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Sample records for amylase

  1. Amylase - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... amylase levels may occur due to: Acute pancreatitis Cancer of the pancreas , ovaries, or lungs Cholecystitis Gallbladder attack caused by ... open) Decreased amylase levels may occur due to: Cancer of the pancreas Damage to the pancreas Kidney disease Toxemia of ...

  2. Amylase - urine

    MedlinePlus

    This test is done to diagnose pancreatitis and other diseases that affect the pancreas. ... amylase levels may be a sign of: Acute pancreatitis Alcohol consumption Cancer of the pancreas , ovaries, or ...

  3. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  4. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted. PMID:25129040

  5. Halophilic Amylase from a Moderately Halophilic Micrococcus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi

    1972-01-01

    A moderately halophilic Micrococcus sp., isolated from unrefined solar salt, produced a considerable amount of extracellular dextrinogenic amylase when cultivated aerobically in media containing 1 to 3 m NaCl. The Micrococcus amylase had maximal activity at pH 6 to 7 in 1.4 to 2 m NaCl or KCl at 50 C. Calcium ion and a high concentration of NaCl or KCl were essential for activity and stability of the amylase. The salt response of the amylase depended greatly on the pH and temperature of the enzyme assay. PMID:5058445

  6. Exercise upregulates salivary amylase in humans (Review).

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, Eri; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    The secretion of salivary α-amylase is influenced by adrenergic regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; thus, exercise affects the levels of salivary α-amylase. Granger et al published a review in 2007 that focused attention on salivary α-amylase. In addition, a portable system for monitoring salivary α-amylase activity was launched in Japan at the end of 2005. The correlation between exercise and salivary α-amylase has since been extensively investigated. The present review summarizes relevant studies published in the English and Japanese literature after 2006. A search of the PubMed and CiNii databases identified 54 articles, from which 15 original articles were selected. The findings described in these publications indicate that exercise consistently increases mean salivary α-amylase activities and concentrations, particularly at an intensity of >70% VO2max in healthy young individuals. Thus, these studies have confirmed that salivary α-amylase levels markedly increase in response to physical stress. Salivary α-amylase levels may therefore serve as an effective indicator in the non-invasive assessment of physical stress. PMID:24669232

  7. Thermally Stable Amylases from Antarctic Psychrophilic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrolysis of starch in cold environments by psychrophilic species of bacteria is believed to be accomplished through the production of special cold-adapted amylases. These amylases are reportedly thermally labile with low (<40 deg C) temperature optima and high specific activities at 0 to 25 deg C....

  8. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single α-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  9. Intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C L; Russell, R R

    1998-09-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding alpha-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single alpha-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  10. Production of alpha-amylase by yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Thomse, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme alpha-amylase confers to an organism the enzymatic activity for the degradation of polyglucosides with alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds such as starch and glycogen which are among the major storage compounds in plants and animals. Most alpha-amylases are single polypeptides of molecular weights around 50,000 dalton. They are generally found in the digestive tract of animals and in germinating seeds. Among the products released upon enzymatic degradation of polyglucosides maltose, a sugar that can be utilized as carbon source by yeast, is a major constituent. A cDNA segment complementary to mouse salivary amylase messenger RNA has been inserted into the yeast expression vector pMA56 behind the promoter of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I of yeast. Yeast transformants harboring plasmids with the normal orientation of the promoter and the mouse amylase cDNA gene produce amylase and release the enzyme in free form into the culture medium. Approximately 90% of the amylase activity is found in the medium. Yeast strains carrying MAL allele and transformed with a plasmid which directed the synthesis of mouse alpha-amylase were tested on plates containing starch and in batch fermentations using different high molecular weight sugars and oligosaccharides as carbon source. The results of these experiments will be discussed. (Refs. 21).

  11. Susceptibility to corrosion of laser welding composite arch wire in artificial saliva of salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Jiming; Yu, Wenwen; Sun, Daqian; Sun, Xinhua

    2015-10-01

    In this study, laser-welded composite arch wire (CAW) with a copper interlayer was exposed to artificial saliva containing salivary amylase or pancreatic amylase, and the resultant corrosion behavior was studied. The purpose was to determine the mechanisms by which salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase contribute to corrosion. The effects of amylase on the electrochemical resistance of CAW were tested by potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The dissolved corrosion products were determined by ICP-OES, and the surfaces were analyzed by SEM, AFM and EDS. The results showed that both exposure to salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase significantly improved the corrosion resistance of CAW. Even isozyme could have different influences on the alloy surface. When performing in vitro research of materials to be used in oral cavity, the effect of α-amylase should be taken into account since a simple saline solution does not entirely simulate the physiological situation. PMID:26117761

  12. Possible mechanisms of normal amylase activity in hyperlipemic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mishkin, S.; Bates, J.; O'Hashi, J.; Schneider, P.; Sniderman, A. D.; Wolf, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lipemic serum from three patients with acute pancreatitis and type IV hyperlipemia was fractionated into very-low-density lipoproteins and clear serum. Amylase activity (determined by the Phadebas method) in the component fractions did not exceed that in the original lipemic serum. Addition of these fractions or VLDL and chylomicrons from asymptomatic patients with hyperlipemia to nonlipemic serum from patients with "routine acute pancreatitis" did not inhibit amylase activity or alter the electrophoretic mobility of amylase isoenzymes. Therefore the normal amylase activity often observed in hyperlipemic pancreatitis does not result from an inhibition of amylase activity by serum lipoproteins. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:206333

  13. Expression of β-Amylase from Alfalfa Taproots1

    PubMed Central

    Gana, Joyce A.; Kalengamaliro, Newton E.; Cunningham, Suzanne M.; Volenec, Jeffrey J.

    1998-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots contain large quantities of β-amylase, but little is known about its role in vivo. We studied this by isolating a β-amylase cDNA and by examining signals that affect its expression. The β-amylase cDNA encoded a 55.95-kD polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence showing high similarity to other plant β-amylases. Starch concentrations, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase mRNA levels were measured in roots of alfalfa after defoliation, in suspension-cultured cells incubated in sucrose-rich or -deprived media, and in roots of cold-acclimated germ plasms. Starch levels, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase transcripts were reduced significantly in roots of defoliated plants and in sucrose-deprived cell cultures. β-Amylase transcript was high in roots of intact plants but could not be detected 2 to 8 d after defoliation. β-Amylase transcript levels increased in roots between September and October and then declined 10-fold in November and December after shoots were killed by frost. Alfalfa roots contain greater β-amylase transcript levels compared with roots of sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). Southern analysis indicated that β-amylase is present as a multigene family in alfalfa. Our results show no clear association between β-amylase activity or transcript abundance and starch hydrolysis in alfalfa roots. The great abundance of β-amylase and its unexpected patterns of gene expression and protein accumulation support our current belief that this protein serves a storage function in roots of this perennial species. PMID:9847126

  14. Studies on amylase inhibitors in some Egyptian legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Shekib, L A; el-Iraqui, S M; Abo-Bakr, T M

    1988-01-01

    Amylase inhibitor activity was determined in four legume seeds which are widely consumed in Egypt. The effect of dehulling, heat treatment, soaking and germination were also assessed. The results showed that faba bean contained the highest activity of amylase inhibitor followed by cowpea, lentils, then chickpea. Dehulling resulted in raising the amylase inhibitor activities in all samples investigated, while heat treatment and cooking lowered it. Soaking for 10 h and germination eliminated completely the inhibitor from all samples. PMID:2467277

  15. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  16. Simultaneous study of the metabolic turnover and renal excretion of salivary amylase-125I and pancreatic amylase-131I in the baboon

    PubMed Central

    Duane, William C.; Frerichs, Roger; Levitt, Michael D.

    1972-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of salivary and pancreatic amylase was studied in the baboon, an animal with a serum amylase level and renal clearance of amylase similar to man. Purified amylase was electrolytically iodinated. Although iodinated and uniodinated amylase had similar gel filtration, electrophoretic, enzymatic, glycogen precipitation characteristics, the labeled enzyme was cleared less rapidly by the kidney than was the unlabeled material. However, urinary iodinated amylase which had been biologically screened by the kidney had a renal clearance and serum disappearance rate indistinguishable from unlabeled amylase and thus can serve as a tracer in metabolic turnover studies. Administration of a mixture of salivary amylase-125I and pancreatic amylase-131I made it possible to simultaneously measure the serum disappearance and renal clearance of these two isoenzymes. The metabolic clearance of both isoenzymes was extremely rapid with half-times of about 130 min. This rapid turnover of serum amylase probably accounts for the transient nature of serum amylase elevation which frequently occurs in pancreatitis. Pancreatic amylase-131I was consistently cleared more rapidly (mean clearance ratio: 1.8) by the kidney than was salivary amylase-125I. This more rapid renal clearance of pancreatic amylase may help to explain the disproportionate elevation of urinary amylase relative to serum amylase observed in pancreatitis. PMID:5024043

  17. THE CELL-BOUND ALPHA-AMYLASES OF STREPTOCOCCUS BOVIS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, G J

    1965-02-01

    1. The cell-bound alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis has been isolated from other carbohydrases in the cell extract by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The enzyme has been compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase produced by this organism. 2. The two amylases had similar action patterns on amylose, the main product being maltotriose with smaller amounts of maltose and a little glucose. 3. The cell-bound amylase hydrolysed maltopentaose and maltohexaose at a similar rate to the hydrolysis of amylose. Maltotetraose was hydrolysed six times more slowly, and maltotriose 280 times more slowly, than amylose. 4. Studies with end-labelled maltodextrins revealed that the cell-bound alpha-amylase preferentially hydrolysed the third linkage from the non-reducing end, liberating maltotriose. The linkage at the reducing end of maltotriose was more easily hydrolysed than the other. 5. Egg-white lysozyme and the extracellular enzymes of Streptomyces albus lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus bovis, releasing amylase into the medium. In the presence of 0.6 m-sucrose 10% of the maximal amylase activity was released by lysozyme. Suspension of the spheroplasts in dilute buffer caused the rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane and the liberation of amylase. 6. A sensitive method for determining the ability of amylases to degrade starch granules is described. PMID:14346085

  18. Effect of starch and amylase on the expression of amylase-binding protein A in Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Nikitkova, A E; Haase, E M; Scannapieco, F A

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a common oral commensal bacterial species in tooth biofilm (dental plaque) and specifically binds to salivary amylase through the surface exposed amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). When S. gordonii cells are pretreated with amylase, amylase bound to AbpA facilitates growth with starch as a primary nutrition source. The goal of this study was to explore possible regulatory effects of starch, starch metabolites and amylase on the expression of S. gordonii AbpA. An amylase ligand-binding assay was used to assess the expression of AbpA in culture supernatants and on bacterial cells from S. gordonii grown in defined medium supplemented with 1% starch, 0.5 mg ml(-1) amylase, with starch and amylase together, or with various linear malto-oligosaccharides. Transcription of abpA was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. AbpA was not detectable in culture supernatants containing either starch alone or amylase alone. In contrast, the amount of AbpA was notably increased when starch and amylase were both present in the medium. The expression of abpA was significantly increased (P < 0.05) following 40 min of incubation in defined medium supplemented with starch and amylase. Similar results were obtained in the presence of maltose and other short-chain malto-oligosacchrides. These results suggest that the products of starch hydrolysis produced from the action of salivary α-amylase, particularly maltose and maltotriose, up-regulate AbpA expression in S. gordonii. PMID:22759313

  19. Location of the alpha-amylase gene in rumen Streptococcus bovis strains distinguished by unstable amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Mareková, M; Jonecová, Z; Kmeĭ, V

    1995-01-01

    Genetic stability of amylase activity after serial subcultivation experiments with amylolytic ruminal Streptococcus bovis strains was investigated. Two strains Amy+ and Amy- were obtained. Loss of amylase activity connected with the loss of plasmid DNA was not found in these strains. The presence of the gene responsible for the amylase activity in the chromosome of these strains was revealed by hybridization of the alpha-amylase gene on pJK108 against chromosomal DNA of S. bovis and Bacillus subtilis after a complete restriction with EcoRI. PMID:8851562

  20. a-Amylase activity during pullulan production and a-Amylase gene analyses of Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Aureobasidium pullulans is the source of commercially produced pullulan, a high molecular weight polysaccharide that is used in the manufacture of edible films. It has been proposed that alpha-amylase negatively affects the molecular weight of pullulan in late cultures. Based on a recen...

  1. Optimization of Amylase Application in Raw Sugar Manufacture. Part I: Characterization of Commercial Alpha-Amylases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to 85 de...

  2. Method for using a yeast alpha-amylase promoter

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway; Skeen, Rodney S.; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  3. The Amylase Project: Creating a Classroom of Biotechnologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Diane

    1998-01-01

    A biotechnologist-turned-teacher introduces a series of laboratory modules incorporating concepts from microbiology, cellular biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and evolution. The Amylase Project aims to distill the biotechnology process into a few short steps using amylase, the easiest enzyme to detect of those commonly produced by…

  4. Alpha-amylase gene transcription in tissues of normal dog.

    PubMed

    Mocharla, H; Mocharla, R; Hodes, M E

    1990-02-25

    We studied the distribution of alpha-amylase mRNA in normal dog tissues by northern blotting (NB) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with human pancreatic (AMY2) and salivary (AMY1) alpha-amylase cDNA-specific primers. Analysis of poly(A+) RNA from various normal tissues by NB indicated the presence of detectable levels of alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts only in pancreas. Dot-blot analysis of DNA amplified with primers common to both (human) isoamylase mRNAs showed presence of alpha-amylase gene transcripts not only in pancreas but also in liver, small intestine, large intestine and fallopian tube. Traces of amylase gene transcripts were also observed in ovary, uterus and lung. Interestingly, amylase transcripts were not detectable in the parotid gland by NB or RT-PCR. We have also localized alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts to dog pancreas by in situ transcription and in situ hybridization. Our results suggest that there is high degree of homology between the alpha-amylase mRNA sequences in dog and human at least in the exon 3-4 regions of the human gene. PMID:2315015

  5. Amylase activity of Aspergillus strains--producers of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Tsekova, K; Dentchev, D; Vicheva, A; Dekovska, M

    1993-01-01

    The ability of fungi from genus Aspergillus (producers of organic acids) to synthesize amylase enzymes (alpha-amylase and glucoamylase) was investigated. The productivity of the strains on Czapek-Dox agar and in liquid Czapec-Dox media with 3% soluble starch as a carbon source was established. PMID:8285132

  6. On the mechanism of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Oudjeriouat, Naïma; Moreau, Yann; Santimone, Marius; Svensson, Birte; Marchis-Mouren, Guy; Desseaux, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    Two inhibitors, acarbose and cyclodextrins (CD), were used to investigate the active site structure and function of barley alpha-amylase isozymes, AMY1 and AMY2. The hydrolysis of DP 4900-amylose, reduced (r) DP18-maltodextrin and maltoheptaose (catalysed by AMY1 and AMY2) was followed in the absence and in the presence of inhibitor. Without inhibitor, the highest activity was obtained with amylose, kcat/Km decreased 103-fold using rDP18-maltodextrin and 10(5) to 10(6)-fold using maltoheptaose as substrate. Acarbose is an uncompetitive inhibitor with inhibition constant (L1i) for amylose and maltodextrin in the micromolar range. Acarbose did not bind to the active site of the enzyme, but to a secondary site to give an abortive ESI complex. Only AMY2 has a second secondary binding site corresponding to an ESI2 complex. In contrast, acarbose is a mixed noncompetitive inhibitor of maltoheptaose hydrolysis. Consequently, in the presence of this oligosaccharide substrate, acarbose bound both to the active site and to a secondary binding site. alpha-CD inhibited the AMY1 and AMY2 catalysed hydrolysis of amylose, but was a very weak inhibitor compared to acarbose.beta- and gamma-CD are not inhibitors. These results are different from those obtained previously with PPA. However in AMY1, as already shown for amylases of animal and bacterial origin, in addition to the active site, one secondary carbohydrate binding site (s1) was necessary for activity whereas two secondary sites (s1 and s2) were required for the AMY2 activity. The first secondary site in both AMY1 and AMY2 was only functional when substrate was bound in the active site. This appears to be a general feature of the alpha-amylase family. PMID:14511369

  7. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  8. Activity and storage of commercial amylases in the 2013 Louisiana grinding season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A current problem in the application of amylases at sugarcane factories is the existence of a wide variation in the activities and activity per unit cost of commercial amylases. The efficiency of amylase action to break down starch in the factory is related to the activity of the amylase used. Until...

  9. α-Amylase structural genes in rye.

    PubMed

    Masojć, P; Gale, M D

    1991-10-01

    Rye α-Amy1, α-Amy2, and α-Amy3 genes were studied in the cross between inbred lines using wheat α-amylase cDNA probes. The α-Amy1 and α-Amy2 probes uncovered considerable restriction fragment length polymorphism, whereas the α-Amy3 region was much more conserved. The numbers of restriction fragments found and the F2 segregation data suggest that there are three α-Amy1 genes, two or three α-Amy2 genes, and three α-Amy3 genes in rye. These conclusions were supported by a simultaneous study of α-amylase isozyme polymorphism. The F2 data showed the three individual α-Amy1 genes to span a distance of 3cM at the locus on chromosome 6RL. The genes were mapped relative to other RFLP markers on 6RL. On chromosome 7RL two α-Amy2 genes were shown to be separated by 5 cM. Linkage data within α-Amy3 on 5RL were not obtained since RFLP could be detected at only one of the genes. PMID:24213454

  10. [Determination of exogenous gamma-amylase residue in honey].

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiaoqing; Wu, Bin; Shen, Chongyu; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Tao; Li, Lihua

    2012-08-01

    A novel method for the determination of exogenous gamma-amylase residue in honey using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) was established. After pre-separation by gel column chromatography, the gamma-amylase in honey samples was separated from the sugars. The gamma-amylase was then used to catalyze maltose into glucose. This enzymatic reaction was under the conditions of 55 degrees C and 0.03 mol/L phosphate buffer solution (pH 4.5) for 48 h. The maltose and glucose in the above enzymatic reaction solution were separated using liquid chromatography. By measuring the content of glucose with isotope ratio mass spectrometry, the gamma-amylase in honey can be determined. The linear range of gamma-amylase was 5 - 200 U/kg with the quantification limit of 5 U/kg. The recoveries were between 89.6% and 108.2% with the relative standard deviations from 3.3% to 4.9%. This method was used to analyze 38 honey and rice syrup samples, and the detection rate of gamma-amylase was 76.3%. To further verify the detection capability of this method, an authentic honey was adulterated with 15% (mass fraction) rice syrup. The gamma-amylase content in this sample was 10.2 U/kg. This method can effectively identify honey adulteration with rice syrups from the perspective of enzymology. PMID:23256379

  11. Estimation of restraint stress in rats using salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Takimura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    The rat is an ideal model animal for studying physical and psychological stresses. Recent human studies have shown that salivary amylase activity is a useful biomarker of stress in our social life. To estimate the usefulness of amylase activity as a biomarker of stress in rats, we analyzed changes in physiological parameters including amylase activity and anatomical variables, which were induced by a mild restraint of paws (10 min, 3 times/week, 9 weeks). The quantities of food and water intake and excretion amount of the stress rats were smaller than those of the control rats during the experimental period (5-13 weeks). The body weight of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats. Moreover, the enlargement of the adrenal gland was confirmed in the stress rats, indicating that the mild restraint caused a chronic stress response. The amylase activities of the stress rats were significantly greater than those of the control rats at 5 weeks of age. However, the amylase activity of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats after 6 weeks of age. These results indicate that amylase activity is increased by acute stress and reduced by chronic stress, which is caused by repeated restraint stress. In conclusion, amylase activity is a useful biomarker of acute and chronic stresses in rats. PMID:22753135

  12. Drain amylase aids detection of anastomotic leak after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin H.; Hill, Joshua S.; Reames, Mark K.; Symanowski, James; Hurley, Susie C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anastomotic leak following esophagectomy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As hospital length of stay decreases, the timely diagnosis of leak becomes more important. We evaluated CT esophagram, white blood count (WBC), and drain amylase levels in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Methods The diagnostic performance of CT esophagram, drain amylase >800 IU/L, and WBC >12,000/µL within the first 10 days after surgery in predicting leak at any time after esophagectomy was calculated. Results Anastomotic leak occurred in 13 patients (13%). CT esophagram performed within 10 days of surgery diagnosed six of these leaks with a sensitivity of 0.54. Elevation in drain amylase level within 10 days of surgery diagnosed anastomotic leak with a sensitivity of 0.38. When the CT esophagram and drain amylase were combined, the sensitivity rose to 0.69 with a specificity of 0.98. WBC elevation had a sensitivity of 0.92, with a specificity of 0.34. Among 30 patients with normal drain amylase and a normal WBC, one developed an anastomotic leak. Conclusions Drain amylase adds to the sensitivity of CT esophagram in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Selected patients with normal drain amylase levels and normal WBC may be able to safely forgo CT esophagram. PMID:27034784

  13. Classification and evolution of alpha-amylase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Stebbins, G L; Rodriguez, R L

    1992-08-15

    The DNA sequences for 17 plant genes for alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) were analyzed to determine their phylogenetic relationship. A phylogeny for these genes was obtained using two separate approaches, one based on molecular clock assumptions and the other based on a comparison of sequence polymorphisms (i.e., small and localized insertions) in the alpha-amylase genes. These polymorphisms are called "alpha-amylase signatures" because they are diagnostic of the gene subfamily to which a particular alpha-amylase gene belongs. Results indicate that the cereal alpha-amylase genes fall into two major classes: AmyA and AmyB. The AmyA class is subdivided into the Amy1 and Amy2 subfamilies previously used to classify alpha-amylase genes in barley and wheat. The AmyB class includes the Amy3 subfamily to which most of the alpha-amylase genes of rice belong. Using polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide primers that flank one of the two signature regions, we show that the AmyA and AmyB gene classes are present in approximately equal amounts in all grass species examined except barley. The AmyB (Amy3 subfamily) genes in the latter case are comparatively underrepresented. Additional evidence suggests that the AmyA genes appeared recently and may be confined to the grass family. PMID:1502164

  14. Nanoactivator mediated modifications in thermostable amylase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Rajendra S; Mahabole, Megha P; Pathak, Anupama P

    2012-12-01

    Gram-positive rod-shaped thermophilic bacteria were isolated using samples collected from terrestrial natural thermal spring located at Unkeshwar (Longitude 78.22 degree East to 78.34 degree East, Latitude 19 degree 34' North to 19 degree 40' North), District Nanded, Maharashtra State, India. The isolates were then cultivated using selective media and identified using culture-dependent techniques. One prominent isolate (UN1) exhibited high temperature stability and remarkable amylase production and was identified as Bacillus licheniformis. Amylase production was carried out in starch media and the enzyme was partially purified and characterized for optimization of pH and temperature. Amylolytic activity of the enzyme was determined. Nanoactivator-mediated modifications were carried out to enhance amylolytic activity of the partially purified amylase. Three-fold increase in catalytic efficiency of amylase was obtained after modification. PMID:23350283

  15. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  16. Some studies of alpha-amylase production using Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Esfahanibolandbalaie, Z; Rostami, K; Mirdamadi, S S

    2008-11-15

    The extracellular alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was studied in submerged fermentation using an Adlof-Kuhner orbital shaker. The effect of initial pH values in the range of 4 to 7.5 on enzyme production was investigated and initial pH medium of 6.2 +/- 0.1 resulted in enhanced alpha-amylase production. The effect of carbon and nitrogen source and composition was examined and it has been observed that corn starch concentration of 15 g L(-1) has sound effect on enzyme production. The medium containing corn starch, sodium nitrate resulted in considerable higher enzyme production. Further, the yeast extract of 2.5 g L(-1) in the medium produced higher enzyme in view to other organic nitrogen sources. The effect of temperature on alpha-amylase production from 20 to 40 degrees C has been studied and at 35 +/- 1 degrees C higher alpha-amylase has been obtained. The effect of shaker's speed on alpha-amylase production from 50 to 200 rpm was investigated. And at about 180 rpm higher enzyme production has been observed. In the present study, it has been found that glucose has repressing effect on a-amylase production using A. oryzae PTCC5164. PMID:19260332

  17. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Scannapieco, F A; Bergey, E J; Reddy, M S; Levine, M J

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with 125I-labeled HSMSL or 125I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of [125I]alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch. Images PMID:2788139

  18. Alcoholysis reactions from starch with alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, R I; Del Río, G; Saab, G; Rodríguez, M E; Soberón, X; López-Manguía, A

    1999-06-11

    The ability of alpha-amylases from different sources to carry out reactions of alcoholysis was studied using methanol as substrate. It was found that while the enzymes from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae, two well-studied saccharifying amylases, are capable of alcoholysis reactions, the classical bacterial liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus stearothermophilus are not. The effect of starch and methanol concentration, temperature and pH on the synthesis of glucosides with alpha-amylase from A. niger was studied. Although methanol may inactivate alpha-amylase, a 90% substrate relative conversion can be obtained in 20% methanol at a high starch concentration (15% w/v) due to a stabilizing effect of starch on the enzyme. As the products of alcoholysis are a series of methyl-oligosaccharides, from methyl-glucoside to methyl-hexomaltoside, alcoholysis was indirectly quantified by high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the total methyl-glucoside produced after the addition of glucoamylase to the alpha-amylase reaction products. More alcoholysis was obtained from intact soluble starch than with maltodextrins or pre-hydrolyzed starch. The biotechnological implications of using starch as substrate for the production of alkyl-glucosides is analyzed in the context of these results. PMID:10386619

  19. Amylase mRNA transcripts in normal tissues and neoplasms: the implication of different expressions of amylase isogenes.

    PubMed

    Seyama, K; Nukiwa, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, H; Kira, S

    1994-01-01

    To understand the cellular origin and mechanism of gene expression in amylase-producing cancers, the phenotyping of amylase isogenes by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction-fragment-length polymorphism using restriction endonucleases TaqI, DdeI, HinfI, and AfaI were performed for 3 amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas, 16 lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, other human malignant neoplasms, cultured cell lines, and normal tissues. In addition, amylase mRNA transcripts were semi-quantified by the limited polymerase chain reaction. Amylase mRNA transcripts were detected in all of the tissues examined. The AMY1 gene (salivary type) was exclusively and highly expressed in the salivary glands and the amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas. Coexpression of the AMY1 gene and AMY2 gene (pancreatic type) was observed in most of the lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, lung tissue, and cells scraped from the tracheal epithelium, thyroid, and female genital tract (ovary, fallopian tube, and uterus cervix), while minimal levels of mRNA transcripts of the AMY2 gene were detected in other malignant neoplasms, various normal tissues, and the cultured cell lines. All mRNA transcripts identified as being those of the AMY2 gene were further identified as being from the AMY2B gene except for the transcripts from the pancreas, in which the AMY2A gene and AMY2B gene were coexpressed. On the basis of these results, the clinical occurrence of amylase-producing cancer likely relates to the tissues expressing the AMY1 gene, while the AMY2B gene, which evolutionarily is the oldest gene among human amylase isogenes, is constitutively expressed in various tissues. PMID:7507116

  20. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:7521216

  1. Analysis on evolutionary relationship of amylases from archaea, bacteria and eukaryota.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2016-02-01

    Amylase is one of the earliest characterized enzymes and has many applications in clinical and industrial settings. In biotechnological industries, the amylase activity is enhanced through modifying amylase structure and through cloning and expressing targeted amylases in different species. It is important to understand how engineered amylases can survive from generation to generation. This study used phylogenetic and statistical approaches to explore general patterns of amylases evolution, including 3118 α-amylases and 280 β-amylases from archaea, eukaryota and bacteria with fully documented taxonomic lineage. First, the phylogenetic tree was created to analyze the evolution of amylases with focus on individual amylases used in biofuel industry. Second, the average pairwise p-distance was computed for each kingdom, phylum, class, order, family and genus, and its diversity implies multi-time and multi-clan evolution. Finally, the variance was further partitioned into inter-clan variance and intra-clan variance for each taxonomic group, and they represent horizontal and vertical gene transfer. Theoretically, the results show a full picture on the evolution of amylases in manners of vertical and horizontal gene transfer, and multi-time and multi-clan evolution as well. Practically, this study provides the information on the surviving chance of desired amylase in a given taxonomic group, which may potentially enhance the successful rate of cloning and expression of amylase gene in different species. PMID:26745984

  2. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result. PMID:27327179

  3. [Are amylases in bakery products and flour potential food allergens?].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Sander, I; Jansen, A; Czuppon, A B

    1994-05-21

    The enzyme alpha-amylase from the mould Aspergillus oryzae (Asp o II) routinely used for the production of bread, cakes and pastries has in recent years been identified as an inhalative allergen for occupational diseases (bakers' asthma). It is doubtful whether this amylase in the final product, i.e. after the baking procedure, can still be regarded as an allergen. To clarify this question, detailed case histories on 138 subjects were recorded (98 allergics, 20 patients suffering form chronic intestinal diseases, 20 healthy controls). The clinical examinations included prick skin test and IgE antibody determination using one of the customary enzyme preparations. EAST showed a few of these 138 bread consumers to be weakly sensitized to the enzyme. One of the subjects displayed a significant reaction to alpha-amylase heated to 200 degrees C. As expected, eleven bakers sensitized to alpha-amylase by inhaling it in the workplace (positive prick test, positive case history) predominantly exhibited specific IgE antibodies to the native enzyme. Apart from one weakly positive finding, heated alpha-amylase yielded negative results in this collective. Baking conditions vary widely, especially with regard to single components, temperature and duration. Thus, further investigations as to residual allergenicity or the feasible occurrence of new antigenic determinants during the production of bread, cake and pastries are required. 27% of bakers examined and 9% of atopics showed antibodies to a flour inherent enzyme, a beta-amylase. On the whole, the selected conditions hinted at a weakly sensitizing potential inherent in baking flour and in added amylase. PMID:8209207

  4. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  5. Alpha-amylase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, E. C. M. J.; Pusey, M. L.; Ng, M. L.; Garriott, O. K.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments such as hot springs. The ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered enzymes from extremophiles to be of interest in industrial applications. One approach to producing these extremozymes entails the expression of the enzyme-encoding gene in a mesophilic host such as E.coli. This method has been employed in the effort to produce an alpha-amylase from a hyperthermophile (an organism that displays optimal growth above 80 C) isolated from a hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow vent site in the Atlantic Ocean. alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to produce smaller sugars and constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market. One application for thermostable alpha-amylases is the starch liquefaction process in which starch is converted into fructose and glucose syrups. The a-amylase encoding gene from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and sequenced, revealing high similarity with other archaeal hyperthermophilic a-amylases. The gene encoding the mature protein was expressed in E.coli. Initial characterization of this enzyme has revealed an optimal amylolytic activity between 85-90 C and around pH 5.3-6.0.

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  7. [The β-amylase polymorphism of winter common wheat grains].

    PubMed

    Netsvetaev, V P; Akinshina, O V; Bondarenko, L S; Motorina, I P

    2012-02-01

    The polymorphism of winter common wheat with respect to β-amylase isoenzymes has been analyzed using electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) buffered with a Tris-glycine system (pH 8.3). Seven β-amylase isoenzymes have been found in wheat cultivars and the breeding stock. Isoenzymes A, B, and C are the most frequent in Russian and Ukrainian cultivars (51.7 4.7, 30.7 3.8, and 11.9 2.5%, respectively). Two alleles of the β-Amy-D1 locus of the long arm of chromosome 4D have been identified. The substrate-enzyme affine effect can be used to locate the zones of activity of this enzyme by means of staining for proteins. It has been determined that β-amylase zymotypes may play a role in the aggregating capacity of the grain protein complex via the formation of S-S bonds. PMID:22567995

  8. Molecular characterization of α-amylase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Hanumanthu Prasanna; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Swarupa, Vimjam; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the prominent Gram positive human pathogen secretes many surface and secretary proteins including various enzymes and pathogenic factors that favour the successful colonization and infection of host tissue. α-amylase is one of the enzymes secreted by S. aureus which catalyses the breakdown of complex sugars to monosaccharides, which are required for colonization and survival of this pathogen in any anatomical locales. In the present study we have cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized α-amylase gene from S. aureus ATCC12600. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular weight of 58kDa and the kinetics showed Vmax 0.0208±0.033 (mg/ml)/mg/min and Km 10.633±0.737mg/ml. The multiple sequence analysis showed α- amylase of S. aureus exhibited large differences with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis. As the crystal structure of S. aureus α- amylase was unavailable, we used homology modelling method to build the structure. The built structure was validated by Ramachandran plot which showed 90% of the residues in the allowed region while no residue was found in the disallowed region and the built structure was close to the crystal structure with Z-Score: -6.85. The structural superimposition studies with α- amylases of Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis showed distinct differences with RMSD values of 18.158Åand 7.091Å respectively which correlated with enzyme kinetics, indicating α-amylase is different among these bacteria. PMID:23559746

  9. Molecular characterization of α-amylase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Hanumanthu Prasanna; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Swarupa, Vimjam; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the prominent Gram positive human pathogen secretes many surface and secretary proteins including various enzymes and pathogenic factors that favour the successful colonization and infection of host tissue. α-amylase is one of the enzymes secreted by S. aureus which catalyses the breakdown of complex sugars to monosaccharides, which are required for colonization and survival of this pathogen in any anatomical locales. In the present study we have cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized α-amylase gene from S. aureus ATCC12600. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular weight of 58kDa and the kinetics showed Vmax 0.0208±0.033 (mg/ml)/mg/min and Km 10.633±0.737mg/ml. The multiple sequence analysis showed α- amylase of S. aureus exhibited large differences with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis. As the crystal structure of S. aureus α- amylase was unavailable, we used homology modelling method to build the structure. The built structure was validated by Ramachandran plot which showed 90% of the residues in the allowed region while no residue was found in the disallowed region and the built structure was close to the crystal structure with Z-Score: -6.85. The structural superimposition studies with α- amylases of Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis showed distinct differences with RMSD values of 18.158Åand 7.091Å respectively which correlated with enzyme kinetics, indicating α-amylase is different among these bacteria. PMID:23559746

  10. Neurospora Mutant Exhibiting Hyperproduction of Amylase and Invertase

    PubMed Central

    Gratzner, Howard; Sheehan, D. N.

    1969-01-01

    A mutant strain of Neurospora crassa has been isolated which is derepressed for amylase and β-fructofuranosidase (invertase). Large amounts of the two enzymes were secreted into the culture medium upon depletion of exogenous carbon source. The resulting increases of the two extracellular enzymes were prevented by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, and glycerol. The starving cells of the mutant strain produced amylase and invertase de novo, as evidenced by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into the enzymes. Preliminary genetic studies indicate that these elevated enzyme levels described are due to a single gene mutation. PMID:5773010

  11. Close relationship of a novel Flavobacteriaceae α-amylase with archaeal α-amylases and good potentials for industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol production from various starchy materials has received much attention in recent years. α-Amylases are key enzymes in the bioconversion process of starchy biomass to biofuels, food or other products. The properties of thermostability, pH stability, and Ca-independency are important in the development of such fermentation process. Results A novel Flavobacteriaceae Sinomicrobium α-amylase (FSA) was identified and characterized from genomic analysis of a novel Flavobacteriaceae species. It is closely related with archaeal α-amylases in the GH13_7 subfamily, but is evolutionary distant with other bacterial α-amylases. Based on the conserved sequence alignment and homology modeling, with minor variation, the Zn2+- and Ca2+-binding sites of FSA were predicated to be the same as those of the archaeal thermophilic α-amylases. The recombinant α-amylase was highly expressed and biochemically characterized. It showed optimum activity at pH 6.0, high enzyme stability at pH 6.0 to 11.0, but weak thermostability. A disulfide bond was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in domain C and resulted in the apparent improvement of the enzyme activity at high temperature and broad pH range. Moreover, about 50% of the enzyme activity was detected under 100°C condition, whereas no activity was observed for the wild type enzyme. Its thermostability was also enhanced to some extent, with the half-life time increasing from 25 to 55 minutes at 50°C. In addition, after the introduction of the disulfide bond, the protein became a Ca-independent enzyme. Conclusions The improved stability of FSA suggested that the domain C contributes to the overall stability of the enzyme under extreme conditions. In addition, successfully directed modification and special evolutionary status of FSA imply its directional reconstruction potentials for bioethanol production, as well as for other industrial applications. PMID:24485248

  12. Clinical and immunological responses to occupational exposure to alpha-amylase in the baking industry.

    PubMed Central

    Brisman, J; Belin, L

    1991-01-01

    alpha-Amylase is a starch cleaving enzyme often used in the baking industry as a flour additive. It is usually of fungal origin, produced by Aspergillus oryzae. One previous report has shown IgE antibodies and positive skin prick test against alpha-amylase in asthmatic bakers. This paper describes four alpha-amylase sensitised index cases with occupational asthma or rhinitis and the results of a cross sectional study of 20 workers from the same factory who were also exposed to alpha-amylase powder. Air sampling detected airborne alpha-amylase at a concentration of 0.03 mg/m3. Significantly more work related symptoms such as rhinitis and dermatitis were found among the alpha-amylase exposed workers compared with referents. A skin prick test to alpha-amylase was positive in 30% (6/20) of the exposed workers. Most of the persons showing a positive skin prick test had work related symptoms and were also skin prick test positive to common allergens. Nasal challenge tests with amylase were performed in selected cases and validated three cases of alpha-amylase induced rhinitis. Two non-symptomatic workers had precipitins to alpha-amylase. Specific IgG antibodies were shown by two further serological techniques. The nature and relevance of these antibodies are currently being studied. It is concluded that alpha-amylase powder is a potent occupational sensitiser. Precautions should be taken when handling this allergenic enzyme. PMID:1832939

  13. Clinical and immunological responses to occupational exposure to alpha-amylase in the baking industry.

    PubMed

    Brisman, J; Belin, L

    1991-09-01

    alpha-Amylase is a starch cleaving enzyme often used in the baking industry as a flour additive. It is usually of fungal origin, produced by Aspergillus oryzae. One previous report has shown IgE antibodies and positive skin prick test against alpha-amylase in asthmatic bakers. This paper describes four alpha-amylase sensitised index cases with occupational asthma or rhinitis and the results of a cross sectional study of 20 workers from the same factory who were also exposed to alpha-amylase powder. Air sampling detected airborne alpha-amylase at a concentration of 0.03 mg/m3. Significantly more work related symptoms such as rhinitis and dermatitis were found among the alpha-amylase exposed workers compared with referents. A skin prick test to alpha-amylase was positive in 30% (6/20) of the exposed workers. Most of the persons showing a positive skin prick test had work related symptoms and were also skin prick test positive to common allergens. Nasal challenge tests with amylase were performed in selected cases and validated three cases of alpha-amylase induced rhinitis. Two non-symptomatic workers had precipitins to alpha-amylase. Specific IgG antibodies were shown by two further serological techniques. The nature and relevance of these antibodies are currently being studied. It is concluded that alpha-amylase powder is a potent occupational sensitiser. Precautions should be taken when handling this allergenic enzyme. PMID:1832939

  14. Drosophila melanogaster larvae control amylase secretion according to the hardness of food.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Honami; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae excrete amylase and perform external digestion of their food. In this study, to investigate whether their external digestion ability varies in response to changes in the external environment, we measured the relative amount of amylase excreted by larvae using a new method: the iodine starch agar method (ISAM). Analysis using this method revealed that the amount of amylase excreted by larvae increased in accordance with the increase in the agar concentration. In addition, we investigated the effect on the larval growth rate of adding amylase to the diet. Pupation occurred 24 h later in food containing 1% amylase than in food containing no amylase. These results suggest that the larvae adjust their amylase excretion in response to changes in the external environment, and that its level has a marked influence on the larval growth rate. PMID:23964241

  15. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance. PMID:25689045

  16. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. Purification and characterization of camel (Camelus dromedarius) milk amylase.

    PubMed

    El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Serour, Ehab A; Abdelrahman, Aref M; Haroun, Bakry M; Redwan, El-Rashdy M

    2009-01-01

    Skimmed camel milk contains 59,900 U/L amylase, which is 39,363 times less than serum and plasma amylase. Camel milk beta-amylase was purified as a 61 KDa band using DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 and yielded 561 U/mg. The optimum working pH, Km and temperature were 7.0, 13.6 mg/Lstarch, 30-40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme has been shown higher affinity toward amylose and soluble starch than glycogen, amylopectin, dextrin, or pullulan. Magnesium chloride, CaCl(2) and NaCl activated the amylase, while EDTA and EGTA decreased its activity. While its activity was increased in the presence of Triton X-100 and Triton X-114. Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride did not show any effect on enzyme activity. However, the enzyme activity was inhibited by urea, SDS, DTNB, iodoacetamide, N-ethylmalimide, aprotinin, and trypsin inhibitor. It worked on starch to yield a maltose. Scanning electron microscope images demonstrated a nano-degrading ability on starch granules from various sources (potato, corn, cassava, and rice). PMID:19291574

  2. Optimization of alpha-amylase application in raw sugar manufacture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentration sin raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial alpha-amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to...

  3. Genetics of alpha-amylases in hexaploid oat species.

    PubMed

    Sharopova, N R; Portyanko, V A; Sozinov, A A

    1998-06-01

    The inheritance of alpha-amylases was studied in six F2 populations of hexaploid oats (Avena sativa, A. byzantina, A. fatua, A. sterillis) using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 22 loci was identified and described. Three main linkages of four or five loci each and an additional two pairs of linked loci were detected. It seems likely that the three main linkage groups represent homeologous chromosomes. Matching of alpha-amylase profiles of hexaploid (AACCDD), tetraploid (AACC), and diploid (AA) species was made to assign the linkage groups to particular subgenomes in the hexaploid oat. It was proposed that Linkage 1 (Amy12-Amy10-1-Amy4-Amy13-Amy11) belongs to the D-subgenome; Linkage 2 (Amy10-2, Amy9-Amy8-Amy6) belongs to the A-subgenome; and Linkage 3 (Amy7-Amy3-Amy5-Amy2) belongs to the C-subgenome of the hexaploid oat. The "malt" and "green" alpha-amylases in hexaploid and tetraploid oats have been identified. Isozymes of "green" alpha-amylase were lower in electrophoretic mobility than other isozymes and were governed by loci assigned to the A- and D-subgenomes. PMID:9775349

  4. Recommendations for Amylase Application in the 2008 Louisiana Grinding Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unfortunately, the application of amylase (an enzyme) to break down long chains of unwanted starch in U.S. sugarcane factories is still not optimized because of misinformation about which enzyme to use, and how to add the enzyme. Two large factory trials were conducted at a Louisiana factory to opti...

  5. Characterization of a Hydrophobic Amylase Inhibitor from Corn (Zea mays) Seeds with Activity Against Amylase from Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Edson L Z; Hirooka, Elisa Y; Mendiola-Olaya, Elizabeth; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro

    2003-08-01

    ABSTRACT A hydrophobic 19.7-kDa amylase inhibitor (AI) was purified from corn kernels by 95% ethanol extraction and anionic exchange chromatography. The AI has an isoelectric point of 3.6 and was very stable at different pH values and high temperatures, maintaining 47.6% activity after heating to 94 degrees C for 60 min. Amino acid analysis indicated high valine, leucine, glycine, alanine, and glutamic acid/glutamine content, and especially high valine content (41.2 mol%). This inhibitor is not a glycoprotein. It required 30-min preincubation to maximize complex enzyme-inhibitor formation when the amylase from Fusarium verticillioides was tested. The optimal pH of interaction was 6.5. It showed broad-spectrum activity including the following amylases: human saliva, porcine pancreas, F. verticillioides, as well as those from some insects of agricultural importance (Acanthoscelides obtectus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, Sitophilus zeamais, and Prostephanus truncatus). This novel hydrophobic protein not only inhibited the amylase from F. verticillioides but also decreased the conidia germination. Thus, this protein represents an approach to decrease the production of fumonisin in corn, either by using it as a molecular marker to detect fungal resistance or through genetic engineering. PMID:18943857

  6. Expression of the human amylase genes: Recent origin of a salivary amylase promoter from an actin pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.C.; Gumucio, D.L.; Meisler, M.H. ); Wiebauer, K. )

    1988-09-12

    The human genes encoding salivary amylase (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase (AMY2) are nearly identical in structure and sequence. The authors have used ribonuclease protection studies to identify the functional gene copies in this multigene family. Riboprobes derived from each gene were hybridized to RNA from human pancreas, parotid and liver. The sizes of the protected fragments demonstrated that both pancreatic genes are expressed in pancreas. One of the pancreatic genes, AMY2B, is also transcribed at a low level in liver, but not from the promoter used in pancreas. AMY1 transcripts were detected in parotid, but not in pancreas or liver. Unexpected fragments protected by liver RNA led to the discovery that the 5{prime} regions of the five human amylase genes contain a processed {gamma}-actin pseudogene. The promoter and start site for transcription of AMY1 are recently derived from the 3{prime} untranslated region of {gamma}-actin. In addition, insertion of an endogenous retrovirus has interrupted the {gamma}-actin pseudogene in four of the five amylase genes.

  7. Expression of the human amylase genes: recent origin of a salivary amylase promoter from an actin pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, L C; Wiebauer, K; Gumucio, D L; Meisler, M H

    1988-09-12

    The human genes encoding salivary amylase (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase (AMY2) are nearly identical in structure and sequence. We have used ribonuclease protection studies to identify the functional gene copies in this multigene family. Riboprobes derived from each gene were hybridized to RNA from human pancreas, parotid and liver. The sizes of the protected fragments demonstrated that both pancreatic genes are expressed in pancreas. One of the pancreatic genes, AMY2B, is also transcribed at a low level in liver, but not from the promoter used in pancreas. AMY1 transcripts were detected in parotid, but not in pancreas or liver. Unexpected fragments protected by liver RNA led to the discovery that the 5' regions of the five human amylase genes contain a processed gamma-actin pseudogene. The promoter and start site for transcription of AMY1 are recently derived from the 3' untranslated region of gamma-actin. In addition, insertion of an endogenous retrovirus has interrupted the gamma-actin pseudogene in four of the five amylase genes. PMID:2458567

  8. Amylase α-1A (AMY1A)

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sarika; Roy, Somak; Amin, Milon; Acquafondata, Marie; Yin, Ming; LaFramboise, William; Bastacky, Sheldon; Pantanowitz, Liron; Dhir, Rajiv; Parwani, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) and oncocytoma present with a perplexing overlap of morphologic and immunohistochemical features. ChRCC have deletions in the 1p21.1 region including the amylase α-1A gene (AMY1A). No such deletions are found in oncocytoma. Instead, oncocytomas shared other deletions on chromosome 1: 1p31.3, 1q25.2, and 1q44. We performed AMY1A immunostaining on 75 oncocytomas (57 tissue microarray [TMA] cores, 18 whole slides) and 54 ChRCCs (20 TMA cores, 34 whole slides). Staining was assessed using the H-score method. The intensity was graded as follows: no staining=0, weak=1, moderate=2, and strong=3. The AMY1A immunostain preferentially stained the distal tubules and collecting ducts of normal kidney. All oncocytomas (100%) expressed AMY1A with an H-score that varied from 100 to 300 (mean 205). Mild to moderate heterogeneity in staining intensity was noted within a given oncocytoma. For oncocytomas, 87% (65/75) cases had H-scores of at least 120 with a mean score of 221. Notably, the 13% (10/75) of oncocytoma cases that had an H-score of 100 were derived from the TMA. A total of 87% (47/54) of the ChRCC cases were negative for the AMY1A immunostain. Of the ChRCC cases, 4% (2/54) showed very weak cytoplasmic staining (H-score of 70 each), which was less than the lowest H-score of oncocytoma cases. All 5 cases of ChRCC, which showed an H-score of 100 or more, were referred to as eosinophilic variants of ChRCC. Three of these 5 cases showed a very nondescript, diffuse staining of the cytoplasm. Two of these 5 cases showed an H-score of 130. We think that as the staining pattern of these 2 cases is similar to that of oncocytoma, they should be put in a category of renal oncocytic neoplasms favoring oncocytoma. This result shows that AMY1A staining could be very helpful in further classifying even a subset of the eosinophilic variants of ChRCC. The difference between ChRCC and oncocytoma was statistically significant (χ2 test, P<0

  9. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats. PMID:24319124

  10. A chimera-like alpha-amylase inhibitor suggesting the evolution of Phaseolus vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wato, S; Kamei, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    2000-07-01

    White kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contains two kinds of alpha-amylase inhibitors, one heat-stable (alpha AI-s) and one heat-labile (alpha AI-u). alpha AI-s has recently been revealed to be a tetrameric complex, alpha(2)beta(2), with two active sites [Kasahara et al. (1996) J. Biochem. 120, 177-183]. The present study was undertaken to reveal the molecular features of alpha AI-u, which is composed of three kinds of subunits, alpha, beta, and gamma. The gamma-subunit, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-subunits that are indistinguishable from the alpha- and beta-subunits of alpha AI-s, was found to correspond to a subunit of an alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein, which has been identified as an inactive, evolutionary intermediate between arcelin and the alpha-amylase inhibitor in a P. vulgaris defense protein family. The polypeptide molecular weight of alpha AI-u determined by the light-scattering technique, together with the polypeptide molecular weights of the subunits, suggests that alpha AI-u is a trimeric complex, alpha beta gamma. The inhibition of alpha AI-u by increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) indicates that an inactive 1:1 complex is formed between alpha AI-u and PPA. Molecular weight estimation of the complex by the light-scattering technique confirmed that it is a complex of alpha AI-u with one PPA molecule. Thus it seems probable that alpha AI-u is an evolutionary intermediate of the P. vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor. PMID:10876168

  11. Isomaltose formed by alpha-glucosidases triggers amylase induction in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Murakoshi, Yuriko; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Norihiro

    2002-10-01

    Among various alpha-glucobioses examined, isomaltose was the most effective inducer for amylase synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans. Amylase induction by maltose was completely inhibited by addition of castanospermine or cycloheximide, while induction by isomaltose was not affected by the inhibitors, suggesting that amylase induction by maltose requires inducible alpha-glucosidases. Disruption of the alpha-glucosidase A gene ( agdA), the alpha-glucosidase B gene ( agdB), or both genes did not abolish maltose-dependent induction, although amylase production induced by maltose decreased about 2-fold in the agdA/ agdB double disruptant, compared with that in the agdB disruptant at all concentrations tested. Upon induction by isomaltose, amylase synthesis was enhanced considerably in the agdB and agdA/ agdB disruptants. Even at 3 nM, isomaltose induced amylase production in the double disruptant, supporting the suggestion that isomaltose is a physiological inducer for amylase. Therefore, maltose must be converted to isomaltose by alpha-glucosidases prior to triggering amylase synthesis, but no specific alpha-glucosidase is required for amylase induction by maltose. Probably any alpha-glucosidases having isomaltose-forming activity, including AgdA and AgdB, may participate in amylase induction by maltose. PMID:12420145

  12. Studies on the Utility of B-Amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for B-Amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third in...

  13. Potential of the bean alpha-amylase inhibitor alpha-AI-1 to inhibit alpha-amylase activity in true bugs(Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    True bugs (Hemiptera) are an important pest complex not controlled by Bt crops. An alternative source of resistance includes inhibitors of digestive enzymes. aAI-1, an a-amylase inhibitor from the common bean, has been shown to inhibit a-amylases of bruchid pests of grain legumes. Here we quantify t...

  14. Characterization of the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Detergent: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of [alpha]-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test…

  15. Studies on the Utility of ß-amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for ß-amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third intr...

  16. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase. PMID:25748632

  17. Stabilization of α-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batal, A. I.; Atia, K. S.; Eid, M.

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of α-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using γ irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized α-amylase were studied. Covering of α-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized α-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10 mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized α-amylase showed a higher k/K and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of α-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  18. Action of human pancreatic and salivary alpha-amylases on maltooligosaccharides: evaluation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Saito, N; Horiuchi, T; Yoshida, M; Imai, T

    1979-10-01

    The kinetic studies on the reactions of human pancreatic and salivary alpha-amylases with several maltooligosaccharides (maltotetraose, maltopentaose, maltohexaose, and maltoheptaose) were carried out. The susceptibility to hydrolysis with human pancreatic alpha-amylase decreased in the order of maltopentaose, maltohexaose, maltotetraose, and maltoheptaose, while with human salivary alpha-amylase maltopentaose was hydrolysed slightly slower than maltohexaose but fairly faster than maltotetraose or maltoheptaose from a viewpoint of the rates of reactions based on the amount of substrate changed. The relative rates of production of substrates, utilized in the coupled yeast alpha-glucosidase reaction, increased in the order of maltoheptaose, maltohexaose, maltotetraose, and maltopentaose with human pancreatic alpha-amylase, while with human salivary alpha-amylase in the order of maltoheptaose, maltotetraose, maltohexaose, and maltopentaose. Thus, maltopentaose was considered to be the best substrate over maltotetraose, maltohexaose or maltoheptaose for the alpha-glucosidase coupled method of alpha-amylase determination. PMID:385176

  19. A heterotetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor from emmer (Triticum dicoccon Schrank) seeds.

    PubMed

    Capocchi, A; Muccilli, V; Cunsolo, V; Saletti, R; Foti, S; Fontanini, D

    2013-04-01

    Plants have developed a constitutive defense system against pest attacks, which involves the expression of a set of inhibitors acting on heterologous amylases of different origins. Investigating the soluble protein complement of the hulled wheat emmer we have isolated and characterized a heterotetrameric α-amylase inhibitor (ETI). Based on mass spectrometry data, it is an assembly of proteins highly similar to the CM2/CM3/CM16 found in durum wheat. Our data indicate that these proteins can also inhibit exogenous α-amylases in binary assemblies. The calculated dissociation constants (K(i)) for the pancreatic porcine amylase- and human salivary amylase-ETI complexes are similar to those found in durum and soft wheat. Homology modeling of the CM subunits indicate structural similarities with other proteins belonging to the cereal family of trypsin/α-amylase inhibitors; a possible homology modeled structure for a tetrameric assembly of the subunits is proposed. PMID:23320956

  20. A novel type of human alpha-amylase produced in lung carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tomita, N; Horii, A; Doi, S; Yokouchi, H; Shiosaki, K; Higashiyama, M; Matsuura, N; Ogawa, M; Mori, T; Matsubara, K

    1989-03-15

    A novel type of alpha-amylase was detected in a lung carcinoid tissue after surveying the cDNA library constructed from this tumor mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the amylase expressed in this carcinoid tumor has 13 and 6 amino acid substitutions when compared with salivary amylase (Amy1) and pancreatic amylase (Amy2), respectively. The nucleotide sequence homologies of cDNAs between this carcinoid amylase and amy1, amy2 are 97.5% and 98.2%, respectively. The nucleotide sequence comparison strongly suggests that this new amylase is the product of the amy3 gene that has been detected in human genome [Emi et al., Gene 62 (1988) 229-235] PMID:2701942

  1. Study of fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkialakshmi, S.; Shanthi, B.; Bhuvanapriya, T.

    2012-05-01

    The fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase by acrylamide and succinimide has been studied in water using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The steady-state fluorescence quenching technique has been performed in three different pHs (i.e., 6, 7 and 8) of water. Ground state and excited state binding constants (Kg &Ke) have been calculated. From the calculated binding constants (Kg &Ke) the free energy changes for the ground (ΔGg) and excited (ΔGe) states have been calculated and are presented in tables. UV and FTIR spectra have also been recorded to prove the binding of Barley α-amylase with acrylamide and succinimide.

  2. Production of fungal amylases using cheap, readily available agriresidues, for potential application in textile industry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Singh, Sanamdeep; Bali, Vrinda; Sharma, Lovleen; Mangla, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at isolation and screening of fungal amylase producer, optimization of solid state fermentation conditions for maximum amylase production by the best amylase producer, and characterization of the crude amylases, so produced. Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 showed the highest amylase activity (164.1 U/mL) in secondary screening under SSF conditions and was selected for further studies. The test strain showed maximum amylase production (341.7 U/mL) and supernatant protein concentration (9.7 mg/mL) for incubation period (6 days), temperature (35 °C), initial pH (6.0), nutrient salt solution as moistening agent, and beef extract as nitrogen source. Pomegranate peel produced maximum amylase activity, but wheat bran (only slightly lesser amylase activity as compared to that of pomegranate peel) was chosen for further studies, keeping in mind the seasonal availability of pomegranate peel. TLC confirmed the amylase produced to be α -type and 60 kDa was the molecular weight of the partially purified amylase. The enzyme showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 6.0, temperature of 55 °C, and incubation time of 60 minutes. UV (616.0 U/mL) and chemical (814.2 U/mL) mutation enhanced amylase activity as compared to wild test strain. The study indicates that Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 can be an important source of amylase and the crude enzyme, hence obtained, can be cost effectively applied in multiple sections of textile wet processing. PMID:24527439

  3. Production of Fungal Amylases Using Cheap, Readily Available Agriresidues, for Potential Application in Textile Industry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanamdeep; Bali, Vrinda; Mangla, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at isolation and screening of fungal amylase producer, optimization of solid state fermentation conditions for maximum amylase production by the best amylase producer, and characterization of the crude amylases, so produced. Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 showed the highest amylase activity (164.1 U/mL) in secondary screening under SSF conditions and was selected for further studies. The test strain showed maximum amylase production (341.7 U/mL) and supernatant protein concentration (9.7 mg/mL) for incubation period (6 days), temperature (35°C), initial pH (6.0), nutrient salt solution as moistening agent, and beef extract as nitrogen source. Pomegranate peel produced maximum amylase activity, but wheat bran (only slightly lesser amylase activity as compared to that of pomegranate peel) was chosen for further studies, keeping in mind the seasonal availability of pomegranate peel. TLC confirmed the amylase produced to be α-type and 60 kDa was the molecular weight of the partially purified amylase. The enzyme showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 6.0, temperature of 55°C, and incubation time of 60 minutes. UV (616.0 U/mL) and chemical (814.2 U/mL) mutation enhanced amylase activity as compared to wild test strain. The study indicates that Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 can be an important source of amylase and the crude enzyme, hence obtained, can be cost effectively applied in multiple sections of textile wet processing. PMID:24527439

  4. Kinetic studies of amylase and biomass production by Calvatia gigantea

    SciTech Connect

    Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Production of alpha-amylase (alpha-4, glucan 4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) by microorganisms has been practiced for many years in small and large scale operations and the literature on this enzyme is voluminous. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae have been reported as the main fungal species used for commercial production of the enzyme. On the other hand, large volumes of low-cost agricultural products such as acorn (the perisperm-free dry seed contains approximately 60% starch) are wasted in many countries and provide a challenge to biotechnology to efficiently utilize these rich sources of starch for the production of high added value products like enzymes. C. gigantea is an edible puffball excreting high levels of alpha-amylase when cultivated on different sources of starch containing elevated quantities of toxic tannic compounds. This fungus has been employed for the production of microbial protein from wastes and acorns containing high levels of toxic tannic compounds. The same fungus was also reported to grow on both hydrolyzable and condensed tannins as sole carbon sources. The present work was undertaken to investigate certain kinetic characteristics of alpha-amylase and biomass production by C. gigantea grown on soluble and acorn starch in a lab fermenter. (Refs. 18).

  5. Characterization of the L. manihotivorans alpha-amylase gene.

    PubMed

    Morlon-Guyot, J; Mucciolo-Roux, F; Rodriguez Sanoja, R; Guyot, J P

    2001-07-01

    Primers and probes were established from the sequences of the alpha-amylase genes (amyA) of L. amylovorus CIP 102989 and of L. plantarum A6 (Giraud and Cuny 1997). They were successfully used for the detection of the amyA gene in L. manihotivorans strain LMG 18010T and a 2842 bp region, containing the entire gene (2706 bp) with its putative promoter has been sequenced. More than 98% nucleotide sequence identities was found with L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amyA genes. The deduced amino acid sequence shares more than 96% amino acid sequence identities with L. amylovorus and L. plantarum alpha-amylases, and also 65% and 59% identities with the alpha-amylases of B. subtilis and S. bovis, respectively. The 3' terminal part of L. manihotivorans LMG 18010T amyA gene contained four repeated sequences (SRU). The amyA genes of the three lactobacilli species differed mainly in the number of SRU and in the size of the flanking regions of the SRU. PMID:11697143

  6. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase in aqueous cosolvent systems.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jay Kant; Prakash, V

    2009-09-01

    The activity and thermal stability of alpha-amylase were studied in the presence of different concentrations of trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was found to be 50 +/- 2 degrees C. Further increase in temperature resulted in irreversible thermal inactivation of the enzyme. In the presence of cosolvents, the rate of thermal inactivation was found to be significantly reduced. The apparent thermal denaturation temperature (Tm) app and activation energy (Ea) of alpha-amylase were found to be significantly increased in the presence of cosolvents in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of 40% trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol, increments in the (Tm)app were 20 degrees C, 14 degrees C, 13 degrees C and 9 degrees C, respectively. The Ea of thermal denaturation of alpha-amylase in the presence of 20% (w/v) trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol was found to be 126, 95, 90 and 43 kcal/mol compared with a control value of 40 kcal/mol. Intrinsic and 8-anilinonaphathalene-1-sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorescence studies indicated that thermal denaturation of the enzyme was accompanied by exposure of the hydrophobic cluster on the protein surface. Preferential interaction parameters indicated extensive hydration of the enzyme in the presence of cosolvents. PMID:19805899

  7. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  8. Paper-based α-amylase detector for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satarupa; Mandal, Nilanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication of a paper-sensor for quantitative detection of α-amylase activity in human blood serum. Pieces of filter papers were coated with starch-iodine solution leading to an intense blue coloration on the surface. Dispensing α-amylase solution on the starch-iodine coated paper reduced the intensity of the color because of starch-hydrolysis catalyzed by amylase. The variation in the intensity of the color with the concentration of amylase was estimated in three stages: (i) initially, the paper-surface was illuminated with a light emitting diode, (ii) then, the transmitted (reflected) rays emitted through (from) the paper were collected on a photoresistor, and (iii) the variations in the electrical resistance of the photoresistor were correlated with the amylase concentration in analyte. The resistance of photoresistor decreased monotonically with an increase in amylase concentration because the intensity of the reflected (transmitted) rays collected from (through) the paper increased with reduction in the color intensity on the paper surface. Since a specific bio-reaction was employed to detect the activity of amylase, the sensor was found to be equally efficient in detecting unknown quantities of amylase in human blood serum. The reported sensor has shown the potential to graduate into a point-of-care detection tool for α-amylase. PMID:26655186

  9. The purification of a novel amylase from Bacillus subtilis and its inhibition by wheat proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, A R; Ade, P; Di Maggio, D; Fanelli, C; Vittozzi, L

    1983-01-01

    A new alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) from Bacillus subtilis was purified by affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme, estimated from sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, was 93000, which is very different from the molecular weights of two well-characterized amylases from B. subtilis. Electrofocusing showed an isoelectric point of 5. Amylase shows a broad maximum of activity between pH 6 and 7; maximal inhibition of enzyme by wheat-protein alpha-amylase inhibitors is displayed at pH 7. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6189482

  10. Inhibition of amylases from different origins by albumins from the wheat kernel.

    PubMed

    Silano, V; Furia, M; Gianfreda, L; Macri, A; Palescandolo, R; Rab, A; Scardi, V; Stella, E; Valfre, F

    1975-05-23

    The amylase activity of water extracts from 18 insect species, from 23 marine species and from 17 different species of birds and mammals was determined quantitatively. The inhibition of amylase in these extracts by three albumin fractions from the mature wheat kernel, which had been separated according to their molecular weights (60 000, 24 000 and 12 500 D), was determined as well. The inhibition activity of the three albumin fractions toward amylases extracted from a number of cereal species or from immature and germinating wheat kernel was also tested. The extracts from insects that are destructive of wheat grain and stored wheat products showed much higher amylase activities as compared to the other insect species that do not attack wheat and wheat products. On the basis of the effectiveness with which the three albumin fractions inhibit their activities, the amylase preparations tested were divided into susceptible, partially susceptible and resistent. Susceptible amylases, inhibited by any of the three albumin fractions, were found mainly in insects that attack wheat and in marine species. Partially susceptible amylases, inhibited by only one or two of the three albumin fractions, were present in a few avain and mammalian species including man. Resistent amylases were largely distributed in cereal, avian and mammalian species as well as in insect species that do not usually attack wheat grain or wheat flour products. At no stage of development, wheat alpha-amylase was inhibited by the albumin fractions from the mature kernel. The 12 500 dalton albumin fraction was the most effective in inhibiting insect amylases, but it was inactive toward avian and mammalian amylases. The 24 000 dalton albumin fraction was the most effective in inhibiting amylases from marine avian and mammalian species and inhibited as much as 33 amylases over 66 different amylases tested. It is suggested that protein inhibitors of amylase contributed to natural selection of polyploid

  11. Structure of amylase-binding protein A of Streptococcus gordonii: A potential receptor for human salivary α-amylase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Ashish; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Gooley, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) of a number of oral streptococci is essential for the colonization of the dental pellicle. We have determined the solution structure of residues 24–195 of AbpA of Streptococcus gordonii and show a well-defined core of five helices in the region of 45–115 and 135–145. 13Cα/β chemical shift and heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOE data are consistent with this fold and that the remainder of the protein is unstructured. The structure will inform future molecular experiments in defining the mechanism of human salivary α-amylase binding and biofilm formation by streptococci. PMID:25739638

  12. A single gene directs synthesis of a precursor protein with beta- and alpha-amylase activities in Bacillus polymyxa.

    PubMed Central

    Uozumi, N; Sakurai, K; Sasaki, T; Takekawa, S; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1989-01-01

    The Bacillus polymyxa amylase gene comprises 3,588 nucleotides. The mature amylase comprises 1,161 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127,314. The gene appeared to be divided into two portions by the direct-repeat sequence located at almost the middle of the gene. The 5' region upstream of the direct-repeat sequence was shown to be responsible for the synthesis of beta-amylase. The 3' region downstream of the direct-repeat sequence contained four sequences homologous with those in other alpha-amylases, such as Taka-amylase A. The 48-kilodalton (kDa) amylase isolated from B. polymyxa was proven to have alpha-amylase activity. The amino acid sequences of the peptides generated from the 48-kDa amylase showed complete agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminal portion. The B. polymyxa amylase gene was therefore concluded to contain in-phase beta- and alpha-amylase-coding sequences in the 5' and 3' regions, respectively. A precursor protein, a 130-kDa amylase, directed by a plasmid, pYN520, carrying the entire amylase gene, had both beta- and alpha-amylase activities. This represents the first report of a single protein precursor in procaryotes that gives rise to two enzymes. Images PMID:2464578

  13. Properties of an amylase from thermophilic Bacillus SP

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Côrrea, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; da Silva, Júlia Caroline Matos; de Oliveira Mansur, Luciana Ribeiro Coutinho; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal

    2008-01-01

    α-Amylase production by thermophilic Bacillus sp strain SMIA-2 cultivated in liquid cultures containing soluble starch as a carbon source and supplemented with 0.05% whey protein and 0.2% peptone reached a maximum activity at 32 h, with levels of 37 U/mL. Studies on the amylase characterization revealed that the optimum temperature of this enzyme was 90°C. The enzyme was stable for 1 h at temperatures ranging from 40-50°C while at 90°C, 66% of its maximum activity was lost. However, in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was stable at 90°C for 30 min and retained about 58% residual activity after 1 h. The optimum pH of the enzyme was found to be 8.5. After incubation of enzyme for 2 h at pH 9.5 and 11.0 was observed a decrease of about 6.3% and 16.5% of its original activity. At pH 6.0 the enzyme lost about 36% of its original activity. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Co2+, Cu2+ and Ba2+, but less affected by Mg2+, Na+ and K+. In the presence of 2.0 M NaCl, 63% of amylase activity was retained after 2 h incubation at 45°C. The amylase exhibited more than 70% activity when incubated for 1 h at 50°C with sodium dodecyl sulphate. However, very little residual activity was obtained with sodium hypochlorite and with hydrogen peroxide the enzyme was completely inhibited. The compatibility of Bacillus sp SMIA-2 amylase with certain commercial detergents was shown to be good as the enzyme retained 86%, 85% and 75% of its activity after 20 min incubation at 50°C in the presence of the detergent brands Omo®, Campeiro® and Tide®, respectively. PMID:24031188

  14. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C18:1ω7c (32.8%), C16:1ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  15. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions.

    PubMed

    Khannous, Lamia; Jrad, Mouna; Dammak, Mouna; Miladi, Ramzi; Chaaben, Nour; Khemakhem, Bassem; Gharsallah, Néji; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C(18:1)ω7c (32.8%), C(16:1)ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  16. Purification and characterization of α-Amylase from Miswak Salvadora persica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The miswak (Salvadora persica) is a natural toothbrush. It is well known that very little information has been reported on enzymes in miswak as medicinal plant. Recently, we study peroxidase in miswak. In the present study, the main goal of this work is to purify and characterize α-amylase from miswak. The second goal is to study the storage stability of α-amylase in toothpaste. Method The purification method included chromatographaphy of miswak α-amylase on DEAE-Sepharose column and Sephacryl S-200 column. Molecular weight was determined by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Results Five α-amylases A1, A4a, A4b, A5a and A5b from miswak were purified and they had molecular weights of 14, 74, 16, 30 and 20 kDa, respectively. α-Amylases had optimum pH from 6 to 8. Affinity of the substrates toward all enzymes was studied. Miswak α-amylases A1, A4a, A4b, A5a and A5b had Km values for starch and glycogen of 3.7, 3.7, 7.1, 0.52, 4.3 mg/ml and 5.95, 5.9 4.16, 6.3, 6.49 mg/ml, respectively. The optimum temperature for five enzymes ranged 40°C- 60°C. Miswak α-amylases were stable up to 40°C- 60°C after incubation for 30 min. Ca+2 activated all the miswak α-amylases, while Ni2+, Co+2 and Zn+2 activated or inhibited some of these enzymes. The metal chelators, EDTA, sodium citrate and sodium oxalate had inhibitory effects on miswak α-amylases. PMSF, p-HMB, DTNB and 1,10 phenanthroline caused inhibitory effect on α-amylases. The analysis of hydrolytic products after starch hydrolysis by miswak α-amylases on paper chromatography revealed that glucose, maltose, maltotriose and oligosaccharide were the major products. Crude miswak α-amylase in the toothpaste retained 55% of its original activity after 10 months of storage at room temperature. Conclusions From these findings, α-amylases from miswak can be considered as beneficial enzymes for pharmaceuticals. Therefore, we study the storage stability of the crude α-amylase of miswak, which contained the five

  17. Biochemical properties of alpha-amylase from peel of Citrus sinensis cv. Abosora.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh Ahmed; Drees, Ehab A; El-Badry, Mohamed O; Fahmy, Afaf S

    2010-04-01

    alpha-Amylase activity was screened in the peel, as waste fruit, of 13 species and cultivars of Egyptian citrus. The species Citrus sinensis cv. Abosora had the highest activity. alpha-Amylase AI from Abosora peel was purified to homogeneity using anion and cation-exchange, and gel filtration chromatographies. Molecular weight of alpha-amylase AI was found to be 42 kDa. The hydrolysis properties of alpha-amylase AI toward different substrates indicated that corn starch is the best substrate. The alpha-amylase had the highest activity toward glycogen compared with amylopectin and dextrin. Potato starch had low affinity toward alpha-amylase AI but it did not hydrolyze beta-cyclodextrin and dextran. Apparent Km for alpha-amylase AI was 5 mg (0.5%) starch/ml. alpha-Amylase AI showed optimum activity at pH 5.6 and 40 degrees C. The enzyme was thermally stable up to 40 degrees C and inactivated at 70 degrees C. The effect of mono and divalent metal ions were tested for the alpha-amylase AI. Ba2+ was found to have activating effect, where as Li+ had negligible effect on activity. The other metals caused inhibition effect. Activity of the alpha-amylase AI was increased one and half in the presence of 4 mM Ca2+ and was found to be partially inactivated at 10 mM Ca2+. The reduction of starch viscosity indicated that the enzyme is endoamylase. The results suggested that, in addition to citrus peel is a rich source of pectins and flavanoids, alpha-amylase AI from orange peel could be involved in the development and ripening of citrus fruit and may be used for juice processing. PMID:19941088

  18. GA Enhanced a-Amylase Synthesis in Halved Grains of Barley (Hordeum vulgare): A Simple Laboratory Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory demonstration is suggested for the formation of a-amylase enzyme in halved grains of barley. Data presented in the article provide some information of the pattern of a- and b-amylase activity during germination. (PS)

  19. Production and Partial Purification of Alpha Amylase from Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 121) Using Solid State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Raul, Dibyangana; Biswas, Tania; Mukhopadhyay, Suchita; Kumar Das, Shrayan; Gupta, Suvroma

    2014-01-01

    Amylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starch into sugars and plays a pivotal role in a variety of areas like use as digestives, for the production of ethanol and high fructose corn syrup, detergents, desiring of textiles, modified starches, hydrolysis of oil-field drilling fluids, and paper recycling. In the present work, solid state fermentation (SSF) for α -amylase production has been used in lieu of submerged fermentation (SmF) due to its simple technique, low capital investment, lower levels of catabolite repression, and better product recovery. Bacillus subtilis has been well known as producer of alpha amylase and was tested using solid state fermentation for 48 hours at 37°C with wheat bran as substrate. Comparison between different fermentation hours demonstrated high yield of alpha amylase after 48 hours. This alpha amylase has optimum pH and temperature at 7.1 and 40°C, respectively. With the goal to purify alpha amylase, 30-70% (NH4)2SO4 cut concentrated the amylase activity threefold with respect to crude fermented extract. This was verified in quantitative DNS assay method as well as in zymogram gel profile. The exact molecular weight of the amylase is yet to be determined with the aid of other protein purification techniques. PMID:24672727

  20. NMR assignment of the amylase-binding protein A from Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis is a primary colonizer of tooth surfaces in the oral cavity. Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) from S. parasanguinis is responsible for the recruitment of salivary amylase to bacterial surface, which plays an important role in the development of oral biofilms. Here, we describe the essentially complete NMR assignments for AbpA. PMID:25016927

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Oral Streptococcus Strains That Encode Amylase-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  2. Draft genome sequences of 18 oral streptococcus strains that encode amylase-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  3. Cloning of a yeast alpha-amylase promoter and its regulated heterologous expression

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR; Hooker, Brian S [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Daniel B [Pasco, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  4. Further Experiments on Gibberellin-Stimulated Amylase Production in Cereal Grains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppage, Jo; Hill, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments conducted on wheat and barley grains to analyze activities of alpha- and beta-amylase enzymes. Gibberellins were used exogenously. Techniques are described in detail. Results on different cultivars revealed that beta-amylase was not an invariable result of imbibition. Techniques employed can be used by school students. (PS)

  5. Use of activated carbons to remove undesirable residual amylase from factory and refinery streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over) activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were develope...

  6. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  12. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test. PMID:22946767

  13. Oligosaccharide binding to barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Mori, Haruhide; Svensson, Birte; Aghajari, Nushin

    2005-09-23

    Enzymatic subsite mapping earlier predicted 10 binding subsites in the active site substrate binding cleft of barley alpha-amylase isozymes. The three-dimensional structures of the oligosaccharide complexes with barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) described here give for the first time a thorough insight into the substrate binding by describing residues defining 9 subsites, namely -7 through +2. These structures support that the pseudotetrasaccharide inhibitor acarbose is hydrolyzed by the active enzymes. Moreover, sugar binding was observed to the starch granule-binding site previously determined in barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 (AMY2), and the sugar binding modes are compared between the two isozymes. The "sugar tongs" surface binding site discovered in the AMY1-thio-DP4 complex is confirmed in the present work. A site that putatively serves as an entrance for the substrate to the active site was proposed at the glycone part of the binding cleft, and the crystal structures of the catalytic nucleophile mutant (AMY1D180A) complexed with acarbose and maltoheptaose, respectively, suggest an additional role for the nucleophile in the stabilization of the Michaelis complex. Furthermore, probable roles are outlined for the surface binding sites. Our data support a model in which the two surface sites in AMY1 can interact with amylose chains in their naturally folded form. Because of the specificities of these two sites, they may locate/orient the enzyme in order to facilitate access to the active site for polysaccharide chains. Moreover, the sugar tongs surface site could also perform the unraveling of amylose chains, with the aid of Tyr-380 acting as "molecular tweezers." PMID:16030022

  14. Clinical significance of elevated serum and urine amylase levels in patients with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Swensson, E E; Maull, K I

    1981-12-01

    During the 45 month period beginning January 1977, 251 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of acute appendicitis underwent celiotomy at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A preoperative serum or urine amylase determination was recorded in 155 of the patients (62 percent). Of this group, 15 patients (10 percent) had elevation of serum amylase or 2 hour urine amylase. Hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria directly led to misdiagnosis or treatment delay in 5 of the 15 patients. Appendiceal rupture occurred in three patients, two of whom had prolonged (greater than 1 month) hospitalizations directly attributable to the misdiagnosis. As a result of this study, we conclude that (1) acute appendicitis and elevated amylase levels may occur concurrently, (2) hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria should not dissuade the surgeon from early operation if other clinical features suggest appendicitis, and (3) abdominal pain and elevation of amylase level define significant intraabdominal disease, not specifically pancreatic disease. PMID:6172043

  15. alpha-Amylase production in high cell density submerged cultivation of Aspergillus oryzae and A. nidulans.

    PubMed

    Agger, T; Spohr, A B; Nielsen, J

    2001-01-01

    The effect of biomass concentration on the formation of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase during submerged cultivation with A. oryzae and recombinant A. nidulans strains has been investigated. It was found that the specific rate of alpha-amylase formation in chemostats decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration in the range of approx. 2-12 g dry weight kg(-1). When using a recombinant A. nidulans strain in which the gene responsible for carbon catabolite repression of the A. oryzae alpha-amylase gene (creA) was deleted, no significant decrease in the specific rate of alpha-amylase formation was observed. On the basis of the experimental results, it is suggested that the low value of the specific alpha-amylase productivity observed at high biomass concentration is caused by slow mixing of the concentrated feed solution in the viscous fermentation medium. PMID:11234963

  16. Influence of Cotyledons upon α-Amylase Activity in Pea Embryonic Axes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bill D.

    1979-01-01

    α-Amylase activity remained relatively low in the axes of intact etiolated pea seedlings; the activity was predominantly confined to the epicotyl. Starch accumulated slightly. When the cotyledons were removed and the axes cultured on medium containing no carbon source, the starch reserve in the axes disappeared within a few days. This was accompanied by a 10- to 15-fold increase in α-amylase activity, in the absence of additional epicotyl growth. The phenonemon was observed for axes throughout early growth, although the relative accumulation of α-amylase activity in cultured axes was less for older seedlings. This change was attributed to a reduced response by nongrowing tissues. There was no corresponding change in β-amylase activity. These observations, described for several varieties of peas, demonstrate the control of cotyledons upon the utilization of stored reserves within the axis, with α-amylase as a key enzyme. PMID:16660848

  17. Amylase production by endophytic fungi Cylindrocephalumsp. isolated from medicinal plant Alpinia calcarata (Haw.) Roscoe

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha, V. H.; Ramesha, A.; Savitha, J.; Srinivas, C

    2012-01-01

    Amylases are among the most important enzymes used in modern biotechnology particularly in the process involving starch hydrolysis. Fungal amylase has large applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. Considering these facts, endophytic fungi isolated from the plant Alpinia calcarata (Haw.) Roscoe were screened for amylolytic activity on glucose yeast extract peptone agar (GYP) medium. Among thirty isolates of endophytic fungi, isolate number seven identified as Cylindrocephalum sp. (Ac-7) showed highest amylolytic activity and was taken for further study. Influence of various physical and chemical factors such as pH, temperature, carbon and nitrogen sources on amylase production in liquid media were studied. The maximal amylase production was found to be at 30ºC and at pH 7.0 of the growth medium. Among the various carbon and nitrogen sources tested, maltose at 1.5% and Sodium nitrate at 0.3% respectively gave optimum amylase production. PMID:24031946

  18. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch. PMID:20871989

  19. Raw starch conversion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Aspergillus tubingensis amylases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Starch is one of the most abundant organic polysaccharides available for the production of bio-ethanol as an alternative transport fuel. Cost-effective utilisation of starch requires consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) where a single microorganism can produce the enzymes required for hydrolysis of starch, and also convert the glucose monomers to ethanol. Results The Aspergillus tubingensis T8.4 α-amylase (amyA) and glucoamylase (glaA) genes were cloned and expressed in the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294 and the semi-industrial strain, S. cerevisiae Mnuα1. The recombinant AmyA and GlaA displayed protein sizes of 110–150 kDa and 90 kDa, respectively, suggesting significant glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. The Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] and Y294[AmyA-GlaA] strains were able to utilise 20 g l-1 raw corn starch as sole carbohydrate source, with ethanol titers of 9.03 and 6.67 g l-1 (0.038 and 0.028 g l-1 h-1), respectively, after 10 days. With a substrate load of 200 g l-1 raw corn starch, Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] yielded 70.07 g l-1 ethanol (0.58 g l-1 h-1) after 120 h of fermentation, whereas Y294[AmyA-GlaA] was less efficient at 43.33 g l-1 ethanol (0.36 g l-1 h-1). Conclusions In a semi-industrial amylolytic S. cerevisiae strain expressing the A. tubingensis α-amylase and glucoamylase genes, 200 g l-1 raw starch was completely hydrolysed (saccharified) in 120 hours with 74% converted to released sugars plus fermentation products and the remainder presumably to biomass. The single-step conversion of raw starch represents significant progress towards the realisation of CBP without the need for any heat pretreatment. Furthermore, the amylases were produced and secreted by the host strain, thus circumventing the need for exogenous amylases. PMID:24286270

  20. Exposure-sensitization relationship for alpha-amylase allergens in the baking industry.

    PubMed

    Houba, R; Heederik, D J; Doekes, G; van Run, P E

    1996-07-01

    Fungal alpha-amylase is an important occupational allergen in the bakery industry. Epidemiologic studies focusing on the relationship between alpha-amylase allergen exposure and work-related respiratory allergy, however, have not been reported yet. In this cross-sectional study, sensitization to occupational allergens and work-related symptoms were studied in 178 bakery workers and related to allergen exposure. Alpha-amylase allergen concentrations were measured in personal dust samples, using a sandwich enzyme immunoassay. All workers were categorized into groups on the basis of their job histories and the alpha-amylase exposure levels of their job titles. Of all workers 25% had one or more work-related symptoms. As much as 9% of the bakery workers showed a positive skin prick test reaction to fungal amylase, and in 8% amylase-specific IgE was demonstrated. Alpha-amylase exposure and atopy appeared to be the most important determinants of skin sensitization, with prevalence ratios for atopy of 20.8 (95% CI, 2.74 to 158) and for medium and high alpha-amylase exposure groups of 8.6 (95% CI, 1.01 to 74) and 15.9 (95% CI, 1.95 to 129), respectively. Furthermore, a positive association was found between positive skin prick tests to alpha-amylase and work-related respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, this study has shown that there is a strong and positive relationship between alpha-amylase allergen exposure levels in bakeries and specific sensitization in bakery workers. PMID:8680668

  1. Low serum amylase and obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome: A novel interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei

    2016-03-25

    For the last decade, low serum amylase (hypoamylasemia) has been reported in certain common cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes (regardless of type), and metabolic syndrome, all of which appear to have a common etiology of insufficient insulin action due to insulin resistance and/or diminished insulin secretion. Some clinical studies have shown that salivary amylase may be preferentially decreased in obese individuals, whereas others have revealed that pancreatic amylase may be preferentially decreased in diabetic subjects with insulin dependence. Despite this accumulated evidence, the clinical relevance of serum, salivary, and pancreatic amylase and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, copy number variations (CNVs) in the salivary amylase gene (AMY1), which range more broadly than the pancreatic amylase gene (AMY2A and AMY2B), have been shown to be well correlated with salivary and serum amylase levels. In addition, low CNV of AMY1, indicating low salivary amylase, was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, low taste perception/satiety, and postprandial hyperglycemia through impaired insulin secretion at early cephalic phase. In most populations, insulin-dependent diabetes is less prevalent (minor contribution) compared with insulin-independent diabetes, and obesity is highly prevalent compared with low body weight. Therefore, obesity as a condition that elicits cardiometabolic diseases relating to insulin resistance (major contribution) may be a common determinant for low serum amylase in a general population. In this review, the novel interpretation of low serum, salivary, and pancreas amylase is discussed in terms of major contributions of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27022442

  2. Low serum amylase and obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome: A novel interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kei

    2016-01-01

    For the last decade, low serum amylase (hypoamylasemia) has been reported in certain common cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes (regardless of type), and metabolic syndrome, all of which appear to have a common etiology of insufficient insulin action due to insulin resistance and/or diminished insulin secretion. Some clinical studies have shown that salivary amylase may be preferentially decreased in obese individuals, whereas others have revealed that pancreatic amylase may be preferentially decreased in diabetic subjects with insulin dependence. Despite this accumulated evidence, the clinical relevance of serum, salivary, and pancreatic amylase and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, copy number variations (CNVs) in the salivary amylase gene (AMY1), which range more broadly than the pancreatic amylase gene (AMY2A and AMY2B), have been shown to be well correlated with salivary and serum amylase levels. In addition, low CNV of AMY1, indicating low salivary amylase, was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, low taste perception/satiety, and postprandial hyperglycemia through impaired insulin secretion at early cephalic phase. In most populations, insulin-dependent diabetes is less prevalent (minor contribution) compared with insulin-independent diabetes, and obesity is highly prevalent compared with low body weight. Therefore, obesity as a condition that elicits cardiometabolic diseases relating to insulin resistance (major contribution) may be a common determinant for low serum amylase in a general population. In this review, the novel interpretation of low serum, salivary, and pancreas amylase is discussed in terms of major contributions of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27022442

  3. Characterization of two coleopteran α-amylases and molecular insights into their differential inhibition by synthetic α-amylase inhibitor, acarbose.

    PubMed

    Channale, Sonal M; Bhide, Amey J; Yadav, Yashpal; Kashyap, Garima; Pawar, Pankaj K; Maheshwari, V L; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-07-01

    Post-harvest insect infestation of stored grains makes them unfit for human consumption and leads to severe economic loss. Here, we report functional and structural characterization of two coleopteran α-amylases viz. Callosobruchus chinensis α-amylase (CcAmy) and Tribolium castaneum α-amylase (TcAmy) along with their interactions with proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitors. Secondary structural alignment of CcAmy and TcAmy with other coleopteran α-amylases revealed conserved motifs, active sites, di-sulfide bonds and two point mutations at spatially conserved substrate or inhibitor-binding sites. Homology modeling and molecular docking showed structural differences between these two enzymes. Both the enzymes had similar optimum pH values but differed in their optimum temperature. Overall, pattern of enzyme stabilities were similar under various temperature and pH conditions. Further, CcAmy and TcAmy differed in their substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency towards starch and amylopectin. HPLC analysis detected common amylolytic products like maltose and malto-triose while glucose and malto-tetrose were unique in CcAmy and TcAmy catalyzed reactions respectively. At very low concentrations, wheat α-amylase inhibitor was found to be superior over the acarbose as far as complete inhibition of amylolytic activities of CcAmy and TcAmy was concerned. Mechanism underlying differential amylolytic reaction inhibition by acarbose was discussed. PMID:27132147

  4. Effects of dietary amylase and sucrose on productivity of cows fed low-starch diets.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Rodriguez, C F; Engstrom, M; Azem, E; Bradford, B J

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have observed positive effects of both sucrose and exogenous amylase on the productivity of dairy cattle. Our objective was to evaluate direct effects and interactions of amylase and sucrose on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and milk components. Forty-eight multiparous Holstein cows between 70 and 130 d in milk were randomly assigned to each of 4 pens (12 cows/pen). Pens were randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, balanced for carryover effects. Treatment periods were 28 d, with 24 d for diet adaptation and 4d for sample and data collection. The treatments were a control diet (36% NDF and 21% starch), the control diet with amylase [0.5 g/kg of DM; Ronozyme RumiStar 600 (CT); DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Basel, Switzerland], a diet with sucrose replacing corn grain at 2% of DM, and the sucrose diet with amylase (0.5 g/kg of DM). All data were analyzed with mixed models, including the fixed effects of sugar, amylase, and their interaction, and the random effects of period and pen. Milk data included the random effects of cow nested within pen and pen × period to provide the error term for the pen-level analysis. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatments. Milk yield and milk composition were not altered by the inclusion of sucrose or amylase; however, a tendency for an amylase × sucrose interaction was observed for milk protein content, reflecting slightly lower milk protein concentrations for amylase and sucrose treatments (3.00 and 2.99 ± 0.03%) compared with the control and amylase + sucrose treatments (3.02 and 3.03 ± 0.03%). Solids-corrected and fat-corrected milk yields were not significantly altered by treatment, although the direct effect of amylase approached significance for both variables, suggesting possible small increases with amylase supplementation (~0.5 kg/d). Feed efficiency (energy-corrected milk divided by dry matter intake) numerically increased with either amylase (1.57 ± 0

  5. Salivary Alpha-Amylase Reactivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cynthia; Couture-Lalande, Marie-Ève; Narain, Tasha A.; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The two main components of the stress system are the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axes. While cortisol has been commonly used as a biomarker of HPA functioning, much less attention has been paid to the role of the SAM in this context. Studies have shown that long-term breast cancer survivors display abnormal reactive cortisol patterns, suggesting a dysregulation of their HPA axis. To fully understand the integrity of the stress response in this population, this paper explored the diurnal and acute alpha-amylase profiles of 22 breast cancer survivors and 26 women with no history of cancer. Results revealed that breast cancer survivors displayed identical but elevated patterns of alpha-amylase concentrations in both diurnal and acute profiles relative to that of healthy women, F (1, 39) = 17.95, p < 0.001 and F (1, 37) = 7.29, p = 0.010, respectively. The average area under the curve for the diurnal and reactive profiles was 631.54 ± 66.94 SEM and 1238.78 ± 111.84 SEM, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to their cortisol results, which showed normal diurnal and blunted acute patterns. The complexity of the stress system necessitates further investigation to understand the synergistic relationship of the HPA and SAM axes. PMID:27023572

  6. Circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Chiarenza, A P; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1990-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in parotid gland of 25 day old rats was studied under different experimental conditions (fast, reversed photoperiod, constant light or darkness and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of rats fasted or exposed for 7 days to constant darkness did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod and it disappeared in animals submitted to constant light or darkness for 15 days or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm persisted, with minor changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and post-natal life in constant light or darkness. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, under autonomous nervous system control and maternal coordination. This model appears to be useful in the study of sympathetic nervous system control of target organs and circadian rhythms in general. PMID:2076161

  7. High-activity barley alpha-amylase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominic W S; Batt, Sarah B; Lee, Charles C; Robertson, George H

    2004-10-01

    Barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 was cloned into and constitutively secreted by Saccharomyces cervisiae. The gene coding for the wild-type enzyme was subjected to directed evolution. Libraries of mutants were screened by halo formation on starch agar plates, followed by high-throughput liquid assay using dye-labeled starch as the substrate. The concentration of recombinant enzyme in the culture supernatant was determined by immunodetection, and used for the calculation of specific activity. After three rounds of directed evolution, one mutant (Mu322) showed 1000 times the total activity and 20 times the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme produced by the same yeast expression system. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this mutant with the wild type revealed five substitutions: Q44H, R303K and F325Y in domain A, and T94A and R128Q in domain B. Two of these mutations. Q44H and R303K, result in amino acids highly conserved in cereal alpha-amylases. R303K and F325Y are located in the raw starch-binding fragment of the enzyme molecule. PMID:15635937

  8. Amylase in the saliva and in the gastric aspirates of premature infants: its potential role in glucose polymer hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C; Lebenthal, E; Lee, P C; Topper, W

    1983-12-01

    Amylase activity was found in saliva from 13 infants, 26-42 wk corrected gestational age. The levels of salivary amylase activity increased with advancing age. In 10 infants, 31-38 wk corrected gestational age (estimated gestational age in wk plus age in wk after birth), gastric aspirates collected before a feeding and sequentially at 30-min intervals after two consecutive feedings were analyzed for amylase activity and pH. Two different postprandial patterns were obtained. For six of the 10 infants, both the pH and amylase activities of their gastric aspirates showed a distinct maxima at about 60 min after a feeding and a minima at 180 min just before the second feeding. In the remaining four infants, the pHs of their gastric aspirates remained relatively high (5.0-6.0) for the entire postprandial period. In these infants, there was a persistently high level of the amylase activity. In all 10 infants, amylase activity was found in their gastric aspirate samples when the pH was above 3.0. Comparison of the amylase in the gastric aspirate with purified pancreatic and salivary amylases by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the amylase in the gastric aspirate has an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of salivary amylase, which suggests a salivary origin. This study supports the possibility that salivary amylase could enter the stomach and retain a significant amount of its activity in premature infants. PMID:6197692

  9. Effects of alpha-amylase on in vitro growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bortner, C A; Miller, R D; Arnold, R R

    1983-01-01

    Sterile parotid saliva inhibited growth of Legionella pneumophila on solid media, and the salivary component involved in this inhibition has been shown to be amylase. Disk diffusion and well plate assays were used to study possible mechanisms for this effect. The amylolytic activity of saliva copurified with inhibitory activity, and both activities were sensitive to proteinase K digestion and heat treatment. In addition, purified alpha-amylase from several sources (bacteria, fungi, porcine pancreas, and human saliva) exhibited similar activity. Incorporation of charcoal or bovine serum albumin into media blocked inhibition by amylase. Replacement of Bacto-Agar with Noble agar (both from Difco Laboratories) prevented growth inhibition in the absence of starch. However, when corn starch was present with Noble agar, amylase-induced growth inhibition occurred. Purification of starch by washing with methanol eliminated some toxic component. The toxic component from starch could be recovered from the methanol wash and inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in the absence of amylase activity. The results suggest that toxic substances exist in media components which may be unmasked during salivary amylase digestion of starch. This effect may explain, in part, the difficulty in recovery of the organism from clinical specimens containing amylase. PMID:6190756

  10. Protein engineering in the alpha-amylase family: catalytic mechanism, substrate specificity, and stability.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B

    1994-05-01

    Most starch hydrolases and related enzymes belong to the alpha-amylase family which contains a characteristic catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain. Currently known primary structures that have sequence similarities represent 18 different specificities, including starch branching enzyme. Crystal structures have been reported in three of these enzyme classes: the alpha-amylases, the cyclodextrin glucanotransferases, and the oligo-1,6-glucosidases. Throughout the alpha-amylase family, only eight amino acid residues are invariant, seven at the active site and a glycine in a short turn. However, comparison of three-dimensional models with a multiple sequence alignment suggests that the diversity in specificity arises by variation in substrate binding at the beta-->alpha loops. Designed mutations thus have enhanced transferase activity and altered the oligosaccharide product patterns of alpha-amylases, changed the distribution of alpha-, beta- and gamma-cyclodextrin production by cyclodextrin glucanotransferases, and shifted the relative alpha-1,4:alpha-1,6 dual-bond specificity of neopullulanase. Barley alpha-amylase isozyme hybrids and Bacillus alpha-amylases demonstrate the impact of a small domain B protruding from the (beta/alpha)8-scaffold on the function and stability. Prospects for rational engineering in this family include important members of plant origin, such as alpha-amylase, starch branching and debranching enzymes, and amylomaltase. PMID:8018865

  11. Gene knockout of the intracellular amylase gene by homologous recombination in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Brooker, J D; McCarthy, J M

    1997-09-01

    Streptococcus bovis expresses two different amylases, one intracellular and the other secreted. A suicide vector containing part of the intracellular alpha-amylase gene from Streptococcus bovis WI-1 was recombined into the S. bovis WI-1 chromosome to disrupt the endogenous gene. Recombination was demonstrated by Southern blot, and zymogram analysis confirmed the loss of the intracellular amylase. Amylase activity in cell-free extracts of the recombinant grown in the presence of 1% starch was only 7% of wild type. The rate of logarithmic growth of the recombinant was 15-20% of the wild type in medium containing either 1% glucose, starch, or cellobiose. Revertants and non-amylase control recombinants had logarithmic growth rates that were the same as wild type. Plasmid transformants containing multiple copies of the cloned gene expressed up to threefold higher levels of intracellular amylase activity than wild type but did not demonstrate elevated growth rates. These results suggest that a critical level of expression of the intracellular amylase gene may be important for rapid growth of the bacterium. PMID:9236293

  12. alpha. -Amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes EM1: Nucleotide sequence of the gene, processing of the enzyme, and comparison to other. alpha. -amylases

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, H.; Burchhardt, G.; Spreinat, A.; Haeckel, K.; Wienecke, A.; Antranikian, G.; Schmidt, B. )

    1991-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the {alpha}-amylase gene (amyA) from Clostridium thermosulfurogenes EM1 cloned in Escherichia coli was determined. The reading frame of the gene consisted of 2,121 bp. Comparison of the DNA sequence data with the amino acid sequence of the N terminus of the purified secreted protein of C. thermosulfurogenes Em1 suggested that the {alpha}-amylase is translated form mRNA as a secretory precursor with a signal peptide of 27 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature {alpha}-amylase contained 679 residues, resulting in a protein with a molecular mass of 75,112 Da. In E. coli the enzyme was transported to the periplasmic space and the signal peptide was cleaved at exactly the same site between two alanine residues. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the C. thermosulfurogenes EM1 {alpha}-amylase with those from other bacterial and eukaryotic {alpha}-amylases showed several homologous regions, probably in the enzymatically functioning regions. The tentative Ca{sup 2+}-binding site (consensus region I) of this Ca{sub 2+}-independent enzyme showed only limited homology. The deduced amino acid sequence of a second obviously truncated open reading frame showed significant homology to the malG gene product of E. coli. Comparison of the {alpha}-amylase gene region of C. thermosulfurogenes EM1 (DSM3896) with the {beta}-amylase gene region of C. thermosulfurogenes (ATCC 33743) indicated that both genes have been exchanged with each other at identical sites in the chromosomes of these strains.

  13. Production of α-Amylase by the Ruminal Anaerobic Fungus Neocallimastix frontalis

    PubMed Central

    Mountfort, Douglas O.; Asher, Rodney A.

    1988-01-01

    α-Amylase production was examined in the ruminal anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis. The enzyme was released mainly into the culture fluid and had temperature and pH optima of 55°C and 5.5, respectively, and the apparent Km for starch was 0.8 mg ml−1. The products of α-amylase action were mainly maltotriose, maltotetraose, and longer-chain oligosaccharides. No activity of the enzyme was observed towards these compounds or pullulan, but activity on amylose was similar to starch. Evidence for the endo action of α-amylase was also obtained from experiments which showed that the reduction in iodine-staining capacity and release in reducing power by action on amylose was similar to that for commercial α-amylase. Activities of α-amylase up to 4.4 U ml−1 (1 U represents 1 μmol of glucose equivalents released per min) were obtained for cultures grown on 2.5 mg of starch ml−1 in shaken cultures. No growth occurred in unshaken cultures. With elevated concentrations of starch (>2.5 mg ml−1), α-amylase production declined and glucose accumulated in the cultures. Addition of glucose to cultures grown on low levels of starch, in which little glucose accumulated, suppressed α-amylase production, and in bisubstrate growth studies, active production of the enzyme only occurred during growth on starch after glucose had been preferentially utilized. When cellulose, cellobiose, glucose, xylan, and xylose were tested as growth substrates for the production of α-amylase (initial concentration, 2.5 mg ml−1), they were found to be less effective than starch, but maltose was almost as effective. The fungal α-amylase was found to be stable at 60°C in the presence of low concentrations of starch (≤5%), suggesting that it may be suitable for industrial application. PMID:16347742

  14. Capillary electrophoresis as a screening tool for alpha amylase inhibitors in plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Imad I.; Afifi, Fatima U.

    2010-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for screening plant extract for potential alpha amylase (AA) inhibitory activity. The method was validated against a well established UV method. Overall, the proposed method was shown able to detect plants with significant alpha amylase inhibitory activity but not those with rather clinically insignificant activities. Fifty plant species were screened using both the proposed CE method and the UV method and seven plant species were found to possess significant AA inhibitory activities. Two plant species were proved to have alpha amylase inhibitory activity for the first time. PMID:24115900

  15. Seeking new mutation clues from Bacillus licheniformis amylase by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao

    2009-07-01

    Amylase is one of the most important industrial enzymes in the world. Researchers have been searching for a highly thermal stable mutant for many years, but most focus on point mutations of one or few nitrogenous bases. According to this molecular dynamic simulation of amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA), the deletion of some nitrogenous bases would be more efficacious than point mutations. The simulation reveals strong fluctuation of the BLA structure at optimum temperature. The fluctuation of the outer domains of BLA is stronger than that of the core domain. Molecular simulation provides a clue to design thermal stable amylases through deletion mutations in the outer domain.

  16. Crystal and molecular structure of barley alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kadziola, A; Abe, J; Svensson, B; Haser, R

    1994-05-27

    The three-dimensional structure of barley malt alpha-amylase (isoform AMY2-2) was determined by multiple isomorphous replacement using three heavy-atom derivatives and solvent flattening. The model was refined using a combination of simulated annealing and conventional restrained least-squares crystallographic refinement to an R-factor of 0.153 based on 18,303 independent reflections with F(o) > sigma(F(o)) between 10 and 2.8 A resolution, with root-mean-square deviations of 0.016 A and 3.3 degrees from ideal bond lengths and bond angles, respectively. The final model consists of 403 amino acid residues, three calcium ions and 153 water molecules. The polypeptide chain folds into three domains: a central domain forming a (beta alpha)8-barrel of 286 residues, with a protruding irregular structured loop domain of 64 residues (domain B) connecting strand beta 3 and helix alpha 3 of the barrel, and a C-terminal domain of 53 residues forming a five stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. Unlike the previously known alpha-amylase structures, AMY2-2 contains three Ca2+ binding sites co-ordinated by seven or eight oxygen atoms from carboxylate groups, main-chain carbonyl atoms and water molecules, all calcium ions being bound to domain B and therefore essential for the structural integrity of that domain. Two of the Ca2+ sites are located only 7.0 A apart with one Asp residue serving as ligand for both. One Ca2+ site located at about 20 A from the other two was found to be exchangeable with Eu3+. By homology with other alpha-amylases, some important active site residues are identified as Asp179, Glu204 and Asp289, and are situated at the C-terminal end of the central beta-barrel. A starch granule binding site, previously identified as Trp276 and Trp277, is situated on alpha-helix 6 in the central (beta alpha)8-barrel, at the surface of the enzyme. This binding site region is associated with a considerable disruption of the (beta alpha)8-barrel 8-fold symmetry. PMID:8196040

  17. Purification of a novel α-amylase inhibitor from local Himalayan bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds with activity towards bruchid pests and human salivary amylase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mridu; Sharma, Pratima; Nath, Amarjit K

    2014-07-01

    Six bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars of Himalayan region were analysed for α- amylase inhibitor activity. The α-amylase inhibitor from seeds of screened bean cultivar KR-9, showing maximum inhibitory activity was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography (Sephadex G-100) and ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sephadex). The inhibitor was purified to homogeneity as judged by native-PAGE with 14.22 fold purification and 71.66% recovery. Purified inhibitor consisted of three subunits of molecular weight 15,488, 18,620 and 26,302 daltons, respectively as determined by SDS-PAGE. It was found to be heat stable up to 30 °C-40 °C and had two pH optima of 5.0 and 6.9. Nature of inhibition was found to be of non-competitive type. The purified inhibitor was found to be effective against α-amylases extracted from larvae of Callosobruchus chinensis, Tribolium castaneum and gut enzyme of Spodoptera littoralis. Larvae of Tribolium castaneum fed on flour mixed with purified inhibitor for 5 days showed 100% larval mortality. Purified α-amylase inhibitor was also found to inhibit human salivary α-amylase, suggesting its potential in prevention and therapy of obesity and use as drug design targets for treatment of diabetes. The gene encoding the inhibitor may be used to develop transgenic plants resistant against insect pests. PMID:24966421

  18. Optimization of alpha-amylase immobilization in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Figen; Yagar, Hulya; Balkan, Bilal

    2007-01-01

    alpha-Amylase enzyme was produced by Aspergillus sclerotiorum under SSF conditions, and immobilized in calcium alginate beads. Effects of immobilization conditions, such as alginate concentration, CaCl(2) concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads, on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CaCl(2) concentration were found to be 3% (w/v). Using a loading enzyme concentration of 140 U mL(-1), and bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.5 g, maximum enzyme activity was observed. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 7 repeated uses, losing only 35% of their initial activity. Among the various starches tested, the highest enzyme activity (96.2%) was determined in soluble potato starch hydrolysis for 120 min at 40 degrees C. PMID:17516249

  19. Transglycosylation of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    PubMed

    Cho, J S; Yoo, S S; Cheong, T K; Kim, M J; Kim, Y; Park, K H

    2000-02-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), a sweet compound derived from citrus fruits, was modified to a series of its oligosaccharides by transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (BSMA). Maltotriose as a donor was reacted with NHDC as an acceptor to glycosylate for the purpose of increasing the solubility of NHDC. Maltosyl-NHDC was a major transglycosylation product among the several transfer products by TLC analysis. The structure of the major transglycosylation product was determined to be maltosyl-alpha-(1,6)-neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by MALDI-TOF/MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR. Maltosyl-NHDC was 700 times more soluble in water and 7 times less sweet than NHDC. PMID:10691608

  20. Characterization of a starch-hydrolyzing α-amylase produced by Aspergillus niger WLB42 mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shihui; Lin, Chaoyang; Liu, Yun; Shen, Zhicheng; Jeyaseelan, Jenasia; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungus for commercial amylase production, the increase of amylase activity will be beneficial to the amylase industry. Herein we report a high α-amylase producing (HAP) A. niger WLB42 mutated from A. niger A4 by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The fermentation conditions for the amylase production were optimized. The results showed that both the amylase activity and total protein content reached highest after 48-h incubation in liquid medium using starch as the sole carbon source. The enzyme production reached maximum at temperature of 30°C, pH 7, with 40 g/L starch in the medium inoculated with 1.4% v/v spore. When 0.3% w/v urea was added to the liquid medium as a nitrogen source, the amylase activity was elevated by 20%. Nine monosaccharides and derivatives were tested for α-amylase induction, glucose was the best inducer. Furthermore, the enzymology characterization of amylase was conducted. The molecular weight of amylase was determined to be 50 kD by SDS-PAGE. The amylase had maximum activity at 45°C and pH 7. The activity could be dramatically triggered by adding 1 mM Co2+, increased to 250%. The activity was inhibited by detergents SDS and Triton X-100. Six different brands of starch were tested for amylase activity, the results demonstrated that the more soluble of the starch, the higher hydrolyzability of the substrate by amylase. PMID:27335681

  1. Characterization of a starch-hydrolyzing α-amylase produced by Aspergillus niger WLB42 mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihui; Lin, Chaoyang; Liu, Yun; Shen, Zhicheng; Jeyaseelan, Jenasia; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungus for commercial amylase production, the increase of amylase activity will be beneficial to the amylase industry. Herein we report a high α-amylase producing (HAP) A. niger WLB42 mutated from A. niger A4 by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The fermentation conditions for the amylase production were optimized. The results showed that both the amylase activity and total protein content reached highest after 48-h incubation in liquid medium using starch as the sole carbon source. The enzyme production reached maximum at temperature of 30°C, pH 7, with 40 g/L starch in the medium inoculated with 1.4% v/v spore. When 0.3% w/v urea was added to the liquid medium as a nitrogen source, the amylase activity was elevated by 20%. Nine monosaccharides and derivatives were tested for α-amylase induction, glucose was the best inducer. Furthermore, the enzymology characterization of amylase was conducted. The molecular weight of amylase was determined to be 50 kD by SDS-PAGE. The amylase had maximum activity at 45°C and pH 7. The activity could be dramatically triggered by adding 1 mM Co(2+), increased to 250%. The activity was inhibited by detergents SDS and Triton X-100. Six different brands of starch were tested for amylase activity, the results demonstrated that the more soluble of the starch, the higher hydrolyzability of the substrate by amylase. PMID:27335681

  2. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  3. Characterization of extracellular amylase produced by haloalkalophilic strain Kocuria sp. HJ014.

    PubMed

    Soto-Padilla, Marisela Y; Gortáres-Moroyoqui, Pablo; Cira-Chávez, Luis A; Levasseur, Anthony; Dendooven, Luc; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel

    2016-08-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Kocuria sp. (HJ014) has the ability to produce extracellular amylase. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize this protein. The amylase enzyme with a specific activity of 753,502 U/mg was purified 5.7- fold using Sepharose 4B and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration columns. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 45,000 Da as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The amylase showed maximum activity at pH 9 and 50°C in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. The Km was 3.0 mg/ml and Vmax 90.09 U/ml. It was found that extracellular amylase from Kocuria sp. has a high industrial potential. PMID:26813880

  4. Synergistic action of. alpha. -amylase and glucoamylase on hydrolysis of starch

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, M.; Kawamura, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Synergistic action of ..alpha..-amylase and glucoamylase on hydrolysis of starch is modeled by the kinetic equations presented in this paper. At the early stage of the reaction ..alpha..-amylase acts as a contributor of newly formed non-reducing ends of starch molecules to glucoamylase by splitting the original starch molecules. This is expressed by the simultaneous differential equations which consist of each rate equation for ..alpha.. amylase and glucoamylase. After the molecular weight of the substrate decreases to the value of about 5000, which is obtained experimentally in this work, the action of ..alpha.. amylase can be neglected and the rate of formation of glucose obeys only the rate equation for glucoamylase. 5 references.

  5. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-01-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  6. Purification of extrachloroplastic. beta. -amylase from leaves of starchless and wild type Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.; Monroe, J.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-04-01

    Amylase activity in crude leaf extracts from starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is 5 to 10 fold higher than in the wild type (WT) when plants are grown under a 12 h photoperiod. Visualized on native PAGE, the increased activity is attributed primarily to a previously characterized extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. The {beta}-amylases from phosoglucomutase deficient (starchless) and WT leaves were purified to homogeneity in two steps utilizing polyethylene glycol fractionation, and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The enzyme from both mutant and WT leaves had negligible activity toward either {beta}-limit dextrin or pullulan. The specific activities of both purified enzymes were similar indicating that the protein is over-expressed in the mutant. Preliminary antibody neutralization experiments suggest that the two {beta}-amylases are not different.

  7. Biochemical features and kinetic properties of α-amylases from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Homaei, Ahmad; Ghanbarzadeh, Mehri; Monsef, Ferial

    2016-02-01

    Marine organisms have the ability of producing enzymes with unique properties compared to those of the same enzymes from terrestrial organisms. α-Amylases are among the most important extracellular enzymes found in various groups of organisms such as plants, animals and microorganisms. They play important roles in their carbohydrates metabolism of each organism. Microbial production of α-amylases is more effective than other sources of the enzyme. Many microorganisms are known to produce α-amylase including bacteria, yeasts, fungi and actinomycetes. However, enzymes from fungal and bacterial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. This review deals with what is known about the kinetics, biochemical properties and applications of these enzymes that have only been found in them and not in other α-amylases, and discussing their mechanistic and regulatory implications. PMID:26657843

  8. Evolution of the amylase isozymes in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Y; Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    1999-10-01

    The relationship between the net charge of molecules and their mobility on electrophoresis was analyzed for Drosophila alpha-amylases. Most of the differences in electrophoretic mobility, 98.2%, can be explained by the charge state. Therefore five reference amino acid sites, which are informative residues for charge differences among amylase isozymes, were considered for the evolution of the isozymes in Drosophila melanogaster. The amylase isozymes in D. melanogaster can be classified into three groups, I (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3-A), II (AMY3-B and AMY4), and III (AMY5, AMY6-A, and AMY6-B), based on the differences in the reference sites. The most primitive amylase in D. melanogaster was found to belong to Group I, most likely the AMY2 isozyme. Groups II and III could have been derived from Group I. These results were confirmed by the analysis of 38 amino acid sites with charge differences in Drosophila. PMID:10626037

  9. The Use of Commercially Available Alpha-Amylase Compounds to Inhibit and Remove Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Craigen, Bradford; Dashiff, Aliza; Kadouri, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a versatile human pathogen, is commonly associated with medical device infections. Its capacity to establish and maintain these infections is thought to be related to its ability to form adherent biofilms. In this study, commercially available α-amylase compounds from various biological sources were evaluated for their ability to reduce and prevent biofilm formation of several S. aureus isolates. Our data demonstrates that α-amylase compounds can rapidly detach biofilms of S. aureus, as well as inhibit biofilm formation. Our data also demonstrates that α-amylase compounds have an ability to reduce and disassociate S. aureus cell-aggregates grown in liquid suspension. These findings suggest that commercially available α-amylase compounds could be used in the future to control S. aureus biofilm-related infections. PMID:21760865

  10. Salivary α-amylase levels as a biomarker of experienced fear

    PubMed Central

    Bibas, David; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported data related to emotions collected in conjunction with a museum exhibit on emotion (Goose Bumps!—The Science of Fear).1 In this addendum, we present additional data collected as part of that study. We collected two commonly measured indices of emotional arousal, salivary cortisol and α-amylase, before and after participants had gone through a realistic fear challenge course as part of the exhibit. We found that α-amylase, but not cortisol, showed a highly specific increase only for those participants who endorsed both emotional arousal and negative valence. By contrast, the fear-inducing course resulted in high arousal but positive valence in some participants; in these, no increased α-amylase was measured. We conclude that salivary α-amylase is a promising biomarker for fearful experiences, and suggest that it is important to pay attention to positively valenced arousal that may be induced by fearful stimuli in a laboratory setting. PMID:21331229

  11. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-08-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  12. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Hyperthermophile α-Amylase from Pyrococcus woesei

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Amir; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Vafaei, Sedighe; Mohebi, Reza; Farzi, Maryam; Taherikalani, Morovat; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In an attempt α-amylase gene from Pyrococcus woesei was amplified and cloned into a pTYB2 vector to generate the recombinant plasmid pTY- α-amylase. Methods Escherichia coli BL21 used as a host and protein expression was applied using IPTG. SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated the 100 kDa protein. Amylolytic activity of proteins produced by transformed E. coli cells was detected by zymography, and the rate of active α-amylase with and without the intein tag in both soluble conditions and as inclusion bodies solubilized by 4M urea were measured. Results Amylolytic activity of ∼185,000 U/L of bacterial culture was observed from the soluble form of the protein using this system. Conclusion These results indicate that this expression system was appropriate for the production of thermostable α-amylase. PMID:26835242

  13. Relationship among physiological quality, heterosis, and amylase gene expression in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G E; Von Pinho, E V R; Andrade, T; Souza, J C; Caixeta, F; Ferreira, R A D C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed heterosis, amylase enzyme gene expression, and the physiological quality of maize seeds with different genotypes and sizes, which were subjected to aging and not subjected to aging. We used seeds from 2 maize lines that differed with regard to physiological quality, the hybrid, and the reciprocal hybrid; they were classified into 2 sizes and were subjected to aging and not subjected to aging. Physiological quality was assessed by performing tests for germination, emergence, emergence speed index, and artificial aging. Expressions of the genes alpha amylase B73, alpha amylase (LOC542522), isoamylase mRNA clone 353244, and the endogenous controls ubiquitin and alcohol dehydrogenase in the seeds were studied using quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We observed heterosis for seed quality and for expression of amylase genes in the genotypes studied. We found no difference in seed quality between large and small seeds. PMID:26345793

  14. Ontogenesis of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, S L; Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Rins, L; Aoki, A

    1981-01-01

    Changes in alpha-amylase (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) of parotid gland were investigated during postnatal development of the rat. Modifications in amylase activity after birth allow the distinction of three stages which can be correlated with the morphologic development of the parotid gland. Significant sexual differences in the evolution of alpha-amylase activity were found. During the first stage (from birth to the 20th day) there is a higher increase in females, while males have a more pronounced increment in the second stage (from the 20th to the 30th day). By means of gel electrophoresis of parotid extracts, four molecular forms of amylase can be separated. The slowest migrating band (Form 1) is not detected at the initial stage. PMID:6164673

  15. From carbohydrates to drug-like fragments: Rational development of novel α-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Al-Asri, Jamil; Fazekas, Erika; Lehoczki, Gábor; Perdih, Andrej; Görick, Cornelia; Melzig, Matthias F; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Wolber, Gerhard; Mortier, Jérémie

    2015-10-15

    Starch catabolism leading to high glucose level in blood is highly problematic in chronic metabolic diseases, such as type II diabetes and obesity. α-Amylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of starch, increasing blood sugar concentration. Its inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach to control hyperglycaemia. However, only few drug-like molecule inhibitors without sugar moieties have been discovered so far, and little information on the enzymatic mechanism is available. This work aims at the discovery of novel small α-amylase binders using a systematic in silico methodology. 3D-pharmacophore-based high throughput virtual screening of small compounds libraries was performed to identify compounds with high α-amylase affinity. Twenty-seven compounds were selected and biologically tested, revealing IC50 values in the micromolar range and ligand efficiency higher than the one of the bound form of acarbose, which is used as a reference for α-amylase inhibition. PMID:26395057

  16. High-resolution α-amylase assay combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for expedited identification of α-amylase inhibitors: proof of concept and α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Okutan, Leyla; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2014-11-26

    Type 2 diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and new improved drugs or functional foods containing selective α-amylase inhibitors are needed for improved management of blood glucose. In this article the development of a microplate-based high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay with direct photometric measurement of α-amylase activity is described. The inhibition assay is based on porcine pancreatic α-amylase with 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotriose as substrate, which this gives a stable, sensitive, and cheap inhibition assay as requested for high-resolution purposes. In combination with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR, this provides an analytical platform that allows simultaneous chemical and biological profiling of α-amylase inhibitors in plant extracts. Proof-of-concept with an artificial mixture of six compounds-of which three are known α-amylase inhibitors-showed that the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition profiles allowed detection of sub-microgram amounts of the α-amylase inhibitors. Furthermore, the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform allowed identification of cinnamaldehyde as the α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum Presl.). PMID:25368916

  17. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL(-1) at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg(-1). The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0-8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t₁/₂) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  18. New Perspectives on the Role of α- and β-Amylases in Transient Starch Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Alex Chi; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Morell, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Transient starch in leaves is synthesized by various biosynthetic enzymes in the chloroplasts during the light period. This paper presents the first mathematical model for the (bio)synthesis of the chain-length distribution (CLD) of transient starch to aid the understanding of this synthesis. The model expresses the rate of change of the CLD in terms of the actions of the enzymes involved. Using this to simulate the experimental CLD with different enzyme combinations is a new means to test for enzymes that are significant to the rate of change of the CLD during synthesis. Comparison between the simulated CLD from different enzyme combinations and the experimental CLD in the leaves of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana indicate α-amylase, in addition to the core starch biosynthetic enzymes, is also involved in the modification of glucans for the synthesis of insoluble starch granules. The simulations suggest involvement of β-amylase, in the absence of α-amylase in mutants, slows the rate of attaining a crystalline-competent CLD for crystallization of glucans to form insoluble starch. This suggests a minor role of β-amylase in shaping normal starch synthesis. The model simulation predicts that debranching of glucans is an efficient mechanism for the attainment of crystalline-competent CLD; however, attaining this is still possible, albeit slower, through combinations of α- and β-amylase in the absence of isoamylase-type debranching enzyme. In Arabidopsis defective in one of the isoamylase-type debranching enzymes, the impact of α-amylase in starch synthesis is reduced, while β-amylase becomes significantly involved, slowing the rate of synthesis in this mutant. Modeling of transient starch CLD brings to light previously unrecognized but significant effects of α- and β-amylase on the rate of transient starch synthesis. PMID:24971464

  19. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL−1 at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg−1. The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0–8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t1/2) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  20. [Cloning the alpha-amylase gene of Streptococcus bovis and its expression in Bacillus subtilis cells].

    PubMed

    Iakorski, P; Kuntsova, M M; Loseva, E F; Khasanov, F K

    1991-06-01

    The gene coding for alpha-amylase from the ruminant bacterium Streptococcus bovis was cloned on the plasmid pMX39 in Bacillus subtilis cells. An alpha-amylase positive colony was isolated in the initial screening of 3900 colonies on the medium containing insoluble starch. The size of the insert was approximately 2.8 kb. The recombinant plasmid was stably maintained in Bacillus subtilis cells under the nonselective conditions. PMID:1944323

  1. Production of itaconic acid in Escherichia coli expressing recombinant α-amylase using starch as substrate.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shusuke; Chin, Taejun; Nagata, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohara, Hitomi; Aso, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Several studies on fermentative production of a vinyl monomer itaconic acid from hydrolyzed starch using Aspergillus terreus have been reported. Herein, we report itaconic acid production by Escherichia coli expressing recombinant α-amylase, using soluble starch as its sole carbon source. To express α-amylase in E. coli, we first constructed recombinant plasmids expressing α-amylases by using cell surface display technology derived from two amylolytic bacteria, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) and Streptococcus bovis NRIC 1535. The recombinant α-amylase from S. bovis (SBA) showed activity at 28°C, which is the optimal temperature for production of itaconic acid, while α-amylase from B. amyloliquefaciens displayed no noticeable activity. E. coli cells expressing SBA produced 0.15 g/L itaconic acid after 69 h cultivation under pH-stat conditions, using 1% starch as the sole carbon source. In fact, E. coli cells expressing SBA had similar growth rates when grown in the presence of 1% glucose or starch, thereby highlighting the expression of an active α-amylase that enabled utilization of starch to produce itaconic acid in E. coli. PMID:25468427

  2. [Baking ingredients, especially alpha-amylase, as occupational inhalation allergens in the baking industry].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B; Baur, X

    1990-03-31

    Baker's asthma is the most frequent occupational lung disease in Switzerland and West Germany. Cereal flours, and more rarely flour parasites, are implicated as the responsible allergens. Based on an observation of a case of baker's asthma due to monovalent sensitization to alpha-amylase used as additive to flour, 31 bakers with occupational asthma and/or rhinitis were routinely tested by skin tests and serological RAST examinations for allergic sensitivity to flour, alpha-amylase and other bakery additives. 17/31 subjects (55%) reacted positively in scratch tests to a commercial powdered alpha-amylase and 13/20 (65%) to a lecithin preparation. 23/31 (74%) and 19/31 (61%) were RAST positive to wheat and to rye flour respectively. 32% had RAST specific IgE to alpha-amylase (from Aspergillus oryzae), 19.3% to soya bean flour and 16% to malt. 7/12 and 5/12 respectively reacted to trypsin inhibitor and lipoxidase, the main allergens in soya bean. In two patients monosensitization to alpha-amylase was present. In accordance with other reports we recommend that baking additives, especially alpha-amylase, should be tested in allergological diagnosis of occupational diseases in flour processing workers. Full declaration of all additives used in the bakery industry is needed. PMID:2326614

  3. Psychological stress-induced changes in salivary alpha-amylase and adrenergic activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Younhee

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among salivary alpha-amylase, plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate during psychological stress. This study used a pretest-post-test experimental design with a control group, using repeated measures. A total of 33 participants was divided into the experimental group (n = 16) that underwent a college academic final test as the psychological stress and the control group (n = 17) that did not undergo the test. The levels of salivary alpha-amylase and plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured seven times and stress and anxiety were measured once and twice, respectively, as subjective stress markers. Significant changes in the level of salivary alpha-amylase were found in response to psychological stress. However, the correlations of salivary alpha-amylase with the plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were only partially found to be statistically significant. In conclusion, it was shown that salivary alpha-amylase was sensitive to stress throughout this study. Thus, salivary alpha-amylase may be used to measure stress uninvasively in both clinical settings and nursing research where the effects of stress might be scrutinized. Furthermore, the mechanisms of illnesses that are induced by stress could be explored. PMID:21210927

  4. Cross-inhibitory activity of cereal protein inhibitors against alpha-amylases and xylanases.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Ana I; Faulds, Craig B; Svensson, Birte; Bartolomé, Begoña; Williamson, Gary; Juge, Nathalie

    2003-08-21

    The purification and characterisation of a xylanase inhibitor (XIP-I) from wheat was reported previously. In our current work, XIP-I is also demonstrated to have the capacity to inhibit the two barley alpha-amylase isozymes (AMY1 and AMY2). XIP-I completely inhibited the activity of AMY1 and AMY2 towards insoluble Blue Starch and a soluble hepta-oligosaccharide derivative. A ternary complex was formed between insoluble starch, a catalytically inactive mutant of AMY1 (D180A), and XIP-I, suggesting that the substrate-XIP-I interaction is necessary for inhibition of barley alpha-amylases. K(i) values for alpha-amylase inhibition, however, could not be calculated due to the nonlinear nature of the inhibition pattern. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance and gel electrophoresis did not indicate interaction between XIP-I and the alpha-amylases. The inhibition was abolished by CaCl(2), indicating that the driving force for the interaction is different from that of complexation between the barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) and AMY2. This is the first report of a proteinaceous inhibitor of AMY1. BASI, in addition, was demonstrated to partially inhibit the endo-1,4-beta-D-xylanase from Aspergillus niger (XylA) of glycoside hydrolase family 11. Taken together, the data demonstrate for the first time the dual target enzyme specificity of BASI and XIP-I inhibitors for xylanase and alpha-amylase. PMID:12922177

  5. Oral intercourse or secondary transfer? A Bayesian approach of salivary amylase and foreign DNA findings.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Michelle; Moore, Elizabeth

    2013-06-10

    The Bayesian Approach allows forensic scientists to evaluate the significance of scientific evidence in light of two conflicting hypothesis. This aids the investigator to calculate a numerical value of the probability that the scientific findings support one hypothesis over conflicting opinions. In the case where oral intercourse is alleged, α-amylase, an indicator of saliva, is detected on penile swabs. The value of this finding is unknown as it may indicate the presence of saliva resulting from oral intercourse however it may also represent the presence of saliva due to innocent means such as background levels of salivary-α-amylase in the male population due to secondary transfer. Therefore, it is difficult to attach significance to this finding without background information and knowledge. A population study of the background levels of salivary-α-amylase was performed by analysing items of underwear worn under normal circumstances by 69 male volunteers. The Phadebas press test was used to screen the garments for amylase-containing stains and the positive areas were subjected to further confirmation of saliva by the RSID-Saliva kit. 44% of underwear screened had stains containing amylase. This study determined the background level of salivary-α-amylase and DNA on the inside front of male underwear which has potential implications on the interpretation of evidence in alleged oral intercourse. PMID:23683908

  6. [Microbial alpha-amylases: physicochemical properties, substrate specificity and domain structure].

    PubMed

    Avdiiuk, K V; Varbanets', L D

    2013-01-01

    The current literature data on producers, physico-chemical properties and substrate specificity of a-amylases produced by microbes from different taxonomic groups such as bacteria, fungi and yeasts are discussed in the survey. Synthesis of alpha-amylase majority is an inducible process which is stimulated in the presence of starch or products of its hydrolysis. It is possible to increase enzymes activity level by optimization of cultivation conditions of strains-producers. alpha-Amylases, isolated from different sources are distinguished in their physico-chemical properties, particularly in their molecular weights, pH- and thermooptimums, inhibitors and activators. The enzymes hydrolyse soluble starch, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, maltodextrins, alpha- and beta3-cyclodextrins and other carbohydrate substrates. It is well known that alpha-amylases belong to GH-13 family of glycosyl-hydrolases, which contain the catalytic domain A as (beta/alpha)8-barrel. In addition to domain A, alpha-amylases contain two other domains: B and C, which are localized approximately on opposite sides of (beta/alpha)8-barrel. Most of the known alpha-amylases contain calcium ion, which is located on the surface between domains A and B and plays an important role in stability and activity of the enzyme. PMID:24319968

  7. Effect of an herb root extract, herbal dentifrice and synthetic dentifrice on human salivary amylase

    PubMed Central

    Sapra, Gaurav; Vyas, Yogesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rahul; Aggarwal, Ashish; Chandrashekar, K T; Sharma, Kanika

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salivary amylase is an enzyme, which plays a vital role in formation of dental plaque. It has the ability to bind on the bacterial surfaces and to hydrolyze starch, giving rise to products that are transformed into acids leading to dental caries. Suppression of salivary amylase activity can lead to decrease in risk of dental caries and plaque associated periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an herb, Spilanthes calva (in form of a test dentifrice) on human salivary amylase activity and to compare it with other dentifrices. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of age 18-35 years were randomly selected and divided equally into 4 groups. Group 1 subjects were assigned to use Test Dentifrice (with S. calva root extract), while Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 subjects were assigned to use Herbal Dentifrice (Arodent™), Synthetic Dentifrice (Colgate®), and Control Dentifrice respectively. Salivary amylase activity was determined by Bernfeld method in each group, before and after using the given dentifrices. Results: Maximum inhibition of salivary amylase activity was found in the group using test dentifrice as compared to others. Conclusion: The present study indicates that, the root extract of S. calva possess significant inhibitory activity for salivary amylase. Use of S. calva root extract will provide a wider protection against different pathogenic oral microflora. Use of this extract singly or in combination is strongly recommended in the dentifrice formulations. PMID:24130585

  8. Purification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of an intracellular maltotriose-producing alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148.

    PubMed

    Satoh, E; Uchimura, T; Kudo, T; Komagata, K

    1997-12-01

    An intracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 was purified and characterized. The enzyme was induced by maltose and soluble starch and produced about 80% maltotriose from soluble starch. Maltopentaose was hydrolyzed to maltotriose and maltose and maltohexaose was hydrolyzed mainly to maltotriose by the enzyme. Maltotetraose, maltotriose, and maltose were not hydrolyzed. This intracellular enzyme was considered to be a maltotriose-producing enzyme. The enzymatic characteristics and hydrolysis product from soluble starch were different from those of the extracellular raw-starch-hydrolyzing alpha-amylase of strain 148. The deduced amino acid sequence of the intracellular alpha-amylase was similar to the sequences of the mature forms of extracellular liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus strains, although the intracellular alpha-amylase did not contain a signal peptide. No homology between the intracellular and extracellular alpha-amylases of S. bovis 148 was observed. PMID:9406414

  9. Purification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of an intracellular maltotriose-producing alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, E; Uchimura, T; Kudo, T; Komagata, K

    1997-01-01

    An intracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 was purified and characterized. The enzyme was induced by maltose and soluble starch and produced about 80% maltotriose from soluble starch. Maltopentaose was hydrolyzed to maltotriose and maltose and maltohexaose was hydrolyzed mainly to maltotriose by the enzyme. Maltotetraose, maltotriose, and maltose were not hydrolyzed. This intracellular enzyme was considered to be a maltotriose-producing enzyme. The enzymatic characteristics and hydrolysis product from soluble starch were different from those of the extracellular raw-starch-hydrolyzing alpha-amylase of strain 148. The deduced amino acid sequence of the intracellular alpha-amylase was similar to the sequences of the mature forms of extracellular liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus strains, although the intracellular alpha-amylase did not contain a signal peptide. No homology between the intracellular and extracellular alpha-amylases of S. bovis 148 was observed. PMID:9406414

  10. Molecular, Biochemical, and Dietary Regulation Features of α-Amylase in a Carnivorous Crustacean, the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Casuso, Antonio; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitously distributed throughout microbials, plants and animals. It is widely accepted that omnivorous crustaceans have higher α-amylase activity and number of isoforms than carnivorous, but contradictory results have been obtained in some species, and carnivorous crustaceans have been less studied. In addition, the physiological meaning of α-amylase polymorphism in crustaceans is not well understood. In this work we studied α-amylase in a carnivorous lobster at the gene, transcript, and protein levels. It was showed that α-amylase isoenzyme composition (i.e., phenotype) in lobster determines carbohydrate digestion efficiency. Most frequent α-amylase phenotype has the lowest digestion efficiency, suggesting this is a favoured trait. We revealed that gene and intron loss have occurred in lobster α-amylase, thus lobsters express a single 1830 bp cDNA encoding a highly conserved protein with 513 amino acids. This protein gives rise to two isoenzymes in some individuals by glycosylation but not by limited proteolysis. Only the glycosylated isoenzyme could be purified by chromatography, with biochemical features similar to other animal amylases. High carbohydrate content in diet down-regulates α-amylase gene expression in lobster. However, high α-amylase activity occurs in lobster gastric juice irrespective of diet and was proposed to function as an early sensor of the carbohydrate content of diet to regulate further gene expression. We concluded that gene/isoenzyme simplicity, post-translational modifications and low Km, coupled with a tight regulation of gene expression, have arose during evolution of α-amylase in the carnivorous lobster to control excessive carbohydrate digestion in the presence of an active α-amylase. PMID:27391425

  11. Molecular, Biochemical, and Dietary Regulation Features of α-Amylase in a Carnivorous Crustacean, the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perera, Erick; Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Casuso, Antonio; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitously distributed throughout microbials, plants and animals. It is widely accepted that omnivorous crustaceans have higher α-amylase activity and number of isoforms than carnivorous, but contradictory results have been obtained in some species, and carnivorous crustaceans have been less studied. In addition, the physiological meaning of α-amylase polymorphism in crustaceans is not well understood. In this work we studied α-amylase in a carnivorous lobster at the gene, transcript, and protein levels. It was showed that α-amylase isoenzyme composition (i.e., phenotype) in lobster determines carbohydrate digestion efficiency. Most frequent α-amylase phenotype has the lowest digestion efficiency, suggesting this is a favoured trait. We revealed that gene and intron loss have occurred in lobster α-amylase, thus lobsters express a single 1830 bp cDNA encoding a highly conserved protein with 513 amino acids. This protein gives rise to two isoenzymes in some individuals by glycosylation but not by limited proteolysis. Only the glycosylated isoenzyme could be purified by chromatography, with biochemical features similar to other animal amylases. High carbohydrate content in diet down-regulates α-amylase gene expression in lobster. However, high α-amylase activity occurs in lobster gastric juice irrespective of diet and was proposed to function as an early sensor of the carbohydrate content of diet to regulate further gene expression. We concluded that gene/isoenzyme simplicity, post-translational modifications and low Km, coupled with a tight regulation of gene expression, have arose during evolution of α-amylase in the carnivorous lobster to control excessive carbohydrate digestion in the presence of an active α-amylase. PMID:27391425

  12. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  13. Alpha-Amylase Activity in Blood Increases after Pharmacological, But Not Psychological, Activation of the Adrenergic System

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Urs M.; La Marca, Roberto; Erni, Katja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Alpha-amylase in both blood and saliva has been used as a diagnostic parameter. While studies examining alpha-amylase activity in saliva have shown that it is sensitive to physiological and psychological challenge of the adrenergic system, no challenge studies have attempted to elucidate the role of the adrenergic system in alpha-amylase activity in blood. We set out to examine the impact of psychological and pharmacological challenge on alpha-amylase in blood in two separate studies. Methods In study 1, healthy subjects were examined in a placebo-controlled, double-blind paradigm using yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. In study 2, subjects were examined in a standardized rest-controlled psychosocial stress protocol. Alpha-amylase activity in blood was repeatedly measured in both studies. Results Results of study 1 showed that alpha-amylase in blood is subject to stronger increases after injection of yohimbine compared to placebo. In study 2, results showed that there was no significant effect of psychological stress compared to rest. Conclusions Alpha-amylase in blood increases after pharmacological activation of the adrenergic pathways suggesting that sympathetic receptors are responsible for these changes. Psychological stress, however, does not seem to have an impact on alpha-amylase in blood. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying activity changes in alpha-amylase in blood in healthy individuals. PMID:26110636

  14. Associations of eating a late-evening meal before bedtime with low serum amylase and unhealthy conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the associations of eating a late-evening meal (ELM), a putative unhealthy eating behavior, with low serum amylase, other eating behaviors, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Therefore, we investigated whether ELM before bedtime was associated with low serum amylase or other clinical factors in 2,426 asymptomatic adults aged 20–80 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ELM was significantly associated with low serum amylase (<60 IU/l), overweight, smoking, daily alcohol consumption, skipping breakfast, and rapid eating, but not with abnormal glucose metabolism. In conclusion, ELM may be independently associated with low serum amylase and common unhealthy behaviors. PMID:24354901

  15. Interaction of wheat monomeric and dimeric protein inhibitors with alpha-amylase from yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L. larva).

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, V; Gramenzi, F; Pace, W; Petrucci, T; Poerio, E; Silano, V

    1980-01-01

    The highly purified alpha-amylase from Tenebrio molitor L. larva (yellow mealworm) reversibly combines with two closely related homogeneous glycoprotein inhibitors, one dimeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.19') and one monomeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.28'), from wheat flour. As established by means of difference spectroscopy and kinetic studies, molar combining ratios for the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase-inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 1:1 and 1:2 respectively. Two amylase--inhibitor-0.19 complexes with slightly different retention volumes on Bio-Gel P-300 and only one amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complex were observed. Dissociation constants of the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 0.85 nM and 0.13 nM respectively. A strong tendency of both complexes to precipitate under an ultracentrifugal field was observed; the minimum molecular weight calculated for the two complexes under such conditions was approx. 95 000. The two complexes showed difference spectra indicating involvement of structurally related or identical tryptophyl side chains in the binding of inhibitors 0.28 and 0.19 to the amylase. A model summarizing the main features of the inhibition of the insect amylase by the two wheat protein inhibitors is proposed. PMID:6985361

  16. Purification and characterization of the extracellular alpha-amylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, V; Croux, C; Goma, G; Soucaille, P

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography (mono Q) and gel filtration (Superose 12). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.7 and a molecular weight of 84,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was a monomeric protein, the 19-amino-acid N terminus of which displayed 42% homology with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying alpha-amylase. The amino acid composition of the enzyme showed a high number of acidic and hydrophobic residues and only one cysteine residue per mole. The activity of the alpha-amylase was not stimulated by calcium ions (or other metal ions) or inhibited by EDTA, although the enzyme contained seven calcium atoms per molecule. alpha-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.6 and 45 degrees C. The alpha-amylase was stable at an acidic pH but very sensitive to thermal inactivation. It hydrolyzed soluble starch, with a Km of 3.6 g . liter-1 and a Kcat of 122 mol of reducing sugars . s-1 . mol-1. The alpha-amylase showed greater activity with high-molecular-weight substrates than with low-molecular-weight maltooligosaccharides, hydrolyzed glycogen and pullulan slowly, but did not hydrolyze dextran or cyclodextrins. The major end products of maltohexaose degradation were glucose, maltose, and maltotriose; maltotetraose and maltopentaose were formed as intermediate products. Twenty seven percent of the glucoamylase activity generally detected in the culture supernatant of C. acetobutylicum can be attributed to the alpha-amylase. Images PMID:8967771

  17. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase from malted jowar (Sorghum bicolor).

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Siva Sai; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna; Rao, A G Appu

    2005-08-24

    Malted cereals are rich sources of alpha-amylase, which catalyzes the random hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1-4)-glycosidic bonds of starch, leading to liquefaction. Amylases play a role in the predigestion of starch, leading to a reduction in the water absorption capacity of the cereal. Among the three cereal amylases (barley, ragi, and jowar), jowar amylase is found to be the most thermostable. The major amylase from malted jowar, a 47 kDa alpha-amylase, purified to homogeneity, is rich in beta structure ( approximately 60%) like other cereal amylases. T(m), the midpoint of thermal inactivation, is found to be 69.6 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Thermal inactivation is found to follow first-order kinetics at pH 4.8, the pH optimum of the enzyme. Activation energy, E(a), is found to be 45.3 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1). The activation enthalpy (DeltaH), entropy (DeltaS*), and free energy change (DeltaG) are calculated to be 44.6 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1), 57.1 +/- 0.3 cal mol(-)(1) K(-)(1), and 25.2 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1), respectively. The thermal stability of the enzyme in the presence of the commonly used food additives NaCl and sucrose has been studied. T(m) is found to decrease to 66.3 +/- 0.3, 58.1 +/- 0.2, and 48.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C, corresponding to the presence of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 M NaCl, respectively. Sucrose acts as a stabilizer; the T(m) value is found to be 77.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C compared to 69.6 +/- 0.3 degrees C in the control. PMID:16104815

  18. Purification and characterization of the extracellular. alpha. -amylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    SciTech Connect

    Paquet, V.; Croux, C.; Goma, G.; Soucaille, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular {alpha}-amylase (1,4-{alpha}-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography (Mono Q) and gel filtration (Superose 12). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.7 and a molecular weight of 84,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was a monomeric protein, the 19-amino-acid N terminus of which displayed 42% homology with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying {alpha}-amylase. The amino acid composition of the enzyme showed a high number of acidic and hydrophobic residues and only one cysteine residue per mole. The activity of the {alpha}-amylase was not stimulated by calcium ions (or other metal ions) or inhibited by EDTA, although the enzyme contained seven calcium atoms per molecule. {alpha}-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.6 and 45{degree}C. The {alpha}-amylase was stable at an acidic pH but very sensitive to thermal inactivation. It hydrolyzed soluble starch, with a K{sub m} of 3.6 g {center dot} liter{sup {minus}1} and a K{sub cat} of 122 mol of reducing sugars {center dot} s{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mol{sup {minus}1}. The {alpha}-amylase showed greater activity with high-molecular-weight substrates than with low-molecular-weight maltooligosaccharides, hydrolyzed glycogen and pullulan slowly, but did not hydrolyze dextran or cyclodextrins. The major end products of maltohexaose degradation were glucose, maltose, and maltotriose; maltotetraose and maltopentaose were formed as intermediate products. Twenty seven percent of the glucoamylase activity generally detected in the culture supernatant of C. acetobutylicum can be attributed to the {alpha}-amylase.

  19. Dynamics of the Streptococcus gordonii Transcriptome in Response to Medium, Salivary α-Amylase, and Starch

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Elaine M.; Feng, Xianghui; Pan, Jiachuan; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, interacts with salivary α-amylase via amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). This enzyme hydrolyzes starch to glucose, maltose, and maltodextrins that can be utilized by various oral bacteria for nutrition. Microarray studies demonstrated that AbpA modulates gene expression in response to amylase, suggesting that the amylase-streptococcal interaction may function in ways other than nutrition. The goal of this study was to explore the role of AbpA in gene regulation through comparative transcriptional profiling of wild-type KS1 and AbpA− mutant KS1ΩabpA under various environmental conditions. A portion of the total RNA isolated from mid-log-phase cells grown in 5% CO2 in (i) complex medium with or without amylase, (ii) defined medium (DM) containing 0.8% glucose with/without amylase, and (iii) DM containing 0.2% glucose and amylase with or without starch was reverse transcribed to cDNA and the rest used for RNA sequencing. Changes in the expression of selected genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Maltodextrin-associated genes, fatty acid synthesis genes and competence genes were differentially expressed in a medium-dependent manner. Genes in another cluster containing a putative histidine kinase/response regulator, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, thioredoxin protein, lipoprotein, and cytochrome c-type protein were downregulated in KS1ΩabpA under all of the environmental conditions tested. Thus, AbpA appears to modulate genes associated with maltodextrin utilization/transport and fatty acid synthesis. Importantly, in all growth conditions AbpA was associated with increased expression of a potential two-component signaling system associated with genes involved in reducing oxidative stress, suggesting a role in signal transduction and stress tolerance. PMID:26025889

  20. Chemical constituents of Swertia longifolia Boiss. with α-amylase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ara, Leila; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Read, Roger W; Arshadi, Sattar; Nikan, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    α-Amylase inhibitors play a critical role in the control of diabetes and many of medicinal plants have been found to act as α-amylase inhibitors. Swertia genus, belonging to the family Gentianaceae, comprises different species most of which have been used in traditional medicine of several cultures as antidiabetic, anti-pyretic, analgesic, liver and gastrointestinal tonic. Swertia longifolia Boiss. is the only species of Swertia growing in Iran. In the present investigation, phytochemical study of S. longifolia was performed and α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant fractions and purified compounds were determined. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with hexane, chloroform, methanol and water, respectively. The components of the hexane and chloroform fractions were isolated by different chromatographic methods and their structures were determined by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data. α-Amylase inhibitory activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using 3,5-dinitro salysilic acid. During phytochemical examination, α-amyrin, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol were purified from the hexane fraction, while ursolic acid, daucosterol and swertiamarin were isolated from chloroform fraction. The results of the biochemical assay revealed α-amylase inhibitory activity of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water fractions, of which the chloroform and methanol fractions were more potent (IC50 16.8 and 18.1 mg/ml, respectively). Among examined compounds, daucosterol was found to be the most potent α-amylase inhibitor (57.5% in concentration 10 mg/ml). With regard to α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant extracts, purified constituents, and antidiabetic application of the species of Swertia genus in traditional medicine of different countries, S. longifolia seems more appropriate species for further mechanistic antidiabetic evaluations. PMID:27051429

  1. Different polyphenolic components of soft fruits inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Gordon J; Shpiro, Faina; Dobson, Patricia; Smith, Pauline; Blake, Alison; Stewart, Derek

    2005-04-01

    Polyphenol-rich extracts from soft fruits were tested for their ability to inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase. All extracts tested caused some inhibition of alpha-amylase, but there was a 10-fold difference between the least and most effective extracts. Strawberry and raspberry extracts were more effective alpha-amylase inhibitors than blueberry, blackcurrant, or red cabbage. Conversely, alpha-glucosidase was more readily inhibited by blueberry and blackcurrant extracts. The extent of inhibition of alpha-glucosidase was related to their anthocyanin content. For example, blueberry and blackcurrant extracts, which have the highest anthocyanin content, were the most effective inhibitors of alpha-glucosidase. The extracts most effective in inhibiting alpha-amylase (strawberry and raspberry) contain appreciable amounts of soluble tannins. Other tannin-rich extracts (red grape, red wine, and green tea) were also effective inhibitors of alpha-amylase. Indeed, removing tannins from strawberry extracts with gelatin also removed inhibition. Fractionation of raspberry extracts on Sephadex LH-20 produced an unbound fraction enriched in anthocyanins and a bound fraction enriched in tannin-like polyphenols. The unbound anthocyanin-enriched fraction was more effective against alpha-glucosidase than the original extract, whereas the alpha-amylase inhibitors were concentrated in the bound fraction. The LH-20 bound sample was separated by preparative HPLC, and fractions were assayed for inhibition of alpha-amylase. The inhibitory components were identified as ellagitannins using LC-MS-MS. This study suggests that different polyphenolic components of fruits may influence different steps in starch digestion in a synergistic manner. PMID:15796622

  2. Phylogenetic and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Thermostable Alpha Amylases of kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huma, Tayyaba; Maryam, Arooma; Rehman, Shahid Ur; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Shaheen, Tayyaba; Haque, Asma; Shaheen, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Alpha amylase family is generally defined as a group of enzymes that can hydrolyse and transglycosylase α-(1, 4) or α-(1, 6) glycosidic bonds along with the preservation of anomeric configuration. For the comparative analysis of alpha amylase family, nucleotide sequences of seven thermo stable organisms of Kingdom Archea i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Kingdom Prokaryotes i.e. Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C), Bacillus subtilis (70°C) and Bacillus KSM K38 (55°C) and Eukaryotes i.e. Aspergillus oryzae (60°C) were selected from NCBI. Primary structure composition analysis and Conserved sequence analysis were conducted through Bio Edit tools. Results from BioEdit shown only three conserved regions of base pairs and least similarity in MSA of the above mentioned alpha amylases. In Mega 5.1 Phylogeny of thermo stable alpha amylases of Kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryote was handled by Neighbor-Joining (NJ) algorithm. Mega 5.1 phylogenetic results suggested that alpha amylases of thermo stable organisms i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C) are more distantly related as compared to less thermo stable organisms. By keeping in mind the characteristics of most thermo stable alpha amylases novel and improved features can be introduced in less thermo stable alpha amylases so that they become more thermo tolerant and productive for industry. PMID:25187685

  3. Chemical constituents of Swertia longifolia Boiss. with α-amylase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ara, Leila; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Read, Roger W.; Arshadi, Sattar; Nikan, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    α-Amylase inhibitors play a critical role in the control of diabetes and many of medicinal plants have been found to act as α-amylase inhibitors. Swertia genus, belonging to the family Gentianaceae, comprises different species most of which have been used in traditional medicine of several cultures as antidiabetic, anti-pyretic, analgesic, liver and gastrointestinal tonic. Swertia longifolia Boiss. is the only species of Swertia growing in Iran. In the present investigation, phytochemical study of S. longifolia was performed and α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant fractions and purified compounds were determined. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with hexane, chloroform, methanol and water, respectively. The components of the hexane and chloroform fractions were isolated by different chromatographic methods and their structures were determined by 1H NMR and 13C NMR data. α-Amylase inhibitory activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using 3,5-dinitro salysilic acid. During phytochemical examination, α-amyrin, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol were purified from the hexane fraction, while ursolic acid, daucosterol and swertiamarin were isolated from chloroform fraction. The results of the biochemical assay revealed α-amylase inhibitory activity of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water fractions, of which the chloroform and methanol fractions were more potent (IC50 16.8 and 18.1 mg/ml, respectively). Among examined compounds, daucosterol was found to be the most potent α-amylase inhibitor (57.5% in concentration 10 mg/ml). With regard to α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant extracts, purified constituents, and antidiabetic application of the species of Swertia genus in traditional medicine of different countries, S. longifolia seems more appropriate species for further mechanistic antidiabetic evaluations. PMID:27051429

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana AMY3 Is a Unique Redox-regulated Chloroplastic α-Amylase*

    PubMed Central

    Seung, David; Thalmann, Matthias; Sparla, Francesca; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lee, Sang Kyu; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Svensson, Birte; Zeeman, Samuel C.; Santelia, Diana

    2013-01-01

    α-Amylases are glucan hydrolases that cleave α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in starch. In vascular plants, α-amylases can be classified into three subfamilies. Arabidopsis has one member of each subfamily. Among them, only AtAMY3 is localized in the chloroplast. We expressed and purified AtAMY3 from Escherichia coli and carried out a biochemical characterization of the protein to find factors that regulate its activity. Recombinant AtAMY3 was active toward both insoluble starch granules and soluble substrates, with a strong preference for β-limit dextrin over amylopectin. Activity was shown to be dependent on a conserved aspartic acid residue (Asp666), identified as the catalytic nucleophile in other plant α-amylases such as the barley AMY1. AtAMY3 released small linear and branched glucans from Arabidopsis starch granules, and the proportion of branched glucans increased after the predigestion of starch with a β-amylase. Optimal rates of starch digestion in vitro was achieved when both AtAMY3 and β-amylase activities were present, suggesting that the two enzymes work synergistically at the granule surface. We also found that AtAMY3 has unique properties among other characterized plant α-amylases, with a pH optimum of 7.5–8, appropriate for activity in the chloroplast stroma. AtAMY3 is also redox-regulated, and the inactive oxidized form of AtAMY3 could be reactivated by reduced thioredoxins. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with mass spectrometry analysis showed that a disulfide bridge between Cys499 and Cys587 is central to this regulation. This work provides new insights into how α-amylase activity may be regulated in the chloroplast. PMID:24089528

  5. Salivary amylase and stress during stressful environment: three Mars analog mission crews study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep; Foing, Bernard H

    2012-06-14

    After the establishment of the space age physicians, human factors engineers, neurologist and psychologists and their special attention to work on people's capability to meet up the physical, psychological, neuroscience and interpersonal strains of working in space, it has been regarded as an issue that seeks urgent consideration. Not study was conducted on effect of simulated Mars analog environment on stress and salivary amylase. So, this study aimed to confirm whether salivary amylase is act as stress biomarker in crew members who took part in Mars analog mission in an isolated and stressful environment. The 18 crew members were selected who took part in Mars Analog Research Station, Utah. Salivary amylase was measured using a biosensor of salivary amylase monitor and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score at pre-extravehicular activity, post-extravehicular activity and on before mission. The state and trait anxiety scores at pre-extravehicular activity for each commander were elevated as compared to after extravehicular activity. There were significant differences in the state and trait anxiety scores between before extravehicular activity and after extravehicular activity of Commander and other members, also there were significant differences in values of before-extravehicular activity between commanders and other members. There were significant differences in values of salivary amylase at before extravehicular activity and after extravehicular activity between commander group and other members. There was significant correlation between salivary amylase and state and trait anxiety scores in all groups. Measuring salivary amylase level could be useful for stress assessment of crew members and population working in a stressful and isolated environment. PMID:22554904

  6. Structural elucidation and molecular characterization of Marinobacter sp. α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Khare, S K

    2016-04-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Marinobacter sp. EMB8 α-amylase was found to be active and stable in salt and organic solvents. A study was carried out using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioinformatics analysis of similar protein sequence to ascertain molecular basis of salt and solvent adaptability of α-amylase. Structural changes recorded in the presence of varying amounts of NaCl exhibited an increase in negative ellipticity as a function of salt, confirming that salt stabilizes the protein and increases the secondary structure, making it catalytically functional. The data of intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence (using 1-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulfonate [ANS] as probe) further confirmed the role of salt. The α-amylase was active in the presence of nonpolar solvents, namely, hexane and decane, but inactivated by ethanol. The decrease in the activity was correlated with the loss of tertiary structure in the presence of ethanol. Guanidine hydrochloride and pH denaturation indicated the molten globule state at pH 4.0. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified α-amylase revealed the relatedness to Pseudoalteromonas sp. α-amylase. "FVHLFEW" was found as the N-terminal signature sequence. Bioinformatics analysis was done using M. algicola α-amylase protein having the same N-terminal signature sequence. The three-dimensional structure of Marinobacter α-amylase was deduced using the I-TASSER server, which reflected the enrichment of acidic amino acids on the surface, imparting the stability in the presence of salt. Our study clearly indicate that salt is necessary for maintaining the secondary and tertiary structure of halophilic protein, which is a necessary prerequisite for catalysis. PMID:26192048

  7. Differential RNA Expression of Two Barley ß-Amylase Genes (Bmy1 and Bmy2) in Developing Grains and Their Association with ß-Amylase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA expression from the barley ß-amylase1 (Bmy1) gene was determined during seed development in four genotypes (Legacy, Harrington, Ashqelon, and PI 296897). The Bmy1 transcript amount in Legacy and Harrington was not significantly different at 17, 19, or 21 days after anthesis (DAA). Ashqelon Bmy...

  8. Immobilization of diastase α-amylase on nano zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Antony, Navya; Balachandran, S; Mohanan, P V

    2016-11-15

    Diastase α-amylase extracted from malt, catalyses break down of starch into maltose. It is commonly used in food and fermentation industry. In the present study nano zinc oxide is used as support for this starch hydrolyzing enzyme. IR study revealed that the enzyme got adsorbed via electrostatic interaction with the functional groups on the support. The immobilized enzyme possessed a better heat-resistance than free enzyme. The kinetic parameters were determined using Lineweaver-Burk plot. The immobilized enzyme showed higher Km 2.08mg/ml than the free enzyme whose Km is 0.45±.05mg/ml. The Vmax of immobilized enzyme was about 2.92±.02mg/ml/min and that of free enzyme was 7.14±.02mg/ml/min, showing decrease in activity after immobilization. The immobilized enzyme showed 70% activity after 30days of storage while free enzyme lost its activity within 7days. About 80% of enzyme retained activity after 4 cycles of reuse. PMID:27283676

  9. Salivary Cortisol, Salivary Alpha Amylase, and the Dental Anxiety Scale

    PubMed Central

    Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/dental history questionnaire. A saliva sample, utilizing the method of passive drooling, was then collected in 2-mL cryovials. Samples were analyzed for salivary cortisol and sAA levels by Salimetrics. Significant associations were observed between DAS scores and presence of pain and history of traumatic dental experience. However, no significant correlations were observed between DAS, cortisol, and sAA levels. Our study reconfirms that dental anxiety is associated with presence of pain and a history of traumatic dental experience. On the other hand, our study was the first to our knowledge to test the correlation between the DAS and sAA; nevertheless, our results failed to show any significant correlation between dental anxiety, cortisol, and sAA levels. PMID:23763559

  10. Interparental Aggression and Parent-Adolescent Salivary Alpha Amylase Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gordis, Elana B.; Margolin, Gayla; Spies, Lauren; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a putative marker of adrenergic activity, in family members engaging in family conflict discussions. We examined symmetry among family members' sAA levels at baseline and in response to a conflict discussion. The relation between a history of interparental aggression on parent-adolescent sAA symmetry also was examined. Participants were 62 families with a mother, father, and biological child age 13-18 (n = 29 girls). After engaging in a relaxation procedure, families participated in a 15-minute triadic family conflict discussion. Participants provided saliva samples at post-relaxation/pre-discussion, immediately post-discussion, and at 10 and 20 min post-discussion. Participants also reported on interparental physical aggression during the previous year. Across the sample we found evidence of symmetry between mothers' and adolescents' sAA levels at baseline and around the discussion. Interparental aggression was associated with lower sAA levels among fathers. Interparental aggression also affected patterns of parent-child sAA response symmetry such that families reporting interparental aggression exhibited greater father-adolescent sAA symmetry than did those with no reports of interparental aggression. Among families with no interparental aggression history, we found consistent mother-adolescent symmetry. These differences suggest different patterns of parent-adolescent physiological attunement among families with interparental aggression. PMID:20096715

  11. Regulation of α-Amylase Activity in Bean Stem Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bill D.

    1984-01-01

    α-Amylase activity was assayed in 1-centimeter sections taken from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. Kentucky Wonder) hypocotyls and epicotyls at measured distances from the cotyledons. The activity was low throughout the hypocotyl for the first 7 days. An increase was first observed with etiolated hypocotyls in the basal region, becoming higher in the more central regions by 14 to 17 days. By 21 days the activity was highest in the upper region, but had decreased in the lower regions. A comparable pattern was observed for the epicotyl from etiolated seedlings, the activity increasing first in the region closest to the cotyledons. These increases were associated with loss of cells from the pith in the hypocotyl and epicotyl of both dark- and light-grown plants. Since the changes were observed in tissues virtually devoid of starch, it is hypothesized that the control mechanism is related to the cellular disassembly associated with the mobilization of materials released during senescence rather than to a regulation by the enzyme's substrate or products. PMID:16663519

  12. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M.; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A.A.; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G.; Armour, John A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  13. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  14. Existence of hydroxylated MWCNTs demotes the catalysis effect of amylases against starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Sivakumar, Amaravathy; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    Possible interaction between amylase and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been elucidated with spectroscopic methods. Hyperchromism of the UV-visible spectra of amylase-CNT conjugates suggested ground state complex formation between them. On contrary, the decreasing fluorescence emission spectra revealed the fate of quenching mechanism to be static. Stoke shift observed from the synchronous and 3D spectra suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic micro-environment of amylases by OH-MWCNTS. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra showed alteration in the amide I band, that corresponds to their effect on alpha-helical structures. Loss of alpha-helical structures and alteration in the dichroic band again revealed possible conformational change and effect towards the stability of polypeptide backbone structures. In addition, the shift observed in the SPR band and FTIR peaks of CNTs-amylase conjugates suggested possible alteration in their optical and structural properties. On the functional aspect, amylase activity on starch degradation and hydrolysis were found to be decreased in the presence of CNTs. PMID:26812109

  15. Inhibition of α-amylase activity by cellulose: Kinetic analysis and nutritional implications.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Sushil; Gidley, Michael J; Warren, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    We report on inhibition of α-amylase activity by cellulose based on in vitro experiments. The presence of cellulose in the hydrolysing medium reduced the initial velocity of starch hydrolysis in a concentration dependent manner. α-Amylase adsorption to cellulose was reversible, attaining equilibrium within 30min of incubation, and showed a higher affinity at 37°C compared to 20 and 0°C. The adsorption was almost unchanged in the presence of maltose (2.5-20mM) but was hindered in the presence of excess protein, suggesting non-specific adsorption of α-amylase to cellulose. Kinetic analyses of α-amylase hydrolysis of maize starch in the presence of cellulose showed that the inhibition is of a mixed type. The dissociation constant (Kic) of the EI complex was found to be ca. 3mg/mL. The observed inhibition of α-amylase activity suggests that cellulose in the diet can potentially attenuate starch hydrolysis. PMID:25843863

  16. Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor: structure, biophysics and protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C; Fukuda, Kenji; Svensson, Birte

    2004-02-12

    Bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitors have been implicated in plant defence and regulation of endogenous alpha-amylase action. The barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) inhibits the barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2) and subtilisin-type serine proteases. BASI belongs to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family of the beta-trefoil fold proteins. Diverse approaches including site-directed mutagenesis, hybrid constructions, and crystallography have been used to characterise the structures and contact residues in the AMY2/BASI complex. The three-dimensional structure of the AMY2/BASI complex is characterised by a completely hydrated Ca2+ situated at the protein interface that connects the three catalytic carboxyl groups in AMY2 with side chains in BASI via water molecules. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we have recently demonstrated Ca2+-modulated kinetics of the AMY2/BASI interaction and found that the complex formation involves minimal structural changes. The modulation of the interaction by calcium ions makes it unique among the currently known binding mechanisms of proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors. PMID:14871656

  17. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues. PMID:25179433

  18. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities. PMID:15640201

  19. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  20. Characterizing Novel Thermophilic Amylase Producing Bacteria From Taptapani Hot Spring, Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sudip Kumar; Raut, Sangeeta; Satpathy, Soumya; Rout, Prangya Ranjan; Bandyopadhyay, Bidyut; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amylases play a vital role in biotechnological studies and rank an important position in the world enzyme market (25% to 33%). Bioprocess method of amylase production is more effective than the other sources, since the technique is easy, cost effective, fast, and the enzymes of required properties can be procured. Objectives: The current study aimed to report the characteristics of novel amylase producing bacterial strains isolated from Taptapani hot spring, Odisha, India. Materials and Methods: Bacterial strains were isolated by dilution plating method from the water samples collected from Taptapani Hot Spring, Odisha and screened for amylase production through starch hydrolysis. The bacterial isolates were identified morphologically, biochemically, and finally by 16S rDNA profiling. Results: Based on the morphological, physiological, biochemical characteristics and the molecular characterization, the isolates SS1, SS2, and SS3 were identified as Bacillus barbaricus, Aeromonas veroni, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of enzymes from SS1, SS2, and SS3 strains were 19 kDa, 56 kDa and 49 kDa, respectively. Conclusions: The current report isolates, characterizes, and demonstrates the novel heat-adapted amylase-producing bacteria SS1, SS2 and SS3 from Taptapani hot spring, indicating its potentiality and stability under acidic conditions. PMID:25741425

  1. Effect of anthranilic acid on the catabolite repression of a Drosophila amylase gene in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.M.; Moehring, J.M.; Chernin, M.I.

    1987-05-01

    A Drosophila pseudoobscura amylase pseudogene cloned in Escherichia coli is expressed at high levels. The expression of this pseudogene is repressed when glucose (0.5% final conc) is added to a starch minimal medium culture of E. coli cells that contain the amylase plasmid pAMY17F. Addition of anthranilic acid (7 mM final conc.) to catabolite repressed cells acts like adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by derepressing the amylase pseudogene at the promoter. This is consistent with the Metabolite Gene Regulation (MGR) model proposed by Kline et al. which suggests that small molecules can circumvent the necessity for cAMP. Catabolite repression of the amylase structural gene of D. pseudoobscura has been previously shown. This would suggest that the amylase pseudogene expression in E. coli is either from a Drosophila structural gene promoter co-cloned with the pseudogene or a catabolite repressible E. coli promoter placed in the proper orientation and reading frame during the rearrangement of pAMY17F.

  2. Starch-Binding Domain Affects Catalysis in Two Lactobacillus α-Amylases

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R.; Ruiz, B.; Guyot, J. P.; Sanchez, S.

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in α-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus α-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus α-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities. PMID:15640201

  3. Classification of microbial α-amylases for food manufacturing using proteinase digestion

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takumi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tada, Atsuko; Ito, Yusai; Otsuki, Noriko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes produced by microorganisms and plants are used as food additives to aid the processing of foods. Identification of the origin of these enzyme products is important for their proper use. Proteinase digestion of α-amylase products, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, was applied to α-amylase from the mold Aspergillus species, the bacteria Bacillus species, and the actinomycetes Saccharomonospora species. Eighteen commercial products of α-amylase were digested with trypsin and endoproteinase Lys-C and HPLC analyzed. For some proteinase/sample combinations, the area of the intact α-amylase peak decreased and new peaks were detected after digestion. The presence and retention times of the novel peaks were used to group the products. The results from this method, called the proteinase digestion–HPLC method, allowed the classification of the α-amylase products into 10 groups, whereas the results from sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis allowed their classification into seven groups. PMID:25473515

  4. Phenotypic Variation for Diastatic power, ß-Amylase Activity, and ß-Amylase Thermostability vs. Allelic Variation at the Bmy1 Locus in a Sample of North American Barley Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malting quality data including diastatic power, ß-amylase activity, and ß-amylase thermostability, were collected on malts from three barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) breeding program trials containing two growth habits and 165 lines grown in multiple environments. We attempted to identify causal polymor...

  5. Beta-Amylase activity and thermostability in wild and cultivated barleys with different Bmy1 intron III alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) beta-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. Specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron have been correlated with beta-amylase activity and thermostability and may have potential as a selective marker for cultivar development. The B...

  6. The need for and development of a method to measure carry-over amylase activity in raw and refined sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over carry-over activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in refined sugars to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed for much larger markets than the...

  7. Development of an industrial method to quantitatively measure carry-over amylase activity in raw and refined sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased concern over carry-over activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food manufacturing industries and other end-users. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed...

  8. General Subject 1. Report to ICUMSA on the determination of commercial alpha-amylase activity by a spectrophotometric method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report is given on a new industrial method for the determination of the activity or strength of commercial alpha-amylase at a sugarcane factory or refinery, as well as a recommendation. At the present time, the activities or strengths of commercial alpha-amylases cannot be directly compared becau...

  9. Identification of serum and urine proteins responsible for enhanced pigment production by group B streptococci as amylases.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Fraile, M; Sampedro, A; Ruiz-Bravo, A; Sanbonmatsu, S; Gimenez-Gallego, G

    1996-09-01

    The serum and urine proteins responsible for enhanced pigment production in Streptococcus agalactiae in culture media were purified by chromatography and were identified as amylases by comparison of their amino acid composition with that calculated for proteins with known sequences. Similar pigment-enhancing activity was displayed by other amylases of nonanimal origin and by maltooligosaccharides. PMID:8877142

  10. Mechanism of removal of undesirable residual amylase, insoluble starch, and select colorants from refinery streams by powdered activated carbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need in the world-wide sugar industry to find a practical and economical solution to remove or inactivate residual alpha-amylase that are high temperature stable from factory or refinery streams. A survey of refineries that used amylase and had activated carbon systems for decolorization,...

  11. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  12. Study on alpha-amylase hydrolysis of potato amylopectin by a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoko; Noel, Timothy R; Ring, Steve G

    2008-02-13

    Potato amylopectin with phosphate groups was immobilized on a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCMD) using the attractive interaction between opposite charges, and enzymatic starch hydrolysis was monitored directly. Poly( L-lysine) (PLL) proved to be an appropriate cationic linker between the QCMD silica sensor and potato amylopectin. Increased mass and dissipation were observed when amylopectin was adsorbed onto the PLL layer and reversed when alpha-amylase was added. The effect of chitosan with cationic property on the hydrolysis of amylopectin was studied. Chitosan was observed to be adsorbed onto the amylopectin surface and to suppress hydrolysis by alpha-amylase. The formation of alternating layers of amylopectin and chitosan was monitored by QCMD. Amylopectin-chitosan trilayers increased resistance to digestion by alpha-amylase compared to one layer and to control without chitosan. PMID:18181571

  13. Bacterial and Archaeal α-Amylases: Diversity and Amelioration of the Desirable Characteristics for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-01-01

    Industrial enzyme market has been projected to reach US$ 6.2 billion by 2020. Major reasons for continuous rise in the global sales of microbial enzymes are because of increase in the demand for consumer goods and biofuels. Among major industrial enzymes that find applications in baking, alcohol, detergent, and textile industries are α-amylases. These are produced by a variety of microbes, which randomly cleave α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch leading to the formation of limit dextrins. α-Amylases from different microbial sources vary in their properties, thus, suit specific applications. This review focuses on the native and recombinant α-amylases from bacteria and archaea, their production and the advancements in the molecular biology, protein engineering and structural studies, which aid in ameliorating their properties to suit the targeted industrial applications. PMID:27516755

  14. Purification and crystallization of α-amylases from mucoid and non-mucoid B. amyloliquefaciens strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Elif; Mikami, Bunzo

    2001-11-01

    The purified α-amylases from mucoid and non-mucoid B. amyloliquefaciens strains were crystallized in forms suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. Very thin crystals of α-amylase of non-mucoid strain were obtained in the presence 15% propanol, 12% PEG 6000 and 0.1 M PIPES (pH: 7.1) at the end of 3 months and these were not suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystals of the mucoid strain of B. amyloliquefaciens α-amylase were obtained with 30% PEG 6000, 0.2 M (NH 4) 2SO 4 and 0.1 M PIPES (pH: 6.5) at the end of 3 months and these were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis.

  15. Potent Human α-Amylase Inhibition by the β-Defensin-like Protein Helianthamide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif. Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27066537

  16. RAmy2A; a novel alpha-amylase-encoding gene in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Reinl, S J; Rodriguez, R L

    1992-02-15

    The structure and expression of the alpha-amylase-encoding gene, RAmy2A, are described. This only representative of the Amy2 subfamily in rice differs from other cereal alpha-amylase-encoding genes in several respects. It contains the largest introns of all the cereal alpha-amylase-encoding genes examined to date. Moreover, the second of three introns in this gene contains a long inverted repeat sequence that can potentially form a large and stable stem-loop structure in the unspliced RNA transcript. Finally, RAmy2A is constitutively expressed at very low levels in germinated seeds, root, etiolated leaves, immature seeds and callus. This is in marked contrast to the Amy2 genes of wheat and barley which are highly expressed in the aleurone layer of the germinated seeds. PMID:1541400

  17. Differentiation of alpha-amylase from various sources: an approach using selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quarino, L; Hess, J; Shenouda, M; Ristenbatt, R R; Gold, J; Shaler, R C

    1993-01-01

    A radial diffusion assay in an agarose/starch gel utilizing crude kidney bean extract and a commercially prepared alpha-amylase inhibitor isolated from wheat seeds was developed and assessed to determine its ability to differentiate alpha-amylase from various sources. Kidney bean extract was found to have a greater inhibitory effect on AMY2, while the wheat lectin inhibitor was found to have a greater inhibitory effect on AMY1. Neither inhibitor was found to have any effect on commercially prepared bacterial alpha-amylase extract in both liquid preparations and dried stains. Mixtures of varying concentrations of pancreatic and salivary extracts also gave interpretable results. Additionally, dried stains prepared from human body fluids having high levels of AMY2 were differentiated from dried stains prepared from human body fluids containing high levels of AMY1. PMID:8360608

  18. Differential expression of rice alpha-amylase genes during seedling development under anoxia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y S; Thomas, B R; Rodriguez, R L

    1999-08-01

    The unique capability of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings to grow under anoxic conditions may result in part from their ability to express alpha-amylase and maintain the supply of sugar needed for energy metabolism. Previous studies have demonstrated that under aerobic conditions the Amy1 and Amy2 subfamily genes are regulated primarily by phytohormones while the Amy3 subfamily genes are induced during sugar starvation. The expression patterns for these alpha-amylase genes were considerably different in anoxic vs. aerobic rice seedlings. The level of total alpha-amylase mRNA under anoxic conditions was decreased in aleurone layers while it increased in the embryo. Anoxic conditions greatly diminished the expression of the Amy1A gene in aleurone. Conversely, expression of many Amy3 subfamily genes was up-regulated and prolonged in embryo tissues under anoxic conditions. PMID:10527416

  19. Smart phone: a popular device supports amylase activity assay in fisheries research.

    PubMed

    Thongprajukaew, Karun; Choodum, Aree; Sa-E, Barunee; Hayee, Ummah

    2014-11-15

    Colourimetric determinations of amylase activity were developed based on a standard dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) staining method, using maltose as the analyte. Intensities and absorbances of red, green and blue (RGB) were obtained with iPhone imaging and Adobe Photoshop image analysis. Correlation of green and analyte concentrations was highly significant, and the accuracy of the developed method was excellent in analytical performance. The common iPhone has sufficient imaging ability for accurate quantification of maltose concentrations. Detection limits, sensitivity and linearity were comparable to a spectrophotometric method, but provided better inter-day precision. In quantifying amylase specific activity from a commercial source (P>0.02) and fish samples (P>0.05), differences compared with spectrophotometric measurements were not significant. We have demonstrated that iPhone imaging with image analysis in Adobe Photoshop has potential for field and laboratory studies of amylase. PMID:24912700

  20. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae entrapped in polyacrylamide gel.

    PubMed

    Raviyan, Patcharin; Tang, Juming; Rasco, Barbara A

    2003-08-27

    To determine the suitability as a time-temperature indicator for dielectric pasteurization processes, the thermal stability (50-75 degrees C) of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase immobilized in polyacrylamide gel in phosphate buffer, mashed potatoes, and minced shrimp was examined. Changing the cross-linking agent concentration from 3.3 to 5.3% and adding 2% salt did not markedly affect the thermal stability of the immobilized alpha-amylase. Thermal inactivation was first order, and immobilization generally improved the thermal stability of alpha-amylase. z values of the immobilized system in test food systems were 10.2 degrees C (phosphate buffer), 8.45 degrees C (minced shrimp), and 7.78 degrees C (mashed potatoes). PMID:12926898

  1. Heterologous expression and secretion of Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase in Leuconostoc citreum.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyun-Ju; Moon, Jin-Seok; Seo, Eun-Young; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-11-01

    To develop a gene expression system for Leuconostoc genus, construction of expression vector and expression of a heterologus protein in Leuconostoc was performed. Alpha-amylase gene from Lactobacillus amylovorus was cloned into a Leuconostoc cloning vector, pLeuCM, with its own signal peptide. pLeuCMamy was introduced into Leuconostoc citreum CB2567 and a successful expression of alpha-amy gene was confirmed by enzyme activity assays. About 90% of alpha-amylase activity was detected in the culture broth, revealing most of expressed alpha-amylase was secreted out cells. The signal sequence of alpha-amy gene is a good candidate for the secretion of heterologous protein by using Leuconostoc host-vector system. PMID:19618275

  2. Bacterial and Archaeal α-Amylases: Diversity and Amelioration of the Desirable Characteristics for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-01-01

    Industrial enzyme market has been projected to reach US$ 6.2 billion by 2020. Major reasons for continuous rise in the global sales of microbial enzymes are because of increase in the demand for consumer goods and biofuels. Among major industrial enzymes that find applications in baking, alcohol, detergent, and textile industries are α-amylases. These are produced by a variety of microbes, which randomly cleave α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch leading to the formation of limit dextrins. α-Amylases from different microbial sources vary in their properties, thus, suit specific applications. This review focuses on the native and recombinant α-amylases from bacteria and archaea, their production and the advancements in the molecular biology, protein engineering and structural studies, which aid in ameliorating their properties to suit the targeted industrial applications. PMID:27516755

  3. An In Vitro and In Vivo Study of the α-Amylase Activity of Phaseolamin

    PubMed Central

    de Gouveia, Neire Moura; Alves, Fernanda Vieira; Furtado, Fabiana Barcelos; Scherer, Danielli Luana; Mundim, Antonio Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the polypeptide profiles, inhibition of human salivary α-amylase activity, and hemagglutination properties of a commercial phaseolamin sample. We also performed an in vivo assay to investigate the effects of a commercial phaseolamin treatment (100, 500, or 1500 mg/kg) over 20 days on the glycemia, body weight, and serum biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) of nondiabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The in vitro evaluation showed defined protein profiles, low hemagglutination activity, and high α-amylase inhibition. None of the experimental groups treated with phaseolamin or acarbose showed decreases in body weight. Our data demonstrate that phaseolamin inhibits amylase activity in vitro, reduces blood glucose levels, decreases or attenuates some of the renal and hepatic effects of diabetes in streptozotocin-induced rats, and could therefore have therapeutic potential in the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. PMID:24650210

  4. Effect of sexual steroids upon ontogeny of alpha-amylase of rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, S L; Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Blanco, A

    1982-04-30

    The effect of gonadectomy (at the 10th day of life) and treatment with sexual steroids (during the first month) upon development of alpha-amylase activity in rat parotid gland has been studied. Alpha-amylase specific activity of parotid glands from 20-day-old orchidectomized rats and from 25-day-old ovariectomized animals was significantly higher than that of intact male and female rats of the same age respectively. Spayed males treated with testosterone (10 microgram/day on the 13th, 15th, and 17th day) and ovariectomized rats treated with oestradiol (2.5 microgram/day from the 16th to the 22nd day) showed values of enzymic activity similar to those of normal animals. Results indicate that oestradiol and testosterone have an inhibitory effect upon the increase of alpha-amylase activity in parotid gland during a very defined period of development. PMID:6178953

  5. Interaction of europium and curium with alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Barkleit, Astrid; Heller, Anne; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Bernhard, Gert

    2016-06-01

    The complexation of Eu(iii) and Cm(iii) with the protein α-amylase (Amy), a major enzyme in saliva and pancreatic juice, was investigated over wide ranges of pH and concentration at both ambient and physiological temperatures. Macroscopic sorption experiments demonstrated a strong and fast binding of Eu(iii) to Amy between pH 5 and 8. The protein provides three independent, non-cooperative binding sites for Eu(iii). The overall association constant of these three binding sites on the protein was calculated to be log K = 6.4 ± 0.1 at ambient temperature. With potentiometric titration, the averaged deprotonation constant of the carboxyl groups (the aspartic and glutamic acid residues) of Amy was determined to be pKa = 5.23 ± 0.14 at 25 °C and 5.11 ± 0.24 at 37 °C. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) revealed two different species for both Eu(iii) and Cm(iii) with Amy. In the case of the Eu(iii) species, the stability constants were determined to be log β11 = 4.7 ± 0.2 and log β13 = 12.0 ± 0.4 for Eu : Amy = 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 complexes, respectively, whereas the values for the respective Cm(iii) species were log β11 = 4.8 ± 0.1 and log β13 = 12.1 ± 0.1. Furthermore, the obtained stability constants were extrapolated to infinite dilution to make our data compatible with the existing thermodynamic database. PMID:26866402

  6. Stress affects salivary alpha-Amylase activity in bonobos.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Verena; Deschner, Tobias; Möstl, Erich; Selzer, Dieter; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2012-01-18

    Salivary alpha-Amylase (sAA) is a starch digesting enzyme. In addition to its function in the context of nutrition, sAA has also turned out to be useful for monitoring sympathetic nervous system activity. Recent studies on humans have found a relationship between intra-individual changes in sAA activity and physical and psychological stress. In studies on primates and other vertebrates, non-invasive monitoring of short-term stress responses is usually based on measurements of cortisol levels, which are indicative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity. The few studies that have used both cortisol levels and sAA activity indicate that these two markers may respond differently and independently to different types of stress such that variation in the degree of the activation of different stress response systems might reflect alternative coping mechanisms or individual traits. Here, we present the first data on intra- and inter-individual variation of sAA activity in captive bonobos and compare the results with information from other ape species and humans. Our results indicate that sAA activity in the bonobo samples was significantly lower than in the human samples but within the range of other great ape species. In addition, sAA activity was significantly higher in samples collected at times when subjects had been exposed to stressors (judged by changes in behavioral patterns and cortisol levels) than in samples collected at other times. Our results indicate that bonobos possess functioning sAA and, as in other species, sAA activity is influenced by autonomic nervous system activity. Monitoring sAA activity could therefore be a useful tool for evaluating stress in bonobos. PMID:21945369

  7. Isolation, characterization and inhibition by acarbose of the alpha-amylase from Lactobacillus fermentum: comparison with Lb. manihotivorans and Lb. plantarum amylases.

    PubMed

    Talamond, P; Desseaux, V; Moreau, Y; Santimone, M; Marchis-Mouren, G

    2002-11-01

    Extracellular alpha-amylase from Lactobacillus fermentum (FERMENTA) was purified by glycogen precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purification was approximately 28-fold with a 27% yield. The FERMENTA molecular mass (106,000 Da) is in the same range as the ones determined for L. amylovorus (AMYLOA), L. plantarum (PLANTAA) and L. manihotivorans (MANIHOA) alpha-amylases. The amino acid composition of FERMENTA differs from the other lactobacilli considered here, but however, indicates that the peptidic sequence contains two equal parts: the N-terminal catalytic part; and the C-terminal repeats. The isoelectric point of FERMENTA, PLANTAA, MANIHOA are approximately the same (3.6). The FERMENTA optimum pH (5.0) is slightly more acidic and the optimum temperature is lower (40 degrees C). Raw starch hydrolysis catalyzed by all three amylases liberates maltotriose and maltotretaose. Maltose is also produced by FERMENTA and MANIHOA. Maltohexaose FERMENTA catalyzed hydrolysis produces maltose and maltotriose. Finally, kinetics of FERMENTA, PLANTAA and MANIHOA using amylose as a substrate and acarbose as an inhibitor, were carried out. Statistical analysis of kinetic data, expressed using a general velocity equation and assuming rapid equilibrium, showed that: (1) in the absence of inhibitor k(cat)/Km are, respectively, 1x10(9), 12.6x10(9) and 3.2x10(9) s(-1) M(-1); and (2) the inhibition of FERMENTA is of the mixed non-competitive type (K(1i)=5.27 microM; L(1i)=1.73 microM) while the inhibition of PLANTAA and MANIHOA is of the uncompetitive type (L(1i)=1.93 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively). Whatever the inhibition type, acarbose is a strong inhibitor of these Lactobacillus amylases. These results indicate that, as found in porcine and barley amylases, Lactobacillus amylases contain in addition to the active site, a soluble carbohydrate (substrate or product) binding site. PMID:12431403

  8. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of a Highly Thermostable Amylase Gene of Thermotoga petrophila into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Asma; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; ud Din, Zia; Aftab, Saima; Iqbal, Irfana; ul Haq, Ikram

    2016-02-01

    A putative α-amylase gene of Thermotoga petrophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-21a (+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal expression of the α-amylase using various parameters, such as pH, temperature, time of induction and addition of an inducer. The optimum temperature and pH for the maximum expression of α-amylase were 22 °C and 7.0 pH units, respectively. Purification of the recombinant enzyme was carried out by heat treatment method, followed by ion exchange chromatography with 34.6-fold purification having specific activity of 126.31 U mg(-1) and a recovery of 56.25%. Molecular weight of the purified α-amylase, 70 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 100 °C temperature and at pH of 7.0. The enzyme activity was increased in the presence of metal ions especially Ca(+2) and decreased in the presence of EDTA indicating that the α-amylase was a metalloenzyme. However, addition of 1% Tween 20, Tween 80 and β-mercaptoethanol constrained the enzyme activity to 87, 96 and 89%, respectively. No considerable effect of organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, acetone and n-butanol) was observed on enzyme activity. With soluble starch as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was 73.8 U mg(-1). The α-amylase enzyme was active to hydrolyse starch forming maltose. PMID:26526464

  9. [Alpha-amylase as an occupational allergen in baking industry employees].

    PubMed

    De Zotti, R; Larese, F; Molinari, S

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 226 bakers and pastry makers and in 88 students of a training school for bakers, we evaluated skin sensitization to the common allergens, wheat and alpha amylase. Skin prick tests were positive to the enzyme in 17 exposed subjects (7.5%) and in one student with previous occupational exposure as a baker; 27 exposed subjects (11.9%) and 2 students were sensitized to wheat. Among the 42 exposed workers who complained of work-related symptoms, 12 (28.6%) cases were skin positive to amylase and 17 (42.9%) to wheat. Among the 17 workers who were positive to amylase, 16 were also sensitized to wheat and/or common allergens, 12 complained of symptoms at work but since in many cases there was a positive response to wheat, too, it is impossible to speculate on the role of each allergen in inducing symptoms. One case, with work-related rhinoconjunctivitis, had skin sensitization only to alpha amylase but no specific IgE in the serum. These findings confirm that bakers are at risk of sensitization not only to wheat allergen but also to amylase from Aspergillus oryzae. The enzyme should be included in the list of substances to be tested among bakers in whom an occupational allergy is suspected, but particular care should be taken in evaluating the cutaneous response, especially if compared to wheat wheals. Further investigations are also needed to identify the source of risk and to better define the characteristics of the enzyme and the relationship between skin reaction to amylase, sensitization to wheat and atopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8072442

  10. A lectin gene encodes the alpha-amylase inhibitor of the common bean.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-01-01

    An alpha-amylase inhibitor that inhibits insect and mammalian alpha-amylases but not plant alpha-amylases, is present in seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). We have purified the alpha-amylase inhibitor by using a selective heat treatment in acidic medium and affinity chromatography with porcine pancreas alpha-amylase coupled to agarose. Under sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, the purified inhibitor gave rise to five bands with mobilities corresponding to molecular masses ranging from 14 to 19 kDa. N-terminal sequencing (up to 15 amino acids) of the polypeptides obtained from these bands resulted in only two different sequences matching two stretches of the amino acid sequence deduced from an already described lectin gene [Hoffman, L. M. (1984) J. Mol. Appl. Gen. 2,447-453]. This gene is different from but closely related to the genes that code for phytohemagglutinin, the major lectin of bean. Further evidence based on amino acid composition, identification of a precursor, and recognition of the product of the gene (expressed in Escherichia coli) by an anti-alpha-amylase inhibitor serum confirms that the inhibitor is encoded by this or a closely related lectin gene. This finding assigns a biological function, which has been described at the molecular level, to a plant lectin gene product and supports the defense role postulated for seed lectins. The lack of homology with other families of enzyme inhibitors suggests that this may be the first member of a new family of plant enzyme inhibitors. Images PMID:2682631

  11. Identification of a new oat β-amylase by functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Nihed; Khemakhem, Bassem; Fendri, Imen; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Baril, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2016-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) seed extracts exhibited a high degree of catalytic activity including amylase activities. Proteins in the oat seed extracts were optimized for their amylolytic activities. Oat extract with amylolytic activity was separated by SDS-PAGE and a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was subjected to tryptic digestion. The generated amino acid sequences were analyzed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) and database searches. These sequences were used to identify a partial cDNA from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of A. sativa L. Based upon EST sequences, a predicted full-length gene was identified, with an open reading frame of 1464 bp encoding a protein of 488 amino acid residues (AsBAMY), with a theoretical molecular mass of 55 kDa identified as a β-amylase belonging to the plant β-amylase family. Primary structure of oat β-amylase (AsBAMY) protein indicated high similarity with other β-amylase from other cereals such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and rye (Secale cereale) with two conserved Glu residues (E184 and E378) assigned as the “putative” catalytic residues which would act as an acid and base pair in the catalytic process. In addition, a 3D-model of AsBAMY was built from known X-ray structures and sequence alignments. A similar core (β/α)8-barrel architecture was found in AsBAMY like the other cereal β-amylases with a specific location of the active site in a pocket-like cavity structure made at one end of this core (β/α)8-barrel domain suggesting an accessibility of the non-reducing end of the substrate and thus confirming the results of AsBAMY exo-acting hydrolase. PMID:26455400

  12. Amylase release from dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells stimulated by glucagon: effect of membrane stabilizers.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The effect of membrane stabilizers and cytochalasin-B on amylase secretion, basal and induced by ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ, bethanechol and glucagon, was studied in dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Cytochalasin-B did not affect basal or secretagogue-stimulated amylase secretion. 3. Membrane stabilizers [thymol (10(-7)-10(-4) M), chlorpromazine (10(-7)-10(-4) M) and propranolol (10(-7)-10(-5) M) did not alter basal release of amylase. At higher concentrations of thymol (10(-3) M), chlorpromazine (10(-3) M) and propranolol (10(-4) M), dissociated acinar cells were lysed as indicated by an increase in release of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). 4. Ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ (maximal effective concentrations, 0.01 u. ml.-1), bethanechol (maximal effective concentrations, 10(-4) M) and glucagon increased amylase secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. Concentrations of CCK-PZ and bethanechol beyond optimal levels decreased amylase secretion. Concentrations of ionophore A23187 and glucagon when tested beyond 10(-6) M and 10(-4) M respectively increased the release of LDH. In concentrations that were non-toxic, membrane stabilizers blocked the stimulating effect of cholecystokinin-pancreozymin and bethanechol on amylase secretion but did not alter the response to A23187 and glucagon. 5. Unlike bethanechol, glucagon neither increased the uptake of 45Ca nor did it alter the release of 45Ca from cells previously loaded with 45CaCl2. 6. These data provide evidence that stimulus-secretion coupling in dissociated pancreatic acinar cells is basically similar to cells in situ. The effect of glucagon is consistent with the model in which hormone-dependent mobilization of Ca2+ from intra- or extracellular sources is bypassed leading to digestive enzyme secretion. PMID:6166745

  13. Prevalence of the Amylase-Binding Protein A Gene (abpA) in Oral Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan E.; Rogers, Jeffrey D.; Haase, Elaine M.; Zelasko, Peter M.; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    Salivary amylase binds specifically to a number of oral streptococcal species. This interaction may play an important role in dental plaque formation. Recently, a 585-bp gene was cloned and sequenced from Streptococcus gordonii Challis encoding a 20.5-kDa amylase-binding protein (AbpA). The goal of this study was to determine if related genes are present in other species of oral streptococci. Biotinylated abpA was used in Southern blot analysis to screen genomic DNA from several strains representing eight species of oral streptococci. This probe hybridized with a 4.0-kb HindIII restriction fragment from all 13 strains of S. gordonii tested. The probe did not appear to bind to any restriction fragments from other species of amylase-binding oral streptococci including Streptococcus mitis (with the exception of 1 of 14 strains), Streptococcus crista (3 strains), Streptococcus anginosus (1 strain), and Streptococcus parasanguinis (1 strain), or to non-amylase-binding oral streptococci including Streptococcus sanguinis (3 strains), Streptococcus oralis (4 strains), and Streptococcus mutans (1 strain). Primers homologous to sequences within the 3′ and 5′ ends of abpA yielded products of 400 bp following PCR of genomic DNA from the Southern blot-positive strains. Several of these PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The levels of similarity of these cloned products to the abpA of S. gordonii Challis ranged from 91 to 96%. These studies reveal that the abpA gene appears to be specific to S. gordonii and differs from genes encoding amylase-binding proteins from other species of amylase-binding streptococci. PMID:10565935

  14. Alternative catalytic anions differentially modulate human alpha-amylase activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Maurus, Robert; Begum, Anjuman; Williams, Leslie K; Fredriksen, Jason R; Zhang, Ran; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2008-03-18

    A mechanistic study of the essential allosteric activation of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by chloride ion has been conducted by exploring a wide range of anion substitutions through kinetic and structural experiments. Surprisingly, kinetic studies indicate that the majority of these alternative anions can induce some level of enzymatic activity despite very different atomic geometries, sizes, and polyatomic natures. These data and subsequent structural studies attest to the remarkable plasticity of the chloride binding site, even though earlier structural studies of wild-type human pancreatic alpha-amylase suggested this site would likely be restricted to chloride binding. Notably, no apparent relationship is observed between anion binding affinity and relative activity, emphasizing the complexity of the relationship between chloride binding parameters and the activation mechanism that facilitates catalysis. Of the anions studied, particularly intriguing in terms of observed trends in substrate kinetics and their novel atomic compositions were the nitrite, nitrate, and azide anions, the latter of which was found to enhance the relative activity of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by nearly 5-fold. Structural studies have provided considerable insight into the nature of the interactions formed in the chloride binding site by the nitrite and nitrate anions. To probe the role such interactions play in allosteric activation, further structural analyses were conducted in the presence of acarbose, which served as a sensitive reporter molecule of the catalytic ability of these modified enzymes to carry out its expected rearrangement by human pancreatic alpha-amylase. These studies show that the largest anion of this group, nitrate, can comfortably fit in the chloride binding pocket, making all the necessary hydrogen bonds. Further, this anion has nearly the same ability to activate human pancreatic alpha-amylase and leads to the production of the same acarbose product

  15. Componential profile and amylase inhibiting activity of phenolic compounds from Calendula officinalis L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    An ethanolic extract and its ethyl acetate-soluble fraction from leaves of Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) were found to show an inhibitory effect on amylase. From the crude extract fractions, one new phenolic acid glucoside, 6'-O-vanilloyl-β-D-glucopyranose, was isolated, together with twenty-four known compounds including five phenolic acid glucosides, five phenylpropanoids, five coumarins, and nine flavonoids. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral data. The main components, isoquercitrin, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin-3-O-(6''-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on amylase. PMID:24683352

  16. Purification and characterization of periplasmic alpha-amylase from Xanthomonas campestris K-11151.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, J; Onitsuka, N; Nakano, T; Shibata, Y; Hizukuri, S; Entani, E

    1994-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris K-11151, isolated from soil, produced a periplasmic alpha-amylase of a new type. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, as shown by several criteria. The purified enzyme showed almost the same activities on alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, soluble starch, and amylose. Moreover, it was active on branched cyclodextrins, pullulan, and maltose but not on glycogen. Kinetic analysis showed that alpha-cyclodextrin was the best substrate among the cyclodextrins. The substrate specificity suggested that this enzyme had the combined activities of alpha-amylase, cyclodextrinase, and neopullulanase. Images PMID:8206836

  17. Molecular characterization of a bean alpha-amylase inhibitor that inhibits the alpha-amylase of the mexican bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus.

    PubMed

    Grossi de Sa, M F; Mirkov, T E; Ishimoto, M; Colucci, G; Bateman, K S; Chrispeels, M J

    1997-01-01

    Cultivated varieties of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) contain an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI-1) that inhibits porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA; EC 3.2.1.1) and the amylases of certain seed weevils, but not that of the Mexican bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. A variant of alpha AI-1, called alpha AI-2, is found in certain arcelin-containing wild accessions of the common bean. The variant alpha AI-2 inhibits Z. subfasciatus alpha-amylase (ZSA), but not PPA. We purified alpha AI-2 and studied its interaction with ZSA. The formation of the alpha AI-2-ZSA complex is time-dependent and occurs maximally at pH 5.0 or below. When a previously isolated cDNA assumed to encode alpha AI-2 was expressed in transgenic tobacco seeds, the seeds contained inhibitory activity toward ZSA but not toward PPA, confirming that the cDNA encodes alpha AI-2. The inhibitors alpha AI-1 and alpha AI-2 share 78% sequence identity at the amino acid level and they differ in an important region that is part of the site where the enzyme binds the inhibitor. The swap of a tripeptide in this region was not sufficient to change the specificity of the two inhibitors towards their respective enzymes. The three-dimensional structure of the alpha AI-1/PPA complex has just been solved and we recently obtained the derived amino acid sequence of ZSA. This additional information allows us to discuss the results described here in the framework of the amino acid residues of both proteins involved in the formation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex and to pinpoint the amino acids responsible for the specificity of the interaction. PMID:9431678

  18. Characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex between barley alpha-amylase and the bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from barley seeds.

    PubMed

    Vallée, F; Kadziola, A; Bourne, Y; Abe, J; Svensson, B; Haser, R

    1994-02-11

    The complex between a member of the barley malt alpha-amylase isozyme 2 family (AMY2-2), and the endogenous bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, BASI, has been crystallized by the hanging drop vapour diffusion technique at a AMY2-2: BASI molar ratio of 1:1. Crystals have been grown within 4 days from solutions containing polyethylene glycol and calcium chloride. Analysis of single crystals by gel electrophoresis showed the presence of both proteins in the crystal lattice. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit cell dimensions a = 74.5 A, b = 96.9 A, c = 171.3 A and they diffract to 2.0 A resolution. The presence of two molecules of the 1:1 complex in the asymmetric unit gives a solvent content of 45% by volume. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the complex was confirmed by the molecular replacement method, using as a search model the recently determined three-dimensional structure of the barley alpha-amylase. PMID:8107117

  19. Dose- and tissue-specific interaction of monoterpenes with the gibberellin-mediated release of potato tuber bud dormancy, sprout growth and induction of α-amylases and β-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Sonja; Podzimska, Dagmara; Voegele, Antje; Imbeck, Madeleine; Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) are involved in bud dormancy release in several species. We show here that GA-treatment released bud dormancy, initiated bud sprouting and promoted sprout growth of excised potato tuber bud discs ('eyes'). Monoterpenes from peppermint oil (PMO) and S-(+)-carvone (CAR) interact with the GA-mediated bud dormancy release in a hormesis-type response: low monoterpene concentrations enhance dormancy release and the initiation of bud sprouting, whereas high concentrations inhibit it. PMO and CAR did, however, not affect sprout growth rate after its onset. We further show that GA-induced dormancy release is associated with tissue-specific regulation of α- and β-amylases. Molecular phylogenetic analysis shows that potato α-amylases cluster into two distinct groups: α-AMY1 and α-AMY2. GA-treatment induced transcript accumulation of members of both α-amylase groups, as well as α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprout and 'sub-eye' tissues. In sprouts, CAR interacts with the GA-mediated accumulation of α-amylase transcripts in an α-AMY2-specific and dose-dependent manner. Low CAR concentrations enhance the accumulation of α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts, but do not affect the α-AMY1-type transcripts. Low CAR concentrations also enhance the accumulation of α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprouts, but not in 'sub-eye' tissues. In contrast, high CAR concentrations have no appreciable effect in sprouts on the enzyme activities and the α-amylase transcript abundances of either group. The dose-dependent effects on the enzyme activities and the α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts in sprouts are specific for CAR but not for PMO. Different monoterpenes therefore may have specific targets for their interaction with hormone signalling pathways. PMID:21858448

  20. Physiological characterisation of recombinant Aspergillus nidulans strains with different creA genotypes expressing A. oryzae alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Agger, Teit; Petersen, Jesper B; O'Connor, Susan M; Murphy, Rachael L; Kelly, Joan M; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-18

    The physiology of three strains of Aspergillus nidulans was examined--a creA deletion strain, a wild type creA genotype and a strain containing extra copies of the creA gene, all producing Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase. The strains were cultured in batch and continuous cultivations and the biomass formation and alpha-amylase production was characterised. Overexpression of the creA gene resulted in a lower maximum specific growth rate and a slightly higher repression of the alpha-amylase production during conditions with high glucose concentration. No expression of creA also resulted in a decreased maximum specific growth rate, but also in drastic changes in morphology. Furthermore, the expression of alpha-amylase was completely derepressed and creA thus seems to be the only regulatory protein responsible for glucose repression of alpha-amylase expression. The effect of different carbon sources on the alpha-amylase production in the creA deletion strain was investigated and it was found that starch was the best inducer. The degree of induction by starch increased almost linearly with the concentration of starch in starch/glucose mixtures. High-density batch cultivation was performed with the creA deletion strain and a final titre of 6.0 g l(-1) of alpha-amylase was reached after 162 h of cultivation. PMID:11689252

  1. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-10-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24975239

  2. The relationship between the level of salivary alpha amylase activity and pain severity in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Jazaeri, Mina; Babaei, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of dental pain severity is very challenging in dentistry. Previous studies have suggested that elevated salivary alpha amylase may contribute to increased physical stresses. There is a close association between salivary alpha amylase and plasma norepinephrine under stressful physical conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pain severity and salivary alpha amylase levels in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients (20 females and 16 males) with severe tooth pain due to symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were selected. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was used to assess the pain severity in each patient. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected, and the level of alpha amylase activity was assessed by the spectrophotometric method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13. Results The level of alpha amylase was significantly increased in the saliva in association with pain severity assessed by VAS. The salivary alpha amylase was also elevated with increased age and in males. Conclusions There was a significant correlation between the VAS pain scale and salivary alpha amylase level, which indicates this biomarker may be a good index for the objective assessment of pain intensity. PMID:24010080

  3. Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 Using Pearl Millet and Its Structural Characterization.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bijay K; Jana, Arijit; Nanda, Prativa K; DasMohapatra, Pradeep K; Sahoo, Santi L; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, Aspergillus terreus NCFT4269.10 was employed in liquid static surface (LSSF) and solid state (SSF) fermentation to assess the optimal conditions for α-amylase biosynthesis. One-variable-at-a-time approach (quasi-optimum protocol) was primarily used to investigate the effect of each parameter on production of amylase. The maximum amylase production was achieved using pearl millet (PM) as substrate by SSF (19.19 ± 0.9 Ug(-1)) and also in presence of 1 mM magnesium sulfate, 0.025% (w/v) gibberellic acid, and 30 mg/100 ml (w/v) of vitamin E (~60-fold higher production of amylase) with the initial medium pH of 7.0 and incubation at 30 °C for 96 h. In addition, maltose, gelatin and isoleucine also influenced the α-amylase production. Amylase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass around 15.3 kDa. The enzyme comprised of a typical secondary structure containing α-helix (12.2%), β-pleated sheet (23.6%), and β-turn (27.4%). Exploitation of PM for α-amylase production with better downstream makes it the unique enzyme for various biotechnological applications. PMID:27242841

  4. Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 Using Pearl Millet and Its Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Bijay K.; Jana, Arijit; Nanda, Prativa K.; DasMohapatra, Pradeep K.; Sahoo, Santi L.; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, Aspergillus terreus NCFT4269.10 was employed in liquid static surface (LSSF) and solid state (SSF) fermentation to assess the optimal conditions for α-amylase biosynthesis. One-variable-at-a-time approach (quasi-optimum protocol) was primarily used to investigate the effect of each parameter on production of amylase. The maximum amylase production was achieved using pearl millet (PM) as substrate by SSF (19.19 ± 0.9 Ug−1) and also in presence of 1 mM magnesium sulfate, 0.025% (w/v) gibberellic acid, and 30 mg/100 ml (w/v) of vitamin E (~60-fold higher production of amylase) with the initial medium pH of 7.0 and incubation at 30 °C for 96 h. In addition, maltose, gelatin and isoleucine also influenced the α-amylase production. Amylase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass around 15.3 kDa. The enzyme comprised of a typical secondary structure containing α-helix (12.2%), β-pleated sheet (23.6%), and β-turn (27.4%). Exploitation of PM for α-amylase production with better downstream makes it the unique enzyme for various biotechnological applications. PMID:27242841

  5. Polyaniline-graphene based α-amylase biosensor with a linear dynamic range in excess of 6 orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Sofia Rodrigues; Lloyd, Catherine; Yao, Seydou; Andrea Salvatore Gazze; Whitaker, Iain S; Francis, Lewis; Conlan, R Steven; Azzopardi, Ernest

    2016-11-15

    α-amylase is an established marker for diagnosis of pancreatic and salivary disease, and recent research has seen a substantial expansion of its use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications for infection, cancer and wound healing. The lack of bedside monitoring devices for α-amylase detection has hitherto restricted the clinical progress of such applications. We have developed a highly sensitive α-amylase immunosensor platform, produced via in situ electropolymerization of aniline onto a screen-printed graphene support (SPE). Covalently binding an α-amylase specific antibody to a polyaniline (PANI) layer and controlling device assembly using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we have achieved a highly linear response against α-amylase concentration. Each stage of the assembly was characterized using a suite of high-resolution topographical, chemical and mechanical techniques. Quantitative, highly sensitive detection was demonstrated using an artificially spiked human blood plasma samples. The device has a remarkably wide limit of quantification (0.025-1000IU/L) compared to α-amylase assays in current clinical use. With potential for simple scale up to volume manufacturing though standard semiconductor production techniques and subsequently clinical application, this biosensor will enable clinical benefit through early disease detection, and better informed administration of correct therapeutic dose of drugs used to treat α-amylase related diseases. PMID:27196256

  6. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24975239

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of two alpha-amylase genes from Streptococcus bovis 148 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, E; Niimura, Y; Uchimura, T; Kozaki, M; Komagata, K

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-amylase genes of Streptococcus bovis 148 were cloned in Escherichia coli MC1061, using pBR322. The recombinant plasmids were classified into two groups on the basis of their restriction maps. Southern blot analysis did not show homology between the two types of alpha-amylase genes, and the two alpha-amylase genes existed on the chromosomal DNA of S. bovis 148. The enzymatic properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the two purified enzymes produced by the cloned E. coli strains were quite different from each other. Particularly, one alpha-amylase (Amy I) was adsorbed on raw corn starch and hydrolyzed raw corn starch, and another (Amy II) was not adsorbed on raw corn starch and did not hydrolyze raw corn starch. Amy I was considered to be the same as the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148 in raw starch absorbability, ability to hydrolyze raw corn starch, enzymatic characteristics, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and mode of action on soluble starch. Amy II showed a unique pattern of oligosaccharide production from soluble starch compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Amy II was suggested to be an intracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Images PMID:8285674

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of two alpha-amylase genes from Streptococcus bovis 148 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Satoh, E; Niimura, Y; Uchimura, T; Kozaki, M; Komagata, K

    1993-11-01

    The alpha-amylase genes of Streptococcus bovis 148 were cloned in Escherichia coli MC1061, using pBR322. The recombinant plasmids were classified into two groups on the basis of their restriction maps. Southern blot analysis did not show homology between the two types of alpha-amylase genes, and the two alpha-amylase genes existed on the chromosomal DNA of S. bovis 148. The enzymatic properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the two purified enzymes produced by the cloned E. coli strains were quite different from each other. Particularly, one alpha-amylase (Amy I) was adsorbed on raw corn starch and hydrolyzed raw corn starch, and another (Amy II) was not adsorbed on raw corn starch and did not hydrolyze raw corn starch. Amy I was considered to be the same as the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148 in raw starch absorbability, ability to hydrolyze raw corn starch, enzymatic characteristics, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and mode of action on soluble starch. Amy II showed a unique pattern of oligosaccharide production from soluble starch compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Amy II was suggested to be an intracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. PMID:8285674

  9. α-Amylase sensor based on the degradation of oligosaccharide hydrogel films monitored with a quartz crystal sensor.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Martin John; Biela, Anna; Krause, Steffi

    2015-05-15

    α-Amylase hydrolyses starch molecules to produce smaller oligosaccharides and sugars. Amylases are of great importance in biotechnology and find application in fermentation, detergents, food and the paper industry. The measurement of α-amylase activity in serum and urine has been used in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Salivary amylase has also been shown to be a stress indicator. Sensor coatings suitable for the detection of α-amylase activity have been developed. Oligosaccharides such as glycogen and amylopectin were spin-coated onto gold coated quartz crystals with a base frequency of 10 MHz. The films were subsequently cross-linked with hexamethylene diisocyanate. Film degradation was monitored with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance measurements. The films were shown to be stable in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Addition of α-amylase to the solution resulted in the rapid degradation of the films. The maximum rate of degradation was found to be strongly dependent on the amylase activity in the range typically found in serum when diagnosing pancreatitis (0.08-8 U/ml). Sensor responses in serum were found to be very similar to those obtained in buffer indicating the absence of non-specific binding. PMID:25266253

  10. Purification of a. beta. -amylase that accumulates in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism. [Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.