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Sample records for amylase

  1. Amylase - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... amylase levels may occur due to: Acute pancreatitis Cancer of the pancreas , ovaries, or lungs Cholecystitis Gallbladder attack caused by ... open) Decreased amylase levels may occur due to: Cancer of the pancreas Damage to the pancreas Kidney disease Toxemia of ...

  2. Amylase - urine

    MedlinePlus

    This test is done to diagnose pancreatitis and other diseases that affect the pancreas. ... amylase levels may be a sign of: Acute pancreatitis Alcohol consumption Cancer of the pancreas , ovaries, or ...

  3. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  4. Detergent-compatible bacterial amylases.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-10-01

    Proteases, lipases, amylases, and cellulases are enzymes used in detergent formulation to improve the detergency. The amylases are specifically supplemented to the detergent to digest starchy stains. Most of the solid and liquid detergents that are currently manufactured contain alkaline enzymes. The advantages of using alkaline enzymes in the detergent formulation are that they aid in removing tough stains and the process is environmentally friendly since they reduce the use of toxic detergent ingredients. Amylases active at low temperature are preferred as the energy consumption gets reduced, and the whole process becomes cost-effective. Most microbial alkaline amylases are used as detergent ingredients. Various reviews report on the production, purification, characterization, and application of amylases in different industry sectors, but there is no specific review on bacterial or fungal alkaline amylases or detergent-compatible amylases. In this mini-review, an overview on the production and property studies of the detergent bacterial amylases is given, and the stability and compatibility of the alkaline bacterial amylases in the presence of the detergents and the detergent components are highlighted. PMID:25129040

  5. Halophilic Amylase from a Moderately Halophilic Micrococcus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi

    1972-01-01

    A moderately halophilic Micrococcus sp., isolated from unrefined solar salt, produced a considerable amount of extracellular dextrinogenic amylase when cultivated aerobically in media containing 1 to 3 m NaCl. The Micrococcus amylase had maximal activity at pH 6 to 7 in 1.4 to 2 m NaCl or KCl at 50 C. Calcium ion and a high concentration of NaCl or KCl were essential for activity and stability of the amylase. The salt response of the amylase depended greatly on the pH and temperature of the enzyme assay. PMID:5058445

  6. Exercise upregulates salivary amylase in humans (Review).

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, Eri; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    The secretion of salivary α-amylase is influenced by adrenergic regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; thus, exercise affects the levels of salivary α-amylase. Granger et al published a review in 2007 that focused attention on salivary α-amylase. In addition, a portable system for monitoring salivary α-amylase activity was launched in Japan at the end of 2005. The correlation between exercise and salivary α-amylase has since been extensively investigated. The present review summarizes relevant studies published in the English and Japanese literature after 2006. A search of the PubMed and CiNii databases identified 54 articles, from which 15 original articles were selected. The findings described in these publications indicate that exercise consistently increases mean salivary α-amylase activities and concentrations, particularly at an intensity of >70% VO2max in healthy young individuals. Thus, these studies have confirmed that salivary α-amylase levels markedly increase in response to physical stress. Salivary α-amylase levels may therefore serve as an effective indicator in the non-invasive assessment of physical stress. PMID:24669232

  7. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single α-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  8. Intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C L; Russell, R R

    1998-09-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding alpha-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single alpha-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  9. Thermally Stable Amylases from Antarctic Psychrophilic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrolysis of starch in cold environments by psychrophilic species of bacteria is believed to be accomplished through the production of special cold-adapted amylases. These amylases are reportedly thermally labile with low (<40 deg C) temperature optima and high specific activities at 0 to 25 deg C....

  10. Production of alpha-amylase by yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Thomse, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme alpha-amylase confers to an organism the enzymatic activity for the degradation of polyglucosides with alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds such as starch and glycogen which are among the major storage compounds in plants and animals. Most alpha-amylases are single polypeptides of molecular weights around 50,000 dalton. They are generally found in the digestive tract of animals and in germinating seeds. Among the products released upon enzymatic degradation of polyglucosides maltose, a sugar that can be utilized as carbon source by yeast, is a major constituent. A cDNA segment complementary to mouse salivary amylase messenger RNA has been inserted into the yeast expression vector pMA56 behind the promoter of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I of yeast. Yeast transformants harboring plasmids with the normal orientation of the promoter and the mouse amylase cDNA gene produce amylase and release the enzyme in free form into the culture medium. Approximately 90% of the amylase activity is found in the medium. Yeast strains carrying MAL allele and transformed with a plasmid which directed the synthesis of mouse alpha-amylase were tested on plates containing starch and in batch fermentations using different high molecular weight sugars and oligosaccharides as carbon source. The results of these experiments will be discussed. (Refs. 21).

  11. Susceptibility to corrosion of laser welding composite arch wire in artificial saliva of salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Jiming; Yu, Wenwen; Sun, Daqian; Sun, Xinhua

    2015-10-01

    In this study, laser-welded composite arch wire (CAW) with a copper interlayer was exposed to artificial saliva containing salivary amylase or pancreatic amylase, and the resultant corrosion behavior was studied. The purpose was to determine the mechanisms by which salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase contribute to corrosion. The effects of amylase on the electrochemical resistance of CAW were tested by potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The dissolved corrosion products were determined by ICP-OES, and the surfaces were analyzed by SEM, AFM and EDS. The results showed that both exposure to salivary amylase and pancreatic amylase significantly improved the corrosion resistance of CAW. Even isozyme could have different influences on the alloy surface. When performing in vitro research of materials to be used in oral cavity, the effect of α-amylase should be taken into account since a simple saline solution does not entirely simulate the physiological situation. PMID:26117761

  12. Possible mechanisms of normal amylase activity in hyperlipemic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mishkin, S.; Bates, J.; O'Hashi, J.; Schneider, P.; Sniderman, A. D.; Wolf, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lipemic serum from three patients with acute pancreatitis and type IV hyperlipemia was fractionated into very-low-density lipoproteins and clear serum. Amylase activity (determined by the Phadebas method) in the component fractions did not exceed that in the original lipemic serum. Addition of these fractions or VLDL and chylomicrons from asymptomatic patients with hyperlipemia to nonlipemic serum from patients with "routine acute pancreatitis" did not inhibit amylase activity or alter the electrophoretic mobility of amylase isoenzymes. Therefore the normal amylase activity often observed in hyperlipemic pancreatitis does not result from an inhibition of amylase activity by serum lipoproteins. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:206333

  13. Expression of β-Amylase from Alfalfa Taproots1

    PubMed Central

    Gana, Joyce A.; Kalengamaliro, Newton E.; Cunningham, Suzanne M.; Volenec, Jeffrey J.

    1998-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots contain large quantities of β-amylase, but little is known about its role in vivo. We studied this by isolating a β-amylase cDNA and by examining signals that affect its expression. The β-amylase cDNA encoded a 55.95-kD polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence showing high similarity to other plant β-amylases. Starch concentrations, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase mRNA levels were measured in roots of alfalfa after defoliation, in suspension-cultured cells incubated in sucrose-rich or -deprived media, and in roots of cold-acclimated germ plasms. Starch levels, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase transcripts were reduced significantly in roots of defoliated plants and in sucrose-deprived cell cultures. β-Amylase transcript was high in roots of intact plants but could not be detected 2 to 8 d after defoliation. β-Amylase transcript levels increased in roots between September and October and then declined 10-fold in November and December after shoots were killed by frost. Alfalfa roots contain greater β-amylase transcript levels compared with roots of sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). Southern analysis indicated that β-amylase is present as a multigene family in alfalfa. Our results show no clear association between β-amylase activity or transcript abundance and starch hydrolysis in alfalfa roots. The great abundance of β-amylase and its unexpected patterns of gene expression and protein accumulation support our current belief that this protein serves a storage function in roots of this perennial species. PMID:9847126

  14. Studies on amylase inhibitors in some Egyptian legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Shekib, L A; el-Iraqui, S M; Abo-Bakr, T M

    1988-01-01

    Amylase inhibitor activity was determined in four legume seeds which are widely consumed in Egypt. The effect of dehulling, heat treatment, soaking and germination were also assessed. The results showed that faba bean contained the highest activity of amylase inhibitor followed by cowpea, lentils, then chickpea. Dehulling resulted in raising the amylase inhibitor activities in all samples investigated, while heat treatment and cooking lowered it. Soaking for 10 h and germination eliminated completely the inhibitor from all samples. PMID:2467277

  15. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  16. Simultaneous study of the metabolic turnover and renal excretion of salivary amylase-125I and pancreatic amylase-131I in the baboon

    PubMed Central

    Duane, William C.; Frerichs, Roger; Levitt, Michael D.

    1972-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of salivary and pancreatic amylase was studied in the baboon, an animal with a serum amylase level and renal clearance of amylase similar to man. Purified amylase was electrolytically iodinated. Although iodinated and uniodinated amylase had similar gel filtration, electrophoretic, enzymatic, glycogen precipitation characteristics, the labeled enzyme was cleared less rapidly by the kidney than was the unlabeled material. However, urinary iodinated amylase which had been biologically screened by the kidney had a renal clearance and serum disappearance rate indistinguishable from unlabeled amylase and thus can serve as a tracer in metabolic turnover studies. Administration of a mixture of salivary amylase-125I and pancreatic amylase-131I made it possible to simultaneously measure the serum disappearance and renal clearance of these two isoenzymes. The metabolic clearance of both isoenzymes was extremely rapid with half-times of about 130 min. This rapid turnover of serum amylase probably accounts for the transient nature of serum amylase elevation which frequently occurs in pancreatitis. Pancreatic amylase-131I was consistently cleared more rapidly (mean clearance ratio: 1.8) by the kidney than was salivary amylase-125I. This more rapid renal clearance of pancreatic amylase may help to explain the disproportionate elevation of urinary amylase relative to serum amylase observed in pancreatitis. PMID:5024043

  17. THE CELL-BOUND ALPHA-AMYLASES OF STREPTOCOCCUS BOVIS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, G J

    1965-02-01

    1. The cell-bound alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis has been isolated from other carbohydrases in the cell extract by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The enzyme has been compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase produced by this organism. 2. The two amylases had similar action patterns on amylose, the main product being maltotriose with smaller amounts of maltose and a little glucose. 3. The cell-bound amylase hydrolysed maltopentaose and maltohexaose at a similar rate to the hydrolysis of amylose. Maltotetraose was hydrolysed six times more slowly, and maltotriose 280 times more slowly, than amylose. 4. Studies with end-labelled maltodextrins revealed that the cell-bound alpha-amylase preferentially hydrolysed the third linkage from the non-reducing end, liberating maltotriose. The linkage at the reducing end of maltotriose was more easily hydrolysed than the other. 5. Egg-white lysozyme and the extracellular enzymes of Streptomyces albus lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus bovis, releasing amylase into the medium. In the presence of 0.6 m-sucrose 10% of the maximal amylase activity was released by lysozyme. Suspension of the spheroplasts in dilute buffer caused the rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane and the liberation of amylase. 6. A sensitive method for determining the ability of amylases to degrade starch granules is described. PMID:14346085

  18. Effect of starch and amylase on the expression of amylase-binding protein A in Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Nikitkova, A E; Haase, E M; Scannapieco, F A

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a common oral commensal bacterial species in tooth biofilm (dental plaque) and specifically binds to salivary amylase through the surface exposed amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). When S. gordonii cells are pretreated with amylase, amylase bound to AbpA facilitates growth with starch as a primary nutrition source. The goal of this study was to explore possible regulatory effects of starch, starch metabolites and amylase on the expression of S. gordonii AbpA. An amylase ligand-binding assay was used to assess the expression of AbpA in culture supernatants and on bacterial cells from S. gordonii grown in defined medium supplemented with 1% starch, 0.5 mg ml(-1) amylase, with starch and amylase together, or with various linear malto-oligosaccharides. Transcription of abpA was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. AbpA was not detectable in culture supernatants containing either starch alone or amylase alone. In contrast, the amount of AbpA was notably increased when starch and amylase were both present in the medium. The expression of abpA was significantly increased (P < 0.05) following 40 min of incubation in defined medium supplemented with starch and amylase. Similar results were obtained in the presence of maltose and other short-chain malto-oligosacchrides. These results suggest that the products of starch hydrolysis produced from the action of salivary α-amylase, particularly maltose and maltotriose, up-regulate AbpA expression in S. gordonii. PMID:22759313

  19. Location of the alpha-amylase gene in rumen Streptococcus bovis strains distinguished by unstable amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Mareková, M; Jonecová, Z; Kmeĭ, V

    1995-01-01

    Genetic stability of amylase activity after serial subcultivation experiments with amylolytic ruminal Streptococcus bovis strains was investigated. Two strains Amy+ and Amy- were obtained. Loss of amylase activity connected with the loss of plasmid DNA was not found in these strains. The presence of the gene responsible for the amylase activity in the chromosome of these strains was revealed by hybridization of the alpha-amylase gene on pJK108 against chromosomal DNA of S. bovis and Bacillus subtilis after a complete restriction with EcoRI. PMID:8851562

  20. Optimization of Amylase Application in Raw Sugar Manufacture. Part I: Characterization of Commercial Alpha-Amylases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to 85 de...

  1. a-Amylase activity during pullulan production and a-Amylase gene analyses of Aureobasidium pullulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Aureobasidium pullulans is the source of commercially produced pullulan, a high molecular weight polysaccharide that is used in the manufacture of edible films. It has been proposed that alpha-amylase negatively affects the molecular weight of pullulan in late cultures. Based on a recen...

  2. The Amylase Project: Creating a Classroom of Biotechnologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Diane

    1998-01-01

    A biotechnologist-turned-teacher introduces a series of laboratory modules incorporating concepts from microbiology, cellular biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and evolution. The Amylase Project aims to distill the biotechnology process into a few short steps using amylase, the easiest enzyme to detect of those commonly produced by…

  3. Alpha-amylase gene transcription in tissues of normal dog.

    PubMed

    Mocharla, H; Mocharla, R; Hodes, M E

    1990-02-25

    We studied the distribution of alpha-amylase mRNA in normal dog tissues by northern blotting (NB) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with human pancreatic (AMY2) and salivary (AMY1) alpha-amylase cDNA-specific primers. Analysis of poly(A+) RNA from various normal tissues by NB indicated the presence of detectable levels of alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts only in pancreas. Dot-blot analysis of DNA amplified with primers common to both (human) isoamylase mRNAs showed presence of alpha-amylase gene transcripts not only in pancreas but also in liver, small intestine, large intestine and fallopian tube. Traces of amylase gene transcripts were also observed in ovary, uterus and lung. Interestingly, amylase transcripts were not detectable in the parotid gland by NB or RT-PCR. We have also localized alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts to dog pancreas by in situ transcription and in situ hybridization. Our results suggest that there is high degree of homology between the alpha-amylase mRNA sequences in dog and human at least in the exon 3-4 regions of the human gene. PMID:2315015

  4. Method for using a yeast alpha-amylase promoter

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway; Skeen, Rodney S.; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  5. Amylase activity of Aspergillus strains--producers of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Tsekova, K; Dentchev, D; Vicheva, A; Dekovska, M

    1993-01-01

    The ability of fungi from genus Aspergillus (producers of organic acids) to synthesize amylase enzymes (alpha-amylase and glucoamylase) was investigated. The productivity of the strains on Czapek-Dox agar and in liquid Czapec-Dox media with 3% soluble starch as a carbon source was established. PMID:8285132

  6. On the mechanism of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Oudjeriouat, Naïma; Moreau, Yann; Santimone, Marius; Svensson, Birte; Marchis-Mouren, Guy; Desseaux, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    Two inhibitors, acarbose and cyclodextrins (CD), were used to investigate the active site structure and function of barley alpha-amylase isozymes, AMY1 and AMY2. The hydrolysis of DP 4900-amylose, reduced (r) DP18-maltodextrin and maltoheptaose (catalysed by AMY1 and AMY2) was followed in the absence and in the presence of inhibitor. Without inhibitor, the highest activity was obtained with amylose, kcat/Km decreased 103-fold using rDP18-maltodextrin and 10(5) to 10(6)-fold using maltoheptaose as substrate. Acarbose is an uncompetitive inhibitor with inhibition constant (L1i) for amylose and maltodextrin in the micromolar range. Acarbose did not bind to the active site of the enzyme, but to a secondary site to give an abortive ESI complex. Only AMY2 has a second secondary binding site corresponding to an ESI2 complex. In contrast, acarbose is a mixed noncompetitive inhibitor of maltoheptaose hydrolysis. Consequently, in the presence of this oligosaccharide substrate, acarbose bound both to the active site and to a secondary binding site. alpha-CD inhibited the AMY1 and AMY2 catalysed hydrolysis of amylose, but was a very weak inhibitor compared to acarbose.beta- and gamma-CD are not inhibitors. These results are different from those obtained previously with PPA. However in AMY1, as already shown for amylases of animal and bacterial origin, in addition to the active site, one secondary carbohydrate binding site (s1) was necessary for activity whereas two secondary sites (s1 and s2) were required for the AMY2 activity. The first secondary site in both AMY1 and AMY2 was only functional when substrate was bound in the active site. This appears to be a general feature of the alpha-amylase family. PMID:14511369

  7. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:7497089

  8. Activity and storage of commercial amylases in the 2013 Louisiana grinding season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A current problem in the application of amylases at sugarcane factories is the existence of a wide variation in the activities and activity per unit cost of commercial amylases. The efficiency of amylase action to break down starch in the factory is related to the activity of the amylase used. Until...

  9. α-Amylase structural genes in rye.

    PubMed

    Masojć, P; Gale, M D

    1991-10-01

    Rye α-Amy1, α-Amy2, and α-Amy3 genes were studied in the cross between inbred lines using wheat α-amylase cDNA probes. The α-Amy1 and α-Amy2 probes uncovered considerable restriction fragment length polymorphism, whereas the α-Amy3 region was much more conserved. The numbers of restriction fragments found and the F2 segregation data suggest that there are three α-Amy1 genes, two or three α-Amy2 genes, and three α-Amy3 genes in rye. These conclusions were supported by a simultaneous study of α-amylase isozyme polymorphism. The F2 data showed the three individual α-Amy1 genes to span a distance of 3cM at the locus on chromosome 6RL. The genes were mapped relative to other RFLP markers on 6RL. On chromosome 7RL two α-Amy2 genes were shown to be separated by 5 cM. Linkage data within α-Amy3 on 5RL were not obtained since RFLP could be detected at only one of the genes. PMID:24213454

  10. Drain amylase aids detection of anastomotic leak after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin H.; Hill, Joshua S.; Reames, Mark K.; Symanowski, James; Hurley, Susie C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anastomotic leak following esophagectomy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As hospital length of stay decreases, the timely diagnosis of leak becomes more important. We evaluated CT esophagram, white blood count (WBC), and drain amylase levels in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Methods The diagnostic performance of CT esophagram, drain amylase >800 IU/L, and WBC >12,000/µL within the first 10 days after surgery in predicting leak at any time after esophagectomy was calculated. Results Anastomotic leak occurred in 13 patients (13%). CT esophagram performed within 10 days of surgery diagnosed six of these leaks with a sensitivity of 0.54. Elevation in drain amylase level within 10 days of surgery diagnosed anastomotic leak with a sensitivity of 0.38. When the CT esophagram and drain amylase were combined, the sensitivity rose to 0.69 with a specificity of 0.98. WBC elevation had a sensitivity of 0.92, with a specificity of 0.34. Among 30 patients with normal drain amylase and a normal WBC, one developed an anastomotic leak. Conclusions Drain amylase adds to the sensitivity of CT esophagram in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Selected patients with normal drain amylase levels and normal WBC may be able to safely forgo CT esophagram. PMID:27034784

  11. Classification and evolution of alpha-amylase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Stebbins, G L; Rodriguez, R L

    1992-08-15

    The DNA sequences for 17 plant genes for alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) were analyzed to determine their phylogenetic relationship. A phylogeny for these genes was obtained using two separate approaches, one based on molecular clock assumptions and the other based on a comparison of sequence polymorphisms (i.e., small and localized insertions) in the alpha-amylase genes. These polymorphisms are called "alpha-amylase signatures" because they are diagnostic of the gene subfamily to which a particular alpha-amylase gene belongs. Results indicate that the cereal alpha-amylase genes fall into two major classes: AmyA and AmyB. The AmyA class is subdivided into the Amy1 and Amy2 subfamilies previously used to classify alpha-amylase genes in barley and wheat. The AmyB class includes the Amy3 subfamily to which most of the alpha-amylase genes of rice belong. Using polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide primers that flank one of the two signature regions, we show that the AmyA and AmyB gene classes are present in approximately equal amounts in all grass species examined except barley. The AmyB (Amy3 subfamily) genes in the latter case are comparatively underrepresented. Additional evidence suggests that the AmyA genes appeared recently and may be confined to the grass family. PMID:1502164

  12. Estimation of restraint stress in rats using salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Takimura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    The rat is an ideal model animal for studying physical and psychological stresses. Recent human studies have shown that salivary amylase activity is a useful biomarker of stress in our social life. To estimate the usefulness of amylase activity as a biomarker of stress in rats, we analyzed changes in physiological parameters including amylase activity and anatomical variables, which were induced by a mild restraint of paws (10 min, 3 times/week, 9 weeks). The quantities of food and water intake and excretion amount of the stress rats were smaller than those of the control rats during the experimental period (5-13 weeks). The body weight of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats. Moreover, the enlargement of the adrenal gland was confirmed in the stress rats, indicating that the mild restraint caused a chronic stress response. The amylase activities of the stress rats were significantly greater than those of the control rats at 5 weeks of age. However, the amylase activity of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats after 6 weeks of age. These results indicate that amylase activity is increased by acute stress and reduced by chronic stress, which is caused by repeated restraint stress. In conclusion, amylase activity is a useful biomarker of acute and chronic stresses in rats. PMID:22753135

  13. [Determination of exogenous gamma-amylase residue in honey].

    PubMed

    Fei, Xiaoqing; Wu, Bin; Shen, Chongyu; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Tao; Li, Lihua

    2012-08-01

    A novel method for the determination of exogenous gamma-amylase residue in honey using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) was established. After pre-separation by gel column chromatography, the gamma-amylase in honey samples was separated from the sugars. The gamma-amylase was then used to catalyze maltose into glucose. This enzymatic reaction was under the conditions of 55 degrees C and 0.03 mol/L phosphate buffer solution (pH 4.5) for 48 h. The maltose and glucose in the above enzymatic reaction solution were separated using liquid chromatography. By measuring the content of glucose with isotope ratio mass spectrometry, the gamma-amylase in honey can be determined. The linear range of gamma-amylase was 5 - 200 U/kg with the quantification limit of 5 U/kg. The recoveries were between 89.6% and 108.2% with the relative standard deviations from 3.3% to 4.9%. This method was used to analyze 38 honey and rice syrup samples, and the detection rate of gamma-amylase was 76.3%. To further verify the detection capability of this method, an authentic honey was adulterated with 15% (mass fraction) rice syrup. The gamma-amylase content in this sample was 10.2 U/kg. This method can effectively identify honey adulteration with rice syrups from the perspective of enzymology. PMID:23256379

  14. Nanoactivator mediated modifications in thermostable amylase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Rajendra S; Mahabole, Megha P; Pathak, Anupama P

    2012-12-01

    Gram-positive rod-shaped thermophilic bacteria were isolated using samples collected from terrestrial natural thermal spring located at Unkeshwar (Longitude 78.22 degree East to 78.34 degree East, Latitude 19 degree 34' North to 19 degree 40' North), District Nanded, Maharashtra State, India. The isolates were then cultivated using selective media and identified using culture-dependent techniques. One prominent isolate (UN1) exhibited high temperature stability and remarkable amylase production and was identified as Bacillus licheniformis. Amylase production was carried out in starch media and the enzyme was partially purified and characterized for optimization of pH and temperature. Amylolytic activity of the enzyme was determined. Nanoactivator-mediated modifications were carried out to enhance amylolytic activity of the partially purified amylase. Three-fold increase in catalytic efficiency of amylase was obtained after modification. PMID:23350283

  15. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  16. Some studies of alpha-amylase production using Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Esfahanibolandbalaie, Z; Rostami, K; Mirdamadi, S S

    2008-11-15

    The extracellular alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was studied in submerged fermentation using an Adlof-Kuhner orbital shaker. The effect of initial pH values in the range of 4 to 7.5 on enzyme production was investigated and initial pH medium of 6.2 +/- 0.1 resulted in enhanced alpha-amylase production. The effect of carbon and nitrogen source and composition was examined and it has been observed that corn starch concentration of 15 g L(-1) has sound effect on enzyme production. The medium containing corn starch, sodium nitrate resulted in considerable higher enzyme production. Further, the yeast extract of 2.5 g L(-1) in the medium produced higher enzyme in view to other organic nitrogen sources. The effect of temperature on alpha-amylase production from 20 to 40 degrees C has been studied and at 35 +/- 1 degrees C higher alpha-amylase has been obtained. The effect of shaker's speed on alpha-amylase production from 50 to 200 rpm was investigated. And at about 180 rpm higher enzyme production has been observed. In the present study, it has been found that glucose has repressing effect on a-amylase production using A. oryzae PTCC5164. PMID:19260332

  17. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Scannapieco, F A; Bergey, E J; Reddy, M S; Levine, M J

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with 125I-labeled HSMSL or 125I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of [125I]alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch. Images PMID:2788139

  18. Alcoholysis reactions from starch with alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, R I; Del Río, G; Saab, G; Rodríguez, M E; Soberón, X; López-Manguía, A

    1999-06-11

    The ability of alpha-amylases from different sources to carry out reactions of alcoholysis was studied using methanol as substrate. It was found that while the enzymes from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae, two well-studied saccharifying amylases, are capable of alcoholysis reactions, the classical bacterial liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus stearothermophilus are not. The effect of starch and methanol concentration, temperature and pH on the synthesis of glucosides with alpha-amylase from A. niger was studied. Although methanol may inactivate alpha-amylase, a 90% substrate relative conversion can be obtained in 20% methanol at a high starch concentration (15% w/v) due to a stabilizing effect of starch on the enzyme. As the products of alcoholysis are a series of methyl-oligosaccharides, from methyl-glucoside to methyl-hexomaltoside, alcoholysis was indirectly quantified by high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the total methyl-glucoside produced after the addition of glucoamylase to the alpha-amylase reaction products. More alcoholysis was obtained from intact soluble starch than with maltodextrins or pre-hydrolyzed starch. The biotechnological implications of using starch as substrate for the production of alkyl-glucosides is analyzed in the context of these results. PMID:10386619

  19. Amylase mRNA transcripts in normal tissues and neoplasms: the implication of different expressions of amylase isogenes.

    PubMed

    Seyama, K; Nukiwa, T; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, H; Kira, S

    1994-01-01

    To understand the cellular origin and mechanism of gene expression in amylase-producing cancers, the phenotyping of amylase isogenes by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction-fragment-length polymorphism using restriction endonucleases TaqI, DdeI, HinfI, and AfaI were performed for 3 amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas, 16 lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, other human malignant neoplasms, cultured cell lines, and normal tissues. In addition, amylase mRNA transcripts were semi-quantified by the limited polymerase chain reaction. Amylase mRNA transcripts were detected in all of the tissues examined. The AMY1 gene (salivary type) was exclusively and highly expressed in the salivary glands and the amylase-producing lung adenocarcinomas. Coexpression of the AMY1 gene and AMY2 gene (pancreatic type) was observed in most of the lung cancers without hyperamylasemia, lung tissue, and cells scraped from the tracheal epithelium, thyroid, and female genital tract (ovary, fallopian tube, and uterus cervix), while minimal levels of mRNA transcripts of the AMY2 gene were detected in other malignant neoplasms, various normal tissues, and the cultured cell lines. All mRNA transcripts identified as being those of the AMY2 gene were further identified as being from the AMY2B gene except for the transcripts from the pancreas, in which the AMY2A gene and AMY2B gene were coexpressed. On the basis of these results, the clinical occurrence of amylase-producing cancer likely relates to the tissues expressing the AMY1 gene, while the AMY2B gene, which evolutionarily is the oldest gene among human amylase isogenes, is constitutively expressed in various tissues. PMID:7507116

  20. Changes of serum amylase, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio in dogs with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuzawa, M; Morizono, M; Nagata, K; Hayano, S; Sakamoto, H; Yasuda, N; Okamoto, K; Kawasaki, Y; Deguchi, E

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the diagnostic application of amylase to canine pancreatic diseases, serum amylase activities, its isozyme fractions and amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were analyzed in normal intact dogs and dogs experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. There was no statistic difference between normal male and female dogs. Amylase specific activities in pancreatic tissue extracts were more than 2,300 times higher than that in serum, and were also higher than those in other tissues; parotid and mandibular salivary glands, lung, heart, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and kidney. Following the chloroform injection into the pancreatic tissue, WBC increased from 6 to 240 hr and serum glucose significantly increased at 72 and 96 hr, and no urine glucose was detected. BUN as well as serum and urine creatinine showed normal levels. ACCR increased until 96 hr without statistic significance. Serum amylase activities increased significantly after 3 hr and its isozyme was separated into 4 fractions (Amy1-Amy4) in contrast to 3 fractions (Amy2-Amy4) in intact dogs. Since this extra Amy1 seen from 1 hr increasing after 6 hr similarly to other 3 fractions, the evaluation of serum amylase and its isozyme fractions was indicated to be useful for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs. PMID:7521216

  1. Analysis on evolutionary relationship of amylases from archaea, bacteria and eukaryota.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2016-02-01

    Amylase is one of the earliest characterized enzymes and has many applications in clinical and industrial settings. In biotechnological industries, the amylase activity is enhanced through modifying amylase structure and through cloning and expressing targeted amylases in different species. It is important to understand how engineered amylases can survive from generation to generation. This study used phylogenetic and statistical approaches to explore general patterns of amylases evolution, including 3118 α-amylases and 280 β-amylases from archaea, eukaryota and bacteria with fully documented taxonomic lineage. First, the phylogenetic tree was created to analyze the evolution of amylases with focus on individual amylases used in biofuel industry. Second, the average pairwise p-distance was computed for each kingdom, phylum, class, order, family and genus, and its diversity implies multi-time and multi-clan evolution. Finally, the variance was further partitioned into inter-clan variance and intra-clan variance for each taxonomic group, and they represent horizontal and vertical gene transfer. Theoretically, the results show a full picture on the evolution of amylases in manners of vertical and horizontal gene transfer, and multi-time and multi-clan evolution as well. Practically, this study provides the information on the surviving chance of desired amylase in a given taxonomic group, which may potentially enhance the successful rate of cloning and expression of amylase gene in different species. PMID:26745984

  2. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result. PMID:27327179

  3. [Are amylases in bakery products and flour potential food allergens?].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Sander, I; Jansen, A; Czuppon, A B

    1994-05-21

    The enzyme alpha-amylase from the mould Aspergillus oryzae (Asp o II) routinely used for the production of bread, cakes and pastries has in recent years been identified as an inhalative allergen for occupational diseases (bakers' asthma). It is doubtful whether this amylase in the final product, i.e. after the baking procedure, can still be regarded as an allergen. To clarify this question, detailed case histories on 138 subjects were recorded (98 allergics, 20 patients suffering form chronic intestinal diseases, 20 healthy controls). The clinical examinations included prick skin test and IgE antibody determination using one of the customary enzyme preparations. EAST showed a few of these 138 bread consumers to be weakly sensitized to the enzyme. One of the subjects displayed a significant reaction to alpha-amylase heated to 200 degrees C. As expected, eleven bakers sensitized to alpha-amylase by inhaling it in the workplace (positive prick test, positive case history) predominantly exhibited specific IgE antibodies to the native enzyme. Apart from one weakly positive finding, heated alpha-amylase yielded negative results in this collective. Baking conditions vary widely, especially with regard to single components, temperature and duration. Thus, further investigations as to residual allergenicity or the feasible occurrence of new antigenic determinants during the production of bread, cake and pastries are required. 27% of bakers examined and 9% of atopics showed antibodies to a flour inherent enzyme, a beta-amylase. On the whole, the selected conditions hinted at a weakly sensitizing potential inherent in baking flour and in added amylase. PMID:8209207

  4. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  5. Alpha-amylase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, E. C. M. J.; Pusey, M. L.; Ng, M. L.; Garriott, O. K.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments such as hot springs. The ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered enzymes from extremophiles to be of interest in industrial applications. One approach to producing these extremozymes entails the expression of the enzyme-encoding gene in a mesophilic host such as E.coli. This method has been employed in the effort to produce an alpha-amylase from a hyperthermophile (an organism that displays optimal growth above 80 C) isolated from a hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow vent site in the Atlantic Ocean. alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to produce smaller sugars and constitute a class of industrial enzymes having approximately 25% of the enzyme market. One application for thermostable alpha-amylases is the starch liquefaction process in which starch is converted into fructose and glucose syrups. The a-amylase encoding gene from the hyperthermophile Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and sequenced, revealing high similarity with other archaeal hyperthermophilic a-amylases. The gene encoding the mature protein was expressed in E.coli. Initial characterization of this enzyme has revealed an optimal amylolytic activity between 85-90 C and around pH 5.3-6.0.

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  7. [The β-amylase polymorphism of winter common wheat grains].

    PubMed

    Netsvetaev, V P; Akinshina, O V; Bondarenko, L S; Motorina, I P

    2012-02-01

    The polymorphism of winter common wheat with respect to β-amylase isoenzymes has been analyzed using electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) buffered with a Tris-glycine system (pH 8.3). Seven β-amylase isoenzymes have been found in wheat cultivars and the breeding stock. Isoenzymes A, B, and C are the most frequent in Russian and Ukrainian cultivars (51.7 4.7, 30.7 3.8, and 11.9 2.5%, respectively). Two alleles of the β-Amy-D1 locus of the long arm of chromosome 4D have been identified. The substrate-enzyme affine effect can be used to locate the zones of activity of this enzyme by means of staining for proteins. It has been determined that β-amylase zymotypes may play a role in the aggregating capacity of the grain protein complex via the formation of S-S bonds. PMID:22567995

  8. Molecular characterization of α-amylase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Hanumanthu Prasanna; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Swarupa, Vimjam; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the prominent Gram positive human pathogen secretes many surface and secretary proteins including various enzymes and pathogenic factors that favour the successful colonization and infection of host tissue. α-amylase is one of the enzymes secreted by S. aureus which catalyses the breakdown of complex sugars to monosaccharides, which are required for colonization and survival of this pathogen in any anatomical locales. In the present study we have cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized α-amylase gene from S. aureus ATCC12600. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular weight of 58kDa and the kinetics showed Vmax 0.0208±0.033 (mg/ml)/mg/min and Km 10.633±0.737mg/ml. The multiple sequence analysis showed α- amylase of S. aureus exhibited large differences with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis. As the crystal structure of S. aureus α- amylase was unavailable, we used homology modelling method to build the structure. The built structure was validated by Ramachandran plot which showed 90% of the residues in the allowed region while no residue was found in the disallowed region and the built structure was close to the crystal structure with Z-Score: -6.85. The structural superimposition studies with α- amylases of Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis showed distinct differences with RMSD values of 18.158Åand 7.091Å respectively which correlated with enzyme kinetics, indicating α-amylase is different among these bacteria. PMID:23559746

  9. Molecular characterization of α-amylase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Hanumanthu Prasanna; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Swarupa, Vimjam; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the prominent Gram positive human pathogen secretes many surface and secretary proteins including various enzymes and pathogenic factors that favour the successful colonization and infection of host tissue. α-amylase is one of the enzymes secreted by S. aureus which catalyses the breakdown of complex sugars to monosaccharides, which are required for colonization and survival of this pathogen in any anatomical locales. In the present study we have cloned, sequenced, expressed and characterized α-amylase gene from S. aureus ATCC12600. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular weight of 58kDa and the kinetics showed Vmax 0.0208±0.033 (mg/ml)/mg/min and Km 10.633±0.737mg/ml. The multiple sequence analysis showed α- amylase of S. aureus exhibited large differences with Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis. As the crystal structure of S. aureus α- amylase was unavailable, we used homology modelling method to build the structure. The built structure was validated by Ramachandran plot which showed 90% of the residues in the allowed region while no residue was found in the disallowed region and the built structure was close to the crystal structure with Z-Score: -6.85. The structural superimposition studies with α- amylases of Bacillus subtilis and Streptococcus bovis showed distinct differences with RMSD values of 18.158Åand 7.091Å respectively which correlated with enzyme kinetics, indicating α-amylase is different among these bacteria. PMID:23559746

  10. Neurospora Mutant Exhibiting Hyperproduction of Amylase and Invertase

    PubMed Central

    Gratzner, Howard; Sheehan, D. N.

    1969-01-01

    A mutant strain of Neurospora crassa has been isolated which is derepressed for amylase and β-fructofuranosidase (invertase). Large amounts of the two enzymes were secreted into the culture medium upon depletion of exogenous carbon source. The resulting increases of the two extracellular enzymes were prevented by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, and glycerol. The starving cells of the mutant strain produced amylase and invertase de novo, as evidenced by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into the enzymes. Preliminary genetic studies indicate that these elevated enzyme levels described are due to a single gene mutation. PMID:5773010

  11. Close relationship of a novel Flavobacteriaceae α-amylase with archaeal α-amylases and good potentials for industrial applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol production from various starchy materials has received much attention in recent years. α-Amylases are key enzymes in the bioconversion process of starchy biomass to biofuels, food or other products. The properties of thermostability, pH stability, and Ca-independency are important in the development of such fermentation process. Results A novel Flavobacteriaceae Sinomicrobium α-amylase (FSA) was identified and characterized from genomic analysis of a novel Flavobacteriaceae species. It is closely related with archaeal α-amylases in the GH13_7 subfamily, but is evolutionary distant with other bacterial α-amylases. Based on the conserved sequence alignment and homology modeling, with minor variation, the Zn2+- and Ca2+-binding sites of FSA were predicated to be the same as those of the archaeal thermophilic α-amylases. The recombinant α-amylase was highly expressed and biochemically characterized. It showed optimum activity at pH 6.0, high enzyme stability at pH 6.0 to 11.0, but weak thermostability. A disulfide bond was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in domain C and resulted in the apparent improvement of the enzyme activity at high temperature and broad pH range. Moreover, about 50% of the enzyme activity was detected under 100°C condition, whereas no activity was observed for the wild type enzyme. Its thermostability was also enhanced to some extent, with the half-life time increasing from 25 to 55 minutes at 50°C. In addition, after the introduction of the disulfide bond, the protein became a Ca-independent enzyme. Conclusions The improved stability of FSA suggested that the domain C contributes to the overall stability of the enzyme under extreme conditions. In addition, successfully directed modification and special evolutionary status of FSA imply its directional reconstruction potentials for bioethanol production, as well as for other industrial applications. PMID:24485248

  12. Clinical and immunological responses to occupational exposure to alpha-amylase in the baking industry.

    PubMed Central

    Brisman, J; Belin, L

    1991-01-01

    alpha-Amylase is a starch cleaving enzyme often used in the baking industry as a flour additive. It is usually of fungal origin, produced by Aspergillus oryzae. One previous report has shown IgE antibodies and positive skin prick test against alpha-amylase in asthmatic bakers. This paper describes four alpha-amylase sensitised index cases with occupational asthma or rhinitis and the results of a cross sectional study of 20 workers from the same factory who were also exposed to alpha-amylase powder. Air sampling detected airborne alpha-amylase at a concentration of 0.03 mg/m3. Significantly more work related symptoms such as rhinitis and dermatitis were found among the alpha-amylase exposed workers compared with referents. A skin prick test to alpha-amylase was positive in 30% (6/20) of the exposed workers. Most of the persons showing a positive skin prick test had work related symptoms and were also skin prick test positive to common allergens. Nasal challenge tests with amylase were performed in selected cases and validated three cases of alpha-amylase induced rhinitis. Two non-symptomatic workers had precipitins to alpha-amylase. Specific IgG antibodies were shown by two further serological techniques. The nature and relevance of these antibodies are currently being studied. It is concluded that alpha-amylase powder is a potent occupational sensitiser. Precautions should be taken when handling this allergenic enzyme. PMID:1832939

  13. Clinical and immunological responses to occupational exposure to alpha-amylase in the baking industry.

    PubMed

    Brisman, J; Belin, L

    1991-09-01

    alpha-Amylase is a starch cleaving enzyme often used in the baking industry as a flour additive. It is usually of fungal origin, produced by Aspergillus oryzae. One previous report has shown IgE antibodies and positive skin prick test against alpha-amylase in asthmatic bakers. This paper describes four alpha-amylase sensitised index cases with occupational asthma or rhinitis and the results of a cross sectional study of 20 workers from the same factory who were also exposed to alpha-amylase powder. Air sampling detected airborne alpha-amylase at a concentration of 0.03 mg/m3. Significantly more work related symptoms such as rhinitis and dermatitis were found among the alpha-amylase exposed workers compared with referents. A skin prick test to alpha-amylase was positive in 30% (6/20) of the exposed workers. Most of the persons showing a positive skin prick test had work related symptoms and were also skin prick test positive to common allergens. Nasal challenge tests with amylase were performed in selected cases and validated three cases of alpha-amylase induced rhinitis. Two non-symptomatic workers had precipitins to alpha-amylase. Specific IgG antibodies were shown by two further serological techniques. The nature and relevance of these antibodies are currently being studied. It is concluded that alpha-amylase powder is a potent occupational sensitiser. Precautions should be taken when handling this allergenic enzyme. PMID:1832939

  14. Drosophila melanogaster larvae control amylase secretion according to the hardness of food.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Honami; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae excrete amylase and perform external digestion of their food. In this study, to investigate whether their external digestion ability varies in response to changes in the external environment, we measured the relative amount of amylase excreted by larvae using a new method: the iodine starch agar method (ISAM). Analysis using this method revealed that the amount of amylase excreted by larvae increased in accordance with the increase in the agar concentration. In addition, we investigated the effect on the larval growth rate of adding amylase to the diet. Pupation occurred 24 h later in food containing 1% amylase than in food containing no amylase. These results suggest that the larvae adjust their amylase excretion in response to changes in the external environment, and that its level has a marked influence on the larval growth rate. PMID:23964241

  15. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance. PMID:25689045

  16. Optimization of alpha-amylase application in raw sugar manufacture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentration sin raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial alpha-amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to...

  17. Genetics of alpha-amylases in hexaploid oat species.

    PubMed

    Sharopova, N R; Portyanko, V A; Sozinov, A A

    1998-06-01

    The inheritance of alpha-amylases was studied in six F2 populations of hexaploid oats (Avena sativa, A. byzantina, A. fatua, A. sterillis) using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 22 loci was identified and described. Three main linkages of four or five loci each and an additional two pairs of linked loci were detected. It seems likely that the three main linkage groups represent homeologous chromosomes. Matching of alpha-amylase profiles of hexaploid (AACCDD), tetraploid (AACC), and diploid (AA) species was made to assign the linkage groups to particular subgenomes in the hexaploid oat. It was proposed that Linkage 1 (Amy12-Amy10-1-Amy4-Amy13-Amy11) belongs to the D-subgenome; Linkage 2 (Amy10-2, Amy9-Amy8-Amy6) belongs to the A-subgenome; and Linkage 3 (Amy7-Amy3-Amy5-Amy2) belongs to the C-subgenome of the hexaploid oat. The "malt" and "green" alpha-amylases in hexaploid and tetraploid oats have been identified. Isozymes of "green" alpha-amylase were lower in electrophoretic mobility than other isozymes and were governed by loci assigned to the A- and D-subgenomes. PMID:9775349

  18. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1070 - Amylase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amylase test system. 862.1070 Section 862.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. Purification and characterization of camel (Camelus dromedarius) milk amylase.

    PubMed

    El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Serour, Ehab A; Abdelrahman, Aref M; Haroun, Bakry M; Redwan, El-Rashdy M

    2009-01-01

    Skimmed camel milk contains 59,900 U/L amylase, which is 39,363 times less than serum and plasma amylase. Camel milk beta-amylase was purified as a 61 KDa band using DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 and yielded 561 U/mg. The optimum working pH, Km and temperature were 7.0, 13.6 mg/Lstarch, 30-40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme has been shown higher affinity toward amylose and soluble starch than glycogen, amylopectin, dextrin, or pullulan. Magnesium chloride, CaCl(2) and NaCl activated the amylase, while EDTA and EGTA decreased its activity. While its activity was increased in the presence of Triton X-100 and Triton X-114. Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride did not show any effect on enzyme activity. However, the enzyme activity was inhibited by urea, SDS, DTNB, iodoacetamide, N-ethylmalimide, aprotinin, and trypsin inhibitor. It worked on starch to yield a maltose. Scanning electron microscope images demonstrated a nano-degrading ability on starch granules from various sources (potato, corn, cassava, and rice). PMID:19291574

  4. Recommendations for Amylase Application in the 2008 Louisiana Grinding Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unfortunately, the application of amylase (an enzyme) to break down long chains of unwanted starch in U.S. sugarcane factories is still not optimized because of misinformation about which enzyme to use, and how to add the enzyme. Two large factory trials were conducted at a Louisiana factory to opti...

  5. Characterization of a Hydrophobic Amylase Inhibitor from Corn (Zea mays) Seeds with Activity Against Amylase from Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Edson L Z; Hirooka, Elisa Y; Mendiola-Olaya, Elizabeth; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro

    2003-08-01

    ABSTRACT A hydrophobic 19.7-kDa amylase inhibitor (AI) was purified from corn kernels by 95% ethanol extraction and anionic exchange chromatography. The AI has an isoelectric point of 3.6 and was very stable at different pH values and high temperatures, maintaining 47.6% activity after heating to 94 degrees C for 60 min. Amino acid analysis indicated high valine, leucine, glycine, alanine, and glutamic acid/glutamine content, and especially high valine content (41.2 mol%). This inhibitor is not a glycoprotein. It required 30-min preincubation to maximize complex enzyme-inhibitor formation when the amylase from Fusarium verticillioides was tested. The optimal pH of interaction was 6.5. It showed broad-spectrum activity including the following amylases: human saliva, porcine pancreas, F. verticillioides, as well as those from some insects of agricultural importance (Acanthoscelides obtectus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, Sitophilus zeamais, and Prostephanus truncatus). This novel hydrophobic protein not only inhibited the amylase from F. verticillioides but also decreased the conidia germination. Thus, this protein represents an approach to decrease the production of fumonisin in corn, either by using it as a molecular marker to detect fungal resistance or through genetic engineering. PMID:18943857

  6. Expression of the human amylase genes: Recent origin of a salivary amylase promoter from an actin pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.C.; Gumucio, D.L.; Meisler, M.H. ); Wiebauer, K. )

    1988-09-12

    The human genes encoding salivary amylase (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase (AMY2) are nearly identical in structure and sequence. The authors have used ribonuclease protection studies to identify the functional gene copies in this multigene family. Riboprobes derived from each gene were hybridized to RNA from human pancreas, parotid and liver. The sizes of the protected fragments demonstrated that both pancreatic genes are expressed in pancreas. One of the pancreatic genes, AMY2B, is also transcribed at a low level in liver, but not from the promoter used in pancreas. AMY1 transcripts were detected in parotid, but not in pancreas or liver. Unexpected fragments protected by liver RNA led to the discovery that the 5{prime} regions of the five human amylase genes contain a processed {gamma}-actin pseudogene. The promoter and start site for transcription of AMY1 are recently derived from the 3{prime} untranslated region of {gamma}-actin. In addition, insertion of an endogenous retrovirus has interrupted the {gamma}-actin pseudogene in four of the five amylase genes.

  7. Expression of the human amylase genes: recent origin of a salivary amylase promoter from an actin pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, L C; Wiebauer, K; Gumucio, D L; Meisler, M H

    1988-09-12

    The human genes encoding salivary amylase (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase (AMY2) are nearly identical in structure and sequence. We have used ribonuclease protection studies to identify the functional gene copies in this multigene family. Riboprobes derived from each gene were hybridized to RNA from human pancreas, parotid and liver. The sizes of the protected fragments demonstrated that both pancreatic genes are expressed in pancreas. One of the pancreatic genes, AMY2B, is also transcribed at a low level in liver, but not from the promoter used in pancreas. AMY1 transcripts were detected in parotid, but not in pancreas or liver. Unexpected fragments protected by liver RNA led to the discovery that the 5' regions of the five human amylase genes contain a processed gamma-actin pseudogene. The promoter and start site for transcription of AMY1 are recently derived from the 3' untranslated region of gamma-actin. In addition, insertion of an endogenous retrovirus has interrupted the gamma-actin pseudogene in four of the five amylase genes. PMID:2458567

  8. Amylase α-1A (AMY1A)

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sarika; Roy, Somak; Amin, Milon; Acquafondata, Marie; Yin, Ming; LaFramboise, William; Bastacky, Sheldon; Pantanowitz, Liron; Dhir, Rajiv; Parwani, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) and oncocytoma present with a perplexing overlap of morphologic and immunohistochemical features. ChRCC have deletions in the 1p21.1 region including the amylase α-1A gene (AMY1A). No such deletions are found in oncocytoma. Instead, oncocytomas shared other deletions on chromosome 1: 1p31.3, 1q25.2, and 1q44. We performed AMY1A immunostaining on 75 oncocytomas (57 tissue microarray [TMA] cores, 18 whole slides) and 54 ChRCCs (20 TMA cores, 34 whole slides). Staining was assessed using the H-score method. The intensity was graded as follows: no staining=0, weak=1, moderate=2, and strong=3. The AMY1A immunostain preferentially stained the distal tubules and collecting ducts of normal kidney. All oncocytomas (100%) expressed AMY1A with an H-score that varied from 100 to 300 (mean 205). Mild to moderate heterogeneity in staining intensity was noted within a given oncocytoma. For oncocytomas, 87% (65/75) cases had H-scores of at least 120 with a mean score of 221. Notably, the 13% (10/75) of oncocytoma cases that had an H-score of 100 were derived from the TMA. A total of 87% (47/54) of the ChRCC cases were negative for the AMY1A immunostain. Of the ChRCC cases, 4% (2/54) showed very weak cytoplasmic staining (H-score of 70 each), which was less than the lowest H-score of oncocytoma cases. All 5 cases of ChRCC, which showed an H-score of 100 or more, were referred to as eosinophilic variants of ChRCC. Three of these 5 cases showed a very nondescript, diffuse staining of the cytoplasm. Two of these 5 cases showed an H-score of 130. We think that as the staining pattern of these 2 cases is similar to that of oncocytoma, they should be put in a category of renal oncocytic neoplasms favoring oncocytoma. This result shows that AMY1A staining could be very helpful in further classifying even a subset of the eosinophilic variants of ChRCC. The difference between ChRCC and oncocytoma was statistically significant (χ2 test, P<0

  9. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats. PMID:24319124

  10. A chimera-like alpha-amylase inhibitor suggesting the evolution of Phaseolus vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wato, S; Kamei, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    2000-07-01

    White kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contains two kinds of alpha-amylase inhibitors, one heat-stable (alpha AI-s) and one heat-labile (alpha AI-u). alpha AI-s has recently been revealed to be a tetrameric complex, alpha(2)beta(2), with two active sites [Kasahara et al. (1996) J. Biochem. 120, 177-183]. The present study was undertaken to reveal the molecular features of alpha AI-u, which is composed of three kinds of subunits, alpha, beta, and gamma. The gamma-subunit, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-subunits that are indistinguishable from the alpha- and beta-subunits of alpha AI-s, was found to correspond to a subunit of an alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein, which has been identified as an inactive, evolutionary intermediate between arcelin and the alpha-amylase inhibitor in a P. vulgaris defense protein family. The polypeptide molecular weight of alpha AI-u determined by the light-scattering technique, together with the polypeptide molecular weights of the subunits, suggests that alpha AI-u is a trimeric complex, alpha beta gamma. The inhibition of alpha AI-u by increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) indicates that an inactive 1:1 complex is formed between alpha AI-u and PPA. Molecular weight estimation of the complex by the light-scattering technique confirmed that it is a complex of alpha AI-u with one PPA molecule. Thus it seems probable that alpha AI-u is an evolutionary intermediate of the P. vulgaris alpha-amylase inhibitor. PMID:10876168

  11. Isomaltose formed by alpha-glucosidases triggers amylase induction in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Murakoshi, Yuriko; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Norihiro

    2002-10-01

    Among various alpha-glucobioses examined, isomaltose was the most effective inducer for amylase synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans. Amylase induction by maltose was completely inhibited by addition of castanospermine or cycloheximide, while induction by isomaltose was not affected by the inhibitors, suggesting that amylase induction by maltose requires inducible alpha-glucosidases. Disruption of the alpha-glucosidase A gene ( agdA), the alpha-glucosidase B gene ( agdB), or both genes did not abolish maltose-dependent induction, although amylase production induced by maltose decreased about 2-fold in the agdA/ agdB double disruptant, compared with that in the agdB disruptant at all concentrations tested. Upon induction by isomaltose, amylase synthesis was enhanced considerably in the agdB and agdA/ agdB disruptants. Even at 3 nM, isomaltose induced amylase production in the double disruptant, supporting the suggestion that isomaltose is a physiological inducer for amylase. Therefore, maltose must be converted to isomaltose by alpha-glucosidases prior to triggering amylase synthesis, but no specific alpha-glucosidase is required for amylase induction by maltose. Probably any alpha-glucosidases having isomaltose-forming activity, including AgdA and AgdB, may participate in amylase induction by maltose. PMID:12420145

  12. Potential of the bean alpha-amylase inhibitor alpha-AI-1 to inhibit alpha-amylase activity in true bugs(Hemiptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    True bugs (Hemiptera) are an important pest complex not controlled by Bt crops. An alternative source of resistance includes inhibitors of digestive enzymes. aAI-1, an a-amylase inhibitor from the common bean, has been shown to inhibit a-amylases of bruchid pests of grain legumes. Here we quantify t...

  13. Studies on the Utility of B-Amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for B-Amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third in...

  14. Studies on the Utility of ß-amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for ß-amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third intr...

  15. Characterization of the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Detergent: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of [alpha]-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test…

  16. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase. PMID:25748632

  17. A novel type of human alpha-amylase produced in lung carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tomita, N; Horii, A; Doi, S; Yokouchi, H; Shiosaki, K; Higashiyama, M; Matsuura, N; Ogawa, M; Mori, T; Matsubara, K

    1989-03-15

    A novel type of alpha-amylase was detected in a lung carcinoid tissue after surveying the cDNA library constructed from this tumor mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the amylase expressed in this carcinoid tumor has 13 and 6 amino acid substitutions when compared with salivary amylase (Amy1) and pancreatic amylase (Amy2), respectively. The nucleotide sequence homologies of cDNAs between this carcinoid amylase and amy1, amy2 are 97.5% and 98.2%, respectively. The nucleotide sequence comparison strongly suggests that this new amylase is the product of the amy3 gene that has been detected in human genome [Emi et al., Gene 62 (1988) 229-235] PMID:2701942

  18. Action of human pancreatic and salivary alpha-amylases on maltooligosaccharides: evaluation of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Saito, N; Horiuchi, T; Yoshida, M; Imai, T

    1979-10-01

    The kinetic studies on the reactions of human pancreatic and salivary alpha-amylases with several maltooligosaccharides (maltotetraose, maltopentaose, maltohexaose, and maltoheptaose) were carried out. The susceptibility to hydrolysis with human pancreatic alpha-amylase decreased in the order of maltopentaose, maltohexaose, maltotetraose, and maltoheptaose, while with human salivary alpha-amylase maltopentaose was hydrolysed slightly slower than maltohexaose but fairly faster than maltotetraose or maltoheptaose from a viewpoint of the rates of reactions based on the amount of substrate changed. The relative rates of production of substrates, utilized in the coupled yeast alpha-glucosidase reaction, increased in the order of maltoheptaose, maltohexaose, maltotetraose, and maltopentaose with human pancreatic alpha-amylase, while with human salivary alpha-amylase in the order of maltoheptaose, maltotetraose, maltohexaose, and maltopentaose. Thus, maltopentaose was considered to be the best substrate over maltotetraose, maltohexaose or maltoheptaose for the alpha-glucosidase coupled method of alpha-amylase determination. PMID:385176

  19. A heterotetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor from emmer (Triticum dicoccon Schrank) seeds.

    PubMed

    Capocchi, A; Muccilli, V; Cunsolo, V; Saletti, R; Foti, S; Fontanini, D

    2013-04-01

    Plants have developed a constitutive defense system against pest attacks, which involves the expression of a set of inhibitors acting on heterologous amylases of different origins. Investigating the soluble protein complement of the hulled wheat emmer we have isolated and characterized a heterotetrameric α-amylase inhibitor (ETI). Based on mass spectrometry data, it is an assembly of proteins highly similar to the CM2/CM3/CM16 found in durum wheat. Our data indicate that these proteins can also inhibit exogenous α-amylases in binary assemblies. The calculated dissociation constants (K(i)) for the pancreatic porcine amylase- and human salivary amylase-ETI complexes are similar to those found in durum and soft wheat. Homology modeling of the CM subunits indicate structural similarities with other proteins belonging to the cereal family of trypsin/α-amylase inhibitors; a possible homology modeled structure for a tetrameric assembly of the subunits is proposed. PMID:23320956

  20. Stabilization of α-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batal, A. I.; Atia, K. S.; Eid, M.

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of α-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using γ irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized α-amylase were studied. Covering of α-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized α-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10 mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized α-amylase showed a higher k/K and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of α-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  1. Study of fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkialakshmi, S.; Shanthi, B.; Bhuvanapriya, T.

    2012-05-01

    The fluorescence quenching of Barley α-amylase by acrylamide and succinimide has been studied in water using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The steady-state fluorescence quenching technique has been performed in three different pHs (i.e., 6, 7 and 8) of water. Ground state and excited state binding constants (Kg &Ke) have been calculated. From the calculated binding constants (Kg &Ke) the free energy changes for the ground (ΔGg) and excited (ΔGe) states have been calculated and are presented in tables. UV and FTIR spectra have also been recorded to prove the binding of Barley α-amylase with acrylamide and succinimide.

  2. Production of fungal amylases using cheap, readily available agriresidues, for potential application in textile industry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Singh, Sanamdeep; Bali, Vrinda; Sharma, Lovleen; Mangla, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at isolation and screening of fungal amylase producer, optimization of solid state fermentation conditions for maximum amylase production by the best amylase producer, and characterization of the crude amylases, so produced. Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 showed the highest amylase activity (164.1 U/mL) in secondary screening under SSF conditions and was selected for further studies. The test strain showed maximum amylase production (341.7 U/mL) and supernatant protein concentration (9.7 mg/mL) for incubation period (6 days), temperature (35 °C), initial pH (6.0), nutrient salt solution as moistening agent, and beef extract as nitrogen source. Pomegranate peel produced maximum amylase activity, but wheat bran (only slightly lesser amylase activity as compared to that of pomegranate peel) was chosen for further studies, keeping in mind the seasonal availability of pomegranate peel. TLC confirmed the amylase produced to be α -type and 60 kDa was the molecular weight of the partially purified amylase. The enzyme showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 6.0, temperature of 55 °C, and incubation time of 60 minutes. UV (616.0 U/mL) and chemical (814.2 U/mL) mutation enhanced amylase activity as compared to wild test strain. The study indicates that Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 can be an important source of amylase and the crude enzyme, hence obtained, can be cost effectively applied in multiple sections of textile wet processing. PMID:24527439

  3. Production of Fungal Amylases Using Cheap, Readily Available Agriresidues, for Potential Application in Textile Industry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanamdeep; Bali, Vrinda; Mangla, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at isolation and screening of fungal amylase producer, optimization of solid state fermentation conditions for maximum amylase production by the best amylase producer, and characterization of the crude amylases, so produced. Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 showed the highest amylase activity (164.1 U/mL) in secondary screening under SSF conditions and was selected for further studies. The test strain showed maximum amylase production (341.7 U/mL) and supernatant protein concentration (9.7 mg/mL) for incubation period (6 days), temperature (35°C), initial pH (6.0), nutrient salt solution as moistening agent, and beef extract as nitrogen source. Pomegranate peel produced maximum amylase activity, but wheat bran (only slightly lesser amylase activity as compared to that of pomegranate peel) was chosen for further studies, keeping in mind the seasonal availability of pomegranate peel. TLC confirmed the amylase produced to be α-type and 60 kDa was the molecular weight of the partially purified amylase. The enzyme showed maximum enzyme activity at pH 6.0, temperature of 55°C, and incubation time of 60 minutes. UV (616.0 U/mL) and chemical (814.2 U/mL) mutation enhanced amylase activity as compared to wild test strain. The study indicates that Aspergillus fumigatus NTCC1222 can be an important source of amylase and the crude enzyme, hence obtained, can be cost effectively applied in multiple sections of textile wet processing. PMID:24527439

  4. Characterization of the L. manihotivorans alpha-amylase gene.

    PubMed

    Morlon-Guyot, J; Mucciolo-Roux, F; Rodriguez Sanoja, R; Guyot, J P

    2001-07-01

    Primers and probes were established from the sequences of the alpha-amylase genes (amyA) of L. amylovorus CIP 102989 and of L. plantarum A6 (Giraud and Cuny 1997). They were successfully used for the detection of the amyA gene in L. manihotivorans strain LMG 18010T and a 2842 bp region, containing the entire gene (2706 bp) with its putative promoter has been sequenced. More than 98% nucleotide sequence identities was found with L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amyA genes. The deduced amino acid sequence shares more than 96% amino acid sequence identities with L. amylovorus and L. plantarum alpha-amylases, and also 65% and 59% identities with the alpha-amylases of B. subtilis and S. bovis, respectively. The 3' terminal part of L. manihotivorans LMG 18010T amyA gene contained four repeated sequences (SRU). The amyA genes of the three lactobacilli species differed mainly in the number of SRU and in the size of the flanking regions of the SRU. PMID:11697143

  5. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase in aqueous cosolvent systems.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jay Kant; Prakash, V

    2009-09-01

    The activity and thermal stability of alpha-amylase were studied in the presence of different concentrations of trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was found to be 50 +/- 2 degrees C. Further increase in temperature resulted in irreversible thermal inactivation of the enzyme. In the presence of cosolvents, the rate of thermal inactivation was found to be significantly reduced. The apparent thermal denaturation temperature (Tm) app and activation energy (Ea) of alpha-amylase were found to be significantly increased in the presence of cosolvents in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of 40% trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol, increments in the (Tm)app were 20 degrees C, 14 degrees C, 13 degrees C and 9 degrees C, respectively. The Ea of thermal denaturation of alpha-amylase in the presence of 20% (w/v) trehalose, sorbitol, sucrose and glycerol was found to be 126, 95, 90 and 43 kcal/mol compared with a control value of 40 kcal/mol. Intrinsic and 8-anilinonaphathalene-1-sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorescence studies indicated that thermal denaturation of the enzyme was accompanied by exposure of the hydrophobic cluster on the protein surface. Preferential interaction parameters indicated extensive hydration of the enzyme in the presence of cosolvents. PMID:19805899

  6. Kinetic studies of amylase and biomass production by Calvatia gigantea

    SciTech Connect

    Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Production of alpha-amylase (alpha-4, glucan 4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) by microorganisms has been practiced for many years in small and large scale operations and the literature on this enzyme is voluminous. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae have been reported as the main fungal species used for commercial production of the enzyme. On the other hand, large volumes of low-cost agricultural products such as acorn (the perisperm-free dry seed contains approximately 60% starch) are wasted in many countries and provide a challenge to biotechnology to efficiently utilize these rich sources of starch for the production of high added value products like enzymes. C. gigantea is an edible puffball excreting high levels of alpha-amylase when cultivated on different sources of starch containing elevated quantities of toxic tannic compounds. This fungus has been employed for the production of microbial protein from wastes and acorns containing high levels of toxic tannic compounds. The same fungus was also reported to grow on both hydrolyzable and condensed tannins as sole carbon sources. The present work was undertaken to investigate certain kinetic characteristics of alpha-amylase and biomass production by C. gigantea grown on soluble and acorn starch in a lab fermenter. (Refs. 18).

  7. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  8. Paper-based α-amylase detector for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satarupa; Mandal, Nilanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication of a paper-sensor for quantitative detection of α-amylase activity in human blood serum. Pieces of filter papers were coated with starch-iodine solution leading to an intense blue coloration on the surface. Dispensing α-amylase solution on the starch-iodine coated paper reduced the intensity of the color because of starch-hydrolysis catalyzed by amylase. The variation in the intensity of the color with the concentration of amylase was estimated in three stages: (i) initially, the paper-surface was illuminated with a light emitting diode, (ii) then, the transmitted (reflected) rays emitted through (from) the paper were collected on a photoresistor, and (iii) the variations in the electrical resistance of the photoresistor were correlated with the amylase concentration in analyte. The resistance of photoresistor decreased monotonically with an increase in amylase concentration because the intensity of the reflected (transmitted) rays collected from (through) the paper increased with reduction in the color intensity on the paper surface. Since a specific bio-reaction was employed to detect the activity of amylase, the sensor was found to be equally efficient in detecting unknown quantities of amylase in human blood serum. The reported sensor has shown the potential to graduate into a point-of-care detection tool for α-amylase. PMID:26655186

  9. The purification of a novel amylase from Bacillus subtilis and its inhibition by wheat proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, A R; Ade, P; Di Maggio, D; Fanelli, C; Vittozzi, L

    1983-01-01

    A new alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) from Bacillus subtilis was purified by affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme, estimated from sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, was 93000, which is very different from the molecular weights of two well-characterized amylases from B. subtilis. Electrofocusing showed an isoelectric point of 5. Amylase shows a broad maximum of activity between pH 6 and 7; maximal inhibition of enzyme by wheat-protein alpha-amylase inhibitors is displayed at pH 7. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6189482

  10. Inhibition of amylases from different origins by albumins from the wheat kernel.

    PubMed

    Silano, V; Furia, M; Gianfreda, L; Macri, A; Palescandolo, R; Rab, A; Scardi, V; Stella, E; Valfre, F

    1975-05-23

    The amylase activity of water extracts from 18 insect species, from 23 marine species and from 17 different species of birds and mammals was determined quantitatively. The inhibition of amylase in these extracts by three albumin fractions from the mature wheat kernel, which had been separated according to their molecular weights (60 000, 24 000 and 12 500 D), was determined as well. The inhibition activity of the three albumin fractions toward amylases extracted from a number of cereal species or from immature and germinating wheat kernel was also tested. The extracts from insects that are destructive of wheat grain and stored wheat products showed much higher amylase activities as compared to the other insect species that do not attack wheat and wheat products. On the basis of the effectiveness with which the three albumin fractions inhibit their activities, the amylase preparations tested were divided into susceptible, partially susceptible and resistent. Susceptible amylases, inhibited by any of the three albumin fractions, were found mainly in insects that attack wheat and in marine species. Partially susceptible amylases, inhibited by only one or two of the three albumin fractions, were present in a few avain and mammalian species including man. Resistent amylases were largely distributed in cereal, avian and mammalian species as well as in insect species that do not usually attack wheat grain or wheat flour products. At no stage of development, wheat alpha-amylase was inhibited by the albumin fractions from the mature kernel. The 12 500 dalton albumin fraction was the most effective in inhibiting insect amylases, but it was inactive toward avian and mammalian amylases. The 24 000 dalton albumin fraction was the most effective in inhibiting amylases from marine avian and mammalian species and inhibited as much as 33 amylases over 66 different amylases tested. It is suggested that protein inhibitors of amylase contributed to natural selection of polyploid

  11. Structure of amylase-binding protein A of Streptococcus gordonii: A potential receptor for human salivary α-amylase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Ashish; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Gooley, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) of a number of oral streptococci is essential for the colonization of the dental pellicle. We have determined the solution structure of residues 24–195 of AbpA of Streptococcus gordonii and show a well-defined core of five helices in the region of 45–115 and 135–145. 13Cα/β chemical shift and heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOE data are consistent with this fold and that the remainder of the protein is unstructured. The structure will inform future molecular experiments in defining the mechanism of human salivary α-amylase binding and biofilm formation by streptococci. PMID:25739638

  12. A single gene directs synthesis of a precursor protein with beta- and alpha-amylase activities in Bacillus polymyxa.

    PubMed Central

    Uozumi, N; Sakurai, K; Sasaki, T; Takekawa, S; Yamagata, H; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1989-01-01

    The Bacillus polymyxa amylase gene comprises 3,588 nucleotides. The mature amylase comprises 1,161 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127,314. The gene appeared to be divided into two portions by the direct-repeat sequence located at almost the middle of the gene. The 5' region upstream of the direct-repeat sequence was shown to be responsible for the synthesis of beta-amylase. The 3' region downstream of the direct-repeat sequence contained four sequences homologous with those in other alpha-amylases, such as Taka-amylase A. The 48-kilodalton (kDa) amylase isolated from B. polymyxa was proven to have alpha-amylase activity. The amino acid sequences of the peptides generated from the 48-kDa amylase showed complete agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminal portion. The B. polymyxa amylase gene was therefore concluded to contain in-phase beta- and alpha-amylase-coding sequences in the 5' and 3' regions, respectively. A precursor protein, a 130-kDa amylase, directed by a plasmid, pYN520, carrying the entire amylase gene, had both beta- and alpha-amylase activities. This represents the first report of a single protein precursor in procaryotes that gives rise to two enzymes. Images PMID:2464578

  13. Properties of an amylase from thermophilic Bacillus SP

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Côrrea, Thamy Lívia Ribeiro; da Silva, Júlia Caroline Matos; de Oliveira Mansur, Luciana Ribeiro Coutinho; Martins, Meire Lelis Leal

    2008-01-01

    α-Amylase production by thermophilic Bacillus sp strain SMIA-2 cultivated in liquid cultures containing soluble starch as a carbon source and supplemented with 0.05% whey protein and 0.2% peptone reached a maximum activity at 32 h, with levels of 37 U/mL. Studies on the amylase characterization revealed that the optimum temperature of this enzyme was 90°C. The enzyme was stable for 1 h at temperatures ranging from 40-50°C while at 90°C, 66% of its maximum activity was lost. However, in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was stable at 90°C for 30 min and retained about 58% residual activity after 1 h. The optimum pH of the enzyme was found to be 8.5. After incubation of enzyme for 2 h at pH 9.5 and 11.0 was observed a decrease of about 6.3% and 16.5% of its original activity. At pH 6.0 the enzyme lost about 36% of its original activity. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Co2+, Cu2+ and Ba2+, but less affected by Mg2+, Na+ and K+. In the presence of 2.0 M NaCl, 63% of amylase activity was retained after 2 h incubation at 45°C. The amylase exhibited more than 70% activity when incubated for 1 h at 50°C with sodium dodecyl sulphate. However, very little residual activity was obtained with sodium hypochlorite and with hydrogen peroxide the enzyme was completely inhibited. The compatibility of Bacillus sp SMIA-2 amylase with certain commercial detergents was shown to be good as the enzyme retained 86%, 85% and 75% of its activity after 20 min incubation at 50°C in the presence of the detergent brands Omo®, Campeiro® and Tide®, respectively. PMID:24031188

  14. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C18:1ω7c (32.8%), C16:1ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  15. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions.

    PubMed

    Khannous, Lamia; Jrad, Mouna; Dammak, Mouna; Miladi, Ramzi; Chaaben, Nour; Khemakhem, Bassem; Gharsallah, Néji; Fendri, Imen

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C(18:1)ω7c (32.8%), C(16:1)ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  16. Purification and characterization of α-Amylase from Miswak Salvadora persica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The miswak (Salvadora persica) is a natural toothbrush. It is well known that very little information has been reported on enzymes in miswak as medicinal plant. Recently, we study peroxidase in miswak. In the present study, the main goal of this work is to purify and characterize α-amylase from miswak. The second goal is to study the storage stability of α-amylase in toothpaste. Method The purification method included chromatographaphy of miswak α-amylase on DEAE-Sepharose column and Sephacryl S-200 column. Molecular weight was determined by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Results Five α-amylases A1, A4a, A4b, A5a and A5b from miswak were purified and they had molecular weights of 14, 74, 16, 30 and 20 kDa, respectively. α-Amylases had optimum pH from 6 to 8. Affinity of the substrates toward all enzymes was studied. Miswak α-amylases A1, A4a, A4b, A5a and A5b had Km values for starch and glycogen of 3.7, 3.7, 7.1, 0.52, 4.3 mg/ml and 5.95, 5.9 4.16, 6.3, 6.49 mg/ml, respectively. The optimum temperature for five enzymes ranged 40°C- 60°C. Miswak α-amylases were stable up to 40°C- 60°C after incubation for 30 min. Ca+2 activated all the miswak α-amylases, while Ni2+, Co+2 and Zn+2 activated or inhibited some of these enzymes. The metal chelators, EDTA, sodium citrate and sodium oxalate had inhibitory effects on miswak α-amylases. PMSF, p-HMB, DTNB and 1,10 phenanthroline caused inhibitory effect on α-amylases. The analysis of hydrolytic products after starch hydrolysis by miswak α-amylases on paper chromatography revealed that glucose, maltose, maltotriose and oligosaccharide were the major products. Crude miswak α-amylase in the toothpaste retained 55% of its original activity after 10 months of storage at room temperature. Conclusions From these findings, α-amylases from miswak can be considered as beneficial enzymes for pharmaceuticals. Therefore, we study the storage stability of the crude α-amylase of miswak, which contained the five

  17. Biochemical properties of alpha-amylase from peel of Citrus sinensis cv. Abosora.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh Ahmed; Drees, Ehab A; El-Badry, Mohamed O; Fahmy, Afaf S

    2010-04-01

    alpha-Amylase activity was screened in the peel, as waste fruit, of 13 species and cultivars of Egyptian citrus. The species Citrus sinensis cv. Abosora had the highest activity. alpha-Amylase AI from Abosora peel was purified to homogeneity using anion and cation-exchange, and gel filtration chromatographies. Molecular weight of alpha-amylase AI was found to be 42 kDa. The hydrolysis properties of alpha-amylase AI toward different substrates indicated that corn starch is the best substrate. The alpha-amylase had the highest activity toward glycogen compared with amylopectin and dextrin. Potato starch had low affinity toward alpha-amylase AI but it did not hydrolyze beta-cyclodextrin and dextran. Apparent Km for alpha-amylase AI was 5 mg (0.5%) starch/ml. alpha-Amylase AI showed optimum activity at pH 5.6 and 40 degrees C. The enzyme was thermally stable up to 40 degrees C and inactivated at 70 degrees C. The effect of mono and divalent metal ions were tested for the alpha-amylase AI. Ba2+ was found to have activating effect, where as Li+ had negligible effect on activity. The other metals caused inhibition effect. Activity of the alpha-amylase AI was increased one and half in the presence of 4 mM Ca2+ and was found to be partially inactivated at 10 mM Ca2+. The reduction of starch viscosity indicated that the enzyme is endoamylase. The results suggested that, in addition to citrus peel is a rich source of pectins and flavanoids, alpha-amylase AI from orange peel could be involved in the development and ripening of citrus fruit and may be used for juice processing. PMID:19941088

  18. GA Enhanced a-Amylase Synthesis in Halved Grains of Barley (Hordeum vulgare): A Simple Laboratory Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory demonstration is suggested for the formation of a-amylase enzyme in halved grains of barley. Data presented in the article provide some information of the pattern of a- and b-amylase activity during germination. (PS)

  19. Further Experiments on Gibberellin-Stimulated Amylase Production in Cereal Grains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppage, Jo; Hill, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments conducted on wheat and barley grains to analyze activities of alpha- and beta-amylase enzymes. Gibberellins were used exogenously. Techniques are described in detail. Results on different cultivars revealed that beta-amylase was not an invariable result of imbibition. Techniques employed can be used by school students. (PS)

  20. Use of activated carbons to remove undesirable residual amylase from factory and refinery streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over) activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were develope...

  1. Structure of waxy maize starch hydrolyzed by maltogenic alpha-amylase in relation to its retrogradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltogenic a-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase enzyme preparation from...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1012 - α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true α-Amylase enzyme preparation from Bacillus... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1012 α-Amylase...

  7. Production and Partial Purification of Alpha Amylase from Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 121) Using Solid State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Raul, Dibyangana; Biswas, Tania; Mukhopadhyay, Suchita; Kumar Das, Shrayan; Gupta, Suvroma

    2014-01-01

    Amylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starch into sugars and plays a pivotal role in a variety of areas like use as digestives, for the production of ethanol and high fructose corn syrup, detergents, desiring of textiles, modified starches, hydrolysis of oil-field drilling fluids, and paper recycling. In the present work, solid state fermentation (SSF) for α -amylase production has been used in lieu of submerged fermentation (SmF) due to its simple technique, low capital investment, lower levels of catabolite repression, and better product recovery. Bacillus subtilis has been well known as producer of alpha amylase and was tested using solid state fermentation for 48 hours at 37°C with wheat bran as substrate. Comparison between different fermentation hours demonstrated high yield of alpha amylase after 48 hours. This alpha amylase has optimum pH and temperature at 7.1 and 40°C, respectively. With the goal to purify alpha amylase, 30-70% (NH4)2SO4 cut concentrated the amylase activity threefold with respect to crude fermented extract. This was verified in quantitative DNS assay method as well as in zymogram gel profile. The exact molecular weight of the amylase is yet to be determined with the aid of other protein purification techniques. PMID:24672727

  8. NMR assignment of the amylase-binding protein A from Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis is a primary colonizer of tooth surfaces in the oral cavity. Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) from S. parasanguinis is responsible for the recruitment of salivary amylase to bacterial surface, which plays an important role in the development of oral biofilms. Here, we describe the essentially complete NMR assignments for AbpA. PMID:25016927

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Oral Streptococcus Strains That Encode Amylase-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  10. Draft genome sequences of 18 oral streptococcus strains that encode amylase-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  11. Cloning of a yeast alpha-amylase promoter and its regulated heterologous expression

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR; Hooker, Brian S [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Daniel B [Pasco, WA

    2003-04-01

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  12. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test. PMID:22946767

  13. Oligosaccharide binding to barley alpha-amylase 1.

    PubMed

    Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Mori, Haruhide; Svensson, Birte; Aghajari, Nushin

    2005-09-23

    Enzymatic subsite mapping earlier predicted 10 binding subsites in the active site substrate binding cleft of barley alpha-amylase isozymes. The three-dimensional structures of the oligosaccharide complexes with barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) described here give for the first time a thorough insight into the substrate binding by describing residues defining 9 subsites, namely -7 through +2. These structures support that the pseudotetrasaccharide inhibitor acarbose is hydrolyzed by the active enzymes. Moreover, sugar binding was observed to the starch granule-binding site previously determined in barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 (AMY2), and the sugar binding modes are compared between the two isozymes. The "sugar tongs" surface binding site discovered in the AMY1-thio-DP4 complex is confirmed in the present work. A site that putatively serves as an entrance for the substrate to the active site was proposed at the glycone part of the binding cleft, and the crystal structures of the catalytic nucleophile mutant (AMY1D180A) complexed with acarbose and maltoheptaose, respectively, suggest an additional role for the nucleophile in the stabilization of the Michaelis complex. Furthermore, probable roles are outlined for the surface binding sites. Our data support a model in which the two surface sites in AMY1 can interact with amylose chains in their naturally folded form. Because of the specificities of these two sites, they may locate/orient the enzyme in order to facilitate access to the active site for polysaccharide chains. Moreover, the sugar tongs surface site could also perform the unraveling of amylose chains, with the aid of Tyr-380 acting as "molecular tweezers." PMID:16030022

  14. alpha-Amylase production in high cell density submerged cultivation of Aspergillus oryzae and A. nidulans.

    PubMed

    Agger, T; Spohr, A B; Nielsen, J

    2001-01-01

    The effect of biomass concentration on the formation of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase during submerged cultivation with A. oryzae and recombinant A. nidulans strains has been investigated. It was found that the specific rate of alpha-amylase formation in chemostats decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration in the range of approx. 2-12 g dry weight kg(-1). When using a recombinant A. nidulans strain in which the gene responsible for carbon catabolite repression of the A. oryzae alpha-amylase gene (creA) was deleted, no significant decrease in the specific rate of alpha-amylase formation was observed. On the basis of the experimental results, it is suggested that the low value of the specific alpha-amylase productivity observed at high biomass concentration is caused by slow mixing of the concentrated feed solution in the viscous fermentation medium. PMID:11234963

  15. Influence of Cotyledons upon α-Amylase Activity in Pea Embryonic Axes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bill D.

    1979-01-01

    α-Amylase activity remained relatively low in the axes of intact etiolated pea seedlings; the activity was predominantly confined to the epicotyl. Starch accumulated slightly. When the cotyledons were removed and the axes cultured on medium containing no carbon source, the starch reserve in the axes disappeared within a few days. This was accompanied by a 10- to 15-fold increase in α-amylase activity, in the absence of additional epicotyl growth. The phenonemon was observed for axes throughout early growth, although the relative accumulation of α-amylase activity in cultured axes was less for older seedlings. This change was attributed to a reduced response by nongrowing tissues. There was no corresponding change in β-amylase activity. These observations, described for several varieties of peas, demonstrate the control of cotyledons upon the utilization of stored reserves within the axis, with α-amylase as a key enzyme. PMID:16660848

  16. Amylase production by endophytic fungi Cylindrocephalumsp. isolated from medicinal plant Alpinia calcarata (Haw.) Roscoe

    PubMed Central

    Sunitha, V. H.; Ramesha, A.; Savitha, J.; Srinivas, C

    2012-01-01

    Amylases are among the most important enzymes used in modern biotechnology particularly in the process involving starch hydrolysis. Fungal amylase has large applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. Considering these facts, endophytic fungi isolated from the plant Alpinia calcarata (Haw.) Roscoe were screened for amylolytic activity on glucose yeast extract peptone agar (GYP) medium. Among thirty isolates of endophytic fungi, isolate number seven identified as Cylindrocephalum sp. (Ac-7) showed highest amylolytic activity and was taken for further study. Influence of various physical and chemical factors such as pH, temperature, carbon and nitrogen sources on amylase production in liquid media were studied. The maximal amylase production was found to be at 30ºC and at pH 7.0 of the growth medium. Among the various carbon and nitrogen sources tested, maltose at 1.5% and Sodium nitrate at 0.3% respectively gave optimum amylase production. PMID:24031946

  17. Clinical significance of elevated serum and urine amylase levels in patients with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Swensson, E E; Maull, K I

    1981-12-01

    During the 45 month period beginning January 1977, 251 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of acute appendicitis underwent celiotomy at the Medical College of Virginia Hospital. A preoperative serum or urine amylase determination was recorded in 155 of the patients (62 percent). Of this group, 15 patients (10 percent) had elevation of serum amylase or 2 hour urine amylase. Hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria directly led to misdiagnosis or treatment delay in 5 of the 15 patients. Appendiceal rupture occurred in three patients, two of whom had prolonged (greater than 1 month) hospitalizations directly attributable to the misdiagnosis. As a result of this study, we conclude that (1) acute appendicitis and elevated amylase levels may occur concurrently, (2) hyperamylasemia or hyperamylasuria should not dissuade the surgeon from early operation if other clinical features suggest appendicitis, and (3) abdominal pain and elevation of amylase level define significant intraabdominal disease, not specifically pancreatic disease. PMID:6172043

  18. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch. PMID:20871989

  19. Raw starch conversion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Aspergillus tubingensis amylases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Starch is one of the most abundant organic polysaccharides available for the production of bio-ethanol as an alternative transport fuel. Cost-effective utilisation of starch requires consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) where a single microorganism can produce the enzymes required for hydrolysis of starch, and also convert the glucose monomers to ethanol. Results The Aspergillus tubingensis T8.4 α-amylase (amyA) and glucoamylase (glaA) genes were cloned and expressed in the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294 and the semi-industrial strain, S. cerevisiae Mnuα1. The recombinant AmyA and GlaA displayed protein sizes of 110–150 kDa and 90 kDa, respectively, suggesting significant glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. The Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] and Y294[AmyA-GlaA] strains were able to utilise 20 g l-1 raw corn starch as sole carbohydrate source, with ethanol titers of 9.03 and 6.67 g l-1 (0.038 and 0.028 g l-1 h-1), respectively, after 10 days. With a substrate load of 200 g l-1 raw corn starch, Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] yielded 70.07 g l-1 ethanol (0.58 g l-1 h-1) after 120 h of fermentation, whereas Y294[AmyA-GlaA] was less efficient at 43.33 g l-1 ethanol (0.36 g l-1 h-1). Conclusions In a semi-industrial amylolytic S. cerevisiae strain expressing the A. tubingensis α-amylase and glucoamylase genes, 200 g l-1 raw starch was completely hydrolysed (saccharified) in 120 hours with 74% converted to released sugars plus fermentation products and the remainder presumably to biomass. The single-step conversion of raw starch represents significant progress towards the realisation of CBP without the need for any heat pretreatment. Furthermore, the amylases were produced and secreted by the host strain, thus circumventing the need for exogenous amylases. PMID:24286270

  20. Low serum amylase and obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome: A novel interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei

    2016-03-25

    For the last decade, low serum amylase (hypoamylasemia) has been reported in certain common cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes (regardless of type), and metabolic syndrome, all of which appear to have a common etiology of insufficient insulin action due to insulin resistance and/or diminished insulin secretion. Some clinical studies have shown that salivary amylase may be preferentially decreased in obese individuals, whereas others have revealed that pancreatic amylase may be preferentially decreased in diabetic subjects with insulin dependence. Despite this accumulated evidence, the clinical relevance of serum, salivary, and pancreatic amylase and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, copy number variations (CNVs) in the salivary amylase gene (AMY1), which range more broadly than the pancreatic amylase gene (AMY2A and AMY2B), have been shown to be well correlated with salivary and serum amylase levels. In addition, low CNV of AMY1, indicating low salivary amylase, was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, low taste perception/satiety, and postprandial hyperglycemia through impaired insulin secretion at early cephalic phase. In most populations, insulin-dependent diabetes is less prevalent (minor contribution) compared with insulin-independent diabetes, and obesity is highly prevalent compared with low body weight. Therefore, obesity as a condition that elicits cardiometabolic diseases relating to insulin resistance (major contribution) may be a common determinant for low serum amylase in a general population. In this review, the novel interpretation of low serum, salivary, and pancreas amylase is discussed in terms of major contributions of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27022442

  1. Exposure-sensitization relationship for alpha-amylase allergens in the baking industry.

    PubMed

    Houba, R; Heederik, D J; Doekes, G; van Run, P E

    1996-07-01

    Fungal alpha-amylase is an important occupational allergen in the bakery industry. Epidemiologic studies focusing on the relationship between alpha-amylase allergen exposure and work-related respiratory allergy, however, have not been reported yet. In this cross-sectional study, sensitization to occupational allergens and work-related symptoms were studied in 178 bakery workers and related to allergen exposure. Alpha-amylase allergen concentrations were measured in personal dust samples, using a sandwich enzyme immunoassay. All workers were categorized into groups on the basis of their job histories and the alpha-amylase exposure levels of their job titles. Of all workers 25% had one or more work-related symptoms. As much as 9% of the bakery workers showed a positive skin prick test reaction to fungal amylase, and in 8% amylase-specific IgE was demonstrated. Alpha-amylase exposure and atopy appeared to be the most important determinants of skin sensitization, with prevalence ratios for atopy of 20.8 (95% CI, 2.74 to 158) and for medium and high alpha-amylase exposure groups of 8.6 (95% CI, 1.01 to 74) and 15.9 (95% CI, 1.95 to 129), respectively. Furthermore, a positive association was found between positive skin prick tests to alpha-amylase and work-related respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, this study has shown that there is a strong and positive relationship between alpha-amylase allergen exposure levels in bakeries and specific sensitization in bakery workers. PMID:8680668

  2. Low serum amylase and obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome: A novel interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kei

    2016-01-01

    For the last decade, low serum amylase (hypoamylasemia) has been reported in certain common cardiometabolic conditions such as obesity, diabetes (regardless of type), and metabolic syndrome, all of which appear to have a common etiology of insufficient insulin action due to insulin resistance and/or diminished insulin secretion. Some clinical studies have shown that salivary amylase may be preferentially decreased in obese individuals, whereas others have revealed that pancreatic amylase may be preferentially decreased in diabetic subjects with insulin dependence. Despite this accumulated evidence, the clinical relevance of serum, salivary, and pancreatic amylase and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In recent years, copy number variations (CNVs) in the salivary amylase gene (AMY1), which range more broadly than the pancreatic amylase gene (AMY2A and AMY2B), have been shown to be well correlated with salivary and serum amylase levels. In addition, low CNV of AMY1, indicating low salivary amylase, was associated with insulin resistance, obesity, low taste perception/satiety, and postprandial hyperglycemia through impaired insulin secretion at early cephalic phase. In most populations, insulin-dependent diabetes is less prevalent (minor contribution) compared with insulin-independent diabetes, and obesity is highly prevalent compared with low body weight. Therefore, obesity as a condition that elicits cardiometabolic diseases relating to insulin resistance (major contribution) may be a common determinant for low serum amylase in a general population. In this review, the novel interpretation of low serum, salivary, and pancreas amylase is discussed in terms of major contributions of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27022442

  3. Characterization of two coleopteran α-amylases and molecular insights into their differential inhibition by synthetic α-amylase inhibitor, acarbose.

    PubMed

    Channale, Sonal M; Bhide, Amey J; Yadav, Yashpal; Kashyap, Garima; Pawar, Pankaj K; Maheshwari, V L; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-07-01

    Post-harvest insect infestation of stored grains makes them unfit for human consumption and leads to severe economic loss. Here, we report functional and structural characterization of two coleopteran α-amylases viz. Callosobruchus chinensis α-amylase (CcAmy) and Tribolium castaneum α-amylase (TcAmy) along with their interactions with proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitors. Secondary structural alignment of CcAmy and TcAmy with other coleopteran α-amylases revealed conserved motifs, active sites, di-sulfide bonds and two point mutations at spatially conserved substrate or inhibitor-binding sites. Homology modeling and molecular docking showed structural differences between these two enzymes. Both the enzymes had similar optimum pH values but differed in their optimum temperature. Overall, pattern of enzyme stabilities were similar under various temperature and pH conditions. Further, CcAmy and TcAmy differed in their substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency towards starch and amylopectin. HPLC analysis detected common amylolytic products like maltose and malto-triose while glucose and malto-tetrose were unique in CcAmy and TcAmy catalyzed reactions respectively. At very low concentrations, wheat α-amylase inhibitor was found to be superior over the acarbose as far as complete inhibition of amylolytic activities of CcAmy and TcAmy was concerned. Mechanism underlying differential amylolytic reaction inhibition by acarbose was discussed. PMID:27132147

  4. Effects of dietary amylase and sucrose on productivity of cows fed low-starch diets.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Rodriguez, C F; Engstrom, M; Azem, E; Bradford, B J

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have observed positive effects of both sucrose and exogenous amylase on the productivity of dairy cattle. Our objective was to evaluate direct effects and interactions of amylase and sucrose on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and milk components. Forty-eight multiparous Holstein cows between 70 and 130 d in milk were randomly assigned to each of 4 pens (12 cows/pen). Pens were randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, balanced for carryover effects. Treatment periods were 28 d, with 24 d for diet adaptation and 4d for sample and data collection. The treatments were a control diet (36% NDF and 21% starch), the control diet with amylase [0.5 g/kg of DM; Ronozyme RumiStar 600 (CT); DSM Nutritional Products Ltd., Basel, Switzerland], a diet with sucrose replacing corn grain at 2% of DM, and the sucrose diet with amylase (0.5 g/kg of DM). All data were analyzed with mixed models, including the fixed effects of sugar, amylase, and their interaction, and the random effects of period and pen. Milk data included the random effects of cow nested within pen and pen × period to provide the error term for the pen-level analysis. Dry matter intake was not affected by treatments. Milk yield and milk composition were not altered by the inclusion of sucrose or amylase; however, a tendency for an amylase × sucrose interaction was observed for milk protein content, reflecting slightly lower milk protein concentrations for amylase and sucrose treatments (3.00 and 2.99 ± 0.03%) compared with the control and amylase + sucrose treatments (3.02 and 3.03 ± 0.03%). Solids-corrected and fat-corrected milk yields were not significantly altered by treatment, although the direct effect of amylase approached significance for both variables, suggesting possible small increases with amylase supplementation (~0.5 kg/d). Feed efficiency (energy-corrected milk divided by dry matter intake) numerically increased with either amylase (1.57 ± 0

  5. High-activity barley alpha-amylase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominic W S; Batt, Sarah B; Lee, Charles C; Robertson, George H

    2004-10-01

    Barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 was cloned into and constitutively secreted by Saccharomyces cervisiae. The gene coding for the wild-type enzyme was subjected to directed evolution. Libraries of mutants were screened by halo formation on starch agar plates, followed by high-throughput liquid assay using dye-labeled starch as the substrate. The concentration of recombinant enzyme in the culture supernatant was determined by immunodetection, and used for the calculation of specific activity. After three rounds of directed evolution, one mutant (Mu322) showed 1000 times the total activity and 20 times the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme produced by the same yeast expression system. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this mutant with the wild type revealed five substitutions: Q44H, R303K and F325Y in domain A, and T94A and R128Q in domain B. Two of these mutations. Q44H and R303K, result in amino acids highly conserved in cereal alpha-amylases. R303K and F325Y are located in the raw starch-binding fragment of the enzyme molecule. PMID:15635937

  6. Circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Chiarenza, A P; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1990-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in parotid gland of 25 day old rats was studied under different experimental conditions (fast, reversed photoperiod, constant light or darkness and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of rats fasted or exposed for 7 days to constant darkness did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod and it disappeared in animals submitted to constant light or darkness for 15 days or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm persisted, with minor changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and post-natal life in constant light or darkness. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, under autonomous nervous system control and maternal coordination. This model appears to be useful in the study of sympathetic nervous system control of target organs and circadian rhythms in general. PMID:2076161

  7. Salivary Alpha-Amylase Reactivity in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Cynthia; Couture-Lalande, Marie-Ève; Narain, Tasha A.; Lebel, Sophie; Bielajew, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The two main components of the stress system are the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axes. While cortisol has been commonly used as a biomarker of HPA functioning, much less attention has been paid to the role of the SAM in this context. Studies have shown that long-term breast cancer survivors display abnormal reactive cortisol patterns, suggesting a dysregulation of their HPA axis. To fully understand the integrity of the stress response in this population, this paper explored the diurnal and acute alpha-amylase profiles of 22 breast cancer survivors and 26 women with no history of cancer. Results revealed that breast cancer survivors displayed identical but elevated patterns of alpha-amylase concentrations in both diurnal and acute profiles relative to that of healthy women, F (1, 39) = 17.95, p < 0.001 and F (1, 37) = 7.29, p = 0.010, respectively. The average area under the curve for the diurnal and reactive profiles was 631.54 ± 66.94 SEM and 1238.78 ± 111.84 SEM, respectively. This is in sharp contrast to their cortisol results, which showed normal diurnal and blunted acute patterns. The complexity of the stress system necessitates further investigation to understand the synergistic relationship of the HPA and SAM axes. PMID:27023572

  8. Amylase in the saliva and in the gastric aspirates of premature infants: its potential role in glucose polymer hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hodge, C; Lebenthal, E; Lee, P C; Topper, W

    1983-12-01

    Amylase activity was found in saliva from 13 infants, 26-42 wk corrected gestational age. The levels of salivary amylase activity increased with advancing age. In 10 infants, 31-38 wk corrected gestational age (estimated gestational age in wk plus age in wk after birth), gastric aspirates collected before a feeding and sequentially at 30-min intervals after two consecutive feedings were analyzed for amylase activity and pH. Two different postprandial patterns were obtained. For six of the 10 infants, both the pH and amylase activities of their gastric aspirates showed a distinct maxima at about 60 min after a feeding and a minima at 180 min just before the second feeding. In the remaining four infants, the pHs of their gastric aspirates remained relatively high (5.0-6.0) for the entire postprandial period. In these infants, there was a persistently high level of the amylase activity. In all 10 infants, amylase activity was found in their gastric aspirate samples when the pH was above 3.0. Comparison of the amylase in the gastric aspirate with purified pancreatic and salivary amylases by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the amylase in the gastric aspirate has an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of salivary amylase, which suggests a salivary origin. This study supports the possibility that salivary amylase could enter the stomach and retain a significant amount of its activity in premature infants. PMID:6197692

  9. Protein engineering in the alpha-amylase family: catalytic mechanism, substrate specificity, and stability.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B

    1994-05-01

    Most starch hydrolases and related enzymes belong to the alpha-amylase family which contains a characteristic catalytic (beta/alpha)8-barrel domain. Currently known primary structures that have sequence similarities represent 18 different specificities, including starch branching enzyme. Crystal structures have been reported in three of these enzyme classes: the alpha-amylases, the cyclodextrin glucanotransferases, and the oligo-1,6-glucosidases. Throughout the alpha-amylase family, only eight amino acid residues are invariant, seven at the active site and a glycine in a short turn. However, comparison of three-dimensional models with a multiple sequence alignment suggests that the diversity in specificity arises by variation in substrate binding at the beta-->alpha loops. Designed mutations thus have enhanced transferase activity and altered the oligosaccharide product patterns of alpha-amylases, changed the distribution of alpha-, beta- and gamma-cyclodextrin production by cyclodextrin glucanotransferases, and shifted the relative alpha-1,4:alpha-1,6 dual-bond specificity of neopullulanase. Barley alpha-amylase isozyme hybrids and Bacillus alpha-amylases demonstrate the impact of a small domain B protruding from the (beta/alpha)8-scaffold on the function and stability. Prospects for rational engineering in this family include important members of plant origin, such as alpha-amylase, starch branching and debranching enzymes, and amylomaltase. PMID:8018865

  10. Effects of alpha-amylase on in vitro growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bortner, C A; Miller, R D; Arnold, R R

    1983-01-01

    Sterile parotid saliva inhibited growth of Legionella pneumophila on solid media, and the salivary component involved in this inhibition has been shown to be amylase. Disk diffusion and well plate assays were used to study possible mechanisms for this effect. The amylolytic activity of saliva copurified with inhibitory activity, and both activities were sensitive to proteinase K digestion and heat treatment. In addition, purified alpha-amylase from several sources (bacteria, fungi, porcine pancreas, and human saliva) exhibited similar activity. Incorporation of charcoal or bovine serum albumin into media blocked inhibition by amylase. Replacement of Bacto-Agar with Noble agar (both from Difco Laboratories) prevented growth inhibition in the absence of starch. However, when corn starch was present with Noble agar, amylase-induced growth inhibition occurred. Purification of starch by washing with methanol eliminated some toxic component. The toxic component from starch could be recovered from the methanol wash and inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in the absence of amylase activity. The results suggest that toxic substances exist in media components which may be unmasked during salivary amylase digestion of starch. This effect may explain, in part, the difficulty in recovery of the organism from clinical specimens containing amylase. PMID:6190756

  11. Gene knockout of the intracellular amylase gene by homologous recombination in Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Brooker, J D; McCarthy, J M

    1997-09-01

    Streptococcus bovis expresses two different amylases, one intracellular and the other secreted. A suicide vector containing part of the intracellular alpha-amylase gene from Streptococcus bovis WI-1 was recombined into the S. bovis WI-1 chromosome to disrupt the endogenous gene. Recombination was demonstrated by Southern blot, and zymogram analysis confirmed the loss of the intracellular amylase. Amylase activity in cell-free extracts of the recombinant grown in the presence of 1% starch was only 7% of wild type. The rate of logarithmic growth of the recombinant was 15-20% of the wild type in medium containing either 1% glucose, starch, or cellobiose. Revertants and non-amylase control recombinants had logarithmic growth rates that were the same as wild type. Plasmid transformants containing multiple copies of the cloned gene expressed up to threefold higher levels of intracellular amylase activity than wild type but did not demonstrate elevated growth rates. These results suggest that a critical level of expression of the intracellular amylase gene may be important for rapid growth of the bacterium. PMID:9236293

  12. alpha. -Amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes EM1: Nucleotide sequence of the gene, processing of the enzyme, and comparison to other. alpha. -amylases

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, H.; Burchhardt, G.; Spreinat, A.; Haeckel, K.; Wienecke, A.; Antranikian, G.; Schmidt, B. )

    1991-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the {alpha}-amylase gene (amyA) from Clostridium thermosulfurogenes EM1 cloned in Escherichia coli was determined. The reading frame of the gene consisted of 2,121 bp. Comparison of the DNA sequence data with the amino acid sequence of the N terminus of the purified secreted protein of C. thermosulfurogenes Em1 suggested that the {alpha}-amylase is translated form mRNA as a secretory precursor with a signal peptide of 27 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature {alpha}-amylase contained 679 residues, resulting in a protein with a molecular mass of 75,112 Da. In E. coli the enzyme was transported to the periplasmic space and the signal peptide was cleaved at exactly the same site between two alanine residues. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the C. thermosulfurogenes EM1 {alpha}-amylase with those from other bacterial and eukaryotic {alpha}-amylases showed several homologous regions, probably in the enzymatically functioning regions. The tentative Ca{sup 2+}-binding site (consensus region I) of this Ca{sub 2+}-independent enzyme showed only limited homology. The deduced amino acid sequence of a second obviously truncated open reading frame showed significant homology to the malG gene product of E. coli. Comparison of the {alpha}-amylase gene region of C. thermosulfurogenes EM1 (DSM3896) with the {beta}-amylase gene region of C. thermosulfurogenes (ATCC 33743) indicated that both genes have been exchanged with each other at identical sites in the chromosomes of these strains.

  13. Production of α-Amylase by the Ruminal Anaerobic Fungus Neocallimastix frontalis

    PubMed Central

    Mountfort, Douglas O.; Asher, Rodney A.

    1988-01-01

    α-Amylase production was examined in the ruminal anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix frontalis. The enzyme was released mainly into the culture fluid and had temperature and pH optima of 55°C and 5.5, respectively, and the apparent Km for starch was 0.8 mg ml−1. The products of α-amylase action were mainly maltotriose, maltotetraose, and longer-chain oligosaccharides. No activity of the enzyme was observed towards these compounds or pullulan, but activity on amylose was similar to starch. Evidence for the endo action of α-amylase was also obtained from experiments which showed that the reduction in iodine-staining capacity and release in reducing power by action on amylose was similar to that for commercial α-amylase. Activities of α-amylase up to 4.4 U ml−1 (1 U represents 1 μmol of glucose equivalents released per min) were obtained for cultures grown on 2.5 mg of starch ml−1 in shaken cultures. No growth occurred in unshaken cultures. With elevated concentrations of starch (>2.5 mg ml−1), α-amylase production declined and glucose accumulated in the cultures. Addition of glucose to cultures grown on low levels of starch, in which little glucose accumulated, suppressed α-amylase production, and in bisubstrate growth studies, active production of the enzyme only occurred during growth on starch after glucose had been preferentially utilized. When cellulose, cellobiose, glucose, xylan, and xylose were tested as growth substrates for the production of α-amylase (initial concentration, 2.5 mg ml−1), they were found to be less effective than starch, but maltose was almost as effective. The fungal α-amylase was found to be stable at 60°C in the presence of low concentrations of starch (≤5%), suggesting that it may be suitable for industrial application. PMID:16347742

  14. Seeking new mutation clues from Bacillus licheniformis amylase by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao

    2009-07-01

    Amylase is one of the most important industrial enzymes in the world. Researchers have been searching for a highly thermal stable mutant for many years, but most focus on point mutations of one or few nitrogenous bases. According to this molecular dynamic simulation of amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA), the deletion of some nitrogenous bases would be more efficacious than point mutations. The simulation reveals strong fluctuation of the BLA structure at optimum temperature. The fluctuation of the outer domains of BLA is stronger than that of the core domain. Molecular simulation provides a clue to design thermal stable amylases through deletion mutations in the outer domain.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis as a screening tool for alpha amylase inhibitors in plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Imad I.; Afifi, Fatima U.

    2010-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for screening plant extract for potential alpha amylase (AA) inhibitory activity. The method was validated against a well established UV method. Overall, the proposed method was shown able to detect plants with significant alpha amylase inhibitory activity but not those with rather clinically insignificant activities. Fifty plant species were screened using both the proposed CE method and the UV method and seven plant species were found to possess significant AA inhibitory activities. Two plant species were proved to have alpha amylase inhibitory activity for the first time. PMID:24115900

  16. Crystal and molecular structure of barley alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kadziola, A; Abe, J; Svensson, B; Haser, R

    1994-05-27

    The three-dimensional structure of barley malt alpha-amylase (isoform AMY2-2) was determined by multiple isomorphous replacement using three heavy-atom derivatives and solvent flattening. The model was refined using a combination of simulated annealing and conventional restrained least-squares crystallographic refinement to an R-factor of 0.153 based on 18,303 independent reflections with F(o) > sigma(F(o)) between 10 and 2.8 A resolution, with root-mean-square deviations of 0.016 A and 3.3 degrees from ideal bond lengths and bond angles, respectively. The final model consists of 403 amino acid residues, three calcium ions and 153 water molecules. The polypeptide chain folds into three domains: a central domain forming a (beta alpha)8-barrel of 286 residues, with a protruding irregular structured loop domain of 64 residues (domain B) connecting strand beta 3 and helix alpha 3 of the barrel, and a C-terminal domain of 53 residues forming a five stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. Unlike the previously known alpha-amylase structures, AMY2-2 contains three Ca2+ binding sites co-ordinated by seven or eight oxygen atoms from carboxylate groups, main-chain carbonyl atoms and water molecules, all calcium ions being bound to domain B and therefore essential for the structural integrity of that domain. Two of the Ca2+ sites are located only 7.0 A apart with one Asp residue serving as ligand for both. One Ca2+ site located at about 20 A from the other two was found to be exchangeable with Eu3+. By homology with other alpha-amylases, some important active site residues are identified as Asp179, Glu204 and Asp289, and are situated at the C-terminal end of the central beta-barrel. A starch granule binding site, previously identified as Trp276 and Trp277, is situated on alpha-helix 6 in the central (beta alpha)8-barrel, at the surface of the enzyme. This binding site region is associated with a considerable disruption of the (beta alpha)8-barrel 8-fold symmetry. PMID:8196040

  17. Purification of a novel α-amylase inhibitor from local Himalayan bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds with activity towards bruchid pests and human salivary amylase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mridu; Sharma, Pratima; Nath, Amarjit K

    2014-07-01

    Six bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars of Himalayan region were analysed for α- amylase inhibitor activity. The α-amylase inhibitor from seeds of screened bean cultivar KR-9, showing maximum inhibitory activity was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography (Sephadex G-100) and ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sephadex). The inhibitor was purified to homogeneity as judged by native-PAGE with 14.22 fold purification and 71.66% recovery. Purified inhibitor consisted of three subunits of molecular weight 15,488, 18,620 and 26,302 daltons, respectively as determined by SDS-PAGE. It was found to be heat stable up to 30 °C-40 °C and had two pH optima of 5.0 and 6.9. Nature of inhibition was found to be of non-competitive type. The purified inhibitor was found to be effective against α-amylases extracted from larvae of Callosobruchus chinensis, Tribolium castaneum and gut enzyme of Spodoptera littoralis. Larvae of Tribolium castaneum fed on flour mixed with purified inhibitor for 5 days showed 100% larval mortality. Purified α-amylase inhibitor was also found to inhibit human salivary α-amylase, suggesting its potential in prevention and therapy of obesity and use as drug design targets for treatment of diabetes. The gene encoding the inhibitor may be used to develop transgenic plants resistant against insect pests. PMID:24966421

  18. Optimization of alpha-amylase immobilization in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Figen; Yagar, Hulya; Balkan, Bilal

    2007-01-01

    alpha-Amylase enzyme was produced by Aspergillus sclerotiorum under SSF conditions, and immobilized in calcium alginate beads. Effects of immobilization conditions, such as alginate concentration, CaCl(2) concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads, on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CaCl(2) concentration were found to be 3% (w/v). Using a loading enzyme concentration of 140 U mL(-1), and bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.5 g, maximum enzyme activity was observed. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 7 repeated uses, losing only 35% of their initial activity. Among the various starches tested, the highest enzyme activity (96.2%) was determined in soluble potato starch hydrolysis for 120 min at 40 degrees C. PMID:17516249

  19. Transglycosylation of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    PubMed

    Cho, J S; Yoo, S S; Cheong, T K; Kim, M J; Kim, Y; Park, K H

    2000-02-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), a sweet compound derived from citrus fruits, was modified to a series of its oligosaccharides by transglycosylation activity of Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase (BSMA). Maltotriose as a donor was reacted with NHDC as an acceptor to glycosylate for the purpose of increasing the solubility of NHDC. Maltosyl-NHDC was a major transglycosylation product among the several transfer products by TLC analysis. The structure of the major transglycosylation product was determined to be maltosyl-alpha-(1,6)-neohesperidin dihydrochalcone by MALDI-TOF/MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR. Maltosyl-NHDC was 700 times more soluble in water and 7 times less sweet than NHDC. PMID:10691608

  20. Characterization of a starch-hydrolyzing α-amylase produced by Aspergillus niger WLB42 mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shihui; Lin, Chaoyang; Liu, Yun; Shen, Zhicheng; Jeyaseelan, Jenasia; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungus for commercial amylase production, the increase of amylase activity will be beneficial to the amylase industry. Herein we report a high α-amylase producing (HAP) A. niger WLB42 mutated from A. niger A4 by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The fermentation conditions for the amylase production were optimized. The results showed that both the amylase activity and total protein content reached highest after 48-h incubation in liquid medium using starch as the sole carbon source. The enzyme production reached maximum at temperature of 30°C, pH 7, with 40 g/L starch in the medium inoculated with 1.4% v/v spore. When 0.3% w/v urea was added to the liquid medium as a nitrogen source, the amylase activity was elevated by 20%. Nine monosaccharides and derivatives were tested for α-amylase induction, glucose was the best inducer. Furthermore, the enzymology characterization of amylase was conducted. The molecular weight of amylase was determined to be 50 kD by SDS-PAGE. The amylase had maximum activity at 45°C and pH 7. The activity could be dramatically triggered by adding 1 mM Co2+, increased to 250%. The activity was inhibited by detergents SDS and Triton X-100. Six different brands of starch were tested for amylase activity, the results demonstrated that the more soluble of the starch, the higher hydrolyzability of the substrate by amylase. PMID:27335681

  1. Characterization of a starch-hydrolyzing α-amylase produced by Aspergillus niger WLB42 mutated by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shihui; Lin, Chaoyang; Liu, Yun; Shen, Zhicheng; Jeyaseelan, Jenasia; Qin, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungus for commercial amylase production, the increase of amylase activity will be beneficial to the amylase industry. Herein we report a high α-amylase producing (HAP) A. niger WLB42 mutated from A. niger A4 by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The fermentation conditions for the amylase production were optimized. The results showed that both the amylase activity and total protein content reached highest after 48-h incubation in liquid medium using starch as the sole carbon source. The enzyme production reached maximum at temperature of 30°C, pH 7, with 40 g/L starch in the medium inoculated with 1.4% v/v spore. When 0.3% w/v urea was added to the liquid medium as a nitrogen source, the amylase activity was elevated by 20%. Nine monosaccharides and derivatives were tested for α-amylase induction, glucose was the best inducer. Furthermore, the enzymology characterization of amylase was conducted. The molecular weight of amylase was determined to be 50 kD by SDS-PAGE. The amylase had maximum activity at 45°C and pH 7. The activity could be dramatically triggered by adding 1 mM Co(2+), increased to 250%. The activity was inhibited by detergents SDS and Triton X-100. Six different brands of starch were tested for amylase activity, the results demonstrated that the more soluble of the starch, the higher hydrolyzability of the substrate by amylase. PMID:27335681

  2. Purification of extrachloroplastic. beta. -amylase from leaves of starchless and wild type Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.; Monroe, J.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-04-01

    Amylase activity in crude leaf extracts from starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is 5 to 10 fold higher than in the wild type (WT) when plants are grown under a 12 h photoperiod. Visualized on native PAGE, the increased activity is attributed primarily to a previously characterized extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. The {beta}-amylases from phosoglucomutase deficient (starchless) and WT leaves were purified to homogeneity in two steps utilizing polyethylene glycol fractionation, and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The enzyme from both mutant and WT leaves had negligible activity toward either {beta}-limit dextrin or pullulan. The specific activities of both purified enzymes were similar indicating that the protein is over-expressed in the mutant. Preliminary antibody neutralization experiments suggest that the two {beta}-amylases are not different.

  3. Biochemical features and kinetic properties of α-amylases from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Homaei, Ahmad; Ghanbarzadeh, Mehri; Monsef, Ferial

    2016-02-01

    Marine organisms have the ability of producing enzymes with unique properties compared to those of the same enzymes from terrestrial organisms. α-Amylases are among the most important extracellular enzymes found in various groups of organisms such as plants, animals and microorganisms. They play important roles in their carbohydrates metabolism of each organism. Microbial production of α-amylases is more effective than other sources of the enzyme. Many microorganisms are known to produce α-amylase including bacteria, yeasts, fungi and actinomycetes. However, enzymes from fungal and bacterial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. This review deals with what is known about the kinetics, biochemical properties and applications of these enzymes that have only been found in them and not in other α-amylases, and discussing their mechanistic and regulatory implications. PMID:26657843

  4. Evolution of the amylase isozymes in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Y; Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    1999-10-01

    The relationship between the net charge of molecules and their mobility on electrophoresis was analyzed for Drosophila alpha-amylases. Most of the differences in electrophoretic mobility, 98.2%, can be explained by the charge state. Therefore five reference amino acid sites, which are informative residues for charge differences among amylase isozymes, were considered for the evolution of the isozymes in Drosophila melanogaster. The amylase isozymes in D. melanogaster can be classified into three groups, I (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3-A), II (AMY3-B and AMY4), and III (AMY5, AMY6-A, and AMY6-B), based on the differences in the reference sites. The most primitive amylase in D. melanogaster was found to belong to Group I, most likely the AMY2 isozyme. Groups II and III could have been derived from Group I. These results were confirmed by the analysis of 38 amino acid sites with charge differences in Drosophila. PMID:10626037

  5. The Use of Commercially Available Alpha-Amylase Compounds to Inhibit and Remove Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Craigen, Bradford; Dashiff, Aliza; Kadouri, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a versatile human pathogen, is commonly associated with medical device infections. Its capacity to establish and maintain these infections is thought to be related to its ability to form adherent biofilms. In this study, commercially available α-amylase compounds from various biological sources were evaluated for their ability to reduce and prevent biofilm formation of several S. aureus isolates. Our data demonstrates that α-amylase compounds can rapidly detach biofilms of S. aureus, as well as inhibit biofilm formation. Our data also demonstrates that α-amylase compounds have an ability to reduce and disassociate S. aureus cell-aggregates grown in liquid suspension. These findings suggest that commercially available α-amylase compounds could be used in the future to control S. aureus biofilm-related infections. PMID:21760865

  6. Salivary α-amylase levels as a biomarker of experienced fear

    PubMed Central

    Bibas, David; Adolphs, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported data related to emotions collected in conjunction with a museum exhibit on emotion (Goose Bumps!—The Science of Fear).1 In this addendum, we present additional data collected as part of that study. We collected two commonly measured indices of emotional arousal, salivary cortisol and α-amylase, before and after participants had gone through a realistic fear challenge course as part of the exhibit. We found that α-amylase, but not cortisol, showed a highly specific increase only for those participants who endorsed both emotional arousal and negative valence. By contrast, the fear-inducing course resulted in high arousal but positive valence in some participants; in these, no increased α-amylase was measured. We conclude that salivary α-amylase is a promising biomarker for fearful experiences, and suggest that it is important to pay attention to positively valenced arousal that may be induced by fearful stimuli in a laboratory setting. PMID:21331229

  7. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-08-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  8. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Hyperthermophile α-Amylase from Pyrococcus woesei

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Amir; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Vafaei, Sedighe; Mohebi, Reza; Farzi, Maryam; Taherikalani, Morovat; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In an attempt α-amylase gene from Pyrococcus woesei was amplified and cloned into a pTYB2 vector to generate the recombinant plasmid pTY- α-amylase. Methods Escherichia coli BL21 used as a host and protein expression was applied using IPTG. SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated the 100 kDa protein. Amylolytic activity of proteins produced by transformed E. coli cells was detected by zymography, and the rate of active α-amylase with and without the intein tag in both soluble conditions and as inclusion bodies solubilized by 4M urea were measured. Results Amylolytic activity of ∼185,000 U/L of bacterial culture was observed from the soluble form of the protein using this system. Conclusion These results indicate that this expression system was appropriate for the production of thermostable α-amylase. PMID:26835242

  9. Relationship among physiological quality, heterosis, and amylase gene expression in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G E; Von Pinho, E V R; Andrade, T; Souza, J C; Caixeta, F; Ferreira, R A D C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed heterosis, amylase enzyme gene expression, and the physiological quality of maize seeds with different genotypes and sizes, which were subjected to aging and not subjected to aging. We used seeds from 2 maize lines that differed with regard to physiological quality, the hybrid, and the reciprocal hybrid; they were classified into 2 sizes and were subjected to aging and not subjected to aging. Physiological quality was assessed by performing tests for germination, emergence, emergence speed index, and artificial aging. Expressions of the genes alpha amylase B73, alpha amylase (LOC542522), isoamylase mRNA clone 353244, and the endogenous controls ubiquitin and alcohol dehydrogenase in the seeds were studied using quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We observed heterosis for seed quality and for expression of amylase genes in the genotypes studied. We found no difference in seed quality between large and small seeds. PMID:26345793

  10. Synergistic action of. alpha. -amylase and glucoamylase on hydrolysis of starch

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, M.; Kawamura, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Synergistic action of ..alpha..-amylase and glucoamylase on hydrolysis of starch is modeled by the kinetic equations presented in this paper. At the early stage of the reaction ..alpha..-amylase acts as a contributor of newly formed non-reducing ends of starch molecules to glucoamylase by splitting the original starch molecules. This is expressed by the simultaneous differential equations which consist of each rate equation for ..alpha.. amylase and glucoamylase. After the molecular weight of the substrate decreases to the value of about 5000, which is obtained experimentally in this work, the action of ..alpha.. amylase can be neglected and the rate of formation of glucose obeys only the rate equation for glucoamylase. 5 references.

  11. Effect of oilseed cakes on alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, T; Chandra, A K

    1982-01-01

    The effects of oilseed cakes on extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis CUMC305 was investigated. Each oilseed cake was made of groundnut, mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut copra, madhuca, or cotton. alpha-Amylase production was considerably improved in all instances and varied with the oilseed cake concentration in basal medium containing peptone and beef extract. Maximum increases were effected by a low concentration (0.5 to 1.0%) of groundnut or coconut, a high concentration (3%) of linseed or mustard, and an Rintermediate concentration (2%) of cotton, madhuca, or sesame. The oilseed cakes made of groundnut or mustard could completely replace the conventional peptone-beef extract medium as the fermentation base for the production of alpha-amylase by B. licheniformis. The addition of corn steep liquor to cotton, linseed, sesame, or madhuca cake in the medium improved alpha-amylase production. PMID:6181738

  12. From carbohydrates to drug-like fragments: Rational development of novel α-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Al-Asri, Jamil; Fazekas, Erika; Lehoczki, Gábor; Perdih, Andrej; Görick, Cornelia; Melzig, Matthias F; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Wolber, Gerhard; Mortier, Jérémie

    2015-10-15

    Starch catabolism leading to high glucose level in blood is highly problematic in chronic metabolic diseases, such as type II diabetes and obesity. α-Amylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of starch, increasing blood sugar concentration. Its inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach to control hyperglycaemia. However, only few drug-like molecule inhibitors without sugar moieties have been discovered so far, and little information on the enzymatic mechanism is available. This work aims at the discovery of novel small α-amylase binders using a systematic in silico methodology. 3D-pharmacophore-based high throughput virtual screening of small compounds libraries was performed to identify compounds with high α-amylase affinity. Twenty-seven compounds were selected and biologically tested, revealing IC50 values in the micromolar range and ligand efficiency higher than the one of the bound form of acarbose, which is used as a reference for α-amylase inhibition. PMID:26395057

  13. Ontogenesis of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, S L; Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Rins, L; Aoki, A

    1981-01-01

    Changes in alpha-amylase (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1) of parotid gland were investigated during postnatal development of the rat. Modifications in amylase activity after birth allow the distinction of three stages which can be correlated with the morphologic development of the parotid gland. Significant sexual differences in the evolution of alpha-amylase activity were found. During the first stage (from birth to the 20th day) there is a higher increase in females, while males have a more pronounced increment in the second stage (from the 20th to the 30th day). By means of gel electrophoresis of parotid extracts, four molecular forms of amylase can be separated. The slowest migrating band (Form 1) is not detected at the initial stage. PMID:6164673

  14. Characterization of extracellular amylase produced by haloalkalophilic strain Kocuria sp. HJ014.

    PubMed

    Soto-Padilla, Marisela Y; Gortáres-Moroyoqui, Pablo; Cira-Chávez, Luis A; Levasseur, Anthony; Dendooven, Luc; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel

    2016-08-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Kocuria sp. (HJ014) has the ability to produce extracellular amylase. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize this protein. The amylase enzyme with a specific activity of 753,502 U/mg was purified 5.7- fold using Sepharose 4B and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration columns. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 45,000 Da as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The amylase showed maximum activity at pH 9 and 50°C in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. The Km was 3.0 mg/ml and Vmax 90.09 U/ml. It was found that extracellular amylase from Kocuria sp. has a high industrial potential. PMID:26813880

  15. The synergetic effect of starch and alpha amylase on the biodegradation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Biria, D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of adding soluble starch on biodegradation of n-alkanes (C10-C14) by Bacillus subtilis TB1 was investigated. Gas chromatography was employed to measure the residual hydrocarbons in the system. It was observed that the efficiency of biodegradation improved with the presence of starch and the obtained residual hydrocarbons in the system were 53% less than the samples without starch. The produced bacterial enzymes were studied through electrophoresis and reverse zymography for explaining the observations. The results indicated that the produced amylase by the bacteria can degrade hydrocarbons and the same was obtained by the application of a commercial alpha amylase sample. In addition, in silico docking of alpha-amylase with n-alkanes with different molecular weights was studied by Molegro virtual docker which showed high negative binding energies and further substantiated the experimental observations. Overall, the findings confirmed the catalytic effect of alpha amylase on n-alkanes degradation. PMID:26971168

  16. High-resolution α-amylase assay combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for expedited identification of α-amylase inhibitors: proof of concept and α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Okutan, Leyla; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2014-11-26

    Type 2 diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and new improved drugs or functional foods containing selective α-amylase inhibitors are needed for improved management of blood glucose. In this article the development of a microplate-based high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay with direct photometric measurement of α-amylase activity is described. The inhibition assay is based on porcine pancreatic α-amylase with 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotriose as substrate, which this gives a stable, sensitive, and cheap inhibition assay as requested for high-resolution purposes. In combination with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR, this provides an analytical platform that allows simultaneous chemical and biological profiling of α-amylase inhibitors in plant extracts. Proof-of-concept with an artificial mixture of six compounds-of which three are known α-amylase inhibitors-showed that the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition profiles allowed detection of sub-microgram amounts of the α-amylase inhibitors. Furthermore, the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform allowed identification of cinnamaldehyde as the α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum Presl.). PMID:25368916

  17. New Perspectives on the Role of α- and β-Amylases in Transient Starch Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Alex Chi; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Morell, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Transient starch in leaves is synthesized by various biosynthetic enzymes in the chloroplasts during the light period. This paper presents the first mathematical model for the (bio)synthesis of the chain-length distribution (CLD) of transient starch to aid the understanding of this synthesis. The model expresses the rate of change of the CLD in terms of the actions of the enzymes involved. Using this to simulate the experimental CLD with different enzyme combinations is a new means to test for enzymes that are significant to the rate of change of the CLD during synthesis. Comparison between the simulated CLD from different enzyme combinations and the experimental CLD in the leaves of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana indicate α-amylase, in addition to the core starch biosynthetic enzymes, is also involved in the modification of glucans for the synthesis of insoluble starch granules. The simulations suggest involvement of β-amylase, in the absence of α-amylase in mutants, slows the rate of attaining a crystalline-competent CLD for crystallization of glucans to form insoluble starch. This suggests a minor role of β-amylase in shaping normal starch synthesis. The model simulation predicts that debranching of glucans is an efficient mechanism for the attainment of crystalline-competent CLD; however, attaining this is still possible, albeit slower, through combinations of α- and β-amylase in the absence of isoamylase-type debranching enzyme. In Arabidopsis defective in one of the isoamylase-type debranching enzymes, the impact of α-amylase in starch synthesis is reduced, while β-amylase becomes significantly involved, slowing the rate of synthesis in this mutant. Modeling of transient starch CLD brings to light previously unrecognized but significant effects of α- and β-amylase on the rate of transient starch synthesis. PMID:24971464

  18. [Cloning the alpha-amylase gene of Streptococcus bovis and its expression in Bacillus subtilis cells].

    PubMed

    Iakorski, P; Kuntsova, M M; Loseva, E F; Khasanov, F K

    1991-06-01

    The gene coding for alpha-amylase from the ruminant bacterium Streptococcus bovis was cloned on the plasmid pMX39 in Bacillus subtilis cells. An alpha-amylase positive colony was isolated in the initial screening of 3900 colonies on the medium containing insoluble starch. The size of the insert was approximately 2.8 kb. The recombinant plasmid was stably maintained in Bacillus subtilis cells under the nonselective conditions. PMID:1944323

  19. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL−1 at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg−1. The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0–8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t1/2) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  20. Expression and Characterization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 Recombinant α-Amylase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sivasangkary; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Chor Leow, Thean; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus SR74 is a locally isolated thermophilic bacteria producing thermostable and thermoactive α-amylase. Increased production and commercialization of thermostable α-amylase strongly warrant the need of a suitable expression system. In this study, the gene encoding the thermostable α-amylase in G. stearothermophilus SR74 was amplified, sequenced, and subcloned into P. pastoris GS115 strain under the control of a methanol inducible promoter, alcohol oxidase (AOX). Methanol induced recombinant expression and secretion of the protein resulted in high levels of extracellular amylase production. YPTM medium supplemented with methanol (1% v/v) was the best medium and once optimized, the maximum recombinant α-amylase SR74 achieved in shake flask was 28.6 U mL(-1) at 120 h after induction. The recombinant 59 kDa α-amylase SR74 was purified 1.9-fold using affinity chromatography with a product yield of 52.6% and a specific activity of 151.8 U mg(-1). The optimum pH of α-amylase SR74 was 7.0 and the enzyme was stable between pH 6.0-8.0. The purified enzyme was thermostable and thermoactive, exhibiting maximum activity at 65°C with a half-life (t₁/₂) of 88 min at 60°C. In conclusion, thermostable α-amylase SR74 from G. stearothermophilus SR74 would be beneficial for industrial applications, especially in liquefying saccrification. PMID:26090417

  1. Cross-inhibitory activity of cereal protein inhibitors against alpha-amylases and xylanases.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Ana I; Faulds, Craig B; Svensson, Birte; Bartolomé, Begoña; Williamson, Gary; Juge, Nathalie

    2003-08-21

    The purification and characterisation of a xylanase inhibitor (XIP-I) from wheat was reported previously. In our current work, XIP-I is also demonstrated to have the capacity to inhibit the two barley alpha-amylase isozymes (AMY1 and AMY2). XIP-I completely inhibited the activity of AMY1 and AMY2 towards insoluble Blue Starch and a soluble hepta-oligosaccharide derivative. A ternary complex was formed between insoluble starch, a catalytically inactive mutant of AMY1 (D180A), and XIP-I, suggesting that the substrate-XIP-I interaction is necessary for inhibition of barley alpha-amylases. K(i) values for alpha-amylase inhibition, however, could not be calculated due to the nonlinear nature of the inhibition pattern. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance and gel electrophoresis did not indicate interaction between XIP-I and the alpha-amylases. The inhibition was abolished by CaCl(2), indicating that the driving force for the interaction is different from that of complexation between the barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) and AMY2. This is the first report of a proteinaceous inhibitor of AMY1. BASI, in addition, was demonstrated to partially inhibit the endo-1,4-beta-D-xylanase from Aspergillus niger (XylA) of glycoside hydrolase family 11. Taken together, the data demonstrate for the first time the dual target enzyme specificity of BASI and XIP-I inhibitors for xylanase and alpha-amylase. PMID:12922177

  2. Production of itaconic acid in Escherichia coli expressing recombinant α-amylase using starch as substrate.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shusuke; Chin, Taejun; Nagata, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohara, Hitomi; Aso, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Several studies on fermentative production of a vinyl monomer itaconic acid from hydrolyzed starch using Aspergillus terreus have been reported. Herein, we report itaconic acid production by Escherichia coli expressing recombinant α-amylase, using soluble starch as its sole carbon source. To express α-amylase in E. coli, we first constructed recombinant plasmids expressing α-amylases by using cell surface display technology derived from two amylolytic bacteria, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) and Streptococcus bovis NRIC 1535. The recombinant α-amylase from S. bovis (SBA) showed activity at 28°C, which is the optimal temperature for production of itaconic acid, while α-amylase from B. amyloliquefaciens displayed no noticeable activity. E. coli cells expressing SBA produced 0.15 g/L itaconic acid after 69 h cultivation under pH-stat conditions, using 1% starch as the sole carbon source. In fact, E. coli cells expressing SBA had similar growth rates when grown in the presence of 1% glucose or starch, thereby highlighting the expression of an active α-amylase that enabled utilization of starch to produce itaconic acid in E. coli. PMID:25468427

  3. [Baking ingredients, especially alpha-amylase, as occupational inhalation allergens in the baking industry].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B; Baur, X

    1990-03-31

    Baker's asthma is the most frequent occupational lung disease in Switzerland and West Germany. Cereal flours, and more rarely flour parasites, are implicated as the responsible allergens. Based on an observation of a case of baker's asthma due to monovalent sensitization to alpha-amylase used as additive to flour, 31 bakers with occupational asthma and/or rhinitis were routinely tested by skin tests and serological RAST examinations for allergic sensitivity to flour, alpha-amylase and other bakery additives. 17/31 subjects (55%) reacted positively in scratch tests to a commercial powdered alpha-amylase and 13/20 (65%) to a lecithin preparation. 23/31 (74%) and 19/31 (61%) were RAST positive to wheat and to rye flour respectively. 32% had RAST specific IgE to alpha-amylase (from Aspergillus oryzae), 19.3% to soya bean flour and 16% to malt. 7/12 and 5/12 respectively reacted to trypsin inhibitor and lipoxidase, the main allergens in soya bean. In two patients monosensitization to alpha-amylase was present. In accordance with other reports we recommend that baking additives, especially alpha-amylase, should be tested in allergological diagnosis of occupational diseases in flour processing workers. Full declaration of all additives used in the bakery industry is needed. PMID:2326614

  4. Psychological stress-induced changes in salivary alpha-amylase and adrenergic activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Younhee

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among salivary alpha-amylase, plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate during psychological stress. This study used a pretest-post-test experimental design with a control group, using repeated measures. A total of 33 participants was divided into the experimental group (n = 16) that underwent a college academic final test as the psychological stress and the control group (n = 17) that did not undergo the test. The levels of salivary alpha-amylase and plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured seven times and stress and anxiety were measured once and twice, respectively, as subjective stress markers. Significant changes in the level of salivary alpha-amylase were found in response to psychological stress. However, the correlations of salivary alpha-amylase with the plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were only partially found to be statistically significant. In conclusion, it was shown that salivary alpha-amylase was sensitive to stress throughout this study. Thus, salivary alpha-amylase may be used to measure stress uninvasively in both clinical settings and nursing research where the effects of stress might be scrutinized. Furthermore, the mechanisms of illnesses that are induced by stress could be explored. PMID:21210927

  5. Effect of an herb root extract, herbal dentifrice and synthetic dentifrice on human salivary amylase

    PubMed Central

    Sapra, Gaurav; Vyas, Yogesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rahul; Aggarwal, Ashish; Chandrashekar, K T; Sharma, Kanika

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salivary amylase is an enzyme, which plays a vital role in formation of dental plaque. It has the ability to bind on the bacterial surfaces and to hydrolyze starch, giving rise to products that are transformed into acids leading to dental caries. Suppression of salivary amylase activity can lead to decrease in risk of dental caries and plaque associated periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an herb, Spilanthes calva (in form of a test dentifrice) on human salivary amylase activity and to compare it with other dentifrices. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects of age 18-35 years were randomly selected and divided equally into 4 groups. Group 1 subjects were assigned to use Test Dentifrice (with S. calva root extract), while Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 subjects were assigned to use Herbal Dentifrice (Arodent™), Synthetic Dentifrice (Colgate®), and Control Dentifrice respectively. Salivary amylase activity was determined by Bernfeld method in each group, before and after using the given dentifrices. Results: Maximum inhibition of salivary amylase activity was found in the group using test dentifrice as compared to others. Conclusion: The present study indicates that, the root extract of S. calva possess significant inhibitory activity for salivary amylase. Use of S. calva root extract will provide a wider protection against different pathogenic oral microflora. Use of this extract singly or in combination is strongly recommended in the dentifrice formulations. PMID:24130585

  6. Oral intercourse or secondary transfer? A Bayesian approach of salivary amylase and foreign DNA findings.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Michelle; Moore, Elizabeth

    2013-06-10

    The Bayesian Approach allows forensic scientists to evaluate the significance of scientific evidence in light of two conflicting hypothesis. This aids the investigator to calculate a numerical value of the probability that the scientific findings support one hypothesis over conflicting opinions. In the case where oral intercourse is alleged, α-amylase, an indicator of saliva, is detected on penile swabs. The value of this finding is unknown as it may indicate the presence of saliva resulting from oral intercourse however it may also represent the presence of saliva due to innocent means such as background levels of salivary-α-amylase in the male population due to secondary transfer. Therefore, it is difficult to attach significance to this finding without background information and knowledge. A population study of the background levels of salivary-α-amylase was performed by analysing items of underwear worn under normal circumstances by 69 male volunteers. The Phadebas press test was used to screen the garments for amylase-containing stains and the positive areas were subjected to further confirmation of saliva by the RSID-Saliva kit. 44% of underwear screened had stains containing amylase. This study determined the background level of salivary-α-amylase and DNA on the inside front of male underwear which has potential implications on the interpretation of evidence in alleged oral intercourse. PMID:23683908

  7. [Microbial alpha-amylases: physicochemical properties, substrate specificity and domain structure].

    PubMed

    Avdiiuk, K V; Varbanets', L D

    2013-01-01

    The current literature data on producers, physico-chemical properties and substrate specificity of a-amylases produced by microbes from different taxonomic groups such as bacteria, fungi and yeasts are discussed in the survey. Synthesis of alpha-amylase majority is an inducible process which is stimulated in the presence of starch or products of its hydrolysis. It is possible to increase enzymes activity level by optimization of cultivation conditions of strains-producers. alpha-Amylases, isolated from different sources are distinguished in their physico-chemical properties, particularly in their molecular weights, pH- and thermooptimums, inhibitors and activators. The enzymes hydrolyse soluble starch, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, maltodextrins, alpha- and beta3-cyclodextrins and other carbohydrate substrates. It is well known that alpha-amylases belong to GH-13 family of glycosyl-hydrolases, which contain the catalytic domain A as (beta/alpha)8-barrel. In addition to domain A, alpha-amylases contain two other domains: B and C, which are localized approximately on opposite sides of (beta/alpha)8-barrel. Most of the known alpha-amylases contain calcium ion, which is located on the surface between domains A and B and plays an important role in stability and activity of the enzyme. PMID:24319968

  8. Purification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of an intracellular maltotriose-producing alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148.

    PubMed

    Satoh, E; Uchimura, T; Kudo, T; Komagata, K

    1997-12-01

    An intracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 was purified and characterized. The enzyme was induced by maltose and soluble starch and produced about 80% maltotriose from soluble starch. Maltopentaose was hydrolyzed to maltotriose and maltose and maltohexaose was hydrolyzed mainly to maltotriose by the enzyme. Maltotetraose, maltotriose, and maltose were not hydrolyzed. This intracellular enzyme was considered to be a maltotriose-producing enzyme. The enzymatic characteristics and hydrolysis product from soluble starch were different from those of the extracellular raw-starch-hydrolyzing alpha-amylase of strain 148. The deduced amino acid sequence of the intracellular alpha-amylase was similar to the sequences of the mature forms of extracellular liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus strains, although the intracellular alpha-amylase did not contain a signal peptide. No homology between the intracellular and extracellular alpha-amylases of S. bovis 148 was observed. PMID:9406414

  9. Purification, characterization, and nucleotide sequence of an intracellular maltotriose-producing alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, E; Uchimura, T; Kudo, T; Komagata, K

    1997-01-01

    An intracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 was purified and characterized. The enzyme was induced by maltose and soluble starch and produced about 80% maltotriose from soluble starch. Maltopentaose was hydrolyzed to maltotriose and maltose and maltohexaose was hydrolyzed mainly to maltotriose by the enzyme. Maltotetraose, maltotriose, and maltose were not hydrolyzed. This intracellular enzyme was considered to be a maltotriose-producing enzyme. The enzymatic characteristics and hydrolysis product from soluble starch were different from those of the extracellular raw-starch-hydrolyzing alpha-amylase of strain 148. The deduced amino acid sequence of the intracellular alpha-amylase was similar to the sequences of the mature forms of extracellular liquefying alpha-amylases from Bacillus strains, although the intracellular alpha-amylase did not contain a signal peptide. No homology between the intracellular and extracellular alpha-amylases of S. bovis 148 was observed. PMID:9406414

  10. Molecular, Biochemical, and Dietary Regulation Features of α-Amylase in a Carnivorous Crustacean, the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perera, Erick; Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Casuso, Antonio; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitously distributed throughout microbials, plants and animals. It is widely accepted that omnivorous crustaceans have higher α-amylase activity and number of isoforms than carnivorous, but contradictory results have been obtained in some species, and carnivorous crustaceans have been less studied. In addition, the physiological meaning of α-amylase polymorphism in crustaceans is not well understood. In this work we studied α-amylase in a carnivorous lobster at the gene, transcript, and protein levels. It was showed that α-amylase isoenzyme composition (i.e., phenotype) in lobster determines carbohydrate digestion efficiency. Most frequent α-amylase phenotype has the lowest digestion efficiency, suggesting this is a favoured trait. We revealed that gene and intron loss have occurred in lobster α-amylase, thus lobsters express a single 1830 bp cDNA encoding a highly conserved protein with 513 amino acids. This protein gives rise to two isoenzymes in some individuals by glycosylation but not by limited proteolysis. Only the glycosylated isoenzyme could be purified by chromatography, with biochemical features similar to other animal amylases. High carbohydrate content in diet down-regulates α-amylase gene expression in lobster. However, high α-amylase activity occurs in lobster gastric juice irrespective of diet and was proposed to function as an early sensor of the carbohydrate content of diet to regulate further gene expression. We concluded that gene/isoenzyme simplicity, post-translational modifications and low Km, coupled with a tight regulation of gene expression, have arose during evolution of α-amylase in the carnivorous lobster to control excessive carbohydrate digestion in the presence of an active α-amylase. PMID:27391425

  11. Molecular, Biochemical, and Dietary Regulation Features of α-Amylase in a Carnivorous Crustacean, the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Sitcha, Juan Antonio; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Casuso, Antonio; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; García-Galano, Tsai; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitously distributed throughout microbials, plants and animals. It is widely accepted that omnivorous crustaceans have higher α-amylase activity and number of isoforms than carnivorous, but contradictory results have been obtained in some species, and carnivorous crustaceans have been less studied. In addition, the physiological meaning of α-amylase polymorphism in crustaceans is not well understood. In this work we studied α-amylase in a carnivorous lobster at the gene, transcript, and protein levels. It was showed that α-amylase isoenzyme composition (i.e., phenotype) in lobster determines carbohydrate digestion efficiency. Most frequent α-amylase phenotype has the lowest digestion efficiency, suggesting this is a favoured trait. We revealed that gene and intron loss have occurred in lobster α-amylase, thus lobsters express a single 1830 bp cDNA encoding a highly conserved protein with 513 amino acids. This protein gives rise to two isoenzymes in some individuals by glycosylation but not by limited proteolysis. Only the glycosylated isoenzyme could be purified by chromatography, with biochemical features similar to other animal amylases. High carbohydrate content in diet down-regulates α-amylase gene expression in lobster. However, high α-amylase activity occurs in lobster gastric juice irrespective of diet and was proposed to function as an early sensor of the carbohydrate content of diet to regulate further gene expression. We concluded that gene/isoenzyme simplicity, post-translational modifications and low Km, coupled with a tight regulation of gene expression, have arose during evolution of α-amylase in the carnivorous lobster to control excessive carbohydrate digestion in the presence of an active α-amylase. PMID:27391425

  12. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  13. Alpha-Amylase Activity in Blood Increases after Pharmacological, But Not Psychological, Activation of the Adrenergic System

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Urs M.; La Marca, Roberto; Erni, Katja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Alpha-amylase in both blood and saliva has been used as a diagnostic parameter. While studies examining alpha-amylase activity in saliva have shown that it is sensitive to physiological and psychological challenge of the adrenergic system, no challenge studies have attempted to elucidate the role of the adrenergic system in alpha-amylase activity in blood. We set out to examine the impact of psychological and pharmacological challenge on alpha-amylase in blood in two separate studies. Methods In study 1, healthy subjects were examined in a placebo-controlled, double-blind paradigm using yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. In study 2, subjects were examined in a standardized rest-controlled psychosocial stress protocol. Alpha-amylase activity in blood was repeatedly measured in both studies. Results Results of study 1 showed that alpha-amylase in blood is subject to stronger increases after injection of yohimbine compared to placebo. In study 2, results showed that there was no significant effect of psychological stress compared to rest. Conclusions Alpha-amylase in blood increases after pharmacological activation of the adrenergic pathways suggesting that sympathetic receptors are responsible for these changes. Psychological stress, however, does not seem to have an impact on alpha-amylase in blood. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying activity changes in alpha-amylase in blood in healthy individuals. PMID:26110636

  14. Associations of eating a late-evening meal before bedtime with low serum amylase and unhealthy conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the associations of eating a late-evening meal (ELM), a putative unhealthy eating behavior, with low serum amylase, other eating behaviors, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Therefore, we investigated whether ELM before bedtime was associated with low serum amylase or other clinical factors in 2,426 asymptomatic adults aged 20–80 years. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ELM was significantly associated with low serum amylase (<60 IU/l), overweight, smoking, daily alcohol consumption, skipping breakfast, and rapid eating, but not with abnormal glucose metabolism. In conclusion, ELM may be independently associated with low serum amylase and common unhealthy behaviors. PMID:24354901

  15. Interaction of wheat monomeric and dimeric protein inhibitors with alpha-amylase from yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L. larva).

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, V; Gramenzi, F; Pace, W; Petrucci, T; Poerio, E; Silano, V

    1980-01-01

    The highly purified alpha-amylase from Tenebrio molitor L. larva (yellow mealworm) reversibly combines with two closely related homogeneous glycoprotein inhibitors, one dimeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.19') and one monomeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.28'), from wheat flour. As established by means of difference spectroscopy and kinetic studies, molar combining ratios for the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase-inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 1:1 and 1:2 respectively. Two amylase--inhibitor-0.19 complexes with slightly different retention volumes on Bio-Gel P-300 and only one amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complex were observed. Dissociation constants of the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 0.85 nM and 0.13 nM respectively. A strong tendency of both complexes to precipitate under an ultracentrifugal field was observed; the minimum molecular weight calculated for the two complexes under such conditions was approx. 95 000. The two complexes showed difference spectra indicating involvement of structurally related or identical tryptophyl side chains in the binding of inhibitors 0.28 and 0.19 to the amylase. A model summarizing the main features of the inhibition of the insect amylase by the two wheat protein inhibitors is proposed. PMID:6985361

  16. Phylogenetic and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Thermostable Alpha Amylases of kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huma, Tayyaba; Maryam, Arooma; Rehman, Shahid Ur; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Shaheen, Tayyaba; Haque, Asma; Shaheen, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Alpha amylase family is generally defined as a group of enzymes that can hydrolyse and transglycosylase α-(1, 4) or α-(1, 6) glycosidic bonds along with the preservation of anomeric configuration. For the comparative analysis of alpha amylase family, nucleotide sequences of seven thermo stable organisms of Kingdom Archea i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Kingdom Prokaryotes i.e. Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C), Bacillus subtilis (70°C) and Bacillus KSM K38 (55°C) and Eukaryotes i.e. Aspergillus oryzae (60°C) were selected from NCBI. Primary structure composition analysis and Conserved sequence analysis were conducted through Bio Edit tools. Results from BioEdit shown only three conserved regions of base pairs and least similarity in MSA of the above mentioned alpha amylases. In Mega 5.1 Phylogeny of thermo stable alpha amylases of Kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryote was handled by Neighbor-Joining (NJ) algorithm. Mega 5.1 phylogenetic results suggested that alpha amylases of thermo stable organisms i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C) are more distantly related as compared to less thermo stable organisms. By keeping in mind the characteristics of most thermo stable alpha amylases novel and improved features can be introduced in less thermo stable alpha amylases so that they become more thermo tolerant and productive for industry. PMID:25187685

  17. Chemical constituents of Swertia longifolia Boiss. with α-amylase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ara, Leila; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Read, Roger W.; Arshadi, Sattar; Nikan, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    α-Amylase inhibitors play a critical role in the control of diabetes and many of medicinal plants have been found to act as α-amylase inhibitors. Swertia genus, belonging to the family Gentianaceae, comprises different species most of which have been used in traditional medicine of several cultures as antidiabetic, anti-pyretic, analgesic, liver and gastrointestinal tonic. Swertia longifolia Boiss. is the only species of Swertia growing in Iran. In the present investigation, phytochemical study of S. longifolia was performed and α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant fractions and purified compounds were determined. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with hexane, chloroform, methanol and water, respectively. The components of the hexane and chloroform fractions were isolated by different chromatographic methods and their structures were determined by 1H NMR and 13C NMR data. α-Amylase inhibitory activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using 3,5-dinitro salysilic acid. During phytochemical examination, α-amyrin, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol were purified from the hexane fraction, while ursolic acid, daucosterol and swertiamarin were isolated from chloroform fraction. The results of the biochemical assay revealed α-amylase inhibitory activity of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water fractions, of which the chloroform and methanol fractions were more potent (IC50 16.8 and 18.1 mg/ml, respectively). Among examined compounds, daucosterol was found to be the most potent α-amylase inhibitor (57.5% in concentration 10 mg/ml). With regard to α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant extracts, purified constituents, and antidiabetic application of the species of Swertia genus in traditional medicine of different countries, S. longifolia seems more appropriate species for further mechanistic antidiabetic evaluations. PMID:27051429

  18. Dynamics of the Streptococcus gordonii Transcriptome in Response to Medium, Salivary α-Amylase, and Starch

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Elaine M.; Feng, Xianghui; Pan, Jiachuan; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, interacts with salivary α-amylase via amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). This enzyme hydrolyzes starch to glucose, maltose, and maltodextrins that can be utilized by various oral bacteria for nutrition. Microarray studies demonstrated that AbpA modulates gene expression in response to amylase, suggesting that the amylase-streptococcal interaction may function in ways other than nutrition. The goal of this study was to explore the role of AbpA in gene regulation through comparative transcriptional profiling of wild-type KS1 and AbpA− mutant KS1ΩabpA under various environmental conditions. A portion of the total RNA isolated from mid-log-phase cells grown in 5% CO2 in (i) complex medium with or without amylase, (ii) defined medium (DM) containing 0.8% glucose with/without amylase, and (iii) DM containing 0.2% glucose and amylase with or without starch was reverse transcribed to cDNA and the rest used for RNA sequencing. Changes in the expression of selected genes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Maltodextrin-associated genes, fatty acid synthesis genes and competence genes were differentially expressed in a medium-dependent manner. Genes in another cluster containing a putative histidine kinase/response regulator, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, thioredoxin protein, lipoprotein, and cytochrome c-type protein were downregulated in KS1ΩabpA under all of the environmental conditions tested. Thus, AbpA appears to modulate genes associated with maltodextrin utilization/transport and fatty acid synthesis. Importantly, in all growth conditions AbpA was associated with increased expression of a potential two-component signaling system associated with genes involved in reducing oxidative stress, suggesting a role in signal transduction and stress tolerance. PMID:26025889

  19. Chemical constituents of Swertia longifolia Boiss. with α-amylase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ara, Leila; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Read, Roger W; Arshadi, Sattar; Nikan, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    α-Amylase inhibitors play a critical role in the control of diabetes and many of medicinal plants have been found to act as α-amylase inhibitors. Swertia genus, belonging to the family Gentianaceae, comprises different species most of which have been used in traditional medicine of several cultures as antidiabetic, anti-pyretic, analgesic, liver and gastrointestinal tonic. Swertia longifolia Boiss. is the only species of Swertia growing in Iran. In the present investigation, phytochemical study of S. longifolia was performed and α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant fractions and purified compounds were determined. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with hexane, chloroform, methanol and water, respectively. The components of the hexane and chloroform fractions were isolated by different chromatographic methods and their structures were determined by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data. α-Amylase inhibitory activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using 3,5-dinitro salysilic acid. During phytochemical examination, α-amyrin, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol were purified from the hexane fraction, while ursolic acid, daucosterol and swertiamarin were isolated from chloroform fraction. The results of the biochemical assay revealed α-amylase inhibitory activity of hexane, chloroform, methanol and water fractions, of which the chloroform and methanol fractions were more potent (IC50 16.8 and 18.1 mg/ml, respectively). Among examined compounds, daucosterol was found to be the most potent α-amylase inhibitor (57.5% in concentration 10 mg/ml). With regard to α-amylase inhibitory effects of the plant extracts, purified constituents, and antidiabetic application of the species of Swertia genus in traditional medicine of different countries, S. longifolia seems more appropriate species for further mechanistic antidiabetic evaluations. PMID:27051429

  20. Different polyphenolic components of soft fruits inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Gordon J; Shpiro, Faina; Dobson, Patricia; Smith, Pauline; Blake, Alison; Stewart, Derek

    2005-04-01

    Polyphenol-rich extracts from soft fruits were tested for their ability to inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase. All extracts tested caused some inhibition of alpha-amylase, but there was a 10-fold difference between the least and most effective extracts. Strawberry and raspberry extracts were more effective alpha-amylase inhibitors than blueberry, blackcurrant, or red cabbage. Conversely, alpha-glucosidase was more readily inhibited by blueberry and blackcurrant extracts. The extent of inhibition of alpha-glucosidase was related to their anthocyanin content. For example, blueberry and blackcurrant extracts, which have the highest anthocyanin content, were the most effective inhibitors of alpha-glucosidase. The extracts most effective in inhibiting alpha-amylase (strawberry and raspberry) contain appreciable amounts of soluble tannins. Other tannin-rich extracts (red grape, red wine, and green tea) were also effective inhibitors of alpha-amylase. Indeed, removing tannins from strawberry extracts with gelatin also removed inhibition. Fractionation of raspberry extracts on Sephadex LH-20 produced an unbound fraction enriched in anthocyanins and a bound fraction enriched in tannin-like polyphenols. The unbound anthocyanin-enriched fraction was more effective against alpha-glucosidase than the original extract, whereas the alpha-amylase inhibitors were concentrated in the bound fraction. The LH-20 bound sample was separated by preparative HPLC, and fractions were assayed for inhibition of alpha-amylase. The inhibitory components were identified as ellagitannins using LC-MS-MS. This study suggests that different polyphenolic components of fruits may influence different steps in starch digestion in a synergistic manner. PMID:15796622

  1. Salivary amylase and stress during stressful environment: three Mars analog mission crews study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep; Foing, Bernard H

    2012-06-14

    After the establishment of the space age physicians, human factors engineers, neurologist and psychologists and their special attention to work on people's capability to meet up the physical, psychological, neuroscience and interpersonal strains of working in space, it has been regarded as an issue that seeks urgent consideration. Not study was conducted on effect of simulated Mars analog environment on stress and salivary amylase. So, this study aimed to confirm whether salivary amylase is act as stress biomarker in crew members who took part in Mars analog mission in an isolated and stressful environment. The 18 crew members were selected who took part in Mars Analog Research Station, Utah. Salivary amylase was measured using a biosensor of salivary amylase monitor and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score at pre-extravehicular activity, post-extravehicular activity and on before mission. The state and trait anxiety scores at pre-extravehicular activity for each commander were elevated as compared to after extravehicular activity. There were significant differences in the state and trait anxiety scores between before extravehicular activity and after extravehicular activity of Commander and other members, also there were significant differences in values of before-extravehicular activity between commanders and other members. There were significant differences in values of salivary amylase at before extravehicular activity and after extravehicular activity between commander group and other members. There was significant correlation between salivary amylase and state and trait anxiety scores in all groups. Measuring salivary amylase level could be useful for stress assessment of crew members and population working in a stressful and isolated environment. PMID:22554904

  2. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase from malted jowar (Sorghum bicolor).

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Siva Sai; Singh, Sridevi Annapurna; Rao, A G Appu

    2005-08-24

    Malted cereals are rich sources of alpha-amylase, which catalyzes the random hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1-4)-glycosidic bonds of starch, leading to liquefaction. Amylases play a role in the predigestion of starch, leading to a reduction in the water absorption capacity of the cereal. Among the three cereal amylases (barley, ragi, and jowar), jowar amylase is found to be the most thermostable. The major amylase from malted jowar, a 47 kDa alpha-amylase, purified to homogeneity, is rich in beta structure ( approximately 60%) like other cereal amylases. T(m), the midpoint of thermal inactivation, is found to be 69.6 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Thermal inactivation is found to follow first-order kinetics at pH 4.8, the pH optimum of the enzyme. Activation energy, E(a), is found to be 45.3 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1). The activation enthalpy (DeltaH), entropy (DeltaS*), and free energy change (DeltaG) are calculated to be 44.6 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1), 57.1 +/- 0.3 cal mol(-)(1) K(-)(1), and 25.2 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-)(1), respectively. The thermal stability of the enzyme in the presence of the commonly used food additives NaCl and sucrose has been studied. T(m) is found to decrease to 66.3 +/- 0.3, 58.1 +/- 0.2, and 48.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C, corresponding to the presence of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 M NaCl, respectively. Sucrose acts as a stabilizer; the T(m) value is found to be 77.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C compared to 69.6 +/- 0.3 degrees C in the control. PMID:16104815

  3. Purification and characterization of the extracellular. alpha. -amylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824

    SciTech Connect

    Paquet, V.; Croux, C.; Goma, G.; Soucaille, P. )

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular {alpha}-amylase (1,4-{alpha}-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography (Mono Q) and gel filtration (Superose 12). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.7 and a molecular weight of 84,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was a monomeric protein, the 19-amino-acid N terminus of which displayed 42% homology with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying {alpha}-amylase. The amino acid composition of the enzyme showed a high number of acidic and hydrophobic residues and only one cysteine residue per mole. The activity of the {alpha}-amylase was not stimulated by calcium ions (or other metal ions) or inhibited by EDTA, although the enzyme contained seven calcium atoms per molecule. {alpha}-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.6 and 45{degree}C. The {alpha}-amylase was stable at an acidic pH but very sensitive to thermal inactivation. It hydrolyzed soluble starch, with a K{sub m} of 3.6 g {center dot} liter{sup {minus}1} and a K{sub cat} of 122 mol of reducing sugars {center dot} s{sup {minus}1} {center dot} mol{sup {minus}1}. The {alpha}-amylase showed greater activity with high-molecular-weight substrates than with low-molecular-weight maltooligosaccharides, hydrolyzed glycogen and pullulan slowly, but did not hydrolyze dextran or cyclodextrins. The major end products of maltohexaose degradation were glucose, maltose, and maltotriose; maltotetraose and maltopentaose were formed as intermediate products. Twenty seven percent of the glucoamylase activity generally detected in the culture supernatant of C. acetobutylicum can be attributed to the {alpha}-amylase.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana AMY3 Is a Unique Redox-regulated Chloroplastic α-Amylase*

    PubMed Central

    Seung, David; Thalmann, Matthias; Sparla, Francesca; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lee, Sang Kyu; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Svensson, Birte; Zeeman, Samuel C.; Santelia, Diana

    2013-01-01

    α-Amylases are glucan hydrolases that cleave α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in starch. In vascular plants, α-amylases can be classified into three subfamilies. Arabidopsis has one member of each subfamily. Among them, only AtAMY3 is localized in the chloroplast. We expressed and purified AtAMY3 from Escherichia coli and carried out a biochemical characterization of the protein to find factors that regulate its activity. Recombinant AtAMY3 was active toward both insoluble starch granules and soluble substrates, with a strong preference for β-limit dextrin over amylopectin. Activity was shown to be dependent on a conserved aspartic acid residue (Asp666), identified as the catalytic nucleophile in other plant α-amylases such as the barley AMY1. AtAMY3 released small linear and branched glucans from Arabidopsis starch granules, and the proportion of branched glucans increased after the predigestion of starch with a β-amylase. Optimal rates of starch digestion in vitro was achieved when both AtAMY3 and β-amylase activities were present, suggesting that the two enzymes work synergistically at the granule surface. We also found that AtAMY3 has unique properties among other characterized plant α-amylases, with a pH optimum of 7.5–8, appropriate for activity in the chloroplast stroma. AtAMY3 is also redox-regulated, and the inactive oxidized form of AtAMY3 could be reactivated by reduced thioredoxins. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with mass spectrometry analysis showed that a disulfide bridge between Cys499 and Cys587 is central to this regulation. This work provides new insights into how α-amylase activity may be regulated in the chloroplast. PMID:24089528

  5. Purification and characterization of the extracellular alpha-amylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, V; Croux, C; Goma, G; Soucaille, P

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography (mono Q) and gel filtration (Superose 12). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.7 and a molecular weight of 84,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was a monomeric protein, the 19-amino-acid N terminus of which displayed 42% homology with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying alpha-amylase. The amino acid composition of the enzyme showed a high number of acidic and hydrophobic residues and only one cysteine residue per mole. The activity of the alpha-amylase was not stimulated by calcium ions (or other metal ions) or inhibited by EDTA, although the enzyme contained seven calcium atoms per molecule. alpha-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.6 and 45 degrees C. The alpha-amylase was stable at an acidic pH but very sensitive to thermal inactivation. It hydrolyzed soluble starch, with a Km of 3.6 g . liter-1 and a Kcat of 122 mol of reducing sugars . s-1 . mol-1. The alpha-amylase showed greater activity with high-molecular-weight substrates than with low-molecular-weight maltooligosaccharides, hydrolyzed glycogen and pullulan slowly, but did not hydrolyze dextran or cyclodextrins. The major end products of maltohexaose degradation were glucose, maltose, and maltotriose; maltotetraose and maltopentaose were formed as intermediate products. Twenty seven percent of the glucoamylase activity generally detected in the culture supernatant of C. acetobutylicum can be attributed to the alpha-amylase. Images PMID:8967771

  6. Structural elucidation and molecular characterization of Marinobacter sp. α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Khare, S K

    2016-04-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Marinobacter sp. EMB8 α-amylase was found to be active and stable in salt and organic solvents. A study was carried out using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, and bioinformatics analysis of similar protein sequence to ascertain molecular basis of salt and solvent adaptability of α-amylase. Structural changes recorded in the presence of varying amounts of NaCl exhibited an increase in negative ellipticity as a function of salt, confirming that salt stabilizes the protein and increases the secondary structure, making it catalytically functional. The data of intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence (using 1-anilinonaphthalene 8-sulfonate [ANS] as probe) further confirmed the role of salt. The α-amylase was active in the presence of nonpolar solvents, namely, hexane and decane, but inactivated by ethanol. The decrease in the activity was correlated with the loss of tertiary structure in the presence of ethanol. Guanidine hydrochloride and pH denaturation indicated the molten globule state at pH 4.0. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified α-amylase revealed the relatedness to Pseudoalteromonas sp. α-amylase. "FVHLFEW" was found as the N-terminal signature sequence. Bioinformatics analysis was done using M. algicola α-amylase protein having the same N-terminal signature sequence. The three-dimensional structure of Marinobacter α-amylase was deduced using the I-TASSER server, which reflected the enrichment of acidic amino acids on the surface, imparting the stability in the presence of salt. Our study clearly indicate that salt is necessary for maintaining the secondary and tertiary structure of halophilic protein, which is a necessary prerequisite for catalysis. PMID:26192048

  7. Differential RNA Expression of Two Barley ß-Amylase Genes (Bmy1 and Bmy2) in Developing Grains and Their Association with ß-Amylase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA expression from the barley ß-amylase1 (Bmy1) gene was determined during seed development in four genotypes (Legacy, Harrington, Ashqelon, and PI 296897). The Bmy1 transcript amount in Legacy and Harrington was not significantly different at 17, 19, or 21 days after anthesis (DAA). Ashqelon Bmy...

  8. Interparental Aggression and Parent-Adolescent Salivary Alpha Amylase Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gordis, Elana B.; Margolin, Gayla; Spies, Lauren; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a putative marker of adrenergic activity, in family members engaging in family conflict discussions. We examined symmetry among family members' sAA levels at baseline and in response to a conflict discussion. The relation between a history of interparental aggression on parent-adolescent sAA symmetry also was examined. Participants were 62 families with a mother, father, and biological child age 13-18 (n = 29 girls). After engaging in a relaxation procedure, families participated in a 15-minute triadic family conflict discussion. Participants provided saliva samples at post-relaxation/pre-discussion, immediately post-discussion, and at 10 and 20 min post-discussion. Participants also reported on interparental physical aggression during the previous year. Across the sample we found evidence of symmetry between mothers' and adolescents' sAA levels at baseline and around the discussion. Interparental aggression was associated with lower sAA levels among fathers. Interparental aggression also affected patterns of parent-child sAA response symmetry such that families reporting interparental aggression exhibited greater father-adolescent sAA symmetry than did those with no reports of interparental aggression. Among families with no interparental aggression history, we found consistent mother-adolescent symmetry. These differences suggest different patterns of parent-adolescent physiological attunement among families with interparental aggression. PMID:20096715

  9. Salivary Cortisol, Salivary Alpha Amylase, and the Dental Anxiety Scale

    PubMed Central

    Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/dental history questionnaire. A saliva sample, utilizing the method of passive drooling, was then collected in 2-mL cryovials. Samples were analyzed for salivary cortisol and sAA levels by Salimetrics. Significant associations were observed between DAS scores and presence of pain and history of traumatic dental experience. However, no significant correlations were observed between DAS, cortisol, and sAA levels. Our study reconfirms that dental anxiety is associated with presence of pain and a history of traumatic dental experience. On the other hand, our study was the first to our knowledge to test the correlation between the DAS and sAA; nevertheless, our results failed to show any significant correlation between dental anxiety, cortisol, and sAA levels. PMID:23763559

  10. Regulation of α-Amylase Activity in Bean Stem Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bill D.

    1984-01-01

    α-Amylase activity was assayed in 1-centimeter sections taken from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. Kentucky Wonder) hypocotyls and epicotyls at measured distances from the cotyledons. The activity was low throughout the hypocotyl for the first 7 days. An increase was first observed with etiolated hypocotyls in the basal region, becoming higher in the more central regions by 14 to 17 days. By 21 days the activity was highest in the upper region, but had decreased in the lower regions. A comparable pattern was observed for the epicotyl from etiolated seedlings, the activity increasing first in the region closest to the cotyledons. These increases were associated with loss of cells from the pith in the hypocotyl and epicotyl of both dark- and light-grown plants. Since the changes were observed in tissues virtually devoid of starch, it is hypothesized that the control mechanism is related to the cellular disassembly associated with the mobilization of materials released during senescence rather than to a regulation by the enzyme's substrate or products. PMID:16663519

  11. Immobilization of diastase α-amylase on nano zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Antony, Navya; Balachandran, S; Mohanan, P V

    2016-11-15

    Diastase α-amylase extracted from malt, catalyses break down of starch into maltose. It is commonly used in food and fermentation industry. In the present study nano zinc oxide is used as support for this starch hydrolyzing enzyme. IR study revealed that the enzyme got adsorbed via electrostatic interaction with the functional groups on the support. The immobilized enzyme possessed a better heat-resistance than free enzyme. The kinetic parameters were determined using Lineweaver-Burk plot. The immobilized enzyme showed higher Km 2.08mg/ml than the free enzyme whose Km is 0.45±.05mg/ml. The Vmax of immobilized enzyme was about 2.92±.02mg/ml/min and that of free enzyme was 7.14±.02mg/ml/min, showing decrease in activity after immobilization. The immobilized enzyme showed 70% activity after 30days of storage while free enzyme lost its activity within 7days. About 80% of enzyme retained activity after 4 cycles of reuse. PMID:27283676

  12. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M.; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A.A.; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G.; Armour, John A.L.

    2015-01-01

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  13. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations. PMID:25788522

  14. Existence of hydroxylated MWCNTs demotes the catalysis effect of amylases against starch degradation.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Sivakumar, Amaravathy; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-05-01

    Possible interaction between amylase and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been elucidated with spectroscopic methods. Hyperchromism of the UV-visible spectra of amylase-CNT conjugates suggested ground state complex formation between them. On contrary, the decreasing fluorescence emission spectra revealed the fate of quenching mechanism to be static. Stoke shift observed from the synchronous and 3D spectra suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic micro-environment of amylases by OH-MWCNTS. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra showed alteration in the amide I band, that corresponds to their effect on alpha-helical structures. Loss of alpha-helical structures and alteration in the dichroic band again revealed possible conformational change and effect towards the stability of polypeptide backbone structures. In addition, the shift observed in the SPR band and FTIR peaks of CNTs-amylase conjugates suggested possible alteration in their optical and structural properties. On the functional aspect, amylase activity on starch degradation and hydrolysis were found to be decreased in the presence of CNTs. PMID:26812109

  15. Inhibition of α-amylase activity by cellulose: Kinetic analysis and nutritional implications.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Sushil; Gidley, Michael J; Warren, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    We report on inhibition of α-amylase activity by cellulose based on in vitro experiments. The presence of cellulose in the hydrolysing medium reduced the initial velocity of starch hydrolysis in a concentration dependent manner. α-Amylase adsorption to cellulose was reversible, attaining equilibrium within 30min of incubation, and showed a higher affinity at 37°C compared to 20 and 0°C. The adsorption was almost unchanged in the presence of maltose (2.5-20mM) but was hindered in the presence of excess protein, suggesting non-specific adsorption of α-amylase to cellulose. Kinetic analyses of α-amylase hydrolysis of maize starch in the presence of cellulose showed that the inhibition is of a mixed type. The dissociation constant (Kic) of the EI complex was found to be ca. 3mg/mL. The observed inhibition of α-amylase activity suggests that cellulose in the diet can potentially attenuate starch hydrolysis. PMID:25843863

  16. Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor: structure, biophysics and protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C; Fukuda, Kenji; Svensson, Birte

    2004-02-12

    Bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitors have been implicated in plant defence and regulation of endogenous alpha-amylase action. The barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) inhibits the barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2) and subtilisin-type serine proteases. BASI belongs to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family of the beta-trefoil fold proteins. Diverse approaches including site-directed mutagenesis, hybrid constructions, and crystallography have been used to characterise the structures and contact residues in the AMY2/BASI complex. The three-dimensional structure of the AMY2/BASI complex is characterised by a completely hydrated Ca2+ situated at the protein interface that connects the three catalytic carboxyl groups in AMY2 with side chains in BASI via water molecules. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we have recently demonstrated Ca2+-modulated kinetics of the AMY2/BASI interaction and found that the complex formation involves minimal structural changes. The modulation of the interaction by calcium ions makes it unique among the currently known binding mechanisms of proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors. PMID:14871656

  17. Identification of active site residues of Fenugreek β-amylase: chemical modification and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Vinay K; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of Fenugreek β-amylase is not available in protein data bank. Therefore, an attempt has been made to identify the catalytic amino acid residues of enzyme by employing studies of pH dependence of enzyme catalysis, chemical modification and bioinformatics. Treatment of purified Fenugreek β-amylase with EDAC in presence of glycine methyl ester and sulfhydryl group specific reagents (IAA, NEM and p-CMB), followed a pseudo first-order kinetics and resulted in effective inactivation of enzyme. The reaction with EDAC in presence of NTEE (3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethylester) resulted into modification of two carboxyl groups per molecule of enzyme and presence of one accessible sulfhydryl group at the active site, per molecule of enzyme was ascertained by titration with DTNB. The above results were supported by the prevention of inactivation of enzyme in presence of substrate. Based on MALDI-TOF analysis of purified Fenugreek β-amylase and MASCOT search, β-amylase of Medicago sativa was found to be the best match. To further confirm the amino acid involved in catalysis, homology modelling of β-amylase of M. sativa was performed. The sequence alignment, superimposition of template and target models, along with study of interactions involved in docking of sucrose and maltose at the active site, led to identification of Glu187, Glu381 and Cys344 as active site residues. PMID:25179433

  18. Starch-binding domain affects catalysis in two Lactobacillus alpha-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R; Ruiz, B; Guyot, J P; Sanchez, S

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in alpha-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus alpha-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities. PMID:15640201

  19. Starch-Binding Domain Affects Catalysis in Two Lactobacillus α-Amylases

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, R.; Ruiz, B.; Guyot, J. P.; Sanchez, S.

    2005-01-01

    A new starch-binding domain (SBD) was recently described in α-amylases from three lactobacilli (Lactobacillus amylovorus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus manihotivorans). Usually, the SBD is formed by 100 amino acids, but the SBD sequences of the mentioned lactobacillus α-amylases consist of almost 500 amino acids that are organized in tandem repeats. The three lactobacillus amylase genes share more than 98% sequence identity. In spite of this identity, the SBD structures seem to be quite different. To investigate whether the observed differences in the SBDs have an effect on the hydrolytic capability of the enzymes, a kinetic study of L. amylovorus and L. plantarum amylases was developed, with both enzymes acting on several starch sources in granular and gelatinized forms. Results showed that the amylolytic capacities of these enzymes are quite different; the L. amylovorus α-amylase is, on average, 10 times more efficient than the L. plantarum enzyme in hydrolyzing all the tested polymeric starches, with only a minor difference in the adsorption capacities. PMID:15640201

  20. Classification of microbial α-amylases for food manufacturing using proteinase digestion

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Takumi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tada, Atsuko; Ito, Yusai; Otsuki, Noriko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes produced by microorganisms and plants are used as food additives to aid the processing of foods. Identification of the origin of these enzyme products is important for their proper use. Proteinase digestion of α-amylase products, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, was applied to α-amylase from the mold Aspergillus species, the bacteria Bacillus species, and the actinomycetes Saccharomonospora species. Eighteen commercial products of α-amylase were digested with trypsin and endoproteinase Lys-C and HPLC analyzed. For some proteinase/sample combinations, the area of the intact α-amylase peak decreased and new peaks were detected after digestion. The presence and retention times of the novel peaks were used to group the products. The results from this method, called the proteinase digestion–HPLC method, allowed the classification of the α-amylase products into 10 groups, whereas the results from sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis allowed their classification into seven groups. PMID:25473515

  1. Effect of anthranilic acid on the catabolite repression of a Drosophila amylase gene in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.M.; Moehring, J.M.; Chernin, M.I.

    1987-05-01

    A Drosophila pseudoobscura amylase pseudogene cloned in Escherichia coli is expressed at high levels. The expression of this pseudogene is repressed when glucose (0.5% final conc) is added to a starch minimal medium culture of E. coli cells that contain the amylase plasmid pAMY17F. Addition of anthranilic acid (7 mM final conc.) to catabolite repressed cells acts like adenosine 3',5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) by derepressing the amylase pseudogene at the promoter. This is consistent with the Metabolite Gene Regulation (MGR) model proposed by Kline et al. which suggests that small molecules can circumvent the necessity for cAMP. Catabolite repression of the amylase structural gene of D. pseudoobscura has been previously shown. This would suggest that the amylase pseudogene expression in E. coli is either from a Drosophila structural gene promoter co-cloned with the pseudogene or a catabolite repressible E. coli promoter placed in the proper orientation and reading frame during the rearrangement of pAMY17F.

  2. Characterizing Novel Thermophilic Amylase Producing Bacteria From Taptapani Hot Spring, Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sudip Kumar; Raut, Sangeeta; Satpathy, Soumya; Rout, Prangya Ranjan; Bandyopadhyay, Bidyut; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amylases play a vital role in biotechnological studies and rank an important position in the world enzyme market (25% to 33%). Bioprocess method of amylase production is more effective than the other sources, since the technique is easy, cost effective, fast, and the enzymes of required properties can be procured. Objectives: The current study aimed to report the characteristics of novel amylase producing bacterial strains isolated from Taptapani hot spring, Odisha, India. Materials and Methods: Bacterial strains were isolated by dilution plating method from the water samples collected from Taptapani Hot Spring, Odisha and screened for amylase production through starch hydrolysis. The bacterial isolates were identified morphologically, biochemically, and finally by 16S rDNA profiling. Results: Based on the morphological, physiological, biochemical characteristics and the molecular characterization, the isolates SS1, SS2, and SS3 were identified as Bacillus barbaricus, Aeromonas veroni, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of enzymes from SS1, SS2, and SS3 strains were 19 kDa, 56 kDa and 49 kDa, respectively. Conclusions: The current report isolates, characterizes, and demonstrates the novel heat-adapted amylase-producing bacteria SS1, SS2 and SS3 from Taptapani hot spring, indicating its potentiality and stability under acidic conditions. PMID:25741425

  3. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  4. Phenotypic Variation for Diastatic power, ß-Amylase Activity, and ß-Amylase Thermostability vs. Allelic Variation at the Bmy1 Locus in a Sample of North American Barley Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malting quality data including diastatic power, ß-amylase activity, and ß-amylase thermostability, were collected on malts from three barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) breeding program trials containing two growth habits and 165 lines grown in multiple environments. We attempted to identify causal polymor...

  5. The need for and development of a method to measure carry-over amylase activity in raw and refined sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over carry-over activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in refined sugars to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed for much larger markets than the...

  6. Development of an industrial method to quantitatively measure carry-over amylase activity in raw and refined sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased concern over carry-over activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food manufacturing industries and other end-users. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed...

  7. General Subject 1. Report to ICUMSA on the determination of commercial alpha-amylase activity by a spectrophotometric method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report is given on a new industrial method for the determination of the activity or strength of commercial alpha-amylase at a sugarcane factory or refinery, as well as a recommendation. At the present time, the activities or strengths of commercial alpha-amylases cannot be directly compared becau...

  8. Beta-Amylase activity and thermostability in wild and cultivated barleys with different Bmy1 intron III alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) beta-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. Specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron have been correlated with beta-amylase activity and thermostability and may have potential as a selective marker for cultivar development. The B...

  9. Identification of serum and urine proteins responsible for enhanced pigment production by group B streptococci as amylases.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Fraile, M; Sampedro, A; Ruiz-Bravo, A; Sanbonmatsu, S; Gimenez-Gallego, G

    1996-09-01

    The serum and urine proteins responsible for enhanced pigment production in Streptococcus agalactiae in culture media were purified by chromatography and were identified as amylases by comparison of their amino acid composition with that calculated for proteins with known sequences. Similar pigment-enhancing activity was displayed by other amylases of nonanimal origin and by maltooligosaccharides. PMID:8877142

  10. Mechanism of removal of undesirable residual amylase, insoluble starch, and select colorants from refinery streams by powdered activated carbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need in the world-wide sugar industry to find a practical and economical solution to remove or inactivate residual alpha-amylase that are high temperature stable from factory or refinery streams. A survey of refineries that used amylase and had activated carbon systems for decolorization,...

  11. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  12. Bacterial and Archaeal α-Amylases: Diversity and Amelioration of the Desirable Characteristics for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-01-01

    Industrial enzyme market has been projected to reach US$ 6.2 billion by 2020. Major reasons for continuous rise in the global sales of microbial enzymes are because of increase in the demand for consumer goods and biofuels. Among major industrial enzymes that find applications in baking, alcohol, detergent, and textile industries are α-amylases. These are produced by a variety of microbes, which randomly cleave α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch leading to the formation of limit dextrins. α-Amylases from different microbial sources vary in their properties, thus, suit specific applications. This review focuses on the native and recombinant α-amylases from bacteria and archaea, their production and the advancements in the molecular biology, protein engineering and structural studies, which aid in ameliorating their properties to suit the targeted industrial applications. PMID:27516755

  13. Purification and crystallization of α-amylases from mucoid and non-mucoid B. amyloliquefaciens strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Elif; Mikami, Bunzo

    2001-11-01

    The purified α-amylases from mucoid and non-mucoid B. amyloliquefaciens strains were crystallized in forms suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. Very thin crystals of α-amylase of non-mucoid strain were obtained in the presence 15% propanol, 12% PEG 6000 and 0.1 M PIPES (pH: 7.1) at the end of 3 months and these were not suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystals of the mucoid strain of B. amyloliquefaciens α-amylase were obtained with 30% PEG 6000, 0.2 M (NH 4) 2SO 4 and 0.1 M PIPES (pH: 6.5) at the end of 3 months and these were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis.

  14. Potent Human α-Amylase Inhibition by the β-Defensin-like Protein Helianthamide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif. Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27066537

  15. RAmy2A; a novel alpha-amylase-encoding gene in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Reinl, S J; Rodriguez, R L

    1992-02-15

    The structure and expression of the alpha-amylase-encoding gene, RAmy2A, are described. This only representative of the Amy2 subfamily in rice differs from other cereal alpha-amylase-encoding genes in several respects. It contains the largest introns of all the cereal alpha-amylase-encoding genes examined to date. Moreover, the second of three introns in this gene contains a long inverted repeat sequence that can potentially form a large and stable stem-loop structure in the unspliced RNA transcript. Finally, RAmy2A is constitutively expressed at very low levels in germinated seeds, root, etiolated leaves, immature seeds and callus. This is in marked contrast to the Amy2 genes of wheat and barley which are highly expressed in the aleurone layer of the germinated seeds. PMID:1541400

  16. Differentiation of alpha-amylase from various sources: an approach using selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quarino, L; Hess, J; Shenouda, M; Ristenbatt, R R; Gold, J; Shaler, R C

    1993-01-01

    A radial diffusion assay in an agarose/starch gel utilizing crude kidney bean extract and a commercially prepared alpha-amylase inhibitor isolated from wheat seeds was developed and assessed to determine its ability to differentiate alpha-amylase from various sources. Kidney bean extract was found to have a greater inhibitory effect on AMY2, while the wheat lectin inhibitor was found to have a greater inhibitory effect on AMY1. Neither inhibitor was found to have any effect on commercially prepared bacterial alpha-amylase extract in both liquid preparations and dried stains. Mixtures of varying concentrations of pancreatic and salivary extracts also gave interpretable results. Additionally, dried stains prepared from human body fluids having high levels of AMY2 were differentiated from dried stains prepared from human body fluids containing high levels of AMY1. PMID:8360608

  17. Differential expression of rice alpha-amylase genes during seedling development under anoxia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y S; Thomas, B R; Rodriguez, R L

    1999-08-01

    The unique capability of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings to grow under anoxic conditions may result in part from their ability to express alpha-amylase and maintain the supply of sugar needed for energy metabolism. Previous studies have demonstrated that under aerobic conditions the Amy1 and Amy2 subfamily genes are regulated primarily by phytohormones while the Amy3 subfamily genes are induced during sugar starvation. The expression patterns for these alpha-amylase genes were considerably different in anoxic vs. aerobic rice seedlings. The level of total alpha-amylase mRNA under anoxic conditions was decreased in aleurone layers while it increased in the embryo. Anoxic conditions greatly diminished the expression of the Amy1A gene in aleurone. Conversely, expression of many Amy3 subfamily genes was up-regulated and prolonged in embryo tissues under anoxic conditions. PMID:10527416

  18. Smart phone: a popular device supports amylase activity assay in fisheries research.

    PubMed

    Thongprajukaew, Karun; Choodum, Aree; Sa-E, Barunee; Hayee, Ummah

    2014-11-15

    Colourimetric determinations of amylase activity were developed based on a standard dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) staining method, using maltose as the analyte. Intensities and absorbances of red, green and blue (RGB) were obtained with iPhone imaging and Adobe Photoshop image analysis. Correlation of green and analyte concentrations was highly significant, and the accuracy of the developed method was excellent in analytical performance. The common iPhone has sufficient imaging ability for accurate quantification of maltose concentrations. Detection limits, sensitivity and linearity were comparable to a spectrophotometric method, but provided better inter-day precision. In quantifying amylase specific activity from a commercial source (P>0.02) and fish samples (P>0.05), differences compared with spectrophotometric measurements were not significant. We have demonstrated that iPhone imaging with image analysis in Adobe Photoshop has potential for field and laboratory studies of amylase. PMID:24912700

  19. Thermal stability of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae entrapped in polyacrylamide gel.

    PubMed

    Raviyan, Patcharin; Tang, Juming; Rasco, Barbara A

    2003-08-27

    To determine the suitability as a time-temperature indicator for dielectric pasteurization processes, the thermal stability (50-75 degrees C) of Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase immobilized in polyacrylamide gel in phosphate buffer, mashed potatoes, and minced shrimp was examined. Changing the cross-linking agent concentration from 3.3 to 5.3% and adding 2% salt did not markedly affect the thermal stability of the immobilized alpha-amylase. Thermal inactivation was first order, and immobilization generally improved the thermal stability of alpha-amylase. z values of the immobilized system in test food systems were 10.2 degrees C (phosphate buffer), 8.45 degrees C (minced shrimp), and 7.78 degrees C (mashed potatoes). PMID:12926898

  20. Heterologous expression and secretion of Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase in Leuconostoc citreum.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyun-Ju; Moon, Jin-Seok; Seo, Eun-Young; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-11-01

    To develop a gene expression system for Leuconostoc genus, construction of expression vector and expression of a heterologus protein in Leuconostoc was performed. Alpha-amylase gene from Lactobacillus amylovorus was cloned into a Leuconostoc cloning vector, pLeuCM, with its own signal peptide. pLeuCMamy was introduced into Leuconostoc citreum CB2567 and a successful expression of alpha-amy gene was confirmed by enzyme activity assays. About 90% of alpha-amylase activity was detected in the culture broth, revealing most of expressed alpha-amylase was secreted out cells. The signal sequence of alpha-amy gene is a good candidate for the secretion of heterologous protein by using Leuconostoc host-vector system. PMID:19618275

  1. Study on alpha-amylase hydrolysis of potato amylopectin by a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoko; Noel, Timothy R; Ring, Steve G

    2008-02-13

    Potato amylopectin with phosphate groups was immobilized on a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCMD) using the attractive interaction between opposite charges, and enzymatic starch hydrolysis was monitored directly. Poly( L-lysine) (PLL) proved to be an appropriate cationic linker between the QCMD silica sensor and potato amylopectin. Increased mass and dissipation were observed when amylopectin was adsorbed onto the PLL layer and reversed when alpha-amylase was added. The effect of chitosan with cationic property on the hydrolysis of amylopectin was studied. Chitosan was observed to be adsorbed onto the amylopectin surface and to suppress hydrolysis by alpha-amylase. The formation of alternating layers of amylopectin and chitosan was monitored by QCMD. Amylopectin-chitosan trilayers increased resistance to digestion by alpha-amylase compared to one layer and to control without chitosan. PMID:18181571

  2. Effect of sexual steroids upon ontogeny of alpha-amylase of rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, S L; Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Blanco, A

    1982-04-30

    The effect of gonadectomy (at the 10th day of life) and treatment with sexual steroids (during the first month) upon development of alpha-amylase activity in rat parotid gland has been studied. Alpha-amylase specific activity of parotid glands from 20-day-old orchidectomized rats and from 25-day-old ovariectomized animals was significantly higher than that of intact male and female rats of the same age respectively. Spayed males treated with testosterone (10 microgram/day on the 13th, 15th, and 17th day) and ovariectomized rats treated with oestradiol (2.5 microgram/day from the 16th to the 22nd day) showed values of enzymic activity similar to those of normal animals. Results indicate that oestradiol and testosterone have an inhibitory effect upon the increase of alpha-amylase activity in parotid gland during a very defined period of development. PMID:6178953

  3. Bacterial and Archaeal α-Amylases: Diversity and Amelioration of the Desirable Characteristics for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-01-01

    Industrial enzyme market has been projected to reach US$ 6.2 billion by 2020. Major reasons for continuous rise in the global sales of microbial enzymes are because of increase in the demand for consumer goods and biofuels. Among major industrial enzymes that find applications in baking, alcohol, detergent, and textile industries are α-amylases. These are produced by a variety of microbes, which randomly cleave α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch leading to the formation of limit dextrins. α-Amylases from different microbial sources vary in their properties, thus, suit specific applications. This review focuses on the native and recombinant α-amylases from bacteria and archaea, their production and the advancements in the molecular biology, protein engineering and structural studies, which aid in ameliorating their properties to suit the targeted industrial applications. PMID:27516755

  4. An In Vitro and In Vivo Study of the α-Amylase Activity of Phaseolamin

    PubMed Central

    de Gouveia, Neire Moura; Alves, Fernanda Vieira; Furtado, Fabiana Barcelos; Scherer, Danielli Luana; Mundim, Antonio Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the polypeptide profiles, inhibition of human salivary α-amylase activity, and hemagglutination properties of a commercial phaseolamin sample. We also performed an in vivo assay to investigate the effects of a commercial phaseolamin treatment (100, 500, or 1500 mg/kg) over 20 days on the glycemia, body weight, and serum biochemical parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) of nondiabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The in vitro evaluation showed defined protein profiles, low hemagglutination activity, and high α-amylase inhibition. None of the experimental groups treated with phaseolamin or acarbose showed decreases in body weight. Our data demonstrate that phaseolamin inhibits amylase activity in vitro, reduces blood glucose levels, decreases or attenuates some of the renal and hepatic effects of diabetes in streptozotocin-induced rats, and could therefore have therapeutic potential in the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. PMID:24650210

  5. Interaction of europium and curium with alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Barkleit, Astrid; Heller, Anne; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Bernhard, Gert

    2016-06-01

    The complexation of Eu(iii) and Cm(iii) with the protein α-amylase (Amy), a major enzyme in saliva and pancreatic juice, was investigated over wide ranges of pH and concentration at both ambient and physiological temperatures. Macroscopic sorption experiments demonstrated a strong and fast binding of Eu(iii) to Amy between pH 5 and 8. The protein provides three independent, non-cooperative binding sites for Eu(iii). The overall association constant of these three binding sites on the protein was calculated to be log K = 6.4 ± 0.1 at ambient temperature. With potentiometric titration, the averaged deprotonation constant of the carboxyl groups (the aspartic and glutamic acid residues) of Amy was determined to be pKa = 5.23 ± 0.14 at 25 °C and 5.11 ± 0.24 at 37 °C. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) revealed two different species for both Eu(iii) and Cm(iii) with Amy. In the case of the Eu(iii) species, the stability constants were determined to be log β11 = 4.7 ± 0.2 and log β13 = 12.0 ± 0.4 for Eu : Amy = 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 complexes, respectively, whereas the values for the respective Cm(iii) species were log β11 = 4.8 ± 0.1 and log β13 = 12.1 ± 0.1. Furthermore, the obtained stability constants were extrapolated to infinite dilution to make our data compatible with the existing thermodynamic database. PMID:26866402

  6. Stress affects salivary alpha-Amylase activity in bonobos.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Verena; Deschner, Tobias; Möstl, Erich; Selzer, Dieter; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2012-01-18

    Salivary alpha-Amylase (sAA) is a starch digesting enzyme. In addition to its function in the context of nutrition, sAA has also turned out to be useful for monitoring sympathetic nervous system activity. Recent studies on humans have found a relationship between intra-individual changes in sAA activity and physical and psychological stress. In studies on primates and other vertebrates, non-invasive monitoring of short-term stress responses is usually based on measurements of cortisol levels, which are indicative of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity. The few studies that have used both cortisol levels and sAA activity indicate that these two markers may respond differently and independently to different types of stress such that variation in the degree of the activation of different stress response systems might reflect alternative coping mechanisms or individual traits. Here, we present the first data on intra- and inter-individual variation of sAA activity in captive bonobos and compare the results with information from other ape species and humans. Our results indicate that sAA activity in the bonobo samples was significantly lower than in the human samples but within the range of other great ape species. In addition, sAA activity was significantly higher in samples collected at times when subjects had been exposed to stressors (judged by changes in behavioral patterns and cortisol levels) than in samples collected at other times. Our results indicate that bonobos possess functioning sAA and, as in other species, sAA activity is influenced by autonomic nervous system activity. Monitoring sAA activity could therefore be a useful tool for evaluating stress in bonobos. PMID:21945369

  7. Isolation, characterization and inhibition by acarbose of the alpha-amylase from Lactobacillus fermentum: comparison with Lb. manihotivorans and Lb. plantarum amylases.

    PubMed

    Talamond, P; Desseaux, V; Moreau, Y; Santimone, M; Marchis-Mouren, G

    2002-11-01

    Extracellular alpha-amylase from Lactobacillus fermentum (FERMENTA) was purified by glycogen precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The purification was approximately 28-fold with a 27% yield. The FERMENTA molecular mass (106,000 Da) is in the same range as the ones determined for L. amylovorus (AMYLOA), L. plantarum (PLANTAA) and L. manihotivorans (MANIHOA) alpha-amylases. The amino acid composition of FERMENTA differs from the other lactobacilli considered here, but however, indicates that the peptidic sequence contains two equal parts: the N-terminal catalytic part; and the C-terminal repeats. The isoelectric point of FERMENTA, PLANTAA, MANIHOA are approximately the same (3.6). The FERMENTA optimum pH (5.0) is slightly more acidic and the optimum temperature is lower (40 degrees C). Raw starch hydrolysis catalyzed by all three amylases liberates maltotriose and maltotretaose. Maltose is also produced by FERMENTA and MANIHOA. Maltohexaose FERMENTA catalyzed hydrolysis produces maltose and maltotriose. Finally, kinetics of FERMENTA, PLANTAA and MANIHOA using amylose as a substrate and acarbose as an inhibitor, were carried out. Statistical analysis of kinetic data, expressed using a general velocity equation and assuming rapid equilibrium, showed that: (1) in the absence of inhibitor k(cat)/Km are, respectively, 1x10(9), 12.6x10(9) and 3.2x10(9) s(-1) M(-1); and (2) the inhibition of FERMENTA is of the mixed non-competitive type (K(1i)=5.27 microM; L(1i)=1.73 microM) while the inhibition of PLANTAA and MANIHOA is of the uncompetitive type (L(1i)=1.93 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively). Whatever the inhibition type, acarbose is a strong inhibitor of these Lactobacillus amylases. These results indicate that, as found in porcine and barley amylases, Lactobacillus amylases contain in addition to the active site, a soluble carbohydrate (substrate or product) binding site. PMID:12431403

  8. Identification of a new oat β-amylase by functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Nihed; Khemakhem, Bassem; Fendri, Imen; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Baril, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2016-01-01

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) seed extracts exhibited a high degree of catalytic activity including amylase activities. Proteins in the oat seed extracts were optimized for their amylolytic activities. Oat extract with amylolytic activity was separated by SDS-PAGE and a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was subjected to tryptic digestion. The generated amino acid sequences were analyzed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) and database searches. These sequences were used to identify a partial cDNA from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of A. sativa L. Based upon EST sequences, a predicted full-length gene was identified, with an open reading frame of 1464 bp encoding a protein of 488 amino acid residues (AsBAMY), with a theoretical molecular mass of 55 kDa identified as a β-amylase belonging to the plant β-amylase family. Primary structure of oat β-amylase (AsBAMY) protein indicated high similarity with other β-amylase from other cereals such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and rye (Secale cereale) with two conserved Glu residues (E184 and E378) assigned as the “putative” catalytic residues which would act as an acid and base pair in the catalytic process. In addition, a 3D-model of AsBAMY was built from known X-ray structures and sequence alignments. A similar core (β/α)8-barrel architecture was found in AsBAMY like the other cereal β-amylases with a specific location of the active site in a pocket-like cavity structure made at one end of this core (β/α)8-barrel domain suggesting an accessibility of the non-reducing end of the substrate and thus confirming the results of AsBAMY exo-acting hydrolase. PMID:26455400

  9. Amylase release from dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells stimulated by glucagon: effect of membrane stabilizers.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The effect of membrane stabilizers and cytochalasin-B on amylase secretion, basal and induced by ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ, bethanechol and glucagon, was studied in dissociated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Cytochalasin-B did not affect basal or secretagogue-stimulated amylase secretion. 3. Membrane stabilizers [thymol (10(-7)-10(-4) M), chlorpromazine (10(-7)-10(-4) M) and propranolol (10(-7)-10(-5) M) did not alter basal release of amylase. At higher concentrations of thymol (10(-3) M), chlorpromazine (10(-3) M) and propranolol (10(-4) M), dissociated acinar cells were lysed as indicated by an increase in release of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). 4. Ionophore A23187, CCK-PZ (maximal effective concentrations, 0.01 u. ml.-1), bethanechol (maximal effective concentrations, 10(-4) M) and glucagon increased amylase secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. Concentrations of CCK-PZ and bethanechol beyond optimal levels decreased amylase secretion. Concentrations of ionophore A23187 and glucagon when tested beyond 10(-6) M and 10(-4) M respectively increased the release of LDH. In concentrations that were non-toxic, membrane stabilizers blocked the stimulating effect of cholecystokinin-pancreozymin and bethanechol on amylase secretion but did not alter the response to A23187 and glucagon. 5. Unlike bethanechol, glucagon neither increased the uptake of 45Ca nor did it alter the release of 45Ca from cells previously loaded with 45CaCl2. 6. These data provide evidence that stimulus-secretion coupling in dissociated pancreatic acinar cells is basically similar to cells in situ. The effect of glucagon is consistent with the model in which hormone-dependent mobilization of Ca2+ from intra- or extracellular sources is bypassed leading to digestive enzyme secretion. PMID:6166745

  10. [Alpha-amylase as an occupational allergen in baking industry employees].

    PubMed

    De Zotti, R; Larese, F; Molinari, S

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 226 bakers and pastry makers and in 88 students of a training school for bakers, we evaluated skin sensitization to the common allergens, wheat and alpha amylase. Skin prick tests were positive to the enzyme in 17 exposed subjects (7.5%) and in one student with previous occupational exposure as a baker; 27 exposed subjects (11.9%) and 2 students were sensitized to wheat. Among the 42 exposed workers who complained of work-related symptoms, 12 (28.6%) cases were skin positive to amylase and 17 (42.9%) to wheat. Among the 17 workers who were positive to amylase, 16 were also sensitized to wheat and/or common allergens, 12 complained of symptoms at work but since in many cases there was a positive response to wheat, too, it is impossible to speculate on the role of each allergen in inducing symptoms. One case, with work-related rhinoconjunctivitis, had skin sensitization only to alpha amylase but no specific IgE in the serum. These findings confirm that bakers are at risk of sensitization not only to wheat allergen but also to amylase from Aspergillus oryzae. The enzyme should be included in the list of substances to be tested among bakers in whom an occupational allergy is suspected, but particular care should be taken in evaluating the cutaneous response, especially if compared to wheat wheals. Further investigations are also needed to identify the source of risk and to better define the characteristics of the enzyme and the relationship between skin reaction to amylase, sensitization to wheat and atopy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8072442

  11. Prevalence of the Amylase-Binding Protein A Gene (abpA) in Oral Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan E.; Rogers, Jeffrey D.; Haase, Elaine M.; Zelasko, Peter M.; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    Salivary amylase binds specifically to a number of oral streptococcal species. This interaction may play an important role in dental plaque formation. Recently, a 585-bp gene was cloned and sequenced from Streptococcus gordonii Challis encoding a 20.5-kDa amylase-binding protein (AbpA). The goal of this study was to determine if related genes are present in other species of oral streptococci. Biotinylated abpA was used in Southern blot analysis to screen genomic DNA from several strains representing eight species of oral streptococci. This probe hybridized with a 4.0-kb HindIII restriction fragment from all 13 strains of S. gordonii tested. The probe did not appear to bind to any restriction fragments from other species of amylase-binding oral streptococci including Streptococcus mitis (with the exception of 1 of 14 strains), Streptococcus crista (3 strains), Streptococcus anginosus (1 strain), and Streptococcus parasanguinis (1 strain), or to non-amylase-binding oral streptococci including Streptococcus sanguinis (3 strains), Streptococcus oralis (4 strains), and Streptococcus mutans (1 strain). Primers homologous to sequences within the 3′ and 5′ ends of abpA yielded products of 400 bp following PCR of genomic DNA from the Southern blot-positive strains. Several of these PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The levels of similarity of these cloned products to the abpA of S. gordonii Challis ranged from 91 to 96%. These studies reveal that the abpA gene appears to be specific to S. gordonii and differs from genes encoding amylase-binding proteins from other species of amylase-binding streptococci. PMID:10565935

  12. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of a Highly Thermostable Amylase Gene of Thermotoga petrophila into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Asma; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; ud Din, Zia; Aftab, Saima; Iqbal, Irfana; ul Haq, Ikram

    2016-02-01

    A putative α-amylase gene of Thermotoga petrophila was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-21a (+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal expression of the α-amylase using various parameters, such as pH, temperature, time of induction and addition of an inducer. The optimum temperature and pH for the maximum expression of α-amylase were 22 °C and 7.0 pH units, respectively. Purification of the recombinant enzyme was carried out by heat treatment method, followed by ion exchange chromatography with 34.6-fold purification having specific activity of 126.31 U mg(-1) and a recovery of 56.25%. Molecular weight of the purified α-amylase, 70 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 100 °C temperature and at pH of 7.0. The enzyme activity was increased in the presence of metal ions especially Ca(+2) and decreased in the presence of EDTA indicating that the α-amylase was a metalloenzyme. However, addition of 1% Tween 20, Tween 80 and β-mercaptoethanol constrained the enzyme activity to 87, 96 and 89%, respectively. No considerable effect of organic solvents (ethanol, methanol, isopropanol, acetone and n-butanol) was observed on enzyme activity. With soluble starch as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was 73.8 U mg(-1). The α-amylase enzyme was active to hydrolyse starch forming maltose. PMID:26526464

  13. A lectin gene encodes the alpha-amylase inhibitor of the common bean.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-01-01

    An alpha-amylase inhibitor that inhibits insect and mammalian alpha-amylases but not plant alpha-amylases, is present in seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). We have purified the alpha-amylase inhibitor by using a selective heat treatment in acidic medium and affinity chromatography with porcine pancreas alpha-amylase coupled to agarose. Under sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, the purified inhibitor gave rise to five bands with mobilities corresponding to molecular masses ranging from 14 to 19 kDa. N-terminal sequencing (up to 15 amino acids) of the polypeptides obtained from these bands resulted in only two different sequences matching two stretches of the amino acid sequence deduced from an already described lectin gene [Hoffman, L. M. (1984) J. Mol. Appl. Gen. 2,447-453]. This gene is different from but closely related to the genes that code for phytohemagglutinin, the major lectin of bean. Further evidence based on amino acid composition, identification of a precursor, and recognition of the product of the gene (expressed in Escherichia coli) by an anti-alpha-amylase inhibitor serum confirms that the inhibitor is encoded by this or a closely related lectin gene. This finding assigns a biological function, which has been described at the molecular level, to a plant lectin gene product and supports the defense role postulated for seed lectins. The lack of homology with other families of enzyme inhibitors suggests that this may be the first member of a new family of plant enzyme inhibitors. Images PMID:2682631

  14. Purification and characterization of periplasmic alpha-amylase from Xanthomonas campestris K-11151.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, J; Onitsuka, N; Nakano, T; Shibata, Y; Hizukuri, S; Entani, E

    1994-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris K-11151, isolated from soil, produced a periplasmic alpha-amylase of a new type. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, as shown by several criteria. The purified enzyme showed almost the same activities on alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, soluble starch, and amylose. Moreover, it was active on branched cyclodextrins, pullulan, and maltose but not on glycogen. Kinetic analysis showed that alpha-cyclodextrin was the best substrate among the cyclodextrins. The substrate specificity suggested that this enzyme had the combined activities of alpha-amylase, cyclodextrinase, and neopullulanase. Images PMID:8206836

  15. Alternative catalytic anions differentially modulate human alpha-amylase activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Maurus, Robert; Begum, Anjuman; Williams, Leslie K; Fredriksen, Jason R; Zhang, Ran; Withers, Stephen G; Brayer, Gary D

    2008-03-18

    A mechanistic study of the essential allosteric activation of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by chloride ion has been conducted by exploring a wide range of anion substitutions through kinetic and structural experiments. Surprisingly, kinetic studies indicate that the majority of these alternative anions can induce some level of enzymatic activity despite very different atomic geometries, sizes, and polyatomic natures. These data and subsequent structural studies attest to the remarkable plasticity of the chloride binding site, even though earlier structural studies of wild-type human pancreatic alpha-amylase suggested this site would likely be restricted to chloride binding. Notably, no apparent relationship is observed between anion binding affinity and relative activity, emphasizing the complexity of the relationship between chloride binding parameters and the activation mechanism that facilitates catalysis. Of the anions studied, particularly intriguing in terms of observed trends in substrate kinetics and their novel atomic compositions were the nitrite, nitrate, and azide anions, the latter of which was found to enhance the relative activity of human pancreatic alpha-amylase by nearly 5-fold. Structural studies have provided considerable insight into the nature of the interactions formed in the chloride binding site by the nitrite and nitrate anions. To probe the role such interactions play in allosteric activation, further structural analyses were conducted in the presence of acarbose, which served as a sensitive reporter molecule of the catalytic ability of these modified enzymes to carry out its expected rearrangement by human pancreatic alpha-amylase. These studies show that the largest anion of this group, nitrate, can comfortably fit in the chloride binding pocket, making all the necessary hydrogen bonds. Further, this anion has nearly the same ability to activate human pancreatic alpha-amylase and leads to the production of the same acarbose product

  16. Componential profile and amylase inhibiting activity of phenolic compounds from Calendula officinalis L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    An ethanolic extract and its ethyl acetate-soluble fraction from leaves of Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) were found to show an inhibitory effect on amylase. From the crude extract fractions, one new phenolic acid glucoside, 6'-O-vanilloyl-β-D-glucopyranose, was isolated, together with twenty-four known compounds including five phenolic acid glucosides, five phenylpropanoids, five coumarins, and nine flavonoids. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral data. The main components, isoquercitrin, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin-3-O-(6''-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on amylase. PMID:24683352

  17. Molecular characterization of a bean alpha-amylase inhibitor that inhibits the alpha-amylase of the mexican bean weevil Zabrotes subfasciatus.

    PubMed

    Grossi de Sa, M F; Mirkov, T E; Ishimoto, M; Colucci, G; Bateman, K S; Chrispeels, M J

    1997-01-01

    Cultivated varieties of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) contain an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI-1) that inhibits porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA; EC 3.2.1.1) and the amylases of certain seed weevils, but not that of the Mexican bean weevil, Zabrotes subfasciatus. A variant of alpha AI-1, called alpha AI-2, is found in certain arcelin-containing wild accessions of the common bean. The variant alpha AI-2 inhibits Z. subfasciatus alpha-amylase (ZSA), but not PPA. We purified alpha AI-2 and studied its interaction with ZSA. The formation of the alpha AI-2-ZSA complex is time-dependent and occurs maximally at pH 5.0 or below. When a previously isolated cDNA assumed to encode alpha AI-2 was expressed in transgenic tobacco seeds, the seeds contained inhibitory activity toward ZSA but not toward PPA, confirming that the cDNA encodes alpha AI-2. The inhibitors alpha AI-1 and alpha AI-2 share 78% sequence identity at the amino acid level and they differ in an important region that is part of the site where the enzyme binds the inhibitor. The swap of a tripeptide in this region was not sufficient to change the specificity of the two inhibitors towards their respective enzymes. The three-dimensional structure of the alpha AI-1/PPA complex has just been solved and we recently obtained the derived amino acid sequence of ZSA. This additional information allows us to discuss the results described here in the framework of the amino acid residues of both proteins involved in the formation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex and to pinpoint the amino acids responsible for the specificity of the interaction. PMID:9431678

  18. Characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex between barley alpha-amylase and the bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from barley seeds.

    PubMed

    Vallée, F; Kadziola, A; Bourne, Y; Abe, J; Svensson, B; Haser, R

    1994-02-11

    The complex between a member of the barley malt alpha-amylase isozyme 2 family (AMY2-2), and the endogenous bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, BASI, has been crystallized by the hanging drop vapour diffusion technique at a AMY2-2: BASI molar ratio of 1:1. Crystals have been grown within 4 days from solutions containing polyethylene glycol and calcium chloride. Analysis of single crystals by gel electrophoresis showed the presence of both proteins in the crystal lattice. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit cell dimensions a = 74.5 A, b = 96.9 A, c = 171.3 A and they diffract to 2.0 A resolution. The presence of two molecules of the 1:1 complex in the asymmetric unit gives a solvent content of 45% by volume. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the complex was confirmed by the molecular replacement method, using as a search model the recently determined three-dimensional structure of the barley alpha-amylase. PMID:8107117

  19. Dose- and tissue-specific interaction of monoterpenes with the gibberellin-mediated release of potato tuber bud dormancy, sprout growth and induction of α-amylases and β-amylases.

    PubMed

    Rentzsch, Sonja; Podzimska, Dagmara; Voegele, Antje; Imbeck, Madeleine; Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA) are involved in bud dormancy release in several species. We show here that GA-treatment released bud dormancy, initiated bud sprouting and promoted sprout growth of excised potato tuber bud discs ('eyes'). Monoterpenes from peppermint oil (PMO) and S-(+)-carvone (CAR) interact with the GA-mediated bud dormancy release in a hormesis-type response: low monoterpene concentrations enhance dormancy release and the initiation of bud sprouting, whereas high concentrations inhibit it. PMO and CAR did, however, not affect sprout growth rate after its onset. We further show that GA-induced dormancy release is associated with tissue-specific regulation of α- and β-amylases. Molecular phylogenetic analysis shows that potato α-amylases cluster into two distinct groups: α-AMY1 and α-AMY2. GA-treatment induced transcript accumulation of members of both α-amylase groups, as well as α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprout and 'sub-eye' tissues. In sprouts, CAR interacts with the GA-mediated accumulation of α-amylase transcripts in an α-AMY2-specific and dose-dependent manner. Low CAR concentrations enhance the accumulation of α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts, but do not affect the α-AMY1-type transcripts. Low CAR concentrations also enhance the accumulation of α- and β-amylase enzyme activity in sprouts, but not in 'sub-eye' tissues. In contrast, high CAR concentrations have no appreciable effect in sprouts on the enzyme activities and the α-amylase transcript abundances of either group. The dose-dependent effects on the enzyme activities and the α-AMY2-type α-amylase transcripts in sprouts are specific for CAR but not for PMO. Different monoterpenes therefore may have specific targets for their interaction with hormone signalling pathways. PMID:21858448

  20. Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 Using Pearl Millet and Its Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Bijay K.; Jana, Arijit; Nanda, Prativa K.; DasMohapatra, Pradeep K.; Sahoo, Santi L.; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, Aspergillus terreus NCFT4269.10 was employed in liquid static surface (LSSF) and solid state (SSF) fermentation to assess the optimal conditions for α-amylase biosynthesis. One-variable-at-a-time approach (quasi-optimum protocol) was primarily used to investigate the effect of each parameter on production of amylase. The maximum amylase production was achieved using pearl millet (PM) as substrate by SSF (19.19 ± 0.9 Ug−1) and also in presence of 1 mM magnesium sulfate, 0.025% (w/v) gibberellic acid, and 30 mg/100 ml (w/v) of vitamin E (~60-fold higher production of amylase) with the initial medium pH of 7.0 and incubation at 30 °C for 96 h. In addition, maltose, gelatin and isoleucine also influenced the α-amylase production. Amylase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass around 15.3 kDa. The enzyme comprised of a typical secondary structure containing α-helix (12.2%), β-pleated sheet (23.6%), and β-turn (27.4%). Exploitation of PM for α-amylase production with better downstream makes it the unique enzyme for various biotechnological applications. PMID:27242841

  1. Physiological characterisation of recombinant Aspergillus nidulans strains with different creA genotypes expressing A. oryzae alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Agger, Teit; Petersen, Jesper B; O'Connor, Susan M; Murphy, Rachael L; Kelly, Joan M; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-18

    The physiology of three strains of Aspergillus nidulans was examined--a creA deletion strain, a wild type creA genotype and a strain containing extra copies of the creA gene, all producing Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase. The strains were cultured in batch and continuous cultivations and the biomass formation and alpha-amylase production was characterised. Overexpression of the creA gene resulted in a lower maximum specific growth rate and a slightly higher repression of the alpha-amylase production during conditions with high glucose concentration. No expression of creA also resulted in a decreased maximum specific growth rate, but also in drastic changes in morphology. Furthermore, the expression of alpha-amylase was completely derepressed and creA thus seems to be the only regulatory protein responsible for glucose repression of alpha-amylase expression. The effect of different carbon sources on the alpha-amylase production in the creA deletion strain was investigated and it was found that starch was the best inducer. The degree of induction by starch increased almost linearly with the concentration of starch in starch/glucose mixtures. High-density batch cultivation was performed with the creA deletion strain and a final titre of 6.0 g l(-1) of alpha-amylase was reached after 162 h of cultivation. PMID:11689252

  2. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-10-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24975239

  3. The relationship between the level of salivary alpha amylase activity and pain severity in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Jazaeri, Mina; Babaei, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of dental pain severity is very challenging in dentistry. Previous studies have suggested that elevated salivary alpha amylase may contribute to increased physical stresses. There is a close association between salivary alpha amylase and plasma norepinephrine under stressful physical conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pain severity and salivary alpha amylase levels in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods Thirty-six patients (20 females and 16 males) with severe tooth pain due to symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were selected. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was used to assess the pain severity in each patient. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected, and the level of alpha amylase activity was assessed by the spectrophotometric method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13. Results The level of alpha amylase was significantly increased in the saliva in association with pain severity assessed by VAS. The salivary alpha amylase was also elevated with increased age and in males. Conclusions There was a significant correlation between the VAS pain scale and salivary alpha amylase level, which indicates this biomarker may be a good index for the objective assessment of pain intensity. PMID:24010080

  4. Production of α-Amylase by Aspergillus terreus NCFT 4269.10 Using Pearl Millet and Its Structural Characterization.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Bijay K; Jana, Arijit; Nanda, Prativa K; DasMohapatra, Pradeep K; Sahoo, Santi L; Patra, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, Aspergillus terreus NCFT4269.10 was employed in liquid static surface (LSSF) and solid state (SSF) fermentation to assess the optimal conditions for α-amylase biosynthesis. One-variable-at-a-time approach (quasi-optimum protocol) was primarily used to investigate the effect of each parameter on production of amylase. The maximum amylase production was achieved using pearl millet (PM) as substrate by SSF (19.19 ± 0.9 Ug(-1)) and also in presence of 1 mM magnesium sulfate, 0.025% (w/v) gibberellic acid, and 30 mg/100 ml (w/v) of vitamin E (~60-fold higher production of amylase) with the initial medium pH of 7.0 and incubation at 30 °C for 96 h. In addition, maltose, gelatin and isoleucine also influenced the α-amylase production. Amylase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass around 15.3 kDa. The enzyme comprised of a typical secondary structure containing α-helix (12.2%), β-pleated sheet (23.6%), and β-turn (27.4%). Exploitation of PM for α-amylase production with better downstream makes it the unique enzyme for various biotechnological applications. PMID:27242841

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of two alpha-amylase genes from Streptococcus bovis 148 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, E; Niimura, Y; Uchimura, T; Kozaki, M; Komagata, K

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-amylase genes of Streptococcus bovis 148 were cloned in Escherichia coli MC1061, using pBR322. The recombinant plasmids were classified into two groups on the basis of their restriction maps. Southern blot analysis did not show homology between the two types of alpha-amylase genes, and the two alpha-amylase genes existed on the chromosomal DNA of S. bovis 148. The enzymatic properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the two purified enzymes produced by the cloned E. coli strains were quite different from each other. Particularly, one alpha-amylase (Amy I) was adsorbed on raw corn starch and hydrolyzed raw corn starch, and another (Amy II) was not adsorbed on raw corn starch and did not hydrolyze raw corn starch. Amy I was considered to be the same as the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148 in raw starch absorbability, ability to hydrolyze raw corn starch, enzymatic characteristics, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and mode of action on soluble starch. Amy II showed a unique pattern of oligosaccharide production from soluble starch compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Amy II was suggested to be an intracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Images PMID:8285674

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of two alpha-amylase genes from Streptococcus bovis 148 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Satoh, E; Niimura, Y; Uchimura, T; Kozaki, M; Komagata, K

    1993-11-01

    The alpha-amylase genes of Streptococcus bovis 148 were cloned in Escherichia coli MC1061, using pBR322. The recombinant plasmids were classified into two groups on the basis of their restriction maps. Southern blot analysis did not show homology between the two types of alpha-amylase genes, and the two alpha-amylase genes existed on the chromosomal DNA of S. bovis 148. The enzymatic properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the two purified enzymes produced by the cloned E. coli strains were quite different from each other. Particularly, one alpha-amylase (Amy I) was adsorbed on raw corn starch and hydrolyzed raw corn starch, and another (Amy II) was not adsorbed on raw corn starch and did not hydrolyze raw corn starch. Amy I was considered to be the same as the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148 in raw starch absorbability, ability to hydrolyze raw corn starch, enzymatic characteristics, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and mode of action on soluble starch. Amy II showed a unique pattern of oligosaccharide production from soluble starch compared with the extracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. Amy II was suggested to be an intracellular alpha-amylase of S. bovis 148. PMID:8285674

  7. α-Amylase sensor based on the degradation of oligosaccharide hydrogel films monitored with a quartz crystal sensor.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Martin John; Biela, Anna; Krause, Steffi

    2015-05-15

    α-Amylase hydrolyses starch molecules to produce smaller oligosaccharides and sugars. Amylases are of great importance in biotechnology and find application in fermentation, detergents, food and the paper industry. The measurement of α-amylase activity in serum and urine has been used in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Salivary amylase has also been shown to be a stress indicator. Sensor coatings suitable for the detection of α-amylase activity have been developed. Oligosaccharides such as glycogen and amylopectin were spin-coated onto gold coated quartz crystals with a base frequency of 10 MHz. The films were subsequently cross-linked with hexamethylene diisocyanate. Film degradation was monitored with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance measurements. The films were shown to be stable in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Addition of α-amylase to the solution resulted in the rapid degradation of the films. The maximum rate of degradation was found to be strongly dependent on the amylase activity in the range typically found in serum when diagnosing pancreatitis (0.08-8 U/ml). Sensor responses in serum were found to be very similar to those obtained in buffer indicating the absence of non-specific binding. PMID:25266253

  8. Purification of a. beta. -amylase that accumulates in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism. [Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Amylase activity is elevated 5- to 10-fold in leaves of several different Arabidopsis thaliana mutants defective in starch metabolism when they are grown under a 12-hour photoperiod. Activity is also increased when plants are grown under higher light intensity. It was previously determined that the elevated activity was an extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. Due to the location of this enzyme outside the chloroplast, its function is not known. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from leaves of both a starchless mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase and from the wild type using polyethylene glycol fractionation and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the {beta}-amylase from both sources was 55,000 daltons as determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration studies indicated that the enzyme was a monomer. The specific activities of the purified protein from mutant and wild-type sources, their substrate specificities, and K{sub m} for amylopectin were identical. Based on these results it was concluded that the mutant contained an increased level of {beta}-amylase protein. Enzyme neutralization studies using a polyclonal antiserum raised to purified {beta}-amylase showed that in each of two starchless mutants, one starch deficient mutant and one starch overproducing mutant, the elevated amylase activity was due to elevated {beta}-amylase protein.

  9. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24975239

  10. Polyaniline-graphene based α-amylase biosensor with a linear dynamic range in excess of 6 orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Sofia Rodrigues; Lloyd, Catherine; Yao, Seydou; Andrea Salvatore Gazze; Whitaker, Iain S; Francis, Lewis; Conlan, R Steven; Azzopardi, Ernest

    2016-11-15

    α-amylase is an established marker for diagnosis of pancreatic and salivary disease, and recent research has seen a substantial expansion of its use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications for infection, cancer and wound healing. The lack of bedside monitoring devices for α-amylase detection has hitherto restricted the clinical progress of such applications. We have developed a highly sensitive α-amylase immunosensor platform, produced via in situ electropolymerization of aniline onto a screen-printed graphene support (SPE). Covalently binding an α-amylase specific antibody to a polyaniline (PANI) layer and controlling device assembly using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we have achieved a highly linear response against α-amylase concentration. Each stage of the assembly was characterized using a suite of high-resolution topographical, chemical and mechanical techniques. Quantitative, highly sensitive detection was demonstrated using an artificially spiked human blood plasma samples. The device has a remarkably wide limit of quantification (0.025-1000IU/L) compared to α-amylase assays in current clinical use. With potential for simple scale up to volume manufacturing though standard semiconductor production techniques and subsequently clinical application, this biosensor will enable clinical benefit through early disease detection, and better informed administration of correct therapeutic dose of drugs used to treat α-amylase related diseases. PMID:27196256

  11. Conquering the control of insoluble and soluble starch with novel applications of amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The new knowledge that there is markedly more insoluble starch than previously considered in products across both the sugarcane factory and refinery has processing implications. This includes the application of a-amylases in the factory to control not only soluble but insoluble starch. Studies wer...

  12. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has the same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.

  13. DNA sequence evolution of the amylase multigene family in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    PubMed

    Brown, C J; Aquadro, C F; Anderson, W W

    1990-09-01

    The alpha-Amylase locus in Drosophila pseudoobscura is a multigene family of one, two or three copies on the third chromosome. The nucleotide sequences of the three Amylase genes from a single chromosome of D. pseudoobscura are presented. The three Amylase genes differ at about 0.5% of their nucleotides. Each gene has a putative intron of 71 (Amy1) or 81 (Amy2 and Amy3) bp. In contrast, Drosophila melanogaster Amylase genes do not have an intron. The functional Amy1 gene of D. pseudoobscura differs from the Amy-p1 gene of D. melanogaster at an estimated 13.3% of the 1482 nucleotides in the coding region. The estimated rate of synonymous substitutions is 0.398 +/- 0.043, and the estimated rate of nonsynonymous substitutions is 0.068 +/- 0.008. From the sequence data we infer that Amy2 and Amy3 are more closely related to each other than either is to Amy1. From the pattern of nucleotide substitutions we reason that there is selection against synonymous substitutions within the Amy1 sequence; that there is selection against nonsynonymous substitutions within the Amy2 sequence, or that Amy2 has recently undergone a gene conversion with Amy1; and that Amy3 is nonfunctional and subject to random genetic drift. PMID:1699840

  14. Biochemistry, Structure and Function of Non-Wheat Proteins: Case Study of Barley ß-Amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of a protein is not always evident and may be due to its multifunctional nature. ß-Amylase in seeds of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) constitutes approximately 2% of the total protein in mature seeds and is assumed to be important when storage proteins are mobilized to support protein s...

  15. Fucoidan - An α-amylase inhibitor from Sargassum wightii with relevance to NIDDM.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana Senthil, S; Vinoth Kumar, T; Geetharamani, D; Suja, G; Yesudas, Rincy; Chacko, Amrutha

    2015-11-01

    The present experiment was conducted to screen the α-amylase inhibitory activity of fucoidan extracted from Sargassum wightii collected at the coastal area of Mandapam, Tamil Nadu, India. Fucoidan was extracted from the sporophyll of S. Wightii by ethanol and CaCl2 precipitation method. The average yield was 1.8±0.16% and the extracted fucoidan was found to contain 53±0.52% of fucose and 36±0.60% of sulphate. Structural elucidation (FT-IR and NMR) and in vitro α-amylase activity of purified fucoidon were performed. Fucoidan at the concentration of 62.5, 125 and 250μg exhibited 24.81, 62.50 and 99.24% inhibition against α-amylase, respectively, in a dose dependent manner. Fucoidan from S. wightii also inhibits α-glucosidase which clearly indicates dual inhibitory activity of the compound. The IC50 value against α-amylase of fucoidan is found to be 103.83μg which is more effective than that of acarbose (16mg). PMID:26325676

  16. Enhancing Maritime Education and Training: Measuring a Ship Navigator's Stress Based on Salivary Amylase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murai, Koji; Wakida, Shin-Ichi; Miyado, Takashi; Fukushi, Keiichi; Hayashi, Yuji; Stone, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose that the measurement of salivary amylase activity is an effective index to evaluate the stress of a ship navigator for safe navigation training and education. Design/methodology/approach: Evaluation comes from the simulator and actual on-board experiments. The subjects are real captains who have…

  17. Crystal structures of human pancreatic alpha-amylase in complex with carbohydrate and proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Nahoum, V; Roux, G; Anton, V; Rougé, P; Puigserver, A; Bischoff, H; Henrissat, B; Payan, F

    2000-01-01

    Crystal structures of human pancreatic alpha-amylase (HPA) in complex with naturally occurring inhibitors have been solved. The tetrasaccharide acarbose and a pseudo-pentasaccharide of the trestatin family produced identical continuous electron densities corresponding to a pentasaccharide species, spanning the -3 to +2 subsites of the enzyme, presumably resulting from transglycosylation. Binding of the acarviosine core linked to a glucose residue at subsites -1 to +2 appears to be a critical part of the interaction process between alpha-amylases and trestatin-derived inhibitors. Two crystal forms, obtained at different values of pH, for the complex of HPA with the protein inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris (alpha-amylase inhibitor) have been solved. The flexible loop typical of the mammalian alpha-amylases was shown to exist in two different conformations, suggesting that loop closure is pH-sensitive. Structural information is provided for the important inhibitor residue, Arg-74, which has not been observed previously in structural analyses. PMID:10657258

  18. Partial characterization of cold active amylases and proteases of Streptomyces sp. from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cotârleţ, Mihaela; Negoiţă, Teodor Gh.; Bahrim, Gabriela E.; Stougaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate novel enzyme-producing bacteria from vegetation samples from East Antarctica and also to characterize them genetically and biochemically in order to establish their phylogeny. The ability to grow at low temperature and to produce amylases and proteases cold-active was also tested. The results of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the 4 Alga rRNA was 100% identical to the sequences of Streptomyces sp. rRNA from Norway and from the Solomon Islands. The Streptomyces grew well in submerged system at 20°C, cells multiplication up to stationary phase being drastically increased after 120 h of submerged cultivation. The beta-amylase production reached a maximum peak after seven days, while alpha-amylase and proteases were performing biosynthesis after nine days of submerged cultivation at 20°C. Newly Streptomyces were able to produce amylase and proteases in a cold environment. The ability to adapt to low temperature of these enzymes could make them valuable ingredients for detergents, the food industry and bioremediation processes which require low temperatures. PMID:24031702

  19. Validation of an assay for quantification of alpha-amylase in saliva of sheep.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Rubio, Maria; Fuentes, Francisco; Otal, Julio; Quiles, Alberto; Hevia, María Luisa

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay (TR-IFMA) for quantification of salivary alpha-amylase in sheep. For that purpose, after the design of the assay, an analytical and a clinical validation were carried out. The analytical validation of the assay showed intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) of 6.1% and 10.57%, respectively and an analytical limit of detection of 0.09 ng/mL. The assay also demonstrated a high level of accuracy, as determined by linearity under dilution. For clinical validation, a model of acute stress testing was conducted to determine whether expected significant changes in alpha-amylase were picked up in the newly developed assay. In that model, 11 sheep were immobilized and confronted with a sheepdog to induce stress. Saliva samples were obtained before stress induction and 15, 30, and 60 min afterwards. Salivary cortisol was measured as a reference of stress level. The results of TR-IFMA showed a significant increase (P < 0.01) in the concentration of alpha-amylase in saliva after stress induction. The assay developed in this study could be used to measure salivary alpha-amylase in the saliva of sheep and this enzyme could be a possible noninvasive biomarker of stress in sheep. PMID:27408332

  20. Occurrence of toxicity among protease, amylase, and color mutants of a nontoxic soy sauce koji mold.

    PubMed Central

    Kalayanamitr, A; Bhumiratana, A; Flegel, T W; Glinsukon, T; Shinmyo, A

    1987-01-01

    A soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris Raper and Fennel (ATCC 44310), was treated with UV irradiation to obtain mutant strains possessing high protease activities, high amylase activities, and light-colored conidia. Selected mutant strains were tested for toxicity, and some were found acutely toxic to weanling rats, although all were negative for aflatoxin production. PMID:2444160

  1. How Do Detergents Work? A Qualitative Assay to Measure Amylase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, M. Teresa; Casanoves, Marina; Garcia-Vallvé, Santi; Pujadas, Gerard; Mulero, Miquel; Valls, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    We present a practical activity focusing on two main goals: to give learners the opportunity to experience how the scientific method works and to increase their knowledge about enzymes in everyday situations. The exercise consists of determining the amylase activity of commercial detergents. The methodology is based on a qualitative assay using a…

  2. Improvement of Starch Digestion Using α-Amylase Entrapped in Pectin-Polyvinyl Alcohol Blend

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maurício; Fernandes, Kátia; Cysneiros, Cristine; Nassar, Reginaldo; Caramori, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and pectin blends were used to entrap α-amylase (Termamyl) using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The effect of glutaraldehyde concentration (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25%) on the activity of the immobilized enzyme and rate of enzyme released was tested during a 24 h period. Characteristics of the material, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), tensile strength (TS), elongation, and rate of dissolution in water (pH 5.7), ruminal buffering solution (pH 7.0), and reactor containing 0.1 mol L−1 sodium phosphate buffer (pH 6.5), were also analyzed. SEM results showed that the surfaces of the pectin/PVA/amylase films were highly irregular and rough. TS values increased as a function of glutaraldehyde concentration, whereas percentage of elongation (%E) decreased. Pectin/PVA/amylase films presented similar values of solubility in the tested solvents. The material obtained with 0.25% glutaraldehyde performed best with repeated use (active for 24 h), in a phosphate buffer reactor. By contrast, the material obtained with 1.25% glutaraldehyde presented higher performance during in vitro testing using an artificial rumen. The results suggest that pectin/PVA/amylase is a highly promising material for biotechnological applications. PMID:25949991

  3. ALPHA-AMYLASE ACTIVITY IN VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF THE IONIC LIQUID, 1-BUTYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM CHLORIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is an extremely abundant, economical and versatile industrial commodity. Many industrial uses of starch depend on hydrolyzing the polymer for the conversion of glucose and maltodextrins. Starch hydrolysis is frequently achieved by utilizing alpha-amylase, which is an endo-acting enzyme that...

  4. Dual feeding strategy for the production of alpha-amylase by Bacillus caldolyticus using complex media.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Karima; Bader, Johannes; Brokamp, Christian; Popović, Milan K; Bajpai, Rakesh; Berovic, Marin

    2009-10-01

    In this study, the objective was to investigate an exponential feeding strategy for fed-batch production of thermostable alpha-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1.) from the Bacillus caldolyticus (DSM405). The parameters for establishing compositions of feed media and feeding rate were obtained by statistical analysis of batch and continuous shake flask experiments. These parameters were casitone to starch ratio of 2.67g(casitone)g(starch)(-1), maintenance coefficient 0.174g(casitone)g(DW)(-1)h(-1), cell yield 0.62g(DW)g(casitone)(-1) and mu(opt)=0.2h(-1). The exponentially fed fermentation resulted in yield of 120Uml(-1) alpha-amylase that was thermostable up to 105 degrees C. Results of the exponentially fed fermentation have been discussed in the light of a feed-back controlled fed-batch fermentation reported earlier by the authors. A comparison of the temperature and pH effects on amylase produced by B. caldolyticus and on several other commercially available amylases has also been presented. PMID:19439206

  5. Production of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae for several industrial applications in a single step.

    PubMed

    Porfirif, María C; Milatich, Esteban J; Farruggia, Beatriz M; Romanini, Diana

    2016-06-01

    A one-step method as a strategy of alpha-amylase concentration and purification was developed in this work. This methodology requires the use of a very low concentration of biodegradable polyelectrolyte (Eudragit(®) E-PO) and represents a low cost, fast, easy to scale up and non-polluting technology. Besides, this methodology allows recycling the polymer after precipitation. The formation of reversible soluble/insoluble complexes between alpha-amylase and the polymer Eudragit(®) E-PO was studied, and their precipitation in selected conditions was applied with bioseparation purposes. Turbidimetric assays allowed to determine the pH range where the complexes are insoluble (4.50-7.00); pH 5.50 yielded the highest turbidity of the system. The presence of NaCl (0.05M) in the medium totally dissociates the protein-polymer complexes. When the adequate concentration of polymer was added under these conditions to a liquid culture of Aspergillus oryzae, purification factors of alpha-amylase up to 7.43 and recoveries of 88% were obtained in a simple step without previous clarification. These results demonstrate that this methodology is suitable for the concentration and production of alpha-amylase from this source and could be applied at the beginning of downstream processing. PMID:27085017

  6. Increased production of alpha-amylase by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in the presence of glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Tsukagoshi, N.; Miyashiro, S.; Udaka, S.

    1983-07-01

    The production of alpha-amylase by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens increased by a factor of 300 when glycine was added to a chemically defined simple medium at the early-logarithmic phase of growth. Glycine was not metabolized to a significant extent under the conditions used, but it considerably prevented the lowering of the pH of the culture. (Refs. 10).

  7. The Gastric/Pancreatic Amylase Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula With High Sensitivity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Ju; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Ping; Lv, Guo-Yue; Du, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Si-Yuan; Wang, Guang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to identify risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and evaluate the gastric/pancreatic amylase ratio (GPAR) on postoperative day (POD) 3 as a POPF predictor in patients who undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). POPF significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients who undergo PD. Previously identified predictors for POPF often have low predictive accuracy. Therefore, accurate POPF predictors are needed. In this prospective cohort study, we measured the clinical and biochemical factors of 61 patients who underwent PD and diagnosed POPF according to the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula. We analyzed the association between POPF and various factors, identified POPF risk factors, and evaluated the predictive power of the GPAR on POD3 and the levels of serum and ascites amylase. Of the 61 patients, 21 developed POPF. The color of the pancreatic drain fluid, POD1 serum, POD1 median output of pancreatic drain fluid volume, and GPAR were significantly associated with POPF. The color of the pancreatic drain fluid and high GPAR were independent risk factors. Although serum and ascites amylase did not predict POPF accurately, the cutoff value was 1.24, and GPAR predicted POPF with high sensitivity and specificity. This is the first report demonstrating that high GPAR on POD3 is a risk factor for POPF and showing that GPAR is a more accurate predictor of POPF than the previously reported amylase markers. PMID:25621676

  8. Structure of Waxy Maize Starch Hydrolyzed by Maltogenic α-Amylase in Relation to Its Retrogradation.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Navneet; Faubion, Jon; Feng, Guohua; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-04-29

    Maltogenic α-amylase is widely used as an antistaling agent in bakery foods. The objective of this study was to determine the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and starch structure after maltogenic amylase treatments in relation to its retrogradation. Waxy maize starch was cooked and hydrolyzed to different degrees by a maltogenic amylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography were used to determine saccharides formed and the molecular weight (Mw) distributions of the residual starch structure, respectively. Chain length (CL) distributions of debranched starch samples were further related to amylopectin (AP) retrogradation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed the complete inhibition of retrogradation when starches were hydrolyzed to >20% DH. Mw and CL distributions of residual AP structure indicated that with an increase in %DH, a higher proportion of unit chains with degree of polymerization (DP) ≤9 and a lower proportion of unit chains with DP ≥17 were formed. A higher proportion of short outer AP chains that cannot participate in the formation of double helices supports the decrease in and eventual inhibition of retrogradation observed with the increase in %DH. These results suggest that the maltogenic amylase could play a powerful role in inhibiting the staling of baked products even at limited starch hydrolysis. PMID:25843595

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  10. Optimization of Amylase Applications in Raw Sugar Manufacture that Directly Concern Refiners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some US refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial alpha-amylases used by the US sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to 85 ...

  11. Amy63, a novel type of marine bacterial multifunctional enzyme possessing amylase, agarase and carrageenase activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ge; Wu, Shimei; Jin, Weihua; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    A multifunctional enzyme is one that performs multiple physiological functions, thus benefiting the organism. Characterization of multifunctional enzymes is important for researchers to understand how organisms adapt to different environmental challenges. In the present study, we report the discovery of a novel multifunctional enzyme Amy63 produced by marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus 63. Remarkably, Amy63 possesses amylase, agarase and carrageenase activities. Amy63 is a substrate promiscuous α-amylase, with the substrate priority order of starch, carrageenan and agar. Amy63 maintains considerable amylase, carrageenase and agarase activities and stabilities at wide temperature and pH ranges, and optimum activities are detected at temperature of 60 °C and pH of 6.0, respectively. Moreover, the heteroexpression of Amy63 dramatically enhances the ability of E. coli to degrade starch, carrageenan and agar. Motif searching shows three continuous glycosyl hydrolase 70 (GH70) family homologs existed in Amy63 encoding sequence. Combining serial deletions and phylogenetic analysis of Amy63, the GH70 homologs are proposed as the determinants of enzyme promiscuity. Notably, such enzymes exist in all kingdoms of life, thus providing an expanded perspective on studies of multifunctional enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amylase having additional agarase and carrageenase activities. PMID:26725302

  12. Inhibitory activities against heterologous α-amylases and in vitro allergenic reactivity of Einkorn wheats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Monge, R; García-Casado, G; Malpica, J M; Salcedo, G

    1996-10-01

    Salt extracts from seeds of 36 lines of Einkorn wheats were analyzed for their inhibitory activity towards two insect (Tenebrio molitor, Coleoptera, and Ephestia kuehniella, Lepidoptera) and one mammalian (human salivary) α-amylases. Whereas all ten T. monococcum accessions tested were active towards the lepidopteran enzyme, they had no effect on the coleopteran or the mammalian ones. More variability was found among the 21 lines of T. boeticum analyzed, although none of them inhibited human α-amylase. The five accessions of T. urartu showed even greater diversity. Among all Einkorn accessions tested, only two urartu lines affected the three α-amylases. These lines displayed inhibition patterns similar to those of T. aestivum and T. turgidum cultivars. Since several breadwheat α-amylase inhibitors are major allergens associated with baker's asthma, we also studied the in vitro allergenic activity of salt extracts from the Einkorn wheats under study. No significant differences in IgE-binding were found between these accessions and theT. aestivum or T. turgidum cultivars. Furthermore, putative allergens with molecular sizes in the range of 20-60 kDa were detected in these Einkorn wheats. PMID:24162403

  13. Cortisol and α-Amylase Secretion Patterns between and within Depressed and Non-Depressed Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Sanne H.; Bos, Elisabeth H.; Bouwmans, Mara E. J.; van Faassen, Martijn; Kema, Ido P.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Associations between biological stress markers and depression are inconsistent across studies. We assessed whether inter- and intra-individual variability explain these inconsistencies. Methods Pair-matched depressed and non-depressed participants (N = 30) collected saliva thrice a day for 30 days, resulting in 90 measurements per individual. The relationships between measures of stress-system function and depression were examined at the group level by means of mixed model analyses, and at the individual level by means of pair-matched comparisons. The analyses were repeated after adjusting for time-varying lifestyle factors by means of time-series regression analyses. Results Cortisol and α-amylase levels were higher, the α-amylase/cortisol ratio larger, and the daily cortisol slope steeper in the depressed compared to the non-depressed group. Adjusting for lifestyle factors and antidepressant use reduced the associations under study. In 40%–60% of the matched comparisons, depressed individuals had higher cortisol and α-amylase levels, a larger α-amylase/cortisol ratio, and a steeper daily slope than their non-depressed match, regardless of adjustment. Conclusions Our group-level findings were mostly in line with the literature but generalization to individuals appeared troublesome. Findings of studies on this topic should be interpreted with care, because in clinical practice the focus is on individuals instead of groups. PMID:26148294

  14. Occurrence of toxicity among protease, amylase, and color mutants of a nontoxic soy sauce koji mold

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayanamitr, A.; Bhumiratana, A.; Flegel, T.W.; Glinsukon, T.; Shinmyo, A.

    1987-08-01

    A soy sauce koji mold, Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris Raper and Fennel (ATCC 44310), was treated with UV irradiation to obtain mutant strains possessing high protease activities, high amylase activities, and light-colored conidia. Selected mutant strains were tested for toxicity, and some were found acutely toxic to weanling rats, although all were negative for aflatoxin production.

  15. Utilization of industrial and agricultural by-products for fungal amylase production.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, S A; Abdel-Hafez, A M; Mashhoor, W A; Refaat, A A

    1978-01-01

    Attempts were made for using industrial and agricultural by-products and wastes as carbon and nitrogen sources in fermentation medium for alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus niger NRRL-337. The original carbon source of the basal medium was replaced by one of the following materials: rice bran, wheat bran, corn bran, corn starch, cane molasses, and glucose syrup. Rice bran proved to be the best carbon source that secured the highest amylase activity. The nitrogen source of the basal medium was then replaced by different cheap materials, viz: dried yeast, corn steep liquor, gluten-30, gluten-50, and corn steep precipitate. Corn steep precipitate proved to be superior in amylase production. In consideration of these results an economical medium that secured high activity, containing the following ingredients, was suggested: 2.5% corn steep precipitate, 7.2% rice bran, 0.1% MgSO4, 0.1% KH2PO4, and 0.1% CaCO3. From this medium fungal amylase was precipitated and purified. The pure enzyme gave the highest activity at 40 degrees C and pH 4.3. PMID:28620

  16. Purification and characterization of the extracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis JB1.

    PubMed

    Freer, S N

    1993-05-01

    The extracellular alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from maltose-grown Streptococcus bovis JB1 was purified to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography (Mono Q). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.50 and an apparent molecular mass of 77,000 Da, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was rich in acidic and hydrophobic amino acids. The 15-amino-acid NH2-terminal sequence was 40% homologous with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying alpha-amylase and 27% homologous with the Clostridium acetobutylicum alpha-amylase. alpha-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.0 to 6.0. The enzyme was relatively stable between pH 5.5 and 8.5 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. When soluble potato starch was used as the substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.88 mg.ml-1 and a kcat of 2,510 mumol of reducing sugar.min-1.mg of protein-1. The enzyme exhibited neither pullulanase nor dextranase activity and was 40 to 70% as active on amylopectin as on amylose. The major end products of amylose hydrolysis were maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose. PMID:8517735

  17. Interaction mechanism between green tea extract and human α-amylase for reducing starch digestion.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Huan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xingfeng

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of the green tea extract on human pancreatic α-amylase activity and its molecular mechanism. The green tea extract was composed of epicatechin (59.2%), epigallocatechin gallate (14.6%) and epicatechin gallate (26.2%) as determined by HPLC analysis. Enzyme activity measurement showed that % inhibition and IC50 of the green tea extract (10%, based on starch) were 63.5% and 2.07 mg/ml, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant remained unchanged but the maximal velocity decreased from 0.43 (control) to 0.07 mg/(ml × min) (4 mg/ml of the green tea extract), indicating that the green tea extract was an effective inhibitor against α-amylase with a non-competitive mode. The fluorescence data revealed that the green tea extract bound with α-amylase to form a new complex with static quenching mechanism. Docking study showed the epicatechin gallate in the green tea extract presented stronger affinity than epigallocatechin gallate, with more number of amino acid residues involved in amylase binding with hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces. Thus, the green tea extract could be used to manipulate starch digestion for potential health benefits. PMID:25976786

  18. Comparative study on production of a-Amylase from Bacillus licheniformis strains

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Dibu; Chandran, Aswathi; Pratap Chandran, R

    2011-01-01

    Alpha amylase (α-1, 4-glucan-glucanhydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1), an extracellular enzyme, degrades α, 1–4 glucosidic linkages of starch and related substrates in an endo-fashion producing oligosaccharides including maltose, glucose and alpha limit dextrin (7). The present study deals with the production and comparative study of production of α-amylase from two strains of Bacillus licheniformis, MTCC 2617 and 2618, by using four different substrates, starch, rice, wheat and ragi powder as carbon source by submerged fermentation. The effect of varying pH and incubation temperature, activator, inhibitor, and substrate concentration was investigated on the activity of α-amylase produced by MTCC strain 2618. The results shows that the production of the α-amylase by the B.licheniformis strain MTCC 2618, using four different substrates were found to be maximum (Starch 3.64 IU/ml/minutes, Rice powder 2.93 IU/ml/minutes, Wheat powder 2.67 IU/ml/minutes, Ragi powder 2.36 IU/ml/minutes) on comparing the enzyme production of two strains. It was also observed that the maximum production was found on the 3rd day (i.e. 72 hr) and characterization of crude enzyme revealed that optimum activity was at pH 7 and 37°C. PMID:24031769

  19. Structural and biochemical features of acidic α-amylase of Bacillus acidicola.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Archana; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-10-01

    The investigation is aimed at understanding structure-function aspect of α-amylase of an acidophilic bacterium Bacillus acidicola (BAamy), which is Ca(2+)-independent and active at acidic pH of native starch, and thus, suits better in starch saccharification process. The CD spectroscopic data analysis revealed that the enzyme has 30% α-helices, 14.2% β-sheets, and 55.8% random coils at 60 °C and pH 4.0. Using Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase (BStA) as the template, 3-D structure of rBAamy has been proposed. A complete loss in α-amylase activity was recorded when the amino acid residues (D231, E261 and D328) were substituted that confirmed their role in catalysis. The CD studies indicated a decrease in the α-helices content below and beyond the optimum pH and temperature that suggests a critical role of α-helix in maintaining the structural conformation of the enzyme. Fluorescence-quenching by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) suggested the role of tryptophan in maintaining structural integrity of α-amylase and that by acrylamide indicated interaction by simple collision process. PMID:23954129

  20. Extra EF hand unit (DX) mediated stabilization and calcium independency of α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Leila; Khajeh, Khosro; Mollania, Nasrin; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2013-03-01

    It is the common feature of α-amylases that calcium ion is required for their structural integrity and thermal stability. All amylases have at least one Ca(2+) per molecule; therefore amino acids involved in calcium binding are specific and conserved. In this study, sequence analysis revealed the presence of EF-hand-like motif in calcium-binding loop of Bacillus megaterium WHO (BMW)-amylase that was previously isolated from BMW. The EF-hand motif and its variants (EF-hand-like motif) are the most common calcium-binding motifs found in a large number of protein families. To investigate the effect of calcium ion on the thermal stability and activity of BMW-amylase, we used site-directed mutagenesis to replace histidine 58 with Asp (D), Ile (I), Tyr (Y), Phe (F), and Arg (R) at the seventh position of EF-hand-like motif. Upon the addition of an extra DX unit to the calcium-binding loop in H58D variant, thermal stability, catalytic activity, and chelating power of the enzyme improved due to higher affinity toward calcium. H58D variant demonstrated calcium independency compared to the wild type and other created mutants. Conformational changes in the presence and absence of Ca(2+) were monitored using fluorescence technique. PMID:22407721

  1. Optimization of Amylase Application in Raw Sugar Manufacture. Part II: Factory Trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to 85 de...

  2. Optimization of Amylase Applications in Raw Sugar Manufacture that Directly Concern Refiners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial alpha-amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to...

  3. Optimization of Alpha-Amylase Application in U.S. Factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years there have been warnings by some U.S. refineries that there may be a penalty for high starch concentrations in raw sugar if starch control is not improved. Most commercial alpha-amylases used by the U.S. sugar industry to control starch have intermediate temperature stability (up to...

  4. Peer Victimization and Aggression: Moderation by Individual Differences in Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-Amylase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Karen D.; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Granger, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined whether variations in salivary measures of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (cortisol) and autonomic nervous system (alpha amylase [sAA]) contribute to individual differences in the association between peer victimization and aggression. Children (N = 132; M age = 9.46 years, SD = 0.33) completed a measure of peer…

  5. Kinetic study of the irreversible thermal denaturation of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Violet, M; Meunier, J C

    1989-01-01

    The irreversible thermal inactivation of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase was studied. A two-step behaviour in the irreversible denaturation process was found. Our experimental results are consistent only with the two-step model and rule out the two-isoenzyme one. They suggest that the deactivation mechanism involves the existence of a temperature-dependent intermediate form. Therefore the enzyme could exist in a great number of active conformational states. We have shown that Ca2+ is necessary for the structural integrity of alpha-amylase. Indeed, dialysis against chelating agents leads to a reversible enzyme inactivation, though molecular sieving has no effect. Further, the key role of Ca2+ in the alpha-amylase thermostability is reported. The stabilizing effect of Ca2+ is reflected by the decrease of the denaturation constants of both the native and the intermediate forms. Below 75 degrees C, in the presence of 5 mM-CaCl2, alpha-amylase is completely thermostable. Neither other metal ions nor substrate have a positive effect on enzyme thermostability. The effect of temperature on the native enzyme and on one intermediate form was studied. Both forms exhibit the same optimum temperature. Identical activation parameters for the hydrolytic reaction catalysed by these two forms were found. PMID:2597125

  6. Scandium Stimulates the Production of Amylase and Bacilysin in Bacillus subtilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Takashi; Ochi, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of rare earth elements on enzyme production and secondary metabolism in Bacillus subtilis. Addition of scandium to the growth medium stimulated the production of both amylase and bacilysin at the transcriptional level, thus showing scandium to have a remarkable impact in B. subtilis. PMID:21948839

  7. In Vitro α-Amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activities of Methanolic Extract of Amaranthus Caudatus Linn

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Khan, Saleemulla

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study was aimed to investigate the α-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activities of methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus Linn (MeAc). Methods Methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus was screened for α-amylase inhibition activity by CNPG3 method (2-chloro-p-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotrioside) and antioxidant activity was evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazile (DPPH) free radical scavenging, superoxide dismutase (SOD) scavenging, hydroxyl free radical scavenging, nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging, and 2.2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazole-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assays. MeAc was also screened for non enzymatic hemoglycosylation. Results The methanolic extract of Amaranthus caudatus showed potent α-amylase inhibition activity (IC50 19.233 µg/ml). MeAc showed significant antioxidant activity in all the in vitro antioxidant models. Furthermore, the MeAc was found to be extremely effective in scavenging ABTS radical activity (IC50 48.75±1.1 µg/ml) when compared to DPPH (IC50 77.5±0.4 µg/ml), SOD (IC50 62.5±2.1 µg/ml), hydroxyl (IC50 88.50±1.8 µg/ml) and NO (IC50 67.5±2.2 µg/ml) scavenging activity. Conclusions The methanolic extract of A. caudatus showed potent α-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activities. PMID:22043408

  8. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  9. Ontogeny of alpha-amylase circadian rhythms in rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Sanz, E G; Vermouth, N T; Bellavia, S L

    1986-01-01

    The content of alpha-amylase (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1.) and total soluble proteins of parotid glands (from rats exposed to a photoperiod of 14 hr light: 10 hr dark), have been determined every 2 or 3 hr over 24 hr periods in 15, 25 and 90-day-old rats. In 35-, 45- and 72-day-old rats, determinations were performed only at 0100 and 1400 hr. The alpha-amylase and total soluble protein contents from 90-day-old rats show a circadian variation, with a maximum value at 2200 hr and a minimum at 1400 hr. Parotids from 15- and 25-day-old rats also show a circadian rhythm. The minimum value is recorded at 0100 hr and the maximum at 1400 hr. At day 35 and after, there is an inversion of the amylase rhythm. In immature rats, it appears that alpha-amylase and soluble protein are under the influence of another synchronizer, whose timing is independent of that imposed by mastication of solid food. PMID:2878787

  10. Beta-amylase degradation by serine endoproteinases from green barley malt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteolytic degradation of barley proteins is examined in green malt from Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Harrington. Zymographic analysis of the Harrington green malt extracts using commercial preparations of barley beta-amylase incorporated as a proteolytic substrate in 2-D SDS gels shows at least three di...

  11. Enhanced starch hydrolysis using α-amylase immobilized on cellulose ultrafiltration affinity membrane.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Viktoriia; Guzikevich, Kateryna; Burban, Anatoliy; Kujawski, Wojciech; Jarzynka, Karolina; Kujawa, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    In order to prepare ultrafiltration membranes possessing biocatalytic properties, α-amylase has been immobilized on cellulose membranes. Enzyme immobilization was based on a covalent bonding between chitosan and a surface of cellulose membrane, followed by an attachment of Cibacron Blue F3G-A dye as affinity ligand. Various factors affecting the immobilization process, such as enzyme concentration, pH of modifying solution, zeta-potential of membrane surface, and stability of immobilized enzyme were studied. The applicability of immobilized α-amylase has been investigated in ultrafiltration processes. The immobilization of α-amylase on membrane surface allows to increase the value of mass transfer coefficient and to decrease the concentration polarization effect during ultrafiltration of starch solutions. The enzyme layer on the membrane surface prevents a rapid increase of starch concentration due to the amylase hydrolysis of starch in the boundary layer. The presented affinity immobilization technique allows also for the regeneration of membranes from inactivated enzyme. PMID:27516322

  12. Purification and characterization of the extracellular alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis JB1.

    PubMed Central

    Freer, S N

    1993-01-01

    The extracellular alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-D-glucanglucanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.1) from maltose-grown Streptococcus bovis JB1 was purified to apparent homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography (Mono Q). The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 4.50 and an apparent molecular mass of 77,000 Da, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was rich in acidic and hydrophobic amino acids. The 15-amino-acid NH2-terminal sequence was 40% homologous with the Bacillus subtilis saccharifying alpha-amylase and 27% homologous with the Clostridium acetobutylicum alpha-amylase. alpha-Amylase activity on soluble starch was optimal at pH 5.0 to 6.0. The enzyme was relatively stable between pH 5.5 and 8.5 and at temperatures below 50 degrees C. When soluble potato starch was used as the substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.88 mg.ml-1 and a kcat of 2,510 mumol of reducing sugar.min-1.mg of protein-1. The enzyme exhibited neither pullulanase nor dextranase activity and was 40 to 70% as active on amylopectin as on amylose. The major end products of amylose hydrolysis were maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose. Images PMID:8517735

  13. Allotides: Proline-Rich Cystine Knot α-Amylase Inhibitors from Allamanda cathartica.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Q T; Luu, Thuy T; Bai, Yang; Nguyen, Giang K T; Pervushin, Konstantin; Tam, James P

    2015-04-24

    Cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors belong to a knottin family of peptidyl inhibitors of 30-32 residues and contain two to four prolines. Thus far, only four members of the group of cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors have been characterized. Herein, the discovery and characterization of five cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors, allotides C1-C5 (Ac1-Ac5) (1-5), from the medicinal plant Allamanda cathartica are reported using both proteomic and genomic methods. Proteomic analysis showed that 1-5 are 30 amino acids in length with three or four proline residues. NMR determination of 4 revealed that it has two cis- and one trans-proline residues and adopts two equally populated conformations in solution. Determination of disulfide connectivity of 2 by differential S-reduction and S-alkylation provided clues of its unfolding process. Genomic analysis showed that allotide precursors contain a three-domain arrangement commonly found in plant cystine knot peptides with conserved residues flanking the processing sites of the mature allotide domain. This work expands the number of known cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors and furthers the understanding of both the structural and biological diversity of this type of knottin family. PMID:25832441

  14. Improved Production of a Heterologous Amylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zihe; Liu, Lifang; Österlund, Tobias; Hou, Jin; Huang, Mingtao; Fagerberg, Linn; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demand for industrial enzymes and biopharmaceutical proteins relies on robust production hosts with high protein yield and productivity. Being one of the best-studied model organisms and capable of performing posttranslational modifications, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used as a cell factory for recombinant protein production. However, many recombinant proteins are produced at only 1% (or less) of the theoretical capacity due to the complexity of the secretory pathway, which has not been fully exploited. In this study, we applied the concept of inverse metabolic engineering to identify novel targets for improving protein secretion. Screening that combined UV-random mutagenesis and selection for growth on starch was performed to find mutant strains producing heterologous amylase 5-fold above the level produced by the reference strain. Genomic mutations that could be associated with higher amylase secretion were identified through whole-genome sequencing. Several single-point mutations, including an S196I point mutation in the VTA1 gene coding for a protein involved in vacuolar sorting, were evaluated by introducing these to the starting strain. By applying this modification alone, the amylase secretion could be improved by 35%. As a complement to the identification of genomic variants, transcriptome analysis was also performed in order to understand on a global level the transcriptional changes associated with the improved amylase production caused by UV mutagenesis. PMID:24973076

  15. Identification of amylase inhibitor deficient mutants in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millisp.).

    PubMed

    Chougule, N P; Giri, A P; Hivrale, V K; Chhabda, P J; Kachole, M S

    2004-06-01

    We have developed and analyzed several mutant lines (M6 generation) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) for the content of defensive proteins and antinutritional factors. Inhibitors of proteinase and of amylase, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides were analyzed in mature seeds of different pigeonpea accessions (untreated) and compared with mutant lines. Proteinase inhibitor profiles were similar in terms of number and intensities of activity bands but they differ marginally in the activity units in pigeonpea accessions and mutants. Pigeonpea mutants showed significant differences in amylase inhibitor profiles as well as activity units from those of pigeonpea accessions. Interestingly, two mutants (A6-5-1 and A7-3-2) were identified to have absence of amylase inhibitor isoforms. Hemagglutinating activity and raffinose family oligosaccharides content were found to be significantly higher in mutants than in accessions. It is evident from the results that proteinase inhibitors of pigeonpea are stable while amylase inhibitors, lectins, and raffinose family oligosaccharides show altered expression upon mutagen treatments. These mutants will be ideal candidates for further evaluation. PMID:15260142

  16. Halotolerant Ability and α-Amylase Activity of Some Saltwater Fungal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Niknejad, Farhad; Moshfegh, Mahsa; Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Houbraken, Jos; Rezaei, Shahla; Zarrini, Gholamreza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran

    2013-01-01

    Four halotolerant fungal isolates originating from the saltwater Lake Urmia in Iran were selected during a screening program for salt resistance and α-amylase activity. The isolates were identified based on sequencing the ITS region and a part of the β-tubulin gene, as Penicillium chrysogenum (isolate U1; CBS 132820), Fusarium incarnatum (isolate U2; CBS 132821), and Penicillium polonicum (isolate U3; CBS 132822, and isolate U4; CBS 132823). The growth of these isolates was determined by measuring the colony diameter and mycelia dry weight in Sabouraud dextrose agar and yeast nitrogen base medium supplemented with NaCl, KCl, and LiCl. Isolate U4 showed a growth up in 15% NaCl and U1 was the only isolate that could grow in 20% KCl. None of the strains grew in a media containing LiCl. The salt supplemented medium did not increase the size of colony diameter in all isolates (p > 0.05). The ability of the selected isolates for amylase production was quantitatively tested and showed that P. polonicum isolate U4 was the most potent producer of amylase with a yield of 260.9 U/L after 60 h, whereas P. polonicum isolate U3 was the lowest one with a production level of 97.9 U/L after 48 h. P. polonicum isolate U4 could be a suitable candidate for production of amylase on an industrial scale after optimization. PMID:24250679

  17. Persimmon-Tannin, an α-Amylase Inhibitor, Retards Carbohydrate Absorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes play an important role in controlling postprandial blood glucose levels. Thus the effect of persimmon tannin on pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase has been investigated. Persimmon tannin inhibits pancreatic α-amylase and intestinal α-glucosidase in a concentration-dependent manner with the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) for amylase, maltase and sucrase being 1.7 μg/mL, 632 μg/mL and 308 μg/mL, respectively. The effect of persimmon-tannin extract on carbohydrate absorption in rats has also been investigated. Oral administration of persimmon tannin to normal rats fed cornstarch (2 g/kg body weight) significantly suppressed the increase in blood glucose levels and the area under the curve (AUC) after starch loading in a dose-dependent manner. The effective dose of persimmon tannin required to achieve 50% suppression of the rise in blood glucose level was estimated to be 300 mg/kg body weight. Administration of persimmon tannin to rats fed maltose or sucrose delayed the increase of blood glucose level and slightly suppressed AUC, but not significantly. These results suggest that persimmon tannin retards absorption of carbohydrate and reduces post-prandial hyperglycemia mainly through inhibition of α-amylase. PMID:27465726

  18. Phylogenetic and biochemical characterization of a novel cluster of intracellular fungal alpha-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    van der Kaaij, R M; Janecek, S; van der Maarel, M J E C; Dijkhuizen, L

    2007-12-01

    Currently known fungal alpha-amylases are well-characterized extracellular enzymes that are classified into glycoside hydrolase subfamily GH13_1. This study describes the identification, and phylogenetic and biochemical analysis of novel intracellular fungal alpha-amylases. The phylogenetic analysis shows that they cluster in the recently identified subfamily GH13_5 and display very low similarity to fungal alpha-amylases of family GH13_1. Homologues of these intracellular enzymes are present in the genome sequences of all filamentous fungi studied, including ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. One of the enzymes belonging to this new group, Amy1p from Histoplasma capsulatum, has recently been functionally linked to the formation of cell wall alpha-glucan. To study the biochemical characteristics of this novel cluster of alpha-amylases, we overexpressed and purified a homologue from Aspergillus niger, AmyD, and studied its activity product profile with starch and related substrates. AmyD has a relatively low hydrolysing activity on starch (2.2 U mg(-1)), producing mainly maltotriose. A possible function of these enzymes in relation to cell wall alpha-glucan synthesis is discussed. PMID:18048915

  19. Characterization of a Digestive α-Amylase in the Midgut of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Sharifloo, Ali; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal J; Jahroumi, Khalil Talebi

    2016-01-01

    The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression, and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM) and anterior midgut (AM). A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35°C. Also, the enzyme had V max values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and K m values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity, and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate, and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones. PMID:27014094

  20. Characterization of a Digestive α-Amylase in the Midgut of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharifloo, Ali; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal J.; Jahroumi, Khalil Talebi

    2016-01-01

    The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression, and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM) and anterior midgut (AM). A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35°C. Also, the enzyme had Vmax values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and Km values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N, N′, N′-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity, and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate, and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones. PMID:27014094

  1. Rap1 Activation Plays a Regulatory Role in Pancreatic Amylase Secretion*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Maria E.; Chen, Xuequn; Ernst, Stephen A.; Williams, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Rap1 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and is localized on pancreatic zymogen granules. The current study was designed to determine whether GTP-Rap1 is involved in the regulation of amylase secretion. Rap1A/B and the two Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors, Epac1 and CalDAG-GEF III, were identified in mouse pancreatic acini. A fraction of both Rap1 and Epac1 colocalized with amylase in zymogen granules, but only Rap1 was integral to the zymogen granule membranes. Stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK), carbachol, and vasoactive intestinal peptide all induced Rap1 activation, as did calcium ionophore A23187, phorbol ester, forskolin, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, and the Epac-specific cAMP analog 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP. The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 abolished carbachol- but not forskolin-induced Rap1 activation. Co-stimulation with carbachol and 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP led to an additive effect on Rap1 activation, whereas a synergistic effect was seen on amylase release. Although the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 abolished forskolin-stimulated CREB phosphorylation, it did not modify forskolin-induced GTP-Rap1 levels, excluding PKA participation. Overexpression of Rap1 GTPase-activating protein, which blocked Rap1 activation, reduced the effect of 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP, and vasoactive intestinal peptide on amylase release by 60% and reduced CCK- as well as carbachol-stimulated pancreatic amylase release by 40%. These findings indicate that GTP-Rap1 is required for pancreatic amylase release. Rap1 activation not only mediates the cAMP-evoked response via Epac1 but is also involved in CCK- and carbachol-induced amylase release, with their action most likely mediated by CalDAG-GEF III. PMID:18577515

  2. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104–23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  3. A simple one pot purification of bacterial amylase from fermented broth based on affinity toward starch-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Paul, Tanima; Chatterjee, Saptarshi; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Dwiptirtha; Basu, Semanti; Sarkar, Keka

    2015-08-18

    Surface-functionalized adsorbant particles in combination with magnetic separation techniques have received considerable attention in recent years. Selective manipulation on such magnetic nanoparticles permits separation with high affinity in the presence of other suspended solids. Amylase is used extensively in food and allied industries. Purification of amylase from bacterial sources is a matter of concern because most of the industrial need for amylase is met by microbial sources. Here we report a simple, cost-effective, one-pot purification technique for bacterial amylase directly from fermented broth of Bacillus megaterium utilizing starch-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). SPION was prepared by co-precipitation method and then functionalized by starch coating. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID, zeta potential, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The starch-coated nanoparticles efficiently purified amylase from bacterial fermented broth with 93.22% recovery and 12.57-fold purification. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed that the molecular mass of the purified amylase was 67 kD, and native gel showed the retention of amylase activity even after purification. Optimum pH and temperature of the purified amylase were 7 and 50°C, respectively, and it was stable over a range of 20°C to 50°C. Hence, an improved one-pot bacterial amylase purification method was developed using starch-coated SPION. PMID:24840788

  4. Remarkable evolutionary relatedness among the enzymes and proteins from the α-amylase family.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Štefan; Gabriško, Marek

    2016-07-01

    The α-amylase is a ubiquitous starch hydrolase catalyzing the cleavage of the α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in an endo-fashion. Various α-amylases originating from different taxonomic sources may differ from each other significantly in their exact substrate preference and product profile. Moreover, it also seems to be clear that at least two different amino acid sequences utilizing two different catalytic machineries have evolved to execute the same α-amylolytic specificity. The two have been classified in the Cabohydrate-Active enZyme database, the CAZy, in the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13 and GH57. While the former and the larger α-amylase family GH13 evidently forms the clan GH-H with the families GH70 and GH77, the latter and the smaller α-amylase family GH57 has only been predicted to maybe define a future clan with the family GH119. Sequences and several tens of enzyme specificities found throughout all three kingdoms in many taxa provide an interesting material for evolutionarily oriented studies that have demonstrated remarkable observations. This review emphasizes just the three of them: (1) a close relatedness between the plant and archaeal α-amylases from the family GH13; (2) a common ancestry in the family GH13 of animal heavy chains of heteromeric amino acid transporter rBAT and 4F2 with the microbial α-glucosidases; and (3) the unique sequence features in the primary structures of amylomaltases from the genus Borrelia from the family GH77. Although the three examples cannot represent an exhaustive list of exceptional topics worth to be interested in, they may demonstrate the importance these enzymes possess in the overall scientific context. PMID:27154042

  5. β-amylase 1 (BAM1) degrades transitory starch to sustain proline biosynthesis during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Martina; Borghi, Gian Luca; Pirone, Claudia; Thalmann, Matthias; Pazmino, Diana; Costa, Alex; Santelia, Diana; Trost, Paolo; Sparla, Francesca

    2016-03-01

    During photosynthesis of higher plants, absorbed light energy is converted into chemical energy that, in part, is accumulated in the form of transitory starch within chloroplasts. In the following night, transitory starch is mobilized to sustain the heterotrophic metabolism of the plant. β-amylases are glucan hydrolases that cleave α-1,4-glycosidic bonds of starch and release maltose units from the non-reducing end of the polysaccharide chain. In Arabidopsis, nocturnal degradation of transitory starch involves mainly β-amylase-3 (BAM3). A second β-amylase isoform, β-amylase-1 (BAM1), is involved in diurnal starch degradation in guard cells, a process that sustains stomata opening. However, BAM1 also contributes to diurnal starch turnover in mesophyll cells under osmotic stress. With the aim of dissecting the role of β-amylases in osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis, mutant plants lacking either BAM1 or BAM3 were subject to a mild (150mM mannitol) and prolonged (up to one week) osmotic stress. We show here that leaves of osmotically-stressed bam1 plants accumulated more starch and fewer soluble sugars than both wild-type and bam3 plants during the day. Moreover, bam1 mutants were impaired in proline accumulation and suffered from stronger lipid peroxidation, compared with both wild-type and bam3 plants. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that carbon skeletons deriving from BAM1 diurnal degradation of transitory starch support the biosynthesis of proline required to face the osmotic stress. We propose the transitory-starch/proline interplay as an interesting trait to be tackled by breeding technologies aimingto improve drought tolerance in relevant crops. PMID:26792489

  6. Structure-based protein engineering for alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of plant defensin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ku-Feng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Hsu, Ming-Pin; Chen, Ching-San; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2007-08-01

    The structure of a novel plant defensin isolated from the seeds of the mung bean, Vigna radiate, has been determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of VrD2, the V. radiate plant defensin 2 protein, comprises an alpha-helix and one triple-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet stabilized by four disulfide bonds. This protein exhibits neither insecticidal activity nor alpha-amylase inhibitory activity in spite of showing a similar global fold to that of VrD1, an insecticidal plant defensin that has been suggested to function by inhibiting insect alpha-amylase. Our previous study proposed that loop L3 of plant defensins is important for this inhibition. Structural analyses and surface charge comparisons of VrD1 and VrD2 revealed that the charged residues of L3 correlate with the observed difference in inhibitory activities of these proteins. A VrD2 chimera that was produced by transferring the proposed functional loop of VrD1 onto the structurally equivalent loop of VrD2 supported this hypothesis. The VrD2 chimera, which differs by only five residues compared with VrD2, showed obvious activity against Tenebrio molitor alpha-amylase. These results clarify the mode of alpha-amylase inhibition of plant defensins and also represent a possible approach for engineering novel alpha-amylase inhibitors. Plant defensins are important constituents of the innate immune system of plants, and thus the application of protein engineering to this protein family may provide an efficient method for protecting against crop losses. PMID:17444520

  7. Estimation of Levels of Salivary Mucin, Amylase and Total Protein in Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Rahul; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, Suchetha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal diseases are a group of inflammatory conditions resulting from interaction between a pathogenic bacterial biofilm and susceptible host’s inflammatory response eventually leading to the destruction of periodontal structures and subsequent tooth loss. Hence, investigation of salivary proteins in individuals with periodontal diseases may be useful to enhance the knowledge of their roles in these diseases. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted at A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore. The study comprised of 90 patients of age between 25-60 years who were clinically examined and divided into three groups of 30 each: namely clinically healthy, gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. These were classified according to the values of gingival index score, clinical attachment loss and probing pocket depth. Unstimulated saliva was collected and salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels were determined. Statistical analysis: Results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and Karl pearson’s correlation test. Results: The results of the study showed an increased concentration of salivary mucin, amylase and total protein in gingivitis patients and increased levels of amylase and total protein in saliva of chronic periodontitis patients compared to healthy individuals which were statistically significant. A decrease in mucin concentration was observed in the periodontitis group compared to gingivitis group. A positive correlation was present between salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels in the three groups. Conclusion: Salivary mucin, amylase and total protein may serve as an important biochemical parameter of inflammation of the periodontium. Also, it can be hypothesized that various enzyme inhibitors might be useful as a part of host modulation therapy in the treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25478449

  8. Disruption of amylase genes by RNA interference affects reproduction in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Huvet, Arnaud; Béguel, Jean-Philippe; Cavaleiro, Nathalia Pereira; Thomas, Yoann; Quillien, Virgile; Boudry, Pierre; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Fabioux, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Feeding strategies and digestive capacities can have important implications for variation in energetic pathways associated with ecological and economically important traits, such as growth or reproduction in bivalve species. Here, we investigated the role of amylase in the digestive processes of Crassostrea gigas, using in vivo RNA interference. This approach also allowed us to investigate the relationship between energy intake by feeding and gametogenesis in oysters. Double-stranded (ds)RNA designed to target the two α-amylase genes A and B was injected in vivo into the visceral mass of oysters at two doses. These treatments caused significant reductions in mean mRNA levels of the amylase genes: -50.7% and -59% mRNA A, and -71.9% and -70.6% mRNA B in 15 and 75 µg dsRNA-injected oysters, respectively, relative to controls. Interestingly, reproductive knock-down phenotypes were observed for both sexes at 48 days post-injection, with a significant reduction of the gonad area (-22.5% relative to controls) and germ cell under-proliferation revealed by histology. In response to the higher dose of dsRNA, we also observed reductions in amylase activity (-53%) and absorption efficiency (-5%). Based on these data, dynamic energy budget modeling showed that the limitation of energy intake by feeding that was induced by injection of amylase dsRNA was insufficient to affect gonadic development at the level observed in the present study. This finding suggests that other driving mechanisms, such as endogenous hormonal modulation, might significantly change energy allocation to reproduction, and increase the maintenance rate in oysters in response to dsRNA injection. PMID:25883379

  9. Are salivary amylase and pH – Prognostic indicators of cancers?

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, Atmakuri Shanmukha; Uppala, Divya; Majumdar, Sumit; Surekha, Ch.; Deepak, K.G.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Saliva, “Mirror of body's health” has long been of particular interest as a substitute for blood for disease diagnosis and monitoring. The radiation effects on salivary glands are of particular interest in which salivary amylase is a good indicator of salivary glands function. Thus, estimation of these parameters represents a reasonable approach in evaluation of patient's risk for disease occurrence, intensity and prognosis. Aim of study To evaluate and compare the pH and amylase levels in saliva of cancer patients prior to treatment, patients during treatment. Materials and methods Saliva samples of 90 individuals were taken which were divided into 3 groups - 30 individuals without cancer, 30 cancer patients prior treatment and 30 cancer patients during treatment. Materials used were pH strips and pH meter, Salivary Amylase assay. Results Statistical analysis – ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey's test. 1) Significant decrease in salivary amylase levels – in cancer patients, during treatment when compared to others. 2) Significant decrease in salivary pH levels in newly diagnosed cancer patients prior to treatment. Conclusion To conclude, pH strips and pH meter showed to be a useful tool in the measurement of pH of saliva in individuals with and without cancer. This study showed that cancer patients without treatment have a lower pH of saliva. Treatment increased the pH of the saliva to a more alkaline level whereas amylase levels decreased in those subjects. Therefore those parameters can be an area of further research with an increased sample size, which in-turn may help in opening the doors for new dimension in non invasive prognostic markers. PMID:26258019

  10. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  11. Engineering high α-amylase levels in wheat grain lowers Falling Number but improves baking properties.

    PubMed

    Ral, Jean-Philippe; Whan, Alex; Larroque, Oscar; Leyne, Emmett; Pritchard, Jeni; Dielen, Anne-Sophie; Howitt, Crispin A; Morell, Matthew K; Newberry, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Late maturity α-amylase (LMA) and preharvest sprouting (PHS) are genetic defects in wheat. They are both characterized by the expression of specific isoforms of α-amylase in particular genotypes in the grain prior to harvest. The enhanced expression of α-amylase in both LMA and PHS results in a reduction in Falling Number (FN), a test of gel viscosity, and subsequent downgrading of the grain, along with a reduced price for growers. The FN test is unable to distinguish between LMA and PHS; thus, both defects are treated similarly when grain is traded. However, in PHS-affected grains, proteases and other degradative process are activated, and this has been shown to have a negative impact on end product quality. No studies have been conducted to determine whether LMA is detrimental to end product quality. This work demonstrated that wheat in which an isoform α-amylase (TaAmy3) was overexpressed in the endosperm of developing grain to levels of up to 100-fold higher than the wild-type resulted in low FN similar to those seen in LMA- or PHS-affected grains. This increase had no detrimental effect on starch structure, flour composition and enhanced baking quality, in small-scale 10-g baking tests. In these small-scale tests, overexpression of TaAmy3 led to increased loaf volume and Maillard-related browning to levels higher than those in control flours when baking improver was added. These findings raise questions as to the validity of the assumption that (i) LMA is detrimental to end product quality and (ii) a low FN is always indicative of a reduction in quality. This work suggests the need for a better understanding of the impact of elevated expression of specific α-amylase on end product quality. PMID:26010869

  12. A rapid response of beta-amylase to nitric oxide but not gibberellin in wheat seeds during the early stage of germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Shen, Wen-Biao; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Lang-Lai

    2005-03-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) on the responses of amylases in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds (caryopses) were investigated during the first 12 h of germination. GA(3) had no effects on the activities of alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) or beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2), either in intact seeds or embryoless halves within 12 h. In contrast, addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, was able to induce a rapid increase in beta-amylase activity without affecting alpha-amylase. Furthermore, the rapid response of beta-amylase to SNP in wheat seeds could be attributed to NO and was approximately dose-dependent. Some other aspects of SNP induction of amylase isozymes were also characterized. Further investigations showed that SNP might play an interesting role in the dissociation of free beta-amylase from small homopolymers or heteropolymers. Furthermore, SNP also directly induced the release of bound beta-amylase from glutenin and its crude enzyme preparation. However, the slight increase in protease also induced by SNP might not be responsible for this action. Interestingly, based on the fact that the rapid response of beta-amylase to NO also existed in seeds of other species, such as barley, soybean, rice and watermelon, it might be a universal event in early seed germination. PMID:15517355

  13. [Amylase in the mixed saliva of diabetics and nondiabetics on an empty stomach and during the glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Fekete, Z; Gol'denberg, A; Lukach, I; Korets, R; Shval'b, O; Platilova, G; Bandura, A

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic activity of alpha-amylase is significantly elevated in salivary pool from 146 diabetics (2176 +/- 149.3 mu catal.l-1) vs. the salivary pool from 78 nondiabetics (1159 +/- 97.3 mu catal X l-1), the difference in the concentrations of the saliva condensation index (the chloride concentration) in the diabetics and nondiabetics being negligible. Glucose tolerance test has been carried out in 54 subjects. Glucose intake has increased the alpha-amylase catalytic activity and augmented glycosialia in 14 diabetics, in 13 subjects with abnormal glucose tolerance, and in 16 nondiabetics; a negligible rise of glycosialia and a reduction of alpha-amylase catalytic activity have been observed in 11 subjects with a flat glycemia curve. Basing on these data, the authors claim that oral glucose activates amylase and glucose secretion by the salivary glands. PMID:2481117

  14. Mixed-mode resins: taking shortcut in downstream processing of raw-starch digesting α-amylases

    PubMed Central

    Lončar, Nikola; Slavić, Marinela Šokarda; Vujčić, Zoran; Božić, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis 9945a α-amylase is known as a potent enzyme for raw starch hydrolysis. In this paper, a mixed mode Nuvia cPrime™ resin is examined with the aim to improve the downstream processing of raw starch digesting amylases and exploit the hydrophobic patches on their surface. This resin combines hydrophobic interactions with cation exchange groups and as such the presence of salt facilitates hydrophobic interactions while the ion-exchange groups enable proper selectivity. α-Amylase was produced using an optimized fed-batch approach in a defined media and significant overexpression of 1.2 g L−1 was achieved. This single step procedure enables simultaneous concentration, pigment removal as well as purification of amylase with yields of 96% directly from the fermentation broth. PMID:26492875

  15. Aspergillus 6V4, a Strain Isolated from Manipueira, Produces High Amylases Levels by Using Wheat Bran as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Celestino, Jessyca dos Reis; Duarte, Ana Caroline; Silva, Cláudia Maria de Melo; Sena, Hellen Holanda; Ferreira, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro Borges Carriço; Mallmann, Neila Hiraishi; Lima, Natacha Pinheiro Costa; Tavares, Chanderlei de Castro; de Souza, Rodrigo Otávio Silva; Souza, Érica Simplício; Souza, João Vicente Braga

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was screening fungi strains, isolated from manipueira (a liquid subproduct obtained from the flour production of Manihot esculenta), for amylases production and investigating production of these enzymes by the strain Aspergillus 6V4. The fungi isolated from manipueira belonged to Ascomycota phylum. The strain Aspergillus 6V4 was the best amylase producer in the screening assay of starch hydrolysis in petri dishes (ASHPD) and in the assay in submerged fermentation (ASbF). The strain Aspergillus 6V4 produced high amylase levels (335 UI/L) using wheat bran infusion as the exclusive substrate and the supplementation of this substrate with peptone decreased the production of this enzyme. The moisture content of 70% was the best condition for the production of Aspergillus 6V4 amylases (385 IU/g) in solid state fermentation (SSF). PMID:24724017

  16. Pancreatic Amylase Is an Environmental Signal for Regulation of Biofilm Formation and Host Interaction in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A.; Nair, Sean P.; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K.; Trantham, Emma K.; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W.; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A.; Laws, Andrew P.; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism. PMID:26438798

  17. Mixed-mode resins: taking shortcut in downstream processing of raw-starch digesting α-amylases.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Šokarda Slavić, Marinela; Vujčić, Zoran; Božić, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis 9945a α-amylase is known as a potent enzyme for raw starch hydrolysis. In this paper, a mixed mode Nuvia cPrime™ resin is examined with the aim to improve the downstream processing of raw starch digesting amylases and exploit the hydrophobic patches on their surface. This resin combines hydrophobic interactions with cation exchange groups and as such the presence of salt facilitates hydrophobic interactions while the ion-exchange groups enable proper selectivity. α-Amylase was produced using an optimized fed-batch approach in a defined media and significant overexpression of 1.2 g L(-1) was achieved. This single step procedure enables simultaneous concentration, pigment removal as well as purification of amylase with yields of 96% directly from the fermentation broth. PMID:26492875

  18. Pancreatic amylase is an environmental signal for regulation of biofilm formation and host interaction in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A; Nair, Sean P; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K; Trantham, Emma K; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A; Laws, Andrew P; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick; Allan, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism. PMID:26438798

  19. Purification by expanded bed adsorption and characterization of an alpha-amylases FORILASE NTL from A. niger.

    PubMed

    Toledo, A L; Severo, J B; Souza, R R; Campos, E S; Santana, J C C; Tambourgi, E B

    2007-02-01

    In this work the purification and biochemistry characterization of alpha-amylases from Aspergillus niger (FORILASE NTL) were studied. The effects of expansion degree of resin bed on enzyme purification by expanded bed adsorption (EBA) have also been studied. Residence time distributions (RTD) studies were done to achieve the optimal conditions of the amylases recovery on ion-exchange resin, and glucose solution was used as a new tracer. Results showed that height equivalent of the theoretical plates (HETP), axial dispersion and the Prandt number increased with bed height, bed voidage and linear velocity. The adsorption capacity of alpha-amylases, on the resin, increased with bed height and the best condition was at four-expansion degree. alpha-Amylase characterization showed that this enzyme has high affinity with soluble starch, good hydrolysis potential and molecular weight of 116 kDa. PMID:16959553

  20. Comparison of alpha-amylase activity in larval stages of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebionidae).

    PubMed

    Bandani, A R; Balvasi, A

    2006-01-01

    Flour beetles attack stored grain products such as flour, cereals, meal, dried pet food, dried flowers and even dried museum specimens and other foods in the house. Stored-product insects cause tremendous losses by lowering weight, germination rate, nutritional value and grain grade. These beetles are of the most important pests of stored products in the home and grocery stores. The adult female may live for as long as two years, depositing 300 to 400 eggs. The life cycle requires one to four months when temperatures are favorable. Several methods could be used to control this insect including synthetic insecticides, biological control, physical control and transgenic plant carrying gene of interest. Chemical controls are discouraged due to pesticide residue in the commodities and resistance in insects. The study of insect digestive enzymes seems to make sense in the realization that the gut is the major interface between the insect and its environment. Hence, an understanding of digestive enzyme function is essential when developing methods of insect control such as the use of enzyme inhibitors and transgenic plants to control insect pests. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to get a good understanding from enzyme composition of different larval stages of the insect and finally characterize amylase which is the key enzyme in digestive system of this insect. For alpha-amylase study whole larvae were homogenized in 0.02 M phosphate buffer at pH 7.2. The homogenates were separately transferred to a 1.5 ml of centrifuge tubes and centrifuged at 15000xg for 20 min at 4degrees C. The supernatants were used as enzyme source in assays. alpha-Amylase activity was assayed by the dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) procedure using 1% soluble starch (Merck) as substrate. The results show that enzyme activity (OD) in the first, second, third and fourth larval stages were 0.5, 1.15, 1.35 and 1.362, respectively. There are significant differences in amylase activity in

  1. Phospholipase A2 as a point of care alternative to serum amylase and pancreatic lipase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Philips, Natalie; Khan, Shahid A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to serve as high lipase (n = 20), CA19-9 positive (n = 15), and healthy (n = 20) controls. sPLA2-IB concentration correlated well with the serum activity of both amylase and lipase, and performed at least as well as either markers in the differentiation of pancreatitis from controls.Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to

  2. Isolation, purification and characterization of β-amylase from Dioscorea hispida Dennst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktiarni, Dwita; Lusiana, Simamora, Febri Yanti; Gaol, Jusni M. Lumban

    2015-09-01

    β-amylase (E.C 3.2.1.2) is an enzyme commonly found in plants and bacteria. The enzyme is an exo-acting carbohydrolase which hydrolyzes α-1.4-glucosidic linkages of starch, removing maltose units from the non-reducing end of the polysaccharide chain, producing β-maltose and β-limit dextrin as the final product. β-amylase is widely distributed in the higher plants such as sweet potato. Besides the use in starch hydrolysis, starch-converting enzymes are also used in a number of other industrial applications, such as laundry and porcelain detergents or as anti-stalling agents in baking. This enzyme was extracted from Dioscorea hispida Dennst in 0.05 M acetate buffer pH 4.8 and followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation at cold temperature (10°C). Ammonium sulfate fractionation was shared into fraction of 0-60%, 60-70%, 70-80% and 80-100%. The fraction containing high of specific activity (determined by Somogyi-Nelson and Lowry methods) was futher purified by dialysis. Fraction with high enzyme activity of β-amylase were fraction 60-70% and 70-80%, with specific activity of Dioscorea hispida Dennst were 1.32 and 1.55 mg sugar.mg protein-1.minute-1, whereas specific activity of crude extract enzyme was 0.21 mg sugar.mg protein-1.minute-1. After purified with dialysis, fraction with high enzyme activity of β-amylase were fraction of 60-70% and 70-80%, with specific activity of Dioscorea hispida Dennst was 2.72 and 4.24 mg sugar.mg protein-1.minute-1. The purified Dioscorea hispida Dennst β-amylase from dialysis showed increasing in spesific activity the crude enzyme as much as 24 folds. The characterization of enzyme showed that Dioscorea hispida Dennst derived enzyme had optimum pH of 5.5 and temperature of 70°C. The kinetic parameters of purified Dioscorea hispida Dennst β-amylase showed that the KMapp, Vmaxapp value and Hill constant were 0.0211 mg/ml, 9.63 mg sugar.minute-1 and 1.34, respectively.

  3. Cooperativity and substrate specificity of an alkaline amylase and neopullulanase complex of Micrococcus halobius OR-1.

    PubMed

    Rajdevi, K P; Yogeeswaran, G

    2001-03-01

    The saccharifying alkaline amylase and neopullulanase complex of Micrococcus halobius OR-1 hydrolyzes both alpha-(1,4)- and alpha-(1,6)-glycosidic linkages of different linear and branched polysaccharides. The following observations were made concerning the analysis of the coexpressed amylase and neopullulanase enzymes. Even though the enzymes were subjected to a rigorous purification protocol, the activities could not be separated, because both the enzymes were found to migrate in a single peak. By contrast, two independent bands of amylolytic activity at 70 kDa and pullulanolytic activity at 53 kDa were evident by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), reducing and nonreducing PAGE, and zymographic analysis on different polysaccharides. Preferential chemical modification of the enzyme and concomitant high-performance thin-layer chromatographic analyses of the saccharides liberated showed that amylase is sensitive to 1-(dimethylamino-propyl)-3-ethyl carbodiimide-HCl and cleaved alpha-(1,4) linkages of starch, amylose, and amylopectin producing predominantly maltotriose. On the other hand, formalin-sensitive neopullulanase acts on both alpha-(1,4) and alpha-(1,6) linkages of pullulan and starch with maltotriose and panose as major products. It is understood that neopullulanase exhibits dual activity and acts in synergy with amylase toward the hydrolysis of alpha-(1,4) linkages, thereby increasing the overall reaction rate; however, such a synergism is not seen in zymograms, in which the enzymes are physically separated during electrophoresis. It is presumed that SDS-protein intercalation dissociated the enzyme complex, without altering the individual active site architecture, with only the synergism lost. The optimum temperature and pH of amylase and neopullulanase were 60 degreesC and 8.0, respectively. The enzymes were found stable in high alkaline pH for 24 h. Therefore, the saccharifying alkaline amylase and neopullulanase of M

  4. Effects of alpha-amylase and its inhibitors on acid production from cooked starch by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, S; Miyasawa-Hori, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Mayanagi, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated acid production from cooked starch by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis, and the effects of alpha-amylase inhibitors (maltotriitol and acarbose) and xylitol on acid production. Streptococcal cell suspensions were anaerobically incubated with various carbohydrates that included cooked potato starch in the presence or absence of alpha-amylase. Subsequently, the fall in pH and the acid production rate at pH 7.0 were measured. In addition, the effects of adding alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol to the reaction mixture were evaluated. In the absence of alpha-amylase, both the fall in pH and the acid production rate from cooked starch were small. On the other hand, in the presence of alpha-amylase, the pH fell to 3.9-4.4 and the acid production rate was 0.61-0.92 micromol per optical density unit per min. These values were comparable to those for maltose. When using cooked starch, the fall in pH by S. sanguinis and S. mitis was similar to that by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. For all streptococci, alpha-amylase inhibitors caused a decrease in acid production from cooked starch, although xylitol only decreased acid production by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. These results suggest that cooked starch is potentially acidogenic in the presence of alpha-amylase, which occurs in the oral cavity. In terms of the acidogenic potential of cooked starch, S. sanguinis and S. mitis were comparable to S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol might moderate this activity. PMID:19136828

  5. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    PubMed

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants. PMID:26154585

  6. Structural stability of soybean (Glycine max) α-amylase: properties of the unfolding transition studied with fluorescence and CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Arpana; Rosenkranz, Tobias; Fitter, Jörg; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2011-03-01

    Stability and unfolding of mammalian and microbial α-amylases have been intensively investigated. However, there is only limited information available on the structural stability of plant α-amylases, namely of the two isoenzymes from barley AMY1 and AMY2, of the α-amylase from mung bean (Vigna radiata), and of the α-amylase from malted sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). We report here the stability of soyabean α-amylase (GMA), against elevated temperatures and chemical denaturants (GndHCl) by employing circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Since it is well-known that calcium ions play a crucial role for enzymatic activity and stability of a-amylases, we performed our studies with calcium bound and calcium free GMA. The thermal unfolding transition temperature decreased from 72°C for calcium saturated samples to 57°C for the case of calcium depleted GMA. Similarly, the GndHCl transition concentration was lowered from 0.70 M for calcium bound GMA to 0.41 M in the absence of calcium. Thermal unfolding of GMA irreversible due to aggregation of the unfolded state. GMA unfolded in 6 M GndHCl shows high degree of reversibility after diluting the unfolded enzyme in native buffer containing 7 M glycerol. Furthermore, the refolded enzyme showed 93% of activity. PMID:20955173

  7. Inhibitory activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase by plant extracts from the Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Souza, Paula Monteiro de; Sales, Paloma Michelle de; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; Silva, Elton Clementino; Silveira, Dâmaris; Magalhães, Pérola de Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common disease in the world. One therapeutic approach for treating diabetes is inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities to reduce postprandial blood glucose levels. In vitro tests showed that several plant extracts from Brazilian cerrado species can inhibit the activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. The extracts of Eugenia dysenterica, Stryphnodendron adstringens, Pouteria caimito, Pouteria ramiflora, and Pouteria torta showed strong α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Eugenia dysenterica, P. caimito, P. ramiflora, and P. torta aqueous extracts exerted the highest activity against α-amylase (IC₅₀) values of 14.93, 13.6, 7.08, and 5.67 µg/mL, respectively) and α-glucosidase (IC₅₀ values of 0.46, 2.58, 0.35, and 0.22 µg/mL, respectively). Stryphnodendron adstringens ethanol extract also exhibited inhibitory activity against both enzymes (IC₅₀) 1.86 µg/mL against α-amylase and 0.61 µg/mL against α-glucosidase). The results suggest that the activity of these cerrado plants on α-amylase and α-glucosidase represents a potential tool for development of new strategies for treatment of diabetes. PMID:22134849

  8. alpha-Amylase inhibitory activity of some Malaysian plants used to treat diabetes; with particular reference to Phyllanthus amarus.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hasenah; Houghton, P J; Soumyanath, Amala

    2006-10-11

    Extracts of six selected Malaysian plants with a reputation of usefulness in treating diabetes were examined for alpha-amylase inhibition using an in vitro model. Inhibitory activity studied by two different protocols (with and without pre-incubation) showed that Phyllanthus amarus hexane extract had alpha-amylase inhibitory properties. Hexane and dichloromethane extracts of Anacardium occidentale, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Averrhoa bilimbiPithecellobium jiringa and Parkia speciosa were not active when tested without pre-incubation. Extraction and fractionation of Phyllanthus amarus hexane extract led to the isolation of dotriacontanyl docosanoate, triacontanol and a mixture of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. Dotriacontanyl docosanoate and the mixture of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid are reported from this plant species for the first time. All compounds were tested in the alpha-amylase inhibition assay and the results revealed that the oleanolic acid and ursolic acid (2:1) mixture was a potent alpha-amylase inhibitor with IC(50)=2.01 microg/ml (4.41 microM) and that it contributes significantly to the alpha-amylase inhibition activity of the extract. Three pure pentacyclic triterpenoids, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid and lupeol were shown to inhibit alpha-amylase. PMID:16678367

  9. Engineering α-amylase levels in wheat grain suggests a highly sophisticated level of carbohydrate regulation during development

    PubMed Central

    Whan, Alex; Dielen, Anne-Sophie; Mieog, Jos; Bowerman, Andrew F.; Robinson, Hannah M.; Byrne, Keren; Colgrave, Michelle; Larkin, Philip J.; Howitt, Crispin A.; Morell, Matthew K.; Ral, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Wheat starch degradation requires the synergistic action of different amylolytic enzymes. Our spatio-temporal study of wheat α-amylases throughout grain development shows that AMY3 is the most abundant isoform compared with the other known α-amylases. Endosperm-specific over-expression of AMY3 resulted in an increase of total α-amylase activity in harvested grains. Unexpectedly, increased activity did not have a significant impact on starch content or composition but led to an increase of soluble carbohydrate (mainly sucrose) in dry grain. In AMY3 overexpression lines (A3OE), germination was slightly delayed and triacylglycerol (TAG) content was increased in the endosperm of mature grain. Despite increased AMY3 transcript and protein content throughout grain development, alterations of α-amylase activity and starch granule degradation were not detected until grain maturation, suggesting a post-translational inhibition of α-amylase activity in the endosperm during the starch filling period. These findings show unexpected effects of a high level of α-amylase on grain development and composition, notably in carbon partitioning and TAG accumulation, and suggest the presence of a hitherto unknown regulatory pathway during grain filling. PMID:25053646

  10. Utilization of a maltotetraose-producing amylase as a whole wheat bread improver: dough rheology and baking performance.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woosung; Lee, Sung Ho; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Lee, Suyong

    2014-08-01

    A maltotetraose-producing enzyme (G4-amylase) was utilized to improve the baking performance of whole-grain wheat flour. Whole-grain bread dough prepared with G4-amylase showed reduced water absorption and increased development time, while the dough stability was not affected. Also, the G4-amylase-treated samples exhibited lower Mixolab torque values than the control upon heating and cooling. Rheological measurements showed the decreased ratio of Rmax /E and increased tan δ, clearly demonstrating that the viscous characteristics of whole-grain bread dough became dominant with increasing levels of G4-amylase. The use of G4-amylase produced whole-grain wheat breads with a variety of maltooligosaccharides, primarily maltotetraose that positively contributed to the bread volume (1.2-fold higher than the control). Moreover, G4-amylase delayed the crumb firming of whole-grain wheat bread during a 7-d storage period, showing that it can function as an antiretrogradation agent to enhance the quality attributes of whole-grain wheat bread. PMID:25040090

  11. Effects of metals on {alpha}-amylase activity in the digestive gland of the green mussel, Perna viridis L.

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.; Teo, L.H.; Sin, Y.M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of digestive enzymes in the green mussel, Perna viridis L., have been reported, and {alpha}-amylase is believed to have a higher activity than the others. Small plankton, on which the green mussel feeds, may supply plenty of starch and glycogen. They may be an important source of nutrients for the green mussel and the ability of the latter to make good use of them depends mainly on the activities of amylase. The effect of heavy metals on amylase activity is also important as the ability of the mussel`s digestive gland to accumulate these metals is well known. High concentrations of heavy metals, especially lead, have been observed in the water around Singapore. The in vitro inhibition of some metals on the activities of digestive enzymes from the green mussel has been observed, but kinetic properties of the inhibition and the in vivo inhibition of the heavy metals on digestive enzymes are little understood. In the present study, in vitro inhibition of four metals (Pb, Cd, Zn and Hg) on the activity of {alpha}-amylase from the digestive gland of the green mussel will be compared. Their effects on the K{sub M} and V{sub max} values of {alpha}-amylase will also be compared. Finally, lead is either added to the food or water, to see how it affects the activity of {alpha}-amylase and how this effect acts in combination with starvation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Purification, partial characterization, and covalent immobilization-stabilization of an extracellular α-amylase from Aspergillus niveus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tony Marcio; Damásio, André Ricardo de Lima; Maller, Alexandre; Michelin, Michele; Squina, Fabio M; Jorge, João Atílio; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes

    2013-11-01

    An extracellular amylase secreted by Aspergillus niveus was purified using DEAE fractogel ion exchange chromatography and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration. The purified protein migrated as a single band in 5 % polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and 10 % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme exhibited 4.5 % carbohydrate content, 6.6 isoelectric point, and 60 and 52 kDa molar mass estimated by SDS-PAGE and Bio-Sil-Sec-400 gel filtration column, respectively. The amylase efficiently hydrolyzed glycogen, amylose, and amylopectin. The end-products formed after 24 h of starch hydrolysis, analyzed by thin layer chromatography, were maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, and maltopentaose, which classified the studied amylase as an α-amylase. Thermal stability of the α-amylase was improved by covalent immobilization on glyoxyl agarose (half-life of 169 min, at 70 °C). On the other hand, the free α-amylase showed a half-life of 20 min at the same temperature. The optima of pH and temperature were 6.0 and 65 °C for both free and immobilized forms. PMID:23463193

  13. Inhibition of growth of Aspergillus flavus and fungal alpha-amylases by a lectin-like protein from Lablab purpureus.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, A M; Woloshuk, C P

    2001-08-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of maize causing an important ear rot disease when plants are exposed to drought and heat stress. Associated with the disease is the production of aflatoxins, which are a series of structurally related mycotoxins known to be carcinogenic. Previous research has suggested that the alpha-amylase of A. flavus promotes aflatoxin production in the endosperm of infected maize kernels. We report here the isolation and characterization of a 36-kDa alpha-amylase inhibitor from Lablab purpureus (AILP). AILP inhibited the alpha-amylases from several fungi but had little effect on those from animal and plant sources. The protein inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of A. flavus. The amino acid sequence indicated that AILP is similar to lectin members of a lectin-arcelin-alpha-amylase inhibitor family described in common bean and shown to be a component of plant resistance to insect pests. AILP also agglutinated papain-treated red blood cells from human and rabbit. These data indicate that AILP represents a novel variant in the lectin-arcelin-alpha-amylase inhibitor family of proteins having lectin-like and alpha-amylase inhibitory activity. PMID:11497467

  14. Cloning, enhanced expression and characterization of an α-amylase gene from a wild strain in B. subtilis WB800.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Chen, Xianghua; Dai, Jun; Xie, Guangrong; Yan, Luying; Lu, Lina; Chen, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    A Bacillus strain with high productivity of α-amylase isolated from a starch farm was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The α-amylase encoding gene amy1 was cloned into pMD18-T vector and amplified in E. coli DH5α. Shuttle vector pP43MNX was reconstructed to obtain vector pP43X for heterologous expression of the α-amylase in B. subtilis WB800. Recombinant enzyme was sufficiently purified by precipitation, gel filtration and anion exchange with a specific activity of 5566 U/mg. The α-amylase sequence contains an open reading frame of 1545 bp, which encodes a protein of 514 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 58.4 kDa. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 6.0 and 60 °C. Catalytic efficiency of the recombinant α-amylase was inhibited by Hg(2+), Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), but stimulated by Li(+), Mn(2+) and Ca(2+). The purified enzyme showed decreased activity toward detergents (SDS, Tween 20 and Triton X-100). Compared with production by the wild strain, there was a 1.48-fold increase in the productivity of α-amylase in recombinant B. subtilis WB800. PMID:26092061

  15. Chloride Activated Halophilic α-Amylase from Marinobacter sp. EMB8: Production Optimization and Nanoimmobilization for Efficient Starch Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Khare, S K

    2015-01-01

    Halophiles have been perceived as potential source of novel enzymes in recent years. The interest emanates from their ability to catalyze efficiently under high salt and organic solvents. Present work encompasses production optimization and nanoimmobilization of an α-amylase from moderately halophilic Marinobacter sp. EMB8. Media ingredients and culture conditions were optimized by "one-at-a-time approach." Starch was found to be the best carbon source at 5% (w/v) concentration. Glucose acted as catabolic repressor for amylase production. Salt proved critical for amylase production and maximum production was attained at 5% (w/v) NaCl. Optimization of various culture parameters resulted in 48.0 IU/mL amylase production, a 12-fold increase over that of unoptimized condition (4.0 IU/mL). α-Amylase was immobilized on 3-aminopropyl functionalized silica nanoparticles using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. Optimization of various parameters resulted in 96% immobilization efficiency. Starch hydrolyzing efficiency of immobilized enzyme was comparatively better. Immobilized α-amylase retained 75% of its activity after 5th cycle of repeated use. PMID:25667773

  16. Identification of a novel alpha-amylase by expression of a newly cloned human amy3 cDNA in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiosaki, K; Takata, K; Omichi, K; Tomita, N; Horii, A; Ogawa, M; Matsubara, K

    1990-05-14

    A novel amylase gene (amy3) that differs in nucleotide sequence from salivary amylase gene (amy1) and pancreatic amylase gene (amy2) has been described [Tomita et al., Gene 76 (1989) 11-18], but whether this gene can ever code for an active enzyme has not been shown. We prepared cDNA of this gene from an mRNA obtained from lung carcinoid tissue, and expressed it in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the control of an acid phosphatase promoter. The product was secreted into culture media, and showed enzymatic activity, demonstrating that this novel alpha-amylase gene (amy3) can code for a functional isozyme. We purified this enzyme, and compared its biological properties with those of salivary and pancreatic human amylases similarly expressed in yeast. We observed that the novel amylase isozyme is more heat-sensitive than others, and that its substrate specificity is different from the other two isozymes. PMID:2197187

  17. Phytochemical screening and in vitro amylase inhibitory effect of the leaves of Breynia retusa.

    PubMed

    Kripa, K G; Sangeetha, R; Madhavi, P; Deepthi, P

    2011-10-01

    This study was proposed based on the folklore claim and on the scarcity of scientific evidence from the literature for the medicinal uses of Breynia retusa. The aim of the present study was to analyse the phytochemical constituents of the leaves of B. retusa. The fractions obtained by successive fractionation using solvents of varying polarity were studied for the presence of primary and secondary metabolites and the total phenolic content of the different fractions were determined by HPLC. The results of the study support the traditional acclaim of the therapeutic uses of B. retusa. The potential of B. retusa to inhibit alpha-amylase, a prime enzyme involved in carbohydrate metabolism was analysed and it was observed that the ethyl acetate and methanolic extract of the leaves of B. retusa possessed in vitro amylase inhibitory activity. PMID:22518933

  18. Amylase production in solid state fermentation by the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus.

    PubMed

    Kunamneni, Adinarayana; Permaul, Kugen; Singh, Suren

    2005-08-01

    The production of extracellular amylase by the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus was studied in solid state fermentation (SSF). Solid substrates such as wheat bran, molasses bran, rice bran, maize meal, millet cereal, wheat flakes, barley bran, crushed maize, corncobs and crushed wheat were studied for enzyme production. Growth on wheat bran gave the highest amylase activity. The maximum enzyme activity obtained was 534 U/g of wheat bran under optimum conditions of an incubation period of 120 h, an incubation temperature of 50 degrees C, an initial moisture content of 90%, a pH of 6.0, an inoculum level of 10% (v/w), a salt solution concentration of 1.5:10 (v/w) and a ratio of substrate weight to flask volume of 1:100 with soluble starch (1% w/w) and peptone (1% w/w) as supplements. PMID:16198259

  19. Studies on alpha-amylase induced degradation of binary polymeric blends of crosslinked starch and pectin.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, A K; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2007-05-01

    A blend matrix of crosslinked starch and pectin was prepared and characterized by infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared blends were investigated kinetically for water sorption studies and alpha-amylase induced degradation adopting a gravimetric procedure. Based on the experimental findings, a plausible mechanism including both diffusion and surface enhanced degradation was suggested and degradation profiles were interpreted. The influence of various factors such as chemical architecture of the blend, pH and temperature of alpha-amylase solution were examined for the swelling and degradation kinetics of crosslinked starch-pectin blends. The effect of concentration of enzyme solution was also studied on the degradation profile of the blends. A correlation was established between the extent of degradation and water imbibing capacity of the degrading blends. PMID:17143735

  20. Convenience of immobilized Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase as time-temperature-integrator (TTI).

    PubMed

    De Cordt, S F; Hendrickx, M E; Maesmans, G J; Tobback, P P

    1994-02-01

    For the immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase to porous glass beads, the performances of three possible linking agents, glutaric dialdehyde, benzoquinone and s-trichlorotriazine were assessed in respect of the protein yield, the enzymic activity and the thermostability of the immobilized enzyme. These three properties are to be evaluated in view of the possible use of the enzyme preparations as time-temperature-integrators (TTIs) for assessing the severity of heat pasteurization or sterilization processes of food or pharmaceuticals. All three linkers improved the enzyme's resistance to irreversible heat inactivation to a similar extent and in each case biphasic inactivation kinetics were observed, whereas the dissolved B. licheniformis alpha-amylase showed a simple first order decay. The immobilization yield, measured as protein per carrier weight, did not differ markedly for the three linkers, although the enzymic activity of the glutaric dialdehyde-linked enzyme was lower than that of the benzoquinone- and s-trichlorotriazine-linked preparations. PMID:7764538

  1. Functionalized Graphene Sheets As Immobilization Matrix for Fenugreek β-Amylase: Enzyme Kinetics and Stability Studies

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Kritika; Talat, Mahe; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind M.

    2014-01-01

    β-Amylase finds application in food and pharmaceutical industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were customised as a matrix for covalent immobilization of Fenugreek β-amylase using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The factors affecting the process were optimized using Response Surface Methodology based Box-Behnken design of experiment which resulted in 84% immobilization efficiency. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Fourier Tansform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed for the purpose of characterization of attachment of enzyme on the graphene. The enzyme kinetic studies were carried out for obtaining best catalytic performance and enhanced reusability. Optimum temperature remained unchanged, whereas optimum pH showed shift towards acidic range for immobilized enzyme. Increase in thermal stability of immobilized enzyme and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene can be exploited for production of maltose in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25412079

  2. Characterization and Application of BiLA, a Psychrophilic α-Amylase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Won; Jeon, Hye-Yeon; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Na-Ri; Choung, Woo-Jae; Koo, Ye-Seul; Ko, Dam-Seul; You, SangGuan; Shim, Jae-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel α-amylase was cloned from Bifidobacterium longum and named BiLA. The enzyme exhibited optimal activity at 20 °C and a pH value of 5.0. Kinetic analysis using various carbohydrate substrates revealed that BiLA had the highest k(cat/)K(m) value for amylose. Interestingly, analysis of the enzymatic reaction products demonstrated that BiLA specifically catalyzed the hydrolysis of oligosaccharides and starches up to G5 from the nonreducing ends. To determine whether BiLA can be used to generate slowly digestible starch (SDS), starch was treated with BiLA, and the kinetic parameters were analyzed using porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) and amyloglucosidase (AMG). Compared to normal starch, BiLA-treated starch showed lower k(cat)/K(m) values with PPA and AMG, suggesting that BiLA is a potential candidate for the production of SDS. PMID:26979859

  3. α-amylase crystal growth investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, J. P.; Bokern, D.; Lapena, L.; Veesler, S.

    2001-06-01

    The growth behavior of porcine pancreatic α-amylase at defined supersaturation has been investigated by means of temperature controlled in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The step velocities measured by AFM were in overall agreement with the normal growth rates of an individual face measured by optical microscopy. In addition, highly local growth dynamics could be visualized. Imaging in tapping mode revealed crystalline amylase aggregates attached to the basal face and their subsequent incorporation into growing terraces producing a macrodefect. At high supersaturation ( β=1.6) 2-D nucleation was found to be the dominating growth mechanism, whereas at lower supersaturation ( β=1.3) the growth process appears to be defect controlled (spiral growth). The analysis of step heights on 2-D nucleation islands (monomolecular protein layers) and growth steps (two molecules in height) in combination with results from light scattering experiments suggest that a single protein molecule is the basic growth unit.

  4. Functionalized graphene sheets as immobilization matrix for Fenugreek β-amylase: enzyme kinetics and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Garima; Singh, Kritika; Talat, Mahe; Srivastava, Onkar Nath; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2014-01-01

    β-Amylase finds application in food and pharmaceutical industries. Functionalized graphene sheets were customised as a matrix for covalent immobilization of Fenugreek β-amylase using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The factors affecting the process were optimized using Response Surface Methodology based Box-Behnken design of experiment which resulted in 84% immobilization efficiency. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM) and Fourier Tansform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed for the purpose of characterization of attachment of enzyme on the graphene. The enzyme kinetic studies were carried out for obtaining best catalytic performance and enhanced reusability. Optimum temperature remained unchanged, whereas optimum pH showed shift towards acidic range for immobilized enzyme. Increase in thermal stability of immobilized enzyme and non-toxic nature of functionalized graphene can be exploited for production of maltose in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25412079

  5. Expression of a bacterial alpha-amylase gene in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Fang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Guo, Jianli; Chen, Pinnan; Cheng, Jiaan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2008-08-01

    An alpha-amylase gene from Bacillus stearothermophilus under the control of the promoter of a major rice-seed storage protein was introduced into rice. The transgenic line with the highest alpha-amylase activity reached about 15,000 U/g of seeds (one unit is defined as the amount of enzyme that produces 1 mumol of reducing sugar in 1 min at 70 degrees C). The enzyme produced in the seeds had an optimum pH of 5.0-5.5 and optimum temperature of 60-70 degrees C. Without extraction or purification, the power of transgenic rice seeds was able to liquify 100 times its weight of corn powder in 2 h. Thus, the transgenic rice could be used for industrial starch liquefaction. PMID:17926139

  6. Production, purification, and characterization of alpha-amylase from Thermomonospora curvata.

    PubMed Central

    Glymph, J L; Stutzenberger, F J

    1977-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata produces an extracellular alpha-amylase. Maximal amylase production by cultures in a starch-mineral salts medium occurred at pH 7.5 and 53 degrees C. The crude enzyme was unstable to heating (65 degrees C) at pH 4 to 6, and was activated when heated at pH 8. The enzyme was purified 66-fold with a 9% yield and appeared homogeneous on discontinuous gel electrophoresis. The pH and temperature optima for activity of the purified enzyme were 5.5 to 6.0 and 65 degrees C. The molecular weight was calculated to be 62,000. The Km for starch was 0.39 mg/ml. The amylolytic pattern consisted of a mixture of maltotetraose and maltopentaose. Images PMID:21612

  7. Amylase production by solid-state fermentation of agro-industrial wastes using Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Rajshree; Singh, Rajni

    2011-01-01

    Solid state fermentation was carried out using various agro- industrial wastes with the best amylase producing strain isolated from soil. Different physicochemical conditions were varied for maximum enzyme production. The strain produced about 5400 units/g of amylase at 1:3 moisture content, 20% inoculum, after 72 h of incubation with Mustard Oil seed cake as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme activity were found to be 50°C and 6 respectively. The enzyme was found to be thermostable at 70°C for about 2 h without any salt. It showed stability at pH range 5–7. The metal ions as Na+, Ca++, Mg++ and Co++ enhanced the enzyme activity. PMID:24031761

  8. Alpha-amylase circadian rhythm of young rat parotid gland: an endogenous rhythm with maternal coordination.

    PubMed

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1992-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in the parotid glands of 25-day-old rats were studied under different experimental designs (fasting, reversed photoperiod, constant lighting conditions and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of fasted rats did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm was present, with changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and postnatal life in constant light or dark. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, and with maternal coordination. PMID:1610312

  9. Production and characterization of a thermostable alpha-amylase from Nocardiopsis sp. endophyte of yam bean.

    PubMed

    Stamford, T L; Stamford, N P; Coelho, L C; Araújo, J M

    2001-01-01

    Thermostable amylolytic enzymes have been currently investigated to improve industrial processes of starch degradation. Studies on production of alpha-amylase by Nocardiopsis sp., an endophytic actinomycete isolated from yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus L. Urban), showed that higher enzyme levels were obtained at the end of the logarithmic growth phase after incubation for 72 h at pH 8.6. Maximum activity of alpha-amylase was obtained at pH 5.0 and 70 degrees C. The isolated enzyme exhibited thermostable properties as indicated by retention of 100% of residual activity at 70 degrees C, and 50% of residual activity at 90 degrees C for 10 min. Extracellular enzyme from Nocardiopsis sp. was purified by fractional precipitation with ammonium sulphate. After 60% saturation produced 1130 U mg-1 protein and yield was 28% with purification 2.7-fold. The enzyme produced by Nocardiopsis sp. has potential for industrial applications. PMID:11131797

  10. Expression and secretion of alpha-amylase and glucoamylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; He, M; Li, W; Zhang, T

    1994-01-01

    alpha-Amylase genes of Bacillus licheniformis and glucoamylase cDNA of Aspergillus niger were ligated to a E. coli-yeast shuttle vector. The resultant plasmid was used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae to construct starch-degrading yeast strain. The results of enzyme activity assay and enzyme property analysis show that alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes have been expressed simultaneously in yeast under the control of promoters and terminators of yeast MF-alpha 1 factor and PGK genes and over 99% of enzyme activities were secreted to the medium. The engineered yeast strain hydrolyses 97% of the starch (10%) in the medium after 6 days. The recombinant plasmid exists stably in yeast. PMID:7780020

  11. Comparison of Antibodies with Amylase Activity from Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Doronin, Vasilii B.; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A.; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Cesnik, Edward; Buneva, Valentina N.; Granieri, Enrico; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IgGs from serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients are active in hydrolysis of DNA and myelin basic protein. According to literature data, anti-DNA and anti-MBP abzymes may promote important neuropathologic mechanisms in this chronic inflammatory disorder and in MS pathogenesis development. At the same time, the involvement of antibodies with amylase activity in the pathogenesis of any autoimmune disease has not yet been identified. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were obtained by a sequential affinity chromatography of the CSF proteins on protein G-Sepharose and FPLC gel filtration. We are able to present the first unpredictable evidence showing that IgGs from CSF possess amylase activity and efficiently hydrolyze maltoheptaose; their average specific Ab activity is ~30-fold higher than that of antibodies from sera of the same MS patients. Specific average RA (SAA) for IgGs from healthy volunteers was approximately ~1000 lower than that for MS patients. In addition, it was shown that a relative SAA of total proteins of CSF (including Abs) ~15-fold lower than that for purified IgGs, while the relative SAA of the total sera protein is higher than that of sera IgGs by a factor of 1033. This result speaks in favor of the fact that amylolytic activity of CSF proteins is mainly caused by the activity of amylase abzymes. One cannot exclude, that amylase abzymes of CSF can play a, as yet unknown, role in the pathogenesis of MS. Some possible reasons of these findings are discussed. PMID:27196086

  12. Polymorphism of salivary esterase and alpha-amylase in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Petalopoulos, A; Fousteri, M; Kouvatsi, A; Triantaphyllidis, C

    1993-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of two salivary enzymes (esterase and alpha-amylase) was studied in individuals from eight districts of Greece. The pooled gene frequencies were: SetS = 0.63, SetF = 0.37, AMY1 = 0.87, AMY2 = 0.10, AMY3 = 0.02, and AMY4 = 0.01. There was no intrapopulation heterogeneity, while there was a significant difference between the Greeks and the few other European populations studied. PMID:7507080

  13. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin. PMID:27108177

  14. Comparison of Antibodies with Amylase Activity from Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Cesnik, Edward; Buneva, Valentina N; Granieri, Enrico; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IgGs from serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients are active in hydrolysis of DNA and myelin basic protein. According to literature data, anti-DNA and anti-MBP abzymes may promote important neuropathologic mechanisms in this chronic inflammatory disorder and in MS pathogenesis development. At the same time, the involvement of antibodies with amylase activity in the pathogenesis of any autoimmune disease has not yet been identified. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were obtained by a sequential affinity chromatography of the CSF proteins on protein G-Sepharose and FPLC gel filtration. We are able to present the first unpredictable evidence showing that IgGs from CSF possess amylase activity and efficiently hydrolyze maltoheptaose; their average specific Ab activity is ~30-fold higher than that of antibodies from sera of the same MS patients. Specific average RA (SAA) for IgGs from healthy volunteers was approximately ~1000 lower than that for MS patients. In addition, it was shown that a relative SAA of total proteins of CSF (including Abs) ~15-fold lower than that for purified IgGs, while the relative SAA of the total sera protein is higher than that of sera IgGs by a factor of 1033. This result speaks in favor of the fact that amylolytic activity of CSF proteins is mainly caused by the activity of amylase abzymes. One cannot exclude, that amylase abzymes of CSF can play a, as yet unknown, role in the pathogenesis of MS. Some possible reasons of these findings are discussed. PMID:27196086

  15. Halophilic alkali- and thermostable amylase from a novel polyextremophilic Amphibacillus sp. NM-Ra2.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular gluco-amylo-pullulanase from Amphibacillus sp. NM-Ra2 was purified to homogeneity by ethanol precipitation, anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Molecular mass of the enzyme was 50kDa (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme showed maximal activity at 1.9 M NaCl, pH50°C 8.0 and 54°C and was active from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl and 37 to 65°C. The enzyme was inhibited by EDTA and was stable and active in the presence of PMSF, DTT, H2O2, Triton-X-100, Tween 20 and Tween 80. Ca2+ is inessential for activity. The amylase was stimulated with K+ and inhibited with Cu2+ and Mg2+. Hg2+, Zn2+ and Fe2+ had no effect on activity. Amylase was stable and active in the presence of ethanol, methanol and benzene (25%, v/v). The enzyme hydrolyzed linear and branched polysaccharides including pullulan, glycogen and amylopectin, and hydrolyzed raw wheat starch and raw corn starch (14.6% and 13.5% over 2 h). Amylase activity was inhibited by soluble starch concentrations greater than 0.3%. The major products of soluble starch hydrolysis were maltose and maltotriose. The amylase, being halophilic and alkali-thermostable, in addition to being resistant to surfactants, oxidizing agents and organic solvents, can find applications in the starch processing, pharmaceutical, food and paper/pulp industries. PMID:25008132

  16. The genetic control of the alpha-amylase isozymes of the durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Prokopyk, D O; Antonyuk, M Z; Ternovskaya, T K

    2009-01-01

    The hybridological analysis was provided on several durum wheat genotypes with utilizing three F2 populations developed from the crossing between parental forms that differed in the invariable malt-zone triplet on electrophoretic spectrum of alpha-amylase. Three components of this zone are controlled by three genes with an independent way of inheritance: one of them is located on the 6B or 5B chromosome, and two genes are located on the chromosomes of A subgenome. PMID:19938630

  17. Cloning and Characterization of an Alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular a-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  18. Cloning and Characterization of an alpha-amylase Gene from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Thioreducens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Mark L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding an extracellular alpha-amylase, TTA, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Primary structural analysis revealed high similarity with other a-amylases from the Thermococcus and Pyrococcus genera, as well as the four highly conserved regions typical for a-amylases. The 1374 bp gene encodes a protein of 457 amino acids, of which 435 constitute the mature protein preceded by a 22 amino acid signal peptide. The molecular weight of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be 43 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Maximal enzymatic activity of recombinant TTA was observed at 90 C and pH 5.5 in the absence of exogenous Ca(2+), and the enzyme was considerably stable even after incubation at 90 C for 2 hours. The thermostability at 90 and 102 C was enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). The extraordinarily high specific activity (about 7.4 x 10(exp 3) U/mg protein at 90 C, pH 5.5 with soluble starch as substrate) together with its low pH optimum makes this enzyme an interesting candidate for starch processing applications.

  19. Enhanced maltose production through mutagenesis of acceptor binding subsite +2 in Bacillus stearothermophilus maltogenic amylase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yecheng; Duan, Xuguo; Wang, Lei; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-10

    Maltogenic amylases are used to decrease the maltotriose content of high maltose syrups. However, due to the interplay between the hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities of maltogenic amylases, the maltotriose contents of these syrups are still greater than that necessary for pure maltose preparation. In this study, the maltogenic amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus was engineered to decrease its transglycosylation activity with the expectation that this would enhance maltose production. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate Trp 177 variants W177F, W177Y, W177L, W177N, and W177S. The transglycosylation activities of the mutant enzymes decreased as the hydrophilicity of the residue at position 177 increased. The mutant enzymes exhibited notable enhancements in maltose production, with a minimum of maltotriose contents of 0.2%, compared with 3.2% for the wild-type enzyme. Detailed characterization of the mutant enzymes suggests that the best of them, W177S, will deliver performance superior to that of the wild-type under industrial conditions. PMID:26597712

  20. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome1-3. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A, and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. The copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the genome’s largest influence on obesity4, though genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole genome sequence analysis3,5, droplet digital PCR6, and genome mapping7, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that AMY1 copy number in individuals’ genomes is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates to nearby SNPs, which do not associate with BMI. We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in two other cohorts totaling ~3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI4, yet found no association. PMID:26098870

  1. Antidiabetic Activity of Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera: Potent Amylase and Glucosidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sougata; Ahire, Mehul; Patil, Sumersing; Jabgunde, Amit; Bhat Dusane, Meenakshi; Joshi, Bimba N.; Pardesi, Karishma; Jachak, Sanjay; Dhavale, Dilip D.; Chopade, Balu A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting about 220 million people worldwide. One of the most critical complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyper-glycemia (PPHG). Glucosidase inhibitor and α-amylase inhibitors are class of compounds that help in managing PPHG. Low-cost herbal treatment is recommended due to their lesser side effect for treatment of diabetes. Two plants with significant traditional therapeutic potential, namely, Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera, were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Stem, leaf, and flower of G. glauca and bulb of D. bulbifera were sequentially extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol as well as separately with 70% ethanol. Petroleum ether extract of flower of G. glauca was found to inhibit α-amylase significantly (78.56%). Extracts were further tested against crude murine pancreatic, small intestinal, and liver glucosidase enzyme which revealed excellent inhibitory properties. α-glucosidase inhibition provided a strong in vitro evidence for confirmation of both G. glauca and D. bulbifera as excellent antidiabetic remedy. This is the first report of its kind that provides a strong biochemical basis for management of type II diabetes using G. glauca and D. bulbifera. These results provide intense rationale for further in vivo and clinical study. PMID:21785651

  2. Muscarinic receptors and amylase secretion of rat pancreatic acini during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Morisset, J; Wood, J; Solomon, T E; Larose, L

    1987-08-01

    This study examines the effects of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis on the secretory response of rat pancreatic acini to carbamylcholine and concentration of acinar muscarinic receptors. Rats were injected subcutaneously every 8 hr with cerulein, 12 micrograms/kg, for two days. They were sacrificed 2 and 4 hr after the first injection, 4 hr after the second and third, and 8 hr after the sixth. By 2 hr after the first injection, carbamylcholine showed decreased potency for stimulating amylase release; decreased potency becomes maximal after the second injection. Four hours after the first injection, carbamylcholine also showed decreased efficacy for causing maximal amylase release. In the course of development of pancreatitis, progressive reductions in muscarinic receptor concentrations were evident from 4 hr after the second injection. Following the complete treatment (8 hr after the sixth injection), no alteration could be observed in the affinity or proportions of each agonist class of muscarinic receptors. These studies indicate that the pancreatic acinar cells still remain functional after acute cerulein-induced pancreatitis, although significant reductions in potency and efficacy of carbamylcholine to cause amylase release and reduced muscarinic receptor concentration occur. PMID:2440647

  3. Rice proteins, extracted by alkali and α-amylase, differently affect in vitro antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxuan; Liu, Ye; Li, Hui; Yang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Alkali treatment and α-amylase degradation are different processes for rice protein (RP) isolation. The major aim of this study was to determine the influence of two different extraction methods on the antioxidant capacities of RPA, extracted by alkaline (0.2% NaOH), and RPE, extracted by α-amylase, during in vitro digestion for 2h with pepsin and for 3h with pancreatin. Upon pepsin-pancreatin digestion, the protein hydrolysates (RPA-S, RPE-S), which were the supernatants in the absence of undigested residue, and the whole protein digests (RPA, RPE), in which undigested residue remained, were measured. RPE exhibited the stronger antioxidant responses to free radical scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and reducing power, whereas the weakest antioxidant capacities were produced by RPE-S. In contrast, no significant differences in antioxidant activity were observed between RPA and RPA-S. The present study demonstrated that the in vitro antioxidant responses induced by the hydrolysates and the protein digests of RPs could be affected differently by alkali treatment and α-amylase degradation, suggesting that the extraction is a vital processing step to modify the antioxidant capacities of RPs. The results of the current study indicated that the protein digests, in which undigested residues remained, could exhibit more efficacious antioxidant activity compared to the hydrolysates. PMID:27041309

  4. The Amylase gene cluster on the evolving sex chromosomes of Drosophila miranda.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, S; Steinemann, M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of chromosomal homology, the Amylase gene cluster in Drosophila miranda must be located on the secondary sex chromosome pair, neo-X (X2) and neo-Y, but is autosomally inherited in all other Drosophila species. Genetic evidence indicates no active amylase on the neo-Y chromosome and the X2-chromosomal locus already shows dosage compensation. Several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the Amy gene cluster has been lost already from the evolving neo-Y chromosome. This finding shows that a relatively new neo-Y chromosome can start to lose genes and hence gradually lose homology with the neo-X. The X2-chromosomal Amy1 is intact and Amy2 contains a complete coding sequence, but has a deletion in the 3'-flanking region. Amy3 is structurally eroded and hampered by missing regulatory motifs. Functional analysis of the X2-chromosomal Amy1 and Amy2 regions from D. miranda in transgenic D. melanogaster flies reveals ectopic AMY1 expression. AMY1 shows the same electrophoretic mobility as the single amylase band in D. miranda, while ectopic AMY2 expression is characterized by a different mobility. Therefore, only the Amy1 gene of the resident Amy cluster remains functional and hence Amy1 is the dosage compensated gene. PMID:9872956

  5. α-Glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activity of Senna surattensis.

    PubMed

    Thilagam, Ellappan; Parimaladevi, Balasubramaian; Kumarappan, Chidambaram; Mandal, Subhash Chandra

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ethanolic extract of the leaves of Senna surattensis (EESS) on α-glucosidase and α-amylase. We also studied the in vitro antidiabetic activity of S. surattensis using the glucose uptake by isolated rat hemidiaphragm model. In vitro studies using mammalian α-glucosidase extracted from the small intestine homogenate of mouse showed that the extract was found to be more effective in inhibiting the activities of maltase [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)): 209.15 μg/mL] and sucrase (IC(50): 366.44 μg/mL) when compared with the control group (acarbose). The extract of S. surattensis were further quantified with respect to porcine pancreatic α-amylase inhibition using the chromogenic 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. Interestingly, S. surattensis was also found to exhibit α-amylase (IC(50): 123.95 μg/mL) inhibitory activity. The glucose uptake in the rat hemidiaphragm was significantly (p < 0.01) increased by EESS (220.95 ± 5.4 mg/g/30 minute) when compared with the control group. The total polyphenolic content of EESS was found to be 98 μg pyrocatechol/mg of the extract. These results suggest that EESS inhibited carbohydrate digestive enzymes and increased the peripheral uptake of glucose. This study endorses the use of this plant for further studies to determine their potential for managing type II diabetes. PMID:23433052

  6. Structural and catalytic properties of immobilized α-amylase from Laceyella sacchari TSI-2.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rushit J; Singh, Satya P

    2016-04-01

    One of the approaches to address the issues of the cost of production, recovery and reusability of the extremozymes can be immobilization. In this report, we describe immobilization of an α-amylase from Laceyella sacchari TSI-2 and characterization of the immobilized enzyme. The enzyme was immobilized on 6 different matrices using entrapment, ionic binding and surface adsorption. The DEAE cellulose with glutaraldehyde crosslinking appeared most effective for the immobilization with high operational stability. While the temperature optima and thermal stability of the immobilized α-amylase shifted from 60 to 70°C with increased half-life, the pH optima remain unaltered while pH stability was shifted from 6 to 7. The stability of the immobilized enzyme improved in solvents. The enzyme catalysis in surfactants enhanced, while the Km and Vmax were reduced after immobilization. The structural features of the immobilized enzyme as probed by FT-IR established the role of aliphatic amines, esters and alkenes in immobilization. The starch hydrolysis efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was 15.55%. The immobilized enzyme in various detergents was highly efficient in removing the starch stain from cotton cloth. Taken together, the α-amylase turned more stable after immobilization and can be a favored choice for applications. PMID:26740465

  7. Statistical media optimization and production of ITS alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gigras, Paresh; Sahai, Vikram; Gupta, Rani

    2002-09-01

    The production of an intermediate temperature-stable (ITS) alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae was studied by using a central composite design with three independent variables, viz., starch, yeast extract, and K(2)HPO(4). The model equation provided a suitable model for the response surface for alpha-amylase production, and, from the optimal concentrations of the medium components, a model was predicted, which was then used for enzyme production in a 150-L bioreactor. In the bioreactor studies, the enzyme yields (161 U/ml) were similar to that of the shake flask (133 U/ml); however, the time required for maximum alpha-amylase production in the bioreactor was reduced to 48 h compared with 120 h in shake flask cultures. An increased level of phosphate in the medium and low inoculum size were necessary to control the excessive foaming in the bioreactor; however, control of the pO(2) level and agitation was not mandatory for enzyme production. The peak enzyme production coincided with the increase in pH of the fermentation broth and was maximal when the pH of the system was above 7.5. Thus, in the present study, pH acted as an indicator of the initiation or end of the enzyme synthesis or of the fermentation cycle. PMID:12177743

  8. Coconut oil cake--a potential raw material for the production of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sumitra; Patel, Anil K; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Francis, Febe; Nagy, Viviana; Szakacs, George; Pandey, Ashok

    2004-06-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) was carried out using coconut oil cake (COC) as substrate for the production of alpha-amylase using a fungal culture of Aspergillus oryzae. Raw COC supported the growth of the culture, resulting in the production of 1372 U/gds alpha-amylase in 24 h. Process optimization using a single parameter mode showed enhanced enzyme titre, which was maximum (1827 U/gds) when SSF was carried out at 30 degrees C for 72 h using a substrate with 68% initial moisture. Supplementation with glucose and starch further enhanced enzyme titre, which was maximum (1911 U/gds) with 0.5% starch. However, maltose inhibited the enzyme production. Studies on the effect of addition of external organic and inorganic nitrogenous compounds further showed a positive impact on enzyme synthesis by the culture. Increase of 1.7-fold in the enzyme activity (3388 U/gds) was obtained when peptone at 1% concentration was added to the fermentation medium. The enzyme production was growth-related, the activity being the maximum when the fungal biomass was at its peak at 72 h. Use of COC as raw material for enzyme synthesis could be of great commercial significance. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on alpha-amylase production using COC in SSF. PMID:15051078

  9. Production and properties of alpha-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and its application in starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Bilal; Ertan, Figen

    2005-01-01

    Fungi were screened for their ability to produce alpha-amylase by a plate culture method. Penicillium chrysogenum showed high enzymatic activity. Alpha-amylase production by P. chrysogenum cultivated in liquid media containing maltose (2%) reached its maximum at 6-8 days, at 30 degrees C, with a level of 155 U ml(-1). Some general properties of the enzyme were investigated. The optimum reaction pH and temperature were 5.0 and 30-40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at a pH range from 5.0-6.0 and at 30 degrees C for 20 min and the enzyme's 92.1% activity's was retained at 40 degrees C for 20 min without substrate. Hydrolysis products of the enzyme were maltose, unidefined oligosaccharides, and a trace amount of glucose. Alpha-amylase of P. chrysogenum hydrolysed starches from different sources. The best hydrolysis was determined (98.69%) in soluble starch for 15 minute at 30 degrees C. PMID:15881598

  10. Application of decolourized and partially purified polygalacturonase and α-amylase in apple juice clarification

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Tapati Bhanja; Banerjee, Rintu

    2014-01-01

    Polygalacturonase and α-amylase play vital role in fruit juice industry. In the present study, polygalacturonase was produced by Aspergillus awamori Nakazawa MTCC 6652 utilizing apple pomace and mosambi orange (Citrus sinensis var mosambi) peels as solid substrate whereas, α-amylase was produced from A. oryzae (IFO-30103) using wheat bran by solid state fermentation (SSF) process. These carbohydrases were decolourized and purified 8.6-fold, 34.8-fold and 3.5-fold, respectively by activated charcoal powder in a single step with 65.1%, 69.8% and 60% recoveries, respectively. Apple juice was clarified by these decolourized and partially purified enzymes. In presence of 1% polygalacturonase from mosambi peels (9.87 U/mL) and 0.4% α-amylase (899 U/mL), maximum clarity (%T660nm = 97.0%) of juice was attained after 2 h of incubation at 50 °C in presence of 10 mM CaCl2. Total phenolic content of juice was reduced by 19.8% after clarification, yet with slightly higher %DPPH radical scavenging property. PMID:24948919

  11. Antidiabetic Activity of Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera: Potent Amylase and Glucosidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sougata; Ahire, Mehul; Patil, Sumersing; Jabgunde, Amit; Bhat Dusane, Meenakshi; Joshi, Bimba N; Pardesi, Karishma; Jachak, Sanjay; Dhavale, Dilip D; Chopade, Balu A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder affecting about 220 million people worldwide. One of the most critical complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyper-glycemia (PPHG). Glucosidase inhibitor and α-amylase inhibitors are class of compounds that help in managing PPHG. Low-cost herbal treatment is recommended due to their lesser side effect for treatment of diabetes. Two plants with significant traditional therapeutic potential, namely, Gnidia glauca and Dioscorea bulbifera, were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Stem, leaf, and flower of G. glauca and bulb of D. bulbifera were sequentially extracted with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and methanol as well as separately with 70% ethanol. Petroleum ether extract of flower of G. glauca was found to inhibit α-amylase significantly (78.56%). Extracts were further tested against crude murine pancreatic, small intestinal, and liver glucosidase enzyme which revealed excellent inhibitory properties. α-glucosidase inhibition provided a strong in vitro evidence for confirmation of both G. glauca and D. bulbifera as excellent antidiabetic remedy. This is the first report of its kind that provides a strong biochemical basis for management of type II diabetes using G. glauca and D. bulbifera. These results provide intense rationale for further in vivo and clinical study. PMID:21785651

  12. [An amylase from fresh fruiting bodies of the monkey head mushroom Hericium erinaceum].

    PubMed

    Du, F; Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2013-01-01

    An amylase with a molecular mass of 55 kDa and an N-terminal sequence exhibiting similarity to enzyme from Bacteroides thetaitaomicron was isolated from fruiting bodies of the monkey head mushroom Hericium erinaceum. The purification scheme included extraction with distilled water, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-sepharose, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. The amylase of H. erinaceum was adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) and eluted with 0.2 M NaCl in the same buffer. The enzyme was subsequently adsorbed on SP-Sepharose in 10 mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4.5) and eluted with 0.3 M NaCl in the same buffer. This fraction was subsequently subjected to gel filtration on Superdex 75. The first peak eluted had a molecular mass of 55 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The amylase of H. erinaceum exhibited a pH optimum of 4.6 and a temperature optimum of 40 degrees C. The enzyme activity was enhanced by Mn2+ and Fe3+ ions, but inhibited by Hg2+ ions. PMID:23662447

  13. [Influence of amaranth on the production of alpha-amylase using Aspergillus niger NRRL 3112].

    PubMed

    Mariani, D D; Lorda, G; Balatti, A P

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the amaranth seed meal and the aeration conditions on the alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus niger NRRL 3112 were studied. The assays of selection of culture medium were carried out in a rotary shaker at 250 rpm and 2.5 cm stroke. The aeration conditions were studied in a mechanically stirred fermentor New Brunswick type. A concentration of alpha-amylase of 2750 U.Dun/ml was achieved at 120 h with a dry weight of 8.0 g/l, using a base medium with 5.0 g/l Amaranthus cruentus seed meal. In the experiment performed in a New Brunswick fermentor, the highest value was 2806 U.Dun/ml. This result was obtained after 120 h, operating at 300 rpm and an airflow of 1 l/l. min. in a limited dissolved oxygen concentration. It was determined that the increase in the agitation rate was not favorable to the enzyme production, despite that an increase was verified in the dissolved oxygen. The morphology of the microorganism, in long and ramified hyphae, was the critical factor to obtain higher levels of alpha-amylase. PMID:11149149

  14. Impact of amylases on biopolymer dynamics during storage of straight-dough wheat bread.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Fierens, Ellen; Delcour, Jan A

    2013-07-01

    When Bacillus stearothermophilus α-amylase (BStA), Pseudomonas saccharophila α-amylase (PSA), or Bacillus subtilis α-amylase (BSuA) was added to a bread recipe to impact bread firming, amylose crystal formation was facilitated, leading to lower initial crumb resilience. Bread loaves that best retained their quality were those obtained when BStA was used. The enzyme hindered formation of an extended starch network, resulting in less water immobilization and smaller changes in crumb firmness and resilience. BSuA led to extensive degradation of the starch network during bread storage with release of immobilized water, eventually resulting in partial structure collapse and poor crumb resilience. The most important effect of PSA was an increased bread volume, resulting in smaller changes in crumb firmness and resilience. A negative linear relation was found between NMR proton mobilities of water and biopolymers in the crumb and crumb firmness. The slope of that relation gave an indication of the strength of the starch network. PMID:23777249

  15. Alpha amylase enzyme inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effect of Lawsonia inermis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Hasan; Mahbub, Nasir Uddin; Khan, Md Forhad; Hana, Humayera Kabir; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Previously it was reported elsewhere that Lawsonia inermis have anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect in experimental animals. The in vitro porcine alpha amylase inhibitory effect was investigated of this plant methanolic extracts and consequently hypoglycemic effect by quantitatively determining the maltose from the maltose standard curve while the anti-inflammatory effect by acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. Acarbose (10 microg mL(-1)) and Diclofenac sodium (20 mg kg(-1)) were used as reference hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory drugs, respectively, for this study. The methanolic leaves extract of the plant significantly inhibited (60.97% compared to untreated) enzymatic activity of the amylase at 10 microg mL(-1) dose (p < 0.05) also reduced the chemically induced nociceptive pain stimuli significantly at all doses (p < 0.01). Carbohydrates, glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and tannins were found to have in phytochemical screening of the extract which are thought to bring these effects. For the conclusive purpose, it is suggesting from the result that the pharmacological properties of this Lawsonia inermis can elicit hypoglycemic effect by inhibiting alpha-amylase enzyme and can reduce neurogenic pain stimulus. It gives the notion that how this group of patient would be therapeutically benefitted by decreasing both these effects by the same agent which is easy available. PMID:24506051

  16. Optimizing of the formation of active BMW-amylase after in vitro refolding.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahi, Parisa; Khajeh, Khosro; Akbari, Neda

    2012-09-01

    This study was carried out to determine the optimal folding condition of α-amylase from Bacillus megaterium WHO using response surface methodology (RSM). A first-order model showed that three factors namely glycerol, Ca(2+) and protein concentration had the most significant effect on refolding. Analysis of the results showed that glycerol was better than the other polyols due to its effect on protein stability. Since α-amylases are known to contain calcium ions in their structure, the presence of calcium in the refolding buffer was compulsory. The concentration of protein had the most significant quadratic effect on the response studied. A second-order polynomial model was developed to quantify the relationships between variables. It was shown that the combination of 20%(v/v) glycerol, 25 mM Ca(2+) and 0.3 (mg/ml) protein was the most efficient condition for in vitro refolding of α-amylase. Under the optimal condition the yield of refolding was enhanced up to 7-fold. In order to analysis the size distribution in optimized and basic medium, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was fulfilled. The information gathered in this study showed that the use of solvent engineering and optimization procedure can be a general method for protein refolding. PMID:22750395

  17. Structural studies of wheat monomeric and dimeric protein inhibitors of alpha-amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, T; Sannia, G; Parlamenti, R; Silano, V

    1978-01-01

    Two wheat monomeric protein inhibitors of alpha-amylase with mol.wt. 12000, designated inhibitors 0.28 and 0.39 according to their gel-electrophoretic mobilities, showed almost identical circular-dichroism spectra in both the far and near u.v. at different pH values as well as in the presence or absence of dissociating and reducing agents. Both inhibitors (0.28 and 0.39) were readily inactivated by reduction of the five disulphide bridges present in each inhibitor molecule. These properties are very similar to those exhibited by the wheat dimeric protein inhibitor of alpha-amylase with mol.wt. 24000, designated inhibitor 0.19 according to its gel-electrophoretic mobility. The N-terminal sequence of the 0.19 inhibitor was determined without separating its subunits and compared with that of the 0.28 inhibitor reported by Redman [(1976) Biochem. J. 155, 193--195]. Petide 'maps' from tryptic digests of reduced and carboxymethylated inhibitors 0.19 and 0.28 were compared. One molecule of reducing sugar is covalently bound per inhibitor-0.19 protomer and inhibitor-0.28 molecule. The results obtained strongly support previous findings indicating the structural equivalence of inhibitor 0.28 with each inhibitor-0.19 protomer and the common phylogenetic origin of these protein alpha-amylase inhibitors from wheat kernel. PMID:308369

  18. Differential determination of serum isoamylase using an amylase inhibitor and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Kameya, A; Hayakawa, T; Noda, A; Kondo, T

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic significance of a simple and rapid screening procedure for determining the relative amounts of pancreatic and salivary isoamylase using an amylase inhibitor was evaluated in 242 subjects (controls 84, acute pancreatitis nine, chronic pancreatitis 28, pancreatic cancer 14, peptic ulcer 25, liver cirrhosis 15, cholelithiasis 24, irritable colon syndrome 13, diabetes mellitus 13, mumps seven, and chronic renal failure 10). Electrophoretically separated isoamylases of saliva and pure pancreatic juice were all inhibited at similar degrees to the corresponding unfractionated amylases. Total amylase and pancreatic isoamylase were elevated in all nine patients with acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic isoamylase was decreased in 12 of 28 patients (43%) with chronic pancreatitis and increased in nine of 14 patients (64%) with pancreatic cancer. The mean pancreatic isoamylase activity in the patients with acute pancreatitis was significantly higher (p less than 0.01), while that of chronic pancreatitis was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) when compared with controls. The inhibition method offers simple, rapid, and specific analysis of serum isoamylase for the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemia in cases of emergency. PMID:3966456

  19. Amylases without known homologues discovered in an acid mine drainage: significance and impact

    PubMed Central

    Delavat, François; Phalip, Vincent; Forster, Anne; Plewniak, Frédéric; Lett, Marie-Claire; Lièvremont, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs) are extreme environments characterized by acidic and oligotrophic conditions and by metal contaminations. A function-based screening of an AMD-derived metagenomic library led to the discovery and partial characterization of two non-homologous endo-acting amylases sharing no sequence similarity with any known amylase nor glycosidase. None carried known amylolytic domains, nor could be assigned to any GH-family. One amylase displayed no similarity with any known protein, whereas the second one was similar to TraC proteins involved in the bacterial type IV secretion system. According to the scarce similarities with known proteins, 3D-structure modelling using I-TASSER was unsuccessful. This study underlined the utility of a function-driven metagenomic approach to obtain a clearer image of the bacterial community enzymatic landscape. More generally, this work points out that screening for microorganisms or biomolecules in a priori incongruous environments could provide unconventional and new exciting ways for bioprospecting. PMID:22482035

  20. Diet and the evolution of human amylase gene copy number variation

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Claw, Katrina G.; Lee, Arthur S.; Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Werner, John; Villanea, Fernando A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Misra, Rajeev; Carter, Nigel P.; Lee, Charles; Stone, Anne C.

    2008-01-01

    Starch consumption is a prominent characteristic of agricultural societies and hunter-gatherers in arid environments. In contrast, rainforest and circum-arctic hunter-gatherers and some pastoralists consume much less starch1-3. This behavioral variation raises the possibility that different selective pressures have acted on amylase, the enzyme responsible for starch hydrolysis4. We found that salivary amylase gene (AMY1) copy number is correlated positively with salivary amylase protein levels, and that individuals from populations with high-starch diets have on average more AMY1 copies than those with traditionally low-starch diets. Comparisons with other loci in a subset of these populations suggest that the level of AMY1 copy number differentiation is unusual. This example of positive selection on a copy number variable gene is one of the first in the human genome. Higher AMY1 copy numbers and protein levels likely improve the digestion of starchy foods, and may buffer against the fitness-reducing effects of intestinal disease. PMID:17828263

  1. Cloning, characterization, and expression of two alpha-amylase genes from Aspergillus niger var. awamori.

    PubMed

    Korman, D R; Bayliss, F T; Barnett, C C; Carmona, C L; Kodama, K H; Royer, T J; Thompson, S A; Ward, M; Wilson, L J; Berka, R M

    1990-03-01

    Using synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we cloned genomic DNA sequences encoding an alpha-amylase gene from Aspergillus niger var. awamori (A. awamori) on a 5.8 kb EcoRI fragment. Hybridization experiments, using a portion of this cloned fragment to probe DNA from A. awamori, suggested the presence of two alpha-amylase gene copies which were subsequently cloned as 7 kb (designated as amyA) and 4 kb (amyB) HindIII fragments. DNA sequence analysis of the amyA and amyB genes revealed the following: (1) Both genes are arranged as nine exons and eight introns; (2) The nucleotide sequences of amyA and amyB are identical throughout all but the last few nucleotides of their respective coding regions; (3) The amyA and amyB genes from A. awamori share extensive homology (greater than or equal to 98% identity) with the genes encoding Taka-amylase from A. oryzae. In order to test whether both amyA and amyB were functional in the genome, we constructed vectors containing gene fusions of either amyA and amyB to bovine prochymosin cDNA and used these vectors to transform A. awamori. Transformants which contained either the amyA- or amyB-prochymosin gene fusions produced extracellular chymosin, suggesting that both genes are functional. PMID:2340591

  2. Thermostable α-amylase immobilization: Enhanced stability and performance for starch biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gudi Satheesh; Rather, Gulam Mohmad; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Reddy, Bontha Rajasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The uses of thermostable starch hydrolytic biocatalysts are steadily increasing for the industrial application because of their obvious need for biocatalytic performance at elevated temperatures. The starch liquefaction and saccharification can be carried out simultaneously by the use of thermostable starch hydrolytic biocatalysts, thus minimizing the unit operations, time, and efforts. The cost factor hampers the industrialization of expensive soluble (free) enzymes for biocatalytic applications and the immobilization of enzymes offers promising alternative to the hurdle. The present investigation was aimed for immobilization of thermostable α-amylase using calcium alginate, and statistical optimization studies were carried out for enhanced biocatalytic performance. Initially, one-parameter at a time optimization studies were carried out for identification of significant factors influencing the immobilization. Furthermore, a statistical approach, response surface methodology, was applied for immobilization of α-amylase. The immobilized α-amylase in alginate microbeads showed enhanced stability to temperature and reusable property for up to seven cycles (with the retention of 50% initial activity). Finally, the kinetic behavior of free and immobilized enzyme showed the Km value of 1.2% and 2.6% (w/v) and Vmax of 1,020 and 1,030 U, respectively. Fifty percent reduction in affinity of the immobilized enzyme toward substrate was compensated by its longer stability. PMID:25604037

  3. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of the reaction of barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor and the high pI barley alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Sidenius, U; Olsen, K; Svensson, B; Christensen, U

    1995-03-20

    The interaction of alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) from barley seeds and the high pI barley alpha-amylase (AMY2) de novo synthesized during seed germination, has been studied at pH 8.0, 25 degrees C, using stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy, equilibrium fluorescence titration and kinetic analysis of the displacement of BASI from the BASI-AMY2 complex by the substrate blue starch. The results are in accordance with a two-step reaction model: [formula: see text] The resulting values of the kinetic parameters were: k2/K1 = (1.0 +/- 0.2) x 10(6) M-1.s-1, K1 = 0.4 +/- 0.21 mM, k2 = 320 +/- 150 s-1, k-2 = (7.2 +/- 0.6) x 10(-5)s-1, and the overall dissociation constant Kd = (0.7 +/- 0.1) x 10(-10) M. BASI thus is best characterized as a fast reacting, tight-binding inhibitor of AMY2. PMID:7698332

  4. Complete sequence, subunit structure, and complexes with pancreatic alpha-amylase of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, K; Hayashi, K; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Wen, J; Hara, S; Yamaguchi, H

    1996-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I), which is composed of two kinds of glycopolypeptide subunits, alpha and beta, was established by conventional methods. The polypeptide molecular weight of PHA-I determined by the light-scattering technique, considered together with the sequence molecular weights revealed for the subunits, indicated that PHA-I has the subunit stoichiometry of (alpha beta)2 complex. Inhibition test of PHA-I with increasing amounts of porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA) suggested that an inactive 2:1 complex is formed between PPA and PHA-I. In fact, two complexes differing from each other in the molar ratio of PPA to PHA-I were separated by gel filtration, and molecular weight estimation by the light-scattering technique confirmed that they are complexes of PHA-I with one or two PPA molecules. The binding of PPA to PHA-I appeared to follow simple binomial statistics, suggesting that two binding sites on PHA-I are independent and of high affinity for PPA. PMID:8864861

  5. Insecticidal activity of an alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein resembling a putative precursor of alpha-amylase inhibitor in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, M; Yamada, T; Kaga, A

    1999-06-15

    alpha-Amylase inhibitor (alphaAI) in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., protects seeds from insect pests such as the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) and the azuki bean weevil (C. chinensis). Cultivars which lack alphaAI still show resistance to both bruchids. These cultivars have a glycoprotein that reacts with anti-alphaAI-1 antibodies. The glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 29 kDa (Gp29) was purified and the encoding gene was isolated. The primary structure of Gp29 is the same as alpha-amylase inhibitor-like protein (AIL) from which the encoding gene has already been isolated. AIL resembles a putative precursor of alphaAI, even though it does not form the active inhibitor. However, AIL has some inhibitory effect on the growth of C. maculatus but not C. chinensis. The presence of AIL alone is insufficient to explain the bruchid resistance of common bean cultivars lacking alpha-AI. Common bean seeds appear to contain several factors responsible for the bruchid resistance. PMID:10366733

  6. A amylase activity of nymphal stages of sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae).

    PubMed

    Kazzazi, M; Bandani, A R; Ashuri, A; Hosseinkhani, S

    2005-01-01

    Wheat production in Iran has changed substantially over the past one or two decades with development of higher-yielding cultivars and improved methods of planting. Sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), is the most important cereal pest in Iran. Sunn pest like other insect pests of wheat lives on a polysaccharide-rich diet and depends to a large extent on effectiveness of their alpha-amylases for survival. alpha-amylase (1-4-alpha-D-glucan glucanohydrolase) hydrolyses starch, and related polysaccharides by randomly cleaving internal alpha-1,4-glucosidic linkages and has a major role in the utilization of polysaccharides. The recent increase in study of insect digestive enzymes seems to make sense in the realization that the gut is the major interface between the insect and its environment. Hence, an understanding of digestive enzyme function is essential when developing methods of insect control such as the use of enzyme inhibitor's and transgenic plants to control phytophagous insects. The aim of the current study is to identify and characterize alpha-amylase activity in order to gain a better understanding of its digestive physiology, which hopefully will lead to new strategies of the insect control. In order to analyze a-amylase activity adult and different nymphal stages were collected from wheat field from Karaj area and midgut complex from these individuals were dissected under a light microscope in ice-cold saline buffer (0.006M NaCl). After homogenization in buffer, homogenate was centrifuged at 15000 g for 20 min at 4 degrees C. The supernatant was pooled and stored at -20 degrees C for subsequent analysis. alpha-amylase activity was assayed by the dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) procedure using soluble starch as substrate (starch 1%). Our result showed that enzyme activities in different nymphal stages (first, second, third, fourth and fifth stadium) were 0.19, 0.78, 1.21, 1.23, 1.25 units/mg protein, respectively. PMID:16628929

  7. Grain Development Mutants of Barley ([alpha]-Amylase Production during Grain Maturation and Its Relation to Endogenous Gibberellic Acid Content).

    PubMed Central

    Green, L. S.; Faergestad, E. M.; Poole, A.; Chandler, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Himalaya) mutants with altered grain morphology were isolated to investigate whether defects in grain development, possibly involving gibberellins (GAs) and abscisic acid, would lead to altered patterns of [alpha]-amylase gene expression. Following treatment with sodium azide, 75 mutants, typically showing grain shriveling, were identified. At grain maturity 15 of the 75 mutants had higher [alpha]-amylase activities in shriveled grains compared with either phenotypically normal grains that developed on the same heterozygous plant or with grains of cv Himalaya. Studies of four of these mutants demonstrated increased levels of both high- and low-isoelectric point [alpha]-amylase isozymes midway through grain development. This category of mutant has been designated pga, for premature grain [alpha]-amylase. One such mutant (M326) showed an endosperm-determined inheritance pattern. When crossed into a (GA-deficient) dwarfing background there was a 10- to 20-fold reduction in [alpha]-amylase activity, suggesting a requirement for GA biosynthesis. Endogenous GAs and abscisic acid were quantified by combined gas chromatography-specific ion monitoring in normal and mutant grains of heterozygous M326 plants during the period of [alpha]-amylase accumulation. Mutant grains had significantly higher (5.8-fold) levels of the bioactive GA1 compared with normal grains but much lower (approximately 10-fold) levels of the 2[beta]-hydroxylated ("inactive") GAs, typical of developing barley grains (e.g. GA8, GA34, GA48). We propose that a reduced extent of 2[beta]-hydroxylation in the mutant grains results in an increased level of GA1, which is responsible for premature [alpha]-amylase gene expression. PMID:12223700

  8. Cloning and expression of Lipomyces starkeyi alpha-amylase in Escherichia coli and determination of some of its properties.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Jin Ha; Kim, Doman; Day, Donal F; Robyt, John F; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Moon, Tae-Wha

    2004-04-01

    The Lipomyces starkeyi alpha-amylase (LSA) gene encoding soluble starch-degrading alpha-amylase was cloned and characterized from a derepressed and partially constitutive mutant for both dextranase and amylase activities. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of the cDNA fragment reveals an open reading frame of 1944 bp encoding a 619 amino acid (aa) mature protein (LSA) with a calculated molecular weight of 68.709 kDa that was estimated to be about 73 kDa, including His tag (4 kDa) based on SDS-PAGE (10% acrylamide gel), activity staining, and the Western blotting, using anti-amylase-Ab. LSA had a sequence similar to other alpha-amylases in four conserved regions of the alpha-amylase family: (I) (287)DIVVNH(292), (II) (372)GLRIDTVKH(380), (III) (399)GEVFD(403), (IV) (462)FLENQD(467). Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis showed one intron of 60 nucleotides in the genomic lsa at positions between 966 and 967 of cDNA. The cloned LSA amylase showed a maximum activity at pH 6 and optimum temperature of 40 (o)C, with greater than 90% stability between pH 5 and pH 8 for 16 h. It was inhibited by Cu(2+) and stimulated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Enzyme activity was not affected by 1 mM EGTA but was inhibited by 1 mM EDTA. LSA did not hydrolyze maltodextrins of G2 to G4, yet formed G2+G3 from G5, G2+G4 or G3+G3 from G6, and G3+G4 from G7. LSA did not hydrolyze soluble starch in the present of 2% (w/v) of acarbose. Kinetics of LSA was carried out by using starch as a substrate and the inhibition type of acarbose was the mixed non-competitive type (ki = 3.4 microM). PMID:15043869

  9. The S-layer from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase.

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, E; Schocher, I; Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1995-01-01

    The S-layer lattice from Bacillus stearothermophilus DSM 2358 completely covers the cell surface and exhibits oblique symmetry. During growth of B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 on starch medium, three amylases with molecular weights of 58,000, 98,000, and 184,000 were secreted into the culture fluid, but only the high-molecular-weight enzyme was found to be cell associated. Studies of interactions between cell wall components and amylases revealed no affinity of the high-molecular-weight amylase to isolated peptidoglycan. On the other hand, this enzyme was always found to be associated with S-layer self-assembly products or S-layer fragments released during preparation of spheroplasts by treatment of whole cells with lysozyme. The molar ratio of S-layer subunits to the bound amylase was approximately 8:1, which corresponded to one enzyme molecule per four morphological subunits. Immunoblotting experiments with polyclonal antisera against the high-molecular-weight amylase revealed a strong immunological signal in response to the enzyme but no cross-reaction with the S-layer protein or the smaller amylases. Immunogold labeling of whole cells with anti-amylase antiserum showed that the high-molecular-weight amylase is located on the outer face of the S-layer lattice. Because extraction of the amylase was possible without disintegration of the S-layer lattice into its constituent subunits, it can be excluded that the enzyme is incorporated into the crystal lattice and participates in the self-assembly process. Affinity experiments strongly suggest the presence of a specific recognition mechanism between the amylase molecules and S-layer protein domains either exposed on the outermost surface or inside the pores. In summary, results obtained in this study confirmed that the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus DSM 2358 functions as an adhesion site for a high-molecular-weight amylase. PMID:7533757

  10. Specific inhibition of barley alpha-amylase 2 by barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor depends on charge interactions and can be conferred to isozyme 1 by mutation.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, K W; Vallée, F; Juge, N; Aghajari, N; Guo, X; Haser, R; Svensson, B

    2000-02-01

    alpha-Amylase 2 (AMY2) and alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) from barley bind with Ki = 0.22 nM. AMY2 is a (beta/alpha)8-barrel enzyme and the segment Leu116-Phe143 in domain B (Val89-Ile152), protruding at beta-strand 3 of the (beta/alpha)8-barrel, was shown using isozyme hybrids to be crucial for the specificity of the inhibitor for AMY2. In the AMY2-BASI crystal structure [F. Vallée, A. Kadziola, Y. Bourne, M. Juy, K. W. Rodenburg, B. Svensson & R. Haser (1998) Structure 6, 649-659] Arg128AMY2 forms a hydrogen bond with Ser77BASI, while Asp142AMY2 makes a salt-bridge with Lys140BASI. These two enzyme residues are substituted by glutamine and asparagine, respectively, to assess their contribution in binding of the inhibitor. These mutations were performed in the well-expressed, inhibitor-sensitive hybrid barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1)-(1-90)/AMY2-(90-403) with Ki = 0.33 nM, because of poor production of AMY2 in yeast. In addition Arg128, only found in AMY2, was introduced into an AMY1 context by the mutation T129R/K130P in the inhibitor-insensitive hybrid AMY1-(1-161)/AMY2-(161-403). The binding energy was reduced by 2.7-3.0 kcal.mol-1 as determined from Ki after the mutations R128Q and D142N. This corresponds to loss of a charged interaction between the protein molecules. In contrast, sensitivity to the inhibitor was gained (Ki = 7 microM) by the mutation T129R/K130P in the insensitive isozyme hybrid. Charge screening raised Ki 14-20-fold for this latter mutant, AMY2, and the sensitive isozyme hybrid, but only twofold for the R128Q and D142N mutants. Thus electrostatic stabilization was effectively introduced and lost in the different mutant enzyme-inhibitor complexes and rational engineering using an inhibitor recognition motif to confer binding to the inhibitor mimicking the natural AMY2-BASI complex. PMID:10672010

  11. Isolation and Partial Characterization of a Factor from Barley Aleurone that Modifies alpha-Amylase in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sticher, L; Jones, R L

    1991-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications that give rise to multiple forms of alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. When analyzed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, barley alpha-amylase has a molecular mass of 43 to 44 kilodaltons, but isoelectric focusing resolves the enzyme into a large number of isoforms. To precisely identify these isoforms, we propose a system of classification based on their isoelectric points (pl). alpha-Amylases with pls of approximately 5, previously referred to as low pl or Amy1 isoforms, have been designated HAMY1, and alpha-amylases with pls of approximately 6, referred to as high pl or Amy2, are designated HAMY2. Individual isoforms of HAMY1 and HAMY2 are identified by their pls. For example, the most acidic alpha-amylase synthesized and secreted by barley aleurone layers is designated HAMY1(4.56). Some of the diversity in the pls of barley alpha-amylases arises from posttranslational modifications of the enzyme. We report the isolation of a factor from barley aleurone layers and incubation media that can modify HAMY1 isoforms in vitro. This factor has a molecular mass between 30 and 50 kilodaltons, and it can catalyze the conversion of HAMY1(4.90) and HAMY1(4.64) to isoforms 4.72 and 4.56, respectively. The in vitro conversion of HAMY1 isoforms by the factor is favored by pH values of approximately 5 and is inhibited at approximately pH 7. The level of this factor in aleurone layers and incubation media is not affected by treatment of the tissue with gibberellic acid. The amylase-modifying activity from barley will also modify alpha-amylases isolated from human saliva and porcine pancreas. An activity that can modify HAMY1 isoforms in vitro has also been isolated from Onozuka R10 cellulase. Because the activity isolated from barley lowers the pl of alpha-amylase from barley, human saliva, and porcine pancreas, we speculate that it is a deamidase. PMID:16668534

  12. Isolation and Partial Characterization of a Factor from Barley Aleurone that Modifies α-Amylase in Vitro 1

    PubMed Central

    Sticher, Liliane; Jones, Russell L.

    1991-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications that give rise to multiple forms of α-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. When analyzed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, barley α-amylase has a molecular mass of 43 to 44 kilodaltons, but isoelectric focusing resolves the enzyme into a large number of isoforms. To precisely identify these isoforms, we propose a system of classification based on their isoelectric points (pl). α-Amylases with pls of approximately 5, previously referred to as low pl or Amy1 isoforms, have been designated HAMY1, and α-amylases with pls of approximately 6, referred to as high pl or Amy2, are designated HAMY2. Individual isoforms of HAMY1 and HAMY2 are identified by their pls. For example, the most acidic α-amylase synthesized and secreted by barley aleurone layers is designated HAMY1(4.56). Some of the diversity in the pls of barley α-amylases arises from posttranslational modifications of the enzyme. We report the isolation of a factor from barley aleurone layers and incubation media that can modify HAMY1 isoforms in vitro. This factor has a molecular mass between 30 and 50 kilodaltons, and it can catalyze the conversion of HAMY1(4.90) and HAMY1(4.64) to isoforms 4.72 and 4.56, respectively. The in vitro conversion of HAMY1 isoforms by the factor is favored by pH values of approximately 5 and is inhibited at approximately pH 7. The level of this factor in aleurone layers and incubation media is not affected by treatment of the tissue with gibberellic acid. The amylase-modifying activity from barley will also modify α-amylases isolated from human saliva and porcine pancreas. An activity that can modify HAMY1 isoforms in vitro has also been isolated from Onozuka R10 cellulase. Because the activity isolated from barley lowers the pl of α-amylase from barley, human saliva, and porcine pancreas, we speculate that it is a deamidase. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID

  13. A Proposed Mechanism for the Thermal Denaturation of a Recombinant Bacillus Halmapalus Alpha-amylase - the Effect of Calcium Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Anders D.; Pusey, Marc L.; Fuglsang, Claus C.; Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability of a recombinant alpha-amylase from Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) has been investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This alpha-amylase is homologous to other Bacillus alpha-amylases where previous crystallographic studies have identified the existence of 3 calcium binding sites in the structure. Denaturation of BHA is irreversible with a Tm of approximately 89 C, and DSC thermograms can be described using a one-step irreversible model. A 5 C increase in T(sub m) in the presence of 10 fold excess CaCl2 was observed. However, a concomitant increase in the tendency to aggregate was also observed. The presence of 30-40 fold excess calcium chelator (EDTA or EGTA) results in a large destabilization of BHA corresponding to about 40 C lower T(sub m), as determined by both CD and DSC. Ten fold excess EGTA reveals complex DSC thermograms corresponding to both reversible and irreversible transitions, which possibly originate from different populations of BHA:calcium complexes. The observations in the present study have, in combination with structural information of homologous alpha-amylases, provided the basis for the proposal of a simple denaturation mechanism of BHA. The proposed mechanism describes the irreversible thermal denaturation of different BHA:calcium complexes and the calcium binding equilibrium involved. Furthermore, the model accounts for a temperature induced reversible structural change associated with calcium binding.

  14. Antidiabetic Activity of Ruellia tuberosa L., Role of α-Amylase Inhibitor: In Silico, In Vitro, and In Vivo Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ratna Wulan, Dyah; Priyo Utomo, Edi; Mahdi, Chanif

    2015-01-01

    Ruellia tuberosa L. is a folk remedy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, its hypoglycemic activity has not been investigated so far. In the present study, the antidiabetic mechanism of the n-hexane fraction of methanolic extract (HFME) of this plant was investigated in silico, in vitro, and in vivo. In silico study was performed using AutoDock4.2 software. In vitro  α-amylase inhibitory activity was investigated by starch-iodine method. A single dose of 450 mg/kg HFME for 14 days was subjected to an antidiabetic screening in vivo by a multiple low dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) induced rats. Molecular modeling results show that Betulin exhibited noncompetitive α-amylase inhibitory activities. The effect of HFME elicited significant reductions of diabetic rat blood glucose. A single dose administration of HFME inhibited α-amylase activity in vivo (P < 0.01) compared to a diabetic control group. Moreover, this extract strongly inhibited the α-amylase activity in vitro (IC50 0.14 ± 0.005 mg/mL). It is concluded that HFME exerted an antidiabetic effect via α-amylase inhibitor. Our findings provide a possible hypoglycemic action of R. tuberosa L. as an alternative therapy in the management of diabetes. PMID:26576302

  15. Secretion, purification, and characterisation of barley alpha-amylase produced by heterologous gene expression in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Juge, N; Svensson, B; Williamson, G

    1998-04-01

    Efficient production of recombinant barley alpha-amylase has been achieved in Aspergillus niger. The cDNA encoding alpha-amylase isozyme 1 (AMY1) and its signal peptide was placed under the control of the Aspergillus nidulans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) promoter and the A. nidulans trpC gene terminator. Secretion yields up to 60 mg/l were obtained in media optimised for alpha-amylase activity and low protease activity. The recombinant AMY1 (reAMY1) was purified to homogeneity and found to be identical to native barley AMY1 with respect to size, pI, and immunoreactivity. N-terminal sequence analysis of the recombinant protein indicated that the endogenous plant signal peptide is correctly processed in A. niger. Electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry gave a molecular mass for the dominant form of 44,960 Da, in accordance with the loss of the LQRS C-terminal residues; glycosylation apparently did not occur. The activities of recombinant and native barley alpha-amylases are very similar towards insoluble and soluble starch as well as 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol beta-D-maltoheptaoside and amylose (degree of polymerisation = 17). Barley alpha-amylase is the first plant protein efficiently secreted and correctly processed by A. niger using its own signal sequence. PMID:9615479

  16. Effects of high-fat diet on salivary α-amylase, serum parameters and food consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lénia; Mouta, Raquel; Costa, Ana Rodrigues; Pereira, Alfredo; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Amado, Francisco; Antunes, Célia M; Lamy, Elsa

    2015-06-01

    Salivary α-amylase, a major protein in saliva, has been described as a marker of sympathetic nervous system activity, hence for metabolic energy balance. In this context, its expression in overweight and obesity is of interest. Rats fed with a diet enriched with sunflower oil differentially gained weight yielding two subgroups according to their susceptibility (OP) or resistance (OR) to obesity. Elevated plasmatic levels of leptin in the OP subgroup and altered plasmatic lipid profiles (lower triglycerides and higher total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio compared to controls) in the OR subgroup were observed. Animals from the OP subgroup presented higher α-amylase expression and activity even prior to the dietary treatment, suggesting that this salivary protein may constitute a putative indicator of susceptibility for fat tissue accumulation. After 18 weeks of high-fat diet consumption, salivary α-amylase levels did not significantly change in the OP subgroup, but increased 3-fold in the OR subgroup. The increase in α-amylase levels for the latter might represent an adaptation to lower starch intake. These results suggest that salivary α-amylase secretion might be useful to predict susceptibility for weight gain induced by high-fat diet consumption. PMID:25795283

  17. Characterization of a Novel Maltose-Forming α-Amylase from Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum ST-III.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Na-Ri; Lee, Hye-Won; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Choung, Woo-Jae; Koo, Ye-Seul; Ko, Dam-Seul; Shim, Jae-Hoon

    2016-03-23

    A novel maltose (G2)-forming α-amylase from Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum ST-III was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. Analysis of conserved amino acid sequence alignments showed that L. plantarum maltose-producing α-amylase (LpMA) belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 13. The recombinant enzyme (LpMA) was a novel G2-producing α-amylase. The properties of purified LpMA were investigated following enzyme purification. LpMA exhibited optimal activity at 30 °C and pH 3.0. It produced only G2 from the hydrolysis of various substrates, including maltotriose (G3), maltopentaose (G5), maltosyl β-cyclodextrin (G2-β-CD), amylose, amylopectin, and starch. However, LpMA was unable to hydrolyze cyclodextrins. Reaction pattern analysis using 4-nitrophenyl-α-d-maltopentaoside (pNPG5) demonstrated that LpMA hydrolyzed pNPG5 from the nonreducing end, indicating that LpMA is an exotype α-amylase. Kinetic analysis revealed that LpMA had the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km ratio) toward G2-β-CD. Compared with β-amylase, a well-known G2-producing enzyme, LpMA produced G2 more efficiently from liquefied corn starch due to its ability to hydrolyze G3. PMID:26919577

  18. Amylase production by Saccharomycopsis fibuligera A11 in solid-state fermentation for hydrolysis of Cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Mei

    2010-09-01

    The optimization of process parameters for high amylase production by Saccharomycopsis fibuligera A11 in solid-state fermentation was carried out using central composite design. Finally, the optimal parameters obtained with the response surface methodology (RSM) were moisture 610.0 ml/kg, inoculum 30.0 ml (OD(600 nm) = 20.0)/kg, the amount ratio of wheat bran to rice husk 0.42, cassava starch concentration 20.0 g/kg, temperature 28 degrees C, and natural pH. Under the optimized conditions, 4,296 U/g of dry substrate of amylase activity was reached in the solid-state fermentation culture of the yeast strain A11 within 160 h, whereas the predicted maximum amylase activity of 4,222 U/g of dry substrate of amylase activity was derived from the RSM regression. It was found that cassava starch can be actively converted into monosaccharides and oligosaccharides by the crude amylase. PMID:19701612

  19. Characterization of a thermostable raw-starch hydrolyzing α-amylase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Menghao; Huang, Mengmeng; He, Hao; Lu, Jian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    A deep-sea thermophile, Geobacillus sp. 4j, was identified to grow on starch and produce thermostable amylase. N-terminally truncated form of Geobacillus sp. 4j α-amylase (Gs4j-amyA) was fused at its N-terminal end with the signal peptide of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli. The enzyme was over-expressed in E. coli BL21 with a maximum extracellular production of 130U/ml in shake flask. The yield of the transformant increased 22-fold as compared with that of the wild strain. The recombinant enzyme purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, exhibited a molecular mass of 62kDa. It displayed the maximal activity at 60-65°C and pH 5.5. Its half-life (t1/2) at 80°C was 4.25h with a temperature deactivation energy of 166.3kJ/mol. Compared to three commonly used commercial α-amylases, the Gs4j-amyA exhibited similar thermostable performance to BLA but better than BAA and BSA. It also showed a universally efficient raw starch hydrolysis performance superior to commercial α-amylases at an acidic pH approaching nature of starch slurry. As a new acidic-resistant thermostable α-amylase, it has the potential to bypass the industrial gelatinization step in raw starch hydrolysis. PMID:26073094

  20. Enhanced Production and Characterization of a Solvent Stable Amylase from Solvent Tolerant Bacillus tequilensis RG-01: Thermostable and Surfactant Resistant

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Soni; Shukla, Neha; Mishra, Pooja; Gaur, Rajeeva

    2014-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains isolated from the soil samples in the presence of cyclohexane were screened for amylase production. Among them, culture RG-01 was adjudged as the best amylase producer and was identified as Bacillus tequilensis from MTCC, Chandigarh. The isolate showed maximum amylase production (8100 U/mL) in the presence of starch, peptone, and Ca2+ ions at 55°C pH 7.0 within 24 h of incubation. The enzyme was stable in the presence of n-dodecane, isooctane, n-decane, xylene, toluene, n-hexane, n-butanol, and cyclohexane, respectively. The presence of benzene, methanol, and ethanol marginally reduced the amylase stability, respectively. The enzyme was showed it 100% activity at 55°C and pH 7.0 with 119% and 127% stability at 55°C and pH 7.0, respectively. The enzyme was also stable in the presence of SDS, Tween-40, Tween-60, and Tween-80 (1%) and was found stimulatory effect, respectively. Only Triton-X-100 showed a moderate inhibitory effect (5%) on amylase activity. This isolate (Bacillus tequilensis RG-01) may be useful in several industrial applications owing to its thermotolerant and organic solvents and surfactants resistance characteristics. PMID:25401163

  1. Production of cold-adapted amylase by marine bacterium Wangia sp. C52: optimization, modeling, and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Hu; Dang, Hongyue; Lu, Jianren; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the fermentation parameters in the shake-flask culture of marine bacterium Wangia sp. C52 to increase cold-adapted amylase production using two statistical experimental methods including Plackett-Burman design, which was applied to find the key ingredients for the best medium composition, and response surface methodology, which was used to determine the optimal concentrations of these components. The results showed starch, tryptone, and initial pH had significant effects on the cold-adapted amylase production. A central composite design was then employed to further optimize these three factors. The experimental results indicated that the optimized composition of medium was 6.38 g  L(-1) starch, 33.84 g  L(-1) tryptone, 3.00 g  L(-1) yeast extract, 30 g  L(-1) NaCl, 0.60 g  L(-1) MgSO(4) and 0.56 g  L(-1) CaCl(2). The optimized cultivation conditions for amylase production were pH 7.18, a temperature of 20°C, and a shaking speed of 180 rpm. Under the proposed optimized conditions, the amylase experimental yield (676.63 U  mL(-1)) closely matched the yield (685.60 U  mL(-1)) predicted by the statistical model. The optimization of the medium contributed to tenfold higher amylase production than that of the control in shake-flask experiments. PMID:21365455

  2. Enhanced production of α-amylase by Penicillium chrysogenum in liquid culture by modifying the process parameters.

    PubMed

    Dar, Gowhar H; Kamili, Azra N; Nazir, Ruqeya; Bandh, Suhaib A; Jan, Tariq R; Chishti, Mohammad Z

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we have assessed the role of changing physicochemical parameters and substrate types on the production of α-amylase enzyme from Penicillium chrysogenum, with a view to determining the optimal conditions required for its maximum production. The findings of this research revealed that, at pH 6 using linseed oil cake as substratum, α-amylase enzyme production was maximum (550.0 U/mL), when the fungi was incubated for 6 days at 30 °C in 0.1 M acetate buffer. Further, reasonably good production of the α-amylase enzyme was also observed at pH 9 with all the experimented carbon sources as substrates. Moreover, statistical analysis, using analysis of variance (ANOVA) carried out to study the impact of different studied parameters on the α-amylase enzyme production revealed that incubation period of 6-18 days is highly significant (p = 0.01) factor in amylotic activity of the P. chrysogenum. Under the researched out optimal conditions, P. chrysogenum is an economically viable option for the industrial and biotechnological production of α-amylase enzyme. PMID:26220910

  3. Improvement of thermal stability of a mutagenised α-amylase by manipulation of the calcium-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ghollasi, Marzieh; Ghanbari-Safari, Maryam; Khajeh, Khosro

    2013-12-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of an α-amylase isolated from Bacillus megaterium WHO has been performed to evaluate the roles of the calcium binding site residues in enzyme thermostability. The strategy used was to replace residues in the hypothetical calcium binding loops of B. megaterium WHO α-amylase (BMW-amylase) by equivalent positions at Halothermothrix orenii α-amylase (AmyA) as a thermophilic amylase by QuikChange site directed mutagenesis. Asn-75, Ser-76, and His-77 were mutated in the second calcium binding site which resulted in an increase in thermostability. All mutants retained their hydrolytic activity although their kcat parameter decreased in compare to the wild type and in the presence of calcium ions. In S76P and H77E, the Km for starch decreases while overall activity (kcat/Km) was increased. In the presence of calcium, conversion of His-77 to Glu resulted in a 4-fold enhancement in enzyme half life and a 9°C upward shift in T50, which was observed in compare to the wild type. Further analysis suggested the H77E mutant as the most stable which increased the affinity of the enzyme for calcium ion and its optimum temperature was 5°C higher than the wild type. PMID:24315644

  4. Inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities by ethanolic extract of Telfairia occidentalis (fluted pumpkin) leaf

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, G; Akinyemi, AJ; Ademiluyi, AO

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of Telfairia occidentalis Hook f. (Curcubitaceae) (T. occidentalis) leaf on key enzyme linked to type-2 diabetes (α - amylase and α - glucosidase) as well as assess the effect of blanching (a commonly practiced food processing technique) of the vegetable on these key enzymes. Methods Fresh leaves of T. occidentalis were blanched in hot water for 10 minutes, and the extracts of both the fresh and blanched vegetables were prepared and used for subsequent analysis. The inhibitory effect of the extract on α - amylase and α - glucosidase activities as well as some antioxidant parameter was determined in vitro. Results The result revealed that unprocessed T. occidentalis leaf reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ and also inhibited α - amylase and α - glucosidase activities in a dose dependent manner. However, blanching of the leafy vegetables caused a significant (P<0.05) increase in the antioxidant properties but decrease their ability to inhibit α - amylase and α - glucosidase activities. Conclusions This antioxidant properties and enzyme inhibition could be part of the mechanism by which they are used in the treatment/prevention of type-2 diabetes. However, the blanched vegetable reduces their ability to inhibit both α - amylase and α - glucosidase activity in vitro. PMID:23570004

  5. Β-Amylase from Starchless Seeds of Trigonella Foenum-Graecum and Its Localization in Germinating Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Garima; Kayastha, Arvind M.

    2014-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds do not contain starch as carbohydrate reserve. Synthesis of starch is initiated after germination. A β-amylase from ungerminated fenugreek seeds was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity. The enzyme was purified 210 fold with specific activity of 732.59 units/mg. Mr of the denatured enzyme as determined from SDS-PAGE was 58 kD while that of native enzyme calculated from size exclusion chromatography was 56 kD. Furthermore, its identity was confirmed to be β-amylase from MALDI-TOF analysis. The optimum pH and temperature was found to be 5.0 and 50°C, respectively. Starch was hydrolyzed at highest rate and enzyme showed a Km of 1.58 mg/mL with it. Antibodies against purified Fenugreek β-amylase were generated in rabbits. These antibodies were used for localization of enzyme in the cotyledon during different stages of germination using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Fenugreek β-amylase was found to be the major starch degrading enzyme depending on the high amount of enzyme present as compared to α-amylase and also its localization at the periphery of amyloplasts. A new finding in terms of its association with protophloem was observed. Thus, this enzyme appears to be important for germination of seeds. PMID:24551136

  6. Comparisons of amylolytic enzyme activities and ß-amylases with differing Bmy1 intron III alleles to sugar production during congress mashing with North American barley cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the relationships between patterns of activity development of malt amylolytic enzymes (a-amylase, ß-amylase, and limit dextrinase) and sugar production in two- and six-row North American cultivars during the course of Congress mashing and to test two hypotheses:...

  7. Production of raw-starch-digesting α-amylase isoform from Bacillus sp. under solid-state fermentation and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Božić, Nataša; Slavić, Marinela Šokarda; Gavrilović, Anja; Vujčić, Zoran

    2014-07-01

    α-Amylase production by solid-state fermentation of different Bacillus sp. was studied previously on different fermentation media. However, no study has been reported on the influence of selected media on expression of desired amylase isoforms such as raw-starch-digesting amylase (RSDA). In this paper, the influence of different inexpensive and available agro-resources as solid media (corn, wheat and triticale) on α-amylase isoform induction from three wild-type Bacillus sp., selected among one hundred strains tested, namely 9B, 12B and 24A was investigated. For all three strains, tested amylases were detected in the multiple forms; however, number and intensity of each form differed depending on the solid media used for growth. To determine which isoform from Bacillus sp. 12B was RSDA, the suspected isoform was purified. The optimum pH for the purified α-amylase isoform was 6.0-8.0, while the optimum temperature was 60-90 °C. Isoform was considerably thermostable and Ca(2+)-independent, and actually the only α-amylase active towards raw starch. Purification and characterization of RSDA showed that not all of the solid media tested induced RSDA. From an economic point of view, it might be significant to obtain pure isoenzyme for potential use in the raw-starch hydrolysis, since it was 5 times more efficient in raw corn starch hydrolysis than the crude amylase preparation. PMID:24385152

  8. Differential RNA Expression of Bmy1 During Late Seed Development in Wild and Cultivated Barley and the Association With ß-Amylase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four genotypes carrying different ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) intron III alleles (Bmy1.a, Bmy1.b, Bmy1.c, and Bmy1.d) were analyzed for differences in Bmy1 DNA sequence, Bmy1 RNA expression, ß-amylase activity and protein, and total protein during late seed development. Wild barleys Ashqelon (Bmy1.c) and PI...

  9. cDNA cloning, biochemical characterization and inhibition by plant inhibitors of the alpha-amylases of the Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Titarenko, E; Chrispeels, M J

    2000-10-01

    We report the characterization and cDNA cloning of two alpha-amylase isozymes from larvae of the Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte). Larvae raised on artificial media have very low levels of amylase activity, and much higher levels are found in larvae raised on maize seedlings. At pH 5.7, the optimum pH for enzyme activity, the alpha-amylases are substantially but not completely inhibited by amylase inhibitors from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from wheat (Triticum aestivum). Using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we cloned two cDNAs with 83% amino acid identity that encode alpha-amylase-like polypeptides. Expression of one of the two cDNAs in insect cells with a baculovirus vector shows that this cDNA encodes an active amylase with a mobility that corresponds to that of one of the two isozymes present in larval extracts. The expressed enzyme is substantially inhibited by the same two inhibitors. We also show that expression in Arabidopsis of the cDNA that encodes the amylase inhibitor AI-1 of the common bean results in the accumulation of active inhibitor in the roots, and the results are discussed with reference to the possibility of using amylase inhibitors as a strategy to genetically engineer maize plants that are resistant to Western corn rootworm larvae. PMID:10899464

  10. Utilization of Different Bmy1 Intron III Alleles for Predicting ß-Amylase Activity and Thermostability in Wild and Cultivated Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphisms in intron III of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) endosperm-specific beta-amylase (Bmy1) have been associated with beta-amylase activity and thermostability and are thought to have potential as a selective marker for breeding elite malting cultivars. The third intron of Bmy1 was sequenced ...

  11. Tracking amylolytic enzyme activities during congress mashing with North American barley cultivars: Comparisons of patterns of activity and ß-amylases with differing Bmy1 ...correlations of amylolytic enzyme activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to test three hypotheses: 1) that a-amylase will have less consistent patterns of activity during mashing than ß-amylase and limit dextrinase 2) that differing ß-amylase 1 intron III alleles (Bmy1.a and Bmy1.b) would not be useful in predicting high or low activities or th...

  12. [POLYMORPHISM OF ALFA-AMYLASE AND CONJUGATION IN COMMON WHEAT ENZYME TYPES WITH QUANTITATIVE TRAITS OF PLANTS].

    PubMed

    Netsvetaev, V P; Bondarenko, L S; Motorina, I P

    2015-01-01

    Using polymorphism of alpha-amylase in the winter common wheat studied inheritance isoenzymes and its conjugation enzyme types with germinating grain on the "vine", grain productivity, plant height and time of ear formation. It is shown that the polymorphism isoenzyme of alpha-amylase wheat is limited by the presence of different loci whose products are similar in electrophoretic parameters. In this regard, one component of the enzyme can be controlling at one or two or three genes. Identification of a locus controlling alpha-amylase isoenzyme in the fast moving part of the electrophoretogram, designated as α-Amy-B7. Determine the distance of the locus to factor α-Amy-B6. PMID:26841490

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rice bifunctional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Peng, Wen-Yan; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ying-Cheng; Liu, Ming-Yih; Chang, Tschining; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2006-08-01

    The crystallization of rice α-amylase/subtilisin bifunctional inhibitor is reported. Rice bifunctional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (RASI) can inhibit both α-amylase from larvae of the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and subtilisin from Bacillus subtilis. The synthesis of RASI is up-regulated during the late milky stage in developing seeds. The 8.9 kDa molecular-weight RASI from rice has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. According to 1.81 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data from rice RASI crystals, the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.99, b = 62.95, c = 66.70 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates two RASI molecules in an asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 44%.

  14. [Inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants--a possibility to treat diabetes mellitus type II by phytotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Melzig, Matthias F; Funke, Ines

    2007-01-01

    Antidiabetics of plant origin are in common use. A proof of their effectiveness or their mode of action is often missing. The aim of this work was to review the knowledge about inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants and to comment on the use in anti-diabetic treatment. Herbal alpha-amylase inhibitors are rarely described in the literature, nevertheless they have the ability to lower postprandial blood glucose level and should be used in the supplementary treatment of diabetes. Important constituents for the inhibitory activity against alpha-amylase are mainly polyphenolic compounds. There is a need for further clinical studies to establish a rational therapy with traditional herbal preparations, especially for the leaves from the blueberry, tamarind, lemon balm and rosemary, the hulls from white kidney beans or green tea extract. PMID:17704980

  15. An energy-saving glutathione production method from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Yoshida, Hideyo; Arai, Shogo; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is industrially produced by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Before the glutathione fermentation process with S. cerevisiae, a glucose extraction process from starchy materials is required. This glucose extraction is usually carried out by converting starchy materials to starch using high-temperature cooking and subsequent hydrolysis by amylases to convert starch to glucose. In this study, to develop an energy-saving glutathione production process by reducing energy consumption during the cooking step, we efficiently produced glutathione from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing S. cerevisiae. The combination of the amylase-expressing yeast with low-temperature cooking is potentially applicable to a variety of energy-saving bio-production methods of chemicals from starchy bio-resources. PMID:22294378

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Series of Oleanolic Acid Saponins as α-Glucosidase and α-Amylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tiantian; Wu, Shaoping; Guo, Sen; Bai, Lu; Liu, Qingchao; Bai, Naisheng

    2015-09-01

    Sixteen naturally occurring oleanolic acid saponins and their derivatives were synthesized in an efficient and practical strategy, and their inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were evaluated in vitro. Among all the compounds, 28-O-monoglucoside 8 exhibited remarkably potent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase with an IC50 value of 87.3 µM, which was fivefold stronger than that of the antidiabetic acarbose. Based on the preliminary structure-activity relationships, for 28-O-monoglucosides, the presence of a terminal α-l-rhamnopyranosyl residue enhanced the α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activities. Furthermore, for 3,28-O-bidesmosides, sugar-substituted moieties attached to the C-3 and C-28 positions of the oleanolic acid scaffold are helpful to increase the inhibitory activities against α-amylase and α-glucosidase. PMID:26207761

  17. α-Amylase monitoring by a novel amperometric biosensor based on Au electrode: its optimization, characterization, and application.

    PubMed

    Mengulluoglu, Umut; Altug, Cagri; Ertugrul, H Deniz; Yildiz, Abdulkerim; Ekici, E Melis; Dinckaya, Erhan

    2012-02-01

    A low-cost and sensitive amperometric biosensor was developed for the determination of α-amylase activity. The biosensor was constructed by immobilizing glucose oxidase-gelatin via glutaraldehyde on the Au electrode surface. Measurements were carried out chronoamperometrically at -0.7 V. Several parameters such as glucose oxidase activity, gelatin amount, and glutaraldehyde percentage for cross-linking were optimized. Optimum pH, optimum temperature, repeatability, and storage stabilities of the biosensor were identified. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a linear calibration curve was obtained for α-amylase between 0.819 and 13.110 U/ml. Sample analyses were carried out by detecting α-amylase activities in baker's yeast samples. PMID:21838534

  18. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [alpha]-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, J.J.; Hunt, D.C.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the [alpha]-amylases of mammals and insects. This [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]Al) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M[sub r]) 15,000 to 18,000. The authors report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, they found that antibodies to [alpha]Al recognize large (M[sub r] 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical [alpha]Al processing products (M[sub r] 15,000-18,000). [alpha]Al activity was found in all extracts that had the typical [alpha]Al processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, they made a mutant [alpha]Al in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-[alpha]Al when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-[alpha]Al was separated from mature [alpha]Al by gel filtration, pro-[alpha]Al was found not to have [alpha]-amylase inhibitory activity. The authors interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. They suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformation constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Evaluation of Ten Wild Nigerian Mushrooms for Amylase and Cellulase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Adeoyo, Olusegun Richard

    2011-01-01

    Amylases and cellulases are important enzymes that can be utilized for various biological activities. Ten different wild Nigerian mushrooms (Agaricus blazei, Agaricus sp., Corilopsis occidentalis, Coriolus versicolor, Termitomyces clypeatus, Termitomyces globulus, Pleurotus tuber-regium, Podoscypha bolleana, Pogonomyces hydnoides, and Nothopanus hygrophanus) were assayed for production of these secondary metabolites. The results revealed that most of the tested wild fungi demonstrated very good amylase and cellulase activities. With the incorporation of carboxymethyl-cellulose (a carbon source) into the culture medium, Agaricus blazei had the highest amylolytic activity of 0.60 unit/mL (at 25℃, pH 6.8). This was followed in order by P. tuber-regium and Agaricus sp. with 0.42 and 0.39 unit/mL, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). Maltose and sucrose supplementation into the submerged liquid medium made N. hygrophanus and P. hydnoides to exhibit very low amylase activities of 0.09 and 0.11 unit/mL, respectively. Introducing peptone (an organic nitrogen source) into the basal medium enhanced the ability of C. versicolor to produce a cellulase value of 0.74 unit/mL. Other organic nitrogen sources that supported good cellulase activities were yeast extract and urea. Sodium nitrate (inorganic nitrogen source) generally inhibited cellulase production in all mushrooms. The best carbon source was carboxymethyl-cellulose, which promoted very high cellulase activity of 0.67 unit/mL in C. versicolor, which was followed in order by P. tuber-regium, T. chypeatus, and C. occidentalis (p ≤ 0.05). Sucrose was the poorest carbon compound, supporting the lowest values of 0.01, 0.01, and 0.14 unit/mL in P. hydnoides, A. blazei, and Agaricus sp., respectively. PMID:22783085

  20. Multiple time courses of salivary alpha-amylase and dimensions of affect in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Doane, Leah D; Van Lenten, Scott A

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has illustrated associations among daily experiences, emotions and stress-responding physiological systems. Recently, investigators have examined salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a surrogate marker of the autonomic nervous system, and its associations with affect. The current study examined associations among affective valence, arousal and sAA across three different time courses at the momentary, daily and inter-individual level to understand varying influences of adolescents' daily emotional experiences on sAA reactivity and diurnal sAA activity. Adolescents (N=82) provided salivary samples and diary reports of affect and experiences five times a day for three consecutive days. They also completed self-report questionnaires on trait affect. Findings from multilevel growth curves demonstrated that adolescents in our sample displayed typical sAA diurnal rhythms with levels dropping 30 min after waking and then increasing across the day to a peak in the late afternoon. Within person momentary experiences of high arousal positive affect were associated with momentary sAA reactivity. Prior day experiences of high arousal negative affect were associated with a greater amylase awakening response (i.e., greater decrease) and flatter slopes the next day. Trait positive affect was also associated with flatter sAA slopes. Our findings suggest that both affective arousal and valence should be accounted for when examining differences in sAA reactivity and diurnal patterns. Further, our results indicated that emotion-physiology transactions among adolescents occur over varying time scales for salivary alpha-amylase as well as cortisol. PMID:25076484

  1. High endogenous salivary amylase activity is associated with improved glycemic homeostasis following starch ingestion in adults.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Abigail L; Breslin, Paul A S

    2012-05-01

    In the current study, we determined whether increased digestion of starch by high salivary amylase concentrations predicted postprandial blood glucose following starch ingestion. Healthy, nonobese individuals were prescreened for salivary amylase activity and classified as high (HA) or low amylase (LA) if their activity levels per minute fell 1 SD higher or lower than the group mean, respectively. Fasting HA (n = 7) and LA (n = 7) individuals participated in 2 sessions during which they ingested either a starch (experimental) or glucose solution (control) on separate days. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the participants drank each solution. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as diploid AMY1 gene copy number. HA individuals had significantly more AMY1 gene copies within their genomes than did the LA individuals. We found that following starch ingestion, HA individuals had significantly lower postprandial blood glucose concentrations at 45, 60, and 75 min, as well as significantly lower AUC and peak blood glucose concentrations than the LA individuals. Plasma insulin concentrations in the HA group were significantly higher than baseline early in the testing session, whereas insulin concentrations in the LA group did not increase at this time. Following ingestion of the glucose solution, however, blood glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ between the groups. These observations are interpreted to suggest that HA individuals may be better adapted to ingest starches, whereas LA individuals may be at greater risk for insulin resistance and diabetes if chronically ingesting starch-rich diets. PMID:22492122

  2. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and phytochemical study of Zhumeria majdae Rech. f. and Wendelbo

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafie, Behnaz; Mokhber-Dezfouli, Najmeh; Manayi, Azadeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Ajani, Yousef; Gohari, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Zhumeria majdae (Lamiaceae) is an endemic species growing in the South parts of Iran especially Hormozgan province. The plant is so-called Mohrekhosh locally and widely used for medicinal purposes including stomachache and dysmenorrhea. Objective: In order to separation and identification of the main flavonoid glycosides of the plant (aerial parts including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits were used) and evaluation of its alpha-amylase inhibitory (AAI) activity, methanolic extract was prepared and fractionated to botanolic portion. Materials and Methods: Isolation of the main compounds of the butanol extract of the plant have been performed using different column chromatography methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (C18 column) and Sephadex LH-20 as well. The isolated compounds were identified by Hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and comparison with those reported in previous literature. Moreover, inhibitory activity of the butanolic extract of the plant against alpha-amylase enzyme was examined in different concentrations (15–30 mg/mL), where acarbose used as a positive control. Results: Three flavonoid glycosides: Linarin (1), hispidulin-7-O-(4-O-acetyl-rutinoside) (2), hispidulin-7-O-rutinoside (3) were successfully identified in the extract. The activity of alpha amylase enzyme was dose-dependently suppressed by the butanol extract. The extract exhibited the highest inhibition at 30 mg/mL toward enzyme (77.9 ± 2.1%), while acarbose inhibited the enzyme at 20 mg/mL by 73.9 ± 1.9%. The inhibitory concentrations of 50% for the extract and acarbose were calculated at 24.5 ± 2.1 and 6.6 ± 3.1 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Z. majdae contains glycosylated flavones and could be a good candidate for anti-diabetic evaluations in animal and clinical trials due to possessing AAI activity. PMID:26692743

  3. Structural elements of thermostability in the maltogenic amylase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Deepika; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-08-01

    Maltogenic amylase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans (Gt-MamyIII), which has the highest thermostability among bacterial maltogenic amylases, has been used as a model enzyme to understand the role of networked salt bridges in thermoadaptation. The role of intra-chain cross-domain salt bridge networks in the thermostabilization of maltogenic amylase of G. thermoleovorans was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and CD analysis. The amino acid pairs in seven salt bridges have been mutated singly and pair-wise, and their free energy of thermal inactivation has been calculated. Among seven, single and double mutations in the amino acids corresponding to four salt bridges (lys306.glu336, arg403.asp65, arg497.glu523 and lys524.glu523) decrease T1/2 and Tm of Gt-MamyIII significantly. Moreover, glu523 forms networked salt bridges with arg497 and lys524. OE1 of glu523 forms electrostatic interactions with NH1 of arg497, NH2 of arg497 and NZ of lys524 at a distance of 2.33, 2.02 and 0.33Å, respectively. The mutations in three buried amino acids led to a decline in T1/2 and Tm. The buried as well as networked cross-domain salt bridges thus appear to play a significant role in the thermostabilization of Gt-MamyIII. The salt bridges lys306.glu336 and arg403.asp65, which are isolated and partially accessible, play a minor role in its thermostabilization. PMID:25881956

  4. Protein structures of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Gepts, Paul L; Whitaker, John R

    2002-10-23

    Two nucleotide sequences for genes that encode alpha-amylase inhibitor 4 (alphaAI-4) from white kidney bean (WKB) cv. 858, designated gene alphaAI-4 (Accession No. ), and alpha-amylase inhibitor 5 (alphaAI-5) from black bean (BB), designated gene alphaAI-5 (Accession No. ), were determined. Genes alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 encode 244 amino acid prepro-alphaAI-4 and prepro-alphaAI-5 polypeptides that are 93 and 95% identical with alpha-amylase inhibitor l (alphaAI-l; Hoffman, L. M.; Ma, Y.; Barker, R. F. Nucleic Acids Res. 1982, 10, 7819-7828), 40 and 43% identical with red kidney bean lectin, and 52 and 55% identical with arcelin l of wild-type bean. The high degree of sequence similarity indicates the evolutionary relationship among these genes. PCR analysis of genomic DNA purified from six genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris showed very similar band patterns in 2% agarose gel, another indication of the conserved size homology among these genes. Proteolytic processing sites were located between Asn77 and Ser78 for pro-alphaAI-4 and pro-alphaAI-5. A bend next to Asn77 in three-dimensional model structures of alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 proinhibitors indicates that the proteolytic cleavage is necessary to remove the conformational constraint for activation to the mature protein. Mature WKB alphaAI-4 was composed of four subunits (2alpha2beta) and had a molecular weight of 50000 determined by multiangle laser light scattering and 56714 determined by laser-assisted time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:12381161

  5. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pueyo, J J; Hunt, D C; Chrispeels, M J

    1993-01-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the alpha-amylases of mammals and insects. This alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 to 18,000. We report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, we found that antibodies to alpha AI recognize large (M(r) 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical alpha AI processing products (M(r) 15,000-18,000). Alpha AI activity was found in all extracts that had the typical alpha AI processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, we made a mutant alpha AI in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-alpha AI when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-alpha AI was separated from mature alpha AI by gel filtration, pro-alpha AI was found not to have alpha-amylase inhibitory activity. We interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. We suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformational constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. PMID:8310064

  6. AmyM, a Novel Maltohexaose-Forming α-Amylase from Corallococcus sp. Strain EGB

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoukun; Wu, Jiale; Zhang, Biying; Wang, Fei; Ye, Xianfeng; Huang, Yan; Huang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel α-amylase, AmyM, was purified from the culture supernatant of Corallococcus sp. strain EGB. AmyM is a maltohexaose-forming exoamylase with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa. Based on the results of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting of AmyM and by comparison to the genome sequence of Corallococcus coralloides DSM 2259, the AmyM gene was identified and cloned into Escherichia coli. amyM encodes a secretory amylase with a predicted signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues, which showed no significant identity with known and functionally verified amylases. amyM was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells with a hexahistidine tag. The signal peptide efficiently induced the secretion of mature AmyM in E. coli. Recombinant AmyM (rAmyM) was purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) affinity chromatography, with a specific activity of up to 14,000 U/mg. rAmyM was optimally active at 50°C in Tris-HCl buffer (50 mM; pH 7.0) and stable at temperatures of <50°C. rAmyM was stable over a wide range of pH values (from pH 5.0 to 10.0) and highly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, detergents, and various organic solvents. Its activity toward starch was independent of calcium ions. The Km and Vmax of recombinant AmyM for soluble starch were 6.61 mg ml−1 and 44,301.5 μmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. End product analysis showed that maltohexaose accounted for 59.4% of the maltooligosaccharides produced. These characteristics indicate that AmyM has great potential in industrial applications. PMID:25576603

  7. Effect of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone on the activity and stability of alpha-amylase: a comparative study on bacterial, fungal, and mammalian enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Larijani, Bagher; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) was recently introduced as an activator of mammalian alpha-amylase. In the current study, the effect of NHDC has been investigated on bacterial and fungal alpha-amylases. Enzyme assays and kinetic analysis demonstrated the capability of NHDC to significantly activate both tested alpha-amylases. The ligand activation pattern was found to be more similar between the fungal and mammalian enzyme in comparison with the bacterial one. Further, thermostability experiments indicated a stability increase in the presence of NHDC for the bacterial enzyme. In silico (docking) test locates a putative binding site for NHDC on alpha-amylase surface in domain B. This domain shows differences in various alpha-amylase types, and the different behavior of the ligand toward the studied enzymes may be attributed to this fact. PMID:25808616

  8. Characteristics of alpha-Amylase during Germination of Two High-Sugar Sweet Corn Cultivars of Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Sanwo, M M; Demason, D A

    1992-07-01

    The role of the scutellum and the aleurone in alpha-amylase production in the high-sugar sweet corn cultivars Illini X-tra Sweet (shrunken-2, sh2) and Illinois 677a (sugary, sugary enhancer; su se) was compared to that in the starchy (Su) hybrid Funks G4646 with the use of alpha-amylase enzyme assays, isoelectric focusing, electron microscopy, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The scutellum of Illinois 677a had low levels of alpha-amylase activity compared to that of Funks G4646 through 10 days after imbibition, and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet had negligible activity. On the isoelectric focusing gels, the Illinois 677a scutellum had fewer alpha-amylase isozymes at 7 days compared to the Funks G4646 scutellum. The Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone had no alpha-amylase isozymes. Funks G4646 scutellar epithelial and aleurone cells contained abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, polysomes, and dictyosomes at 5 and 7 days, respectively. The scutellar epithelial cells of Illinois 677a contained fewer of these structures by 5 days, and the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone contained mostly lipid bodies through 7 days. Few cytoplasmic membranes and little RNA were detected with laser scanning confocal microscopy in the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone compared to Funks G4646 at 7 days. These data suggest that the scutellum of Illinois 677a and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet have impaired abilities to produce alpha-amylase. PMID:16668987

  9. Characteristics of α-Amylase during Germination of Two High-Sugar Sweet Corn Cultivars of Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Sanwo, Monica M.; DeMason, Darleen A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of the scutellum and the aleurone in α-amylase production in the high-sugar sweet corn cultivars Illini X-tra Sweet (shrunken-2, sh2) and Illinois 677a (sugary, sugary enhancer; su se) was compared to that in the starchy (Su) hybrid Funks G4646 with the use of α-amylase enzyme assays, isoelectric focusing, electron microscopy, and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The scutellum of Illinois 677a had low levels of α-amylase activity compared to that of Funks G4646 through 10 days after imbibition, and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet had negligible activity. On the isoelectric focusing gels, the Illinois 677a scutellum had fewer α-amylase isozymes at 7 days compared to the Funks G4646 scutellum. The Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone had no α-amylase isozymes. Funks G4646 scutellar epithelial and aleurone cells contained abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, polysomes, and dictyosomes at 5 and 7 days, respectively. The scutellar epithelial cells of Illinois 677a contained fewer of these structures by 5 days, and the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone contained mostly lipid bodies through 7 days. Few cytoplasmic membranes and little RNA were detected with laser scanning confocal microscopy in the Illini X-tra Sweet aleurone compared to Funks G4646 at 7 days. These data suggest that the scutellum of Illinois 677a and the aleurone of Illini X-tra Sweet have impaired abilities to produce α-amylase. ImagesFigure 5-13Figure 14-19Figure 3Figure 4Figure 20-23 PMID:16668987

  10. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440

  11. Salivary α-amylase exhibits antiproliferative effects in primary cell cultures of rat mammary epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most diagnosed cancers in females, frequently with fatal outcome, so that new strategies for modulating cell proliferation in the mammary tissue are urgently needed. There is some, as yet inconclusive evidence that α-amylase may constitute a novel candidate for affecting cellular growth. Methods The present investigation aimed to examine if salivary α-amylase, an enzyme well known for the metabolism of starch and recently introduced as a stress marker, is able to exert antiproliferative effects on the growth of mammary gland epithelial cells. For this purpose, primary epithelial cultures of breast tissue from two different inbred rat strains, Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis, as well as breast tumor cells of human origin were used. Treatment with human salivary α-amylase was performed once daily for 2 days followed by cell counting (trypan blue assay) to determine alterations in cell numbers. Cell senescence after α-amylase treatment was assessed by β-galactosidase assay. Endogenous α-amylase was detected in cells from F344 and Lewis by immunofluorescence. Results Salivary α-amylase treatment in vitro significantly decreased the proliferation of primary cells from F344 and Lewis rats in a concentration-dependent manner. Noticeably, the sensitivity towards α-amylase was significantly higher in Lewis cells with stronger impact on cell growth after 5 and 50 U/ml compared to F344 cells. An antiproliferative effect of α-amylase was also determined in mammary tumor cells of human origin, but this effect varied depending on the donor, age, and type of the cells. Conclusions The results presented here indicate for the first time that salivary α-amylase affects cell growth in rat mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumor cells of human origin. Thus, α-amylase may be considered a novel, promising target for balancing cellular growth, which may provide an interesting tool for tumor prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:22027017

  12. Stable yeast transformants that secrete functional. cap alpha. -amylase encoded by cloned mouse pancreatic cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, S.A.; Galembeck, E.V.; Faria, J.B.; Frascino, A.C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Mouse pancreatic ..cap alpha..-amylase complementary DNA was inserted into a yeast shuttle vector after the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MF..cap alpha..1 promoter and secretion signals coding sequences. When transformed with the recombinant plasmid, S. cerevisiae cells were able to synthesize and secrete functional ..cap alpha..-amylase, efficiently hydrolyzing starch present in the culture medium. Stable amylolytic cells were obtained from different yeast strains. This work represents a significant step towards producing yeast that can convert starchy materials directly to ethanol.

  13. Local entropy difference upon a substrate binding of a psychrophilic α-amylase and a mesophilic homologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    Psychrophilic α-amylase from the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonashaloplanktis (AHA) and its mesophilic homologue, porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) are theoretically investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We carried out 240-ns MD simulations for four systems, AHA and PPA with/without the bound substrate, and examined protein conformational entropy changes upon the substrate binding. We developed an analysis that decomposes the entropy changes into contributions of individual amino acids, and successfully identified protein regions responsible for the entropy changes. The results provide a molecular insight into the structural flexibilities of those enzymes related to the temperature dependences of the enzymatic activity.

  14. The presence and inactivation of trypsin inhibitors, tannins, lectins and amylase inhibitors in legume seeds during germination. A review.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; van der Poel, A F; Tamminga, S

    1992-01-01

    During the germination of legume seeds, enzymes become active in order to degrade starch, storage-protein and proteinaceous antinutritional factors. The degradation of storage-protein is necessary to make peptides and amino acids available in order to stimulate seed growth and early plant growth. Proteinaceous antinutritional factors such as amylase inhibitors, lectins and trypsin inhibitors are present in legume seeds and protect them against predators. However, during germination, they degrade to a lower level by the action of several enzymes. The effect of germination on the content and activity of amylase inhibitors, lectins, tannins and trypsin inhibitors is discussed. PMID:1372122

  15. [Insulin, glucose, proteins and amylase in the saliva of obese children].

    PubMed

    Kamarýt, J; Stejskal, J; Mrskos, A; Lavický, P

    1989-09-01

    The authors examined the insulin, glucose, total protein concentrations and amylase activity in the saliva of normal (n = 7) and obese subjects (n = 14) before and after a meal. The variability of the values of the investigated parameters in different subjects is considerable. During repeated examinations of the same normal subjects after a prolonged time interval the responses under similar condition in saliva is 17.7 +/- 13.8 microU/ml, when the mean maximum in the 120th minute is 24.7 +/- +13.9 microU/ml. The glucose concentration is on average 2.1 +/- 1.3 mg/dl, total protein 279.5 +/- 53.2 mg/dl and the amylase activity 226 +/- 133 thousand U/l. In the dynamics of the investigated parameters in obese subjects the concentration of insulin and the other parameters are on average higher than the maximum insulin level in normal children, and in three obese children they were more than four or five times higher. The gradual progressive hypersecretion of insulin may thus imply a disposition for type II diabetes mellitus at a later age. PMID:2478304

  16. A comparison of ghrelin, glucose, alpha-amylase and protein levels in saliva from diabetics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2007-01-31

    During the past decade, many salivary parameters have been used to characterize disease states. Ghrelin (GAH) is recently-discovered peptide hormone secreted mainly from the stomach but also produced in a number of other tissues including salivary glands. The aim of this work was to examine the relationship between active (aGAH) and inactive (dGAH) ghrelin in the saliva and other salivary parameters in type II diabetic patients and healthy controls. Salivary parameters were assessed in a single measurement of unstimulated whole saliva from 20 obese and 20 non-obese type II diabetes patients, and in 22 healthy controls. Total protein and alpha-amylase were determined by colorimetric methods, and glucose by the glucose-oxidase method. Saliva aGAH and dGAH levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Salivary concentrations of aGAH and dGAH ghrelin were more markedly decreased in obese diabetic subjects than in the two other groups. Glucose and alpha-amylase levels were higher in diabetic subjects than in controls. Furthermore, there were correlations between GAH levels and BMI, and between GAH and blood pressure. However, there was no marked variability in saliva flow rates among the groups. These results indicate that measurement of salivary GAH and its relationship to other salivary parameters might help to provide insight into the role of ghrelin in diabetes. PMID:17244479

  17. Simultaneous production of amylases and proteases by Bacillus subtilis in brewery wastes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Blanco, Alina; Palacios Durive, Osmar; Batista Pérez, Sulema; Díaz Montes, Zoraida; Pérez Guerra, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous production of amylase (AA) and protease (PA) activity by Bacillus subtilis UO-01 in brewery wastes was studied by combining the response surface methodology with the kinetic study of the process. The optimum conditions (T=36.0°C and pH=6.8) for high biomass production (0.92g/L) were similar to the conditions (T=36.8°C and pH=6.6) for high AA synthesis (9.26EU/mL). However, the maximum PA level (9.77EU/mL) was obtained at pH 7.1 and 37.8°C. Under these conditions, a considerably high reduction (between 69.9 and 77.8%) of the initial chemical oxygen demand of the waste was achieved. In verification experiments under the optimized conditions for production of each enzyme, the AA and PA obtained after 15h of incubation were, respectively, 9.35 and 9.87EU/mL. By using the Luedeking and Piret model, both enzymes were classified as growth-associated metabolites. Protease production delay seemed to be related to the consumption of non-protein and protein nitrogen. These results indicate that the brewery waste could be successfully used for a high scale production of amylases and proteases at a low cost. PMID:27266628

  18. Consolidated bioprocessing of starchy substrates into ethanol by industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secreting fungal amylases.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Lorenzo; Viktor, Marko J; Rose, Shaunita H; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H; Basaglia, Marina; Cagnin, Lorenzo; Casella, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    The development of a yeast strain that converts raw starch to ethanol in one step (called Consolidated Bioprocessing, CBP) could significantly reduce the commercial costs of starch-based bioethanol. An efficient amylolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain suitable for industrial bioethanol production was developed in this study. Codon-optimized variants of the Thermomyces lanuginosus glucoamylase (TLG1) and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera α-amylase (SFA1) genes were δ-integrated into two S. cerevisiae yeast with promising industrial traits, i.e., strains M2n and MEL2. The recombinant M2n[TLG1-SFA1] and MEL2[TLG1-SFA1] yeast displayed high enzyme activities on soluble and raw starch (up to 8118 and 4461 nkat/g dry cell weight, respectively) and produced about 64 g/L ethanol from 200 g/L raw corn starch in a bioreactor, corresponding to 55% of the theoretical maximum ethanol yield (g of ethanol/g of available glucose equivalent). Their starch-to-ethanol conversion efficiencies were even higher on natural sorghum and triticale substrates (62 and 73% of the theoretical yield, respectively). This is the first report of direct ethanol production from natural starchy substrates (without any pre-treatment or commercial enzyme addition) using industrial yeast strains co-secreting both a glucoamylase and α-amylase. PMID:25786804

  19. Characterization of commercial amylases for the removal of filter cake on petroleum wells.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Nattascha; de Mesquita, Rafael Fonseca; Kameda, Etel; Neto, João Crisósthomo de Queiroz; Langone, Marta Antunes Pereira; Coelho, Maria Alice Zarur

    2010-05-01

    Drilling fluid has many functions, such as carry cuttings from the hole permitting their separation at the surface, cool and clean the bit, reduce friction between the drill pipe and wellbore, maintain the stability of the wellbore, and prevent the inflow of fluids from the wellbore and form a thin, low-permeable filter cake. Filter cake removal is an important step concerning both production and injection in wells, mainly concerning horizontal completion. The drilling fluids are typically comprised of starch, the most important component of the filter cake. A common approach to remove this filter cake is the use of acid solutions. However, these are non-specific reactants. A possible alternative is the use of enzymatic preparations, like amylases, that are able to hydrolyze starch. Wells usually operate in drastic conditions for enzymatic preparations, such as high temperature, high salt concentration, and high pressure. Thus, the main objective of this work was to characterize four enzymatic preparations for filter cake removal under open hole conditions. The results showed that high salt concentrations (204,000 ppm NaCl) in completion fluid decreased amylolytic activity. All enzymatic preparations were able to catalyze starch hydrolysis at all temperatures tested (30, 65, 80, and 95 degrees C). An increase of amylolytic activity was observed with the increase of pressure (100, 500 and 1,000 psi) for one commercial amylase. PMID:19802735

  20. Low Drain Fluid Amylase Predicts Absence of Pancreatic Fistula Following Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christina W.; Pitt, Henry A.; Riall, Taylor S.; Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean S.; Israel, Jacqueline S.; Leverson, Glen E.; Parmar, Abhishek D.; Kilbane, E. Molly; Hall, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Improvements in the ability to predict pancreatic fistula could enhance patient outcomes. Previous studies demonstrate that drain fluid amylase on postoperative day 1 (DFA1) is predictive of pancreatic fistula. We sought to assess the accuracy of DFA1 and to identify a reliable DFA1 threshold under which pancreatic fistula is ruled out. Methods Patients undergoing pancreatic resection from November 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012 were selected from the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pancreatectomy Demonstration Project data-base. Pancreatic fistula was defined as drainage of amylase-rich fluid with drain continuation >7 days, percutaneous drainage, or reoperation for a pancreatic fluid collection. Univariate and multi-variable regression models were utilized to identify factors predictive of pancreatic fistula. Results DFA1 was recorded in 536 of 2,805 patients who underwent pancreatic resection, including pancreaticoduodenectomy (n=380), distal pancreatectomy (n=140), and enucleation (n=16). Pancreatic fistula occurred in 92/536 (17.2 %) patients. DFA1, increased body mass index, small pancreatic duct size, and soft texture were associated with fistula (p<0.05). A DFA1 cutoff value of <90 U/L demonstrated the highest negative predictive value of 98.2 %. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve confirmed the predictive relationship of DFA1 and pancreatic fistula. Conclusion Low DFA1 predicts the absence of a pancreatic fistula. In patients with DFA1<90 U/L, early drain removal is advisable. PMID:25112411

  1. Cloning and characterization of a third type of human alpha-amylase gene, AMY2B.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, H; Horii, A; Emi, M; Tomita, N; Doi, S; Ogawa, M; Mori, T; Matsubara, K

    1990-06-15

    We have previously reported concerning the existence of a third type of human alpha-amylase gene, AMY3 [Emi et al., Gene 62 (1988) 229-235; Tomita et al., Gene 76 (1989) 11-18], which is expressed in a lung carcinoid tissue, and differs in nucleotide sequence from the two previously characterized human alpha-amylase genes coding for salivary and pancreatic isozymes, termed AMY1 and AMY2, respectively. Here, we rename this gene AMY2B to coincide with the designation by Gumucio et al. [Mol. Cell Biol. 8 (1988) 1197-1205] and describe its genetic properties as revealed by sequencing studies. It consists of ten major exons whose sequences are highly homologous to those of AMY1 and AMY2. Not only the exons, but also most of the introns seem to be highly conserved, as judged from physical mapping data. The AMY2B gene identified from mRNA in a lung carcinoid tissue has at least two additional untranslated exons in its 5' region; hence the promoter lies far upstream relative to the other two AMY genes. PMID:2401405

  2. Molecular characterization and evolution of the amylase multigene family of Drosophila ananassae.

    PubMed

    Da Lage, J L; Maczkowiak, F; Cariou, M L

    2000-10-01

    Drosophila ananassae is known to produce numerous alpha-amylase variants. We have cloned seven different Amy genes in an African strain homozygous for the AMY1,2,3,4 electrophoretic pattern. These genes are organized as two main clusters: the first one contains three intronless copies on the 2L chromosome arm, two of which are tandemly arranged. The other cluster, on the 3L arm, contains two intron-bearing copies. The amylase variants AMY1 and AMY2 have been assigned to the intronless cluster, and AMY3 and AMY4 to the second one. The divergence of coding sequences between clusters is moderate (6.1% in amino acids), but the flanking regions are very different, which could explain their differential regulation. Within each cluster, coding and noncoding regions are conserved. Two very divergent genes were also cloned, both on chromosome 3L, but very distant from each other and from the other genes. One is the Amyrel homologous (41% divergent), the second one, Amyc1 (21.6% divergent) is unknown outside the D. ananassae subgroup. These two genes have unknown functions. PMID:11040291

  3. Superoxol and amylase inhibition tests for distinguishing gonococcal and nongonococcal cultures growing on selective media.

    PubMed Central

    Arko, R J; Odugbemi, T

    1984-01-01

    Two inexpensive screening tests were evaluated singly and in tandem for distinguishing Neisseria gonorrhoeae from other oxidase-positive microorganisms growing on selective gonococcal media. In tests of 728 cultures, including 460 N. gonorrhoeae, 4 Neisseria lactamica, 257 Neisseria meningitidis, and 7 Branhamella catarrhalis, both Superoxol (30% H2O2; J. T. Baker Chemical Co., Phillipsburg, N.J.) and amylase inhibition tests were 100% sensitive (positive) for 20-h cultures of N. gonorrhoeae. Singly, the Superoxol test was 92.7% specific for N. gonorrhoeae, compared with a specificity of 82.3% for the amylase inhibition test. By using tandem screening tests to distinguish gonococci, we achieved an overall specificity of 98.6%. Group A meningococci were the primary source of error in the Superoxol test, with 97% (37 of 38) strains producing gonococcal like reactions for catalase. From 5 to 20% of N. meningitidis serogroups X, Y, Z, and Z' and nontypable strains, as well as about 50% of B. catarrhalis and N. lactamica strains, were also strong catalase producers. Images PMID:6205016

  4. Structural properties of hydrolyzed high-amylose rice starch by α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fengling; Man, Jianmin; Xu, Bin; Hu, Maozhi; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2011-12-14

    High-amylose cereal starch has a great benefit on human health through its resistant starch (RS) content. Enzyme hydrolysis of native starch is very helpful in understanding the structure of starch granules and utilizing them. In this paper, native starch granules were isolated from a transgenic rice line (TRS) enriched with amylose and RS and hydrolyzed by α-amylase. Structural properties of hydrolyzed TRS starches were studied by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and differential scanning calorimetry. The A-type polymorph of TRS C-type starch was hydrolyzed faster than the B-type polymorph, but the crystallinity did not significantly change during enzyme hydrolysis. The degree of order in the external region of starch granule increased with increasing enzyme hydrolysis time. The amylose content decreased at first and then went back up during enzyme hydrolysis. The hydrolyzed starches exhibited increased onset and peak gelatinization temperatures and decreased gelatinization enthalpy on hydrolysis. These results suggested that the B-type polymorph and high amylose that formed the double helices and amylose-lipid complex increased the resistance to BAA hydrolysis. Furthermore, the spectrum results of RS from TRS native starch digested by pancreatic α-amylase and amyloglucosidase also supported the above conclusion. PMID:22059442

  5. Growth Factors Polymerized Within Fibrin Hydrogel Promote Amylase Production in Parotid Cells

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew D.; Nelson, Joel W.; Leigh, Noel J.; Duffey, Michael E.; Lei, Pedro; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary gland cell differentiation has been a recurring challenge for researchers as primary salivary cells show a loss of phenotype in culture. Particularly, parotid cells show a marked decrease in amylase expression, the loss of tight junction organization and proper cell function. Previously, Matrigel has been used successfully as an extracellular matrix; however, it is not practical for in vivo applications as it is tumorigenic. An alternative method could rely on the use of fibrin hydrogel (FH), which has been used extensively in biomedical engineering applications ranging from cardiovascular tissue engineering to wound-healing experiments. Although several groups have examined the effects of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on salivary cell cultures, little is known about the effects of FH on salivary cell cultures. The current study developed a 3D cell culture model to support parotid gland cell differentiation using a combination of FH and growth factor-reduced Matrigel (GFR-MG). Furthermore, FH polymerized with a combination of EGF and IGF-1 induced formation of 3D spheroids capable of amylase expression and an agonist-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in salivary cells. These studies represent an initial step toward the construction of an artificial salivary gland to restore salivary gland dysfunction. This is necessary to reduce xerostomia in patients with compromised salivary function. PMID:23594102

  6. Inhibitory effects of chickpea and Tribulus terrestris on lipase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Pınar; El, Sedef Nehir

    2016-08-15

    The total saponin content and its in vitro bioaccessibilities in Tribulus terrestris and chickpea were determined by a static in vitro digestion method (COST FA1005 Action INFOGEST). Also, in vitro inhibitory effects of the chosen food samples on lipid and starch digestive enzymes were determined by evaluating the lipase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. The tested T. terrestris and chickpea showed inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (IC50 6967 ± 343 and 2885 ± 85.4 μg/ml, respectively) and α-amylase (IC50 343 ± 26.2 and 167 ± 6.12 μg/ml, respectively). The inhibitory activities of T. terrestris and chickpea against lipase were 15.3 ± 2.03 and 9.74 ± 1.09 μg/ml, respectively. The present study provides the first evidence that these food samples (T. terrestris, chickpea) are potent inhibitors of key enzymes in digestion of carbohydrates and lipids in vitro. PMID:27006227

  7. Variation in β-amylase activity and thermostability in Tibetan annual wild and cultivated barley genotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-tao; Chen, Tian-long; Zhang, Bing-lin; Wu, De-zhi; Huang, Ye-chang; Wu, Fei-bo; Zhang, Guo-ping

    2014-01-01

    β-Amylase activity (BAA) and thermostability (BAT) are important traits for malt quality. In this study, 138 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 20 cultivated genotypes differing in BAA were planted and analyzed in 2009 and 2012. Significant differences were detected among genotypes in BAA and BAT. The cultivated genotypes had a mean BAA of 1137.6 U/g and a range of from 602.1 to 1407.5 U/g, while the wild accessions had a mean of 1517.9 U/g and a range of from 829.7 to 2310.0 U/g. The cultivated genotypes had a mean relative residual β-amylase activity (RRBAA) of 61.6% and a range of from 22.2% to 82.3%, while the wild barleys had a mean of 57.8% and a range of from 21.9% to 96.1%. Moreover, there was a significant difference among genotypes in the response of RRBAA to the temperature and duration of heat treatment. The wild barleys had wider variation in BAA and BAT than cultivated genotypes. PMID:25183034

  8. A new strategy to express the extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Peili; Tian, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chang, Meihui; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFA) shows great starch-processing potential for industrial application due to its thermostability, long half-life and optimal activity at low pH; however, it is difficult to produce in large quantities. In contrast, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA) can be produced in larger quantities, but shows lower stability at high temperatures and low pH. Here, we describe a BAA protein expression pattern-mimicking strategy to express PFA in B. amyloliquefaciens using the expression and secretion elements of BAA, including the codon usage bias and mRNA structure of gene, promoter, signal peptide, host and cultivation conditions. This design was assessed to be successful by comparing the various genes (mpfa and opfa), promoters (PamyA and P43), and strains (F30, F31, F32 and F30-∆amyA). The final production of PFA yielded 2714 U/mL, about 3000- and 14-fold that reportedly produced in B. subtilis or E. coli, respectively. The recombinant PFA was optimally active at ~100 °C and pH 5 and did not require Ca(2+) for activity or thermostability, and >80% of the enzyme activity was retained after treatment at 100 °C for 4 h. PMID:26916714

  9. Production and immobilization of a novel thermoalkalophilic extracellular amylase from bacilli isolate.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Birnur; Yenidunya, Ali Fazil; Akkaya, Recep

    2012-05-01

    A Thermoalkalophilic amylase was produced from an environmental bacterial isolate. The enzyme was then immobilized through its amino groups onto the epoxy rings of magnetic poly glycidyl methacrylate [m-poly (GMA)] beads. The free enzyme was active within a large pH range, between 7 and 12 and displayed the optimum activity at 95°C and pH 10. The immobilization appeared to increase the stability of the enzyme as its bound form showed optimum activity at 105°C and pH 11.0. Kinetic studies demonstrated that immobilized enzyme had higher K(m) and lower V(max) values. The activity of the free and bound enzyme was determined, at 37°C and pH 10.0 and pH 11.0, respectively, in the presence of various organic solvents and detergents (5%, v/v). Results obtained indicated that detergents, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TritonX-100, caused six fold increase and that various organic solvents also increased the activity of the amylase. PMID:22387519

  10. Amyrel, a paralogous gene of the amylase gene family in Drosophila melanogaster and the Sophophora subgenus

    PubMed Central

    Da Lage, Jean-Luc; Renard, Emmanuelle; Chartois, Frédérique; Lemeunier, Françoise; Cariou, Marie-Louise

    1998-01-01

    We describe a gene from Drosophila melanogaster related to the alpha-amylase gene Amy. This gene, which exists as a single copy, was named Amyrel. It is strikingly divergent from Amy because the amino acid divergence is 40%. The coding sequence is interrupted by a short intron at position 655, which is unusual in amylase genes. Amyrel has also been cloned in Drosophila ananassae, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and Drosophila subobscura and is likely to be present throughout the Sophophora subgenus, but, to our knowledge, it has not been detected outside. Unexpectedly, there is a strong conservation of 5′ and 3′ flanking regions between Amyrel genes from different species, which is not the case for Amy and which suggests that selection acts on these regions. In contrast to the Amy genes, Amyrel is transcribed in larvae of D. melanogaster but not in adults. However, the protein has not been detected yet. Amyrel evolves about twice as fast as Amy in the several species studied. We suggest that this gene could result from a duplication of Amy followed by accelerated and selected divergence toward a new adaptation. PMID:9618501

  11. Adsorption of α-amylase onto poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone/itaconic acid) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tümtürk, Hayrettin; Çaykara, Tuncer; Kantoǧlu, Ömer; Güven, Olgun

    1999-05-01

    α-Amylase enzyme was adsorbed on poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone/itaconic acid) (P(VP/IA)) hydrogels prepared by irradiating the ternary mixtures of VP/IA/water by γ-rays at ambient temperature. The adsorption capacity of the hydrogels was determined to increase from 2.30 to 3.40 mg α-amylase/g dry gel with increasing amount of IA in gel system. Kinetic parameters were calculated as 2.51 g/dm 3 for Km and 1.67 × 10 -3 g/dm 3 min for Vmax for free enzyme and in the range of 3.88-5.02 g/dm 3 for Km and 1.62 × 10 -3-2.27 × 10 -3 g/dm 3 min for Vmax depending on the amount of IA in the hydrogel. Enzyme activities were found to increase from 49.9% to 77.4% with increasing amount of IA in the gel system and retained their activities for one month storage. On the other hand, the free enzyme loses its activity completely after 20 days.

  12. Exocyst subunits are involved in isoproterenol-induced amylase release from rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akane; Yoshie, Sumio; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Nashida, Tomoko; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2012-04-01

    Exocytosis of secretory granules in parotid acinar cells requires multiple events: tethering, docking, priming, and fusion with a luminal plasma membrane. The exocyst complex, which is composed of eight subunits (Sec3, Sec5, Sec6, Sec8, Sec10, Sec15, Exo70, and Exo84) that are conserved in yeast and mammalian cells, is thought to participate in the exocytotic pathway. However, to date, no exocyst subunit has been identified in salivary glands. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of exocyst subunits in rat parotid acinar cells. The expression of mRNA for all eight exocyst subunits was detected in parotid acinar cells by RT-PCR, and Sec6 and Sec8 proteins were localized on the luminal plasma membrane. Sec6 interacted with Sec8 after 5 min of stimulation with isoproterenol. In addition, antibodies to-Sec6 and Sec8 inhibited isoproterenol-induced amylase release from streptolysin O-permeabilized parotid acinar cells. These results suggest that an exocyst complex of eight subunits is required for amylase release from parotid acinar cells. PMID:22409218

  13. Inhibition of Porcine Pancreatic Amylase Activity by Sulfamethoxazole: Structural and Functional Aspect.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sujan; Mukherjee, Koel; Banerjee, Amrita; Mukherjee, Suman; Dasgupta, Dipak; Gupta, Suvroma

    2016-06-01

    Combating Type-2 diabetes mellitus is a pivotal challenge in front of the present world. Several lines of therapy are in practice for resisting this deadly disease which often culminates with cardiovascular complexities, neuropathy and retinopathy. Among various therapies, administration of alpha glucosidase inhibitors is common and widely practiced. Sulfonylurea category of anti diabetic drug often suffers from cross reactivity with sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a common drug in use to treat a handful of microbial infections. However the specific cellular target generating postprandial hypoglycemia on SMX administration is till date unraveled. The present work has been initiated to elucidate the effects of a group of sulfonamide drugs inclusive of SMX for their amylase inhibitory role. SMX inhibits porcine pancreatic amylase (PPA) in a noncompetitive mode with an average IC50 value 0.94 mM respectively. Interaction of SMX with PPA is manifested with gradual quenching of tryptophan fluorescence with concomitant shift in lambda max value (λmax). Binding is governed by entropy driven factor (24.8 cal mol(-1) K(-1)) with unfavorable contribution from enthalpy change. SMX interferes with the activity of acarbose in a synergistic mode to reduce the effective dose of acarbose as evident from the in vitro PPA inhibition study. In summary, loss of PPA activity in presence of SMX is indicative of structural changes of PPA which is further augmented in the presence of acarbose as explained in the schematic model and docking study. PMID:27272220

  14. Cortisol, salivary alpha-amylase and children's perceptions of their social networks.

    PubMed

    Ponzi, Davide; Muehlenbein, Michael P; Geary, David C; Flinn, Mark V

    2016-04-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the use of social network analysis in biobehavioral research. Despite the well-established importance of social relationships in influencing human behavior and health, little is known about how children's perception of their immediate social relationships correlates with biological parameters of stress. In this study we explore the association between two measures of children's personal social networks, perceived network size and perceived network density, with two biomarkers of stress, cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase. Forty children (mean age = 8.30, min age = 5, and max age = 12) were interviewed to collect information about their friendships and three samples of saliva were collected. Our results show that children characterized by a lower pre-interview cortisol concentration and a lower salivary alpha-amylase reactivity to the interview reported the highest density of friendships. We discuss this result in light of the multisystem approach to the study of children's behavioral outcomes, emphasizing that future work of this kind is needed in order to understand the cognitive and biological mechanisms underlying children's and adolescents' social perceptual biases. PMID:25919481

  15. Production and characterization of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger JGI 24 isolated in Bangalore.

    PubMed

    Varalakshmi, K N; Kumudini, B S; Nandini, B N; Solomon, J; Suhas, R; Mahesh, B; Kavitha, A P

    2009-01-01

    Five fungal isolates were screened for the production of alpha-amylase using both solid-state and submerged fermentations. The best amylase producer among them, Aspergillus niger JGI 24, was selected for enzyme production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) on wheat bran. Different carbon and nitrogen supplements were used to enhance enzyme production and maximum amount of enzyme was obtained when SSF was carried out with soluble starch and beef extract (1% each) as supplements. Further attempts to enhance enzyme production by UV induced mutagenesis were carried out. Survival rate decreased with increase in duration of UV exposure. Partial purification of the enzyme using ammonium sulphate fractionation resulted in 1.49 fold increase in the enzyme activity. The enzyme showed a molecular weight of 43 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Metal ions Ca2+ and Co2+ increased the enzyme activity. The enzyme was optimally active at 30 degrees C and pH 9.5. PMID:19469283

  16. A new strategy to express the extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Peili; Tian, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chang, Meihui; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular α-amylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PFA) shows great starch-processing potential for industrial application due to its thermostability, long half-life and optimal activity at low pH; however, it is difficult to produce in large quantities. In contrast, α-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAA) can be produced in larger quantities, but shows lower stability at high temperatures and low pH. Here, we describe a BAA protein expression pattern-mimicking strategy to express PFA in B. amyloliquefaciens using the expression and secretion elements of BAA, including the codon usage bias and mRNA structure of gene, promoter, signal peptide, host and cultivation conditions. This design was assessed to be successful by comparing the various genes (mpfa and opfa), promoters (PamyA and P43), and strains (F30, F31, F32 and F30-∆amyA). The final production of PFA yielded 2714 U/mL, about 3000- and 14-fold that reportedly produced in B. subtilis or E. coli, respectively. The recombinant PFA was optimally active at ~100 °C and pH 5 and did not require Ca2+ for activity or thermostability, and >80% of the enzyme activity was retained after treatment at 100 °C for 4 h. PMID:26916714

  17. Effects of alpha-amylase reaction mechanisms on analysis of resistant-starch contents.

    PubMed

    Moore, Samuel A; Ai, Yongfeng; Chang, Fengdan; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-01-22

    This study aimed to understand differences in the resistant starch (RS) contents of native and modified starches obtained using two standard methods of RS content analysis: AOAC Method 991.43 and 2002.02. The largest differences were observed in native potato starch, cross-linked wheat distarch phosphate, and high-amylose corn starch stearic-acid complex (RS5) between using AOAC Method 991.43 with Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BL) and AOAC Method 2002.02 with porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA). To determine possible reasons for these differences, we hydrolyzed raw-starch granules with BL and PPA with equal activity at pH 6.9 and 37°C for up to 84 h and observed the starch granules displayed distinct morphological differences after the hydrolysis. Starches hydrolyzed by BL showed erosion on the surface of the granules; those hydrolyzed by PPA showed pitting on granule surfaces. These results suggested that enzyme reaction mechanisms, including the sizes of the binding sites and the reaction patterns of the two enzymes, contributed to the differences in the RS contents obtained using different methods of RS analysis. PMID:25439920

  18. Starch Biocatalyst Based on α-Amylase-Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Felipe; Pereira, Marita G; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M; Valim, João B

    2015-08-26

    The design of new biocatalysts through the immobilization of enzymes, improving their stability and reuse, plays a major role in the development of sustainable methodologies toward the so-called green chemistry. In this work, α-amylase (AAM) biocatalyst based on Mg3Al-layered double-hydroxide (LDH) matrix was successfully developed with the adsorption method. The adsorption process was studied and optimized as a function of time and enzyme concentration. The biocatalyst was characterized, and the mechanism of interaction between AAM and LDH, as well as the immobilization effects on the catalytic activity, was elucidated. The adsorption process was fast and irreversible, thus yielding a stable biohybrid material. The immobilized AAM partially retained its enzymatic activity, and the biocatalyst rapidly hydrolyzed starch in an aqueous solution with enhanced efficiency at intermediate loading values of ca. 50 mg/g of AAM/LDH. Multiple attachments through electrostatic interactions affected the conformation of the immobilized enzyme on the LDH surface. The biocatalyst was successfully stored in its dry form, retaining 100% of its catalytic activity. The results reveal the potential usefulness of a LDH compound as a support of α-amylase for the hydrolysis of starch that may be applied in industrial and pharmaceutical processes as a simple, environmentally friendly, and low-cost biocatalyst. PMID:26259168

  19. Optimised amylases extraction from oat seeds and its impact on bread properties.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Nihed; Borchani, Maha; Fendri, Imen; Khemakhem, Bassem; Gosset, David; Baril, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Ayadi, Mohamed-Ali; Abdelkafi, Slim

    2015-01-01

    Statistical approaches were employed for the optimisation of the extraction of amylolytic activity from oat (Avena sativa) seeds. The application of the response surface methodology allows us to determine a set of optimal conditions (ratio seed weight/buffer volume 0.1, germination days 10 days, temperature 20 °C and pH 5.6). Experiments carried out under these conditions led to amylase production yield of 91 U/g. Its maximal activity was in the pH 5.6 and at 55 °C. Study of the incorporation of the optimised oat extract into the bread formulation revealed an improvement of the sensory quality and the textural properties of fresh and stored bread. Three-dimensional elaborations of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) images were performed on crumb of the different breads to evaluate the influence of amylase activity on microstructure. The result showed improved baking characteristics as well as overall microscopic and macroscopic appearance. PMID:25453287

  20. The α-Glucosidase and α-Amylase Enzyme Inhibitory of Hydroxytyrosol and Oleuropein.

    PubMed

    Hadrich, Fatma; Bouallagui, Zouhaier; Junkyu, Han; Isoda, Hiroko; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous studies have reported on the antidiabetic properties of various plant extracts through inhibition of carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzymes. The objective of this research was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the hydroxytyrosol and the oleuropein against α-amylase and α-glucosidase. The hydroxytyrosol was purified from olive leaves. The result shows that the hydroxytyrosol had the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 150 μM with mild inhibition against α-amylase. The enzyme kinetic studies, using Lineweaver-Burk indicated that, in the presence of the hydroxytyrosol, the Michaelis-Menton constant (Km) remained constant but the maximal velocity (Vmax) decreased, revealing a non-competitive type of inhibition with inhibition constants; Ki for the formation of the inhibitor-enzyme complex and Kis for the formation of the inhibitor-enzyme-substrate complex of 104.3 and 150.1 μM, respectively. On the other hand, oleuropein showedan uncompetitive inhibition. The concentrations used in this work were below cytotoxic levels observed at 400 μM. However, at 600 μM, the hydroxytyrosol significantly decreased viability of the Caco-2 cells (p < 0.05) and in the case of the oleuropein, there's an increase in cell number compared to control (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are two potential effective α-glucosidase inhibitors for management of postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26235001

  1. A putative precursor protein in the evolution of the bean alpha-amylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Finardi-Filho, F; Mirkov, T E; Chrispeels, M J

    1996-09-01

    Seeds of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris and the tepary bean (P. acutifolius) contain a family of plant defence proteins that includes phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), arcelin and alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI). These homologous proteins differ by the absence of short loops at the surface of the protein and by the presence of a proteolytic processing site (Asn77) that allows alpha AI to be post-translationally cleaved and activated. We now report the derived amino acid sequence of two amylase inhibitor-like (AIL) proteins that are not proteolytically processed, although they have the typical processing site. One protein is from the common bean, and the other from the tepary bean. On a dendrogram, these proteins are grouped with alpha AIs rather than with the arcelins or lectins. alpha AI differs from AIL primarily by the deletion of a 15-amino-acid segment from the middle of the AIL sequence. When alpha AI is expressed in tobacco, it is proteolytically processed to form an active molecule. However, AIL sequences are not processed. We suggest that the AIL proteins may be an intermediate in the evolution of an active alpha AI. PMID:8987505

  2. Low copy number of the salivary amylase gene predisposes to obesity.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Mario; El-Sayed Moustafa, Julia Sarah; Takousis, Petros; Pesce, Francesco; Bonnefond, Amélie; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C; Sudmant, Peter H; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Al-Shafai, Mashael Nedham; Bottolo, Leonardo; Ozdemir, Erdal; So, Hon-Cheong; Davies, Robert W; Patrice, Alexandre; Dent, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Hysi, Pirro G; Dechaume, Aurélie; Huyvaert, Marlène; Skinner, Jane; Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Field, Sarah; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Weill, Jacques; Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Jacobson, Peter; Sjostrom, Lars; Hammond, Christopher J; Deloukas, Panos; Sham, Pak Chung; McPherson, Ruth; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong; Sladek, Robert; Carlsson, Lena M S; Walley, Andrew; Eichler, Evan E; Pattou, Francois; Spector, Timothy D; Froguel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Common multi-allelic copy number variants (CNVs) appear enriched for phenotypic associations compared to their biallelic counterparts. Here we investigated the influence of gene dosage effects on adiposity through a CNV association study of gene expression levels in adipose tissue. We identified significant association of a multi-allelic CNV encompassing the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) with body mass index (BMI) and obesity, and we replicated this finding in 6,200 subjects. Increased AMY1 copy number was positively associated with both amylase gene expression (P = 2.31 × 10(-14)) and serum enzyme levels (P < 2.20 × 10(-16)), whereas reduced AMY1 copy number was associated with increased BMI (change in BMI per estimated copy = -0.15 (0.02) kg/m(2); P = 6.93 × 10(-10)) and obesity risk (odds ratio (OR) per estimated copy = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.26; P = 1.46 × 10(-10)). The OR value of 1.19 per copy of AMY1 translates into about an eightfold difference in risk of obesity between subjects in the top (copy number > 9) and bottom (copy number < 4) 10% of the copy number distribution. Our study provides a first genetic link between carbohydrate metabolism and BMI and demonstrates the power of integrated genomic approaches beyond genome-wide association studies. PMID:24686848

  3. Kinetics and energetics of the binding between barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor and barley alpha-amylase 2 analyzed by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C; Berland, Carolyn R; Sigurskjold, Bent W; Svensson, Birte

    2003-02-18

    The kinetics and energetics of the binding between barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) or BASI mutants and barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2) were determined using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Binding kinetics were in accordance with a 1:1 binding model. At pH 5.5, [Ca(2+)] = 5 mM, and 25 degrees C, the k(on) and k(off) values were 8.3 x 10(+4) M(-1) s(-1) and 26.0 x 10(-4) s(-1), respectively, corresponding to a K(D) of 31 nM. K(D) was dependent on pH, and while k(off) decreased 16-fold upon increasing pH from 5.5 to 8.0, k(on) was barely affected. The crystal structure of AMY2-BASI shows a fully hydrated Ca(2+) at the protein interface, and at pH 6.5 increase of [Ca(2+)] in the 2 microM to 5 mM range raised the affinity 30-fold mainly due to reduced k(off). The K(D) was weakly temperature-dependent in the interval from 5 to 35 degrees C as k(on) and k(off) were only increasing 4- and 12-fold, respectively. A small salt dependence of k(on) and k(off) suggested a minor role for global electrostatic forces in the binding and dissociation steps. Substitution of a positively charged side chain in the mutant K140L within the AMY2 inhibitory site of BASI accordingly did not change k(on), whereas k(off) increased 13-fold. ITC showed that the formation of the AMY2-BASI complex is characterized by a large exothermic heat (Delta H = -69 +/- 7 kJ mol(-1)), a K(D) of 25 nM (27 degrees C, pH 5.5), and an unfavorable change in entropy (-T Delta S = 26 +/- 7 kJ mol(-1)). Calculations based on the thermodynamic data indicated minimal structural changes during complex formation. PMID:12578360

  4. Cloning, expression, and purification of insect (Sitophilus oryzae) alpha-amylase, able to digest granular starch, in Yarrowia lipolytica host.

    PubMed

    Celińska, Ewelina; Białas, Wojciech; Borkowska, Monika; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2015-03-01

    Raw-starch-digesting enzymes (RSDE) are of major importance for industrial applications, as their usage greatly simplifies the starch processing pipeline. To date, only microbial RSDE have gained considerable attention, since only microbial production of enzymes meets industrial demands. In this study, α-amylase from rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae), the major rice pest, was cloned and expressed in Yarrowia lipolytica Po1g strain. The enzyme was secreted into the culture medium, and the peak activity (81 AU/L) was reached after only 29 h of culturing in 5-L bioreactors. Through simple purification procedure of ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography, it was possible to purify the enzyme to apparent homogeneity (25-fold purification factor, at 5 % yield). The optimal conditions for the α-amylase activity were pH 5.0 and a temperature of 40 °C. The α-amylase studied here did not show any obligate requirement for Ca(2+) ions. The recombinant α-amylase appeared to efficiently digest granular starch from pea, amaranth, waxy corn, and waxy rice. PMID:25547839

  5. Maltose effects on barley malt diastatic power enzyme activity and thermostability at high isothermal mashing temperature: II. Alpha-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maltose, the primary product of starch degradation during mashing, has the potential as a compatible solute to affect the activity of and increase the thermostability of barley malt alpha-amylase activity at high temperatures used in mashing and temperatures above those normally used in mashing. To ...

  6. Re-examining the applications of amylase in the sugar industry: Conquering the control of insoluble and soluble starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The new knowledge that there is markedly more insoluble starch than previously considered in products across both the sugarcane factory and refinery has processing implications. Processing parameters such as viscosity and filtration are implicated, as well as the application of '-amylases in the fa...

  7. Simultaneous and enhanced production of thermostable amylases and ethanol from starch by cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, H.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of ..beta..-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60/sup 0/C and produced 9 U of ..beta..-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and > 120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed.

  8. Differential expression of two ß-amylase genes (Bmy1 and Bmy2) in developing and mature barley grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) endosperm-specific (Bmy1) and ubiquitous (Bmy2) ß-amylase were studied during the late maturation phase of seed development in four genotypes. Sequencing of Bmy2 from genomic DNA revealed six polymorphisms in the introns and two synonymous SNPs in the coding region. Acc...

  9. Heterotrimeric G proteins are implicated in gibberellin induction of a-amylase gene expression in wild oat aleurone

    PubMed

    Jones; Smith; Desikan; Plakidou-Dymock; Lovegrove; Hooley

    1998-02-01

    The role of heterotrimeric G proteins in gibberellin (GA) induction of a-amylase gene expression was examined in wild oat aleurone protoplasts. Mas7, a cationic amphiphilic tetradecapeptide that stimulates GDP/GTP exchange by heterotrimeric G proteins, specifically induced alpha-amylase gene expression and enzyme secretion in a very similar manner to GA1. In addition, Mas7 stimulated expression of an alpha-Amy2/54:GUS promoter and reporter construct in transformed protoplasts. Both Mas7 and GA1 induction of alpha-amylase mRNA were insensitive to pertussis toxin. Hydrolysis-resistant nucleotides were introduced into aleurone protoplasts during transfection with reporter gene constructs. GDP-beta-S, which inhibits GDP/GTP exchange by heterotrimeric G proteins, completely prevented GA1 induction of alpha-Amy2/54:GUS expression, whereas GTP-gamma-S, which activates heterotrimeric G proteins, stimulated expression very slightly. Novel cDNA sequences from Galpha and Gbeta subunits were cloned from wild oat aleurone cells. By using RNA gel blot analysis, we found that the transcripts were expressed at a low level. Heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated in several events during plant growth and development, and these data suggest that they may be involved in GA regulation of alpha-amylase gene expression in aleurone. PMID:9490747

  10. Maltose effects on barley malt diastatic power enzyme activity and thermostability at high isothermal mashing temperature: I. ß-amylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis that maltose would increase the thermostability of barley malt beta-amylase activity during isothermal mashing was tested at 68, 73 and 78°C and compared to isothermal mashing at 63°C. Finely ground malts of the two-row cultivar Harrington and the six-row cultivar Morex were incubated...

  11. A single residue mutation abolishes attachment of the CBM26 starch-binding domain from Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Oviedo, N; Escalante, L; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S

    2009-03-01

    Starch is degraded by amylases that frequently have a modular structure composed of a catalytic domain and at least one non-catalytic domain that is involved in polysaccharide binding. The C-terminal domain from the Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase has an unusual architecture composed of five tandem starch-binding domains (SBDs). These domains belong to family 26 in the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) classification. It has been reported that members of this family have only one site for starch binding, where aromatic amino acids perform the binding function. In SBDs, fold similarities are better conserved than sequences; nevertheless, it is possible to identify in CBM26 members at least two aromatic residues highly conserved. We attempt to explain polysaccharide recognition for the L. amylovorus alpha-amylase SBD through site-directed mutagenesis of aromatic amino acids. Three amino acids were identified as essential for binding, two tyrosines and one tryptophan. Y18L and Y20L mutations were found to decrease the SBD binding capacity, but unexpectedly, the mutation at W32L led to a total loss of affinity, either with linear or ramified substrates. The critical role of Trp 32 in substrate binding confirms the presence of just one binding site in each alpha-amylase SBD. PMID:19052787

  12. Identification of essential amino acid residues of an alpha-amylase inhibitor from Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hiramoto, S; Wato, S; Nishimoto, T; Wada, Y; Nagai, K; Yamaguchi, H

    1999-11-01

    Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors, which are bivalent inhibitors with the subunit stoichiometry of (alphabeta)(2) complex, have been inferred to contain unique arginine, tryptophan, and tyrosine residues essential for the inhibitory activity. To test the validity of this inference, an attempt was made to identify the essential amino acid residues of a white kidney bean (P. vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor (PHA-I) by using the chemical modification technique combined with amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Exhaustive modification of the arginine residues by phenylglyoxal did not lead to a marked loss of activity, suggesting that no arginine residue is directly associated with the inhibitory activity. N-Bromosuccinimide treatment of PHA-I in the presence or absence of a substrate alpha-amylase revealed the involvement of two tryptophan residues in alpha-amylase inhibition, and they were identified as Trp188 of the beta-subunit by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry of lysylendopeptidase peptides. Further, two tyrosine residues were preferentially modified either by N-acetylimidazole or by tetranitromethane, resulting in a concomitant loss of most of the PHA-I activity. Amino acid sequencing of the lysylendopeptidase peptides from a tetranitromethane-modified PHA-I identified Tyr186 of the beta-subunit as an essential residue. PMID:10544275

  13. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of α -Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Yang-Yuan; Liu, Dan-Ni; Liu, Jing-Shan; Li, Peng; Chen, Li-Zhi; Xu, Shu-De

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis), the α-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168 h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000 U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for α-amylase production in industrial use. PMID:26171389

  14. Permissive role of the acidification caused by wheat aleurone layers upon. alpha. -amylase induction by GA sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Campos, E.; Bernal-Lugo, I.; Hamabata, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Wheat aleurone has the capacity of acidifying the incubation medium in 1 to 2 pH units. The {alpha}-amylase induction by GA{sub 3} in isolated wheat aleurone layers is strongly dependent on acidic pH of the medium (pH < 5). To examine possible mechanisms {sup 35}-Met incorporation into proteins and {alpha}-amylase, in the presence of GA{sub 3} and Ca{sup 2+} at pH, 4, 5 and 6 was studied. Although {sup 35}-Met uptake decreased markedly ({approx} 90%) at pH 4 in thepresence of GA{sub 3}, incorporation into total protein did not change significantly from other conditions. Auto-radiography of SDS-PAGE showed that most of the amino acid was in the {alpha}-amylase band, meaning that the effect of acidic pH is specific for GA{sub 3} actions on aleurone tissue. On the other hand, an increase of protonated GA{sub 3} diffusion could be ruled out. Also, there was not {alpha}-amylase inactivation at pH 6. These findings point out to the important physiological role of the acidification caused by the aleurone.

  15. Determination of antioxidant capacity and a-amylase inhibitory activity of the essential oils from citronella grass and lemongrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antioxidant capacity of and in vitro a-amylase inhibitory activity of the essential oils extracted from citronella grass and lemongrass. The chemical composition of the extracted essential oils was determined by GC-MS. The antioxidant capacity ...

  16. Metallic/bimetallic magnetic nanoparticle functionalization for immobilization of α-amylase for enhanced reusability in bio-catalytic processes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Rakshit, Kanak; Rathee, Shweta; Angmo, Stanzin; Kaushal, Shimayali; Garg, Pankaj; Chung, Jong Hoon; Sandhir, Rajat; Sangwan, Rajender S; Singhal, Nitin

    2016-08-01

    Novel magnetic nanoparticles coated with silica and gold were synthesized for immobilization of α-amylase enzyme and characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Effect of various limiting factors such as substrate concentration, temperature, and pH on the catalytic activity of enzyme was investigated. The optimum pH for free and immobilized enzyme was found unaffected (7.0), whereas optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was increased from 60°C for free enzyme to 80°C for immobilized counterpart. The gains in catalytic attributes concomitant to ease of recovery of the enzyme reflect the potential of the approach and the product to be useful for the enzymatic bioprocessing. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value of the immobilized α-amylase was higher than that of free α-amylase, whereas maximum velocity (Vmax), and turn over number (Kcat), values were almost similar. Immobilized α-amylase maintained 60% of the enzyme activity even after recycling ten times. PMID:27176673

  17. α-Amylase inhibitory activity from nut seed skin polyphenols. 1. Purification and characterization of almond seed skin polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Takahiro; Shintani, Tomoyoshi; Sato, Hiroaki

    2013-05-15

    Using α-amylase inhibition as a separation guide, polyphenolic compounds from almond ( Prunus dulcis ) seed skin were purified using ultrafiltration and Sephadex LH-20 and ODS columns. The purified fraction specifically and strongly inhibited α-amylase; the IC50 value was 2.2 μg/mL for pig pancreatic α-amylase. The fraction contained about 62% of the total polyphenols, 33.8% flavanol-type tannins and 30% procyanidins. Oral administration of the polyphenol fraction to rats fed corn starch significantly suppressed an increase in blood glucose levels and area under the curve (AUC), in a dose-dependent manner. High-resolution MALDI-TOF mass spectra showed that the structure of this sample is a series of polyflavan-3-ol polymers composed of catechin/epicatechin units and gallocatechin/epigallocatechin units up to 11-mer with several interflavanoid ether linkages. The results suggest almond seed skin contains highly polymerized polyphenols with strong α-amylase inhibitory activity, which retard absorption of carbohydrate. PMID:23614772

  18. Daytime Secretion of Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-Amylase in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sharon A.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Granger, Douglas A.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Anders, Thomas F.; Tager, Ira B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined daytime salivary cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) secretion levels and variability in preschool-aged children with autism (AUT) and typically developing children (TYP). Fifty-two subjects (26 AUT and 26 TYP) were enrolled. Salivary samples were obtained at waking, midday, and bedtime on two consecutive days at three phases…

  19. Modes of Inhibition of α-Amylase and α-Glucosidase by Aqueous Extract of Morinda lucida Benth Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Kazeem, M. I.; Adamson, J. O.; Ogunwande, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder of glucose metabolism. The management of blood glucose level is the hallmark in the treatment of this disease. This may be achieved through the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs such as biguanides, insulin secretagogues, and α-glucosidase inhibitors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Morinda lucida leaf extracts on the activities of α-amylase and α-glucosidase. This was performed using α-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae and α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Aqueous extract of Morinda lucida gave the highest percentage yield (9.99%) of the plant out of the three extracts (compared to acetone and ethanolic extracts) and possesses the highest inhibitory activity against α-amylase (IC50 value of 2.30 mg/mL) and α-glucosidase (IC50 value of 2.00 mg/mL). Kinetic analysis revealed that the aqueous extract of this plant leaf inhibited the α-amylase competitively but displayed mixed noncompetitive mode of inhibition towards α-glucosidase. It can be concluded that aqueous extract of Morinda lucida exhibited the best inhibitory activity on the two enzymes studied and the presence of phytochemicals like flavonoids, saponins, and tannins may have contributed greatly to the inhibitory activity of the plant extract. PMID:24455701

  20. Amylase enzyme from Bacillus subtilis S8-18: a potential desizing agent from the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, Balu Jancy; Sindhulakshmi, Muthukrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-01-01

    The present study is aimed at developing an economical medium for the production of α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis S8-18, a marine sediment isolate from Palk Bay, with various agricultural by-products that are cheap and rich in starch. These products include wheat bran, wheat husk, rice bran, rice husk, and potato peel and are used to replace soluble starch present in the Luria Bertani (LB) broth (synthetic medium). The rice husk was found to be the best to influence enzyme production significantly (61,186 IU mL⁻¹) when compared with the yield of 30,026 IU mL⁻¹ obtained by commercial starch. Hence, LB broth containing rice husk was considered an economical medium. In addition, the effect of various nutritional and physiological factors on enzyme production was also investigated. Furthermore, the desizing efficiency of α-amylases produced by synthetic and economical media was evaluated through various assays like reducing sugar estimation, weight loss assay, drop absorbency assay, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared analyses. In addition, a commercial α-amylase from B. subtilis was also used in desizing analyses for comparative purposes. It revealed that the α-amylase from the economical medium was as effective in desizing the cotton fabrics as that of the commercial enzyme and much superior to the enzyme produced through the synthetic medium. PMID:23659677

  1. The spectrum of low molecular weight alpha-amylase/protease inhibitor genes expressed in the US bread wheat Butte 86

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement of genes encoding alpha-amylase/protease inhibitors expressed in Triticum aestivum cv. Butte 86 was characterized by transcript and proteomic analysis. Coding sequences for 18 distinct proteins were identified among a collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Butte 86 developi...

  2. Production and biochemical characterization of a high maltotetraose (G4) producing amylase from Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Hana; Ben Ayed, Hanen; Ghorbel-Bellaaj, Olfa; Nasri, Moncef; Hmidet, Noomen

    2014-01-01

    Amylase production and biochemical characterization of the crude enzyme preparation from Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22 were evaluated. The highest α-amylase production was achieved after 24 hours of incubation in a culture medium containing 10 g/L potato starch and 5 g/L yeast extract, with initial pH 8.0 at 30°C under continuous agitation at 200 rpm. The optimum temperature and pH for the crude α -amylase activity were 60°C and 8.0, respectively. The effect of different salts was evaluated and it was found that both α -amylase production and activity were Ca(2+)-dependent. The amylolytic preparation was found to catalyze exceptionally the formation of very high levels of maltotetraose from starch (98%, w/w) in the complete absence of glucose since the initial stages of starch hydrolysis (15 min) and hence would have a potential application in the manufacturing of maltotetraose syrups. PMID:24963472

  3. X-ray Crystallographic Analyses of Pig Pancreatic α-Amylase with Limit Dextrin, Oligosaccharide and α-Cyclodextrin†‡

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Steven B.; Day, John S.; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Further refinement of the model using maximum likelihood procedures and re-evaluation of the native electron density map has shown that crystals of pig pancreatic α-amylase, whose structure we reported more than fifteen years ago, in fact contain a substantial amount of carbohydrate. The carbohydrate fragments are the products of glycogen digestion carried out as an essential step of the protein's purification procedure. In particular, the substrate-binding cleft contains a limit dextrin of six glucose residues, one of which contains both α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) linkages to contiguous residues. The disaccharide in the original model, shared between two amylase molecules in the crystal lattice, but also occupying a portion of the substrate binding cleft, is now seen to be a tetrasaccharide. There are, in addition, several other probable monosaccharide binding sites. To these results we have further reviewed our X-ray diffraction analysis of α-amylase complexed with α-cyclodextrin. α-Amylase binds three cyclodextrin molecules. Glucose residues of two of the rings superimpose upon the limit dextrin and the tetrasaccharide. The limit dextrin superimposes in large part upon linear oligosaccharide inhibitors visualized by other investigators. By comprehensive integration of these complexes we have constructed a model for the binding of polysaccharides having the helical character known to be present in natural substrates such as starch and glycogen. PMID:20222716

  4. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Amy1: An Alpha-Amylase from Cryptococcus flavus Expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Alexsandro Sobreira; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Lottermann, Muriele Taborda; Álvares, Alice Cunha Morales; de Moraes, Lídia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; de Freitas, Sonia Maria; Ulhoa, Cirano José

    2011-01-01

    An extracellular alpha-amylase (Amy1) whose gene from Cryptococcus flavus was previously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to homogeneity (67 kDa) by ion-exchange and molecular exclusion chromatography. The enzyme was activated by NH4+ and inhibited by Cu+2 and Hg+2. Significant biochemical and structural discrepancies between wild-type and recombinant α-amylase with respect to Km values, enzyme specificity, and secondary structure content were found. Far-UV CD spectra analysis at pH 7.0 revealed the high thermal stability of both proteins and the difference in folding pattern of Amy1 compared with wild-type amylase from C. flavus, which reflected in decrease (10-fold) of enzymatic activity of recombinant protein. Despite the differences, the highest activity of Amy1 towards soluble starch, amylopectin, and amylase, in contrast with the lowest activity of Amy1w, points to this protein as being of paramount biotechnological importance with many applications ranging from food industry to the production of biofuels. PMID:21490699

  5. Protective mechanism of the Mexican bean weevil against high levels of alpha-amylase inhibitor in the common bean.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, M; Chrispeels, M J

    1996-01-01

    Alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI) protects seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) against predation by certain species of bruchids such as the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) and the azuki bean weevil (Callosobruchus chinensis), but not against predation by the bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus) or the Mexican bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus), insects that are common in the Americas. We characterized the interaction of alpha AI-1 present in seeds of the common bean, of a different isoform, alpha AI-2, present in seeds of wild common bean accessions, and of two homologs, alpha AI-Pa present in seeds of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) and alpha AI-Pc in seeds of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus), with the midgut extracts of several bruchids. The extract of the Z. subfasciatus larvae rapidly digests and inactivates alpha AI-1 and alpha AI-Pc, but not alpha AI-2 or alpha AI-Pa. The digestion is caused by a serine protease. A single proteolytic cleavage in the beta subunit of alpha AI-1 occurs at the active site of the protein. When degradation is prevented, alpha AI-1 and alpha AI-Pc do not inhibit the alpha-amylase of Z. subfasciatus, although they are effective against the alpha-amylase of C. chinensis. Alpha AI-2 and alpha AI-Pa, on the other hand, do inhibit the alpha-amylase of Z. subfasciatus, suggesting that they are good candidates for genetic engineering to achieve resistance to Z. subfasciatus. PMID:8787024

  6. Simultaneous and Enhanced Production of Thermostable Amylases and Ethanol from Starch by Cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, H. H.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of β-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60°C and produced 9 U of β-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and >120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed. PMID:16346791

  7. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of α-Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Yang-Yuan; Liu, Dan-Ni; Liu, Jing-Shan; Li, Peng; Chen, Li-Zhi; Xu, Shu-De

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis), the α-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168 h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000 U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for α-amylase production in industrial use. PMID:26171389

  8. Production and Characteristics of Raw-Starch-Digesting α-Amylase from a Protease-Negative Aspergillus ficum Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Shinsaku; Teramoto, Yuji

    1986-01-01

    Mutational experiments were carried out to decrease the protease productivity of Aspergillus ficum IFO 4320 by using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. A protease-negative mutant, M-33, exhibited higher α-amylaseactivity than the parent strain under submerged culture at 30°C for 24 h. About 70% of the total α-amylase activity in the M-33 culture filtrate was adsorbed onto starch granules. The electrophoretically homogeneous preparation of raw-starch-adsorbable α-amylase (molecular weight, 88,000), acid stable at pH 2, showed intensive raw-starch-digesting activity, dissolving corn starch granules completely. The preparation also exhibited a high synergistic effect with glucoamylase I. A mutant, M-72, with higher protease activity produced a raw cornstarch-unadsorbable α-amylase. The purified enzyme (molecular weight, 54,000), acid unstable, showed no digesting activity on raw corn starch and a lower synergistic effect with glucoamylase I in the hydrolysis of raw corn starch. The fungal α-amylase was therefore divided into two types, a novel type of raw-starch-digesting enzyme and a conventional type of raw-starch-nondigesting enzyme. Images PMID:16347204

  9. Production and Biochemical Characterization of a High Maltotetraose (G4) Producing Amylase from Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22

    PubMed Central

    Maalej, Hana; Ben Ayed, Hanen; Ghorbel-Bellaaj, Olfa; Nasri, Moncef; Hmidet, Noomen

    2014-01-01

    Amylase production and biochemical characterization of the crude enzyme preparation from Pseudomonas stutzeri AS22 were evaluated. The highest α-amylase production was achieved after 24 hours of incubation in a culture medium containing 10 g/L potato starch and 5 g/L yeast extract, with initial pH 8.0 at 30°C under continuous agitation at 200 rpm. The optimum temperature and pH for the crude α-amylase activity were 60°C and 8.0, respectively. The effect of different salts was evaluated and it was found that both α-amylase production and activity were Ca2+-dependent. The amylolytic preparation was found to catalyze exceptionally the formation of very high levels of maltotetraose from starch (98%, w/w) in the complete absence of glucose since the initial stages of starch hydrolysis (15 min) and hence would have a potential application in the manufacturing of maltotetraose syrups. PMID:24963472

  10. Alpha-amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Marine Green Algae and its Possible Role in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P. S.; Suthindhiran, K.; Jayasri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In the continuing search for safe and efficient antidiabetic drug, marine algae become important source which provide several compounds of immense therapeutic potential. Alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and antioxidant compounds are known to manage diabetes and have received much attention recently. In the present study, four green algae (Chaetomorpha aerea, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Chlorodesmis, and Cladophora rupestris) were chosen to evaluate alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory, and antioxidant activity in vitro. Materials and Methods: The phytochemical constituents of all the extracts were qualitatively determined. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by inhibitory potential of extracts against alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase by spectrophotometric assays. Antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide scavenging assay. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was carried out to determine the major compound responsible for its antidiabetic action. Results: Among the various extracts screened, chloroform extract of C. aerea (IC50 − 408.9 μg/ml) and methanol extract of Chlorodesmis (IC50 − 147.6 μg/ml) showed effective inhibition against alpha-amylase. The extracts were also evaluated for alpha-glucosidase inhibition, and no observed activity was found. Methanol extract of C. rupestris showed notable free radical scavenging activity (IC50 – 666.3 μg/ml), followed by H2O2 (34%) and nitric oxide (49%). Further, chemical profiling by GC-MS revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds. Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and z, z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one were predominantly found in the methanol extract of C. rupestris and chloroform extract of C. aerea. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the selected algae exhibit notable alpha-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activity. Therefore, characterization of active compounds and its in vivo

  11. Molecular evolution of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat and its ecological association

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background α-Amylase inhibitors are attractive candidates for the control of seed weevils, as these insects are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. In this study, we aimed to reveal the structure and diversity of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat from Israel and to elucidate the relationship between the emmer wheat genes and ecological factors using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Another objective of this study was to find out whether there were any correlations between SNPs in functional protein-coding genes and the environment. Results The influence of ecological factors on the genetic structure of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes was evaluated by specific SNP markers. A total of 244 dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes were obtained from 13 accessions in 10 populations. Seventy-five polymorphic positions and 74 haplotypes were defined by sequence analysis. Sixteen out of the 75 SNP markers were designed to detect SNP variations in wild emmer wheat accessions from different populations in Israel. The proportion of polymorphic loci P (5%), the expected heterozygosity He, and Shannon's information index in the 16 populations were 0.887, 0.404, and 0.589, respectively. The populations of wild emmer wheat showed great diversity in gene loci both between and within populations. Based on the SNP marker data, the genetic distance of pair-wise comparisons of the 16 populations displayed a sharp genetic differentiation over long geographic distances. The values of P, He, and Shannon's information index were negatively correlated with three climatic moisture factors, whereas the same values were positively correlated by Spearman rank correlation coefficients' analysis with some of the other ecological factors. Conclusion The populations of wild emmer wheat showed a wide range of diversity in dimeric α-amylase inhibitors, both between and within populations. We suggested that SNP markers are useful for the estimation of

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of an α-amylase cDNA highly expressed in major feeding stages of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, C A; Macedo, L L P; Amorim, T M L; Santos, V O; Fragoso, R R; Lucena, W A; Meneguim, A M; Valencia-Jimenez, A; Engler, G; Silva, M C M; Albuquerque, E V S; Grossi-de-Sa, M F

    2014-12-10

    α-Amylases are common enzymes responsible for hydrolyzing starch. Insect-pests, whose larvae develop in seeds, rely obligatorily on α-amylase activity to digest starch, as their major food source. Considering the relevance of insect α-amylases and the natural α-amylase inhibitors present in seeds to protect from insect damage, we report here the molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of the full-length AmyHha cDNA of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, a major insect-pest of coffee crops. The AmyHha sequence has 1879 bp, containing a 1458 bp open reading frame, which encodes a predicted protein with 485 amino acid residues, with a predicted molecular mass of 51.2 kDa. The deduced protein showed 55-79% identity to other insect α-amylases, including Anthonomus grandis, Ips typographus and Sitophilus oryzae α-amylases. In depth analysis revealed that the highly conserved three amino acid residues (Asp184, Glu220, and Asp285), which compose the catalytic site are also presented in AmyHha amylase. The AmyHha gene seems to be a single copy in the haploid genome and AmyHha transcription levels were found higher in L2 larvae and adult insects, both corresponding to major feeding phases. Modeling of the AmyHha predicted protein uncovered striking structural similarities to the Tenebrio molitor α-amylase also displaying the same amino acid residues involved in enzyme catalysis (Asp184, Glu220 and Asp285). Since AmyHha gene was mostly transcribed in the intestinal tract of H. hampei larvae, the cognate α-amylase could be considered a high valuable target to coffee bean insect control by biotechnological strategies. PMID:25264343

  13. The 53-kDa proteolytic product of precursor starch-hydrolyzing enzyme of Aspergillus niger has Taka-amylase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Ravi-Kumar, K; Venkatesh, K S; Umesh-Kumar, S

    2007-04-01

    The 53-kDa amylase secreted by Aspergillus niger due to proteolytic processing of the precursor starch-hydrolyzing enzyme was resistant to acarbose, a potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The enzyme production was induced when A. niger was grown in starch medium containing the inhibitor. Antibodies against the precursor enzyme cross-reacted with the 54-kDa Taka-amylase protein of A. oryzae. It resembled Taka-amylase in most of its properties and also hydrolyzed starch to maltose of alpha-anomeric configuration. However, it did not degrade maltotriose formed during the reaction and was not inhibited by zinc ions. PMID:17123073

  14. Bacillus licheniformis BT5.9 Isolated from Changar Hot Spring, Malang, Indonesia, as a Potential Producer of Thermostable α-amylase

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Darah; Zhu, Han Li; Yusof, Nuraqilah; Isnaeni; Hong, Lim Sheh

    2013-01-01

    A total of 34 bacterial isolates were obtained from soil samples collected from Changar Hot Spring, Malang, Indonesia. Of these, 13 isolates produced a zone of hydrolysis in starch-nutrient agar medium and generated various amylases in liquid medium. One isolate was selected as the best amylase producer and was identified as Bacillus licheniformis BT5.9. The improvement of culture conditions (initial medium pH of 5.0, cultivation temperature of 50°C, agitation speed of 100 rpm and inoculum size of 1.7 × 109 cells/ml) provided the highest amylase production (0.327 U/ml). PMID:24575243

  15. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  16. Putative implication of alpha-amylase loop 7 in the mechanism of substrate binding and reaction products release.

    PubMed

    André, G; Tran, V

    2004-10-01

    Alpha-amylases are widespread endo-enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of internal alpha-(1,4) glycosidic linkages of starch polymers. Molecular modeling of amylose-amylase interactions is a step toward enzymatic mechanism understanding and rational design of new enzymes. From the crystallographic complex of barley alpha-amylase AMY2-acarbose, the static aspects of amylose-amylase docking have been characterized with a model of maltododecaose (DP12) (G. André, A. Buléon, R. Haser, and V. Tran, Biopolymers 1999, Vol. 50, pp. 751-762; G. André and V. Tran, Special Publication no. 246 1999, The Royal Society of Chemistry, H. J. Gilbert, G. J. Davies, B. Henrissat, and B. Svensson, Eds., Cambridge, pp. 165-174). These studies, consistent with the experimental subsite mapping (K. Bak-Jensen, G. André, V. Tran, and B. Svensson, Journal of Biological Chemistry, to be published), propose a propagation scheme for an amylose chain in the active cleft of AMY2. The topographical overview of alpha-amylases identified loop 7 as a conserved segment flanking the active site. Since some crystallographic experiments suspected its high flexibility, its putative motion was explored through a robotic scheme, an alternate route to dynamics simulations that consume CPU time. The present article describes the characteristics of the flexibility of loop 7: location and motion in AMY2. A back-and-forth motion with a large amplitude of more than 0.6 nm was evaluated. This movement could be triggered by two hinge residues. It results in the loop flipping over the active site to enhance the docking of the native helical substrate through specific interactions, it positions the catalytic residues, it distorts the substrate towards its transition state geometry, and finally monitors the release of the products after hydrolysis. The residues involved in the process are now rational mutation points in the hands of molecular biologists. PMID:15356864

  17. Gedunin and Azadiradione: Human Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Inhibiting Limonoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica) as Anti-Diabetic Agents.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Haldar, Saikat; Mulani, Fayaj; Zinjarde, Smita; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2015-01-01

    Human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower postprandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Limonoids from Azadirachta indica known for their therapeutic potential were screened for pancreatic α-amylase inhibition, a known anti-diabetic target. Studies were carried out to reveal their mode of action so as to justify their hypoglycemic potential. Of the nine limonoids isolated/semi-synthesized from A.indica and screened for α-amylase inhibition, azadiradione and exhibited potential inhibition with an IC50 value of 74.17 and 68.38 μM, respectively against HPA under in vitro conditions. Further screening on AR42J α-amylase secretory cell line for cytotoxicity and bioactivity revealed that azadiradione and gedunin exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 of 11.1 and 13.4μM. Maximal secreted α-amylase inhibition of 41.8% and 53.4% was seen at 3.5 and 3.3μM, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested a mixed mode of inhibition with maltopentaose (Ki 42.2, 18.6 μM) and starch (Ki' 75.8, 37.4 μM) as substrate with a stiochiometry of 1:1 for both azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. The molecular docking simulation indicated plausible π-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl interactions between the aromatic amino acids and inhibitors. Fluorescence and CD confirmed the involvement of tryptophan and tyrosine in ligand binding to HPA. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that binding is enthalpically and entropically driven with ΔG° of -21.25 kJ mol-1 and -21.16 kJ mol-1 for azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. Thus, the limonoids azadiradione and gedunin could bind and inactivate HPA (anti-diabetic target) and may prove to be lead drug candidates to reduce/control post-prandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26469405

  18. Gedunin and Azadiradione: Human Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Inhibiting Limonoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica) as Anti-Diabetic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zinjarde, Smita; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2015-01-01

    Human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower postprandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Limonoids from Azadirachta indica known for their therapeutic potential were screened for pancreatic α-amylase inhibition, a known anti-diabetic target. Studies were carried out to reveal their mode of action so as to justify their hypoglycemic potential. Of the nine limonoids isolated/semi-synthesized from A.indica and screened for α-amylase inhibition, azadiradione and exhibited potential inhibition with an IC50 value of 74.17 and 68.38 μM, respectively against HPA under in vitro conditions. Further screening on AR42J α-amylase secretory cell line for cytotoxicity and bioactivity revealed that azadiradione and gedunin exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 of 11.1 and 13.4μM. Maximal secreted α-amylase inhibition of 41.8% and 53.4% was seen at 3.5 and 3.3μM, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested a mixed mode of inhibition with maltopentaose (Ki 42.2, 18.6 μM) and starch (Ki′ 75.8, 37.4 μM) as substrate with a stiochiometry of 1:1 for both azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. The molecular docking simulation indicated plausible π-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl interactions between the aromatic amino acids and inhibitors. Fluorescence and CD confirmed the involvement of tryptophan and tyrosine in ligand binding to HPA. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that binding is enthalpically and entropically driven with ΔG° of -21.25 kJ mol-1 and -21.16 kJ mol-1 for azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. Thus, the limonoids azadiradione and gedunin could bind and inactivate HPA (anti-diabetic target) and may prove to be lead drug candidates to reduce/control post-prandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26469405

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Highly Efficient Calcium-Independent α-Amylase from Talaromyces pinophilus 1-95

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Liang; Wang, Fei; Luo, Xiang; Feng, Yu-Liang; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-amylase is a very important enzyme in the starch conversion process. Most of the α-amylases are calcium-dependent and exhibit poor performance in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process of industrial bioethanol production that uses starch as feedstock. In this study, an extracellular amylolytic enzyme was purified from the culture broth of newly isolated Talaromyces pinophilus strain 1-95. The purified amylolytic enzyme, with an apparent molecular weight of 58 kDa on SDS-PAGE, hydrolyzed maltopentaose, maltohexaose, and maltoheptaose into mainly maltose and maltotriose and minor amount of glucose, confirming the endo-acting mode of the enzyme, and hence, was named Talaromyces pinophilus α-amylase (TpAA). TpAA was most active at pH 4.0–5.0 (with the temperature held at 37°C) and 55°C (at pH 5.0), and stable within the pH range of 5.0–9.5 (at 4°C) and below 45°C (at pH 5.0). Interestingly, the Ca2+ did not improve its enzymatic activity, optimal temperature, or thermostability of the enzyme, indicating that the TpAA was Ca2+-independent. TpAA displayed higher enzyme activity toward malto-oligosaccharides and dextrin than other previously reported α-amylases. This highly active Ca2+-independent α-amylase may have potential applications in starch-to-ethanol conversion process. PMID:25811759

  20. Analysis of a preferential action of α-amylase from B. licheniformis towards amorphous regions of waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Foresti, María Laura; Williams, María del Pilar; Martínez-García, Ricardo; Vázquez, Analía

    2014-02-15

    Waxy maize starch was subjected to α-amylase (Bacillus licheniformis) hydrolysis in buffered medium to determine the evolution of reaction in quantitative terms and also in terms of the morphology and crystallinity of the partially hydrolyzed starch granules. Gathered data allowed studying the pattern of action of this α-amylase over waxy maize starch granules, with particular focus on a preferential hydrolysis of the amorphous regions of starch. Results showed that waxy maize starch hydrolysis followed a two-stage kinetic profile with an initial stage characterized by high reaction rate, followed by a slower second stage. The change of hydrolysis rate occurred at approximately 6h of reaction, a time for which X-ray diffraction data quantitatively analyzed by three different techniques showed a maximum of crystallinity in partially hydrolyzed granules. Scanning electron microscopy images illustrated the action of α-amylases which implied the exoerosion of the granules surface, the entry of α-amylases into the granules through radial channels, their endoerosion towards the granule exterior, and their fragmentation. Fragmentation of waxy maize starch granules revealed internal layered structures of starch which were interpreted as hydrolyzed/non-hydrolyzed growth rings. Under the conditions chosen, kinetic, electron microscopy and X-ray data all gave evidence of a preferential action of α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis towards the less ordered regions of waxy maize starch. Results showed that, provided the proper hydrolysis time is chosen, starch granules with increased crystallinity can be obtained by a pure enzymatic treatment. PMID:24507258