inhibition (PPI), sociability, sucrose preference, tapered beam crossing, and the Porsolt's forced swim test. MnOE had main effects of decreasing activity, ASR, social preference, and social novelty. BAR and FeD transiently modified MnOE effects. BAR groups weighed less and showed decreased anxiety in the elevated zero maze, had increased ASR and decreased PPI, and exhibited reduced sucrose preference compared with the STD groups. FeD animals also weighed less and had increased slips on the tapered beam. Most of the monoamine effects were dopaminergic and occurred in the MnOE groups. The results showed that Mn is a pervasive developmental neurotoxin, the effects of which are modulated by FeD and/or BAR cage rearing. PMID:27302314

  17. Evaluation of the Inhibitory Effects of Bavachinin and Bavachin on Human Monoamine Oxidases A and B

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Messeha, Samia S.; Eyunni, Suresh V. K.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used in the early management of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term suspected side effects of MAO-B classical inhibitors established the need for safer alternative therapeutic agents. In our study, the flavanone bavachinin (BNN) and its analog bavachin (BVN) found in the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. ethanolic extract (PCSEE) were investigated for their human MAO-A and MAO-B (hMAO-A and hMAO-B) inhibition. Both PCSEE and BNN effectively reduced hMAO-B activity more than hMAO-A while BVN had activating effects. BNN showed selective hMAO-B inhibition (IC50 ~ 8.82 μM) more than hMAO-A (IC502009;~ 189.28 μM). BNN in the crude extract was determined by HPLC, also validated by TLC showing a yield of 0.21% PCSEE dry weight. BNN competitively inhibited hMAO-A and hMAO-B, with a lower hMAO-B Ki than hMAO-A Ki by 10.33-fold, and reduced hMAO-B Km/Vmax efficiency ratio to be comparable to the standard selegiline. Molecular docking examination of BNN and BVN predicted an indirect role of BNN C7-methoxy group for its higher affinity, selectivity, and reversibility as an MAO-BI. These findings suggest that BNN, which is known to be a potent PPAR-γ agonist, is a selective and competitive hMAO-B inhibitor and could be used in the management of PD. PMID:26557867

  18. Inactivation of monoamine oxidase B by benzyl 1-(aminomethyl) cyclopropane-1-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Silverman, R B; Lu, X; Blomquist, G D; Ding, C Z; Yang, S

    1997-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various biogenic and xenobiotic amines. Benzyl 1-(aminomethyl)cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (1) was designed as a diactivated cyclopropane mechanism-based inactivator of MAO (Silverman, R.B.: Ding, C.Z.; Borrillo, J.L.; Chang, J.T.J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1993, 115, 2982). [1,1-2H2]-1 exhibits a deuterium isotope effect of 4.5 on inactivation, but in D2O the isotope effect is only 2.3. [1-3H]-1 and [1-14C]-1 were synthesized; upon inactivation of MAO, 1.1 and 2.0 equiv of radioactivity, respectively, are incorporated into the enzyme. Tritium as 3H2O, is released during inactivation with [1-3H]-1. The flavin absorption spectrum changes from that of oxidized to that of reduced flavin after inactivation; denaturation of the inactivated enzyme shows a reduced flavin spectrum, suggesting the formation of a modified flavin. Tryptic digestion of the enzyme labeled with [1-3H]-1 or [1-14C]-1, followed by HPLC analysis, monitoring at 310 nm [corrected] (flavin), shows that the radioactivity comigrates with the 310 nm [corrected] absorptions. The metabolites that are generated during inactivation are benzyl 1-formylcyclopropane-1-carboxylate, benzyl alcohol, and 1-formylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid; no ring-cleaved products were detected. The partition ratio, as determined from the ratio of nonamines to enzyme, is 110. These results are rationalized in terms of a single-electron transfer mechanism leading to the imine of benzyl 1-formylcyclopropane-1-carboxylate, which alkylates the flavin coenzyme. PMID:9061194

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epithelial monoamine oxidase mediates alveolar bone loss in a rat chronic wound model.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Firth, James D; Nayer, Tarun; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Sanbe, Toshihiro; Irie, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Oka, Takashi; Liu, Zhenzi; Vielkind, Juergen; Putnins, Edward E

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is an antimicrobial response to pathogenic challenge that may, in the case of persistent infection, have deleterious effects on the tissue of origin. A rat periodontal disease model was used to study ROS-induced chronic epithelial inflammation and bone loss. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was applied for 8 weeks into the gingival sulcus, and histological analysis confirmed the onset of chronic disease. Junctional epithelium was collected from healthy and diseased animals using laser-capture microdissection, and expression microarray analysis was performed. Of 19,730 genes changed in disease, 42 were up-regulated >/=4-fold. Three of the top 10 LPS-induced genes, monoamine oxidase B (MAO/B) and flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 and 2, are implicated in ROS signaling. LPS-associated induction of the ROS mediator H(2)O(2), as well as MAO/B and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were validated in the rat histological sections and a porcine junctional epithelial cell culture model. Topical MAO inhibitors significantly counteracted LPS-associated elevation of H(2)O(2) production and TNF-alpha expression in vivo and in vitro, inhibited disease-associated apical migration and proliferation of junctional epithelium and inhibited induced systemic H(2)O(2) levels and alveolar bone loss in vivo. These results suggest that LPS induces chronic wounds via elevated MAO/B-mediated increases in H(2)O(2) and TNF-alpha activity by epithelial cells and is further associated with more distant effects on systemic oxidative stress and alveolar bone loss. PMID:19779138

  20. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors Extracted from Tobacco Smoke as Neuroprotective Factors for Potential Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sari, Youssef; Khalil, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of mainly the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, which leads to motor dysfunction. Although, most of the drugs are currently used for symptomatic treatment, there are at least three FDA-approved drugs for the treatment of PD that have been suggested preclinically to have neuroprotective effects. Among these drugs are monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B inhibitors such as selegiline and rasagiline, and non-ergot derivative dopamine agonist, pramipexole. In this review article, we focused on the potential uses of non-selective reversible MAO inhibitor, 2,3,6-trimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, from flue-cured tobacco leaves extract and two β- carboline alkaloids (harman and norharman) as potent, reversible and non-selective MAO inhibitors for the treatment of PD. In addition, we discussed the potential uses of farnesol as a potent inhibitor of MAO-B and farnesylacetone as a less potent selective MAO-B inhibitor. Furthermore, adducts of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline have shown to have competitive inhibitory effects for both MAO-A and MAO-B. These inhibitors have potential neuroprotective effects, which might be mediated at least through nerve growth factor, neurotrophin 3, brain derived neurotrophic factor, and glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor. We suggest here the neuroprotective implication of extracted MAO inhibitors from smoke tobacco; however, it is important to note that there are several existing compounds in tobacco smoke that have toxic effects in the brain, these include and not limited to the induction of neuropathological features observed in individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease and dementia. PMID:25808895

  1. Evaluation of the Inhibitory Effects of Bavachinin and Bavachin on Human Monoamine Oxidases A and B.

    PubMed

    Zarmouh, Najla O; Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Elshami, Faisel M; Messeha, Samia S; Eyunni, Suresh V K; Soliman, Karam F A

    2015-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used in the early management of Parkinson's disease (PD). Long-term suspected side effects of MAO-B classical inhibitors established the need for safer alternative therapeutic agents. In our study, the flavanone bavachinin (BNN) and its analog bavachin (BVN) found in the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. ethanolic extract (PCSEE) were investigated for their human MAO-A and MAO-B (hMAO-A and hMAO-B) inhibition. Both PCSEE and BNN effectively reduced hMAO-B activity more than hMAO-A while BVN had activating effects. BNN showed selective hMAO-B inhibition (IC50 ~ 8.82 μM) more than hMAO-A (IC502009;~ 189.28 μM). BNN in the crude extract was determined by HPLC, also validated by TLC showing a yield of 0.21% PCSEE dry weight. BNN competitively inhibited hMAO-A and hMAO-B, with a lower hMAO-B K i than hMAO-A K i by 10.33-fold, and reduced hMAO-B K m /V max efficiency ratio to be comparable to the standard selegiline. Molecular docking examination of BNN and BVN predicted an indirect role of BNN C7-methoxy group for its higher affinity, selectivity, and reversibility as an MAO-BI. These findings suggest that BNN, which is known to be a potent PPAR-γ agonist, is a selective and competitive hMAO-B inhibitor and could be used in the management of PD. PMID:26557867

  2. Monoamine Release during Unihemispheric Sleep and Unihemispheric Waking in the Fur Seal

    PubMed Central

    Lyamin, Oleg I.; Lapierre, Jennifer L.; Kosenko, Peter O.; Kodama, Tohru; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Korneva, Svetlana M.; Peever, John H.; Mukhametov, Lev M.; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Our understanding of the role of neurotransmitters in the control of the electroencephalogram (EEG) has been entirely based on studies of animals with bilateral sleep. The study of animals with unihemispheric sleep presents the opportunity of separating the neurochemical substrates of waking and sleep EEG from the systemic, bilateral correlates of sleep and waking states. Methods: The release of histamine (HI), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5HT) in cortical and subcortical areas (hypothalamus, thalamus and caudate nucleus) was measured in unrestrained northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) using in vivo microdialysis, in combination with, polygraphic recording of EEG, electrooculogram, and neck electromyogram. Results: The pattern of cortical and subcortical HI, NE, and 5HT release in fur seals is similar during bilaterally symmetrical states: highest in active waking, reduced in quiet waking and bilateral slow wave sleep, and lowest in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Cortical and subcortical HI, NE, and 5HT release in seals is highly elevated during certain waking stimuli and behaviors, such as being sprayed with water and feeding. However, in contrast to acetylcholine (ACh), which we have previously studied, the release of HI, NE, and 5HT during unihemispheric sleep is not lateralized in the fur seal. Conclusions: Among the studied neurotransmitters most strongly implicated in waking control, only ACh release is asymmetric in unihemispheric sleep and waking, being greatly increased on the activated side of the brain. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 491. Citation: Lyamin OI, Lapierre JL, Kosenko PO, Kodama T, Bhagwandin A, Korneva SM, Peever JH, Mukhametov LM, Siegel JM. Monoamine release during unihemispheric sleep and unihemispheric waking in the fur seal. SLEEP 2016;39(3):625–636. PMID:26715233

  3. Monoamine oxidase A polymorphism moderates stability of attention problems and susceptibility to life stress during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zohsel, K; Bianchi, V; Mascheretti, S; Hohm, E; Schmidt, M H; Esser, G; Brandeis, D; Banaschewski, T; Nobile, M; Laucht, M

    2015-11-01

    Attention problems affect a substantial number of children and adolescents and are predictive of academic underachievement and lower global adaptive functioning. Considerable variability has been observed with regard to the individual development of attention problems over time. In particular, the period of adolescence is characterized by substantial maturation of executive functioning including attentional processing, with the influence of genetic and environmental factors on individual trajectories not yet well understood. In the present investigation, we evaluated whether the monoamine oxidase A functional promoter polymorphism, MAOA-LPR, plays a role in determining continuity of parent-rated attention problems during adolescence. At the same time, a potential effect of severe life events (SLEs) was taken into account. A multi-group path analysis was used in a sample of 234 adolescents (149 males, 85 females) who took part in an epidemiological cohort study at the ages of 11 and 15 years. Attention problems during early adolescence were found to be a strong predictor of attention problems in middle adolescence. However, in carriers of the MAOA-LPR low-activity variant (MAOA-L), stability was found to be significantly higher than in carriers of the high-activity variant (MAOA-H). Additionally, only in MAOA-L carriers did SLEs during adolescence significantly impact on attention problems at the age of 15 years, implying a possible gene × environment interaction. To conclude, we found evidence that attention problems during adolescence in carriers of the MAOA-L allele are particularly stable and malleable to life stressors. The present results underline the usefulness of applying a more dynamic GxE perspective. PMID:26449393

  4. High throughput Screening to Identify Natural Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Deiab, S; Park, K; Soliman, KFA

    2012-01-01

    Age-related increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) may contribute to CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, MAO-B inhibitors are used in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson disease as preliminary monotherapy or adjunct therapy with L-dopa. To date, meager natural sources of MAO-B inhibitors have been identified, and the relative strength, potency and rank of many plants relative to standard drugs such as Selegiline (L-deprenyl, Eldepryl) are not known. In this work, we developed and utilized a high throughput enzyme microarray format to screen and evaluate 905 natural product extracts (0.025–.7 mg/ml) to inhibit human MAO-B derived from BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-tandem mass spectroscopy, and enzyme activity was confirmed by [1] substrate conversion (3-mM benzylamine) to H202 and [2] benzaldehyde. Of the 905 natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml] were obtained with extracts of Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense), Bakuchi Seed(Cyamopsis psoralioides), Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis), Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia seed). The data also show, albeit to a lesser extent, inhibitory properties of herbs originating from the mint family (Lamiaceae) and Turmeric, Comfrey, Bringraj, Skullcap, Kava-kava, Wild Indigo, Gentian and Green Tea. In conclusion, the data reflect relative potency information by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human MAO-B inhibitory properties in their natural form. PMID:22887993

  5. The Effect of Hydrophobic Monoamines on Acid-Sensing Ion Channels ASIC1B

    PubMed Central

    Nagaeva, E. I.; Potapieva, N. N.; Tikhonov, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely distributed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems of vertebrates. The pharmacology of these receptors remains poorly investigated, while the search for new ASIC modulators is very important. Recently, we found that some monoamines, which are blockers of NMDA receptors, inhibit and/or potentiate acid-sensing ion channels, depending on the subunit composition of the channels. The effect of 9-aminoacridine, IEM-1921, IEM-2117, and memantine both on native receptors and on recombinant ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3 homomers was studied. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of these four compounds on homomeric ASIC1b channels. Experiments were performed on recombinant receptors expressed in CHO cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Only two compounds, 9-aminoacridine and memantine, inhibited ASIC1b channels. IEM-1921 and IEM-2117 were inactive even at a 1000 μM concentration. In most aspects, the effect of the compounds on ASIC1b was similar to their effect on ASIC1a. The distinguishing feature of homomeric ASIC1b channels is a steep activation-dependence, indicating cooperative activation by protons. In our experiments, the curve of the concentration dependence of ASIC1b inhibition by 9-aminoacridine also had a slope (Hill coefficient) of 3.8, unlike ASIC1a homomers, for which the Hill coefficient was close to 1. This finding indicates that the inhibitory effect of 9-aminoacridine is associated with changes in the activation properties of acid-sensing ion channels. PMID:26085950

  6. Transgenic overexpression of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in the CNS influences behaviour, serum corticosterone and brain monoamines.

    PubMed

    Oprica, Mircea; Zhu, Shunwei; Goiny, Michel; Pham, Therese M; Mohammed, Abdul H; Winblad, Bengt; Bartfai, Tamas; Schultzberg, Marianne

    2005-05-01

    The effects of brain-directed overexpression of human soluble interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hsIL-1ra) on behaviour, serum corticosterone (CST) levels and concentrations of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites in different brain regions, were investigated in six months old homozygotic transgenic male mice (Tg hsIL-1ra(+/+)). The transgenic and age-matched wild type (WT) mice were subjected to a battery of behavioural tests for analysis of open field (OF) behaviours, anxiety in elevated plus maze (EPM), and motor performance in rotarod. One week after the last behavioural test, half of the mice from each genotype were subjected to a mild stress, while the remaining mice served as controls for the determination of serum CST levels and monoamine concentrations in different brain regions. Tg hsIL-1ra(+/+) mice had higher locomotor scores and showed less habituation in the OF test, spent more time in the open arms of the EPM and had similar motor performance as compared to WT mice. The serum CST levels were comparable, both in basal conditions and upon stress, in the two genotypes. Tg hsIL-1ra(+/+) mice had lower concentrations of DA, 5-HT and their metabolites in several brain regions, with different effects on monoamine turnover upon stress. In conclusion, brain-directed overexpression of hsIL-1ra resulted in increased locomotion and decreased habituation, an anxiolytic effect, but did not influence motor performance. Finally, the activation of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis was comparable in the two genotypes, however Tg hsIL-1ra(+/+) mice had a modified metabolism of brain monoamines as compared to WT mice. PMID:15797311

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance 3',4'-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR).

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Dowling, Geraldine; Mahony, Olivia; Brandt, Simon D; Patrick, Julian; Archer, Roland P; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    The recent occurrence of deaths associated with the psychostimulant cis-4,4'-dimethylaminorex (4,4'-DMAR) in Europe indicated the presence of a newly emerged psychoactive substance on the market. Subsequently, the existence of 3,4-methylenedioxy-4-methylaminorex (MDMAR) has come to the authors' attention and this study describes the synthesis of cis- and trans-MDMAR followed by extensive characterization by chromatographic, spectroscopic, mass spectrometric platforms and crystal structure analysis. MDMAR obtained from an online vendor was subsequently identified as predominantly the cis-isomer (90%). Exposure of the cis-isomer to the mobile phase conditions (acetonitrile/water 1:1 with 0.1% formic acid) employed for high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed an artificially induced conversion to the trans-isomer, which was not observed when characterized by gas chromatography. Monoamine release activities of both MDMAR isomers were compared with the non-selective monoamine releasing agent (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) as a standard reference compound. For additional comparison, both cis- and trans-4,4'-DMAR, were assessed under identical conditions. cis-MDMAR, trans-MDMAR, cis-4,4'-DMAR and trans-4,4'-DMAR were more potent than MDMA in their ability to function as efficacious substrate-type releasers at the dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in rat brain tissue. While cis-4,4'-DMAR, cis-MDMAR and trans-MDMAR were fully efficacious releasing agents at the serotonin transporter (SERT), trans-4,4'-DMAR acted as a fully efficacious uptake blocker. Currently, little information is available about the presence of MDMAR on the market but the high potency of ring-substituted methylaminorex analogues at all three monoamine transporters investigated here might be relevant when assessing the potential for serious side-effects after high dose exposure. PMID:25331619

  8. Song Competition Affects Monoamine Levels in Sensory and Motor Forebrain Regions of Male Lincoln's Sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii)

    PubMed Central

    Sewall, Kendra B.; Caro, Samuel P.; Sockman, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii) modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM), because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state. PMID:23555809

  9. Simplified dietary acute tryptophan depletion: effects of a novel amino acid mixture on the neurochemistry of C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Cristina L.; Van Swearingen, Amanda E. D.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Biskup, Caroline S.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Zepf, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diet and nutrition can impact on the biological processes underpinning neuropsychiatric disorders. Amino acid (AA) mixtures lacking a specific neurotransmitter precursor can change the levels of brain serotonin (5-HT) or dopamine (DA) in the central nervous system. The availability of these substances within the brain is determined by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the access of peripheral AA into the brain. AA mixtures lacking tryptophan (TRP) compete with endogenous TRP for uptake into the brain across the BBB, which in turn leads to a decrease in central nervous 5-HT synthesis. Objective The present study compared the effects of a simplified acute tryptophan depletion (SATD) mixture in mice on blood and brain serotonergic and dopaminergic metabolites to those of a commonly used acute tryptophan depletion mixture (ATD Moja-De) and its TRP-balanced control (BAL). Design The SATD formula is composed of only three large neutral AAs: phenylalanine (PHE), leucine (LEU), and isoleucine (ILE). BAL, ATD Moja-De, or SATD formulas were delivered to adult male C57BL/6J mice by gavage. TRP, monoamines, and their metabolites were quantified in blood and brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, amygdala, caudate putamen, and nucleus accumbens). Results Both ATD Moja-De and SATD significantly decreased levels of serum and brain TRP, as well as brain 5-HIAA and 5-HT compared with BAL. SATD reduced HVA levels in caudate but did not alter total DA levels or DOPAC. SATD decreased TRP and serotonergic metabolites comparably to ATD Moja-De administration. Conclusion A simplified and more palatable combination of AAs can manipulate serotonergic function and might be useful to reveal underlying monoamine-related mechanisms contributing to different neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26278978

  10. Effects of monoamine oxidase inhibitor and cytochrome P450 2D6 status on 5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Wu, Chao; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2010-01-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural psychoactive indolealkylamine drug that has been used for recreational purpose. Our previous study revealed that polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) catalyzed 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation to produce active metabolite bufotenine, while 5-MeO-DMT is mainly inactivated through deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO). This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the impact of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype status and MAO inhibitor (MAOI) on 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Enzyme kinetic studies using recombinant CYP2D6 allelic isozymes showed that CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 exhibited 2.6- and 40-fold lower catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km), respectively, in producing bufotenine from 5-MeO-DMT, compared with wild-type CYP2D6.1. When co-incubated with MAOI pargyline, 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation in 10 human liver microsomes showed significantly strong correlation with bufuralol 1’-hydroxylase activities (R² = 0.98; p < 0.0001) and CYP2D6 contents (R² = 0.77; p = 0.0007), whereas no appreciable correlations with enzymatic activities of other P450 enzymes. Furthermore, concurrent MAOI harmaline sharply reduced 5-MeO-DMT depletion and increased bufotenine formation in human CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer hepatocytes. In vivo studies in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mouse models showed that Tg-CYP2D6 mice receiving the same dose of 5-MeO-DMT (20 mg/kg, i.p.) had 60% higher systemic exposure to metabolite bufotenine. In addition, pre-treatment of harmaline (5 mg/kg, i.p.) led to 3.6- and 4.4-fold higher systemic exposure to 5-MeO-DMT (2 mg/kg, i.p.), and 9.9- and 6.1-fold higher systemic exposure to bufotenine in Tg-CYP2D6 and wild-type mice, respectively. These findings indicate that MAOI largely affects 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics, as well as bufotenine formation that is mediated by CYP2D6. PMID:20206139

  11. Effects of monoamine oxidase inhibitor and cytochrome P450 2D6 status on 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Wu, Chao; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2010-07-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural psychoactive indolealkylamine drug that has been used for recreational purpose. Our previous study revealed that polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) catalyzed 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation to produce active metabolite bufotenine, while 5-MeO-DMT is mainly inactivated through deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO). This study, therefore, aimed to investigate the impact of CYP2D6 genotype/phenotype status and MAO inhibitor (MAOI) on 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Enzyme kinetic studies using recombinant CYP2D6 allelic isozymes showed that CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 exhibited 2.6- and 40-fold lower catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)), respectively, in producing bufotenine from 5-MeO-DMT, compared with wild-type CYP2D6.1. When co-incubated with MAOI pargyline, 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation in 10 human liver microsomes showed significantly strong correlation with bufuralol 1'-hydroxylase activities (R(2)=0.98; P<0.0001) and CYP2D6 contents (R(2)=0.77; P=0.0007), whereas no appreciable correlations with enzymatic activities of other P450 enzymes. Furthermore, concurrent MAOI harmaline sharply reduced 5-MeO-DMT depletion and increased bufotenine formation in human CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer hepatocytes. In vivo studies in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mouse models showed that Tg-CYP2D6 mice receiving the same dose of 5-MeO-DMT (20mg/kg, i.p.) had 60% higher systemic exposure to metabolite bufotenine. In addition, pretreatment of harmaline (5mg/kg, i.p.) led to 3.6- and 4.4-fold higher systemic exposure to 5-MeO-DMT (2mg/kg, i.p.), and 9.9- and 6.1-fold higher systemic exposure to bufotenine in Tg-CYP2D6 and wild-type mice, respectively. These findings indicate that MAOI largely affects 5-MeO-DMT metabolism and pharmacokinetics, as well as bufotenine formation that is mediated by CYP2D6. PMID:20206139

  12. Monoamine Oxidases as Potential Contributors to Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Time for a Study in Patients Undergoing Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Duicu, Oana M; Lighezan, Rodica; Sturza, Adrian; Ceausu, Raluca A; Borza, Claudia; Vaduva, Adrian; Noveanu, Lavinia; Gaspar, Marian; Ionac, Adina; Feier, Horea; Muntean, Danina M; Mornos, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to the progression of chronic cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Mitochondria have emerged as the most relevant source of reactive oxygen species, the major culprit being classically considered the respiratory chain at the inner mitochondrial membrane. In the past decade, several experimental studies unequivocally demonstrated the contribution of monoamine oxidases (MAOs) at the outer mitochondrial membrane to the maladaptative ventricular hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. This paper addresses the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to the pathogenesis of heart failure and diabetes together with the mounting evidence for an emerging role of MAO inhibition as putative cardioprotective strategy in both conditions. PMID:26101773

  13. Monoamine Oxidases as Potential Contributors to Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Time for a Study in Patients Undergoing Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Duicu, Oana M.; Lighezan, Rodica; Sturza, Adrian; Ceausu, Raluca A.; Borza, Claudia; Noveanu, Lavinia; Gaspar, Marian; Ionac, Adina; Feier, Horea; Muntean, Danina M.; Mornos, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to the progression of chronic cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Mitochondria have emerged as the most relevant source of reactive oxygen species, the major culprit being classically considered the respiratory chain at the inner mitochondrial membrane. In the past decade, several experimental studies unequivocally demonstrated the contribution of monoamine oxidases (MAOs) at the outer mitochondrial membrane to the maladaptative ventricular hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. This paper addresses the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to the pathogenesis of heart failure and diabetes together with the mounting evidence for an emerging role of MAO inhibition as putative cardioprotective strategy in both conditions. PMID:26101773

  14. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    PubMed Central

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. PMID:25114607

  15. Novel reversible monoamine oxidase A inhibitors: highly potent and selective 3-(1H-pyrrol-3-yl)-2-oxazolidinones.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sergio; Tomassi, Stefano; Tempera, Giampiero; Saccoccio, Stefania; Agostinelli, Enzo; Mai, Antonello

    2011-12-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) are involved in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders; hence, MAO inhibitors are useful agents in the therapy of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, and depression syndrome. Herein we report a novel series of 3-(1H-pyrrol-3-yl)-2-oxazolidinones 3-7 as reversible, highly potent and selective anti-MAO-A agents. In particular, 4b, 5b, and 4c showed a K(i-MAO-A) of 0.6, 0.8, and 1 nM, respectively, 4c being 200000-fold selective for MAO-A with respect to MAO-B. PMID:22017497

  16. Role of 5-HT2C Receptors in Effects of Monoamine Releasers on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Clayton T.; Banks, Matthew L.; Blough, Bruce E.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Many monoamine releasers are abused by humans and produce abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. Facilitation of ICSS in rats can be limited by monoamine releaser-induced serotonin (5-HT) release, but receptors that mediate 5-HT effects of monoamine releasers are unknown. Objectives Investigate whether 5-HT2C receptor activation is necessary for rate-decreasing effects produced in an ICSS procedure in rats by the 5-HT-selective monoamine releaser fenfluramine and the non-selective releasers napthylisopropylamine (PAL-287) and (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ((+)-MDMA). Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle were trained to lever press for brain stimulation under a “frequency-rate” ICSS procedure. Effectiveness of the 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242,084 was evaluated to block rate-decreasing effects produced by (1) the 5-HT2C agonist Ro 60-0175, (2) the 5-HT-selective releaser fenfluramine, and (3) the mixed-action dopamine (DA)/norepinephrine (NE)/5-HT releasers PAL-287 (1.0-5.6 mg/kg), and (+)-MDMA (1.0-3.2 mg/kg). For comparison, effectiveness of SB 242,084 to alter rate-decreasing effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U69,593 and rate-increasing effects of the DA>5-HT releaser amphetamine were also examined. Results SB 242,084 pretreatment blocked rate-decreasing effects of Ro 60-0175 and fenfluramine, but not the rate-decreasing effects of U69,593 or the rate-increasing effects of amphetamine. SB 242,084 blunted the rate-decreasing effects and enhanced expression of rate-increasing effects of PAL-287 and (+)-MDMA. Conclusions These data suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation contributes to rate-decreasing effects that are produced by selective and mixed-action 5-HT releasers in rats and that may oppose and limit the expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by these compounds. PMID:26041338

  17. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Smith, Jacqueline A M; Obedencio, Glenmar P; Martin, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid-mediated antinociceptive

  18. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. PMID:26321417

  19. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  20. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  1. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. PMID:27241617

  2. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of variants of monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Atkin, Kate E.; Reiss, Renate; Turner, Nicholas J.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Grogan, Gideon

    2008-03-01

    Crystals of A. niger monoamine oxidase variants display P2{sub 1} or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2/P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 symmetry, with eight or two molecules in the asymmetric unit, respectively. Monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger (MAO-N) is an FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyses the conversion of terminal amines to their corresponding aldehydes. Variants of MAO-N produced by directed evolution have been shown to possess altered substrate specificity. Crystals of two of these variants (MAO-N-3 and MAO-N-5) have been obtained; the former displays P2{sub 1} symmetry with eight molecules per asymmetric unit and the latter has P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 symmetry and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Solution of these structures will help shed light on the molecular determinants of improved activity and high enantioselectivity towards a broad range of substrates.

  3. Monoamine polygenic liability in health and cocaine dependence: imaging genetics study of aversive processing and associations with depression symptomatology*

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Shumay, Elena; Wu, Salina; Beebe-Wang, Nicasia; Konova, Anna B.; Misyrlis, Michail; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene polymorphisms that affect serotonin signaling modulate reactivity to salient stimuli and risk for emotional disturbances. Here, we hypothesized that these serotonin genes, which have been primarily explored in depressive disorders, could also have important implications for drug addiction, with the potential to reveal important insights into drug symptomatology, severity, and/or possible sequelae such as dysphoria. Methods Using an imaging genetics approach, the current study tested in 62 cocaine abusers and 57 healthy controls the separate and combined effects of variations in the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genes on processing of aversive information. Reactivity to standardized unpleasant images was indexed by a psychophysiological marker of stimulus salience (i.e., the late positive potential (LPP) component of the event-related potential) during passive picture viewing. Depressive symptomatology was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results Results showed that, independent of diagnosis, the highest unpleasant LPPs emerged in individuals with MAOA-Low and at least one ‘Short’ allele of 5-HTTLPR. Uniquely in the cocaine participants with these two risk variants, higher unpleasant LPPs correlated with higher BDI scores. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that a multilocus genetic composite of monoamine signaling relates to depression symptomatology through brain function associated with the experience of negative emotions. This research lays the groundwork for future studies that can investigate clinical outcomes and/or pharmacogenetic therapies in drug addiction and potentially other psychopathologies of emotion dysregulation. PMID:24837582

  4. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and dopamine transporter are molecular targets of Pitx3 in the ventral midbrain dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong-Youn; Hong, Sunghoi; Jeong, Joo-Won; Choi, Sangdun; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Jangwoo; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons play critical roles in the regulation of voluntary movement and their dysfunction is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Pitx3 has been implicated in the proper development of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which are selectively lost in Parkinson’s disease. However, the basic mechanisms underlying its role in mDA neuron development and/or survival are poorly understood. Toward this goal, we sought to identify downstream target genes of Pitx3 by comparing gene expression profiles in mDA neurons of wild-type and Pitx3-deficient aphakia mice. This global gene expression analysis revealed many potential target genes of Pitx3; in particular, the expression of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and dopamine transporter, responsible for dopamine storage and reuptake, respectively, is greatly reduced in mDA neurons by Pitx3 ablation. In addition, gain-of-function analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation strongly indicate that Pitx3 may directly activate transcription of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and dopamine transporter genes, critically contributing to neurotransmission and/or survival of mDA neurons. As the two genes have been known to be regulated by Nurr1, another key dopaminergic transcription factor, we propose that Pitx3 and Nurr1 may coordinately regulate mDA specification and survival, at least in part, through a merging and overlapping downstream pathway. PMID:19780901

  5. Path Integral Simulation of the H/D Kinetic Isotope Effect in Monoamine Oxidase B Catalyzed Decomposition of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Janez; Matute, Ricardo A; Chu, Zhen T; Vianello, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Brain monoamines regulate many centrally mediated body functions, and can cause adverse symptoms when they are out of balance. A starting point to address challenges raised by the increasing burden of brain diseases is to understand, at atomistic level, the catalytic mechanism of an essential amine metabolic enzyme-monoamine oxidase B (MAO B). Recently, we demonstrated that the rate-limiting step of MAO B catalyzed conversion of amines into imines represents the hydride anion transfer from the substrate α-CH2 group to the N5 atom of the flavin cofactor moiety. In this article we simulated for MAO B catalyzed dopamine decomposition the effects of nuclear tunneling by the calculation of the H/D kinetic isotope effect. We applied path integral quantization of the nuclear motion for the methylene group and the N5 atom of the flavin moiety in conjunction with the QM/MM treatment on the empirical valence bond (EVB) level for the rest of the enzyme. The calculated H/D kinetic isotope effect of 12.8 ± 0.3 is in a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for closely related biogenic amines, which gives strong support for the proposed hydride mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of tunneling in enzyme centers and advent of deuterated drugs into clinical practice. PMID:27010708

  6. Ion-pair ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of monoamines: peak-splitting at high flow rates.

    PubMed

    Van Schoors, Jolien; Brouwer, Hendrik-Jan; Maes, Katrien; Michotte, Yvette; Van Eeckhaut, Ann

    2013-12-20

    The use of ion-pair ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with electrochemical detection (ECD) is of great interest for the fast and sensitive determination of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in microdialysis samples. However, when applying high flow rates in ion-pair UHPLC, other peaks than the initial compound peaks appear on the chromatogram. This peak-splitting phenomenon is caused by disturbed ion-pair retention mechanisms. The influence of several chromatographic parameters is investigated. Peak-splitting is delayed to higher flow rates when increasing the concentration of ion-pair reagent or buffering agent in the mobile phase, when decreasing the percentage of organic modifier in the mobile phase, when applying a stationary phase with a smaller amount of packing material or when increasing the separation temperature. One or a combination of these conditions can be applied to analyze the monoamine neurotransmitters using ion-pair UHPLC-ECD at high flow rates. PMID:24238712

  7. The urinary MHPG/creatinine ratio and its relationship to platelet monoamine oxidase activity in abstinent alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Farren, C K; Tipton, K F

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the baseline noradrenergic turnover of subgroups of postwithdrawal abstinent alcoholics and healthy controls. The method chosen was an overnight fasting urine sample of the breakdown product of norepinephrine, MHPG, related to urinary creatinine. A comparison was made with platelet monoamine oxidase activity and also within subgroups of the study population. This study found no difference between alcoholics and controls, nor between subgroups of postwithdrawal alcoholics in their level of urinary MHPG corrected for creatinine, and no significant correlation with major subject characteristics or with platelet monoamine oxidase. There was a trend, however, towards a significant correlation with duration of abstinence from alcohol, and there was a correlation with a history of fighting when drinking alcohol, but not with sociopathic traits overall. Within the type 2 alcoholics there was a significant correlation with a history of fighting when drinking and a negative correlation with behavioral tolerance to alcohol. It is possible that only the subset of type 2 alcoholics with certain antisocial characteristics have noradrenergic abnormalities. Although no statistical difference was found between the different groups under study, the information is helpful in increasing understanding of the noradrenergic system in abstinent alcoholics. PMID:20575773

  8. A Strategy to Employ Clitoria ternatea as a Prospective Brain Drug Confronting Monoamine Oxidase (MAO) Against Neurodegenerative Diseases and Depression.

    PubMed

    Margret, A Anita; Begum, T Nargis; Parthasarathy, S; Suvaithenamudhan, S

    2015-12-01

    Ayurveda is a renowned traditional medicine practiced in India from ancient times and Clitoria ternatea is one such prospective medicinal herb incorporated as an essential constituent in a brain tonic called as medhya rasayan for treating neurological disorders. This work emphasises the significance of the plant as a brain drug there by upholding Indian medicine. The phytochemicals from the root extract were extricated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assay and molecular docking against the protein Monoamine oxidase was performed with four potential compounds along with four reference compounds of the plant. This persuades the prospect of C. ternatea as a remedy for neurodegenerative diseases and depression. The in silico assay enumerates that a major compound (Z)-9,17-octadecadienal obtained from the chromatogram with a elevated retention time of 32.99 furnished a minimum binding affinity energy value of -6.5 kcal/mol against monoamine oxidase (MAO-A). The interactions with the amino acid residues ALA 68, TYR 60 and TYR 69 were analogous to the reference compound kaempferol-3-monoglucoside with a least score of -13.90/-12.95 kcal/mol against the isoforms (MAO) A and B. This study fortifies the phytocompounds of C. ternatea as MAO-inhibitors and to acquire a pharmaceutical approach in rejuvenating Ayurvedic medicine. PMID:26667936

  9. Insight into the functional and structural properties of 3-arylcoumarin as an interesting scaffold in monoamine oxidase B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Matos, Maria João; Vilar, Santiago; García-Morales, Verónica; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Viña, Dolores

    2014-07-01

    The design, synthesis, pharmacological evaluation, and theoretical studies of a new series of halogenated 3-arylcoumarins were carried out with the aim of finding new structural and biological features. This series displays several alkyl, hydroxy, halogen, and/or alkoxy groups in both benzene rings of the 3-arylcoumarin scaffold. Most of the compounds studied show high affinity and selectivity for the human monoamine oxidase B (hMAO-B) isoenzyme, with IC50 values in the low nanomolar and picomolar range. Most of the evaluated compounds display higher MAO-B inhibitory activity and selectivity than selegiline (the reference compound). Coumarin 12 (3-(3-bromophenyl)-6-methylcoumarin) is the most active compound (IC50 =134 pM), being 140-fold more active than selegiline and showing the highest specificity for hMAO-B. To better understand the structure-activity relationships, docking experiments were carried out on human monoamine oxidase (A and B) structures. Finally, the prediction of passive blood-brain partitioning, based on in silico derived physicochemical descriptors, was performed. PMID:24715707

  10. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  11. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-11-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of Arkansas have developed a conceptual understanding of energy and of electromagnetism, including the electromagnetic spectrum, I devote a lecture (and a textbook section) to ozone depletion and another lecture (and section) to global warming. Humankind came together in 1986 and quickly solved, to the extent that humans can solve it, ozone depletion. We could do the same with global warming, but we haven't and as yet there's no sign that we will. The parallel between the ozone and global warming cases, and the difference in outcomes, are striking and instructive.

  12. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  13. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors in South American hallucinogenic plants: tryptamine and beta-carboline constituents of ayahuasca.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D J; Towers, G H; Abbott, F

    1984-04-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage derived by boiling the bark of the Malpighiaceous liana Banisteriopsis caapi together with the leaves of various admixture plants, viz. Psychotria viridis, Psychotria carthagenensis , or Diplopterys cabrerana . B. caapi contains harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine while the admixtures contain N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). DMT, a potent hallucinogen, is inactive orally due to degradation by visceral monoamine oxidase (MAO). The beta-carbolines, however, are highly active reversible inhibitors of MAO and may protect the DMT from deamination by MAO and render it orally active. This mechanism has been proposed to underlie the oral activity of ayahuasca but has not been experimentally confirmed. In the present study the constituents of the admixture plants and the alkaloids of eight ayahuasca samples from Peru were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed using two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Several B. caapi cultivars were quantitatively compared for variations in alkaloid content. Three admixture plants used rarely in the manufacture of ayahuasca were also screened for alkaloids. A selected sample of beta-carbolines were screened for activity as MAO inhibitors using an in vitro assay system, and structure/activity relationships were compared. Inhibition observed with single compounds was compared with the activity of selected samples of ayahuasca which were screened in the system and also with the activity of mixtures of beta-carbolines. The levels of DMT and beta-carbolines found in the ayahuasca samples examined in the present study were an order of magnitude greater than the levels reported in a previous study. Ayahuasca was found to be an extremely effective inhibitor of MAO in vitro and the degree of inhibition was directly correlated with the concentration of MAO-inhibiting beta-carbolines. Inhibition

  14. Natural Products Screening for the Identification of Selective Monoamine Oxidase-B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used for the initial therapy of Parkinson’s disease. Also, MAO-BIs have shown to be effective neuroprotective agents in several neurodegenerative diseases. However, some concerns exist regarding the long-term use of these compounds. Meanwhile, natural compounds showed potential MAO-B selective inhibitions. To date, few selective natural MAO-BIs have been identified. Therefore, the current study is designed to identify plants with potent and specific MAO-B inhibition. Study Design In this work, we utilized high throughput screening to evaluate the different plants ethanolic extract for their effectiveness to inhibit recombinant human (h)MAO-A and hMAO-B and to determine the relative selectivity of the top MAO-BI. Methodology Recombinant human isozymes were verified by Western blotting, and the 155 plants were screened. A continuous fluorometric screening assay was performed followed by two separate hMAO-A and hMAO-B microtiter screenings and IC50 determinations for the top extracts. Results In the screened plants, 9% of the extracts showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-B (RIB) and another 9% showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-A. The top extracts with the most potent RIBs were Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Phellodendron amurense bark, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Ferula assafoetida roots, with the highest RIB of 5.9-fold. Furthermore, extensive maceration of the promising extracts led to increase inhibitory effects with a preserved RIB as confirmed with luminescence assay. The top four extracts hMAO-BIs were equally potent (IC50= 1.3 to 3.8 μg/mL) with highly significant relative selectivities to inhibit hMAO-B (4.1- to 13.4-fold). Conclusion The obtained results indicate that Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Ferula assafoetida, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Phellodendron amurense ethanolic extracts have selective inhibitions for human MAO-B. Investigating these plant extracts as

  15. A template-based mnemonic for monoamine oxidase (MAO-N) catalyzed reactions and its application to the chemo-enzymatic deracemisation of the alkaloid (+/-)-crispine A.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kevin R; Ellis, Andrew J; Reiss, Renate; Snape, Timothy J; Turner, Nicholas J

    2007-09-21

    A template-based mnemonic has been developed for the enzyme monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger and has been used to successfully identify the alkaloid (+/-)-crispine A as a target for chemo-enzymatic deracemisation yielding the biologically active (R)-enantiomer in 97% e.e. PMID:17728879

  16. Effects of the monoamine uptake inhibitors RTI-112 and RTI-113 on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Kimmel, H L; Howell, L L; Carroll, F I

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine, and monoamine uptake inhibitors constitute one class of drugs under consideration as candidate "agonist" medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The pharmacological selectivity of monoamine uptake inhibitors to block uptake of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine is one factor that may influence the efficacy and/or safety of these compounds as drug abuse treatment medications. To address this issue, the present study compared the effects of 7-day treatment with a non-selective monoamine uptake inhibitor (RTI-112) and a dopamine-selective uptake inhibitor (RTI-113) on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. Monkeys (N=3) were trained to respond for cocaine injections (0.01 mg/kg/inj) and food pellets under a second-order schedule [FR2(VR16:S)] during alternating daily components of cocaine and food availability. Both RTI-112 (0.0032-0.01 mg/kg/hr) and RTI-113 (0.01-0.056 mg/kg/h) produced dose-dependent, sustained and nearly complete elimination of cocaine self-administration. However, for both drugs, the potency to reduce cocaine self-administration was similar to the potency to reduce food-maintained responding. These findings do not support the hypothesis that pharmacological selectivity to block dopamine uptake is associated with behavioral selectivity to decrease cocaine- vs. food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. PMID:18755212

  17. “When the going gets tough, who keeps going?” Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion. PMID:25009523

  18. NON-OZONE DEPLETING MOBILE HEAT PUMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the growing environmental and logistical burden posed by continued use of Class I ozone depleting chemicals (ODCs), this co-funded Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and United States Air Force (USAF) Science and Technology project sought t...

  19. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  20. Direct Visualization of an Impurity Depletion Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Ma; Thomas, Bill R.

    2000-01-01

    When a crystal incorporates more impurity per unit of its volume than the impurity concentration in solution, the solution in vicinity of the growing crystal is depleted with respect to the impurity I,2. With a stagnant solution, e. g. in microgravity or gels, an impurity depletion zone expands as the crystal grows and results in greater purity in most of the outer portion of the crystal than in the core. Crystallization in gel provides an opportunity to mimic microgravity conditions and visualize the impurity depletion zone. Colorless, transparent apoferritin (M congruent to 450 KDa) crystals were grown in the presence of red holoferritin dimer as a microheterogeneous impurity (M congruent to 900 KDa) within agarose gel by counterdiffusion with Cd(2+) precipitant. Preferential trapping of dimers, (distribution coefficient K = 4 (exp 1,2)) results in weaker red color around the crystals grown in the left tube in the figure as compared to the control middle tube without crystals. The left and the middle tubes contain colored ferritin dimers, the right tube contains colored trimers. The meniscus in the left tube separate gel (below) and liquid solution containing Cd(2+) (above). Similar solutions, though without precipitants, were present on top of the middle and right tube allowing diffusion of dimers and trimers. The area of weaker color intensity around crystals directly demonstrates overlapped impurity depletion zones.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC BENZENE DEPLETION BY SOIL MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous benzene was rapidly depleted in exposure chambers containing viable soils and plants. When separate components of the system were analyzed, no benzene was detected in soils, plants, or water. Soil microorganisms were shown to be responsible for metabolizing benzene, yield...

  2. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  3. Dissolution Treatment of Depleted Uranium Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates-Anderson, D D; Laue, C A; Fitch, T E

    2004-02-09

    Researchers at LLNL have developed a 3-stage process that converts pyrophoric depleted uranium metal turnings to a solidified final product that can be transported to and buried at a permitted land disposal site. The three process stages are: (1) pretreatment; (2) dissolution; and (3) solidification. Each stage was developed following extensive experimentation. This report presents the results of their experimental studies.

  4. Demonstration of jackhammer incorporating depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, L E; Hoard, R W; Carter, D L; Saculla, M D; Wilson, G V

    2000-04-01

    The United States Government currently has an abundance of depleted uranium (DU). This surplus of about 1 billion pounds is the result of an enrichment process using gaseous diffusion to produce enriched and depleted uranium. The enriched uranium has been used primarily for either nuclear weapons for the military or nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry. Most of the depleted uranium remains at the enrichment process plants in the form of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}). The Department of Energy (DOE) recently began a study to identify possible commercial applications for the surplus material. One of these potential applications is to use the DU in high-density strikers/hammers in pneumatically driven tools, such as jack hammers and piledrivers to improve their impulse performance. The use of DU could potentially increase tunneling velocity and excavation into target materials with improved efficiency. This report describes the efforts undertaken to analyze the particulars of using DU in two specific striking applications: the jackhammer and chipper tool.

  5. How Depleted is the MORB mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the degree of mantle depletion of highly incompatible elements is critically important for assessing Earth's internal heat production and Urey number. Current views of the degree of MORB source depletion are dominated by Salters and Stracke (2004), and Workman and Hart (2005). The first is based on an assessment of average MORB compositions, whereas the second considers trace element data of oceanic peridotites. Both require an independent determination of one absolute concentration, Lu (Salters & Stracke), or Nd (Workman & Hart). Both use parent-daughter ratios Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr calculated from MORB isotopes combined with continental-crust extraction models, as well as "canonical" trace element ratios, to boot-strap the full range of trace element abundances. We show that the single most important factor in determining the ultimate degree of incompatible element depletion in the MORB source lies in the assumptions about the timing of continent extraction, exemplified by continuous extraction versus simple two-stage models. Continued crust extraction generates additional, recent mantle depletion, without affecting the isotopic composition of the residual mantle significantly. Previous emphasis on chemical compositions of MORB and/or peridotites has tended to obscure this. We will explore the effect of different continent extraction models on the degree of U, Th, and K depletion in the MORB source. Given the uncertainties of the two most popular models, the uncertainties of U and Th in DMM are at least ±50%, and this impacts the constraints on the terrestrial Urey ratio. Salters, F.J.M. and Stracke, A., 2004, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 5, Q05004. Workman, R.K. and Hart, S.R., 2005, EPSL 231, 53-72.

  6. Simultaneous Determination of Biogenic Monoamines in Rat Brain Dialysates Using Capillary High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photoluminescence Following Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Moon Chul; Shi, Guoyue; Borland, Laura; Michael, Adrian C.; Weber, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and 3-methoxytyramine in brain is important in understanding neurotransmitter activity. This study presents a sensitive determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain striatum microdialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with the photoluminescence following electron-transfer detection technique. Separation conditions were optimized by changing the concentration of an ion-interaction agent and the percentage of an organic modifier. The high concentration of ion-interaction agent enabled the amines as a class to be separated from interfering acids, but also made the separation very long. To shorten the separation time, 10% (v/v) acetonitrile was used as the organic modifier. Eight chromatographic runs during a 3-h period were analyzed in terms of retention times, peak heights, and peak widths. Chromatograms are very reproducible, with less than 1% changes in peak height over 3 h. Typical concentration detection limits at the optimum separation conditions were less than 100 pM for metabolic acids and ~200 pM for monoamines. The injection volume of the sample was 500 nL. Thus, the mass detection limits were less than 50 amol for metabolic acids and ~100 amol for monoamines. Typical separation time was less than 10 min. To validate the technique, the separation method was applied to the observation of drug-induced changes of monoamine concentrations in rat brain microdialysis samples. Local perfusion of tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, into the striatum of an anesthetized rat decreased dopamine, 3-methoxytyramine, and serotonin concentrations in dialysates. Successive monitoring of striatal dialysates at a temporal resolution of 7.7 min showed that the injection of nomifensine transiently increased dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in rat brain dialysate. PMID:16536408

  7. Neuropsychological measures of attention and memory function in schizophrenia: relationships with symptom dimensions and serum monoamine activity

    PubMed Central

    Oades, Robert D; Röpcke, Bernd; Henning, Uwe; Klimke, Ansgard

    2005-01-01

    Background Some clinical symptoms or cognitive functions have been related to the overall state of monoamine activity in patients with schizophrenia, (e.g. inverse correlation of the dopamine metabolite HVA with delusions or visual-masking performance). However, profiles (as presented here) of the relations of the activity of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin to neuropsychologic (dys)functions in major patient sub-groups with their very different symptomatic and cognitive characteristics have not been reported. Methods Serum measures of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin turnover were examined by regression analyses for the prediction of performance on 10 neuropsychological measures reflecting left- and right-hemispheric and frontal-, parietal- and temporal-lobe function in 108 patients with schizophrenia and 63 matched controls. The neuropsychological battery included tests of verbal fluency, Stroop interference, trail-making, block-design, Mooney faces recognition, picture-completion, immediate and delayed visual and verbal recall. Paranoid and nonparanoid subgroups were based on ratings from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Groups with high and low ratings of ideas-of-reference and thought-disorder were formed from a median split on the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS). Results Verbal-fluency and Stroop-interference (left frontal and fronto-cingulate function) were negatively associated with noradrenergic turnover in nonparanoid and thought-disordered patients. High dopamine turnover related to speeded trail-making (frontal modulation of set switching) in those with many ideas-of-reference. In contrast, low dopamine turnover predicted poor recall in nonparanoid patients and those with little thought disorder. Serotonin metabolism did not independently contribute to the prediction any measure of cognitive performance. But, with regard to the relative activity between monoaminergic systems, increased HVA/5-HIAA ratios

  8. Neurotoxic compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) depletes endogenous norepinephrine and enhances release of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine from rat cortical slices

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, M.E.; Rubio, M.C.; Jaim-Etcheverry, G.

    1984-10-01

    The alkylating compound N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4) injected to rodents blocks norepinephrine (NE) uptake and reduces endogenous NE levels in the central nervous system and in the periphery. To investigate the processes leading to these alterations, rat cortical slices were incubated in the presence of DSP4. Cortical NE was depleted by 40% after incubation of slices in 10(-5) M DSP4 for 60 min and this was blocked by desipramine. The spontaneous outflow of radioactivity from cortical slices labeled previously with (/sup 3/H)NE was enhanced markedly both during exposure to DSP4 and during the subsequent washings, suggesting that NE depletion could be due to this stimulation of NE release. The radioactivity released by DSP4 was accounted for mainly by NE and its deaminated metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol. The enhanced release, independent of external Ca++, apparently originated from the vesicular pool as it was absent after reserpine pretreatment. Activities of the enzymes related to NE synthesis were not altered by DSP4 in vitro and only monoamine oxidase activity was inhibited at high concentrations. Thus, the depletion of endogenous NE produced by DSP4 is probably due to a persistent enhancement of its release from the vesicular pool. Fixation of DSP4 to the NE transport system is necessary but not sufficient to produce the acute NE depletion and the characteristic long-term actions of the compound.

  9. A worldwide view of groundwater depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.; van Kempen, C.; Reckman, J. W.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades, global water demand has increased two-fold due to increasing population, expanding irrigated area and economic development. Globally such demand can be met by surface water availability (i.e., water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) but regional variations are large and the absence of sufficient rainfall and run-off increasingly encourages the use of groundwater resources, particularly in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Excessive abstraction for irrigation frequently leads to overexploitation, i.e. if groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge over extensive areas and prolonged times, persistent groundwater depletion may occur. Observations and various regional studies have revealed that groundwater depletion is a substantial issue in regions such as Northwest India, Northeast Pakistan, Central USA, Northeast China and Iran. Here we provide a global overview of groundwater depletion from the year 1960 to 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree by assessing groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and subtracting estimates of groundwater abstraction obtained from IGRAC-GGIS database. PCR-GLOBWB was forced by the CRU climate dataset downscaled to daily time steps using ERA40 re-analysis data. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily global groundwater recharge (0.5 degree) while considering sub-grid variability of each grid cell (e.g., short and tall vegetation, different soil types, fraction of saturated soil). Country statistics of groundwater abstraction were downscaled to 0.5 degree by using water demand (i.e., agriculture, industry and domestic) as a proxy. To limit problems related to increased capture of discharge and increased recharge due to groundwater pumping, we restricted our analysis to sub-humid to arid areas. The uncertainty in the resulting estimates was assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis of 100 realizations of groundwater recharge and 100 realizations of groundwater abstraction

  10. Bioregeneration of mono-amine modified silica and granular activated carbon loaded with Acid Orange 7 in batch system.

    PubMed

    Al-Amrani, Waheeba Ahmed; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Ngah, Wan Saime Wan

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to investigate the role of mixed culture of biomass in the regeneration of mono-amine modified silica (MAMS) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with Acid Orange 7 (AO7), (2) to quantify and compare the bioregeneration efficiencies of AO7-loaded MAMS and GAC using the sequential adsorption and biodegradation approach and (3) to evaluate the reusability of bioregenerated MAMS. The results show that considerably higher bioregeneration efficiency of AO7-loaded MAMS as compared to that of AO7-loaded GAC was achieved due to higher reversibility of adsorption of MAMS for AO7 and favorable pH factor resulting in more AO7 desorption. The progressive loss of adsorption capacity of MAMS for AO7 with multiple cycles of use suggests possible chemical and microbial fouling of the adsorption sites. PMID:22704829

  11. Association analysis of a polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase B gene with Parkinson`s disease in a Japanese population

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Yuji; Murayama, Nobuhiro; Kuwano, Akira; Kondo, Ikuko

    1995-12-18

    The polymorphic allele of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) gene detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was associated with Parkinson`s disease (PD) in Caucasians. We characterized this polymorphic allele, allele 1, of the MAO-B gene using direct sequencing of PCR products. A single DNA substitution (G-A), resulting gain of Mae III restriction site was detected in intron 13 of the MAO-B gene. The allele associated with PD in Caucasians was twice as frequent as in healthy Japanese, but the association of the allele of the MAO-B gene was not observed in Japanese patients with PD. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Pyrrolidine analogs of GZ-793A: Synthesis and evaluation as inhibitors of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2)

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Ponugoti, Purushothama Rao; Nickell, Justin R.; Deaciuc, Agripina G.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Central heterocyclic ring size reduction from piperidinyl to pyrrolidinyl in the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) inhibitor GZ-793A and its analogs resulted in novel N-propane-1,2(R)-diol analogs 11a–i. These compounds were evaluated for their affinity for the dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding site on VMAT2 and for their ability to inhibit vesicular dopamine (DA) uptake. The 4-difluoromethoxyphenethyl analog 11f was the most potent inhibitor of [3H]-DTBZ binding (Ki=560 nM), with 15-fold greater affinity for this site than GZ-793A (Ki=8.29 μM). Analog 11f also showed similar potency of inhibition of [3H]-DA uptake into vesicles (Ki=45 nM) compared to that for GZ-793A (Ki=29 nM). Thus, 11f represents a new water-soluble inhibitor of VMAT function. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:23597792

  13. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase-A activity in rat brain by synthetic hydrazines: structure-activity relationship (SAR).

    PubMed

    Dar, Ahsana; Khan, Khalid M; Ateeq, Humayun S; Khan, Shagufta; Rahat, Shagufta; Perveen, Shahnaz; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2005-06-01

    A series of hydrazine derivatives was synthesized in order to evaluate their monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitory effects. MAO-A inhibitory activity of 4-tosyl benzoic acid carbohydrazide was quite potent, similarly to that of the corresponding 4-benzyloxy-benzoic acid carbohydrazide and its N-cyanoethylated derivative. Structural variations of these compounds, such as the replacement of the 4-substitutent, of the aromatic ring on which the carbohydrazide moiety is grafted, as well as cyclization of the hydrazide moiety in five- or six-membered rings caused either significant decline or complete loss of MAO inhibitory properties. The most active compound (4-tosyl benzoic acid carbohydrazide) was also subjected to the forced swim test, an animal model of depression, eliciting a marked reduction in immobility time in rats, without affecting the locomotor activity, implying that it possesses anti-depressant properties due to inhibition of MAO type-A. PMID:16119198

  14. [Effect of phenibut on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in rat brain structures].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Kudrin, V S; Klodt, P M; Narkevich, V B; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut, which is a structural analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on the content of monoamines, their metabolites, and neurotransmitter amino acids in brain structures have been studied on Wistar rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) produces a statistically significant increase in the content of dopamine metabolite (3,4-dioxyphenylacetic acid) and the retarding amino acid taurine in striatum. At the same time, phenibut did not significantly influence the levels of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine in various brain structures and produce a moderate decrease in the level of norepinephrine in the hippocampus. PMID:19334514

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of selegiline derivatives as monoamine oxidase inhibitor, antioxidant and metal chelator against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shishun; Chen, Jie; Li, Xiruo; Su, Tao; Wang, Yali; Wang, Zhiren; Huang, Ling; Li, Xingshu

    2015-07-01

    A series of compounds with monoamine oxidase inhibition and biometal chelation activities were designed, synthesised and evaluated as agents against Alzheimer's disease. The in vitro assay shows that most target compounds exhibit good MAO-B activities with submicromolar IC50 values and antioxidant activity (1.49-5.67 ORAC-FL values). The selected compounds were used to determine the biometal chelating ability using UV-vis spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry, which confirm that they can effectively interact with copper(II), iron(II) and zinc(II). The ThT fluorescence binding assay indicates that the synthetic compounds can inhibit Cu(II)-induced Aβ1-42 aggregation. The parallel artificial membrane permeation assay shows that most target compounds can cross the BBB. Based on these results, compound 8a was selected as a potential multifunctional agent for the treatment of AD. PMID:25934229

  16. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  17. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-10-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated. Air ingress did not cause any temperature surge when the uranium was fully hydrided, but created a temperature peak of 200 {degree}C when the uranium was dehydrided. Accumulation of non-reactive gases such as argon and moisture in the air blocked further air ingress. Only a flow-through type of air ingress could damage the vessel. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  19. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  20. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-12-09

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer.

  1. Altitude latitude mapping of plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Liu, J.; Sinha, H.; Banerje, S.

    2007-12-01

    Plasma depletions, if generated at the geomagnetic equator, are expected to appear in the all sky images as dark bands extending pole ward. The all sky observations conducted from Kavalur (12.5¢ªN, 78.8¢ªE; 4.6¢ªN, geomagnetic), INDIA, but showed dark patches in 630.0 nm entering the imager field of view (FOV) from the northern edge in the post-sunset period. These patches gradually extended towards equator and became fully extended dark bands in the North-South direction by midnight. The series of such images appeared to be the airglow signatures of irregularities that are probably generated at off-equatorial latitudes and mapped to the lower or equatorial latitudes. Similar features were observed in several nights. This appearance of depletions as dark patches from the northern edge of the FOV is explained in this work

  2. Triple monoamine uptake inhibitors demonstrate a pharmacologic association between excessive drinking and impulsivity in high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice.

    PubMed

    O'Tousa, David S; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Matson, Liana M; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Linn, Michael Van; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata; Halcomb, Meredith E; Cook, James; Grahame, Nicholas J; June, Harry L

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 30% of current drinkers in the United States drink excessively, and are referred to as problem/hazardous drinkers. These individuals, who may not meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, comprise binge, heavy drinkers, or both. Given their high prevalence, interventions that reduce the risk of binge and heavy drinking have important public health implications. Impulsivity has been repeatedly associated with excessive drinking in the clinical literature. As impulsivity is correlated with, and may play a critical role in, the initiation and maintenance of excessive drinking, this behavior may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. Hence, a better understanding of pharmacological treatments capable of attenuating excessive drinking and impulsivity may markedly improve clinical outcomes. The high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice represent a strong rodent model to study the relationship between impulsivity and excessive alcohol drinking, as recent evidence indicates they consume high levels of alcohol throughout their active cycle and are innately impulsive. Using this model, the present study demonstrates that the triple monoamine uptake inhibitors (TUIs) amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 effectively attenuate binge drinking, heavy drinking assessed via a 24-hour free-choice assay, and impulsivity measured by the delay discounting procedure. In contrast, 3-PBC, a GABA-A α1 preferring ligand with mixed agonist-antagonist properties, attenuates excessive drinking without affecting impulsivity. These findings suggest that in HAP mice, monoamine pathways may predominate as a common mechanism underlying impulsivity and excessive drinking, while the GABAergic system may be more salient in regulating excessive drinking. We further propose that TUIs such as amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 may be used to treat the co-occurrence of impulsivity and excessive drinking. PMID:24118509

  3. Selective suppression of cocaine- versus food-maintained responding by monoamine releasers in rhesus monkeys: benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Baumann, M H; Rothman, R B; Mello, N K; Blough, B E

    2009-04-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of drugs currently under investigation as potential agonist medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The efficacy and safety of monoamine releasers as candidate medications may be influenced in part by their relative potency to release dopamine and serotonin, and we reported previously that releasers with approximately 30-fold selectivity for dopamine versus serotonin release may be especially promising. The present study examined the effects of the releasers benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine, which have 20- to 48-fold selectivity in vitro for releasing dopamine versus serotonin. In an assay of cocaine discrimination, rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate 0.4 mg/kg i.m. cocaine from saline in a two-key, food-reinforced procedure. Each of the releasers produced a dose- and time-dependent substitution for cocaine. 4-Benzylpiperidine had the most rapid onset and shortest duration of action. Phenmetrazine and benzylpiperazine had slower onsets and longer durations of action. In an assay of cocaine self-administration, rhesus monkeys were trained to respond for cocaine injections and food pellets under a second order schedule. Treatment for 7 days with each of the releasers produced a dose-dependent and selective reduction in self-administration of cocaine (0.01 mg/kg/injection). The most selective effects were produced by phenmetrazine. Phenmetrazine also produced a downward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose effect curve, virtually eliminating responding maintained by a 30-fold range of cocaine doses (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) while having only small and transient effects on food-maintained responding. These findings support the potential utility of dopamine-selective releasers as candidate treatments for cocaine dependence. PMID:19151247

  4. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  5. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  6. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-12-02

    A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

  8. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations. PMID:16857031

  9. Record Arctic ozone depletion could occur again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    In the winter of 2010-2011, ozone levels above the Arctic declined to record lows, creating the first Arctic ozone hole, similar to the well-known Antarctic ozone hole. Scientists believe the ozone depletion was due partly to unusually cold temperatures in the stratosphere above the Arctic, as colder stratospheric temperatures make ozone-destroying chemicals such as chlorine more active. As global climate change continues, the Arctic stratosphere is expected to get colder, but levels of ozone-destroying chemicals should decline, as emissions of these chemicals were banned by the Montreal Protocol. To try to learn more about Arctic ozone dynamics and determine whether the Arctic ozone hole is likely to recur, Sinnhuber et al. looked at satellite observations of temperature, ozone, water vapor, and chemicals that affect ozone in the Arctic atmosphere. They also used a model to determine how sensitive ozone levels are to stratospheric temperatures and chemistry. They found that their model accurately reproduced measured conditions. Their model suggests that stratospheric temperatures 1°C lower than in the 2010-2011 winter would result in locally nearly complete ozone depletion in the Arctic lower stratosphere with current levels of chemicals. A 10% reduction in ozone-depleting chemicals would be offset by a 1°C decrease in stratospheric temperatures.

  10. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  11. Antarctic springtime depletion of atmospheric mercury.

    PubMed

    Ebinghaus, Ralf; Kock, Hans H; Temme, Christian; Einax, Jürgen W; Lowe, Astrid G; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P; Schroeder, William H

    2002-03-15

    Unlike other heavy metals that are inherently associated with atmospheric aerosols, mercury in ambient air exists predominantly in the gaseous elemental form. Because of its prolonged atmospheric residence time, elemental mercury vapor is distributed on a global scale. Recently, Canadian researchers have discovered that total gaseous mercury levels in the lower tropospheric boundary layer in the Canadian Arctic are often significantly depleted during the months after polar sunrise. A possible explanation may involve oxidation of elemental mercury, followed by adsorption and deposition of the oxidized form, leading to an increased input of atmospheric mercury into the Arctic ecosystem. Here we present the first continuous high-time-resolution measurements of total gaseous mercury in the Antarctic covering a 12-month period between January 2000 and January 2001 at the German Antarctic research station Neumayer (70 degrees 39' S, 8 degrees 15' W). We report that mercury depletion events also occur in the Antarctic after polar sunrise and compare our measurements with a data setfrom Alert, Nunavut, Canada. We also present indications that BrO radicals and ozone play a key role in the boundary-layer chemistry during springtime mercury depletion events in the Antarctic troposphere. PMID:11944675

  12. N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone protects against 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced depletion of serotonin in rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y

    1999-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) on 3,4-methylenedioxmathamphetamine (MDMA)-induced depletion of serotonin in the CNS. Rats were treated with two concurrent injections of MDMA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), PBN (50-400 mg/kg dissolved in ethanol, 50 mg/ml of 25% ethanol, i.p.), saline or 25% ethanol, alone or in combination, 6 h apart, and sacrificed 5 days later. Rectal temperature was measured prior to and hourly following the drug injection for 5 h. Monoamine levels in the tissue were measured by HPLC. Density of the 5-HT transporters was assayed by [3H]paroxetine binding. Rectal temperature of rats increased after MDMA, decreased after PBN, ethanol, PBN plus ethanol, and MDMA plus ethanol, and was not significantly altered after MDMA plus PBN. Levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and brain stem of rats decreased significantly after MDMA or MDMA plus ethanol, but not after MDMA plus PBN, PBN plus ethanol (PBN dissolved in ethanol), or ethanol as compared to the saline controls. Levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the brain tissues of rats treated with MDMA plus PBN were elevated as compared to those treated with MDMA plus saline. Similar results were observed in the density of 5-HT transporters in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. These results indicate that scavenging of free radicals of MDMA metabolites or reactive oxygen species by PBN and with lowering of body temperature protected against MDMA-induced depletion of serotonin transmitter. PMID:10029234

  13. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  14. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  15. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  16. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  17. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent...

  18. [Mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chang-Huang

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondria is an intracellular double membrane-bound structure and it can provide energy for intracellular metabolism. The metabolism includes Krebs cycle, beta-oxidation and lipid synthesis. The density of mitochondria is different in various tissues dependent upon the demands of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial diseases can occur by defects either in mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 mRNAs that are translated in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial genetic diseases are most resulted from defects in the mtDNA which may be point mutations, deletions, or mitochondrial DNA depletion. These patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial diseases include sporadic, maternally inherited, or of Mendelian inheritance. Mitochondrial DNA depletion is caused by defects in the nuclear genes that are responsible for maintenance of integrity of mtDNA or deoxyribonucelotide pools and mtDNA biogenesis. The mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS) includes the following categories: progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), predominant myopathy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), sensory-ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) and hepato-encephalopathy. The most common tissues or organs involved in MDS and related disorders include the brain, liver and muscles. These involved genes are divided into two groups including 1) DNA polymerase gamma (POLG, POLG2) and Twinkle genes whose products function directly at the mtDNA replication fork, and 2) adenine nucleotide translocator 1, thymidine phosphorylase, thymidine kinase 2, deoxyguanosine kinase, ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase ligase, MPV17 whose products supply the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pools needed for mtDNA replication, and possible mutation in the RRM2B gene. The development has provided new information about the importance of the biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotides for mtDNA replication

  19. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  20. Modelling CO depletion in starless cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the observational detection of molecular depletion in star-forming dark clouds. In many cases the data is of very high quality and what was once considered a rather hypothetical process is now almost universally accepted as a (the) major cause of the presence of emission 'holes' in molecular maps of dense cores. However, the interpretation of the data can be severely undermined by uncertainties in the physics and chemistry. This is particularly true in the case of general molecular studies of active star-forming regions. For these objects there exist strong degeneracies between various chemical effects (gas-phase time-dependencies, desorption processes and efficiencies, ionization rates etc.) and poorly constrained physics (most particularly in the assumed kinematics and evolutionary history). Whilst these problems result in unacceptable ambiguities in the case of evolved sources, we can make significant progress for young, near-static cores and using molecular species with simple chemistries. A considerable set of constraints on the free parameters is now provided by the extensive sub-millimetre continuum and infra-red absorption studies of starless cores. These observations give us good descriptions of the temperature and density profiles in these sources. Moreover CO is to a large extent chemically inert, so that any decline of abundance at high densities can (primarily) be interpreted as being a consequence of freeze-out. Thus there are only two major free parameters:- the net depletion/desorption rate and the chemical age of the source. In this study CO abundance profiles are calculated as a function of time for cores whose temperature and density profiles have already been determined. The results are corrected for excitation effects and converted to synthetic maps, assuming typical single-dish beam parameters and source characteristics. A strong correlation with existing depletion maps is found and strong

  1. Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Aballay, A; Sarrouf, M N; Colombo, M I; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1995-01-01

    Fusion among endosomes is an important step for transport and sorting of internalized macromolecules. Working in a cell-free system, we previously reported that endosome fusion requires cytosol and ATP, and is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Fusion is regulated by monomeric and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. We now report that fusion can proceed at very low Ca2+ concentrations, i.e. < 30 nM. Moreover, fusion is not affected when intravesicular Ca2+ is depleted by preincubation of vesicles with calcium ionophores (5 microM ionomycin or A23187) in the presence of calcium chelators (5 mM EGTA or 60 mM EDTA). The results indicate that fusion can proceed at extremely low concentrations of intravesicular and extravesicular Ca2+. However, BAPTA [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid], a relatively specific Ca2+ chelator, inhibits fusion. BAPTA binds other metals besides Ca2+. We present evidence that BAPTA inhibition is due not to Ca2+ chelation but to Zn2+ depletion. TPEN [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine], another metal-ion chelator with low affinity for Ca2+, also inhibited fusion. TPEN- and BAPTA-inhibited fusions were restored by addition of Zn2+. Zn(2+)-dependent fusion presents the same characteristics as control fusion. In intact cells, TPEN inhibited transport along the endocytic pathway. The results indicate that Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion, suggesting that this ion is necessary for the function of one or more factors involved in the fusion process. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554539

  2. SVARTSENGI FIELD PRODUCTION DATA AND DEPLETION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Thorhallsson, O.S.

    1985-01-22

    There have been two major high-temperature geothermal field developments in Iceland in the last decade; Krafla in the north-east, and Svartsengi in the south-west. These and other geothermal developments have recently been reported by Palmason et al. The Krafla field will not be discussed here, but details about the field are available in Stefansson and the power plant in Eliasson et al. Several reservoir engineering studies of the Krafla field have been published. The Svartsengi field is one of several fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula in south-west Iceland. About 15 km west of Svartsengi, on the tip of the Peninsula, the Reykjanes field is now under development, primarily for seawater chemicals production. The recently drilled Eldvorp field is located in line between these two fields, about 5 km west of Svartsengi. There are also several fields to the east of Svartsengi, at 15-20 km distance. The Svartsengi, Eldvorp, and Reykjanes fields exist in the same tectonic-volcanic environment, and are surrounded by similar geohydrological conditions, as discussed by Georgsson; see also Gudmundsson et al. and Franzson. Optimum development of these and other fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula, requires an understanding of their depletion behavior with time; that is, how the reservoir pressure falls with production. While recognizing that no two geothermal fields are alike, we also realize that an understanding of the depletion behavior of Svartsengi, for example, may prove useful in the development of other similar and nearby fields. The main purpose of this paper is to report our depletion analysis of the Svartsengi field using lumped-parameter and water influx modeling: we also report the field's production history.

  3. Simulation of polar ozone depletion: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Doug; Bandoro, Justin; Garcia, Rolando

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate polar ozone depletion chemistry using the specified dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the year 2011. We find that total ozone depletion in both hemispheres is dependent on cold temperatures (below 192 K) and associated heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles. Reactions limited to warmer temperatures above 192 K, or on binary liquid aerosols, yield little modeled polar ozone depletion in either hemisphere. An imposed factor of three enhancement in stratospheric sulfate increases ozone loss by up to 20 Dobson unit (DU) in the Antarctic and 15 DU in the Arctic in this model. Such enhanced sulfate loads are similar to those observed following recent relatively small volcanic eruptions since 2005 and imply impacts on the search for polar ozone recovery. Ozone losses are strongly sensitive to temperature, with a test case cooler by 2 K producing as much as 30 DU additional ozone loss in the Antarctic and 40 DU in the Arctic. A new finding of this paper is the use of the temporal behavior and variability of ClONO2 and HCl as indicators of the efficacy of heterogeneous chemistry. Transport of ClONO2 from the southern subpolar regions near 55-65°S to higher latitudes near 65-75°S provides a flux of NOx from more sunlit latitudes to the edge of the vortex and is important for ozone loss in this model. Comparisons between modeled and observed total column and profile ozone perturbations, ClONO2 abundances, and the rate of change of HCl bolster confidence in these conclusions.

  4. Rhenium Disulfide Depletion-Load Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Connor; Corbet, Chris; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-03-01

    Many semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have been effectively used to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) devices but have yet to be used in logic designs. We constructed a depletion-load voltage inverter using ultrathin layers of Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) as the semiconducting channel. This ReS2 inverter was fabricated on a single micromechanically-exfoliated flake of ReS2. Electron beam lithography and physical vapor deposition were used to construct Cr/Au electrical contacts, an Alumina top-gate dielectric, and metal top-gate electrodes. By using both low (Aluminum) and high (Palladium) work-function metals as two separate top-gates on a single ReS2 flake, we create a dual-gated depletion mode (D-mode) and enhancement mode (E-mode) FETs in series. Both FETs displayed current saturation in the output characteristics as a result of the FET ``pinch-off'' mechanism and On/Off current ratios of 105. Field-effect mobilities of 23 and 17 cm2V-1s-1 and subthreshold swings of 97 and 551 mV/decade were calculated for the E-mode and D-mode FETs, respectively. With a supply voltage of 1V, at low/negative input voltages the inverter output was at a high logic state of 900 mV. Conversely with high/positive input voltages, the inverter output was at a low logic state of 500 mV. The inversion of the input signal demonstrates the potential for using ReS2 in future integrated circuit designs and the versatility of depletion-load logic devices for TMD research. NRI SWAN Center and ARL STTR Program.

  5. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  6. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  7. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  8. Ozone depletion: implications for the veterinarian.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, K E

    1978-09-15

    Man has inadvertently modified the stratosphere. There is a good possibility that the ozone layer is being depleted by the use of jet aircraft (SST), chlorofluoromethane propellants, and nitrogen fertilizers. Under unpolluted conditions, the production of ozone equals its destruction. By man's intervention, however, the destruction may exceed the production. The potential outcome is increased intensity of solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation and penetration to the earth's surface of previously absorbed wavelengths below about 280 nm. The increased ultraviolet radiation would increase the likelihood of skin cancer in man and ocular squamous cell carcinoma in cattle. The climate also might be modified, possibly in an undesirable way. PMID:568617

  9. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle. PMID:19392251

  10. The serotonin receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine facilitates noradrenaline release from rat spinal cord slices and inhibits monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Reimann, W; Schneider, F

    1993-03-01

    1. The influences of the purported serotonergic agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (MeODMT) on noradrenaline release and metabolism were investigated in a rat spinal cord release model and a monoamine oxidase (MAO) assay. 2. MeODMT inhibited the basal outflow of tritium from rat spinal cord slices preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline and enhanced the electrically-evoked overflow. 3. Effects on basal outflow were not observed, when monoamine oxidase (MAO) was inhibited by pargyline. Effects on the evoked overflow were not observed in the presence of metitepine or phentolamine. 4. Preferential inhibition by MeODMT of MAO A-type enzyme activity was found in a direct assay. 5. The results provide evidence for two different effects by which MeODMT reinforces noradrenergic neurotransmission in the rat spinal cord: facilitation of stimulation-evoked noradrenaline release and inhibition of noradrenaline metabolism by MAO inhibition. PMID:8482527

  11. [Monoamine, GABA, and glutamergic mechanisms of the anterior hypothalamus in anti-aversive effects of sedative and selective drugs in various models of anxiety].

    PubMed

    Talalaenko, A N; Gordienko, D V; Markova, O P; Goncharenko, N V; Pankrat'ev, D V

    2001-01-01

    The experiments using "illuminated site" and "threatening situation" avoidance tests on rats microinjected with GABA, glutamic acid, monoamines and their agonists and antagonists, as well as anxiosedative and anxioselective agents into the anterior hypothalamus revealed functional ambiguity in the neurochemical profile of this limbic brain formation in the anxiety states of various aversive genesis. Preliminary intraperitoneal injection of the monoamine and GABA antagonists, followed by the local administration of the antianxiety drugs studied, showed that the antiaversive action of chlordiazepoxide, fenibut, and indoter is manifested in both anxiety models via a GABAergic mechanism in the anterior hypothalamus. The anxiolytic effect of campiron is manifested only under negative-stressor zoosocial conditions and is mediated by the serotoninergic systems of this limbic brain formation. PMID:11548441

  12. Mesospheric ionization and O2 1Delta(g) depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, K. A.; Solomon, S.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of O2 1Delta(g) emission during solar proton events reveal large depletions below 80 and near 90 km. The lower-altitude depletions are believed to be due to odd hydrogen production and associated depletion of ozone, but the mechanism producing the depletion near 90 km has not yet been established. In this paper, it is proposed that an exothermic charge exchange reaction between O2(+) and O2 1Delta(g) is likely to be responsible for these high-altitude depletions. In particular, it is shown that the vertical structure of the observed change in airglow emission is consistent with this mechanism.

  13. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Stine N; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-08-15

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical detection provided limits of quantifications (LOQs) between 3.6 and 12nM. Within the linear range, obtained recoveries were from 90.9±9.9 to 120±14% and intra-day and inter-day precisions found to be less than 5.5% and 12%, respectively. The analytical method was applicable for quantification of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in frontal cortex, as compared to cerebellum. The chemical turnover in frontal cortex tissue of guinea pig was for serotonin successfully predicted from the turnover observed in the frontal cortex cell culture. In conclusion, the present analytical method shows high precision, accuracy and sensitivity and is broadly applicable to monoamine measurements in cell cultures as well as brain biopsies from animal models used in preclinical neurochemistry. PMID:27379407

  14. Experimental manipulations blunt time-induced changes in brain monoamine levels and completely reverse stress, but not Pb+/-stress-related modifications to these trajectories.

    PubMed

    Cory-Slechta, D A; Virgolini, M B; Rossi-George, A; Weston, D; Thiruchelvam, M

    2009-12-14

    This study sought to further understand how environmental conditions influence the outcomes of early developmental insults. It compared changes in monoamine levels in frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum of male and female Long-Evans rat offspring subjected to maternal Pb exposure (0, 50 or 150ppm in drinking water from 2 months pre-breeding until pup weaning)+/-prenatal (PS) (restraint on GD16-17) or PS+offspring stress (OS; three variable stress challenges to young adults) determined at 2 months of age and at 6 months of age in littermates subsequently exposed either to experimental manipulations (EM: daily handling and performance on an operant fixed interval (FI) schedule of food reward), or to no experience (NEM; time alone). Time alone (NEM conditions), even in normal (control) animals, modified the trajectory of neurochemical changes between 2 and 6 months across brain regions and monoamines. EM significantly modified the NEM trajectories, and except NE and striatal DA, which increased, blunted the changes in monoamine levels that occurred over time alone. Pb+/-stress modified the trajectory of monoamine changes in both EM and NEM conditions, but these predominated under NEM conditions. Stress-associated modifications, occurring mainly with NEM OS groups, were fully reversed by EM procedures, while reversals of Pb+/-stress-associated modifications occurred primarily in nucleus accumbens, a region critical to mediation of FI response rates. These results extend the known environmental conditions that modify developmental Pb+/-stress insults, which is critical to ultimately understanding whether early insults lead to adaptive or maladaptive behavior and to devising behavioral therapeutic strategies. That time alone and a set of EM conditions typically used as outcome measures in intervention studies can themselves invoke neurochemical changes, moreover, has significant implications for experimental design of such studies. PMID:19631235

  15. The effects of aminorex and related compounds on brain monoamines and metabolites in CBA mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Russell, B; Schmierer, D; Laverty, R

    1997-01-01

    Acute and long-term neurochemical effects of aminorex, an appetite-suppressing drug related to amphetamine in chemical structure, and stereoisomers of its analogues were examined and compared with those of 3.4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA) and fenfluramine. Aminorex and its analogues, with exception of 4S, 5S-dimethylaminorex, did not cause the long-term neurotransmitter depletion in either the dopaminergic or 5-HT-ergic systems that was observed after MDMA or fenfluramine in CBA mice. These results are discussed in terms of possible structurally related mechanisms of neurotoxicity. The acute neurochemical effects showed that aminorex and analogues all produced increases in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels, unlike fenfluramine and MDMA in the present study or in published data. This suggests that inhibition of 5-HT metabolism, rather than direct 5-HT release, may be involved in their anorectic effect. The parallel study of acute dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) changes suggest that in CBA mice MDMA may be a better dopamine releaser and this may contribute to its dopaminergic neurotoxicity. However the ability to release dopamine or 5-HT, or both, may be important, but not the only factor involved in causing the long-term neurotoxicity observed with amphetamine derivatives. PMID:9120777

  16. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  17. A critical comparison of ionospheric depletion chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A. )

    1987-05-01

    Six chemicals, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}, CF{sub 3}BR, and Ni(CO){sub 4}, are considered as ionospheric modification agents. Each of these species reacts in the F region to produce localized plasma depletions. The first three interact with O{sup +} and yield polyatomic ions which dissociatively recombine with electrons to give neutrals. The last three dissociatively attach electrons to produce heavy negative ions which become mutually neutralized by reactions with O{sup +}. The effectiveness of these chemicals depends on the amount which goes into the vapor state upon release. Thermodynamic calculations show that H{sub 2}O has the lowest vapor yield of about 20% from a heated, pressurized tank. Over 60% of the other substances should be vented in gaseous form. Based on estimates of plasma density reduction and airglow stimulation, nickel carbonyl is the most efficient of the six species for modifying the nighttime ionosphere. During the daytime, CF{sub 3}BR and SF{sub 6} provide the largest depletions.

  18. Convective Polymer Depletion on Pair Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tai-Hsi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tuinier, Remco

    2011-11-01

    Understanding transport, reaction, aggregation, and viscoelastic properties of colloid-polymer mixture is of great importance in food, biomedical, and pharmaceutical sciences. In non-adsorbing polymer solutions, colloidal particles tend to aggregate due to the depletion-induced osmotic or entropic force. Our early development for the relative mobility of pair particles assumed that polymer reorganization around the particles is much faster than particle's diffusive time, so that the coupling of diffusive and convective effects can be neglected. Here we present a nonequilibrium two-fluid (polymer and solvent) model to resolve the convective depletion effect. The theoretical framework is based on ground state approximation and accounts for the coupling of fluid flow and polymer transport to better describe pair particle interactions. The momentum and polymer transport, chemical potential, and local viscosity and osmotic pressure are simultaneously solved by numerical approximation. This investigation is essential for predicting the demixing kinetics in the pairwise regime for colloid-polymer mixtures. This work is supported by NSF CMMI 0952646.

  19. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  20. A critical comparison of ionospheric depletion chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1987-05-01

    Six chemicals, H2, H2O, CO2, SF6, CF3Br, and Ni(CO)4, are considered as ionospheric modification agents. Each of these species reacts in the F region to produce localized plasma depletions. The first three interact with O(+) and yield polyatomic ions which dissociatively recombine with electrons to give neutrals. The last three dissociatively attach electrons to produce heavy negative ions which become mutually neutralized by reactions with O(+). The effectiveness of these chemicals depends on the amount which goes into the vapor state upon release. Thermodynamic calculations show that H2O has the lowest vapor yield of about 20 percent from a heated, pressurized tank. Over 60 percent of the other substances should be vented in gaseous form. Based on estimates of plasma density reduction and airglow stimulation, nickel carbonyl is the most efficient of the six species for modifying the nighttime ionosphere. During the daytime, CF3Br and SF6 provide the largest depletions.

  1. Stratospheric ozone depletion and animal health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S J

    1992-08-01

    There is an increasing concern over ozone depletion and its effects on the environment and human health. However, the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) that would result from significant losses of ozone is also potentially harmful to animals. Any increase in disease in domestic species would not only have serious animal welfare implications but may also be economically important. The diseases which are likely to increase if ozone depletion continues include the squamous cell carcinomas of the exposed, non-pigmented areas of cats, cattle, sheep and horses. Uberreiter's syndrome in dogs is also associated with exposure to UV-B and may be expected to increase, as may the severity of conditions such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis (New Forest eye) in cattle. Aquaculture systems in which fish often have little or no protection by shading may also be at risk. Cataracts and skin lesions have been associated with the exposure of farmed fish to ultraviolet radiation and have resulted in significant losses. PMID:1529513

  2. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD. PMID:26825854

  3. Correlation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Neurotoxicity with Blood-Brain Barrier Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Mitchell, Mary Jo; Harik, Sami I.

    1987-05-01

    Systemic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) causes parkinsonism in humans and subhuman primates, but not in rats and many other laboratory animals; mice are intermediate in their susceptibility. Since MPTP causes selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity when infused directly into rat substantia nigra, we hypothesized that systemic MPTP may be metabolized by monoamine oxidase and/or other enzymes in rat brain capillaries and possibly other peripheral organs and thus prevented from reaching its neuronal sites of toxicity. We tested this hypothesis by assessing monoamine oxidase in isolated cerebral microvessels of humans, rats, and mice by measuring the specific binding of [3H]pargyline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and by estimating the rates of MPTP and benzylamine oxidation. [3H]Pargyline binding to rat cerebral microvessels was about 10-fold higher than to human or mouse microvessels. Also, MPTP oxidation by rat brain microvessels was about 30-fold greater than by human microvessels; mouse microvessels yielded intermediate values. These results may explain, at least in part, the marked species differences in susceptibility to systemic MPTP. They also suggest the potential importance of ``enzyme barriers'' at the blood-brain interface that can metabolize toxins not excluded by structural barriers, and may provide biological bases for developing therapeutic strategies for the prevention of MPTP-induced neurotoxicity and other neurotoxic conditions including, possibly, Parkinson disease.

  4. Effects of monoamine releasers with varying selectivity for releasing dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2011-12-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of candidate medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse, and concurrent cocaine-versus-food choice procedures are potentially valuable as experimental tools to evaluate the efficacy and safety of candidate medications. This study assessed the choice between cocaine and food by rhesus monkeys during treatment with five monoamine releasers that varied in selectivity to promote the release of dopamine and norepinephrine versus serotonin (5HT) [m-fluoroamphetamine, (+)-phenmetrazine, (+)-methamphetamine, napthylisopropylamine and (±)-fenfluramine]. Rhesus monkeys (n=8) responded under a concurrent-choice schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed ratio 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, fixed ratio 10 schedule). Cocaine choice dose-effect curves were determined daily during continuous 7-day treatment with saline or with each test compound dose. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice, and the highest cocaine doses (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) maintained almost exclusive cocaine choice. Efficacy of monoamine releasers to decrease cocaine choice corresponded to their pharmacological selectivity to release dopamine and norepinephrine versus 5HT. None of the releasers reduced cocaine choice or promoted reallocation of responding to food choice to the same extent as when saline was substituted for cocaine. These results extend the range of conditions across which dopamine and norepinephrine-selective releasers have been shown to reduce cocaine self-administration. PMID:22015808

  5. Characterization of Optically Resolved 9-fluoropropyl-dihydrotetrabenazine as a Potential PET Imaging Agent Targeting Vesicular Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Mei-Ping; Hou, Catherine; Goswami, Rajesh; E.Ponde, Datta; Kilbourn, Michael R.; Kung, Hank F.

    2007-01-01

    Labeling derivatives of dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) with F-18 (T1/2 = 110 min) instead of C-11 (T1/2 = 20 min), would improve their utility and availability for imaging vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2) in clinical settings. The successful synthesis, reported previously, of two novel 9-fluoroalkyl(±)-DTBZ ligands prompted us to study the optically resolved active ligand 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-DTBZ (FP-(+)-DTBZ), which may have more promising characteristics. The inhibition constant (Ki) estimated for FP-(+)-DTBZ (using [3H](±)-DTBZ as the labeled ligand in rat striatal homogenates) showed a lower value as compared to the racemic FP-(±)-DTBZ (0.10 ± 0.01 vs 0.19 ± 0.04 nM). The inactive isomer, FP-(−)-DTBZ, displayed a much lower binding affinity with a Ki value >3000 nM. Biodistribution studies in mice after an iv injection of [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ exhibited a ratio of striatum (ST, target) to cerebellum (CB, background) of 4.51 at 30 minutes post-injection, which is a higher value than previously obtained with the racemic ligand [18F]FP-(±)-DTBZ (ST/CB = 2.95). Brain extraction at 30 minutes after the tracer injection in mice showed that >95% of the radioactivity corresponded to the parent, non-metabolized, compound remaining in the striatum, suggesting that the tracer has an excellent in vivo stability. Furthermore, localization of the tracer in the brain examined with ex vivo autoradiography displayed a typical distribution pattern consistent with VMAT2 sites. The highest labeling was observed in monoaminergic neuron regions (caudate putamen, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, substania nigra, dorsal raphe and locus coerules). We also tested the selective labeling of this tracer at the dopamine neurons in unilateral-lesioned mice (treated with 6-hydroxydopamine). When [18F]FP-(+)-DTBZ and [125I]IPT ((N-(3'-iodopropen-2'-yl)-2-beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane, a selective marker for dopamine transporters in dopaminergic neurons) were

  6. Dimethyltryptamine and other hallucinogenic tryptamines exhibit substrate behavior at the serotonin uptake transporter and the vesicle monoamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gopalakrishnan, Anupama; Anderson, Lyndsey L; Feih, Joel T; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2009-12-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent plant hallucinogen that has also been found in human tissues. When ingested, DMT and related N,N-dialkyltryptamines produce an intense hallucinogenic state. Behavioral effects are mediated through various neurochemical mechanisms including activity at sigma-1 and serotonin receptors, modification of monoamine uptake and release, and competition for metabolic enzymes. To further clarify the pharmacology of hallucinogenic tryptamines, we synthesized DMT, N-methyl-N-isopropyltryptamine (MIPT), N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine. We then tested the abilities of these N,N-dialkyltryptamines to inhibit [(3)H]5-HT uptake via the plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT) in human platelets and via the vesicle monoamine transporter (VMAT2) in Sf9 cells expressing the rat VMAT2. The tryptamines were also tested as inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to the SERT and [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2. Our results show that DMT, MIPT, DPT, and DIPT inhibit [(3)H]5-HT transport at the SERT with K ( I ) values of 4.00 +/- 0.70, 8.88 +/- 4.7, 0.594 +/- 0.12, and 2.32 +/- 0.46 microM, respectively. At VMAT2, the tryptamines inhibited [(3)H]5-HT transport with K ( I ) values of 93 +/- 6.8, 20 +/- 4.3, 19 +/- 2.3, and 19 +/- 3.1 muM, respectively. On the other hand, the tryptamines were very poor inhibitors of [(3)H]paroxetine binding to SERT and of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to VMAT2, resulting in high binding-to-uptake ratios. High binding-to-uptake ratios support the hypothesis that the tryptamines are transporter substrates, not uptake blockers, at both SERT and VMAT2, and also indicate that there are separate substrate and inhibitor binding sites within these transporters. The transporters may allow the accumulation of tryptamines within neurons to reach relatively high levels for sigma-1 receptor activation and to function as releasable transmitters. PMID:19756361

  7. Modulation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) expression in neuropsychiatric disorders: genetic and environmental factors involved in type A MAO expression.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Riederer, Peter; Maruyama, Wakako

    2016-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase types A and B (MAO-A, MAO-B) regulate the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain, and their dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis and influence the clinical phenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Reversible MAO-A inhibitors, such as moclobemide and befloxatone, are currently employed in the treatment of emotional disorders by inhibiting the enzymatic degradation of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine in the central nervous system (CNS). It has been suggested that the irreversible MAO-B inhibitors selegiline and rasagiline exert a neuroprotective effect in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. This effect, however, is not related to their inhibition of MAO activity; in animal and cellular models, selegiline and rasagiline protect neuronal cells through their anti-apoptotic activity and induction of pro-survival genes. There is increasing evidence that MAO-A activity, but not that of MAO-B, is implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, but also in gene induction by MAO-B inhibitors; on the other hand, selegiline and rasagiline increase MAO-A mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels. Taken together, these results suggest that each MAO subtype exerts effects that modulate the expression and activity of the other isoenzyme. The roles of MAO-A and -B in the CNS should therefore be re-evaluated with respect to the "type-specificity" of their inhibitors, which may not be unconditional during chronic treatment. Mao-a expression, in particular, may be implicated in pathogenesis and phenotypes in neuropsychiatric disorders. MAO-A expression is modified by mao polymorphisms affecting its transcriptional efficiency, as well as by mutations and polymorphism of parkin, Sirt1, FOXO, microRNA, presenilin-1, and other regulatory proteins. In addition, childhood maltreatment has been shown to have an impact upon adolescent social behavior in children with mao-a polymorphisms of low transcriptional activity. Low MAO

  8. Behavioral and pharmacokinetic interactions between monoamine oxidase inhibitors and the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, Adam L

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are often ingested together with tryptamine hallucinogens, but relatively little is known about the consequences of their combined use. We have shown previously that monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors alter the locomotor profile of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) in rats, and enhance its interaction with 5-HT2A receptors. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the mechanism for the interaction between 5-MeO-DMT and MAOIs, and to determine whether other behavioral responses to 5-MeO-DMT are similarly affected. Hallucinogens disrupt prepulse inhibition (PPI) in rats, an effect typically mediated by 5-HT2A activation. 5-MeO-DMT also disrupts PPI but the effect is primarily attributable to 5-HT1A activation. The present studies examined whether an MAOI can alter the respective contributions of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors to the effects of 5-MeO-DMT on PPI. A series of interaction studies using the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100,635 and the 5-HT2A antagonist MDL 11,939 were performed to assess the respective contributions of these receptors to the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT in rats pretreated with an MAOI. The effects of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of 5-MeO-DMT and its metabolism to bufotenine were assessed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-selective reaction monitoring-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-SRM-MS/MS). 5-MeO-DMT (1mg/kg) had no effect on PPI when tested 45-min post-injection but disrupted PPI in animals pretreated with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline or the MAO-A/B inhibitor pargyline. The combined effect of 5-MeO-DMT and pargyline on PPI was antagonized by pretreatment with either WAY-100,635 or MDL 11,939. Inhibition of MAO-A increased the level of 5-MeO-DMT in plasma and whole brain, but had no effect on the conversion of 5-MeO-DMT to bufotenine, which was found to be negligible. The present results confirm that 5-MeO-DMT can disrupt PPI by

  9. Neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities of a novel iron chelator-brain selective monoamine oxidase-A/monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Kupershmidt, Lana; Aluf, Yuval; Mechlovich, Danit; Kabha, Hoda; Danovitch, Lena; Zurawski, Vincent R; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we have designed and synthesized a novel multipotent, brain-permeable iron-chelating drug, VAR10303 (VAR), possessing both propargyl and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory moieties. The present study was undertaken to determine the multiple pharmacological activities of VAR in neurodegenerative preclinical models. We demonstrate that VAR affords iron chelating/iron-induced lipid-peroxidation inhibitory potency and brain selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitory effects, with only limited tyramine-cardiovascular potentiation of blood pressure. The results show that in 6-hydroxydopamine rat (neuroprotection) and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse (neurorescue) Parkinson's disease models, VAR significantly attenuated the loss of striatal dopamine levels, markedly reduced dopamine turnover, and increased tyrosine-hydroxylase levels. Furthermore, chronic systemic treatment of aged rats with VAR improved cognitive behavior deficits and enhanced the expression levels of neurotrophic factors (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and nerve growth factor), Bcl-2 family members and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that the multitarget compound VAR exerted neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease and aging, further suggesting that a drug that can regulate multiple brain targets could be an ideal treatment-strategy for age-associated neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25499799

  10. Microfabrics in depleted mantle plaeotransform (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Von Der Handt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite contains several wrench zones that have been interpreted as paleotransforms. These transform-ridge systems developed at the transition between ridge development and intra-oceanic subduction that resulted in depleted mantle (about 18 % melt according to olivine Mg# - spinel Cr#). The most prominent is the Bogota Peninsula paleotransform, a 10 km wide shear zone in which strain localizes in the 2 km wide Ouassé mylonite zone. This strain gradient is associated with microstructure and microfabric evolution that informs the relationship between hydration and strain in mantle mylonite. Olivine recrystallized grain size varies from about 1 mm to about 0.2 mm toward the mylonite zone. The strain gradient is also demonstrated by increasing deformation of orthopyroxene (opx) grains that become elongate porphyroclasts in the mylonite zone. Orthopyroxene geothermometry reveals T ~ 1050-1000 C (Ca-opx) and 950-850 C (Cr-Al-opx) in the least deformed rocks. In the mylonite zone a wider range of T is recorded, with minima reaching 850 C (Ca-opx) and 750 C (Cr-Al-opx). Electron microprobe analysis also detects the presence of 20-200 micron interstitial, high-temperature amphibole (pargasite), with modal abundance increasing in the mylonite zone; this suggests that high-temperature pervasive fluid flow may have played a role in strain localization and mylonitization. Olivine crystallographic fabrics include A-type and E-type, the latter possibly reflecting hydration of shear zone tectonites. E-type fabrics are present in both mylonite and less deformed rocks, and appear to be more common in rocks with olivine grain size < 400 microns. A correlation between E-type fabrics and amphibole mode is being investigated. The shear zone protolith was depleted mantle in which the ridge-transform system was permeated by fluids. These fluids initially originated at the subduction interface, but during the transform evolution, ocean water likely permeated the shear

  11. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  12. Health effects of embedded depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    McClain, David E; Benson, Kimberly A; Dalton, Tom K; Ejnik, John; Emond, Christy A; Hodge, Shelly J; Kalinich, John F; Landauer, Michael R; Livengood, David R; Miller, Alexandra C; Pellmar, Terry C; Stewart, Michael D; Villa, Vilmar; Xu, Jiaquan

    2002-02-01

    The health effects of embedded fragments of depleted uranium (DU) are being investigated to determine whether current surgical fragment-removal policies are appropriate for this metal. The authors studied rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate that uranium from implanted DU fragments distributes to tissues distant from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in kidney that would be nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed with embedded DU, indicating that the kidney adapts when exposed chronically. Nonetheless, further studies of the long-term health impact are needed. DU is mutagenic and transforms human osteoblastic cells into a tumorigenic phenotype. It alters neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crosses the placental barrier, and enters fetal tissue. Preliminary data also indicate decreased rodent litter size when animals are bred 6 months or longer after DU implantation. PMID:11873491

  13. Vacancy Formation Enthalpy in Polycrystalline Depleted Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, K. R.; Lynn, K. G.; Weber, M. H.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy was performed as a function of temperature and beam energy on polycrystalline depleted uranium (DU) foil. Samples were run with varying heat profiles all starting at room temperature. While collecting Doppler-Broadening data, the temperature of the sample was cycled several times. The first heat cycle shows an increasing S-parameter near temperatures of 400K to 500K much lower than the first phase transition of 941K indicating increasing vacancies possibly due to oxygen diffusion from the bulk to the surface. Vacancy formation enthalpies were calculated fitting a model to the data to be 1.6± 0.16 eV. Results are compared to previous work [3,4].

  14. Policies on global warming and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B.

    1987-04-01

    The recent discovery of a dramatic seasonal drop in the amount of ozone over Antarctica has catalyzed concern for protection of stratospheric ozone, the layer of gas that shields the entire planet from excess ultraviolet radiation. Conservative scientific models predict about a 5% reduction in the amount of global ozone by the middle of the next century, with large local variations. The predicted global warming from increased emissions of greenhouse gases will also have differing effects on local climate and weather conditions and consequently on agriculture. Although numerous uncertainties are associated with both ozone depletion and a global warming, there is a consensus that world leaders need to address the problems. The US Congress is now beginning to take note of the task. In this article, one representative outlines some perceptions of the problems and the policy options available to Congress.

  15. Tylosin depletion from edible pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Francesch, R; Arboix, M; Pérez, B

    2002-12-01

    The depletion of tylosin from edible pig tissues was studied following 5 days of intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 10 mg/kg of tylosin to 16 crossbreed pigs. Animals were slaughtered at intervals after treatment and samples of muscle, kidney, liver, skin+fat, and injection site were collected and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seven days after the completion of treatment, the concentration of tylosin in kidney, skin+fat, and at the injection site was higher than the European Union maximal residue limit (MRL) of 100 microg/kg. Tylosin residues in all tissues were below the quantification limit (50 microg/kg) at 10 and 14 days post-treatment. PMID:12443694

  16. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  17. Retention behavior of C1-C6 aliphatic monoamines on anion-exchange and polymethacrylate resins with heptylamine as eluent.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2004-06-11

    Retention behavior of C1-C6, aliphatic monoamines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, amylamine and hexylamine) on columns (150 mm x 6 mm i.d.) packed with various anion-exchange resins (styrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) copolymer-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SAX, polymethacrylate-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SuperQ-5PW and polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel DEAE-5PW) and unfunctionized polymethacrylate resins (TSKgel G5000PW and TSKgel G3000PWXL) was investigated with basic solutions (sodium hydroxide and heptylamine) as the eluents. Due to strongly electrostatic repulsion (ion-exclusion effect) between these anion-exchange resins and these amines, peak resolution between these amines on these anion-exchange resin columns was unsatisfactory with both sodium hydroxide and heptylamine as the eluents. In contrast, these polymethacrylate resins were successfully applied as the stationary phases for the separation of these C1-C6 amines with heptylamine as eluent, because of both small hydrophobicity and small cation-exchange ability of these resins. Excellent simultaneous separation, highly sensitive conductimetric detection and symmetrical peaks for these C1-C6 amines were achieved on the TSKgel G3000PWXL column in 35 min with 5 mM heptylamine at pH 11.1 as the eluent. PMID:15250421

  18. Extraneuronal Monoamine Transporter Mediates the Permissive Action of Cortisol in the Guinea Pig Trachea: Possible Involvement of Tracheal Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Qiu, Wenying; Zheng, Yiqing; Li, Hui; Li, Yijia; Feng, Bing; Guo, Shu; Yan, Li; Cao, Ji-Min

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol, a member of glucocorticoids, could potentiate the action of catecholamine by a non-genomic mechanism. Although this permissive effect has been well appreciated in the anti-asthmatic medication, the underlying signaling pathway has remained mysterious. Here, we show that extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), a membraneous reuptake transporter for circulating catecholamine clearance, is the direct target of cortisol in its permissive effect. We found that BSA-conjugated cortisol, which functions as a cortisol but cannot penetrate cell membrane, enhanced the spasmolytic effect of β-adrenoceptor agonist (isoprenaline) in histamine-sensitized tracheal spirals of guinea pigs, and pharmacological inhibition of EMT with famotidine was powerful enough to imitate the permissive action of cortisol. To our surprise, EMT protein expression was high in the chondrocytes of tracheal cartilage, but was undetectable in tracheal smooth muscle cells. The functionality of EMT was further confirmed with measurement of catecholamine uptake by tracheal chondrocytes. Moreover, cortisol-initiated membrane signaling could activate protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates EMT and induces its internalization via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. Both of the mechanisms slow down the reuptake process by chondrocytes, leading to extracellular catecholamine accumulation and results in a more profound adrenergic signaling activation in tracheal smooth muscle cells. Thus, an EMT-centered pathway was proposed to explain the permissive action of cortisol. Collectively, our results highlight the role of EMT in the crosstalk between glucocorticoid and catecholamine. EMT may represent a promising target for adrenergic signaling modulation. PMID:24098439

  19. Polymorphism in the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 Gene Decreases the Risk of Parkinson's Disease in Han Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinglong; Xu, Pingrong; Zhao, Quanzhen; An, Ran; Jia, Hua; Liu, Zhuolin; Xu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polymorphisms rs363371 and rs363324 in the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) gene have been associated with risk of PD in an Italian population, and our aim is to investigate the association between the two single-nucleotide polymorphisms and PD in Han Chinese. Methods. 561 Han Chinese PD patients and 491 healthy age- and gender-matched controls were genotyped using Ligase detection reaction (LDR) method. Result. Both of patient and control groups showed similar genotype frequencies between patients and controls at both rs363371 and rs363324, as well as similar minor A allele frequencies at rs363371 (P = 0.452) and rs363324 (P = 0.413). None of the observed haplotypes showed a significant association with PD. Subgroup analysis by gender and age at onset revealed a significant association between the A allele of rs363371 and PD in Han Chinese males relative to healthy controls (OR 0.799, 95%  CI 0.665 to 0.959, P = 0.016), and this association remained significant after adjusting for age (OR 0.785, 95%  CI 0.652 to 0.945, P = 0.011). Conclusion. These results suggest that polymorphism of VMAT2 locus is associated with risk of PD in Han Chinese overall but that the A allele at rs363371 may protect against PD in Han Chinese males. PMID:26246935

  20. Peripheral oxytocin treatment affects the rat adreno-medullary catecholamine content modulating expression of vesicular monoamine transporter 2.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, P; Spasojevic, N; Stefanovic, B; Bozovic, N; Jasnic, N; Djordjevic, J; Dronjak, S

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to influence on neuroendocrine function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peripheral oxytocin treatment on the synthesis, uptake and content of adreno-medullary catecholamine. For this purpose oxytocin (3.6μg/100g body weight, s.c) was administrated to male rats once a day over 14 days. In order to assess the effect of peripheral oxytocin treatment on adreno-medullary catecholamine we measured epinephrine and norepinephrine content and gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), norepinephrine transporter (NET) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in the adrenal medulla. Our results show a significant increase of epinephrine (1.7-fold, p<0.05) and norepinephrine (1.5-fold, p<0.05) content in oxytocin treated animals compared to saline treated ones. Oxytocin treatment had no effect either on mRNA or protein level of TH and NET. Under oxytocin treatment the increase in VMAT2 mRNA level was not statistically significant, but it caused a significant increase in protein level of VMAT2 (3.7-fold, p<0.001). These findings indicate that oxytocin treatment increases catecholamine content in the rat adrenal medulla modulating VMAT2 expression. PMID:24239562

  1. Chemotherapy-Induced Monoamine Oxidase Expression in Prostate Carcinoma Functions as a Cytoprotective Resistance Enzyme and Associates with Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P.; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M.; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S.; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H.; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25198178

  2. Individual differences in changes in mood and platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity during hormonal replacement therapy in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M; Vogel, W; Peterson, L G; Snyder, M B

    1996-10-01

    Estrogen replacement treatment in menopausal women has been reported to have a positive effect on mood states. However, the addition of a progestin partially negates this positive effect in some women. The opposite effects of estrogen and progestin on mood may relate to their opposite effects on adrenergic and serotonergic neural function. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 38 nondepressed menopausal women were cyclically treated with estrogen and estrogen plus progestin, or with placebo, for five 28-day cycles. This paper identifies the pretreatment attributes of women who do and do not have negative mood responses to progestin, and examines the relationship of these adverse side-effects to platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO), a marker of adrenergic and serotonergic functioning. Adverse mood responses to progestin occur in women with a long duration of menopause, low pretreatment serum estradiol and testosterone levels, high pretreatment serum FSH levels, low pretreatment platelet MAO activity, and pretreatment mood abnormalities. We conclude that adverse mood response to the addition of a progestin occurs in menopausal women who have low pretreatment gonadal hormone levels secondary to a long duration of menopause. Impaired central nervous system adrenergic and serotonergic functioning also may be a factor predisposing to a negative mood response to progestin. PMID:9044441

  3. Interactions Between Monoamine Oxidase A and Punitive Discipline in African American and Caucasian Men’s Antisocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Daniel Ewon; Shaw, Daniel S.; Hyde, Luke W.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype and childhood maltreatment predict Caucasian boys’ antisocial behavior, the generalizability of this gene-environment interaction to more diverse populations and more common parenting behaviors, such as punitive discipline in early childhood, is not clearly understood. Among 189 low-income men (44% African American, 56% Caucasian) who underwent rigorous assessments of family behavior and social context longitudinally across 20 years, those men with the low activity MAOA allele who experienced more punitive discipline at ages 1.5, 2, and 5 years showed more antisocial behavior from ages 15 through 20 years. Effects of punitive discipline on antisocial behavior differed by caregiver and age at which it occurred, suggesting sensitive periods throughout early childhood in which low MAOA activity elevated boys’ vulnerability to harsh parenting and risk for antisocial behavior. This genetic vulnerability to punitive discipline—and not just extreme, maltreatment experiences—may generalize to other male populations at risk for antisocial behavior. PMID:27014508

  4. The Influence of Monoamine Oxidase Variants on the Risk of Betel Quid-Associated Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Chen, Yuk-Kwan; Wu, Ju-Hui; Huang, Jhen-Hao; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Ka-Wo

    2014-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) and areca nut (AN) (major BQ ingredient) are group I human carcinogens illustrated by International Agency for Research on Cancer and are closely associated with an elevated risk of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx. The primary alkaloid of AN, arecoline, can be metabolized via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) gene by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the variants of the susceptible candidate MAO genes are associated with OPMDs and oral and pharyngeal cancer. A significant trend of MAO-A mRNA expression was found in in vitro studies. Using paired human tissues, we confirmed the significantly decreased expression of MAO-A and MAO-B in cancerous tissues when compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Moreover, we determined that MAO-A single nucleotide polymorphism variants are significantly linked with oral and pharyngeal cancer patients in comparison to OPMDs patients [rs5953210 risk G-allele, odds ratio = 1.76; 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.01]. In conclusion, we suggested that susceptible MAO family variants associated with oral and pharyngeal cancer may be implicated in the modulation of MAO gene activity associated with ROS. PMID:25389533

  5. Oral administration of Cimicifuga racemosa extract affects immobilization stress-induced changes in murine cerebral monoamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nadaoka, Isao; Yasue, Masaaki; Sami, Manabu; Kitagawa, Yasushi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects of Cimicifuga racemosa (CR) plant extracts on the changes in levels of the cerebral monoamines norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT), the respective metabolites 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and plasma corticosterone in mice subjected to acute immobilization stress. Single oral administration of the CR extract (1,000 mg/kg) significantly attenuated plasma corticosterone levels that had been increased as a result of enforced immobilization. Acute immobilization stress caused significant changes in the corresponding amine-to-metabolite ratios in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cortex; however, CR-extract treatment significantly attenuated the MHPG/NE change in the hypothalamus, and the 5-HIAA/5- HT changes in each region of the brain. Our results suggest that the CR extract interacts not only with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis but also with the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM) system under stress conditions. Thus the CR extract can alleviate acute stress responses by suppressing the changes of amine-to-metabolite ratio in brain. PMID:22572387

  6. MicroRNA-142 Reduces Monoamine Oxidase A Expression and Activity in Neuronal Cells by Downregulating SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Datta Chaudhuri, Amrita; Yelamanchili, Sowmya V.; Fox, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRs) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. In HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), miR-142 was found to be upregulated in neurons and myeloid cells in the brain. We investigated the downstream effects of chronic miR-142 upregulation in neuronal cells by comparing gene expression in stable clones of the human neuroblastoma cell line BE(2)M17 expressing miR-142 to controls. Microarray analysis revealed that miR-142 expression led to a reduction in monoamine oxidase (MAO) A mRNA, which was validated by qRT-PCR. In addition to the mRNA, the MAOA protein level and enzyme activity were also reduced. Examination of primary human neurons revealed that miR-142 expression indeed resulted in a downregulation of MAOA protein level. Although MAOA is not a direct target of miR-142, SIRT1, a key transcriptional upregulator of MAOA is, thus miR-142 downregulation of MAOA expression is indirect. MiR-142 induced decrease in MAOA expression and activity may contribute to the changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission reported in HAND. PMID:24244526

  7. Alteration of behavior and monoamine levels attributable to Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 in germ-free mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Yen-Te; Wu, Chien-Chen; Chou, Geng-Ting; Wang, Sabrina; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Probiotics, defined as live bacteria or bacterial products, confer a significant health benefit to the host, including amelioration of anxiety-like behavior and psychiatric illnesses. Here we administered Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 (PS128) to a germ-free (GF) mouse model to investigate the impact of the gut-brain axis on emotional behaviors. First, we demonstrated that chronic administration of live PS128 showed no adverse effects on physical health. Then, we found that administration of live PS128 significantly increased the total distance traveled in the open field test and decreased the time spent in the closed arm in the elevated plus maze test, whereas the administration of PS128 had no significant effects in the depression-like behaviors of GF mice. Also, chronic live PS128 ingestion significantly increased the levels of both serotonin and dopamine in the striatum, but not in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. These results suggest that the chronic administration of PS128 is safe and could induce changes in emotional behaviors. The behavioral changes are correlated with the increase in the monoamine neurotransmitters in the striatum. These findings suggest that daily intake of the L. plantarum strain PS128 could improve anxiety-like behaviors and may be helpful in ameliorating neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26522841

  8. Association of DNA methylation and monoamine oxidase A gene expression in the brains of different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Eo, JungWoo; Lee, Hee-Eun; Nam, Gyu-Hwi; Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Sang-Eun; Seo, Bohyun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2016-04-15

    The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is an important candidate gene for human behavior that encodes an enzyme regulating the metabolism of key neurotransmitters. The regulatory mechanisms of the MAOA gene in dogs are yet to be elucidated. We measured MAOA gene transcription and analyzed the VNTR genotype and methylation status of the gene promoter region in different dog breeds to determine whether MAOA expression is correlated with the MAOA genotype or epigenetic modification in dogs. We found brain-specific expression of the MAOA gene and different transcription levels in different dog breeds including Beagle, Sapsaree, and German shepherd, and also a robust association of the DNA methylation of the gene promoter with mRNA levels. However, the 90 bp tandem repeats that we observed near the transcription start site were not variable, indicating no correlation with canine MAOA activity. These results show that differential DNA methylation in the MAOA promoter region may affect gene expression by modulating promoter activity. Moreover, the distinctive patterns of MAOA expression and DNA methylation may be involved in breed-specific or individual behavioral characteristics, such as aggression, because behavioral phenotypes are related to different physiological and neuroendocrine responses. PMID:26784655

  9. Biodistribution of a positron-emitting suicide inactivator of monoamine oxidase, carbon-11 pargyline, in mice and a rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwata, K.; Ido, T.; Yanai, K.; Kawashima, K.; Miura, Y.; Monma, M.; Watanuki, S.; Takahashi, T.; Iwata, R.

    1985-06-01

    Carbon-11 (/sup 11/C) pargyline, which is a suicide inactivator of Type B monoamine oxidase (MAO), was synthesized by the reaction of N-demethylpargyline with /sup 11/CH/sub 3/l. Biodistribution was investigated in mice, and positron tomographic images of the heart and lung in a rabbit were obtained. The distribution of /sup 11/C after administration of (/sup 11/C)pargyline was measured in several organs and blood at various time intervals. After 30 min its concentrations in the organs were constant. Subcellular distribution studies in the brain, lung, liver, and kidney showed that 59-70% of the /sup 11/C became acid-insoluble and 9-33% was present in the crude mitochondrial fraction at 60 min after injection. The uptakes of the /sup 11/C in each organ except for the kidney and spleen seemed to correlate with the in vitro enzymatic activity of Type B MAO. At high loading dose a nonspecific uptake was observed.

  10. Novel 2H-chromen-2-one derivatives of resveratrol: Design, synthesis, modeling and use as human monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ban-Feng; Cheng, Hui-Jie; Ren, Jing; Li, Hong-Lin; Guo, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Xing-Xing; Liao, Chenzhong

    2015-10-20

    Using a fragment-based drug design strategy, two biomedical interesting fragments, resveratrol and coumarin were linked to design a series of novel human monoamine oxidase (hMAO) inhibitors with a scaffold of 3-((E)-3-(2-((E)-styryl)phenyl)acryloyl)-2H-chromen-2-one, which demonstrated a very interesting selectivity profile against hMAO-A and hMAO-B: some compounds with this scaffold are selective hMAO-A inhibitors, whereas some are selective hMAO-B inhibitors. The small changes in the substituents of the coumarin moiety led to this interesting selectivity profile. The most potent selective hMAO-B inhibitor D7 has a selectivity ratio of 20.93, with an IC₅₀ value of 2.78 μM, similar or better than selegiline (IC₅₀ = 2.89 μM), a selective hMAO-B inhibitor currently in the market for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Our modeling study indicates that Tyr 326 of hMAO-B (or corresponded Ile 335 of hMAO-A) may be the determinant for the specificity of these compounds. The selectivity profile of compounds reported herein suggests that we can further develop both selective hMAO-A and hMAO-B inhibitors based on this novel scaffold. PMID:26352677

  11. Development of fluorinated methoxylated chalcones as selective monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors: Synthesis, biochemistry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bijo; Mathew, Githa Elizabeth; Uçar, Gülberk; Baysal, Ipek; Suresh, Jerad; Vilapurathu, Jobin Kunjumon; Prakasan, Aneesh; Suresh, Jeethu Kuruppath; Thomas, Anjana

    2015-10-01

    A series of methoxylated chalcones with fluoro and trifluoromethyl derivatives were synthesized and investigated for their ability to inhibit human monoamine oxidase A and B. The chemical structures of the compounds have been characterized by means of their (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass spectroscopic datas and elemental analysis. The results demonstrate that these compounds are reversible and selective MAO-B inhibitors with a competitive mode of inhibition. The most potent compound (2E)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] prop-2-en-1-one showed the best activity and higher selectivity towards hMAO-B with Ki and SI values of 0.22±0.01μM and 0.05 comparable to that standard drug, Selegiline Ki and SI values were found as 0.33±0.03μM and 0.04, respectively. Molecular docking studies were carried out to further explain the in vitro results of the new compounds, and to identify the hypothetical binding mode for the compounds inside the inhibitor binding cavity of hMAO-B. PMID:26189013

  12. The protective role of Bax Inhibitor-1 against chronic mild stress through the inhibition of monoamine oxidase A

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Marahatta, Anu; Lin, Shun-Mei; Lee, Mi-Rin; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyung Min; Lee, Hee Jae; Lee, Jae-Won; Bagalkot, Tarique Rajasaheb; Chung, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is a regulator of apoptosis linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It has been hypothesized that BI-1 protects against neuron degenerative diseases. In this study, BI-1−/− mice showed increased vulnerability to chronic mild stress accompanied by alterations in the size and morphology of the hippocampi, enhanced ROS accumulation and an ER stress response compared with BI-1+/+ mice. BI-1−/− mice exposed to chronic mild stress showed significant activation of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), but not MAO-B, compared with BI-1+/+ mice. To examine the involvement of BI-1 in the Ca2+-sensitive MAO activity, thapsigargin-induced Ca2+ release and MAO activity were analyzed in neuronal cells overexpressing BI-1. The in vitro study showed that BI-1 regulates Ca2+ release and related MAO-A activity. This study indicates an endogenous protective role of BI-1 under conditions of chronic mild stress that is primarily mediated through Ca2+-associated MAO-A regulation. PMID:24292328

  13. Changes in brain biogenic monoamines induced by the nootropic drugs adafenoxate and meclofenoxate and by citicholine (experiments on rats).

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Stancheva, S L; Tocuschieva, L; Petkov, V V

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of Adafenoxate (Adf), meclofenoxate (Mf) and citicholine (CCh) administered at a daily dose of 100 mg/kg for 7 days on the levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the frontal cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats were studied. 2. Adafenoxate increased the NA level in the striatum and decreased it in the hypothalamus; it increased the DA level in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus and decreased it in the striatum; it increased the 5-HT level in the cerebral cortex and decreased it in the hippocampus. 3. Meclofenoxate decreased the NA level in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; it increased the DA level in the hippocampus and hypothalamus and the 5-HT level in the cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus. 4. Citicholine increased the NA level in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; it increased the DA level in the striatum and the 5-HT level in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus. 5. An attempt is made to explain some similarities and differences in the behavioral effects of the drugs tested (and those observed in other studies) by the changes they induce in brain biogenic monoamines. PMID:2105261

  14. 1,4-Diphenalkylpiperidines: A new scaffold for the design of potent inhibitors of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Culver, John P; Janganati, Venumadhav; Zheng, Guangrong; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    A series of 1,4-diphenalkylpiperidine analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their affinity and inhibitory potency at the [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding site and [(3)H]dopamine (DA) uptake site on the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). Results revealed that translocation of the phenethyl side chains of lobelane from C2 and C6 to C1 and C4 around the central piperidine ring slightly reduces affinity and inhibitory potency at VMAT2 with respect to lobelane. However, methoxy and fluoro-substitution of either phenyl ring of these 1,4-diphenethyl analogs afforded VMAT2 inhibition comparable or higher (5-fold) affinity at the DTBZ binding and DA uptake sites relative to lobelane, whereas replacement of the 4-phenethyl moiety in these analogs with a 4-phenmethyl moiety markedly reduced affinity for the DTBZ binding and DA uptake sites by 3- and 5-fold, respectively. Among the twenty five 1,4-diphenethylpiperidine analogs evaluated, compounds containing a 4-(2-methoxyphenethyl) moiety exhibited the most potent inhibition of DTBZ binding and vesicular DA uptake. From this subgroup, analogs 8h, 8j and 8m exhibited Ki values of 9.3nM, 13nM and 13nM, respectively, for inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake by VMAT2, and represent some of the most potent inhibitors of VMAT2 function reported thus far. PMID:27212067

  15. Tryptamine serves as a proligand of the AhR transcriptional pathway whose activation is dependent of monoamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Vikström Bergander, Linda; Cai, Wen; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Pongratz, Ingemar

    2012-09-01

    The function of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mediating the biological effect to environmental pollutants is well established. However, accumulated evidence indicates a wide range of physiological and pathological functions mediated by the AhR, suggesting the existence of endogenous AhR ligand(s). The nature of an AhR ligand remain elusive; however, it is known that the AhR is activated by several compounds, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or the tryptophan photoproduct 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole. In this study, we show that physiological concentrations of tryptamine (TA) lead to induction of cytochrome P4501A1 transcription through an AhR-dependent mechanism. In addition, we show that activation of the AhR by TA requires a functional monoamino oxidase system, suggesting that TA acts as an AhR proligand possibly by converting to a high-affinity AhR ligand. Taken together, we show a possible mechanism, through which AhR signaling is activated by endogenous conversion of TA involving monoamine oxidases. PMID:22865928

  16. A comparative computational investigation on the proton and hydride transfer mechanisms of monoamine oxidase using model molecules.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Vildan Enisoğlu; Erdem, Safiye Sağ

    2013-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes regulate the level of neurotransmitters by catalyzing the oxidation of various amine neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. Therefore, they are the important targets for drugs used in the treatment of depression, Parkinson, Alzeimer and other neurodegenerative disorders. Elucidation of MAO-catalyzed amine oxidation will provide new insights into the design of more effective drugs. Various amine oxidation mechanisms have been proposed for MAO so far, such as single electron transfer mechanism, polar nucleophilic mechanism and hydride mechanism. Since amine oxidation reaction of MAO takes place between cofactor flavin and the amine substrate, we focus on the small model structures mimicking flavin and amine substrates so that three model structures were employed. Reactants, transition states and products of the polar nucleophilic (proton transfer), the water-assisted proton transfer and the hydride transfer mechanisms were fully optimized employing various semi-empirical, ab initio and new generation density functional theory (DFT) methods. Activation energy barriers related to these mechanisms revealed that hydride transfer mechanism is more feasible. PMID:24121676

  17. Vanillin-induced amelioration of depression-like behaviors in rats by modulating monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yang; He, Haihui; Li, Guangwu

    2015-02-28

    Olfaction plays an important role in emotions in our daily life. Pleasant odors are known to evoke positive emotions, inducing relaxation and calmness. The beneficial effects of vanillin on depressive model rats were investigated using a combination of behavioral assessments and neurotransmitter measurements. Before and after chronic stress condition (or olfactory bulbectomy), and at the end of vanillin or fluoxetine treatment, body weight, immobility time on the forced swimming test and sucrose consumption in the sucrose consumption test were measured. Changes in these assessments revealed the characteristic phenotypes of depression in rats. Neurotransmitters were measured using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. Our results indicated that vanillin could alleviate depressive symptoms in the rat model of chronic depression via the olfactory pathway. Preliminary analysis of the monoamine neurotransmitters revealed that vanillin elevated both serotonin and dopamine levels in brain tissue. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effect of vanillin against chronic depressive disorder via olfactory pathway. This suggests that vanillin may be a potential pharmacological agent for the treatment of major depressive disorder. PMID:25595338

  18. Using depletion to control colloidal crystal assemblies of hard cuboctahedra.

    PubMed

    Karas, Andrew S; Glaser, Jens; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-06-21

    Depletion interactions arise from entropic forces, and their ability to induce aggregation and even ordering of colloidal particles through self-assembly is well established, especially for spherical colloids. We vary the size and concentration of penetrable hard sphere depletants in a system of cuboctahedra, and we show how depletion changes the preferential facet alignment of the colloids and thereby selects different crystal structures. Moreover, we explain the cuboctahedra phase behavior using perturbative free energy calculations. We find that cuboctahedra can form a stable simple cubic phase, and, remarkably, that the stability of this phase can be rationalized only by considering the effects of both the colloid and depletant entropy. We corroborate our results by analyzing how the depletant concentration and size affect the emergent directional entropic forces and hence the effective particle shape. We propose the use of depletants as a means of easily changing the effective shape of self-assembling anisotropic colloids. PMID:27194463

  19. Elemental Depletions in the Magellanic Clouds and the Evolution of Depletions with Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D.; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) using UV absorption spectroscopy. We measure P ii and Fe ii along 84 spatially distributed sightlines toward the MCs using archival Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we also measure Si ii, Cr ii, and Zn ii from new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations. We analyze these spectra using a new spectral line analysis technique based on a semi-parametric Voigt profile model. We have combined these measurements with H i and H2 column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). Of our 84 P and 16 Zn measurements, 80 and 13, respectively, are depleted by more than 0.1 dex, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the Milky Way (MW) or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. We find GDR ranges of 190-565 in the LMC and 480-2100 in the SMC, which is broadly consistent with GDRs from the literature. These ranges represent actual location to location variation and are evidence of dust destruction and/or growth in the diffuse neutral phase of the interstellar medium. Where they overlap in metallicity, the gas-phase abundances of the MW, LMC, and SMC and damped Lyα systems evolve similarly with metallicity.

  20. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret. PMID:24940811

  1. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su Q.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2–17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman’s capsule) were present at 30–50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS. PMID:27192434

  2. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for a large group of inherited metabolic disorders most of which are due to a dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and, consequently, deficient energy production. MRC function depends on the coordinated expression of both nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. Thus, mitochondrial diseases can be caused by genetic defects in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome, or in the cross-talk between the two. This impaired cross-talk gives rise to so-called nuclear-mitochondrial intergenomic communication disorders, which result in loss or instability of the mitochondrial genome and, in turn, impaired maintenance of qualitative and quantitative mtDNA integrity. In children, most MRC disorders are associated with nuclear gene defects rather than alterations in the mtDNA itself. The mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders with an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission that have onset in infancy or early childhood and are characterized by a reduced number of copies of mtDNA in affected tissues and organs. The MDSs can be divided into least four clinical presentations: hepatocerebral, myopathic, encephalomyopathic and neurogastrointestinal. The focus of this review is to offer an overview of these syndromes, listing the clinical phenotypes, together with their relative frequency, mutational spectrum, and possible insights for improving diagnostic strategies. PMID:24708634

  3. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  4. Ozone depletion: 20 Years after the alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    Scientific curiosity in 1973 led to the challenge of determining the ultimate atmospheric fate of the chlorofluoromethanes, CFC-11 (CCl[sub 3]F) and CFC-12 (CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2]), whose presence at measurable levels in surface air had been detected only two years earlier. In retrospect, the decision to pursue the chemistry of CFC molecules to their final destruction and beyond foreordained an unusual outcome because CFCs are chemically inert and easily survive under almost all natural conditions. By midsummer 1994, the world is well on its way in transition to a CFC-free economy, although not yet to a CFC-free atmosphere. The rates of increase in atmospheric concentration for the three major CFCs (CFC-11, -12, and -113) have all slowed markedly in response to the restrictions of the revised Montreal protocol. Because of their long lifetimes, however, significant but gradually diminishing quantities of CFCs will remain in the atmosphere throughout the 21st century. Atomic chlorine will continue to be released into the stratosphere as long as CFCs persist, and ozone depletion will follow. The existence of the Montreal protocol and the agreement among industrial, governmental, and university scientists on its wisdom offers considerable promise for the handling of future global environmental problems.

  5. Research on mitigation of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y. )

    1994-08-01

    Chlorine atoms released from CFCs by solar Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and from natural sources, are effective catalytic agents for the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Research into large-scale mitigation methods is based on charging the chlorine radical, converting it into negative ions of low reactivity. Generation of charges-and subsequent removal of chlorine ions by atmospheric platforms and electromagnetic waves are described. This method is generally applicable to all halogens. This research is guided by the principle that the solution should be as non-intrusive environmentally as possible; i.e. no chemicals are to be injected. The large-scale mitigation requires the process to be energy efficient and to utilize energy sources already present in the atmosphere. Because of the wide variety of remediation concepts, each is being tested using a combination of laboratory and field experiments together with computer modeling. The first laboratory demonstration of ozone depletion and subsequent recovery due to charge injection is presented. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  6. Tylosin depletion in edible tissues of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Montesissa, C; De Liguoro, M; Santi, A; Capolongo, F; Biancotto, G

    1999-10-01

    The depletion of tylosin residues in edible turkey tissues was followed after 3 days of administration of tylosin tartrate at 500 mg l-1 in drinking water, to 30 turkeys. Immediately after the end of the treatment (day 0) and at day 1, 3, 5 and 10 of withdrawal, six turkeys (three males and three females) per time were sacrificed and samples of edible tissues were collected. Tissue homogenates were extracted, purified and analysed by HPLC according to a method previously published for the analysis of tylosin residues in pig tissues. In all tissues, tylosin residues were already below the detection limits of 50 micrograms kg-1 at time zero. However, in several samples of tissues (skin + fat, liver, kidney, muscle), from the six turkeys sacrificed at that time, one peak corresponding to an unknown tylosin equivalent was detected at measurable concentrations. The identification of this unknown compound was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis of the extracts from incurred samples. The mass fragmentation of the compound was consistent with the structure of tylosin D (the alcoholic derivative of tylosin A), the major metabolite of tylosin previously recovered and identified in tissues and/or excreta from treated chickens, cattle and pigs. PMID:10755131

  7. The behavioral effects of enriched housing are not altered by serotonin depletion but enrichment alters hippocampal neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Galani, Rodrigue; Berthel, Marie-Camille; Lazarus, Christine; Majchrzak, Monique; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2007-07-01

    To assess a possible role for serotonin in the mediation of the behavioral changes induced by enriched housing conditions (EC), adult female Long-Evans rats sustaining a serotonin depletion (150 microg of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, icv) and sham-operated rats were housed postoperatively for 30 days in enriched (12 rats/large cage containing various objects) or standard housing conditions (2 rats/standard laboratory cage). Thereafter, anxiety responses (elevated plus-maze), locomotor activity (in the home-cage), sensori-motor capabilities (beam-walking task), and spatial memory (eight-arm radial maze) were assessed. Monoamine levels were subsequently measured in the frontoparietal cortex and the hippocampus. Overall, EC reduced anxiety-related responses, enhanced sensori-motor performance and improved the memory span in the initial stage of the spatial memory task. Despite a substantial reduction of serotonergic markers in the hippocampus (82%) and the cortex (74%), these positive effects of EC were not altered by the lesion. EC reduced the serotonin levels in the ventral hippocampus (particularly in unlesioned rats: -23%), increased serotonin turnover in the entire hippocampus (particularly in lesioned rats: +36%) and augmented the norepinephrine levels in the dorsal hippocampus (+68% in unlesioned and +49% in lesioned rats); no such alterations were found in the frontoparietal cortex. Our data suggest that an intact serotonergic system is not a prerequisite for the induction of positive behavioral effects by EC. The neurochemical changes found in the hippocampus of EC rats, however, show that the monoaminergic innervation of the hippocampus is a target of EC. PMID:17493843

  8. Greater Monoamine Oxidase A Binding in Perimenopausal Age as Measured With Carbon 11–Labeled Harmine Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rekkas, Paraskevi Vivien; Wilson, Alan A.; Lee, Vivian Wai Han; Yogalingam, Priyanga; Sacher, Julia; Rusjan, Pablo; Houle, Sylvain; Stewart, Donna E.; Kolla, Nathan J.; Kish, Stephen; Chiuccariello, Lina; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Perimenopause is a period of high risk for mood disorders, and it has been proposed that perimenopause is also a window of risk for processes linked to later dementia. However, in human perimenopause, the neurobiological changes implicated in the genesis of mood disorders or dementia have not been identified. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is an important brain enzyme that creates oxidative stress, influences apoptosis, and metabolizes monoamines. After declines in estrogen level, MAO-A density may be elevated for a month or longer, and repeated declines in estrogen level occur with greater magnitude during perimenopause. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether MAO-A total distribution volume (VT), an index of MAO-A density, is elevated in women of perimenopausal age (41–51 years). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a cross-sectional study at a tertiary care psychiatric hospital, 58 women underwent carbon 11–labeled harmine positron emission tomography. These included 19 young women of reproductive age (mean [SD], 28.26 [5.05] years), 27 women of perimenopausal age (mean [SD] age, 45.21 [3.41] years; including 14 women with change in menstrual cycle length with a mean [SD] age of 45.50 [4.00] years and 13 women with no change in menstrual cycle length with a mean [SD] age of 44.92 [2.81] years), and 12 women in menopause (mean [SD] age, 56.25 [3.19] years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Values of MAO-A VT in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsal striatum, ventral striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain. RESULTS On average, MAO-A VT in perimenopausal age was elevated by 34% compared with reproductive age and by 16% compared with menopause (multivariate analysis of variance, group effect, F16,94 = 3.03; P < .001). Within the perimenopausal age group, meeting Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop criteria for perimenopause, which is mainly based on menstrual cycle length, was not associated with MAO-A VT (F8,18 = 0.548; P = .81) but

  9. Behavioral and monoamine perturbations in adult male mice with chronic inflammation induced by repeated peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Saritha; Dodd, Celia A; Filipov, Nikolay M

    2016-04-01

    Considering the limited information on the ability of chronic peripheral inflammation to induce behavioral alterations, including on their persistence after inflammatory stimuli termination and on associated neurochemical perturbations, this study assessed the effects of chronic (0.25 mg/kg; i.p.; twice weekly) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment on selected behavioral, neurochemical and molecular measures at different time points in adult male C57BL/6 mice. Behaviorally, LPS-treated mice were hypoactive after 6 weeks, whereas significant hyperactivity was observed after 12 weeks of LPS and 11 weeks after 13 week LPS treatment termination. Similar biphasic responses, i.e., early decrease followed by a delayed increase were observed in the open field test center time, suggestive of, respectively, increased and decreased anxiety. In a forced swim test, mice exhibited increased immobility (depressive behavior) at all times they were tested. Chronic LPS also produced persistent increase in splenic serotonin (5-HT) and time-dependent, brain region-specific alterations in striatal and prefrontocortical dopamine and 5-HT homeostasis. Microglia, but not astrocytes, were activated by LPS early and late, but their activation did not persist after LPS treatment termination. Above findings demonstrate that chronic peripheral inflammation initially causes hypoactivity and increased anxiety, followed by persistent hyperactivity and decreased anxiety. Notably, chronic LPS-induced depressive behavior appears early, persists long after LPS termination, and is associated with increased splenic 5-HT. Collectively, our data highlight the need for a greater focus on the peripheral/central monoamine alterations and lasting behavioral deficits induced by chronic peripheral inflammation as there are many pathological conditions where inflammation of a chronic nature is a hallmark feature. PMID:26802725

  10. Monoamine oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Du, Cheng-Kun; Zhan, Dong-Yun; Yoshimoto, Misa; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate the involvement of monoamine oxidase (MAO) in hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during ischemia as well as after reperfusion, we applied microdialysis technique to the heart of anesthetized rats. Dialysate samples were collected during 30 min of induced ischemia followed by 60 min of reperfusion. We monitored dialysate 3,4-dihydrobenzoic acid (3,4-DHBA) concentration as an index of hydroxyl radical production using a trapping agent (4-hydroxybenzoic acid), and dialysate myoglobin concentration as an index of cardiomyocyte injury in the ischemic region. The effect of local administration of a MAO inhibitor, pargyline, was investigated. Dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration increased from 1.9 ± 0.5 nM at baseline to 3.5 ± 0.7 nM at 20-30 min of occlusion. After reperfusion, dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration further increased reaching a maximum (4.5 ± 0.3 nM) at 20-30 min after reperfusion, and stabilized thereafter. Pargyline suppressed the averaged increase in dialysate 3,4-DHBA concentration by ∼72% during occlusion and by ∼67% during reperfusion. Dialysate myoglobin concentration increased from 235 ± 60 ng/ml at baseline to 1309 ± 298 ng/ml at 20-30 min after occlusion. After reperfusion, dialysate myoglobin concentration further increased reaching a peak (5833 ± 1017 ng/ml) at 10-20 min after reperfusion, and then declined. Pargyline reduced the averaged dialysate myoglobin concentration by ∼56% during occlusion and by ∼41% during reperfusion. MAO plays a significant role in hydroxyl radical production and cardiomyocyte injury during ischemia as well as after reperfusion. PMID:26953687

  11. The synchronizing research on structure of microcirculation and dynamic changes of monoamine neurotransmitter in the rat endbrain after exhaustive swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qiongjia; Li, He; Xiong, Ruo-Hong; Su, Quan-Sheng; Tan, Jin; Dai, Yi; Xu, Ming

    2003-12-01

    The changes of microconfiguration and dynamic changes of monoamines, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine(DA), in the rat endbrain after exhaustive swimming were observed in order to provide objective reference for evaluation of exercise central fatigue. Thirty-six male SD rates were divided randomly into 4 groups: group control (G1); group immediate after exhaustive swimming (G2); group 24 hours after exhaustive swimming (G3) and group 48 hours after exhaustive swimming (G4), 9 in each group. After adaptive swimming for 4 days, rats in G2, G3 and G4 took loaded swimming in ratio of 5 g for every 100g body weight (5%) till exhaustion. After decapitation, the endbrains of the rats in each group were taken for ordinary electron microscopic observation of change of microcofiguration and measurement of contents of 5-HT, NE and DA by fluorometric photometer. The ultrastructure of the endbrain cortex in G2 had apparent changes. In G3, improvement of ultrastructure of microcirculation in endbrain were observed; In G4, structure of microcirculation almost recovered to normal level. The level of 5-HT and NE in the endbrain of exhaustive swimming rat increased significantly, up to the highest in G3 (24h). It was therefore demonstrated that the configuration change of microcirculation and change of 5-HT and NE contents in rat endbrain after exhaustive exercise were synchronous and that the recovery of the configuration change of microcirculation was faster than change of 5-HT and NE contents, the ultrastructure change of microcirculation being reversible. These results indicate that the improvement of microcirculation in endbrain can help promote recovery of sporting central fatigue.

  12. Effect of Polymorphisms of Three Genes Mediating Monoamine Signalling on Brain Morphometry in Schizophrenia and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumari, Anupa A.; John, John P.; Halahalli, Harsha N.; Paul, Pradip; Thirunavukkarasu, Priyadarshini; Purushottam, Meera; Jain, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the effect of risk alleles of polymorphisms of three schizophrenia risk genes that mediate monoamine signalling in the brain on regional brain volumes of schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. The risk alleles and the gene polymorphisms studied were: Val allele of catechol o-methyltransferase (COMT) rs4680 polymorphism; short allele of 5-hydroxy tryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) polymorphism; and T allele of 5-hydroxy tryptamine 2A (5HT2A) rs6314 polymorphism. Methods The study was carried out on patients with recent onset schizophrenia (n=41) recruited from the outpatient department of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India and healthy control subjects (n=39), belonging to South Indian Dravidian ethnicity. Individual and additive effects of risk alleles of the above gene polymorphisms on brain morphometry were explored using voxel-based morphometry. Results Irrespective of phenotypes, individuals with the risk allele T of the rs6314 polymorphism of 5HT2A gene showed greater (at cluster-extent equivalent to family wise error-correction [FWEc] p<0.05) regional brain volumes in the left inferior temporal and left inferior occipital gyri. Those with the risk alleles of the other two polymorphisms showed a trend (at p<0.001, uncorrected) towards lower regional brain volumes. A trend (at p<0.001, uncorrected) towards additive effects of the above 3 risk alleles (subjects with 2 or 3 risk alleles vs. those with 1 or no risk alleles) on brain morphology was also noted. Conclusion The findings of the present study have implications in understanding the role of individual and additive effects of genetic variants in mediating regional brain morphometry in health and disease. PMID:25912540

  13. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel dual monoamine-cholinesterase inhibitors as potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lang, Ming; Youdim, Moussa B H; Amit, Tamar; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Weinreb, Orly

    2016-10-01

    Current novel therapeutic approach suggests that multifunctional compounds with diverse biological properties and a single bioavailability and pharmacokinetic metabolism, will produce higher significant advantages in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Based on this rational, a new class of cholinesterase (ChE)-monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were designed and synthesized by amalgamating the propargyl moiety of the irreversible selective MAO-B inhibitor, neuroprotective/neurorestorative anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline, into the "N-methyl" position of the ChE inhibitor, anti-AD drug rivastigmine. Initially, we examined the MAO and ChE inhibitory effect of these novel compounds, MT series in vitro and in vivo. Among MT series, MT-031 exhibited higher potency as a dual MAO-A and ChE inhibitor compared to other compounds in acute-treated mice. Additionally, MT-031 was found to increase the striatal levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE), and prevent the metabolism of DA and 5-HT. Finally, we have demonstrated that MT-031 exerted neuroprotective effect against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. These findings provide evidence that MT-031 is a potent brain permeable novel multifunctional, neuroprotective and MAO-A/ChE inhibitor, preserves in one molecule entity some of the beneficial properties of its parent drugs, rasagiline and rivastigmine, and thus may be indicated as novel therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:27318273

  14. Monoamine oxidase A expression is suppressed in human cholangiocarcinoma via coordinated epigenetic and IL-6-driven events

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Frampton, Gabriel; Rao, Arundhati; Zhang, Kun-song; Chen, Wei; Lai, Jia-ming; Yin, Xiao-yu; Walker, Kimberly; Culbreath, Brianne; Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; Quinn, Matthew; McMillin, Matthew; Bradley, Michelle; Liang, Li-Jian; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The secretion of dopamine and serotonin is increased in cholangiocarcinoma, which has growth-promoting effects. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), the degradation enzyme of serotonin and dopamine, is suppressed in cholangiocarcinoma via an unknown mechanism. The aims of this study were to (i) correlate MAOA immunoreactivity with pathophysiological parameters of cholangiocarcinoma, (ii) determine the mechanism by which MAOA expression is suppressed and (iii) evaluate the consequences of restored MAOA expression in cholangiocarcinoma. Design MAOA expression was assessed in cholangiocarcinoma and non-malignant controls. The control of MAOA expression by promoter hypermethylation was evaluated and the contribution of IL-6 signaling to the suppression of MAOA expression was determined. The effects of MAOA overexpression on cholangiocarcinoma growth and invasion were also assessed. Results MAOA expression is correlated with differentiation, invasion and survival in cholangiocarcinoma. The MAOA promoter was hypermethylated immediately upstream of the start codon in cholangiocarcinoma samples and cell lines but not in non-malignant counterparts. IL-6 signaling also decreased MAOA expression via a mechanism independent of hypermethylation, involving the regulation of the balance between SP-1 transcriptional activity and its inhibitor, R1 repressor. Inhibition of both IL-6 signaling and DNA methylation restored MAOA levels to those observed in cholangiocytes. Forced MAOA overexpression inhibited cholangiocarcinoma growth and invasion. Conclusions MAOA expression is suppressed by the coordinated control of promoter hypermethylation and IL-6 signaling. MAOA may be a useful prognostic marker in the management of cholangiocarcinoma, and therapies designed to increase MAOA expression might prove beneficial in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:22906985

  15. Changes in Intensity of Serotonin Syndrome Caused by Adverse Interaction between Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and Serotonin Reuptake Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity. PMID:24577320

  16. The monoamine stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 counteracts downregulated dopamine output in the nucleus accumbens of long-term drinking Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Feltmann, Kristin; Fredriksson, Ida; Wirf, Malin; Schilström, Björn; Steensland, Pia

    2016-03-01

    We recently established that the monoamine stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 (OSU6162) decreased voluntary alcohol-mediated behaviors, including alcohol intake and cue/priming-induced reinstatement, in long-term drinking rats, while blunting alcohol-induced dopamine output in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of alcohol-naïve rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that OSU6162 attenuates alcohol-mediated behaviors by blunting alcohol's rewarding effects. Here, we evaluated the effects of long-term drinking and OSU6162 treatment (30 mg/kg, sc) on basal and alcohol-induced (2.5 g/kg, ip) NAc dopamine outputs in Wistar rats after 10 months of intermittent access to 20% alcohol. The results showed that basal and alcohol-induced NAc dopamine outputs were significantly lower in long-term drinking rats, compared with alcohol-naïve rats. In the long-term drinking rats, OSU6162 slowly increased and maintained the dopamine output significantly elevated compared with baseline for at least 4 hours. Furthermore, OSU6162 pre-treatment did not blunt the alcohol-induced output in the long-term drinking rats, a finding that contrasted with our previous results in alcohol-naïve rats. Finally, OSU6162 did not induce conditioned place preference (CPP) in either long-term drinking or alcohol-naïve rats, indicating that OSU6162 has no reinforcing properties. To verify that the CPP results were not due to memory acquisition impairment, we demonstrated that OSU6162 did not affect novel object recognition. In conclusion, these results indicate that OSU6162 attenuates alcohol-mediated behaviors by counteracting NAc dopamine deficits in long-term drinking rats and that OSU6162 is not rewarding on its own. Together with OSU6162's beneficial side-effect profile, the present study merits evaluation of OSU6162's clinical efficacy to attenuate alcohol use in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:26464265

  17. Oxidative stress-dependent sphingosine kinase-1 inhibition mediates monoamine oxidase A-associated cardiac cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pchejetski, Dimitri; Kunduzova, Oxana; Dayon, Audrey; Calise, Denis; Seguelas, Marie-Hélène; Leducq, Nathalie; Seif, Isabelle; Parini, Angelo; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The mitochondrial enzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO), its isoform MAO-A, plays a major role in reactive oxygen species-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis and postischemic cardiac damage. In the current study, we investigated whether sphingolipid metabolism can account for mediating MAO-A- and reactive oxygen species-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, MAO-A-dependent reactive oxygen species generation led to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, along with sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) inhibition. These phenomena were associated with generation of proapoptotic ceramide and decrease in prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate. These events were mimicked by inhibition of SphK1 with either pharmacological inhibitor or small interfering RNA, as well as by extracellular addition of C(2)-ceramide or H(2)O(2). In contrast, enforced expression of SphK1 protected H9c2 cells from serotonin- or H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis. Analysis of cardiac tissues from wild-type mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion revealed significant upregulation of ceramide and inhibition of SphK1. It is noteworthy that SphK1 inhibition, ceramide accumulation, and concomitantly infarct size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were significantly decreased in MAO-A-deficient animals. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the upregulation of ceramide/sphingosine 1-phosphate ratio is a critical event in MAO-A-mediated cardiac cell apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence linking generation of reactive oxygen species with SphK1 inhibition. Finally, we propose sphingolipid metabolites as key mediators of postischemic/reperfusion cardiac injury. PMID:17158340

  18. The aggression and behavioral abnormalities associated with monoamine oxidase A deficiency are rescued by acute inhibition of serotonin reuptake.

    PubMed

    Godar, Sean C; Bortolato, Marco; Castelli, M Paola; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Chen, Kevin; Ennas, M Grazia; Tambaro, Simone; Shih, Jean C

    2014-09-01

    The termination of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurotransmission is regulated by its uptake by the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT), as well as its degradation by monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A. MAO-A deficiency results in a wide set of behavioral alterations, including perseverative behaviors and social deficits. These anomalies are likely related to 5-HTergic homeostatic imbalances; however, the role of 5-HTT in these abnormalities remains unclear. To ascertain the role of 5-HTT in the behavioral anomalies associated to MAO-A deficiency, we tested the behavioral effects of its blocker fluoxetine on perseverative, social and aggressive behaviors in transgenic animals with hypomorphic or null-allele MAO-A mutations. Acute treatment with the 5-HTT blocker fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced aggressive behavior in MAO-A knockout (KO) mice and social deficits in hypomorphic MAO-A(Neo) mice. Furthermore, this treatment also reduced perseverative responses (including marble burying and water mist-induced grooming) in both MAO-A mutant genotypes. Both MAO-A mutant lines displayed significant reductions in 5-HTT expression across the prefrontal cortex, amygdala and striatum, as quantified by immunohistochemical detection; however, the down-regulation of 5-HTT in MAO-A(Neo) mice was more pervasive and widespread than in their KO counterparts, possibly indicating a greater ability of the hypomorphic line to enact compensatory mechanisms with respect to 5-HT homeostasis. Collectively, these findings suggest that the behavioral deficits associated with low MAO-A activity may reflect developmental alterations of 5-HTT within 5-HTergic neurons. Furthermore, the translational implications of our results highlight 5-HT reuptake inhibition as an interesting approach for the control of aggressive outbursts in MAO-A deficient individuals. PMID:24882701

  19. Azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, is a high-potency, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H.; Wegener, Gregers; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2012-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been shown to act at multiple cellular and molecular targets and as a result possesses diverse medical applications. Among these is a high potency reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) that may, at least in part, underlie its adverse effects but also its psycho- and neuromodulatory actions. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl species, is the major metabolite. Similar to MB, azure B also displays a variety of biological activities and may therefore contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these observations, the present study examines the interactions of azure B with recombinant human MAO-A and -B. The results show that azure B is a potent MAO-A inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 11 nM), approximately 6-fold more potent than is MB (IC{sub 50} = 70 nM) under identical conditions. Measurements of the time-dependency of inhibition suggest that the interaction of azure B with MAO-A is reversible. Azure B also reversibly inhibits the MAO-B isozyme with an IC{sub 50} value of 968 nM. These results suggest that azure B may be a hitherto under recognized contributor to the pharmacology and toxicology of MB by blocking central and peripheral MAO-A activity and as such needs to be considered during its use in humans and animals. Highlights: ► Methylene blue (MB) is a known potent MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, is more potent as a MAO-A inhibitor. ► Azure B may be a contributor to the CNS pharmacology and toxicology of MB.

  20. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II induces over-activation of monoamine oxidase type A: implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Manni, Maria Elena; Zazzeri, Marina; Musilli, Claudia; Bigagli, Elisabetta; Lodovici, Maura; Raimondi, Laura

    2013-10-15

    Several evidences indicate that increased cardiac mitochondrial monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) activity associates with a failing phenotype. Till now, the mechanism underlying such relation is largely unknown. We explored the hypothesis that exposure of cardiomyocytes to AT-II caused activation of MAO-A and also of catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, enzymes involved in degrading MAO's end products. Left ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from normoglycemic (N) and streptozotocin-injected (50 mg/kg) rats (D) treated or not treated with losartan (20 mg/kg/day in drinking water; DLos and NLos, respectively), a type 1 receptor (AT1) antagonist, for 3 weeks. In each group of cells, MAO, catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were measured radiochemically and spectrophotometrically. The same enzymes were also measured in HL-1 immortalized cardiomyocytes not exposed and exposed to AT-II (100 nM for 18 h) in the absence and in the presence of irbesartan (1 μM), an AT1 antagonist. MAO-A catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were found significantly higher in D, than in N cells. MAO-A positively correlated with catalase activity in D cells. MAO-A and aldehyde dehydrogenase but not catalase over-activation, were prevented in DLos cells. Similarly, MAO-A activity, but not catalase and aldehyde dehydrogenase increased significantly in HL-1 cells acutely exposed to AT-II and this increase was prevented when irbesartan, an AT1 antagonist was present. Over-activation of cardiomyocyte MAO-A activity is among acute (18 h) and short-term (2-weeks of diabetes) cardiac effects of AT-II and a novel target of AT1 antagonists, first line treatments of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24012905

  1. Changes in adrenoceptors and monoamine metabolism in neonatal and adult rat brain after postnatal exposure to the antihypertensive labetalol.

    PubMed Central

    Erdtsieck-Ernste, E. B.; Feenstra, M. G.; Botterblom, M. H.; De Barrios, J.; Boer, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the acute (single injection), direct (chronic treatment) and the long-lasting effects after exposure to the alpha 1/beta-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol during rat brain development on adrenoceptors and monoamine metabolism. 2. In 10-day-old rat pups, subcutaneously administered labetalol (10 mg kg-1) passed the blood-brain barrier, reaching a level of 2.1 micrograms g-1 tissue in the brain 90 min after injection. 3. Chronic labetalol treatment (10 mg kg-1, s.c., twice daily) during the first 10 days of life significantly increased alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding in the hypothalamus (+39%), but not in the occipital cortex. 4. This chronic postnatal labetalol treatment did not result in long-lasting changes in alpha 1- and beta-receptors measured on day 60. 5. A single labetalol injection (10 mg kg-1, s.c.) on postnatal day 10 significantly increased noradrenaline (NA) metabolism in all brain regions tested (+25 to 105%), but had no effects on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or dopamine metabolism. 6. Chronic labetalol treatment between postnatal (PN) days 1 and 10 also increased NA metabolism on PN 10 (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG)/NA, +20 to 100%), suggesting that tolerance to the acute effect of labetalol did not occur. A slight increase in 5-HT metabolism (20%) was induced by the chronic labetalol treatment in the hippocampus and meso-limbic system. 7. In general, long-lasting effects on NA metabolism could not be detected on day 60 more than one month after the treatment. However, 5-HT metabolism was significantly increased in all four brain regions measured (+20 to 70%). 8. We conclude that chronic labetalol exposure during early postnatal rat brain development does not cause long-lasting changes in beta-receptor number or NA metabolism, but appears to be critical for the rate of 5-HT metabolism in later life. PMID:1596689

  2. Comparison of the Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase and Butyrylcholinesterase Activities by Infusions from Green Tea and Some Citrus Peels

    PubMed Central

    Ademosun, Ayokunle O.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of infusions from green tea (Camellia sinensis) and some citrus peels [shaddock (Citrus maxima), grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), and orange (Citrus sinensis)] on key enzymes relevant to the management of neurodegenerative conditions [monoamine oxidase (MAO) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)]. The total phenol contents and antioxidant activities as typified by their 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radicals scavenging abilities, ferric reducing antioxidant properties, and Fe2+ chelating abilities were also investigated. Green tea had the highest total phenol (43.3 mg/g) and total flavonoid (16.4 mg/g) contents, when compared to orange [total phenol (19.6 mg/g), total flavonoid (6.5 mg/g)], shaddock [total phenol (16.3 mg/g), total flavonoid (5.2 mg/g)], and grapefruit [total phenol (17.7 mg/g), total flavonoid (5.9 mg/g)]. Orange (EC50 = 1.78 mg/mL) had the highest MAO inhibitory ability, while green tea had the least MAO inhibitory ability (EC50 = 2.56 mg/mL). Similarly, green tea had the least BChE inhibitory ability (EC50 = 5.43 mg/mL) when compared to the citrus peels' infusions. However, green tea infusions had the strongest highest ABTS radical scavenging ability, reducing power, and Fe2+ chelating ability. The inhibition of MAO and BChE activities by the green tea and citrus peels infusions could make them good dietary means for the prevention/management of neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25243093

  3. Neuroprotective effects of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine and its amide derivatives against Aβ(1-42)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Basile, Livia; Giuffrida, Alessandro; Copani, Agata; Tosto, Rita; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Pirrone, Emanuele; Drago, Filippo; Pignatello, Rosario; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and MAO inhibitors (MAOIs) are antidepressant drugs currently studied for their neuroprotective properties in neurodegenerative disorders. In the present work MAOIs such as tranylcypromine [trans-(+)-2-phenylcyclopropanamine, TCP] and its amide derivatives, TCP butyramide (TCP-But) and TCP acetamide (TCP-Ac), were tested for their ability to protect cortical neurons challenged with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ)-(1-42) oligomers (100 nM) for 48 h. TCP significantly prevented Aβ-induced neuronal death in a concentration-dependent fashion and was maximally protective only at 10 µM. TCP-But was maximally protective in mixed neuronal cultures at 1 µM, a lower concentration compared to TCP, whereas the new derivative, TCP-Ac, was more efficacious than TCP and TCP-But and significantly protected cortical neurons against Aβ toxicity at nanomolar concentrations (100 nM). Experiments carried out with the Thioflavin-T (Th-T) fluorescence assay for fibril formation showed that TCP and its amide derivatives influenced the early events of the Aβ aggregation process in a concentration-dependent manner. TCP-Ac was more effective than TCP-But and TCP in slowing down the Aβ(1-42) aggregates formation through a lengthening at the lag phase. In our experimental model co-incubation of Aβ(1-42) oligomers with TCP-Ac was able to almost completely prevent Aβ-induced neurodegeneration. These results suggest that inhibition of Aβ oligomer-mediated aggregation significantly contributes to the overall neuroprotective activity of TCP-Ac and also raise the possibility that TCP, and in particular the new compound TCP-Ac, might represent new pharmacological tools to yield neuroprotection in AD. PMID:26162702

  4. LINKAGE BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE AND STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two primary areas link the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion to global climate change: atmospheric processes and ecological processes. tmospheric processes establish a linkage through the dual roles of certain trace gases in promoting global warming and in depleting the ozon...

  5. Influence of Roller Burnishing Parameters on Depletion of Plasticity Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstein, V. Yu; Petrenko, K. P.

    2016-04-01

    Roller burnishing process considerably increases surface quality and service life of machine parts. Efficiency of roller burnishing rises greatly when technological inheritance (TI) is taken into account. Research results of degree of plasticity reserve depletion (DPRD) while roller burnishing are presented. Results obtained made it possible to establish mechanisms of strain accumulation and plasticity reserve depletion according to roller burnishing parameters.

  6. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  7. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a...

  8. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J.; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm. PMID:23722769

  9. Optimal Allocation of Sampling Effort in Depletion Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    We consider the problem of designing a depletion or removal survey as part of estimating animal abundance for populations with imperfect capture or detection rates. In a depletion survey, animals are captured from a given area, counted, and withheld from the population. This proc...

  10. BENZENE VAPOR DEPLETION IN THE PRESENCE OF PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three plant species, Eichhornia crassipes in a nutrient hydroponic culture Beta vulgaris saccharifera, and Beta vulgaris cicla in soil and in water cultures, were found to deplete benzene from the air. Following benzene depletion, plant tissues were extracted and no benzene was d...

  11. Effect of Acute Swim Stress on Plasma Corticosterone and Brain Monoamine Levels in Bidirectionally Selected DxH Recombinant Inbred Mouse Strains Differing in Fear Recall and Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Caroline A.; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F.; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus, and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 minutes after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:25117886

  12. Is Slow-Onset Long-Acting Monoamine Transport Blockade to Cocaine as Methadone is to Heroin? Implication for Anti-Addiction Medications

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Qing; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Li, Xia; Spiller, Krista; Li, Jie; Chun, Lauren; Wu, Kuo-Ming; Froimowitz, Mark; Gardner, Eliot L

    2010-01-01

    The success of methadone in treating opiate addiction has suggested that long-acting agonist therapies may be similarly useful for treating cocaine addiction. Here, we examined this hypothesis, using the slow-onset long-acting monoamine reuptake inhibitor 31,345, a trans-aminotetralin analog, in a variety of addiction-related animal models, and compared it with methadone's effects on heroin's actions in the same animal models. Systemic administration of 31,345 produced long-lasting enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward (BSR) and extracellular nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine (DA). Pretreatment with 31,345 augmented cocaine-enhanced BSR, prolonged cocaine-enhanced NAc DA, and produced a long-term (24-48 h) reduction in cocaine self-administration rate without obvious extinction pattern, suggesting an additive effect of 31,345 with cocaine. In contrast, methadone pretreatment not only dose-dependently inhibited heroin self-administration with an extinction pattern but also dose-dependently inhibited heroin-enhanced BSR and NAc DA, suggesting functional antagonism by methadone of heroin's actions. In addition, 31,345 appears to possess significant abuse liability, as it produces dose-dependent enhancement of BSR and NAc DA, maintains a low rate of self-administration behavior, and dose-dependently reinstates drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, methadone only partially maintains self-administration with an extinction pattern, and fails to induce reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that 31,345 is a cocaine-like slow-onset long-acting monoamine transporter inhibitor that may act as an agonist therapy for cocaine addiction. However, its pattern of action appears to be significantly different from that of methadone. Ideal agonist substitutes for cocaine should fully emulate methadone's actions, that is, functionally antagonizing cocaine's action while blocking monoamine transporters to augment synaptic DA. PMID:20827272

  13. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:25117886

  14. Update on the pharmacology of selective inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B: focus on modulation of CNS monoamine neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Finberg, John P M

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) were initially used in medicine following the discovery of their antidepressant action. Subsequently their ability to potentiate the effects of an indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amine such as tyramine was discovered, leading to their limitation in clinical use, except for cases of treatment-resistant depression. More recently, the understanding that: a) potentiation of indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amines is caused by inhibitors of MAO-A but not by inhibitors of MAO-B, and b) that reversible inhibitors of MAO-A cause minimal tyramine potentiation, has led to their re-introduction to clinical use for treatment of depression (reversible MAO-A inhibitors and new dose form MAO-B inhibitor) and treatment of Parkinson's disease (MAO-B inhibitors). The profound neuroprotective properties of propargyl-based inhibitors of MAO-B in preclinical experiments have drawn attention to the possibility of employing these drugs for their neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases, and have raised the question of the involvement of the MAO-mediated reaction as a source of reactive free radicals. Despite the long-standing history of MAO inhibitors in medicine, the way in which they affect neuronal release of monoamine neurotransmitters is still poorly understood. In recent years, the detailed chemical structure of MAO-B and MAO-A has become available, providing new possibilities for synthesis of mechanism-based inhibitors. This review describes the latest advances in understanding the way in which MAO inhibitors affect the release of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin (5-HT) in the CNS, with an accent on the importance of these effects for the clinical actions of the drugs. PMID:24607445

  15. Inhibitory effect of chlorpromazine on the syndrome of hyperactivity produced by L-tryptophan or 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in rats treated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The hyperactivity and hyperpyrexia produced by L-tryptophan in rats treated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor was inhibited by chlorpromazine. 2. Chlorpromazine did not inhibit the increased rate of synthesis of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced by tryptophan loading. 3. Hyperactivity and hyperpyrexia were also produced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) in rats. Pretreatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor potentiated the hyperactivity response. Pretreatment of rats with p-chlorophenylalanine did not inhibit hyperactivity produced by 5-MeODMT. 4. Chlorpromazine inhibits hyperactivity caused by tryptophan or 5-MeODMT after monoamine oxidase inhibition either by competition with 5-HT or 5-MeODMT, respectively, at receptor sites or by physiological antagonism. PMID:4261561

  16. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquais, J. M.; Poret, F.; le Doze, R.; Ricaud, J. L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-06-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK).

  17. Ozone depletion during solar proton events in solar cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ozone profile data from the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet Instrument on Nimbus 7 from 1979 to the present and clear cases of ozone destruction associated with five sudden proton events (SPEs) on June 7, 1979, August 21, 1979, October 13-14, 1981, July 13, 1982, and December 8, 1982 are found. During the SPE on July 13, 1982, the largest of this solar cycle, no depletion at all at 45 km is observed, but there is a 15 percent ozone depletion at 50 km increasing to 27 percent at 55 km, all at a solar zenith angle of 85 deg. A strong variation of the observed depletion with solar zenith angle is found, with maximum depletion occurring at the largest zenith angles (near 85 deg) decreasing to near zero for angles below about 70 deg. The observed depletion is short lived, disappearing within hours of the end of the SPE.

  18. Charged micelle depletion attraction and interfacial colloidal phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Iracki, Tara D; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Eichmann, Shannon L; Bevan, Michael A

    2010-12-21

    Ensemble total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) is used to directly measure the evolution of colloid-surface depletion attraction with increasing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration near the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Measured potentials are well described by a modified Asakura-Oosawa (AO) depletion potential in addition to electrostatic and van der Waals contributions. The modified AO potential includes effects of electrostatic interactions between micelles and surfaces via effective depletant dimensions in an excluded volume term and partitioning in an osmotic pressure term. Directly measured colloid-surface depletion potentials are used in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to capture video microscopy (VM) measurements of micelle-mediated quasi-two-dimensional phase behavior including fluid, crystal, and gel microstructures. Our findings provide information to develop more rigorous and analytically simple models of depletion attraction in charged micellar systems. PMID:21077612

  19. Ionogram range/time plots, satellite traces and optical depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Kenneth; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Wilkinson, Phil

    2012-07-01

    Range/time plots derived from 5 minute ionograms have a variety of uses including finding TIDs, following major height variations in the F2 ionosphere and tracking the movement of low latitude electron depletions as verified by co-incident observations by optical methods. This paper investigates these applications with particular emphasis on following optical depletions via ionosonde as observed at Darwin, Australia. Similar additional range/time plots are also discussed from Vanimo and Port Moresby in New Guinea and Tennant Creek and Townsville in Australia. While much theoretical work has been expended on explaining the development of equatorial bubble/depletions, current work highlights the apparently strong development of depletions at times of year when the pre-sunset height rise and following fall is minimal in contrast to current conventional thinking. In contrast, depletions are not observed at Australian equatorial longitudes when the pre- and post- sunset height variations are greatest in magnitude and consistency.

  20. The timing and mechanism of depletion in Lewisian granulites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. S.; Onions, R. K.; Ohara, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Large Ion Lithophile (LIL) depletion in Lewisian granulites is discussed. Severe depletions in U, Th, and other LIL have been well documented in Lewisan mafic and felsic gneisses, but new Pb isotopic analyses show little or no depletion in lithologies with high solidus temperatures, such as peridotite. This suggests that LIL transport in this terrane took place by removal of partial melts rather than by pervasive flooding with externally derived CO2. The Pb and Nd isotopic data gathered on these rocks show that the depletion and granulite metamorphism are distinct events about 250 Ma apart. Both fluid inclusions and cation exchange geothermometers date from the later metamorphic event and therefore have little bearing on the depletion event, suggesting a note of caution for interpretations of other granulite terranes.

  1. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  2. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  3. Observations of TEC Depletions in South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Pradipta, R.

    2014-12-01

    TEC values gathered with several networks of GPS receivers, which operated in South and Central America and the Caribbean region between 2010 and 2013, have been used to investigate the characteristics and morphology of TEC depletions that develop at these locations. In South America the TEC depletions are associated with low-latitude plasma bubbles. In Central America and the Caribbean region, we found that TEC depletions that occur during magnetically active conditions (Kp > 5o), persist for very long periods and sometimes remain even during afternoon hours. During quiet magnetic conditions, TEC depletions occur around the June solstice in Central America and during the December solstice in the Southern part of South America. We have also studied possible links between mid-latitude depletions and the formation of plasma bubbles at low latitudes. In addition, TEC measurements from North America have been utilized to determine the poleward extension of the mid-latitude depletions. These depletions do not appear to be related to auroral plasma processes or to storm enhanced densities (SED). We are studying the possibility that their initiation process is associated with the disturbance dynamo or the prompt penetrating electric field that develop during storm conditions.

  4. Protein disulfide isomerase mediates glutathione depletion-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazushi; Fukui, Masayuki; Zhu, Bao-Ting

    2016-08-26

    Glutathione depletion is a distinct cause underlying many forms of pathogenesis associated with oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Earlier studies showed that glutamate-induced glutathione depletion in immortalized murine HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultimately cell death, but the precise mechanism underlying these processes is not clear. Here we show that during the induction of glutathione depletion, nitric oxide (NO) accumulation precedes ROS accumulation. While neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in untreated HT22 cells exists mostly as a monomer, glutathione depletion results in increased formation of the dimer nNOS, accompanied by increases in the catalytic activity. We identified that nNOS dimerization is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Inhibition of PDI's isomerase activity effectively abrogates glutathione depletion-induced conversion of monomer nNOS into dimer nNOS, accumulation of NO and ROS, and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that PDI is present in untreated cells in an inactive S-nitrosylated form, which becomes activated following glutathione depletion via S-denitrosylation. These results reveal a novel role for PDI in mediating glutathione depletion-induced oxidative cytotoxicity, as well as its role as a valuable therapeutic target for protection against oxidative cytotoxicity. PMID:27317486

  5. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort. PMID:22182421

  6. CO depletion in ATLASGAL-selected high-mass clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Brand, J.; Csengeri, T.; Fontani, F.; Walmsley, C. M.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Beuther, H.; Schuller, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    In the low-mass regime, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of C-bearing molecules in cold starless cores rapidly decrease with increasing density. Here the molecules tend to stick to the grains, forming ice mantles. We study CO depletion in the TOP100 sample of the ATLASGAL survey, and investigate its correlation with evolutionary stage and with the physical parameters of the sources. We use low-J emission lines of CO isotopologues and the dust continuum emission to infer the depletion factor fD. RATRAN one-dimensional models were also used to determine fD and to investigate the presence of depletion above a density threshold. The isotopic ratios and optical depth were derived with a Bayesian approach. We find a significant number of clumps with a large CO depletion, up to ˜20. Larger values are found for colder clumps, thus for earlier evolutionary phases. For massive clumps in the earliest stages of evolution we estimate the radius of the region where CO depletion is important to be a few tenths of a pc. CO depletion in high-mass clumps seems to behave as in the low-mass regime, with less evolved clumps showing larger values for the depletion than their more evolved counterparts, and increasing for denser sources.

  7. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900-2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945-1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001-2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001-2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply. PMID:25510437

  8. Masting in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) depletes stored nutrients.

    PubMed

    Sala, Anna; Hopping, Kelly; McIntire, Eliot J B; Delzon, Sylvain; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2012-10-01

    • In masting trees, synchronized, heavy reproductive events are thought to deplete stored resources and to impose a replenishment period before subsequent masting. However, direct evidence of resource depletion in wild, masting trees is very rare. Here, we examined the timing and magnitude (local vs individual-level) of stored nutrient depletion after a heavy mast event in Pinus albicaulis. • In 2005, the mast year, we compared seasonal changes in leaf and sapwood nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and leaf photosynthetic rates in cone-bearing branches, branches that never produced cones, and branches with experimentally removed cones. We also compared nutrient concentrations in cone branches and branches that had never had cones between 2005 and 2006, and measured tree ring width and new shoot growth during 2005. • During the mast year, N or P depletion occurred only in tissue fractions of reproductive branches, where photosynthetic rates were reduced. However, by the end of the following year, nutrients were depleted in all branches, indicating individual-level resource depletion. New shoot and radial growth were not affected by masting. • We provide direct evidence that mast events in wild trees deplete stored nutrients. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating reproductive costs over time and at the individual level. PMID:22889129

  9. A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

    2016-07-01

    Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [-0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control. PMID:27474142

  10. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  11. Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Kai D.

    2007-07-01

    During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete

  12. Separation and conductimetric detection of C1-C7 aliphatic monocarboxylic acids and C1-C7 aliphatic monoamines on unfunctionized polymethacrylate resin columns.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Towata, Atsuya; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Toyohide

    2004-06-11

    The application of unfunctionized polymethacrylate resin (TSKgel G3000PWXL) as a stationary phase in liquid chromatography with conductimetric detection for C1-C7 aliphatic monocarboxylic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, isovaleric acid, valeric acid, 3,3-dimethylbutyric acid, 4-methylvaleric acid, hexanoic acid, 2-methylhexanoic acid, 5-methylhexanoic acid and heptanoic acid) and C1-C7 aliphatic monoamines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, isobutylamine, butylamine, isoamylamine, amylamine, 1,3-dimethylbutylamine, hexylamine, 2-heptylamine and heptylamine) was attempted with C8 aliphatic monocarboxylic acids (2-propylvaleric acid, 2-ethylhexanoic acid, 2-methylheptanoic acid and octanoic acid) and C8 aliphatic monoamines (1,5-dimethylhexylamine, 2-ethylhexylamine, 1-methylheptylamine and octylamine) as eluents, respectively. Using 1 mM 2-methylheptanoic acid at pH 4.0 as the eluent, excellent separation and relatively high sensitive detection for these C1-C7 carboxylic acids were achieved on a TSKgel G3000PWXL column (150 mm x 6 mm i.d.) in 60 min. Using 2 mM octylamine at pH 11.0 as the eluent, excellent separation and relatively high sensitive detection for these C1-C7 amines were also achieved on the TSKgel G3000PWXL column in 60 min. PMID:15250420

  13. Effects of botulinum toxin type A facial injection on monoamines and their metabolites in sensory, limbic and motor brain regions in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibragić, S; Matak, I; Dračić, A; Smajlović, A; Muminović, M; Proft, F; Sofić, E; Lacković, Z; Riederer, P

    2016-03-23

    Despite its toxicity, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A) is a valuable therapeutic agent for several motor, autonomic and pain disorders. Numerous studies have described its peripheral as well as central effects. Using reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection (HPLC-ED) and gradient elution, we quantified the concentrations of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in 10 brain regions, ipsilateral and contralateral from the site of unilateral BTX-A administration (5U/kg) into the rat whisker pad. In regions associated with nociception and pain processing we also examined possible BTX-A effects in combination with formalin-induced inflammatory orofacial pain. The dominant BTX-A effects on the monoamines and their metabolites were insignificant. The only significant increase caused by BTX-A alone was that of NA in striatum and serotonin in hypothalamus. While antinociceptive effects of BTX-A are most probably not related to central monoamine concentrations, the localized increased NA and 5-HT concentrations might play a role in reported BTX-A efficacy for the treatment of depression. PMID:26876447

  14. Chronic L-deprenyl treatment alters brain monoamine levels and reduces impulsiveness in an animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Boix, F; Qiao, S W; Kolpus, T; Sagvolden, T

    1998-07-01

    Effects of chronic L-deprenyl administration on hyperactive behaviour and brain monoamine levels were studied in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. SHR were hyperactive, impulsive and had impaired sustained attention when tested with a multiple 2-min fixed interval (FI) 5-min extinction (EXT) schedule of reinforcement. Even low, 0.25 mg/kg, doses of chronically-administered L-deprenyl reduced the impulsiveness (bursts of responses with short interresponse times) of SHR, without altering the general hyperactivity or the impaired sustained attention. The drug had no effect on WKY behaviour. The levels of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and their metabolites, measured in neostriatum, nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex, showed that L-deprenyl effectively inhibited monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity. These results suggest that impulsiveness is a behavioural component that may be operating independent of the other components, like hyperactivity and deficient sustained attention, and that can be reduced by chronic MAO-B inhibition with L-deprenyl in this strain of rats. The positive effect of L-deprenyl on impulsiveness is discussed as due either to normalization of an asymmetric dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens, or to a restoration of normal DA function in the prefrontal cortex. PMID:9708846

  15. Disruptions of sensorimotor gating, cytokines, glycemia, monoamines, and genes in both sexes of rats reared in social isolation can be ameliorated by oral chronic quetiapine administration.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chih-Yuan; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of schizophrenia in patients with metabolic abnormalities remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that isolation rearing (IR) induced longitudinal concomitant changes of pro-inflammatory cytokine (pro-CK) levels and metabolic abnormalities with a developmental origin. However, the general consensus, believes that these abnormalities are caused by antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenic patients. The IR paradigm presents with face, construct, and predictive validity for schizophrenia. Therefore, we employed IR rats of both sexes to examine whether chronic quetiapine (QTP, a second-generation antipsychotic medication) treatment induces disruptions of metabolism (body weight, blood pressure, and the glycemic and lipid profiles) or cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha], and further, whether it reverses deficits of behaviors [locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition (PPI)] and the expression of monoamines (dopamine and serotonin) and related genes (Htr1a, Htr2a, Htr3a, Drd1a, and Gabbr2). IR induced higher levels of pro-CK, dysglycemia, blood pressure, locomotor activity, and impaired PPI, simultaneously destabilizing cortico-striatal monoamines and relevant genes in both sexes, while QTP demonstrated dose-dependent reversal of these changes, suggesting that QTP might reduce the pro-CKs to regulate these abnormalities. Our data implied that antipsychotics may not be the solitary factor causing metabolic problems in schizophrenia and suggested that inflammatory changes may play a vital role in the developmental pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26254231

  16. Discovery of New Chemical Entities for Old Targets: Insights on the Lead Optimization of Chromone-Based Monoamine Oxidase B (MAO-B) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reis, Joana; Cagide, Fernando; Chavarria, Daniel; Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Carlos; Gaspar, Alexandra; Uriarte, Eugenio; Remião, Fernando; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-06-23

    The discovery of new chemical entities endowed with potent, selective, and reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitory activity is a clinically relevant subject. Therefore, a small library of chromone derivatives was synthesized and screened toward human monoamine oxidase isoforms (hMAO-A and hMAO-B). The structure-activity relationships studies strengthen the importance of the amide spacer and the direct linkage of carbonyl group to the γ-pyrone ring, along with the presence of meta and para substituents in the exocyclic ring. The most potent MAO-B inhibitors were N-(3'-chlorophenyl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-3-carboxamide (20) (IC50 = 403 pM) and N-(3',4'-dimethylphenyl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-3-carboxamide (27) (IC50 = 669 pM), acting as competitive and noncompetitive reversible inhibitors, respectively. Computational docking studies provided insights into enzyme-inhibitor interactions and a rationale for the observed selectivity and potency. Compound 27 stands out due to its favorable toxicological profile and physicochemical properties, which pointed toward blood-brain barrier permeability, thus being a valid candidate for subsequent animal studies. PMID:27244485

  17. Modification of the effects of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine on exploratory behavior in rats by monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Halberstadt, Adam L.; Buell, Mahalah R.; Masten, Virginia L.; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE The hallucinogenic tea known as ayahuasca is made from a combination of psychoactive plants that contribute the active components N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and 5-methoxy-DMT (5-MeO-DMT), as well as the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors (MAOIs) harmine and harmaline for oral activity. OBJECTIVE The present study examined the effects of 5-MeO-DMT in combination with MAOIs in rats using the Behavioral Pattern Monitor (BPM), which enables analyses of patterns of locomotor activity and exploration. Interaction studies using the serotonin (5-HT)1A antagonist WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg) and the 5-HT2A antagonist MDL 11,939 (1.0 mg/kg) were also performed to assess the respective contributions of these receptors to the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT in MAOI-treated animals. RESULTS 5-MeO-DMT (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/kg) decreased locomotor activity and investigatory behavior. In rats pretreated with a behaviorally inactive dose of harmaline (0.1 mg/kg), 1.0 mg/kg 5-MeO-DMT had biphasic effects on locomotor activity, initially reducing locomotion and then increasing activity as time progressed. The ability of harmaline to shift 5-MeO-DMT to a biphasic locomotor pattern was shared by the selective MAOA inhibitor clorgyline, whereas the selective MAOB inhibitor (−)-deprenyl was ineffective. The late hyperactivity induced by the combination of 1.0 mg/kg 5-MeO-DMT and 0.3 mg/kg clorgyline was blocked by pretreatment with MDL 11,939. Pretreatment with WAY-100635 failed to attenuate either the early hypoactivity or the late hyperactivity. CONCLUSIONS The ability of harmaline to modify the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT is mediated by inhibition of MAOA. Further, 5-HT2A receptors are responsible for the late hyperactivity induced by 5-MeO-DMT in the presence of MAOA inhibitors. PMID:18604652

  18. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a major health concern. More than 40% of patients treated for major depressive disorder with an appropriate antidepressant dose for an adequate duration fail to respond. Further, approximately half of adults with major depressive disorder fail to achieve sustained remission despite various medication trials. The utilization of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) for the treatment of depression in clinical practice today is low due to their widely known adverse effects, some of which may be life threatening, and the risk for dietary and drug interactions. For these reasons, MAOIs are not recommended to be prescribed along with other antidepressants or certain prescription or nonprescription drugs. Pharmacologic options are limited for individuals with TRD, however, and there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of MAOIs in combination with other antidepressants for the management of TRD. We performed a search of the PubMed database (inception through January 25, 2015) to identify cases that illustrate the potential utility, as well as risks, of combination treatment with MAOIs and other antidepressants for the management of TRD; 18 articles met the criteria for our search. In addition, we performed a retrospective case series by reviewing the medical records of 29 adults treated for depression with an MAOI plus another psychotropic agent (an antidepressant or stimulant medication) between 2003 and 2012 at a large Midwestern teaching hospital. We compared the findings of the published experience with our local experience to allow for more informed decisions regarding pharmacotherapy in patients with TRD. We separated the local experience into two groups: 15 cases with the selective MAO type B inhibitor selegiline combined with medications presumed to increase the risk of serotonin syndrome and 14 cases with nonselective MAOIs (phenelzine and tranylcypromine) combined with other contraindicated medications. Although risks of

  19. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  20. In situ observations of bifurcation of equatorial ionospheric plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Aggson, T.L.; Pfaff, R.F.; Maynard, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    Vector electric field measurements from the San Marco D satellite are utilized to investigate the bifurcation of ionospheric plasma depletions (sometimes called {open_quotes}bubbles{close_quotes}) associated with nightside equatorial spread F. These depletions are identified by enhanced upward ExB convection in depleted plasma density channels in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. The in situ determination of the bifurcation process is based on dc electric field measurements of the bipolar variation in the zonal flow, westward and eastward, as the eastbound satellite crosses isolated signatures of updrafting plasma depletion regions. The authors also present data in which more complicated regions of zonal velocity variations appear as the possible result of multiple bifurcations of updrafting equatorial plasma bubbles. 10 refs., 7 fig.

  1. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers.

    PubMed

    Buchegger, Bianca; Kreutzer, Johannes; Plochberger, Birgit; Wollhofen, Richard; Sivun, Dmitry; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schütz, Gerhard J; Schubert, Ulrich; Klar, Thomas A

    2016-02-23

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  2. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1987 the United States, along with 26 other countries, signed a landmark treaty to limit and subsequently, through revisions, phase out the production of all significant ozone depleting substances. Many researchers suspected that these chemicals, especially chl...

  3. Optical depletion spectroscopy for probing evaporatively cooled OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew; Wu, Hao; Stuhl, Benjamin; Reens, David; Yeo, Mark; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements provide a sensitive probe for the detection of molecular species. However, the broad linewidth of the pulsed lasers used for molecular excitation obscures spectral information useful for determination of molecule temperature. This limitation can be overcome by the use of a second, narrowband source of radiation that can deplete a subset of the molecules detected using PLIF, and a high resolution depletion spectrum can be obtained. In the past, we have demonstrated the use of microwave depletion spectroscopy to measure magnetically trapped, evaporatively cooled OH temperatures in the range of 5-50 mK. The lower limit of 5 mK is set by the details of the microwave transition. Here we present temperature measurements of trapped OH using an optical depletion technique, which is in principle capable of probing temperatures as low as 50 microkelvin. We acknowledge funding from the NSF Physics Frontier Center, NIST, DOE, and the AFOSR MURI on Cold Molecules.

  4. Accelerated reabsorption in the proximal tubule produced by volume depletion

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Weinman, Edward J.; Kashgarian, Michael; Hayslett, John P.

    1971-01-01

    The renal response to chronic depletion of extracellular volume was examined using the techniques of micropuncture. Depletion of salt and water was produced by administration of furosemide to rats maintained on a sodium-free diet. There was a marked fall in body weight, plasma volume, and glomerular filtration rate. The intrinsic reabsorptive capacity of the proximal tubule, measured by the split-droplet technique, was greatly enhanced. The acceleration of proximal fluid reabsorption could not be accounted for by changes in filtration rate, tubular geometry, or aldosterone secretion. The half-time of droplet reabsorption in the distal tubule was not altered by sodium depletion. An increase in the reabsorption of fluid in the proximal tubule, as demonstrated directly in the present experiments, provides an explanation for a variety of clinical phenomena associated with volume depletion. Images PMID:5090054

  5. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  6. 10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. (11/11/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Fluorescence depletion properties of insulin–gold nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Fu; Liu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Wei-Kuan; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chou, Pi-Tai; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin–gold nanoclusters exhibit outstanding biocompatibility, photostability, and fluorescence quantum efficiency. However, they have never been used in superresolution microscopy, which requires nonlinear switching or saturation of fluorescence. Here we examine the fluorescence and stimulated emission depletion properties of gold nanoclusters. Their bleaching rate is very slow, demonstrating superior photostability. Surprisingly, however, the best depletion efficiency is less than 70%, whereas the depletion intensity requirement is much higher than the expectation from a simple two-level model. Fluorescence lifetime measurement revealed two distinct lifetime components, which indicate intersystem and reverse intersystem crossing during excitation. Based on population dynamic calculation, excellent agreement of the maximal depletion efficiency is found. Our work not only features the first examination of STED with metallic clusters, but also reveals the significance of molecular transition dynamics when considering a STED labeling. PMID:26309767

  8. Lithium Depletion in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Jensen, E. L.; Reaser, B. E.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study of lithium depletion in twelve late-type pre-main-sequence stars in the coeval Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG). The age of this group ( 12 Myr) is well constrained because all of the stars in the sample have Hipparcos distances. We have determined Li abundances for these K and M stars using equivalent width measurements of the 6707.8 Angstrom Li I line from new high-resolution, high-S/N echelle spectra, and we compare these abundances to models of pre-main-sequence Li depletion by Baraffe et al. (1998), D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1997, 1998), and Siess, Dufour, & Forestini (2000). Significantly more lithium depletion is observed in the sample than is predicted for a group of this age. In particular, the discrepancy between the predicted and the observed lithium abundances increases with decreasing effective temperature, suggesting a problem with theories describing pre-main-sequence lithium depletion. Our data indicate that M stars deplete lithium more rapidly than predicted, which could make M-type post-T-Tauri stars difficult to identify. In addition, we compare our results to the work of Song, Bessell, & Zuckerman (2002) on HIP 112312. In contrast to that work, we did not observe the lithium depletion boundary of the BPMG; none of the three M4.5 stars in the sample showed evidence of lithium (log N(Li) < -0.5), indicating a lithium depletion boundary later than M4.5, further underscoring the gap between age estimates from lithium depletion and those from theoretical evolutionary tracks. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307830.

  9. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  10. Inositol Depletion Restores Vesicle Transport in Yeast Phospholipid Flippase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases. PMID:25781026

  11. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  12. Measurement of depletion-induced force in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilitski, Fiodar; Ward, Andrew; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-03-01

    Microtubule (MT) bundles formed in the presence of non-adsorbing polymers - poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) or Dextran - are widely used in experimental active matter systems. However, many properties of such MT bundles have not been studied experimentally. In this work, we combine optical trapping techniques with an umbrella sampling method in order to measure the depletion force acting on individual microtubule in the axial direction within the bundle. We find depletion force is independent of bundle overlap length and measure its magnitude to be on the order of tens of kB/T μm. We explore the dependence of the depletion force on concentration of depletant (PEG 20K) as well as K+ ions (necessary for screening electrostatic repulsion between MT filaments). We also verify additivity of depletion interaction and confirm that force is increased by a factor of two for three-MT bundles. Additionally, our experimental technique allows us to probe interactions between MTs within the bundle. Experimental data suggests that filaments in the bundle interact only hydrodynamically when depletant concentrations are low enough; however, we observe onset of solid-like friction when osmotic pressure is increased above a certain threshold.

  13. Arginine depletion increases susceptibility to serious infections in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Badurdeen, Shiraz; Mulongo, Musa; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm newborns are highly susceptible to bacterial infections. This susceptibility is regarded as being due to immaturity of multiple pathways of the immune system. However, it is unclear whether a mechanism that unifies these different, suppressed pathways exists. Here, we argue that the immune vulnerability of the preterm neonate is critically related to arginine depletion. Arginine, a “conditionally essential” amino acid, is depleted in acute catabolic states, including sepsis. Its metabolism is highly compartmentalized and regulated, including by arginase-mediated hydrolysis. Recent data suggest that arginase II-mediated arginine depletion is essential for the innate immune suppression that occurs in newborn models of bacterial challenge, impairing pathways critical for the immune response. Evidence that arginine depletion mediates protection from immune activation during first gut colonization suggests a regulatory role in controlling gut-derived pathogens. Clinical studies show that plasma arginine is depleted during sepsis. In keeping with animal studies, small clinical trials of L-arginine supplementation have shown benefit in reducing necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates. We propose a novel, broader hypothesis that arginine depletion during bacterial challenge is a key factor limiting the neonate's ability to mount an adequate immune response, contributing to the increased susceptibility to infections, particularly with respect to gut-derived sepsis. PMID:25360828

  14. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  16. The Use of Multiscale Molecular Simulations in Understanding a Relationship between the Structure and Function of Biological Systems of the Brain: The Application to Monoamine Oxidase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Vianello, Robert; Domene, Carmen; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Computational techniques provide accurate descriptions of the structure and dynamics of biological systems, contributing to their understanding at an atomic level.Classical MD simulations are a precious computational tool for the processes where no chemical reactions take place.QM calculations provide valuable information about the enzyme activity, being able to distinguish among several mechanistic pathways, provided a carefully selected cluster model of the enzyme is considered.Multiscale QM/MM simulation is the method of choice for the computational treatment of enzyme reactions offering quantitative agreement with experimentally determined reaction parameters.Molecular simulation provide insight into the mechanism of both the catalytic activity and inhibition of monoamine oxidases, thus aiding in the rational design of their inhibitors that are all employed and antidepressants and antiparkinsonian drugs. Aging society and therewith associated neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including depression, Alzheimer's disease, obsessive disorders, and Parkinson's disease, urgently require novel drug candidates. Targets include monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and various receptors and transporters. For rational drug design it is particularly important to combine experimental synthetic, kinetic, toxicological, and pharmacological information with structural and computational work. This paper describes the application of various modern computational biochemistry methods in order to improve the understanding of a relationship between the structure and function of large biological systems including ion channels, transporters, receptors, and metabolic enzymes. The methods covered stem from classical molecular dynamics simulations to understand the physical basis and the time evolution of the structures, to combined QM, and QM/MM approaches to probe the chemical mechanisms of enzymatic

  17. The Use of Multiscale Molecular Simulations in Understanding a Relationship between the Structure and Function of Biological Systems of the Brain: The Application to Monoamine Oxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Robert; Domene, Carmen; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Computational techniques provide accurate descriptions of the structure and dynamics of biological systems, contributing to their understanding at an atomic level.Classical MD simulations are a precious computational tool for the processes where no chemical reactions take place.QM calculations provide valuable information about the enzyme activity, being able to distinguish among several mechanistic pathways, provided a carefully selected cluster model of the enzyme is considered.Multiscale QM/MM simulation is the method of choice for the computational treatment of enzyme reactions offering quantitative agreement with experimentally determined reaction parameters.Molecular simulation provide insight into the mechanism of both the catalytic activity and inhibition of monoamine oxidases, thus aiding in the rational design of their inhibitors that are all employed and antidepressants and antiparkinsonian drugs. Aging society and therewith associated neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including depression, Alzheimer's disease, obsessive disorders, and Parkinson's disease, urgently require novel drug candidates. Targets include monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and various receptors and transporters. For rational drug design it is particularly important to combine experimental synthetic, kinetic, toxicological, and pharmacological information with structural and computational work. This paper describes the application of various modern computational biochemistry methods in order to improve the understanding of a relationship between the structure and function of large biological systems including ion channels, transporters, receptors, and metabolic enzymes. The methods covered stem from classical molecular dynamics simulations to understand the physical basis and the time evolution of the structures, to combined QM, and QM/MM approaches to probe the chemical mechanisms of enzymatic

  18. Ego depletion decreases trust in economic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Sarah E.; Baumeister, Roy F.; Vohs, Kathleen D.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments tested the effects of ego depletion on economic decision making. Participants completed a task either requiring self-control or not. Then participants learned about the trust game, in which senders are given an initial allocation of $10 to split between themselves and another person, the receiver. The receiver receives triple the amount given and can send any, all, or none of the tripled money back to the sender. Participants were assigned the role of the sender and decided how to split the initial allocation. Giving less money, and therefore not trusting the receiver, is the safe, less risky response. Participants who had exerted self-control and were depleted gave the receiver less money than those in the non-depletion condition (Experiment 1). This effect was replicated and moderated in two additional experiments. Depletion again led to lower amounts given (less trust), but primarily among participants who were told they would never meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or who were given no information about how similar they were to the receiver (Experiment 3). Amounts given did not differ for depleted and non-depleted participants who either expected to meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or were led to believe that they were very similar to the receiver (Experiment 3). Decreased trust among depleted participants was strongest among neurotics. These results imply that self-control facilitates behavioral trust, especially when no other cues signal decreased social risk in trusting, such as if an actual or possible relationship with the receiver were suggested. PMID:25013237

  19. Coordinated airborne and satellite measurements of equatorial plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Brinton, H.C.; Buchau, J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in December 1979 to investigate the structure of plasma depletions in the low latitude, nightime ionosphere. The measurements included all sky imaging photometer (ASIP), ionosonde and amplitude scintillation observations from the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory (AIO), and in situ ion density measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E) Bennett Ion Mass Spectrometer (BIMS). The AIO performed two flights along the Ascension Island (-18/sup 0/ MLAT) magnetic meridian: one in the southern hemisphere and one near the Ascension conjugate point in the northern hemisphere. During these flights, measurements from the AE-E satellite at 434 km altitude are compared with simultaneous remote ionospheric measurements from the AIO. Density biteouts of approximately one order of magnitude in the dominant ion O/sup +/, were mapped to lower altitudes along magnetic field lines for comparison with 6300-A and 7774-A O I airglow depletions. Because of the different airglow production mechanisms (dissociative recombination of O/sup +//sub 2/ for 6300 A and radiative recombination of O/sup +/ for 7774 A) the 6300-A depletions reflect plasma depletions near the bottomside of the F layer, while those at 7774 A are located near the peak of the layer. The O/sup +/ biteouts map directly into the 7774-