Sample records for anadarko basin oklahoma

  1. Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

  2. Analysis of sedimentary facies and petrofacies of lower Morrowan-upper Chesterian sandstones, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighin, C. William; Flores, Romeo M.

    1989-01-01

    Three major lithofacies have been identified within the Morrow (Pennsylvanian) and Springer (Pennsylvanian-Mississippian) units, in core from 30 drill holes ranging from the Oklahoma Panhandle to the southwestern portion of the Anadarko basin. The study included inspection of ~6,500 ft of core, examination of ~100 thin sections, and a scanning-electron-microscope study of butts of the material used for thin-section preparation. The lithofacies identified are (1) fluvial-influenced coastal, which includes the deltaic facies described by Swanson (1979), (2) tidal-influenced nearshore, and (3) mixed, which shows mixed tidal and nontidal marine influence. Our interpretation is supported by the investigations of Moore (1979), Haiduk (1987), and Swanson (1979). The fluvial-influenced coastal facies is restricted to the northwestern (Panhandle) portion of the Anadarko basin.

  3. Depositional facies, petrofacies, and diagenesis of siliciclastics of Morrow and Springer rocks, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighin, C. William; Flores, Romeo M.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of 6,500 ft of core and -100 thin-sectioned core samples from 30 drill holes from the Oklahoma Panhandle to the southeast part of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, have led to the recognition of three depositional facies of the Springer and Morrow Formations of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian age, as recognized by geologists working in the subsurface of the Midcontinent region. Lithofacies include (1) fluvial-influenced coastal (FIC), (2) tidal-influenced nearshore (TINS), and (3) mixed, which shows mixed tidal and non-tidal marine influence (MT/NTM). The FIC facies is restricted to down-hole depths of 4,400-8,000 ft; the TINS facies is recognized only between down-hole depths of 4,000 and 18,000 ft. Thin-section study of sandstone indicates that quartz arenite is the most common rock type in both the FIC and TINS facies. Subarkose is present, but not common, in the FIC facies. Sublitharenite is moderately common in the TINS facies. Calcite skeletal fragments, mainly of brachiopods and crinoids, are more abundant in the FJC facies than in the TINS facies. The mixed facies includes quartz arenite, subarkose, and sublitharenite. Iron-bearing carbonate cements are observed in rocks of all three depositional facies. Porosity is typically 12,000 ft. Thin films of bitumen have inhibited the effects of diagenesis in some samples. Fractures are identified in core samples, but are rare in thin sections. Porosity is due primarily to dissolution of glauconite, clays or clayey matrix, and some framework grains, but many dissolution pores are partly or completely filled with various clays, and only microporosity remains.

  4. Dolomites formed under conditions of deep burial: Hunton Group carbonate rocks (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) in the deep Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma and Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles A. Sternbach; Gerald M. Friedman

    1986-01-01

    Progressive burial diagenesis of Hunton Group (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) rocks of the deep Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma\\u000a and the Texas Panhandle is evident from petrographic and geochemical study of cores and cuttings from more than 25 boreholes\\u000a up to 30,000 ft deep. Limestone of the Hunton Group, which originated as shallow shelf carbonates, has been replaced, chiefly\\u000a below

  5. Provenance and diagenesis of the Cherokee sandstones, deep Anadarko basin, Western Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Levine, Stephen Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Thin section photomicrograph of chlorite clay (cl) lining a large pore with adjacent calcite cement (arrow), Wood Switzer "C" 5-1, Roger Mills County, Oklahoma, (10x, ppl) 50 14 Authigenic chlorite clay in the Cherokee sandstones 52 15 Silica... 19 Relative abundances of kaolinite clay based on x-ray and SEN data from sandstone core samples and well cuttings. 61 20 Ductile grain deformation resulting from burial compaction. 66 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 21 Thin section...

  6. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Anadarko Basin Province of Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, and Colorado, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.; Gaswirth, S.B.; Abbott, M.M.; Charpentier, R.R.; Cook, T.A.; Ellis, G.S.; Gianoutsos, N.J.; Hatch, J.R.; Klett, T.R.; Nelson, Philip H.; Pawlewicz, M.J.; Pearson, O.N.; Pollastro, R.M.; Schenk, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, using a geoscience-based assessment methodology, estimated mean technically-recoverable undiscovered continuous and conventional resources that total 495 million barrels of oil, 27.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 410 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Anadarko Basin Province; this assessment includes the Las Animas arch area of southeastern Colorado. The province is at a mature stage of exploration and development for conventional resources. Mean undiscovered continuous resources are estimated at 79 percent of oil, 90 percent of natural gas, and 81 percent of natural gas liquids in the province.

  7. Regional geology of Pierce member of upper Morrow formation in Anadarko basin, with a detailed look at South Dempsey field in Roger Mills County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.S. (AnSon Gas Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The members of the upper Morrow formation in the deep Anadarko basin are extremely prolific but elusive targets. The high reserve potential attributable to these reservoirs has been responsible for the ranking of Roger Mills County, Oklahoma, as the leading gas-producing county in the state. The deposition of the Pierce, one of the oldest members of the upper Morrow, was a result of upward movement, during the late Morrowan, of Mississippian Meramec-Osage age sediments along the Amarillo-Wichita uplift, that were unroofed by erosion and deposited as coastal alluvial fans. High-energy traction currents, associated with fluvial channels, carried sediments 10-17 mi northeast, away from the mountain front, and deposited them in sinuous to braided patterns. Textural interpretations from core data of the Pierce show an immature, very poorly sorted conglomerate consisting of medium to coarse-grained quartz sand with pebble to cobble-sized angular and subrounded chert clasts. The Pierce has productive thicknesses ranging from 8 to 60 ft with porosities of 9 to 15% and estimated per-well reserves from 8 to 30 bcf of gas. Although the irregular depositional patterns associated with the Pierce present a challenge to the explorationist, the accompanying prolific production, characteristic of this reservoir, has made it one of the more rewarding targets in Oklahoma. Further understanding of the petrology and depositional environment of the Pierce will aid in the delineation of future exploration plays within both this unit and other members of the upper Morrow formation deposited under similar conditions.

  8. Character, origin and occurrence of natural gases in the Anadarko basin, southwestern Kansas, western Oklahoma and Texas Panhandle, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, D.D.; Threlkeld, C.N.; Vuletich, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Anadarko basin comes from three geographically separated areas that can be differentiated by age of reservoir and by inferred nature of organic, thermal origin of the gases. In the central basin, non-associated gases are produced mainly from Upper Mississippian and Pennsylvanian sandstones. Gas samples are from reservoirs as much as 6588 m deep. Gases become isotopically heavier (??13C1-values range from -49.8 to -33.2???) and chemically drier (C2+-values range from 1-33%) with increasing level of thermal maturity. Gases were generated mainly from interbedded shales with type-III kerogen during the mature and post-mature stages of hydrocarbon generation. Deviations from the trend are due to vertical migration and mixing of gases generated at different levels of thermal maturity over the past 250 Myr. In the giant Panhandle-Hugoton field, non-associated gases are generally produced from Permian carbonates at depths of <900 m. Gases display little compositional variation (mean ??13C1-value is -43.2???, mean C2+-value is 14%). Because organic-rich, mature source rocks are not present in the area, gases probably were generated in the central basin from Pennsylvanian or older source rocks during the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. This interpretation implies migration over distances as much as several hundred kilometers. In the Sooner Trend, associated gases are produced from Silurian, Devonian and Mississippian carbonates at depths as great as 2950 m and were generated from type-II kerogen during the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. Associated oil usually correlates with extracts of the Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Woodford Shale. Gases are isotopically lighter (mean ??13C1-value is -43.9???) and chemically wetter (mean C2+ value is 14%) than those derived from type-III kerogen at an equivalent level of thermal maturity. ?? 1988.

  9. CO/sub 2/ corrosion in the Anadarko Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Some high pressure, temperature and volume gas wells located in the Anadarko Basin area of Washita, Beckham, and Roger Mills counties of Oklahoma have demonstrated in several cases severe corrosion rates which has led to surface equipment and tubular failures. This paper deals primarily with the El Paso Exploration Company's approach to the corrosion problem in producing gas wells. A basic theory on the mechanism of CO/sub 2/ corrosion and the identification of this type of corrosion will be presented to insure a general understanding of this type of corrosion. A discussion on the detection and monitoring system used with comparison of water and gas analysis, visual inspections, ultrasonic thickness measurements and coupon installation. The procedures which determines whether or not a well may require corrosion treating, along with the method by which the wells are treated, and the amount of protection which can be expected from individual treatments. Some specific problems and personal observations will be presented on the corrosion that has been found in the field which may be utilized as a guide or a better indication that a corrosive environment exists. A discussion on corrosion and a corrosion program as it affects economic, environmental and personal safety aspects should a failure occur is also presented.

  10. Characterization and origin of natural gases of the Anadarko Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Dudley D.; Threlkeld, Charles N.; Buletich, April K.

    1989-01-01

    Natural-gas production in the Anadarko basin is from three geographically separated areas that can be differentiated by age of reservoir and by inferred nature of thermal origin of the gases. In the central basin, nonassociated gases are produced mainly from Upper Mississippian and Pennsylvanian sandstones. Gases become isotopically heavier (?13C1 values range from -49.8 to -33.2 ppt) and chemically drier (C1/C1–5 values range from 0.74 to 0.99) with increasing level of thermal maturity. Gas samples are from depths as much as 21,600 ft. Gases were generated mainly from interbedded shales with type-III kerogen during the mature and postmature stages of hydrocarbon generation. Deviations from the trend are due to mixing and migration of gases generated at different levels of thermal maturity over the past 250 m.y. In the giant Panhandle-Hugoton field, nonassociated gases are generally produced from Permian carbonates at depths 13C1 values range from -46.4 to -39.9 ppt, C1/C1–5 values range from 0.69 to 0.96). Because organic-rich, mature source rocks are not present in the area, gases probably were generated in the central basin from Pennsylvanian or older source rocks during the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. This implies migration over distances as much as several hundred miles. In the Sooner trend, associated gases are produced from Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian carbonates at depths as great as 9,600 ft and were generated from type-II kerogen during the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation. Associated oil correlates with extracts of the Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Woodford Shale. Gases are isotopically lighter (?13C1 values of -47.3 to -40.6 ppt) and chemically wetter (C1/C1–5 values of 0.67 to 0.99) than those derived from type-III kerogen at an equivalent level of thermal maturity.

  11. Constraints on the Anadarko Basin-Wichita uplift boundary interpreted from aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones-Cecil, Meridee; Crone, Anthony J.

    1989-01-01

    Modeling and interpretation of aeromagnetic data across the transition between the Anadarko basin and the Wichita uplift in the vicinity of the scarp on the Meers fault (Fig. 1) constrains structural relationships and lithologic contrasts at this boundary. We digitized aeromagnetic data from the map based on a detailed survey flown in 1954 (U.S. Geological Survey, 1975). The flight lines for this survey were oriented east-west, spaced 0.25 mi apart, and flown 500 ft above the ground. The digitized data were gridded using a minimum-curvature gridding program (MINC; Webring, 1981) and plotted as a color-shaded relief map using an unpublished program written by M. W. Webring. The color-shaded relief map was shown in the Anadarko Basin Workshop poster session. Figure 2 is a generalized contour map made from the digitized data, using the unpublished program CONTOURS, written by R. H. Bracken, R. H. Godson, and M. W. Webring.

  12. Looking for Gas Layers in Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Constantin Cranganu

    Students will receive a written material describing how various well logs can be used in a synergistic way to yield more useful information about possible gas presence in sedimentary layers. A detailed description of the method is done by the instructor and an example is fully worked in class. Then, either all students receive Figure 3 as a homework or (if possible) each student will receive an individual set of logs. For the latter situation, the student will then make an oral presentation of his/her findings and a class discussion will follow under instructor's guidance. Uses online and/or real-time data Addresses student fear of quantitative aspect and/or inadequate quantitative skills Uses geophysics to solve problems in other fields

  13. Role of diagenesis in development of upper Morrow fan-delta reservoirs in Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect

    Al-shaieb, Z.; Alberta, P.L.; Gaskins, M.

    1989-03-01

    Upper Morrow chert conglomerates are prolific natural gas reservoirs in the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Based on data obtained during the course of this investigation, the conglomerates display several diagnostic features of a fan-delta depositional environment, with various facies representative of middle-fan and distal parts of the delta-fan complex. These facies were calibrated to suites of wireline logs, characteristic log signatures were identified for each facies, and a map was prepared showing the distribution of facies within the fan-delta complex. Major lithology types of conglomerates are chert, quartz, feldspar, and a combination of these three constituents. A rather complex diagenetic history includes at least nine cementation episodes reflecting various subsidence stages and thermal regimes. Reservoir-quality lithofacies are present mainly in the middle-fan channel facies, which consists of stacks and repetitive sequences of braided-stream deposits. Both intergranular primary and secondary porosity types are present in the chert conglomerates. Although intergranular porosity is very common, it was modified by cementation and dissolution. Complete preservation of original porosity is rare. Remnant primary porosity has provided avenues for fluid migration, which resulted in partial to complete dissolution of rock constituents. Siliceous detrital matrix, chert, and feldspar are the major constituents affected by the dissolution processes. A geochemical model emphasizing the role of feldspar hydrolysis is proposed to explain the dissolution of chert and the development of productive reservoirs in the chert conglomerates.

  14. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01

    analysis of each thin section consisted of a grid point-count of 125 points for composition and 100 points for monocrystalline quartz size. The composi- tional data were normalized with respect to the detrital component of the sample. Grain size... separated by thin limestone beds. All formation contacts within the Cherokee Group are conformable while tne group is bounded below by a major unconformity on top of the Atokan Series. The younger Marmaton Group limestones lie conformably above...

  15. Provenance and diagenesis of the Cherokee sandstones, deep Anadarko basin, Western Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Levine, Stephen Douglas

    1984-01-01

    and volcanic rock fragments, ' feldspars, and monocrystalline quartz. Porosities and permeabilities in these sandstones were destroyed by compaction and pore filling cements, which include calcite, authigenic quartz and clays. Secondary porosity... development began with increased burial from dissolution of calcite cement, feldspars, and rock frag- ments. Dissolution created microporosity, intergranular, and intraconstituent porosity which resulted in some sandstones having over 14% porosity and 1 md...

  16. Permian karst topography in the Wichita uplift, southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, R.N. Busbey, A.B. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The Wichita uplift in southwestern Oklahoma is one part of a record of Pennsylvania and early Permian deformation that affected the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. As a result of a partial inversion, the Lower Paleozoic section of this aulacogen was sequentially stripped off an uplift between the Wichita uplift and the Anadarko basin, resulting in the exposure of ultrabasic rocks deep in the Cambrian igneous fill of the aulacogen. Following the late Paleozoic tectonism, the topography of the uplift was entombed beneath Permian sediments and remained essentially undisturbed until exhumation during the present erosional cycle. Modern erosion is gradually exposing this topography, permitting morphometric analysis of the Permian hill forms. Because of the variation of lithology in the uplift, it is possible to isolate the effects of weathering processes such as intense hydrolysis of the igneous rocks (producing, among other features, or topography) and limestone dissolution, in the form of a surface and subsurface karst imprint. The latter process resulted in a network of small caves that are essentially fissures eroded along tectonic fractures. These small caves can be found in all the exposed areas of limestone. They are particularly noteworthy for three reasons: in at least five examples they contain a complex fauna of Permian vertebrates (mostly fragmentary), speleothems in some examples contain hydrocarbon inclusions, derived from the underlying Anadarko basin, some of the caves yield evidence of post burial evolution in the form of clay infiltration from the surface and brine flushing from the underlying Anadarko basin.

  17. More wells will expand knowledge of Knox group, Black Warrior basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, Dorothy E.

    1991-01-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox group of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi has attracted the interest of the oil industry because of recent significant discoveries of oil and gas in the age-equivalent Arbuckle group carbonates of the Arkoma, Ardmore, and Anadarko basins of Oklahoma. The geologic setting of these areas is described. Oil and gas potential is assessed and the Knox production history is given. Source rock potential is outlined.

  18. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  19. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  20. Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

  1. Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

  2. Basin-centered gas evaluated in Dnieper-Donets basin, Donbas foldbelt, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B.E. [Law (B.E.), Lakewood, CO (United States); Ulmishek, G.F.; Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Kabyshev, B.P. [Ukrainian State Geological Inst., Chernigov (Ukraine); Pashova, N.T.; Krivosheya, V.A. [Ukrainian State Geological Inst., Poltava (Ukraine)

    1998-11-23

    An evaluation of thermal maturity, pore pressures, source rocks, reservoir quality, present-day temperatures, and fluid recovery data indicates the presence of a large basin-centered gas accumulation in the Dnieper-Donets basin (DDB) and Donbas foldbelt (DF) of eastern Ukraine. This unconventional accumulation covers an area of at least 35,000 sq km and extends vertically through as much as 7,000 m of Carboniferous rocks. The gas accumulation is similar, in many respects, to some North American accumulations such as Elmworth in the Alberta basin of western Canada, the Greater Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming, and the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma. Even though rigorous assessments of the recoverable gas have not been conducted in the region, a comparison of the dimensions of the accumulation to similar accumulations in the US indicates gas resources in excess of 100 tcf in place. The paper describes the geology, the reservoirs, source rocks, seals, and recommendations for further study.

  3. 76 FR 48861 - Notice of Issuance of Final Outer Continental Shelf Air Permit for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...Continental Shelf Air Permit for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation AGENCY: Environmental Protection...Shelf (OCS) air permit for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (Anadarko). The permit...Offshore Operators Committee and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation regarding the project....

  4. Ground water in the alluvial deposits of Cottonwood Creek Basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacy, B.L.

    1960-01-01

    Cottonwood Creek basin is a 377 square mile area in central Oklahoma. The rim of the basin has altitudes as high as 1,300 feet, and the mouth is at an altitude of 910. Deposits of Quaternary age consist of alluvium along the stream courses and high terrace deposits along the southern rim of the basin. The alluvium contains a high percentage of clay and silt, ranges in thickness from a few inches to 40 feet, and underlies about 36 square miles of the basin. Sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Permian age, which form the bedrock, consist of the Garber sandstone along the eastern edge, the Hennessey shale through the central part, and Flowerpot shale along the western edge. Replenishment of water in the alluvium is from precipitation, lateral seepage and runoff from adjoining areas, and infiltration from the stream channels during high flows. The major use of ground water in the alluvium is transpiration by cottonwood and willow trees. Virtually no water is withdrawn from the alluvium by wells. (available as photostat copy only)

  5. Patterns of size change in late Neogene pocket gophers from the Meade Basin of Kansas and Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Martin; Pablo Peláez-Campomanes; Christopher Mecklin

    2012-01-01

    A dense late Neogene history of pocket gophers from the Meade Basin of south-western Kansas and north-western Oklahoma preserves a detailed record of size change, as indicated by mean length of the lower fourth premolar. A ‘time for space substitution’ interpretation results in the tentative recognition of a pattern analogous to character displacement, in which the small to medium-sized Pliogeomys

  6. Hydrocarbons in an overmature basin. I. Thermal maturity of Atoka and Hartshorne formations, Arkoma basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Hathon; D. W. Houseknecht

    1987-01-01

    With exploration expanding into deeper portions of the Arkoma basin, it has become important to determine whether the basin's thermal maturity is a factor that must be integrated into exploitation strategies. Lateral thermal maturity patterns can be detailed by analysis of the Hartshorne coal bed. From west to east, the Hartshorne increases systematically from 0.7 to over 2.0% vitrinite reflectance

  7. Hydrocarbons in an overmature basin. I. Thermal maturity of Atoka and Hartshorne formations, Arkoma basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Hathon, L.A.; Houseknecht, D.W.

    1987-08-01

    With exploration expanding into deeper portions of the Arkoma basin, it has become important to determine whether the basin's thermal maturity is a factor that must be integrated into exploitation strategies. Lateral thermal maturity patterns can be detailed by analysis of the Hartshorne coal bed. From west to east, the Hartshorne increases systematically from 0.7 to over 2.0% vitrinite reflectance (R/sub 0/). In the west, R/sub 0/ contours cross the basin nearly perpendicular to structural strike. To the east, R/sub 0/ contours are concave eastward, indicating higher thermal maturities in the center of the basin than along its northern and southern margins. Vertical thermal maturity patterns can be locally detailed by analyzing dispersed organic matter concentrated from Atoka cores and cuttings. Depth versus R/sub 0/ profiles display a constant slope through the basin, and absolute values of thermal maturity display a lateral variation similar to the Hartshorne coal bed. Mean R/sub 0/ values in productive Atoka beds range from about 2 to nearly 5%, depending on depth and location within the basin. The observed thermal maturity of the basin probably resulted from the combined effects of overpressured conditions, gravity-driven fluid flow related to the Arbuckle uplift, and facies-dependent dewatering pathways. Surprisingly, observed levels of thermal maturity indicate that much of the Atoka Formation is overmature, and would be considered nonprospective according to most published thermal maturity hydrocarbon window relationships. Nevertheless, significant gas reserves exist in patterns that do not appear to be influenced by either lateral or vertical trends in thermal maturity.

  8. The Meers Fault in Southern Oklahoma: Holocene Movements on a Fault with Pennsylvanian and Cambrian Linages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.; Holland, A. A.; Luza, K.; Oldow, J. S.; Crain, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Meers fault and subparallel fault strands in southern Oklahoma is the southernmost element of the complex and massive (>10 km of throw) frontal fault zone that forms the boundary between the Anadarko basin, which is the deepest intra-continental basin in the United States, and the uplifted Cambrian igneous rocks of the Wichita Mountains. The Wichita uplift is evidence of extraordinary Pennsylvanian intra-plate deformation along the trend of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, which is a classic example of a failed and massively inverted rift. The Meers Fault is the best-documented Holocene fault scarp east of Colorado and probably represents reactivation of a Pennsylvanian oblique thrust that in turn is likely to be an inverted Cambrian normal fault. The magnitude of these structures is shown on images from 3-D industry seismic reflection data ~25 km northwest of the northwestern mapped extent of the Meers fault that indicate the Pennsylvanian structure, or a northern strand of it, has a reverse throw of ~6km at depth. The fault displays a conspicuous and continuous scarp that is at least 25 km long and is evident in air photos and 1:100,000 scale geologic mapping, but this feature is not well mapped in detail beyond the area of trenching studies conducted in the 1980's. In the Holocene, 3-5 m of vertical surface displacement has been documented and left-lateral strike slip displacement on the fault is 2-3 times greater than the vertical displacement. During this movement, Quaternary soils along the fault were folded and ruptured, and the scarp has dammed small gullies where fine-grained alluvium has collected and has been used in the dating efforts. The most recent movement occurred (1100-1300 y ago) with a variety of earlier events having been proposed. As such, this fault represents one of the highest potential seismic hazards in the central/eastern United States.

  9. Changes in flow in the Beaver-North Canadian River basin upstream from Canton Lake, western Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of hydrologic data for the Beaver-North Canadian River basin upstream from Canton Lake in western Oklahoma. It examines the climatic and hydrologic data for evidence of trends. The hydrologic data examined includes total annual flow, base flow, and annual peak discharges. This study was conducted to determine if there is evidence of trends present in hydrologic and climatic data. All available streamflow-gaging station data, with at least 10 or more years of record, were examined for trends. In addition, the data were divided into an 'early' period (ending in 1971), representing conditions before ground-water levels had declined appreciably, and a 'recent' period (1978-1994), reflecting the condition of declining ground-water levels, including the effects of storage reservoirs. Tests for trend, moving averages, and comparisons of median and average flows for an early period (ending in 1971) with those for the recent period (1978-1994) show that the total annual volume of flow and the magnitudes of instantaneous annual peak discharges measured at most gaging stations in the Beaver- North Canadian River basin have decreased in recent years. Precipitation records for the panhandle, however, show no corresponding changes. The changes in flow are most pronounced in the headwaters upstream from Woodward, but also are evident at Woodward and near Seiling, which represents the inflow to Canton Lake. The average annual discharge decreased between the early period and the recent period by the following amounts: near Guymon, 18,000 acre-feet; at Beaver, 68,000 acre-feet; at Woodward, 72,000 acre-feet; and near Seiling, 63,000 acre-feet. These decreases, expressed as a percentage of the average flows for the early period, were 91 percent near Guymon, 82 percent at Beaver, 49 percent at Woodward, and 37 percent near Seiling. The medians of the annual peak discharges decreased from the early period to the recent period by the following amounts: near Guymon, 98 percent; at Beaver, 86 percent; at Woodward, 80 percent; and near Seiling, 53 percent. The Guymon gage is not affected by reservoirs; the other three mainstem gaging stations are influenced by reservoirs, but the decreases in annual peak discharges are greater than can be explained by storage in those reservoirs. Base flows have undergone substantial change, but unlike the annual volumes the base flows show some increases and some decreases. Flow duration analyses show a shift in the distribution of annual flows. Less contribution is coming from large floods that formerly added substantially to the yearly average flows. Near Seiling, for example, the magnitudes of the large flows that occur less than about 20 percent of the time were greatly reduced in the recent period. A primary mechanism producing these decreased streamflows appears to be the depletion of ground water in the High Plains aquifer that underlies more than 90 percent of the basin. Changes in farming and conservation practices and in water use also may be having an effect.

  10. 78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming...License Condition (LC) No. 47 for its Bear Creek Uranium Mill facility in Converse...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Bear Creek Uranium Mill operated from...

  11. Shallow subsurface geological investigation near the Meers fault, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The Meers fault is part of a complex system of northwest-trending faults forming the boundary between the Wichita Mountains (south) and the Anadarko basin (north). The frontal fault system is dominated by moderately dipping to steeply dipping reverse faults which have a combined net vertical displacement of over 9 km. Of these faults, the Meers fault has a Pennsylvanian-Permian throw of about 2 km. The Meers fault trends N. 60[degree]W. and displaces Permian conglomerate and shale for a distance of at least 26 km, from near the Comanche-Kiowa County boundary to East Cache Creek. At the northwest end of the fault trace, the fault displaces limestone-pebble conglomerates (Post Oak), whereas at the southeast end siltstones and calcrete-bearing shales of the Hennessey are displaced. Multiple radiocarbon ages of soil-humus samples from 2 Canyon Creek trenches (S24, T4N, R13W) show the last surface faulting occurred 1,200--1,300 yr ago. In 1988--89, the Oklahoma Geological Survey drilled 4 core holes to basement in the vicinity of the trench sites. The holes were drilled along a 200-m-long transect normal to the strike of the Meers fault. Two holes were drilled on the north side of the fault and penetrated highly fractured and altered rhyolite at about 58 m. A third hole drilled 25 m south of the fault, intersected weathered and sheared gabbro at 58 m. The basement material in the fourth hole consisted of dark greenish brown, highly fractured and sheared rock. The drill holes encountered Permian, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, 0.5--3 m thick, conglomerate interbedded with shale and siltstone. Drill holes 1--3 contained 3--5 m thick, granite cobble-boulder, clast supported conglomerate resting on rhyolite and/or gabbro. The core-hole information suggests the Meers-fault zone is at least 200 meters wide.

  12. Estimated Nutrient Concentrations and Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Northwestern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma, 2004-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Esralew, Rachel A.; Allen, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    The Eucha-Spavinaw basin is the source of water for Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake, which are part of the water supply for the City of Tulsa. The City of Tulsa has received complaints of taste and odor in the finished drinking water because of deteriorating water quality. The deterioration is largely because of algal growth from the input of nutrients from the Eucha-Spavinaw basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, implemented a continuous, real-time water-quality monitoring program in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin to better understand the source of the nutrient loading. This program included the manual collection of samples analyzed for nutrients and the collection of continuous, in-stream data from water-quality monitors. Continuous water-quality monitors were installed at two existing continuous streamflow-gaging stations - Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma, from October 2004 through September 2007. Total nitrogen concentrations for manually collected water samples ranged from 2.08 to 9.66 milligrams per liter for the water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and from 0.67 to 5.12 milligrams per liter for manually collected water samples from Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Total phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 1.5 milligrams per liter for the water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Colcord and from 0.028 to 1.0 milligram per liter for the water samples collected from Beaty Creek near Jay. Data from water samples and in-stream monitors at Spavinaw and Beaty Creeks (specific conductance and turbidity) were used to develop linear regression equations relating in-stream water properties to total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations. The equations developed for the Spavinaw and Beaty sites are site specific and only valid for the concentration ranges of the explanatory variables used in the analysis. The range in estimated and measured phosphorus is not representative for the range of historic streamflow at the Beaty site and that regression equation would benefit from more high flow and high turbidity samples. In addition, all three study years had below average annual precipitation for the area, and streamflow was especially low in Water Year 2006. Average nutrient concentrations from October 2004 through September 2007, which were drier than others, may not be a good indication of conditions in future wetter years. The equations for the Spavinaw and Beaty sites may be used to estimate instantaneous nutrient concentrations, which can be used to compute loads and yields in real time in order to better characterize the effect of land-management practices in these watersheds on the transport of nutrients to Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake. The methods used in this study show promise for monitoring future effectiveness of implemented best management practices, development and monitoring of total maximum daily loads, early detection of taste-and-odor occurrences, and to anticipate treatment needs for water suppliers.

  13. Oklahoma Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

  14. Environmental effects of agricultural conservation: A framework for research in two watersheds in Oklahoma's Upper Washita River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in the Upper Washita River Basin represents mixed crop-livestock systems of the Southern Plains. Research was established in two sub-watersheds, the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed and the Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watershed, to quantify interactive effects of variable...

  15. Five million years of pocket gopher history in the Meade Basin of southwestern Kansas and northwestern Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Martin; Pablo Peláez-Campomanes; James G. Honey; Federica Marcolini; William A. Akersten

    2011-01-01

    The Meade Basin record of pocket gophers extends from the latest Miocene (Buis Ranch local fauna) to modern time. A primitive species with hypsodont but rooted cheek teeth, Pliogeomys buisi, characterizes the late Hemphillian. Another species of Pliogeomys, P. louderbachi, is described here as a new species from the early Blancan. It is intermediate in dental and mandibular morphology between

  16. Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Konduris, A.M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2003-01-01

    Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

  17. Concentrations, loads, and yields of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment and bacteria concentrations in the Wister Lake Basin, Oklahoma and Arkansas, 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buck, Stephanie D.

    2014-01-01

    The Poteau Valley Improvement Authority uses Wister Lake in southeastern Oklahoma as a public water supply. Total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediments from agricultural runoff and discharges from wastewater treatment plants and other sources have degraded water quality in the lake. As lake-water quality has degraded, water-treatment cost, chemical usage, and sludge production have increased for the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Poteau Valley Improvement Authority, investigated and summarized concentrations of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, suspended sediment, and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus sp.) in surface water flowing to Wister Lake. Estimates of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment loads, yields, and flow-weighted mean concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations were made for the Wister Lake Basin for a 3-year period from October 2010 through September 2013. Data from water samples collected at fixed time increments during base-flow conditions and during runoff conditions at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla. (USGS station 07247015), the Poteau River near Heavener, Okla. (USGS station 07247350), and the Fourche Maline near Leflore, Okla. (USGS station 07247650), water-quality stations were used to evaluate water quality over the range of streamflows in the basin. These data also were collected to estimate annual constituent loads and yields by using regression models. At the Poteau River stations, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment concentrations in surface-water samples were significantly larger in samples collected during runoff conditions than in samples collected during base-flow conditions. At the Fourche Maline station, in contrast, concentrations of these constituents in water samples collected during runoff conditions were not significantly larger than concentrations during base-flow conditions. Flow-weighted mean total phosphorus concentrations at all three stations from 2011 to 2013 were several times larger than the Oklahoma State Standard for Scenic Rivers (0.037 milligrams per liter [mg/L]), with the largest flow-weighted phosphorus concentrations typically being measured at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla., station. Flow-weighted mean total nitrogen concentrations did not vary substantially between the Poteau River stations and the Fourche Maline near Leflore, Okla., station. At all of the sampled water-quality stations, bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus sp.) concentrations were substantially larger in water samples collected during runoff conditions than in water samples collected during base-flow conditions from 2011 to 2013. Estimated annual loads of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment in the Poteau River stations during runoff conditions ranged from 82 to 98 percent of the total annual loads of those constituents. Estimated annual loads of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and suspended sediment in the Fourche Maline during runoff conditions ranged from 86 to nearly 100 percent of the total annual loads. Estimated seasonal total phosphorus loads generally were smallest during base-flow and runoff conditions in autumn. Estimated seasonal total phosphorus loads during base-flow conditions tended to be largest in winter and during runoff conditions tended to be largest in the spring. Estimated seasonal total nitrogen loads tended to be smallest in autumn during base-flow and runoff conditions and largest in winter during runoff conditions. Estimated seasonal suspended sediment loads tended to be smallest during base-flow conditions in the summer and smallest during runoff conditions in the autumn. The largest estimated seasonal suspended sediment loads during runoff conditions typically were in the spring. The estimated mean annual total phosphorus yield was largest at the Poteau River at Loving, Okla., water-quality station. The estimated mean annual total phosphorus yield was largest during base flow at the

  18. Surface-water quality assessment of the North Fork Red River basin upstream from Lake Altus, Oklahoma, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Schneider, M.L.; Masoner, J.R.; Blazs, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Elevated salinity in the North Fork Red River is a major concern of the Bureau of Reclamation W. C. Austin Project at Lake Altus. Understanding the relation between surface-water runoff, ground-water discharge, and surface-water quality is important for maintaining the beneficial use of water in the North Fork Red River basin. Agricultural practices, petroleum production, and natural dissolution of salt-bearing bedrock have the potential to influence the quality of nearby surface water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, sampled stream discharge and water chemistry at 19 stations on the North Fork Red River and tributaries. To characterize surface-water resources of the basin in a systematic manner, samples were collected synoptically during receding streamflow conditions during July 8-11, 2002. Together, sulfate and chloride usually constitute greater than half of the dissolved solids. Concentrations of sulfate ranged from 87.1 to 3,450 milligrams per liter. The minimum value was measured at McClellan Creek near Back (07301220), and the maximum value was measured at Bronco Creek near Twitty (07301303). Concentrations of chloride ranged from 33.2 to 786 milligrams per liter. The minimum value was measured at a North Fork Red River tributary (unnamed) near Twitty (07301310), and the maximum value was measured at the North Fork Red River near Back (07301190), the most upstream sample station.

  19. Comparative evolution of Pennsylvanian platform margins in Oklahoma and north-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaves, A.W.; Puckette, J.O. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Pennsylvanian evolution of the Midland basin's eastern shelf and the northern shelves of the Anadarko and Arkoma basins demonstrates a strongly contrasting pattern with regard to the facies composition and stability of the shelf margin. For the Midland basin a carbonate ramp system developed adjacent to the Eastern shelf during the early Desmoinesian but received no coarse-grained clastic sediment until after the central Fort Worth basin was completely filled by Ouachita orogenic debris in the late Desmoinesian. At that time, a distinct north-south hingeline formed between the shelf and incipient Midland basin that allowed for subsequent vertical accretion of a Missourian-age double bank system. Due to the absence of active deltaic depocenters across the southern two-thirds of the shelf, the Missourian shelf margin did not prograde basinward nor did a submarine fan system develop adjacent to this reciprocal bank complex. Later, during the Virgilian, a single shelf-edge bank and submarine fan complex prograded the shelf edge westward. The shelf edges for the Anadarko and Arkoma basins demonstrate a significantly different pattern. Only during the late Desmoinesian (Marmaton Group) did a shelf-edge bank develop in association with shelf-slope reciprocal sedimentation. For the Anadarko basin, widespread submarine fans, fed from a northeasterly cratonic source, are first seen with Red Fork deposition. Post-Tonkawa cyclic sedimentation prograded the shelf edge southward and gave rise to a more carbonate-dominated shelf sequence. In virtually all instances the regressive submarine fan units indicate eustatic lowstands of sea level.

  20. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

  1. Reservoir Characterization and Waterflood Performance Evaluation of Granite Wash Formation, Anadarko Basin 

    E-print Network

    Nilangekar, Akshay Anand

    2014-05-08

    different plans of development are discussed. It is seen that the overall response to waterflooding is poor due to low formation permeability leading to low water injectivity. But a greater reservoir area can be drained if production is initiated from...

  2. Oklahoma Forestry Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

  3. Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association Pave the Way in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard. Now you can. The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association 900 Asp Ave an opportunity to add their names and graduation years to the stone plaza of the Oklahoma Memorial Union

  4. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is, entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program...

  5. Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Patneaude, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

  6. Potentiometric surface in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer, Oklahoma, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Magers, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A study of the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer was started in 2008 to provide the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) hydrogeologic data and a groundwater flow model that can be used as a tool to help manage the aquifer. The 1973 Oklahoma water law requires the OWRB to do hydrologic investigations of Oklahoma's aquifers (termed 'groundwater basins') and to determine amounts of water that may be withdrawn by permitted water users. 'Maximum annual yield' is a term used by OWRB to describe the total amount of water that can be withdrawn from a specific aquifer in any year while allowing a minimum 20-year life of the basin (Oklahoma Water Resources Board, 2010). Currently (2010), the maximum annual yield has not been determined for the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Until the maximum annual yield determination is made, water users are issued a temporary permit by the OWRB for 2 acre-feet/acre per year. The objective of the study, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, was to study the hydrogeology of the Central Oklahoma aquifer to provide information that will enable the OWRB to determine the maximum annual yield of the aquifer based on different proposed management plans. Groundwater flow models are typically used by the OWRB as a tool to help determine the maximum annual yield. This report presents the potentiometric surface of the Central Oklahoma aquifer based on water-level data collected in 2009 as part of the current (2010) hydrologic study. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-724 by Christenson and others (1992) presents the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. This 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map was made as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment pilot project for the Central Oklahoma aquifer that examined the geochemical and hydrogeological processes operating in the aquifer. An attempt was made to obtain water-level measurements for the 2009 potentiometric-surface map from the wells used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map. Well symbols with circles on the 2009 potentiometric-surface map (fig. 1) indicate wells that were used for the 1986-87 potentiometric-surface map.

  7. Oklahoma Tribes: A History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gover, Kevin

    1977-01-01

    Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

  8. Oklahoma Historical Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

  9. Is Oklahoma getting drier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul, Jr.; Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice)

    2013-06-01

    Land surface hydrology is important to regional climate, ecosystem, agriculture, and even human activities. Changes in soil moisture can produce considerable impacts on socioeconomics. Analysis of assimilation model results, especially those from the Community Land Model, shows that soil moisture over Oklahoma region is continuously reduced from 1980 to 2009. The potential drying trend in the Oklahoma region is evaluated by observations taken during last three decades in this study. Satellite data from Global Precipitation Climatology Project exhibit a clear precipitation decrease in the Oklahoma region during the last decade or so compared with those of two or three decades ago. Accompanying with the precipitation variation, land surface net radiation and temperature over the region are found increases by satellite and/or in-situ measurements. These changes in regional climate conditions also likely result in reduction of regional evaporation and enhancement of sensible heat transport from land surface into the atmosphere as indicated in assimilated data. These observed and modeled evidences of the changes in regional water and energy cycles lead us to conclude that the soil moisture over the Oklahoma region was reduced during the last decade. This soil moisture drop could increase a risk in water shortage for agriculture in the Oklahoma state if the dry period continues. Further investigations on the drying in the Oklahoma State or even entire Southern Great Plains are needed to mitigate potential droughts, reductions in vegetation products, and other socioeconomic impacts.

  10. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy...

  11. Strengthening Oklahoma Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

    Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting…

  12. Sauroposeidon: Oklahoma's Native Giant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathew J. Wedel; Richard L. Cifelli

    Sauroposeidon, the largest dinosaur ever discovered in Oklahoma, is one of the largest dinosaurs that ever lived. Sauroposeidon is represented by a series of neck vertebrae, which show that it is a sauropod dinosaur closely related to Brachiosaurus. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the vertebrae reveal a net- work of small internal chambers. In life, the chambers would have been

  13. Texas-Oklahoma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     ... important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and ... NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science ...

  14. Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

  15. Oklahoma Digital Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

  16. Is Oklahoma getting drier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Fan, T.; Xi, B.

    2010-12-01

    Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) models, especially the Community Land Model (CLM), show a continue reduction of soil moisture over Oklahoma region from 1980 to 2008. When the top 3.5 meter of surface is considered, the total water amounts estimated from models are within the ranges of 145-150, 140-145, 135-140, and 130-135 kg/m2 for the years of 1980-1986, 1987-1993, 1994-2000, and 2001-2008, respectively. A statistically significant decreasing trend of annual mean soil moisture is also found, indicating the region may experience a continuous drying period. Although the moisture change could be related to many factors, precipitation and evaporation potentially are the two dominant meteorological variables in determining the soil moisture variation. The rainfall amounts simulated by CLM are compared well with the satellite observations of Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Both exhibit significant decreases in the region from 1980 to 2008. The CLM rainfalls also agree well with the available in-situ rainfall measurements during 1997 to 2007 from the Oklahoma Mesonet, which consist of 120 stations over the Oklahoma. For evaporation, currently there are no reliable direct observations during the time period studied. Limited satellite observations from the Princeton land surface data set indicate likely increase of evaporation. The soil moisture and temperature from SGP has records starting 1997, which is not enough to show the trend because of large variability. But both SRB and ISCCP surface net radiative flux from 1983 to 2008 shows an increasing trend. This could support the idea of increase in evaporation. The general decreases in precipitation and possible enhancements in evaporation would reduce land surface water storage. The reduced soil moisture could have considerable impact on land surface vegetation. For the Oklahoma region, this change would have a great potential in influence of regional agriculture and society.

  17. Floods in Oklahoma : magnitude and frequency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westfall, A.O.; Patterson, J.L.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents methods by which the magnitude and frequency of expected floods for most streams in Oklahoma can be determined. Flood data were used to define flood-frequency curves applicable to the State. Composite frequency curves were drawn showing the relation of mean annual floods to floods having recurrence intervals from 1.2 to 50 years. In some areas, it was found that the slope of the composite frequency curve varies with the drainage area. An adjustment curve was defined for use in conjunction with the composite curve for these areas. Other curves express the relation of the mean annual flood to drainage basin characteristics. By combining data from the composite and mean annual flood curves, flood-frequency curves can be drawn for streams in Oklahoma not materially affected by the works of man. Neither of the above two types of curves should be extrapolated beyond the range defined by base data. Frequency curves presented in this report were based on analysis of flood records collected at gaging stations having 5 or more years of record not materially affected by regulation or diversion. (available as photostat copy only)

  18. A proposed streamflow data program for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohn, J.D.; Hoffman, G.L.

    1970-01-01

    An evaluation of the streamflow data available in Oklahoma has been made to provide guidelines for planning future data-collection programs. The basic steps in the evaluation procedure were (1) definition of the long-terms goals of the streamflow-data program in quantitative form, (2) examination and analysis of streamflow data to determine which goals have been met, and (3) consideration of alternate programs and techniques to meet the remaining goals. The study defines the individual relation between certain statistical streamflow characteristics and selected basin parameters. This relation is a multiple regression equation that could be used on a statewide basis to compute a selected natural-flow characteristic at any site on a stream. The study shows that several streamflow characteristics can be estimated within an accuracy equivalent to 10 years of record by use of a regression related to at least three climatic or basin parameters for any basin of 50 square miles or more. The study indicates that significant changes in the scope and character of the data-collection program would enhance the possibility of attaining the remaining goals. A streamflow-data program based on the guidelines developed in this study is proposed for the future.

  19. Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

    2007-01-01

    The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

  20. INTENSIVE SURVEY OF THE ILLINOIS RIVER (ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA) IN AUGUST 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality survey of the Illinois River Basin was conducted August 16-29, 1985, in response to concerns that water clarity had decreased in the lower reach which is designated as an Oklahoma scenic river. The survey results demonstrated that background phosphorus concentrati...

  1. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  2. 77 FR 34890 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...Oklahoma intends to revise its program to be no less effective than the Federal regulations and to improve operational efficiency. This document gives the times and locations that the Oklahoma program and this proposed amendment to that...

  3. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  4. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  5. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2008 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2008 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  6. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 Audited Financial Statements Independent Auditors' Report

  7. the university of oklahoma Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    the university of oklahoma ADVENTURE A Year Of Annual Report July 2005 ­ June 2006 #12;Board S S I O N Statement The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma Conducting and disseminating research to increase knowledge Teaching university students to develop critical

  8. 1Mohammed Atiquzzaman University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Fairness in DiffServ Mohammed Atiquzzaman School of Computer Science University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK of Oklahoma DiffServ n Provides statistical guarantees to a few pre- defined per hop behavior Y Expedited University of Oklahoma Differentiated Service Network DiffServ Domain A DiffServ Domain B DiffServ Domain C

  9. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma Student Association. Those. Student Rights Students of the University of Oklahoma are guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

  10. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often...

  11. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    , and in a senior-level engineering course in energy management being taught at Oklahoma State University. The equipment used includes: 1. A solar collector connected to a coffee pot to produce hot water for instant coffee. 2. A solar photo VOltaic...

  12. Changes in streamflow and summary of major-ion chemistry and loads in the North Fork Red River basin upstream from Lake Altus, northwestern Texas and western Oklahoma, 1945-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Wahl, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Upstream from Lake Altus, the North Fork Red River drains an area of 2,515 square miles. The quantity and quality of surface water are major concerns at Lake Altus, and water-resource managers and consumers need historical information to make informed decisions about future development. The Lugert-Altus Irrigation District relies on withdrawals from the lake to sustain nearly 46,000 acres of agricultural land. Kendall's tau tests of precipitation data indicated no statistically significant trend over the entire 100 years of available record. However, a significant increase in precipitation occurred in the last 51 years. Four streamflow-gaging stations with more than 10 years of record were maintained in the basin. These stations recorded no significant trends in annual streamflow volume. Two stations, however, had significant increasing trends in the base-flow index, and three had significant decreasing trends in annual peak flows. Major-ion chemistry in the North Fork Red River is closely related to the chemical composition of the underlying bedrock. Two main lithologies are represented in the basin upstream from Lake Altus. In the upper reaches, young and poorly consolidated sediments include a range of sizes from coarse gravel to silt and clay. Nearsurface horizons commonly are cemented as calcium carbonate caliche. Finer-grained gypsiferous sandstones and shales dominate the lower reaches of the basin. A distinct increase in dissolved solids, specifically sodium, chloride, calcium, and sulfate, occurs as the river flows over rocks that contain substantial quantities of gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. These natural salts are the major dissolved constituents in the North Fork Red River.

  13. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase II State Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Phase II provides a more detailed examination of classroom variables important to achievement in Oklahoma schools. Where Phase I addressed all nine of the Oklahoma essential elements using survey data, Phase II focuses on what occurs in Oklahoma classrooms primarily using data from principal interviews, classroom observations (on-site), and video…

  14. University of Oklahoma Police Department

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    .Disposition: Date Reported: Location : Report #:04/09/14 - WED at 12:59 KUHLMAN COURT, ALL BLOCKS 14-0561 Address Court 04/09/14 - WED at 19:00 - 04/09/14 - WED at 21:00Date and Time Occurred From - Occurred To: CaseUniversity of Oklahoma Police Department Case Log Media Apr 09, 2014 Jun 09, 2014From to Date

  15. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

  16. Organic vegetable weed control research in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lane Agriculture Research Center is operated by Oklahoma State University and the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Located in southeastern Oklahoma, 13 resident scientists work cooperatively to develop production practices for organic vegetable production. On...

  17. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Oklahoma Water. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located within the ISE and is responsible for developing and coordinating water research funding to address the needs of Oklahoma. To guide it in meeting

  18. Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

  19. Oklahoma Whistleblower Act The Oklahoma Whistleblower Act (74 O.S. 840 -2.5) protects employees who

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Oklahoma Whistleblower Act The Oklahoma Whistleblower Act (74 O.S. §840 -2.5) protects employees that he or she has been retaliated against in violation of the Oklahoma Whistleblower Act may file grievance alleging retaliation in violation of the Oklahoma Whistleblower Act must be filed within sixty (60

  20. Methods for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2010-01-01

    Flow statistics can be used to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-supply permitting, flow regulation, and other water rights issues. Flow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no flow data are available to compute the statistics. Methods are presented in this report for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma. Flow statistics included the (1) annual (period of record), (2) seasonal (summer-autumn and winter-spring), and (3) 12 monthly duration statistics, including the 20th, 50th, 80th, 90th, and 95th percentile flow exceedances, and the annual mean-flow (mean of daily flows for the period of record). Flow statistics were calculated from daily streamflow information collected from 235 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Oklahoma and areas in adjacent states. A drainage-area ratio method is the preferred method for estimating flow statistics at an ungaged location that is on a stream near a gage. The method generally is reliable only if the drainage-area ratio of the two sites is between 0.5 and 1.5. Regression equations that relate flow statistics to drainage-basin characteristics were developed for the purpose of estimating selected flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams that are not near gaging stations on the same stream. Regression equations were developed from flow statistics and drainage-basin characteristics for 113 unregulated gaging stations. Separate regression equations were developed by using U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in regions with similar drainage-basin characteristics. These equations can increase the accuracy of regression equations used for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics at ungaged stream locations in Oklahoma. Streamflow-gaging stations were grouped by selected drainage-basin characteristics by using a k-means cluster analysis. Three regions were identified for Oklahoma on the basis of the clustering of gaging stations and a manual delineation of distinguishable hydrologic and geologic boundaries: Region 1 (western Oklahoma excluding the Oklahoma and Texas Panhandles), Region 2 (north- and south-central Oklahoma), and Region 3 (eastern and central Oklahoma). A total of 228 regression equations (225 flow-duration regressions and three annual mean-flow regressions) were developed using ordinary least-squares and left-censored (Tobit) multiple-regression techniques. These equations can be used to estimate 75 flow-duration statistics and annual mean-flow for ungaged streams in the three regions. Drainage-basin characteristics that were statistically significant independent variables in the regression analyses were (1) contributing drainage area; (2) station elevation; (3) mean drainage-basin elevation; (4) channel slope; (5) percentage of forested canopy; (6) mean drainage-basin hillslope; (7) soil permeability; and (8) mean annual, seasonal, and monthly precipitation. The accuracy of flow-duration regression equations generally decreased from high-flow exceedance (low-exceedance probability) to low-flow exceedance (high-exceedance probability) . This decrease may have happened because a greater uncertainty exists for low-flow estimates and low-flow is largely affected by localized geology that was not quantified by the drainage-basin characteristics selected. The standard errors of estimate of regression equations for Region 1 (western Oklahoma) were substantially larger than those standard errors for other regions, especially for low-flow exceedances. These errors may be a result of greater variability in low flow because of increased irrigation activities in this region. Regression equations may not be reliable for sites where the drainage-basin characteristics are outside the range of values of independent vari

  1. 1441210_2.DOC UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    1441210_2.DOC UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA DEFINED CONTRIBUTION RETIREMENT PLAN (Amended and Restated the right to amend, modify or terminate the Plan at any time. #12;1441210_2.DOC i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

  2. 76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

  3. 76 FR 31670 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1970-DR), dated 05/06/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/14/2011. Effective Date: 05/06/2011. Physical Loan...

  4. 75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated 06/11/2010. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, and straight-line winds. Incident Period: 05/10/2010 through 05/13/2010. Effective Date:...

  5. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    and encourages applications from candidates with diverse cultural backgrounds. #12;. Salary and other compensation are competitive with major research institutions. Oklahoma State University State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/E-Verify Employer committed to diversity

  6. Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

  7. TWO ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF OKLAHOMA AND NOTES ON XYRIS JUPICAI (XYRIDACEAE) IN OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason R. Singhurst; Edwin L. Bridges; Walter C. Holmes

    Eleocharis flavescens and Rhynchospora scirpoides are reported as new to Oklahoma. Xyris jupicai, which has been mentioned as occurring in Oklahoma, is documented in the state by citation of voucher specimens. The overall distribution of these species in the West Gulf Coastal Plain is discussed.

  8. The Oklahoma State Study of Oklahoma's Public Higher Education Physical Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G., Ed.; And Others

    This project examines policies related to facilities at public institutions of higher education in Oklahoma in the context of a current legislative debate over a bond issue to fund facilities. The last bond issue for Oklahoma higher education was in 1968. Verification of a representative sample of 27 campus master plans validated an earlier…

  9. OSU Tulsa Library Jack H. Stout University of Oklahoma Memorabilia

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    :9 University of Oklahoma Magazine. Vol. XVI, No. 3, 1928. 1:10 University of Oklahoma Magazine. Vol. 18, No. 3, 1930. The University of Oklahoma Magazine, the successor to the University Empire, was published four before the game. 1:13 Women's Student Government Association Handbook for Fresh

  10. Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

  11. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahomaand the University of Oklahoma StudentAssociation. Those documents Rights Students of the University of Oklahomaare guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

  12. Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma by John M. Lewis A presentation at the 50th Anniversary University of Oklahoma's School of Meteorology October 8, 2010 #12;2 Extended Abstract A review of the University of Oklahoma's (OU's) meteorology program/department over its first 15 years

  13. Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

    2004-01-01

    The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

  14. A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacefield, Kevin Lee

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

  15. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

    1994-03-01

    The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

  16. Oklahoma Handbook: Child Nutrition Programs. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Nutrition concepts, school food service guidelines, and related materials (such as nutrition charts, menu planning worksheets, and student survey forms) are provided in this nutrition handbook. Prepared by the Oklahoma State Department of Education's School Lunch Section, the handbook consists of nine sections that are organized in outline format.…

  17. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma

  18. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  19. Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

    Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

  20. DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN OKLAHOMA LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 15 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Oklahoma. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palm...

  1. Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators Journal 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Journal includes the following four peer reviewed articles: (1) The Changing Role of Grandparents (Fred D. Hammond, III, Terry E. Spigner, Charolette Myles-Nixon, and Pauline Holloway); (2) Pedagogical Agent Instructional Design Challenges (Jon Martens); (3) Differences in Relatedness across…

  2. House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

  3. Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentroth, Mary Ann

    Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

  4. OKLAHOMA STATE Report of Independent Accountants' Application

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    University 107 Whitehurst Hall Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-1015 We have audited the financial statements report thereon dated October 11, 2007. Additionally, we have audited the financial statements report thereon dated October 11, 2007. We have also audited the financial statements comprising

  5. University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology Rapid-response Graduate Degree Application Form This application form is used by the School of Meteorology to provide a rapid, no-cost response to the applicant on prospects to be admitted to the School of Meteorology for pursuit of a graduate degree. The applicant should

  6. OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY VOLUME 32 SPRING 2007

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    . United States, 389 U.S. 347,350-51 (1967) (Fourth Amendment). 7. See Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 153 (1973 inclusion of state constitutions. State courts have repeatedly held that state constitutions significantly.H. 2003). 87 #12;88 Oklahoma City University Law Review [Vol. 32 such as states banning assisted suicide

  7. 1Mohammed Atiquzzaman, University of Oklahoma, USA.

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    protocol suite ! Original TCP performed poorly in satellite networks " errors " long propagation delay. ! Many schemes for enhancing TCP for satellite networks. ! IETF developing Stream Control Transmission ­ multiple IP addresses per host #12;6Mohammed Atiquzzaman, University of Oklahoma, USA. Presentation

  8. 75 FR 42173 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 07/13/2010. Incident: Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Straight Line Winds and Flooding. Incident Period: 06/13/2010 through 06/15/2010. DATES:...

  9. Did the Oklahoma City Bombers Succeed?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan Steiker

    2001-01-01

    The worst case of domestic terrorism in our country's history, the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, led to the enactment of a landmark antiterrorism statute. Not surprisingly, several of the statute's provisions strengthen federal power in extraordinary and unprecedented ways to counter the threat of terrorism. But other provisions radically restrict the ability of

  10. Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas L. Holzer; Joe B. Fletcher; Gary S. Fuis; Trond Ryberg; Thomas M. Brocher; Christopher M. Dietel

    1996-01-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release

  11. Disaster nursing in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R; Keylon, K; Odor, P S; Walker, G; Hunt, L

    1995-10-01

    The Oklahoma City Federal Building disaster quickly changed a routine day of eye surgical procedures into a chaotic trauma center for the victims with not only eye injuries, but multiple deep lacerations and other injuries. The devastating and disruptive effect of the bombing was stressful for the nursing staff who became disaster survivors of the emotional trauma involved. PMID:7594916

  12. Oklahoma: A View of the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruthe Blalock; Depriest, Maria; Fowler, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a dialogue on twentieth-century Oklahoma artists and writers given at a conference titled "Working from Community: American Indian Art and Literature in a Historical and Cultural Context" and held in the summer of 2003 at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Twenty-five educators converged for six weeks of…

  13. On the use of MODIS and TRMM products to simulate hydrological processes in the La Plata Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. C. Saavedra Valeriano; T. Koike; E. H. Berbery

    2009-01-01

    La Plata basin is targeted to establish a distributed water-energy balance model using NASA and JAXA satellite products to estimate fluxes like the river discharge at sub-basin scales. The coupled model is called the Water and Energy Budget-based Distributed Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM), already tested with success in the Little Washita basin, Oklahoma, and the upper Tone River in Japan. The

  14. Flood Frequency Estimates and Documented and Potential Extreme Peak Discharges in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; McCabe, Lan P.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of floods is required for the safe and economical design of highway bridges, culverts, dams, levees, and other structures on or near streams; and for flood plain management programs. Flood frequency estimates for gaged streamflow sites were updated, documented extreme peak discharges for gaged and miscellaneous measurement sites were tabulated, and potential extreme peak discharges for Oklahoma streamflow sites were estimated. Potential extreme peak discharges, derived from the relation between documented extreme peak discharges and contributing drainage areas, can provide valuable information concerning the maximum peak discharge that could be expected at a stream site. Potential extreme peak discharge is useful in conjunction with flood frequency analysis to give the best evaluation of flood risk at a site. Peak discharge and flood frequency for selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 500 years were estimated for 352 gaged streamflow sites. Data through 1999 water year were used from streamflow-gaging stations with at least 8 years of record within Oklahoma or about 25 kilometers into the bordering states of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, New Mexico, and Texas. These sites were in unregulated basins, and basins affected by regulation, urbanization, and irrigation. Documented extreme peak discharges and associated data were compiled for 514 sites in and near Oklahoma, 352 with streamflow-gaging stations and 162 at miscellaneous measurements sites or streamflow-gaging stations with short record, with a total of 671 measurements.The sites are fairly well distributed statewide, however many streams, large and small, have never been monitored. Potential extreme peak-discharge curves were developed for streamflow sites in hydrologic regions of the state based on documented extreme peak discharges and the contributing drainage areas. Two hydrologic regions, east and west, were defined using 98 degrees 15 minutes longitude as the dividing line.

  15. Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for selected dams in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and near Atoka, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shivers, Molly J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Grout, Trevor S.; Lewis, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital-elevation models, field survey measurements, hydraulic data, and hydrologic data (U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations North Canadian River below Lake Overholser near Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241000], and North Canadian River at Britton Road at Oklahoma City, Okla. [07241520]), were used as inputs for the one-dimensional dynamic (unsteady-flow) models using Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) software. The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum flood dam-breach scenario and a sunny-day dam-breach scenario, as well as for maximum flood-inundation elevations and flood-wave arrival times at selected bridge crossings. Points of interest such as community-services offices, recreational areas, water-treatment plants, and wastewater-treatment plants were identified on the flood-inundation maps.

  16. A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

    2003-01-01

    This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

  17. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    in shallow streams, on the water conservation and irrigation habits of Oklahomans, and the development. · Water conservation in Oklahoma urban and suburban watersheds through modification of irrigation

  18. Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    de Nie, Michael Willem.

    Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

  19. N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11

    E-print Network

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

  20. Exploration for fossil and nuclear fuels from orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, N. M.; Tiedemann, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of LANDSAT and Skylab-EREP data have defined both the advantages and limitations of space platforms as a new 'tool' in mineral exploration. One LANDSAT investigation in the Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma has demonstrated a correlation between several types of anomalies recognized in the imagery and the locations of known oil and gas fields. In addition to supporting several LANDSAT follow-on investigations in petroleum exploration, NASA has approved a broad in-house study at Goddard Space Flight Center designed to verify the general applicability of the initial Anadarko Basin results. Using both conventional photogeologic methods and special computer processing, imagery taken over oil-producing areas is being subjected to detailed analysis in search of definitive recognition criteria.

  1. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  2. Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name Home County County Residing In Address City State Zip Code Email Home Phone Business/Cell Phone: Birthday Years in 4-H: From to 4-H Awards/Trips Your membership in the Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association is an investment in the future

  3. Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The Indian Education Program in Oklahoma is financed and operated under the provision of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma Department of Education and is supervised by the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley Act (JOM) of 1936. The narrative section of this 1972 annual report…

  4. Twenty Sixth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The 26th annual report (1973) of American Indian education programs in Oklahoma is presented. The Oklahoma education program is financed and operated under a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior, and the State Department of Education. The supervision of the program is carried out entirely by the State…

  5. Twentieth Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laney, L. J.

    Financed and operated under the provisions of a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Education, and the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this document describes the Indian Education Program in Oklahoma, authorized by the Johnson-O'Malley Act and supervised by the State Department of Education. This 1967 annual…

  6. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  7. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on the water cycle in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. 2. We co-hosted the 7th annual Water Research Symposium. Chris Zou was awarded a 104G grant entitled Eastern Redcedar Encroachment and Water Cycle in TallgrassOklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water

  8. IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ARSENIC STANDARDS ON OKLAHOMA WATER RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The new national standard for arsenic in drinking water supplies, slated to take effect in 2006, is having an unexpected impact on a number of Oklahoma communities. Currently, several municipalities in north central Oklahoma are in compliance with existing arsenic standards (50 ...

  9. Parasitism of aphids in canola fields in central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter canola, Brassica napus L., production in Oklahoma has increased from essentially 0 ha in 2001 to 40,500 ha in 2011, and acreage is expected to continue to increase. Three aphid species typically infest canola fields in central Oklahoma, the turnip aphid Lypaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach), the cab...

  10. Fiscal Equity of Teacher Salaries and Compensation in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Jeffrey; Evans, Nancy O.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the degree to which financial resources supporting teachers was equitably distributed in Oklahoma. Teachers are an important resource and their importance is being increasingly emphasized as educators attempt to increase student achievement. Every student educated in Oklahoma should have an equal right to…

  11. Oklahoma geology, the challenge in a changing environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. B. Miller; B. L. Tillman

    1993-01-01

    A diversity of geology and programs exists in Oklahoma which requires the SCS geologist to use a wide range of experience in order to contribute to the many existing programs. The US Soil Conservation Service geologist work force consists of Bob L. Tillman, Sedimentation Geologist, Chickasha, and Glen B. Miller, Engineering Geologist, Stillwater, Oklahoma. Their poster display illustrates channel erosion

  12. Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. L. Holzer

    2002-01-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a

  13. Literacy and Education among Adult Indians in Oklahoma. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Paul R.; And Others

    The U.S. Office of Education funded the Adult Indian Education Project (AIEP) for 15 months to identify literacy levels and educational needs of adult American Indians in Oklahoma. Using Native American field interviewers, the AIEP surveyed a 1.8% random sample of adults from 19 tribal groups representing 70% of the Indian population of Oklahoma.…

  14. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ://osufacts.okstate.edu Ecology and Management of Sericea Lespedeza D. Chad Cummings Sr. Agriculturist Rangeland Ecology Ecology and Management John R. Weir Research Associate Rangeland Ecology and Management Sericea lespedeza, and biological diversity. Sericea lespedeza has been found growing in all parts of Oklahoma except the Panhandle

  15. Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Erin M.

    2010-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-166-1835, US Post Office Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kominsky

    1987-01-01

    In response to a request from the U.S. Department of Justice on behalf of the U.S. Postal Service, a study was made of background concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Post Office Building located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The purpose of the study was to determine the concentration of PCBs in a building similar in structure to the Page

  17. Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

  18. University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-09-21

    The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

  19. Psychological response to the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Krug, R S; Nixon, S J; Vincent, R

    1996-01-01

    The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City was the most devastating terrorist activity that has occurred in America. Prevention of revictimization of persons seriously affected by the bombing was central to the planned response to this tragedy. Coordination and collaboration among local, state, and national agencies promoted effective clinical services provision, research facilitation, and prevention of revictimization. Information gathered from this cooperative effort will contribute to the effort to minimize the potential for such tragedies in the future as well as help to develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce the effects when the next such disaster occurs. PMID:8682905

  20. Flood of August 27-28, 1977, West Cache Creek and Blue Beaver Creek, southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corley, Robert K.; Huntzinger, Thomas L.

    1979-01-01

    This report documents a major storm which occurred August 27-28, 1977, in southwest Oklahoma near the communities of Cache and Faxon, OK. Blue Beaver Creek and West Cache Creek and their tributaries experienced extensive flooding that caused an estimated $1 million in damages. Reported rainfall amounts of 8 to 12 inches in 6 hours indicate the storm had a frequency in excess of the 100-year rainfall. Peak discharges on Blue Beaver Creek near Cache and West Cache Creek near Faxon were 13,500 cubic feet per second and 45,700 cubic feet per second respectively. The estimated flood frequency was in excess of 100 years on Blue Beaver Creek and in excess of 50 years on West Cache Creek. Unit runoff on small basins were in excess of 2000 cubic feet per second per square mile. Surveyed highwater marks were used to map the flooded area. (USGS)

  1. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-08-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

  2. Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Statewide regression equations for Oklahoma were determined for estimating peak discharge and flood frequency for selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 500 years for ungaged sites on natural unregulated streams. The most significant independent variables required to estimate peak-streamflow frequency for natural unregulated streams in Oklahoma are contributing drainage area, main-channel slope, and mean-annual precipitation. The regression equations are applicable for watersheds with drainage areas less than 2,510 square miles that are not affected by regulation from manmade works. Limitations on the use of the regression relations and the reliability of regression estimates for natural unregulated streams are discussed. Log-Pearson Type III analysis information, basin and climatic characteristics, and the peak-stream-flow frequency estimates for 251 gaging stations in Oklahoma and adjacent states are listed. Techniques are presented to make a peak-streamflow frequency estimate for gaged sites on natural unregulated streams and to use this result to estimate a nearby ungaged site on the same stream. For ungaged sites on urban streams, an adjustment of the statewide regression equations for natural unregulated streams can be used to estimate peak-streamflow frequency. For ungaged sites on streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures, an adjustment of the statewide regression equations for natural unregulated streams can be used to estimate peak-streamflow frequency. The statewide regression equations are adjusted by substituting the drainage area below the floodwater retarding structures, or drainage area that represents the percentage of the unregulated basin, in the contributing drainage area parameter to obtain peak-streamflow frequency estimates.

  3. Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, R.L.; Bergman, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Statewide regression relations for Oklahoma were determined for estimating peak discharge of floods for selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 500 years. The independent variables required for estimating flood discharge for rural streams are contributing drainage area and mean annual precipitation. Main-channel slope, a variable used in previous reports, was found to contribute very little to the accuracy of the relations and was not used. The regression equations are applicable for watersheds with drainage areas less than 2,500 square miles that are not significantly affected by regulation from manmade works. These relations are presented in graphical form for easy application. Limitations on the use of the regression relations and the reliability of regression estimates for rural unregulated streams are discussed. Basin and climatic characteristics, log-Pearson Type III statistics and the flood-frequency relations for 226 gaging stations in Oklahoma and adjacent states are presented. Regression relations are investigated for estimating flood magnitude and frequency for watersheds affected by regulation from small FRS (floodwater retarding structures) built by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service in their watershed protection and flood prevention program. Gaging-station data from nine FRS regulated sites in Oklahoma and one FRS regulated site in Kansas are used. For sites regulated by FRS, an adjustment of the statewide rural regression relations can be used to estimate flood magnitude and frequency. The statewide regression equations are used by substituting the drainage area below the FRS, or drainage area that represents the percent of the basin unregulated, in the contributing drainage area parameter to obtain flood-frequency estimates. Flood-frequency curves and flow-duration curves are presented for five gaged sites to illustrate the effects of FRS regulation on peak discharge.

  4. Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Ford, Trenton W.

    2013-03-06

    , but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet...

  5. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  6. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  7. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  8. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  9. 25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS ...1902 (32 Stat. 43), authorizes right-of-way grants across tribal and individually owned land in Oklahoma. Rights-of-way granted under...

  10. 76 FR 9040 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION:...

  11. 75 FR 6404 - Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION:...

  12. 76 FR 37166 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1989--DR), dated 06/06/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. EFFECTIVE DATES:...

  13. 76 FR 50535 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR), dated 06/21/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/22/2011 through 05/25/2011. Effective Date:...

  14. Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Snell, Charles Burton

    1989-01-01

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOMORPHIC EVIDENCE FOR LATE CENOZOIC DEFORMATION' WICHITA MOUNTAINS, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CHARLES BURTON SNELL Approved as to style and content by Norman R. Til d (Chair of Com ttee) Christ... her C. Mathewson (Member) Kenneth L. White (Member) Jo . S ng (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Geomorphic Evidence for Late Cenozoic Deformation, Wichita Mountains~~ Oklahoma. (December 1989) Charles B. Snell, B. S. , University...

  15. Seasonal to interannual variations of soil moisture measured in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illston, Bradley G.; Basara, Jeffrey B.; Crawford, Kenneth C.

    2004-12-01

    Agriculture is a $2 billion component of the state economy in Oklahoma. As a result, meteorological, climatological, and agricultural communities should benefit from an improved understanding of soil moisture conditions and how those conditions vary spatially and temporally. The Oklahoma Mesonet is an automated observing network that provides real-time hydrometeorological observations at 115 stations across Oklahoma. In 1996, sensors were installed at 60 Mesonet sites to provide near-real-time observations of soil moisture.This study focuses on 6 years of soil moisture data collected between 1997 and 2002 to analyse the annual cycle and temporal characteristics of soil moisture across Oklahoma. The statewide analysis of the annual cycle of soil moisture revealed four distinct soil moisture phases. In addition, the four statewide phases were also observed in each of the nine climate divisions across Oklahoma, although the temporal characteristics of each phase were unique for each division. Further analysis demonstrated that, at shallow soil depths (5 and 25 cm), the spatial variability of soil moisture across Oklahoma was most homogeneous during the winter and spring periods and most heterogeneous during the summer and autumn periods. Conversely, at greater depths (60 and 75 cm), soil moisture was most heterogeneous during the winter period and the most homogeneous during the late spring.

  16. US hydropower resource assessment for Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose, The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Oklahoma.

  17. Oklahoma Climatological Survey: Outreach and Educational Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) provides outreach programs and educational materials to public safety agencies, agricultural interests, educators, and the general public. These include OK-FIRST, which provides weather data and training to public safety agencies; EarthStorm, a program for educators that integrates learning modules with real-time weather data; and Agweather, a website that provides information to help agricultural producers with weather-related decisions. The site also features a glossary of weather terminology, a set of lesson plans, and reference materials intended for use as refresher information by teachers. Other resources include information on tornado safety, case studies on the use of OCS training materials, and a set of maps and graphs with climatological data and information on severe weather phenomena.

  18. Mass casualties in the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Teague, David C

    2004-05-01

    The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was partially destroyed by a terrorist bomb on April 19, 1995. Injuries were sustained by 759 people, 168 of whom died. Fatalities occurred primarily among victims in the collapse zone of the federal building. Only 83 survivors required hospitalization. Twenty-two surviving victims sustained multiple fractures. Most victims arrived at local emergency departments by private vehicle within 2 hours. More severely injured survivors were transported by ambulance. The closer receiving hospitals used emergency department facilities and minor treatment areas. Few survivors were extricated from the bombing site more than 3 hours after the detonation. Mass casualty plans must provide for improved communications, diversion and retriage from facilities nearest the disaster site, and effective coordination of community and hospital resources. PMID:15187837

  19. Seismogram offers insight into Oklahoma City bombing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Fuis, Gary S.; Ryberg, Trond; Brocher, Thomas M.; Dietel, Christopher M.

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, generated seismic waves that were recorded on two permanent seismographs about 7 and 26 km away from the bombing. The seismogram recorded at 26 km shows two low-frequency wave trains, discrete sets of oscillatory signals, that begin about 10 s apart. Public release of this record prompted speculation that each wave train was caused by a different energy source. On May 23, 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the demolition of the bomb-ravaged Federal Building with portable seismographs (Figure 1). Two wave trains were picked up again. The recordings indicate that the wave trains during both the bombing and demolition represent seismic waves traveling at different velocities. We conclude that the two wave trains recorded during the bombing are consistent with a single impulsive energy source.

  20. The distributed model intercomparison project - Phase 2: Motivation and design of the Oklahoma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael B.; Koren, Victor; Reed, Seann; Zhang, Ziya; Zhang, Yu; Moreda, Fekadu; Cui, Zhengtao; Mizukami, Naoki; Anderson, Eric A.; Cosgrove, Brian A.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThe Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) conducted the second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP 2). After DMIP 1, the NWS recognized the need for additional science experiments to guide its research-to-operations path towards advanced hydrologic models for river and water resources forecasting. This was accentuated by the need to develop a broader spectrum of water resources forecasting products (such as soil moisture) in addition to the more traditional river, flash flood, and water supply forecasts. As it did for DMIP 1, the NWS sought the input and contributions from the hydrologic research community. DMIP 1 showed that using operational precipitation data, some distributed models could indeed perform as well as lumped models in several basins and better than lumped models for one basin. However, in general, the improvements were more limited than anticipated by the scientific community. Models combining so-called conceptual rainfall-runoff mechanisms with physically-based routing schemes achieved the best overall performance. Clear gains were achieved through calibration of model parameters, with the average performance of calibrated models being better than uncalibrated models. DMIP 1 experiments were hampered by temporally-inconsistent precipitation data and few runoff events in the verification period for some basins. Greater uncertainty in modeling small basins was noted, pointing to the need for additional tests of nested basins of various sizes. DMIP 2 experiments in the Oklahoma (OK) region were more comprehensive than in DMIP 1, and were designed to improve our understanding beyond what was learned in DMIP 1. Many more stream gauges were located, allowing for more rigorous testing of simulations at interior points. These included two new gauged interior basins that had drainage areas smaller than the smallest in DMIP 1. Soil moisture and routing experiments were added to further assess if distributed models could accurately model basin-interior processes. A longer period of higher quality precipitation data was available, and facilitated a test to note the impacts of data quality on model calibration. Moreover, the DMIP 2 calibration and verification periods contained more runoff events for analysis. Two lumped models were used to define a robust benchmark for evaluating the improvement of distributed models compared to lumped models. Fourteen groups participated in DMIP 2 using a total of sixteen models. Ten of these models were not in DMIP 1. This paper presents the motivation for DMIP 2 Oklahoma experiments, discusses the major project elements, and describes the data and models used. In addition, the paper introduces the findings, which are covered in a companion results paper ( Smith et al., this issue). Lastly, the paper summarizes the DMIP 1 and 2 experiments with commentary from the NWS perspective. Future papers will cover the DMIP 2 experiments in the western USA mountainous basins.

  1. Geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits of the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake, central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River between Lake Overholser and Eufaula Lake, an area of about 1,835 square miles, and to determine the maximum annual yield of ground water. A 1982 water-level map of the alluvial and terrace aquifer was prepared using field data and published records. Data from test holes and other data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board were used to establish the approximate thickness of the alluvial and terrace deposits. The North Canadian River from Lake Overholser, near Oklahoma City, to Eufaula Lake is paralleled by a 2- to 3-mile wide band of alluvium. Scattered terrace deposits on either side of the alluvium reach an extreme width of 8 miles. Rocks of Permian age bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from the west to the midpoint of the study area; Pennsylvanian rocks bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from that point eastward. Three major aquifers are present in the study area: the alluvial and terrace aquifer, consisting of alluvium and terrace deposits of Quaternary age in a narrow band on either side of the North Canadian River; the Garber-Wellington aquifer of Permian age, consisting of an upper unconfined zone and a lower confined zone separated by relatively impermeable shales; and the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of Pennsylvanian age. At locations were the alluvial and terrace aquifer overlies either of the other aquifers, there is hydraulic continuity between the alluvial and terrace aquifer and the other aquifers, and water levels are the same. Most large-scale municipal and industrial pumping from the Garber-Wellington aquifer is from the lower zone and has little discernible effect upon the alluvial and terrace aquifer. The total estimated base flow of the North Canadian River for the studied reach is 264 cubic feet per second. Evapotranspiration from the basin in August is about 60 cubic feet per second for the North Canadian River from Lake Overholser to a measuring station above Eufaula Lake. Estimated recharge rates to the alluvial and terrace aquifer in the basin range from 1.7 inches at the west edge of the study area to 7.0 inches at the east edge. Total permitted withdrawal from the aquifer, according to records of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, ranged from 2,107 acre-feet per year in 1942 to about 21,415 acre-feet per year in 1982. Simulations of the alluvial and terrace aquifer from Lake Overholser to Eufaula Lake were made using a finite-difference model developed by McDonald and Harbaugh (1984). The area of the aquifers was subdivided into a finite-difference grid having 30 rows and 57 columns with cells measuring 1 mile in the north-south direction and 2 miles in the east-west direction. The model was calibrated in two steps: A steady-state calibration simulated head distribution prior to extensive pumping of the aquifer in 1942, and a transient calibration simulated head distribution after extensive pumpage. The final horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the alluvial and terrace aquifer was 0.0036 feet per second (310 feet per day) at all locations. The recharge rate for the alluvial and terrace aquifer ranged from 1.7 inch per year in the west to 7.0 inches per year in the east, and averaged about 3.3 inches per year. A specific yield of 15 percent was used for the transient simulation. Permitted pumpage for 1942 through 1982 was used in the digital model to estimate the annual volume of water in storage in the alluvial and terrace aquifer for the years for this time period. The 1982 permitted pumpage rates were used for projections for 1983 to 2020. The estimated volume of water in storage was 1,940,000 acre-feet in 1982. Because the estimated recharge rate is equal to the allowed pumpage rate in 1982, the projected volume of water in storage in both 1993 and 2020 was 1,890,000 acre-feet.

  2. POSITION AVAILABLE Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    POSITION AVAILABLE Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Oklahoma Overview The Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC) at the University of Oklahoma (OU) is looking to hire a post-doctoral

  3. Weed Control Research in Guar in Texas and Oklahoma: 1961-72.

    E-print Network

    Smith, D. T.; Wiese, A. F.; Santelmann, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    ................................................. Lubbock, Texas 6 Preemergence Treatments ....................................... 6 Perking, Oklahoma ............................................. 6 Lu hhock, Texa s ................................................. 6 Bro~~mfield, Texas... ............................................. 6 xtemergencc Trert tmen t~ ..................................... 6 P. esults and Discussion ................................................. 7 Preplant Trentmentu ............................................... 7 Perkin\\, Oklahoma...

  4. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  5. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  6. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern...

  7. 40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North...

  8. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  9. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  10. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  11. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  12. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  13. 40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125 Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwestern...

  14. 3 CFR - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure Projects Presidential...March 22, 2012 Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma,...

  15. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section...PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan...

  16. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  17. The North West Oklahoma In-Service Cooperative: A Model for Rural Cooperative Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwink, Timothy A.; Hensley, Stephen R.

    The North West Oklahoma In-Service Cooperative (NWOIC), established in 1980, encourages, promotes, and channels faculty development and needs in the rural northwestern quadrant of Oklahoma. Its objectives are: (1) to aid northwestern Oklahoma school districts in the structure and administration of local faculty development plans; (2) to develop…

  18. Oklahoma Library Technology Network (OLTN) Electronic Resources for Elementary Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol, Comp.

    This document describes Oklahoma Library Technology Network electronic resources for elementary age children. The first section provides a history of Oklahoma statewide shared databases. Oklahoma statewide information database contacts are listed in the second section. The third section presents information on InfoTrac Kid's Edition Online…

  19. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

  20. Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A description of the geology of the Permian Basin of the West Texas And Southeastern New Mexico was presented. Also, a brief history of the petroleum and natural gas drilling in the region was given. It was concluded that the New Mexico portion of the Permian Basin has the greatest potential for future fuel production. During 1980, there were 646 oil well completions, and 168 dry holes were recorded in southeast New Mexico. The average total depths of new wells completed was 4,901 feet for oil wells, 8,987 feet for gas wells, and 6,250 feet for dry holes.

  1. Sundaland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Morley, Christopher K.

    The continental core of Sundaland, comprising Sumatra, Java, Borneo, the Thai-Malay Peninsula and Indochina, was assembled during the Triassic Indosinian orogeny, and formed an exposed landmass during Pleistocene lowstands. Because the region includes extensive shallow seas, and is not significantly elevated, it is often assumed to have been stable for a long period. This stability is a myth. The region is today surrounded by subduction and collision zones, and merges with the India-Asia collision zone. Cenozoic deformation of Sundaland is recorded in the numerous deep sedimentary basins alongside elevated highlands. Some sediment may have been supplied from Asia following Indian collision but most was locally derived. Modern and Late Cenozoic sediment yields are exceptionally high despite a relatively small land area. India-Asia collision, Australia-SE Asia collision, backarc extension, subduction rollback, strike-slip faulting, mantle plume activity, and differential crust-lithosphere stretching have been proposed as possible basin-forming mechanisms. In scale, crustal character, heat flow and mantle character the region resembles the Basin and Range province or the East African Rift, but is quite unlike them in tectonic setting. Conventional basin modeling fails to predict heat flow, elevation, basin depths and subsidence history of Sundaland and overestimates stretching factors. These can be explained by interaction of a hot upper mantle, a weak lower crust, and lower crustal flow in response to changing forces at the plate edges. Deformation produced by this dynamic model explains the maintenance of relief and hence sediment supply over long time periods.

  2. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle.

    E-print Network

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01

    in the would annually generate marketing-systemsavings Texas-Oklahoma Panhandle and Texas Gulf ports. of $2.49 million or 12.2 cents per bushel. The 50-, 80- Costs of the current system are estimated and then car system was the second-most efficient system... the development of several system components. Conse- - Unit bai&rarraportation economicdgrain hansporta- quent'r , this would be the most difficult alternative tionlgnin exports. to imp ement. 2 Alternative Export-Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas-Oklahoma...

  3. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

  4. Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

  5. Oklahoma Library Technology Network Plan for Information Sharing and Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

    This plan sets forth approaches for state-level assistance for Oklahoma libraries to exchange information and to share or acquire machine-readable information from public and private sources through telecommunications, as well as for access to these libraries for existing and future state informational databases. Objectives and requirements are…

  6. Oklahoma Structural Engineers Association Central Chapter Monthly Meeting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2001-01-01

    The need for Special Inspections vary based on building code requirements, local building requirements, and the owner's specifications. The need for special inspections and how to communicate the results with all interested parties will be discussed during this meeting. The views of the City of Oklahoma City, a structural engineering firm, and a testing company will be offered followed by

  7. Fungicides for organic cantaloupe production in Oklahoma: An initial assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides that are potentially useful in organic production were evaluated for foliar disease control in cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulates ’Israeli’) during 2009 at Lane, Oklahoma. Milstop (85% potassium bicarbonate), Neem oil, Bonide liquid copper (10% copper octanoate), Serenade (QST ...

  8. Program Assessment: University Without Walls, "Flaming Rainbow," Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitka, Gene

    An educational program assessment of the University Without Walls (UWW), located in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, and known as "Flaming Rainbow," was presented in this document. The evaluation was conducted during March 27-30, 1973. The 6 American Indian participants, who are financially supported by the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) Higher Education…

  9. Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

  10. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  11. Twenty-Seventh Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    The Oklahoma Indian education program is financed and operated under a contract between the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior, and the State Department of Education. Supervision of the program is the responsibility of the State Department of Education as authorized by the Johnson O'Malley (JOM) Act of 1936. To qualify for JOM…

  12. Hydrogen manufacture by Lurgi gasification of Oklahoma coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using the Lurgi gasification process to produce hydrogen from Oklahoma coal are listed. Special attention was given to the production of heat for the process; heat is generated by burning part of pretreated coal in the steam generator. Overall performance of the Lurgi process is summarized in tabular form.

  13. Research Training at the University of Oklahoma: An Opinion Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotsky, Ivan

    The extent to which research training is needed by Master of Public Administration (MPA) graduates at the University of Oklahoma, Advanced Programs, was investigated through the administration of a questionnaire to 38 August 1977 MPA degree recipients. The questionnaire contained 13 questions concerning where the student took most of his courses;…

  14. Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

    1999-01-01

    Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

  15. Oklahoma School Grows from 85 to 473 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gust, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of a Catholic K-8 school in Oklahoma. Reports that the school opened in 1990 and more than quintupled in size by 2001, making it the largest Catholic school in the state. Identifies the school's number one priority as its commitment to Catholicism. (NB)

  16. Improving Print Management at at the University of Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colaw, Lee M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how business students at the University of Oklahoma improved the school's print management by initiating an alternative charging system, networking the printers, and choosing the right hardware and software. Reasons why the UnipriNT Print Management system was chosen to manage the computer lab's printing services are discussed. (GR)

  17. Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

  18. Evaluating Injury Prevention Programs: The Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallonee, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Illustrates how evaluating the Oklahoma City Smoke Alarm Project increased its success in reducing residential fire-related injuries and deaths. The program distributed and tested smoke alarms in residential dwellings and offered educational materials on fire prevention and safety. Evaluation provided sound data on program processes and outcomes,…

  19. The northwest extension of the Meers Fault in southwestern Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Cetin, Hasan

    1991-01-01

    ). General Geologic History and Stratigraphy There are three stages in the geologic history of Southern Oklahoma (Ham et al. , 1964). During the first stage, an aulocogen is thought to have formed in the region as is evidenced by intrusion of diabase...

  20. Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Aviation and Space The Master of Science in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, leadership, legal, and regulatory issues, finance, current participating in this program come from a variety of backgrounds including aviation, military, and government

  1. Infant Toddler Services through Community Collaboration: Oklahoma's Early Childhood Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Carla B.; Horm, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrated services for infants, toddlers, and families are essential for optimal child development, and collaboration across systems is increasingly important to maximize limited resources. The authors describe three successful initiatives in Oklahoma that use a collaborative systems approach to providing direct services to young…

  2. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle. 

    E-print Network

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01

    -78 From Catoosa, Oklahoma Cents Per to bushel (Q/bu.) Mississippi River Ports1 16.92 Houston, Galveston, Beaumont, Port Arthur 26.82 Corpus Christi 37.26 p p p p p p 'Includes Anu, Baton Rouge, Destrehan, Myrtle Grove, New Orleans, Reserve...

  3. University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

  4. Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

  5. 78 FR 36632 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00071

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20/ 2013. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Flooding. Incident Period: 05/18/2013 through 06/02/2013. Effective Date: 06/11/2013. Physical Loan...

  6. Da-Jiang (David) Zheng Oklahoma State University

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, Hans A.

    ) Female alternative mating tactics, reproductive success and the social decision-making network Ophir, AG decisions to mate and reproductive success within alternative mating tactics. Society for Social ochrogaster. Honors and Awards: 2012 Outstanding Master's student, Oklahoma State University 2011 Grant-in-Aid

  7. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Oklahoma's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

  8. UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COUNCIL SPEAKER BUREAU

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    "; to perform at the date, time, and place specified below: If no, are you and your employees legally authorized information Any person who has been an employee of the State of Oklahoma within the past 12 months at the above address immediately following the engagement. FEDERAL LAWS prohibit payment to be given

  9. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Sensing of Water Quality and Harmful Algae in Oklahoma's Lakes (Dr. David Hambright, OU) will use algae blooms. This is a proof-of-concept project. - Developing the Groundwater Monitoring Potential satellite imagery and handheld devices to test the efficacy of remote sensing to detect potential harmful

  10. How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1996-01-01

    Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

  11. STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY -1 The University of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY - 1 The University of Oklahoma STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Revised and Responsibilities Code, and the Student Alcohol Policy. (1) All fraternities, sororities, and residence halls shall be dry. Alcoholic beverages will not be allowed inside fraternity houses, sorority houses and OU

  12. Diurnal cycle of the Oklahoma City urban heat island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Jeffrey B.; Hall, Peter K.; Schroeder, Amanda J.; Illston, Bradley G.; Nemunaitis, Kodi L.

    2008-10-01

    Between the dates of 28 June and 31 July 2003, the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field project was conducted in Oklahoma City and was the largest urban dispersion experiment ever in North America. Because the focus of JU2003 was on atmospheric processes within the urban environment, an extremely dense network of instrumentation was deployed in and around the central business district (CBD) both prior to and during the field experiment. Among the variables collected were high-resolution observations of air temperature from various instrument sources. Additional observations of air temperature were also collected at Oklahoma Mesonet stations in the rural areas surrounding Oklahoma City. Using an index value, the diurnal cycle of the urban heat island (UHI) for Oklahoma City, with respect to the surrounding rural terrain, was quantified. The results revealed a consistent mean nocturnal UHI greater than 1.5°C at both 2 and 9 m. However, observations at 2 m during JU2003 revealed a significant urban "cool" island during the convective portion of the day. The mean variability of temperature within the urban core of Oklahoma City increased significantly after sunrise, increased to a maximum near solar noon, and decreased following sunset. These results were inconsistent with the rural observations wherein the variability among sites was maximized during the nocturnal period. Finally, the vertical temperature gradient between 2 and 9 m demonstrated a clear and strong diurnal trend at the rural locations, whereas observations from the urban environment were nearly isothermal and consistent with near-neutral conditions throughout JU2003.

  13. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  14. Employment Advertising Request -University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Employment Advertising Request - University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return this form to the Office, call Employment & Compensation Services at (405) 325-1826. Deadline for receipt of advertising requests

  15. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995March 31, 1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1995-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and

  16. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1December 31, 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1994-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD

  17. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1December 31, 1994

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Mankin; M. K. Banken

    1995-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with

  18. Ravia nappe, Bryan County, Oklahoma: a gravity slide block off the Tishomingo uplift

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.I.

    1983-08-01

    The Ravia nappe in Bryan County, Oklahoma, is located along the southwestern flank of the Tishomingo uplift, between the Cumberland and East Durant oil fields. This mass of Cambrian-Ordovician through Mississippian sediments tectonically overlies younger Springer shales (Pennsylvanian) of the Ardmore basin. Previously, this feature has been interpreted to have been thrust southward along the Cumberland fault, a fault parallel to the Ravia thrust. Reinterpretation of this area, with additional well data, indicates the Ravia nappe is a gravity slide block off the uplifted Tishomingo mountains. The Ravia nappe is interpreted to have been originally the southwest overturned limb of the Tishomingo uplift. Prior to the major thrusting on the Ravia thrust, but after compressional folding and uplift of the Tishomingo mountains, a breakaway fault formed across the most intensely folded beds. The breakaway fault undercut the overturned southwestern limb of the Tishomingo uplift in a concave-upward fault surface. Gravitational forces caused the Ravia nappe Mississippian Caney rocks to Cambrian-Ordoviciena Arbuckle rocks to slide rotationally southwestward 2.5 mi (4 km). Topographic relief prior to the slide may have been as much as 9000 ft (2700 m). The slide occurred sometime during late Morrowan to early Desmoinesian.

  19. Digital geologic map of Fort Smith Quadrangle, east-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrand, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation of the surficial geology of the 1:250,000-scale Fort Smith quadrangle, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Geologic Map, sheet 1 of 4, included in the Oklahoma Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Fort Smith quadrangle, east-central Oklahoma, Hydrologic Atlas 1, Marcher, 1969. The geology was compiled by M.V. Marcher, in 1967.

  20. Model a Catchment Basin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this resource is to introduce what a catchment basin is and how it works. Students will make a 3-dimensional model of a catchment basin to understand how water moves through the basin and explore how water is affected when there are changes in the basin.

  1. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  2. Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

  3. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  4. A DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP DATABASE FOR THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Heran; Gregory N. Green; Douglas B. Stoeser

    This report consists of a compilation of twelve digital geologic maps provided in ARC\\/INFO interchange (e00) format for the state of Oklahoma. The source maps consisted of nine USGS 1:250,000-scale quadrangle maps and three 1:125,000 scale county maps. This publication presents a digital composite of these data intact and without modification across quadrangle boundaries to resolve geologic unit discontinuities. An

  5. Eutrophication of Tenkiller Reservoir, Oklahoma, from nonpoint agricultural runoff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Dennis Cooke; Eugene B. Welch; John R. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Tenkiller Ferry Reservoir, a large (51.6 km) US midcontinent reservoir in Oklahoma, switched from oligo-mesotrophic prior to 1975 to eutrophic by 1986, evidenced by changes in phytoplankton taxa, chlorophyll (Chl), total phosphorus (TP), transparency, and areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit. External TP loading increased 2.5-fold between 1974 and 2004, mainly as nonpoint loading from disposal of an annual (2001–2004) average 406,818

  6. Geomorphic evidence for Late Cenozoic deformation, Wichita Moutains, Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Snell, Charles Burton

    1989-01-01

    set document moderate post-Pliocene deformation along the Wichita Uplift. Tectonic activity along the Amarillo Uplift resulted in slight warping of the Southern High Plains surface. Modest upwarping is suggested by abnormal surface contours... of Delaware Chair of Advisory Committee: Mr. Norman R. Tilford Holocene displacement on the Meers fault has prompted an investigation into Late Cenozoic tectonic activity in southwestern Oklahoma. The emphasis of this study was on geomorphic evidence...

  7. Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountains area, south-central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, Roy W.; Hanson, Ronald L.; Davis, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Rocks that make up the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer crop out over ~500 mi2 in the Arbuckle Mountains province in south-central Oklahoma. The aquifer consists of limestone, dolomite, and sandstone of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups of Late Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and is about 5,000-9,000 ft thick. The rocks were subjected to intensive folding and faulting associated with major uplift of the area during Early to Late Pennsylvanian time.

  8. Echinoderm Faunas from the Bromide Formation (Middle Ordovician) of Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    1982-01-01

    geosyncline and the opposite end dies out in the platform. Subsidence, sediment thickness, sediment diversity, and tectonic activity are greatest near the mouth of the aulacogen, where it merges with the miogeosyncline from which it is indistinguish- able...) that the concept of aulacogens was clearly presented in English. Hoffman and others stressed how well the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen fits the definition of Shatski and used the work of Ham and others (1964) to discuss the geologic history of the structure trn nap...

  9. SOME INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES IN OKLAHOMA RAPTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. ALAN KOCAN; JOHN SNELLING; ELLIS C. GREINER

    Blood films and sera samples from wild Oklahoma raptors (Strigiformes -36 birds, 3 species; Falconiformes-SO birds, 7 species) were examined for hematozoa and tested for serologic antibody response to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), encephalitis (EEE and WEE), ornithosis, and influenza. Twenty-nine of 36 (80.5%) Strigiformes and 24 of 50 (48.0%) Falconiformes showed the presence of one or more hematozoa. Serologic

  10. AVIFAUNA OF THE FOUR CANYON PRESERVE, ELLIS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Patten; Dan L. Reinking; Donald H. Wolfe

    In 2004 the Nature Conservancy established a new preserve in the mixed prairie of northwestern Oklahoma. Our year-round surveys of the preserve in 2005 yielded 97 bird species. With additional species recorded by others, the site list stands at 111 native species and two non-native species. We confirmed nearly one-fourth of these species as breeders on site, and an additional

  11. 34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at the site of the former Cook House for Willard Mill (upper mill that cut cants for Broughton Lumber Company's flume). Section of feeder after Lava Creek, looking down flume. Note extra large size of "V" in water supply vs. cant portions of flume. South/southeast 170 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

  12. NESTING ECOLOGY OF THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACK D. TYLER

    AssraAcr.-Loggerhead Shrike (Lank ludovicianus) nests were studied in southwestern Oklahoma from 1985 through 1988. Pairing began in late February to early March, and completed nests were found from 13 March to 20 June. Nesting peaked in mid-April, with second nestings from late May to late June. Average length of the nesting season was 11 weeks. Almost one-third of all nests

  13. Characterizing Earthquake Clusters in Oklahoma Using Subspace Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Benz, H.; Aster, R. C.; McNamara, D. E.; Myers, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Subspace detection is a powerful and adaptive tool for continuously detecting low signal to noise seismic signals. Subspace detectors improve upon simple cross-correlation/matched filtering techniques by moving beyond the use of a single waveform template to the use of multiple orthogonal waveform templates that effectively span the signals from all previously identified events within a data set. Subspace detectors are particularly useful in event scenarios where a spatially limited source distribution produces earthquakes with highly similar waveforms. In this context, the methodology has been successfully deployed to identify low-frequency earthquakes within non-volcanic tremor, to characterize earthquakes swarms above magma bodies, and for detailed characterization of aftershock sequences. Here we apply a subspace detection methodology to characterize recent earthquakes clusters in Oklahoma. Since 2009, the state has experienced an unprecedented increase in seismicity, which has been attributed by others to recent expansion in deep wastewater injection well activity. Within the last few years, 99% of increased Oklahoma earthquake activity has occurred within 15 km of a Class II injection well. We analyze areas of dense seismic activity in central Oklahoma and construct more complete catalogues for analysis. For a typical cluster, we are able to achieve catalog completeness to near or below magnitude 1 and to continuously document seismic activity for periods of 6 months or more. Our catalog can more completely characterize these clusters in time and space with event numbers, magnitudes, b-values, energy, locations, etc. This detailed examination of swarm events should lead to a better understanding of time varying earthquake processes and hazards in the state of Oklahoma.

  14. 75 FR 2860 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and Arkansas AGENCY: Environmental...SUMMARY: EPA Region 6 is developing a watershed model for the Illinois River watershed in Oklahoma and Arkansas to address...

  15. Chronology of migration by American coots in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddleman, William R.; Knopf, Fritz L.; Patterson, Craig T.

    1985-01-01

    American coots (Fulica americana) were studied on large reservoirs in north-central Oklahoma in 1979-1982 to determine chronologies of migrations by age- and sex class. Coots began migrating into Oklahoma in mid-September, numbers peaked in early to mid-October, and few birds were seen after 1 November. Some late migrants appeared in mid-December. In spring, coots began migrating in late February, numbers peaked in mid-April, and the last birds were seen in mid-May. Generally, adult and juvenile males and juvenile female coots migrated simultaneously in autumn, but adult females completed migration by 1 November. A few juveniles and adult males migrated in December. Adult coots preceded yearlings in spring. Despite annual and between-lake differences in chronology of autumn migration, most coots migrated before waterfowl hunting season in Oklahoma. Coot hunting seasons in mid-latitude states should commence before the general waterfowl season where management goals are to increase hunter interest and the harvest of birds.

  16. Proposed shallow drilling at the interface between the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and Ouachita fold belt, Arbuckle Mountains region, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lidiak, E.G. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science); Denison, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    Two major tectonic elements in southern North America are the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and the Ouachita foldbelt. The Aulacogen is characterized by basement-cored high-angle fault blocks along which movement occurred throughout much of Paleozoic time. It is one of the most intensely deformed areas in the stable interior platform of the craton. The fold belt, in contrast, consists primarily of thin-skinned compressional structures that formed in Late Paleozoic time. These two prominent tectonic features strike at a high angle to one another and are juxtaposed in southeast Oklahoma where the contact is buried shallowly beneath Cretaceous rocks of the Gulf Coastal Plain. A drilling program comprised of a series of shallow holes drilled across the contact zone will establish the structural and stratigraphic relationships at this important tectonic interface. The results obtained should be critical in elucidating the effect that the transverse aulacogen structures had on the development of the Ouachita frontal zone. Proposed drilling sites are in northern Bryan and Choctaw counties, Oklahoma, along the Tishomingo--Belton anticlines southeast of the basement-cored eastern Arbuckle Mountains. Crystalline rocks in this region are massive middle Proterozoic granitoid rocks overlain by Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Farther southeast, rocks in the frontal zone consist mainly of Late Paleozoic flysch-type sedimentary rocks. Depths to Paleozoic and older rocks beneath the coastal plain deposits are about 300--500 meters so that targeted structures can easily be reached.

  17. Distributions of median nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations across the Red River Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Longing, D; Haggard, B E

    2010-01-01

    Acquisition and compilation of water-quality data for an 11-yr time period (1996-2006) from 589 stream and river stations were conducted to support nutrient criteria development for the multistate Red River Basin shared by Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Ten water-quality parameters were collected from six data sources (USGS, Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, Oklahoma Water Resources Board, and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), and an additional 13 parameters were acquired from at least one source. Median concentrations of water-quality parameters were calculated at each individual station and frequency distributions (minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentiles, and maximum) of the median concentrations were calculated. Across the Red River Basin, median values for total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and sestonic chlorophyll-a (chl-a) ranged from < 0.02 to 20.2 mg L(-1), < 0.01 to 6.66 mg L(-1), and 0.10 to 262 microg L(-1), respectively. Overall, the 25th percentiles of TN data specific to the Red River Basin were generally similar to the USEPA-recommended ecoregion nutrient criteria of 0.31 to 0.88 mg L(-1), whereas median TP and chl-a data specific to the Red River Basin showed 25th percentiles higher than the USEPA-recommended criteria (0.010-0.067 mg TP L(-1); 0.93-3.00 microg chl-a L(-1)). The unique location of the Red River Basin in the south-central United States places it near the boundaries of several aggregate ecoregions; therefore, the development of ecoregion nutrient criteria likely requires using data specific to the Red River Basin, as shown in these analyses. This study provided basin-specific frequency distribution of median concentrations of water-quality parameters as the first step to support states in developing nutrient criteria to protect designated uses in the multijurisdictional Red River Basin. PMID:21284293

  18. Measuring watershed runoff capability with ERTS data. [Washita River Basin, Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Parameters of most equations used to predict runoff from an ungaged area are based on characteristics of the watershed and subject to the biases of a hydrologist. Digital multispectral scanner, MSS, data from ERTS was reduced with the aid of computer programs and a Dicomed display. Multivariate analyses of the MSS data indicate that discrimination between watersheds with different runoff capabilities is possible using ERTS data. Differences between two visible bands of MSS data can be used to more accurately evaluate the parameters than present subjective methods, thus reducing construction cost due to overdesign of flood detention structures.

  19. Oklahoma, Maine, Migration and "Right to Work": A Confused and Misleading Analysis

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Oklahoma, Maine, Migration and "Right to Work": A Confused and Misleading Analysis By the Bureau of Labor Education, University of Maine (Spring 2012) The recent article released by the Maine Heritage Policy Center (MHPC), "The Case for Right-to-Work in Maine: Examining the Evidence in Oklahoma" (1

  20. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  1. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  2. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  3. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  4. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  5. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  6. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  7. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  8. 33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma...Bureau of Reclamation shall operate the Foss Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  9. 33 CFR 208.27 - Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...CONTROL REGULATIONS § 208.27 Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir, Pond (Cobb) Creek, Oklahoma...of Reclamation shall operate the Fort Cobb Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood...

  10. The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

  11. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant in meteorology, and the applicant's general character. If you need room for additional comments please feel free the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  12. 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003.

    E-print Network

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    Multihoming ­ multiple IP addresses per host #12;Page 4 7SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M Payload, SACK, etc. #12;Page 6 11SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, OctPage 1 1SCTP Multistreaming over satellite M.Atiquzzaman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Oct 22, 2003. Effect

  13. Neglected or Delinquent Transition Services in Oklahoma 1982-83. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma City Public School System, OK.

    This report describes a special, 1-year federally funded project of the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma City Public schools, which operated to facilitate the transition of neglected or delinquent youths from state operated institutions to locally operated educational programs. The problems specific to youths in transition…

  14. Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickeson, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

  15. Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathers, Kent

    1996-01-01

    A high school principal describes the day of the terrorist attack on the federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. After meeting with assistant principals and the school nurse to make plans for dealing with possible repercussions, he told students what had happened, monitored TV broadcasts, evacuated the building during bomb scares, and…

  16. Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

    2002-01-01

    During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across the state were also affected. Data on persons who died or were injured were collected from medical examiner reports, hospital medical

  17. The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Michael W.

    The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Osage County, Oklahoma), managed by The Nature Conservancy, consists collected between 1992 and 2007 were examined to obtain a vouchered flora of the preserve. The known flora

  18. Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCharen, Belinda

    2009-01-01

    The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

  19. Rotational reflectance of dispersed vitrinite from the Arkoma basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Weesner, C.M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rotational reflectance of dispersed vitrinite provides superior documentation of thermal maturity and a capability for interpreting relative timing between thermal and kinematic events in Arkoma Basin strata characterized by vitrinite reflectances up to 5%. Rotational reflectance (R(rot)) is a more precise and less ambiguous index of thermal maturity than maximum (R'(max)), minimum (R(min)), and random (R(ran)) reflectance. Vitrinite reflectance anisotropy becomes sufficiently large to be measurable (using a microscope equipped with an automated rotating polarizer) at ???2% R(rot) and increases following a power function with increasing thermal maturity. Rotational reflectance data can be used to infer the shape of the vitrinite reflectance indicating surface (i.e. indicatrix) and, in turn, to enhance interpretations of the timing between thermal maxima and compressional tectonic events. Data from three wells in the Arkoma Basin Ouachita frontal thrust belt are used as examples. The absence of offsets in measured R(rot) across thrust faults combined with a predominance of uniaxial vitrinite in the thrust faulted part of the section suggest thermal maximum postdated thrust faulting in the western Ouachita frontal thrust belt of Oklahoma. In contrast, the general absence of offsets in measured R(rot) across thrust faults combined with a predominance of biaxial vitrinite in the thrust faulted part of the section suggest that the thermal maximum was coeval with thrust faulting in the eastern Ouachita frontal thrust belt of Arkansas. The presence of biaxial vitrinite in an allochthonous section and uniaxial vitrinite in an underlying, autochthonous section suggests that the thermal maximum was coeval with listric thrust faulting in the central Arkoma Basin of Oklahoma, and that rotational reflectance data can be used as a strain indicator to detect subtle decollement zones.

  20. Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

    2005-01-01

    Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

  1. BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mary H.

    1984-01-01

    Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

  2. After the bomb. Oklahoma City rescuers talk about their experiences.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M; Kernes, R; Lindsay, W; Webster, M

    1995-06-01

    Rather than trying to write a second-hand description of the response to the April 19 bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, we thought we'd let some of the people who were there caring for patients and searching for victims share their experiences in their own words. Marion Angell Garza, JEMS editorial/news coordinator, spoke at length with six responders, including paramedics, the triage and treatment officer, a firefighter/EMT-1 and an emergency physician. The following excerpts are from those interviews. PMID:10143265

  3. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  4. Environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus study unit, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamski, James C.; Petersen, James C.; Freiwald, David A.; Davis, Jerri V.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and hydrologic setting of the Ozark Plateaus National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study unit and the factors that affect water quality are described in this report. The primary natural and cultural features that affect water- quality characteristics and the potential for future water-quality problems are described. These environmental features include climate, physio- graphy, geology, soils, population, land use, water use, and surface- and ground-water flow systems. The study-unit area is approximately 47,600 square miles and includes most of the Ozark Plateaus Province and parts of the adjacent Osage Plains and Mississippi Alluvial Plain in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The geology is characterized by basement igneous rocks overlain by a thick sequence of dolomites, limestones, sandstones, and shales of Paleozoic age. Land use in the study unit is predominantly pasture and forest in the southeastern part, and pasture and cropland in the northwestern part. All or part of the White, Neosho-lllinois, Osage, Gasconade, Meramec, St. Francis, and Black River Basins are within the study unit. Streams in the Boston Mountains contain the least mineralized water, and those in the Osage Plains contain the most mineralized water. The study unit contains eight hydrogeologic units including three major aquifers--the Springfield Plateau, Ozark, and St. Francois aquifers. Streams and aquifers in the study unit generally contain calcium or calcium-magnesium bicarbonate waters. Ground- and surface-water interactions are greatest in the Salem and Springfield Plateaus and least in the Boston Mountains and Osage Plains. Geology, land use, and population probably are the most important environmental factors that affect water quality.

  5. Exploitation strategies and their economic applications in the Giant Red Oak Gas Field, Oklahoma, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, J.; Smyth, J.; Vizurraga, A. [Amoco Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Red Oak field is a giant gas field located in the Arkoma basin of Eastern Oklahoma, USA with recoverable reserves of 73.6 BCM (2.6 TCF) maximizing economic return from this field requires forward-looking strategic planning and continuous reassessment of economic and operational impacts. Post-project economic and technical analyses confirm that this strategy for maturing fields effectively reduces technical and economic risk associated with infill drilling and field development. Accuracy of cost, reserve and final performance predictions provided concrete measurement and feedback for continuous improvement of Amoco`s Red Oak field strategy. A strategy was formulated to maximize fieldwide productivity and define an economically prudent field development plan. Engineering field data and performance forecasts were integrated into the reservoir characterization model. This geotechnical model created the basis for the successful application for U.S. Federal Tight Gas Sandstone Designation in 1992 reducing net taxation on produced gas from low permeability (< 0.1md) reservoirs and resulting in substantial tax credit savings. The multi-disciplinary Red Oak team also targeted operational cost reduction. Integrated teams using process re-engineering eliminated or redesigned many costly steps. Strategic planning and post-drilling appraisals provided focus which allowed predictive scheduling of materials, optimization of compression and facilities capacity to trim costs 15% and boost production 0.5MMCMd (20 MMcfd). The planning and forward looking appraisals provide flexibility for uncertain future economic scenarios. The multidisciplinary strategy proved robust enough to fund a 47 km{sup 2} (18 mi{sup 2}) 3D seismic program to provide a detailed structural framework in which reservoir targeting could be accomplished with minimal economic risk.

  6. Improved Estimates of Evapotranspiration at Oklahoma Mesonet Sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, J. B.; Illston, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States is a region of dynamic weather and climate. In addition, the SGP region has demonstrated significant coupling between the land surface and atmospheric processes across varying spatial and temporal scales during the warm season. As such, mesocsale events including deep convection as well as regional drought and pluvial periods are impacted by land-atmosphere inter actions and gradients in the surface conditions. With the establishment of the Oklahoma Mesonet in 1994 and subsequent upgrades to the sensors deployed at the over 100 sites across the state, near real-time, collocated observations of soil and atmospheric variables have been collected, quality assured, and archived. At the same time additional observing systems and field campaigns have increased the breadth of the information gathered on soil, vegetation, and atmospheric processes across the SGP region. Such datasets have led (a) to numerous studies that have increased the understanding of how land-atmosphere interactions impact the local weather and climate of the SGP region and (b) new techniques to link in situ observations with remote sensing to provide improved understanding of surface-atmosphere exchange. Most recently, Oklahoma Mesonet soil and atmospheric observations have been combined with near real-time land surface conditions via MODIS remotely sensed data to improve estimates of evapotranspiration at local and regional scales, understand the dynamics of flash drought, and address the water budget of the region.

  7. Divergent/passive margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

  8. Santa Barbara Basin Los Angeles Basin

    E-print Network

    Einat, Aharonov

    of Groundwater Salinity Seawater Intrusion Mixing with Basinal Brines Dissolution of Evaporites Evaporation ca. 2:1 slope Ca-Enrichment Mineral Buffering Hanor (2006) #12;McIntosh and Walter (2005) Subglacial

  9. Oklahoma Orchestrates Energy Efficiency Solutions: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Oklahoma demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  10. The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

    Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

  11. Principal facts for a gravity survey made in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas during 1948

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, K.L.; Hoskinson, A.J.; Shelton, G.R.

    1971-01-01

    Observed gravity values, station locations, elevations, theoretical gravity, and free-air anomaly values are provided in tabular form for 554 gravity locations in northeastern Oklahoma-southeastern Kansas.

  12. 75 FR 56923 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; State Implementation Plan Revisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...to prohibit air emissions from adversely...through interstate transport. In this action...the interstate transport of NO X emissions from Oklahoma that...pertains to interstate transport of certain emissions. On August...

  13. 76 FR 64065 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...to prohibit emissions that adversely...of interstate transport. The SIP must...CSAPR or Transport Rule) for State emissions that contribute...revision for the transport element of 110...that Oklahoma emissions are not...

  14. Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The region north of the Canadian River in Texas and including the three western counties of Oklahoma have been rapidly developing the groundwater resource since the mid 1960's. This region, hereafter referred to as the Northern High Plains...

  15. JOB OPPORTUNITIES (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, ADA, OKLAHOMA, NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This page lists job opportunities at NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division (SPRD) located in Ada, Oklahoma. These include both EPA Postdoctoral Positions and National Research Council Postdoctoral Positions. SPRD's research programs include basic studies to enha...

  16. 40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County, Roger Mills County, Texas County, Woods County, Woodward...

  17. Four Possible Steps to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Ada, Oklahoma

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of federal, state, and city initiatives on climate change are presented. Specific steps for the City of Ada, Oklahoma, are presented. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy....

  18. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar-Nagy, S.; Voss, P.; Van Geet, O.

    2006-10-01

    U.S. EPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma, has reduced its annual energy consumption by 45% by upgrading its building mechanical system and incorporating renewable energy.

  19. Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Page -1 Oklahoma State University Graduate College Information for Prospective

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Page -1 Oklahoma State University Graduate College Information for Prospective International Graduate Students Thank you for your interest prospective students about OSU. You can find our online application at this web address: https

  20. Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

    1999-01-01

    A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

  1. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  2. Continuous Commissioning of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Martinez, J. T.

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Commissioning ® of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital Fort Sill, Oklahoma Joseph T. Martinez Assistant Research Engineer W. Dan Turner, P.E., Ph,D. Professor and Director Juan Carlos Baltazar, Ph,D. Research Associate... Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Facilities Branch Management Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma ABSTRACT Continuous Commissioning ® (CC ®1 ) of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital...

  3. A study of the relationship between certain moisture parameters and severe convective storms in central Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Scott, Carven Allen

    1977-01-01

    A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Approved as to style...

  4. Texture, composition, and diagenesis of the Burbank Sandstone, North Burbank field, Tract 97, Osage County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Hufford, Walter Ray

    1983-01-01

    TEXTURE, COMPOSITION, AND DIAGENESIS OF THE BURBANK SANDSTONE, NORTH BURBANK FIELD, TRACT 97, OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis HALTER RAY HUFFORD Sumitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology TEXTURE, COMPOSITION, AND DIAGENESIS OF THE BURBANK SANDSTONE, NORTH BURBANK FIELD, TRACT 97, OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by WALTER RAY HUFFORD Approved as the style and content...

  5. Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1969-01-01

    Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... Depreciation Costs and Classification ! of Feedlot Labor ................................................... 31 . Appendix C: Derivation of Cost Curves .................... )I I Highlights Southern Plains (Texas and Oklahoma) feedlot One of the major...

  6. Variational optimization analysis of the 8 June 1974 severe storms in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Liles, Charlie A

    1976-01-01

    VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 Ji3NE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS hy CHARLIE A. LILES Suhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Hniversity pa -tie' fulfillment of the requiremert for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subjeot; Meteorology VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 JUNE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS by CHARLIE A. LILES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) L (Head of Depar ent...

  7. BASINS 2.0

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) first created BASINS (Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources) in 1996 as an aid to water resource planners concerned with water quality and watershed analyses. The strength of BASINS is its integration of "a geographic information system (GIS), national watershed data, and state-of-the-art environmental assessment and modeling tools." The updated version of the program, BASINS 2, can be downloaded from this site.

  8. University of Oklahoma Libraries: Bass Business Oral Histories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Bass Business History Collection at the University of Oklahoma Libraries began in 1955, and since that time the collection has grown to include books, videos, journals and oral histories. The oral histories here include 24 interviews with business professors at the University about everything from the time management studies of Frederick Taylor to the development of organizational theory. Visitors can browse the alphabetical list of interviewees on the right-hand side of the page, and they have the option of listening to the interview or downloading it for later use. Also, visitors can browse the interviews by key names, words, or subjects. Finally, users can opt to sign up for updates when new interviews are added to this enticing collection.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a dog from Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Fox, J C; Ewing, S A; Buckner, R G; Whitenack, D; Manley, J H

    1986-12-15

    A dog with signs of weakness, labored breathing, and generalized edema was examined. It was heavily infested with fleas and had wounds resulting from a recent fight. Hematologic findings were not remarkable, except for parasites in the blood. The dog was treated for fleas and given antibiotics, but was euthanatized when it failed to respond. Blood and tissue specimens were found to contain Trypanosoma cruzi, and the serum contained antibodies to the organism. We believe this is the first confirmed case of T cruzi infection in dogs from Oklahoma. The public health implications of this finding are underscored by a report on the detection of T cruzi in raccoons in the same season and geographic area. PMID:3098711

  10. Geothermal research at Oklahoma State University: An integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.

    1997-12-31

    Oklahoma State University and the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA) are active in providing technical support to government and industry through technology transfer, technology development, technical assistance, and business development support. Technology transfer includes geothermal heat pump (GHP) system training for installers and architects and engineers, national teleconferences, brochures, and other publications. Technology development encompasses design software development, GLHEPRO, in-situ thermal conductivity testing methods and verification of data reduction techniques, and specifications and standards for GHP systems. Examples of technical assistance projects are a Navy officers quarters and a NASA Visitors Center which required design assistance and supporting information in reducing the life cycle cost to make them viable projects.

  11. The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project — basin analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, David C.; Martini, Nicole; Buness, Hermann; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2010-05-01

    Within the context of the Heidelberg Basin Project (Gabriel et al. 2008), we present the first results of three-dimensional structural modelling of the basin, based on interpretation of reflection seismics and decompaction using porosity data measured from core material. Firstly, we interpreted six horizons (Base Quaternary, Internal and Base Pliocene, Base Upper Miocene, Internal and Base Mid Miocene Hydrobien beds) from all available industrial (ca. 100 km) and our own reflection seismic sections (ca. 15 km), which lie within a 8 km radius around the Heidelberg UniNord 1/2 boreholes. This data was used to construct a three-dimensional geometrical model of the Heidelberg Basin. Using 300 core samples, we determined the porosity of the Quaternary sediments and constructed an exponential porosity/depth relationship for these rocks, which were then attributed to the model. Lower strata were given values from the literature. The model shows that the Heidelberg basin has a N-S and E-W areal extent of only 10 × 6 km, directly abutting the eastern fault boundary of the Upper Rhine Graben. The strongest synsedimentary tectonic subsidence occurred during the Upper Miocene, Upper Pliocene, and Quarternary. Faults are not seen within the basin at this level, but a NW-SE striking strike-slip structure is recorded to the west of the basin. Furthermore, the sedimentary depocentre shifted 2 km northwards over time to the present location, directly below the city of Heidelberg. We determined that Quaternary sediments have porosities of over 60% at the surface, but at the Base Quaternary porosity is less than 35%. This strong decrease means that 740 m of sediments were compacted to produce the present ca. 500 m thickness of Quaternary strata. Gabriel, G., Ellwanger, D., Hoselmann, C. & Weidenfeller, M. (2008): The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project. -- Quaternary Science Journal, 57, 3-4, 253-260.

  12. Forensic Seismology and the 1995 Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, T. L.

    2002-05-01

    The terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on April 19, 1995, was recorded on 2 permanent seismographs, 7 and 26 km away. The more distant seismograph recorded 2 low-frequency wave trains separated by about 10 s. Militia groups speculated that the 2 wave trains were caused by separate explosions and hinted at a government cover up. Preliminary statements by the scientific community also contributed to the uncertainty. A public science organization issued a press release that stated "the location and source of the second surface wave-recording is unknown. Detailed investigations at the building site may offer an explanation as to the cause and origin of the second event." A prominent professional newsletter reported that the "first event was caused by energy from the explosion and the second from the fall of the building." To understand the seismic phases in the April 19 seismograms, the USGS monitored the demolition of the damaged building on May 23, 1995, with a portable seismic array. The array recorded the same 2 wave trains during the demolition and indicated the wave trains were a propagation effect and not the result of multiple sources. Modeling of the waveforms indicated that the 2 wave trains probably resulted from propagation of seismic energy in a near-surface zone with a strong velocity gradient. The first phase appeared to be a packet of scattered body waves and the second was the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave. Timely resolution of the ambiguity of the seismogram and publication of results in a refereed publication, EOS, discouraged a conspiracy defense by the terrorists.

  13. Geysers: Lower Geyser Basin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yellowstone National Park

    This Yellowstone National Park web site is dedicated to Lower Geyser Basin. It includes images and descriptions of Queen's Laundry and Sentinel Meadows, Sentinel Cone, Ojo Caliente, Pocket Basin Mud Pots, Imperial Geyser, Spray Geyser, Octopus Spring, Great Fountain Geyser, White Dome Geyser, Pink Cone Geyser, Bead Geyser, Narcissus Geyser, Steady Geyser, Silex Spring, Fountain Paint Pot, Fountain Geyser, Clepsydra Geyser, and Jelly Geyser.

  14. ROANOKE RIVER BASIN DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data files for the Roanoke River Basin provided for use with the Roanoke River Basin Reservoir Model. Includes data on daily pan evaporation, monthly water usage and daily inflow. (see http://www.dwr.ehnr.state.nc.us/roanoke/index.htm)...

  15. A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Jon

    The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

  16. Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1December 31, 1996

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Banken; R. Andrews

    1997-01-01

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in

  17. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-print Network

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma. Detection of vibrations in sand by tarsal sense organs of the nocturnal scorpion Paruroctonus mesaensis sensilla (BCSS), which are groups of eight slits that are responsive to vibrational waves in sand (Brownell

  18. UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, PRELIMINARY BASIN EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a process and a plan by which the Environmental Protection Agency can insure that water quality goals established in the Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 are met in the waters of the Upper Snake Basin (17040201, 17040206, 170...

  19. Impact of Configurations of Rapid Intermittent Assimilation of WSR-88D Radar Data for the 8 May 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Thunderstorm Case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Hu; Ming Xue

    2007-01-01

    Various configurations of the intermittent data assimilation procedure for Level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar data are examined for the analysis and prediction of a tornadic thunderstorm that occurred on 8 May 2003 near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Several tornadoes were produced by this thunderstorm, causing extensive damages in the south Oklahoma City area. Within the rapidly cycled assimilation system, the

  20. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a cement around quartz sand grains, and brecciated pyrite grains are surrounded by rims of hematite and goethite. Dolomite is the principal sandstone cement. Cathodoluminescence microscopic study of the mineral has shown that it was deposited during seven periods before the copper sulfide mineralization. ?? 1991.

  1. The EMS response to the Oklahoma City bombing.

    PubMed

    Maningas, P A; Robison, M; Mallonee, S

    1997-01-01

    This is a descriptive study of the Emergency Medical Services response to a bombing of a United States Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on 19 April 1995. The explosion emanated from a rented truck parked in the front of the building. The force of the explosion destroyed three of the four support columns in the front of the building and resulted in a pancaking effect of the upper floors onto the lower floors. There were three distinct phases of the medical response: 1) Immediately available local EMS ambulances and staff; 2) Additional ambulances staffed by recalled, off-duty personnel; and 3) mutual-aid ambulances and personnel from the surrounding communities. There were 361 persons in the building at the time of the explosion, 163 of these perished. Within the first hour of the explosion, 139 patients were transported to area hospitals. Of these, 32% were in critical condition. During the day of the explosion, 444 persons were treated for physical injuries: 410 of these were related to the explosion and 14, including one with fatal injuries, were sustained during search and rescue attempts. A total of 354 (80%) were treated and released from emergency departments, and 90 (20%) were admitted to hospitals. Six of the transported victims either were dead on arrival to the emergency department or died after admission to the hospital. Of those who died, 95% of the deaths were related to blunt trauma associated with the collapse of the structure. Only three persons were extricated alive after the first five hours following the explosion. The scene became flooded with volunteers who, although their intentions were to provide help and aid to those injured, created a substantial logistical problem for Incident Command. Several other lessons were learned: 1) Telephone lines and cells became overloaded, but the Hospital Emergency Administrative Radio system was operational only in three of the 15 hospitals; 2) Volunteer personnel should have responded to the hospitals and not to the scene; and 3) Training was an essential for the success of such a response. Thus, the success of this operation was a function of the intense training, practice, and coordination between multiple agencies. PMID:10187007

  2. Assessment of climatic suitability for the expansion of Solenopsis invicta Buren in Oklahoma using three general circulation models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. F. Levia Jr; E. E. Frost

    2004-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the climatic suitability for the expansion of Solenopsis invicta Buren (red imported fire ant) in Oklahoma under the present climate and with a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 using three general circulation models (GCMs) (GFDL R30, OSU, UKMO). Oklahoma was chosen as the geographical focus because it has a dense network of meteorological stations and lies

  3. University of Oklahoma Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center, Service Area 4. Final Performance Report, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma Univ., Norman. Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center.

    This report describes and assesses the 1993-94 (October 1, 1993 through September 1994) activities of the federally-funded Bilingual Education Multifunctional Resource Center based at the University of Oklahoma and serving a nine-state area (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee).…

  4. The Effects of Universal Pre-K in Oklahoma: Research Highlights and Policy Implications. CROCUS Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.; Phillips, Deborah

    Oklahoma is one of three states to offer a free prekindergarten (pre-K) program to all students in participating school districts on a voluntary basis. Fortuitous circumstances in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the state's largest school district, permitted an unusually rigorous evaluation of the pre-K program in Tulsa. Because 4-year-olds beginning pre-K and…

  5. Political Protest, Conflict, and Tribal Nationalism: The Oklahoma Choctaws and the Termination Crisis of 1959-1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is headquartered in southeastern Oklahoma and has a tribal citizenry of just over 175,000. The tribal government currently compacts almost all of the tribe's Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service program funding and runs dozens of tribal businesses that today fund more than 80 percent of the tribal…

  6. Financial Aid and Persistence in Community Colleges: Assessing the Effectiveness of Federal and State Financial Aid Programs in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.; Malcolm, Zaria

    2009-01-01

    Using a longitudinal, state-wide dataset, this study assessed the effect of financial aid on the persistence of full-time students in associate's degree programs at the Oklahoma community colleges. Three financial-aid sources were examined: the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP), Pell grants, and Stafford loans. Results indicate that…

  7. Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

  8. Sadness, tragedy and mass disaster in Oklahoma City: providing critical incident stress debriefings to a community in crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Davis

    1996-01-01

    Shortly after 09:00 h on 19 April 1995, the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building, located in downtown Oklahoma City, was devastated with a bomb blast of such gigantic proportions that it was heard 60 miles away in neighbouring Norman, Oklahoma. Oklahomans routinely commuting to work on that sunny Wednesday morning went about their business as usual. A crude bomb chemically

  9. Paleokarstic and karstic features: Arbuckle and Hunton Groups, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Puckette, J.; Matthews, F. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology); Lynch, M. (Unocal, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Cores of the Ordovician-age Arbuckle Group and Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian-age Hunton Group contain evidence of paleokarst. Arbuckle and Hunton Group rocks display surprisingly similar suites of distinct paleo-karstic features. Vugs, solution-enlarged fractures, cavities, collapse breccias, and sediment-filled solution features are evident. Phreatic cements are more commonly observed than vadose cements, while primary speleothemic precipitates are rare. A complex history of exposure, subsidence, and diagenesis is recorded in these rocks. Hunton and Arbuckle carbonates have been subaerially exposed for periods of variable intensity and duration during geologic history. Paleokarst appears to have developed subjacent to disconformities within and between formations of the Arbuckle Group and where these rocks subcrop below regional unconformities. Hunton paleokarstic horizons are apparent below the regional pre-Woodford unconformity, while evidence of inter- and intra-formational subaerial exposure is tenuous. This complex hierarchy of unconformities can produce numerous porous horizons. Porosity preservation may depend on subsidence rates or sea level rises rapid enough to prevent extensive low-temperature phreatic cementation and sediment infill of the existing pore network. Caves in the Arbuckle Group in Murray County, Oklahoma contain many karstic features similar to those observed in cores. Cemented collapse breccia and sediment-filled solution cavities are evident in caves developed in the Cool Creek Formation. These caves are part of an extensive internal drainage system associated with Honey Creek near the crest of the Arbuckle anticline. Cave speleothems and surficial travertine deposits are by-product of karstification processes.

  10. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-02-01

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

  11. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-04-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on methane injection using huff-n-puff process. It appears that additional oil can be recovered using methane as a solvent. Additional experiments will be needed to confirm our analysis. Our engineering analysis has laid out detailed indicators to make the de-watering successful. Using those indicators, we are currently investigating potential in fill well locations in West Carney field. Our technology transfer activities continued this quarter with two presentations and one workshop.

  12. Aquifer - Basin and range

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aquifer basics outlining the makeup of the basin and range aquifers. Description and maps of unconsolidated sand and gravel aquifers. This site consists of information for the Southwestern portion of the United States, consisted of Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah.

  13. Public Education in Oklahoma: A Digest of the Report of a Survey of Public Education in the State of Oklahoma, Made at the Request of the Oklahoma State Educational Survey Commission under the Direction of the United States Commissioner of Education. Bulletin, 1923, No. 14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1923

    1923-01-01

    This bulletin presents the results of a study on the special problems of education for Indians in Oklahoma. During the months of April and May of 1922, a committee of Oklahoma educators, under the direction of the Bureau of Education, conducted a series of educational tests and measurements in public schools in various parts of the State. The…

  14. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  15. Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

  16. Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-04-27

    Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

  17. The use and tenure of land in Oklahoma held primarily for its mineral potential

    E-print Network

    Parcher, L. A.

    1955-01-01

    L I B R A R Y fc&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE USE AND TENURE OF LAND IN OKLAHOMA HELD PRIMARILY FOR ITS MINERAL POTENTIAL A Dis sertation By Loris Alvin Parcher Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE USE AND TENURE OF LAND IN OKLAHOMA HELD PRIMARILY FOR ITS MINERAL POTENTIAL A Dissertation By Loris Alvin Parcher...

  18. Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

  19. The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

  20. Recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults, Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Budnik, R.T.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of Late Precambrian through Quaternary strata in the Palo Duro basin and surrounding uplifts documents recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults. Basement blocks have been uplifted with little tilting or folding of overlying strata along a system of northwest-southeast oriented faults, part of a regional trend extending from central Colorado to southwestern Oklahoma. The orientation of basement terranes in Colorado and that of a 50-mi (80-km) long mylonite zone in east-central New Mexico suggest a Precambrian age for the faults. An Arkosic sandstone overlies basement and underlies a Cambrian(.) quartzose sandstone in a few Palo Duro basin wells. It may represent debris shed from active fault blocks during the opening of the southern Oklahoma aulocogen in the Late Precambrian or Early Cambrian. Ordovician carbonates thin or are missing beneath Mississippian carbonates on some fault blocks, indicating a post-Ordovician-pre-Mississippian period of faulting. The greatest amount of deformation occurred during the Pennsylvanian. Thickness, distribution, and facies of sediments were controlled by the location of active faults. Lower Pennsylvanian strata thin by up to 50% across some structures. Fault blocks provided sources of arkosic debris and loci for carbonate buildups throughout the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Around the periphery of the basin, Late Pennsylvanian or Early Permian faulting caused a wedging out of older units beneath the Wolfcamp. Permian, Triassic, and Neogene units, along with present topography, all have been subtly affected by basement structures. The entire section thins over basement highs. Middle and Upper Permian evaporites are thicker in structural lows. The overlying Dockum Group (Triassic) and Ogallala Formation (Neogene), both nonmarine clastic units, become finer grained over basement highs. Present topographic highs coincide with some basement highs.

  1. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2004-10-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

  2. Validation of soil temperature dataset against ground measurements in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R.; Jackson, T. J.; Reichle, R. H.; Basara, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    In the near future two dedicated soil moisture satellites will be launched (SMOS and SMAP), both carrying an L-band radiometer. It is well known that microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms must account for the physical temperature of the emitting surface. Solutions to this include: difference, or ratio indices; forecast model products; thermal infrared satellite observations; and high frequency passive microwave estimates. The availability of multifrequency observations in the same data stream has made the use of high frequency temperature estimates, specifically 37 GHz (Ka-band), an attractive option. SMOS and SMAP will not include a 37 GHz (Ka-band) microwave radiometer. Therefore, alternative algorithms and data sources will be utilized and explored. One proposed approach is the use of temperature output from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This temperature estimate will need to closely match the spatial resolution and the overpass time of SMOS and SMAP (between 6 and 7 am/pm local time). To date, very little analysis has been performed to assess the accuracy of the NWP forecasts in terms of land surface temperature. In addition, the relationship between the model products and the requirements of radiative transfer and soil moisture retrieval algorithm temperature requirements needs to be assessed. The goal of this paper is to set up a validation framework that can be applied to NWP outputs. In this investigation, we use in situ data from the Oklahoma Mesonet (at 5 cm) to assess the near surface soil temperature from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).

  3. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  4. Accuracy of lineaments mapping from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Nicholas M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of Landsat and other space imaging systems for lineaments detection is analyzed in terms of their effectiveness in recognizing and mapping fractures and faults, and the results of several studies providing a quantitative assessment of lineaments mapping accuracies are discussed. The cases under investigation include a Landsat image of the surface overlying a part of the Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma, the Landsat images and selected radar imagery of major lineaments systems distributed over much of Canadian Shield, and space imagery covering a part of the East African Rift in Kenya. It is demonstrated that space imagery can detect a significant portion of a region's fracture pattern, however, significant fractions of faults and fractures recorded on a field-produced geological map are missing from the imagery as it is evident in the Kenya case.

  5. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  6. Water conservation as a long-range strategy in municipal water supply planning: the case of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study is concerned with Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation options in small and medium sized cities under 50,000 in population. In focusing upon Oklahoma water managers' attitudes, the following questions are addressed: (1) What factors influence Oklahoma water managers' attitudes toward the adoption or rejection of long-term water conservation measures. (2) What are the major incentives or disincentives that may encourage or discourage the adoption and implementing of long-term water conservation alternatives at the municipal level in Oklahoma. (3) What are the distinct geographical variations in attitudes toward adopting water conservation policies. To address these and related questions, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the water managers in the selected Oklahoma towns and cities. Results of the study indicated that local water managers considered local governments as the most appropriate body to deal with water management issues. Local water managers in Oklahoma also place heavy reliance upon traditional structural solutions. If these solutions prove to be inadequate, long-term water conservation alternatives become more appealing. However, Oklahoma water managers in the selected cities and towns expressed their profound concerns about the potential revenue loss if long-term water conservation measures were to be adopted and implemented.

  7. Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Africanized Honey Bees in Oklahoma History of the Africanized Honey Bee South America Africanized honey bees (AHB) were first imported to the Americas in 1956 by the prominent Brazilian geneticist breed of honey bees, which would be less defensive than the wild African bees but which would be more

  8. A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma cores over the central plains of the United States, accomplished using a novel and now-standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) scanning mode for a commercial wind-profiler system. A unique

  9. Dynamics of a recolonizing population of black bears in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, S.L.; Hellgren, E.C.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Hemphill, J., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding how populations expand to recolonize former habitats is important to restoration efforts in wildlife management and conservation. Translocation of black bears (Ursus americanus) to Arkansas in the 1950s and 1960s has led to recolonization of former bear range in Oklahoma, with substantial increases in distribution and abundance of the species in Oklahoma over the last 15 years. We studied demographics of black bears in southeastern Oklahoma from May 2001 to November 2002 to provide insight into characteristics of recolonizing populations of large carnivores. We trapped 51 black bears (22 M, 29 F) 77 times and radiocollared 25 female bears. Sex ratios of adults and cubs were skewed toward females, and the age structure was younger than observed in other unharvested populations. Survival of adult females was estimated at 0.9??0.1, and fertility was estimated at 0.77 female young/female/year. Density on the study area was estimated at 0.21 bears/km2 and the current finite growth rate (??) of the study population was estimated to be 1.11/year. Demographic characteristics of the Oklahoma population of black bears were similar to those of other recolonizing populations of large carnivores.

  10. NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

    1981-01-01

    Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

  11. A fresh-market onion production system for Oklahoma using short and intermediate cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion is a useful fresh-market specialty crop for some Oklahoma producers. In the state, bulb onion is traditionally established using bare-rooted transplants of short day cultivars which are set in the field in February or March. For commercial scale production this can be a problem because weather...

  12. Geophysical logs for selected wells in the Picher Field, northeast Oklahoma and southeast Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott C.; Thomas, Tom B.; Overton, Myles D.; Goemaat, Robert L.; Havens, John S.

    1991-01-01

    The Roubidoux aquifer in northeastern Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. The Roubidoux aquifer may be subject to contamination from abandoned lead and zinc mines of the Picher field. Water in flooded underground mines contains large concentrations of iron, zinc, cadmium, and lead. The contaminated water may migrate from the mines to the Roubidoux aquifer through abandoned water wells in the Picher field. In late 1984, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board began to locate abandoned wells that might be serving as conduits for the migration of contaminants from the abandoned mines. These wells were cleared of debris and plugged. A total of 66 wells had been located, cleared, and plugged by July 1985. In cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey took advantage of the opportunity to obtain geophysical data in the study area and provide the Oklahoma Water Resources Board with data that might be useful during the well-plugging operation. Geophysical logs obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey are presented in this report. The geophysical logs include hole diameter, normal, single-point resistance, fluid resistivity, natural-gamma, gamma-gamma, and neutron logs. Depths logged range from 145 to 1,344 feet.

  13. Twenty-Ninth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    Comprised mainly of tabular data, this 1975-76 annual report on the American Indian Education Program in Eastern Oklahoma presents statistics, a brief narrative highlighting the year's accomplishments, and an appendix. Specifically, this report includes statistical tables on the: number of schools; enrollment and average daily attendance of all…

  14. Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Overton

    Comprised mainly of tabular data, this annual report on American Indian education in Eastern Oklahoma presents statistics, a brief narrative highlighting the year's accomplishments, and an appendix. The statistical information includes the following: (1) Johnson O'Malley (JOM) assisted graduates and dropouts, Indian enrollment, and total JOM…

  15. Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoConto, David G.

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

  16. Petroleum Geoscience Program at University of Oklahoma: 25 Years of Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Slatt; W. W. Clopine

    2003-01-01

    The School of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Oklahoma has a long history and tradition of petroleum geoscience education and research. The 1980's and early 1990's downturn in the petroleum industry resulted in significantly fewer students seeking petroleum industry education and careers. Like many U.S. earth science departments, the School looked to geochemistry and hard rock geology to

  17. Teachers' Perceptions of SAE Programs and Benefits for Students with Special Needs in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwager, Tony A.; White, James D.

    An Oklahoma study sought to identify specific benefits that accrue to students with special needs in secondary Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs and to determine teachers' perceptions of SAE programs for students with special needs. Data were gathered in the fall of 1993 through a mailed survey of all 362 agricultural education…

  18. Does Universal Preschool Improve Learning? Lessons from Georgia and Oklahoma. Backgrounder. No. 2272

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    More than a decade after offering students universal preschool, neither Georgia nor Oklahoma has shown impressive progress in student academic achievement, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. As Congress considers whether the federal government should encourage states to offer universal preschool, the author advocates…

  19. Research, scholarship and creative activity at Oklahoma State University 2010 OSU research team

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    for Research and Technology Transfer Vanguard is published annually by Oklahoma State University Green, Editor, Vanguard 405.744.5827; vpr@okstate.edu Dear Friends and Colleagues: 2009 was a year persistently to find solutions to our society's most pressing needs. This issue of Vanguard is an opportunity

  20. Additional Records of the Little-Known Corixidea major (Heteroptera: Schizopteridae) from Arkansas and Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corixidea major is reported for the first time from Arkansas and Oklahoma. Although described eighty years ago, this minute insect, measuring less than 1.5 mm, has remained one of the rarest North American heteropterans. Previously known only from the Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia, our records e...

  1. Home Processing of Poultry Cooperative Extension Service * Division of Agriculture * Oklahoma State University No. 8400

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Home Processing of Poultry Cooperative Extension Service * Division of Agriculture * Oklahoma State University No. 8400 Joe G. Berry Extension Poultry Specialist Charles Lester County Extension 4-H Agent. Scalding temperatures should be determined by the type of poultry and the difficulty of picking

  2. Impact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ming

    modifications is the so-called urban heat island (UHI) effect, in which near-surface temperaturesImpact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City XIAO-MING HU that urban heat islands (UHIs) frequently formed at night and the observed UHI intensity was variable (18­48C

  3. 78 FR 73858 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...Oklahoma has adopted three EPA drinking water rules, namely the: (1) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2), (2) the Stage 2 Disinfectants...Byproducts Rule (DBP2), and (3) the Ground Water Rule (GWR). EPA has determined...

  4. Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

  5. 76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0307; FRL-9291-1] Oklahoma...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  6. 78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0821; 9817-6] Oklahoma: Final...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  7. 77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 [EPA-R06-RCRA-2012-0054; FRL-9647-7] Oklahoma...Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA has determined that these changes...final authorization from the EPA under RCRA section 3006(b), 42 U.S.C....

  8. 40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), Oklahoma...management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq. (See...management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq....

  9. Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education. Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity: Oklahoma State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Molly

    This report describes Oklahoma State University's (OSU's) Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity (GPED), a program designed to increase the number of minority group graduate students at OSU. GPED goals are: the population of OSU graduate students pursuing degrees will reflect the demographics of the state population by the year 2004; and the…

  10. Cloud-to-Ground Lightning throughout the Lifetime of a Severe Storm System in Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Shafer; Donald R. MacGorman; Frederick H. Carr

    2000-01-01

    Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data are examined relative to digitized radar data for a storm system that occurred in Oklahoma on 26 May 1985. This system evolved through three stages: 1) two lines of cells, one near the dryline and the other 60 km ahead of it; 2) a supercell storm; and 3) a mesoscale convective system (MCS). The behavior of

  11. 'Right-to-Work' Laws and Economic Development in Oklahoma. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.

    The bulk of this position paper consists of statements in opposition to a September 2001 referendum on adopting 'right-to-work' (RTW) legislation in Oklahoma. The statements are by Joan Fitzgerald, William Sschweke, Raymond Hogler, Steven Shulman, Stephan Weiler, Ann Markusen, Robert G. Lynch, David R. Howell, James Galbraith, Colin Gordon, Wim…

  12. Soil water signature of the 2005-2006 drought under tallgrass prairie at Fort Reno, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined changes in the seasonal pattern of soil water content under a tall grass prairie in central Oklahoma as a result of the 2005-2006 drought. The seasonal pattern of soil water content in the top 50 cm of the soil profile was minimally impacted by the drought, as this portion of the...

  13. Report on the projected future climate of the Fort Cobb Watershed, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides technical information on projected climate change and associated monotonic trends of precipitation and air temperature at the ARS Fort Cobb Experimental Watershed in west-central Oklahoma. The report is an attachment to the full report of the multi-location project MLP 464: “Est...

  14. A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, William D.

    A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

  15. Personal Profile Select Campus: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa 1 Employee Information

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Personal Profile Select Campus: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa 1 Employee Information: Last: First: Middle: Date: Current Driver's License State: Number: Home address: City: State: Zip: Phone #1: Phone #2 A Filing B I A B I A Authorization - The information contained on this form is complete and accurate

  16. Distribution patterns of imported fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imported fire ant colonies were quantified in 1000 m2 circular subplots spaced about 125 m apart on a sheep and goat farm in Oklahoma. Mound counts and cumulative above-ground mound volume were used as measures of fire ant population density, and were subjected to regression analyses to determine e...

  17. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992–2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Michalsky; Frederick Denn; Connor Flynn; Gary Hodges; Piotr Kiedron; Annette Koontz; James Schlemmer; Stephen E. Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at

  18. Multi-year precipitation variations and water resources in west-central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Persistent, multi-year departures in annual precipitation from mean have been observed in central Oklahoma. Precipitation departures caused by a sequence of predominantly wet or dry years and lasting 5 or more years are called wet or dry periods, respectively. Impacts of wet and dry periods on water...

  19. OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY, NEWBORN

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY to help guide you through your pregnancy up to six weeks after birth. The program offers a healthy pregnancy calendar, videos on topics such as eating habits, exercise, and stress, physical/emotional changes

  20. Water used by grazed pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan(L) Millsp] in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water use by the warm-season annual pulse pigeon pea must be described to effectively use this legume as forage to support late-summer grazing by stocker cattle in the southern Great Plains (SGP). This study was conducted in central Oklahoma during 2008 to 2010 to quantify water and water use effici...

  1. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Oklahoma related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  2. Sauroposeidon proteles, a new sauropod from the early Cretaceous of Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathew J. Wedel; Richard L. Cifelli; R. Kent Sanders

    2000-01-01

    Sauroposeidon proteles, a new brachiosaurid sauropod, is represented by an articulated series of four mid-cervical vertebrae recovered from the Antlers Formation (Aptian–Albian) of southeastern Oklahoma. Most Early Cretaceous North American sauropod material has been referred to Pleurocoelus, a genus which is largely represented by juvenile material and is not well understood. Regardless of the status and affinities of Pleurocoelus, the

  3. Rock and soil discrimination by low altitude airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in Payne County, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Schwarzer; J. A. S. Adams

    1973-01-01

    The ability to identify and discriminate rock and soil types from the ; air using gamma spectrometry was investigated in Payne County, Oklahoma. The ; data, which were reduced to concentration values for K, U, and Th, were obtained ; from a helicopter at an average altitude of 75 feet above the ground. The area ; investigated was underlain by

  4. Forage nutritive value of Texas bluegrass harvested in the morning and afternoon in northwest Oklahoma.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a highly rhizomatous, dioecious, sexual, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. This native species is of particular interest for development into an improved cool-season forage plant because o...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH TWO SHALLOW AQUIFERS IN OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial microflora of two shallow aquifers in Oklahoma was characterized by direct observation with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM), by plating, and by examination of colony morphology and distribution. Total cell counts varied only slightly from sample to sample, w...

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS OF A PRISTINE GROUNDWATER STUDY SITE IN OKLAHOMA (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most-probable-number counting methods were applied to determine the distribution of protozoa in a depth profile at a groundwater microbiology study site near Lula, Oklahoma in January and June, 1985. Aseptic procedures were used to ensure minimal airborne contamination samples. N...

  7. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Frequently Used Forestry

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Frequently Used Forestry and Natural Resource Terms for Landowners of Oklahoma Champe Green Renewable Resources Extension Specialist Steven Anderson Extension Forestry Specialist Ron Masters Extension Wildlife management zones, and installing waterbars, broad-based dips, etc. See OSU Forestry Extension Report #5, Best

  8. 2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society". The base pay approach operating budget base. #12;· FY 2012 ­ A budget reduction based on the total FY 2011 State Target amount2012 BUDGET, COMPENSATION, & PERFORMANCE EVALUATION GUIDELINES UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH

  9. Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992 -2008

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    information on particle size. Determination of AOD by sunradiometry is especially robust compared Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference- filter sunradiometer with five aerosol bands

  10. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Oklahoma State Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

  11. The Economics of Elementary and Secondary Schooling in Oklahoma. Bulletin B-714.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweeten, Luther; And Others

    Utilizing data from a random sample of Oklahoma elementary and secondary schools, the study examined interrelationships among the educational process, student achievement, and environment. Results revealed the importance of educational objectives, student backgrounds, high school curriculum, teacher salary, and student density upon optimal…

  12. Deaths in the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado from a Historical Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harold E. Brooks; Charles A. Doswell III

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado was the deadliest in the United States in over 20 years, with 36 direct fatalities. To understand how this event fits into the historical context, the record of tornado deaths in the United States has been examined. Almost 20 000 deaths have been reported associated with more,than 3600 tornadoes in the United

  13. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

  14. 40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

  15. School Improvement through Community Dialogue: The First Community Study Circles on Education in Arkansas and Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesser, Jo Sykes; McNeal, Larry

    This study examines the Study Circles program on education that was conducted in Arkansas and Oklahoma in the fall of 1998. Study Circles are a community involvement strategy for collaborative problem solving. They are small, highly participatory groups led by trained facilitators using materials provided by the Study Circles Resource Center. The…

  16. University of Oklahoma and VSP provide you with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    University of Oklahoma and VSP provide you with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP today with an affordable eyecare plan. Sign up for VSP today. PREMIUM PLAN VSP Coverage Effective with Other Providers Visit vsp.com for details, if you plan to see a provider other than a VSP doctor. Exam..................................................................Up

  17. A Comparison of the Otolith and Scale Methods for Aging White Crappies in Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Boxrucker

    1986-01-01

    Scales and otoliths (sagittae) were taken from a sample of 137 white crappies (Pomoxis annularis) collected by fyke netting from Ft. Supply Reservoir, Oklahoma, in November 1982. Scales and otoliths from each fish were aged independently by three experienced scale readers, none of whom had prior experience aging otoliths. The average percent error and coefficient of variation of the scale

  18. Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument. PMID:18974901

  19. Never Again Would We Be the Same: The Oklahoma City Bombing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent Mathers

    1996-01-01

    A terrorist attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City showed the nation that no area of the country was free from the possibility of violence or terrorism. This author describes the day and the aftermath of the tragedy.

  20. Oklahoma City's killer tornadoes: how local hospitals responded to yet another extreme disaster.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    On the evening of May 3rd, a group of high-powered tornadoes tore through Oklahoma--leaving more than 40 people dead and hundreds injured. The main twister formed about 45 miles south of Oklahoma City and was classified F5, the most severe type of tornado, with winds of more than 260 mph. It cut a path one mile wide; stayed on the ground for more than four hours; and, along with other twisters, demolished 60 miles of countryside. More than 7,000 homes were destroyed or damaged, and more than 5,000 families were left homeless. Oklahoma City was hit the hardest, with about 1,500 homes leveled in the storm. A total of 755 people were injured in Oklahoma City and the surrounding area, testing local hospital disaster plans to the maximum. The same hospitals had been called on in April 1995 to handle the over 500 persons injured in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, a terrorist blast that killed 168. The hospitals' latest response to a disaster situation is recorded in this report. PMID:10621277

  1. Integrated grassland observation sites and integrated cropland observation sites at El Reno, Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the financial support from the National Science Foundation and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, a team of researchers from the University of Oklahoma and the USDA ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory have worked together and established two Integrated Grassland Observation s...

  2. Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

    This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

  3. Ecological Investigation of the Invasive White Perch in Kaw Lake, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt E. Kuklinski

    2007-01-01

    Following an unintentional introduction of white perch (Morone americana) into Kaw Reservoir, Oklahoma, questions were raised about the potential impacts this new spe- cies may have on resident sport fish populations. White perch, white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) were collected from 2001 through 2004 using a variety of sampling techniques. White perch catch rates were low

  4. Great Basin National Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Park Service site describes the biology of Great Basin's plants and animals; geology and ecology of the Lehman Caves; air quality of the park; and past human activities in the Great Basin such as farming, ranching, and gold mining. There is a list of historical, geological, and archeological dates important to the park and an instructor guide containing activities such as creating a nature notebook and adopting a tree. There is also information on: planning a visit to the park and the Lehman Caves, park projects such as weeding out non-native plants and the reintroduction of Bonneville Cutthroat Trout, and a self-guided geology field trip.

  5. The lunar Procellarum basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, E. A.

    It is still widely assumed that the Imbrium basin is the largest such structure on the lunar nearside, even though it has been pointed out that geochemical and other data from the Apollo missions strongly indicate that the Imbrium impact occurred eccentrically within the confines of a pre-existing, much larger (the 'Gargantuan') basin. There does, in fact, also exist supporting topographical evidence for the reality of this basin, although the centroid of high radioactivity lies a little west of the topographical center. This topographical evidence consists of incomplete arcs of three closely concentric circles marked by mare shorelines, major systems of mare ridges, and some minor scarps. The rings have surface diameters of 1700, 2400 and 3200 km, and are centered at about 23 deg N, 15 deg W, near the crater Timocharis. Any discussions of the distribution of surface minerals, the compositions, ages, histories and petrology of lunar rocks, etc. should recognize and include any possible effects resulting from the formation of this basin.

  6. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  7. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services

    E-print Network

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

  8. Genetic variation in the 16s mitochondrial rDNA gene from Texas and Oklahoma populations of Amblyomma maculatum

    E-print Network

    Lostak, Tracy Karon

    2009-05-15

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism was used to detect different haplotypes of the 16S mitochondrial rDNA gene within samples of Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, collected from Payne County, Oklahoma and Brazos and Refugio Counties...

  9. The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services 

    E-print Network

    Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

  10. Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Weed Control in Christmas tree plantations is one of

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Weed Control.Weedscompeteforwater,nutrients,andlight andextendthetimerequiredtoproduceamarketabletree. Successful weed control helps the grower produce high.Finally, reductionofweedsreducesinterferencewithlaborandequip- mentmovementandimprovestheplantation'sappearance forconsumers. Methods of Weed Control Site

  11. Newly discovered Martian impact basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, M.

    1985-04-01

    Three previously unrecognized Martian impact basins were discovered through detailed mapping of landforms, structures and terrains near Cassini and Al Qahira basins. Al Qahira A lies on the Martian dichotomy boundary and intersects the older basin, Al Qahira. It has four rings that are expressed by a variety of landforms. Southwestward Al Qahira A is out by a younger Basin, Al Qahira B. Al Qahira B is a highly degraded basin with one identifiable ring. Its ring is expressed by a few massifs, knobs and inward-facing scarps, but is recognized by the distributions of wrinkle ridges and plains units. Cassini A lies southward of the younger Cassini Basin and is intersected by it. It probably has four rings. The importance of detailed mapping of various types of landforms and terrains to the discovery of basins on Mars are demonstrated.

  12. Global analysis of intraplate basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, C.; Mueller, D. R.; Dyksterhuis, S.

    2005-12-01

    Broad intraplate sedimentary basins often show a mismatch of lithospheric extension factors compared to those inferred from sediment thickness and subsidence modelling, not conforming to the current understanding of rift basin evolution. Mostly, these basins are underlain by a very heterogeneous and structurally complex basement which has been formed as a product of Phanerozoic continent-continent or terrane/arc-continent collision and is usually referred to as being accretionary. Most likely, the basin-underlying substrate is one of the key factors controlling the style of extension. In order to investigate and model the geodynamic framework and mechanics controlling formation and evolution of these long-term depositional regions, we have been analysing a global set of more than 200 basins using various remotely sensed geophysical data sets and relational geospatial databases. We have compared elevation, crustal and sediment thickness, heatflow, crustal structure, basin ages and -geometries with computed differential beta, anomalous tectonic subsidence, and differential extension factor grids for these basins. The crust/mantle interactions in the basin regions are investigated using plate tectonic reconstructions in a mantle convection framework for the last 160 Ma. Characteristic parameters and patterns derived from this global analysis are then used to generate a classification scheme, to estimate the misfit between models derived from either crustal thinning or sediment thickness, and as input for extension models using particle-in-cell finite element codes. Basins with high differential extension values include the ``classical'' intraplate-basins, like the Michigan Basin in North America, the Zaire Basin in Africa, basins of the Arabian Penisula, and the West Siberian Basin. According to our global analysis so far, these basins show, that with increasing basin age, the amount of crustal extension vs. the extension values estimated from sediment thickness decreases decreased. This could be used as a indicator for ``basin maturity''. Furthermore, basins with higher differential beta values show generally slightly lower heatflux values. We have attempted to integrate the results from the observations with numerical modelling of different crustal extension scenarios involving a varying heterogeneous basement architecture and attempting to connect the ``pure'' numerical models with real world data as tightly as possible. In the scope of the project we have tried to build a numerical model library linked to the large scale observations, which offers a new powerful way to investigate the complex lithosphere dynamics and geological processes that account for the evolution of intraplate basins, and the influence of the basement architecture on successful or failed rifts.

  13. Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs

    E-print Network

    Kranz, Dwight Stanley

    1981-01-01

    INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Geology INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN SARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA...

  14. The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Travis, Lynn Suzanne

    1987-01-01

    THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

  15. Buried-euxenic-basin model sets Tarim basin potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.J. (Tarim Associates for Oil and Mineral Exploration AG, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1994-11-28

    The Tarim basin is the largest of the three large sedimentary basins of Northwest China. The North and Southwest depressions of Tarim are underlain by thick sediments and very thin crust. The maximum sediment thickness is more than 15 km. Of the several oil fields of Tarim, the three major fields were discovered during the last decade, on the north flank of the North depression and on the Central Tarim Uplift. The major targets of Tarim, according to the buried-euxenic-basin model, should be upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic reservoirs trapping oil and gas condensates from lower Paleozoic source beds. The paper describes the basin and gives a historical perspective of exploration activities and discoveries. It then explains how this basin can be interpreted by the buried-euxenic-basin model. The buried-euxenic-basin model postulates four stages of geologic evolution: (1) Sinian and early Paleozoic platform sedimentation on relic arcs and deep-marine sedimentation in back-arc basins in Xinjiang; (2) Late Paleozoic foreland-basin sedimentation in north Tarim; (3) Mesozoic and Paleogene continental deposition, subsidence under sedimentary load; and (4) Neogene pull-apart basin, wrench faulting and extension.

  16. Regional contemporaneity of eustatic, subsidence, and tectonic events in the Middle-Upper Ordovician of the Appalachians and Ouachita orogens and the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, S.C.; Bergstroem, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    On-going graptolite and conodont studies in the Southern Appalachians, the Ouachitas, and the Arbuckle Mountains have revealed contemporaneity of important geological events of regional significance. Reassessment of previous graptolite biostratigraphy has resulted in a revised zonation that has solved some correlation problems and is tied to the Midcontinent and North Atlantic conodont zonations. These zonations are used to date significant geological events in geographically separate regions during two time intervals in the Middle-Upper Ordovician. The base of the graptolite shale succession (Athens) in the Southern Appalachians (Alabama-Tennessee) belongs to the G. teretiusculus Zone, or locally (Georgia) possibly a slightly older unit, and marks the initial shelf-basin development and uplift of source areas to the east reflecting a phase of the Taconic Orogeny. The bases of the Womble and Woods Hollow shales in the Ouachita Orogen represent about the same level. Slightly younger N. gracilis Zone strata tend to be transgressive throughout the world and appear to represent a global eustatic event. In the Arbuckle Mountains this event is reflected by the Tulip Creek Shale. A major subsidence event in the Oklahoma aulacogen, contemporaneous with the regression, produced a transgressive lithofacies sequence represented by the lower Viola Springs Formation in the Arbuckle Mountains. The regressive and subsidence events appear to have been coeval with the emplacement of the Taconic allochthon and Hamburg Klippe in the Northern Appalachians.

  17. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-10-01

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

  18. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

  19. ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2004-05-01

    The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

  20. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  1. Drainage Basin Morphometry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rick Ford

    The goal of this activity is for to students to observe and quantify the inherent organization within the channel network of a single drainage basin (a la Horton, 1945). The students will use the contour-crenulation method to flesh out the channel network within a selected drainage basin. They will then use the Strahler system to deterime the stream order of each channel segment. They then measure and average various attributes (slope, length, etc.) of the channel segments, by stream order. These data will then be plotted on semi-log graph paper to illustrate the matematical relationships between channel attributes and stream order. This activity gives students practice in delineating drainage divides and channel networks on topographic maps, using map scales to measure distances on topographic maps, and graphing data using a semi-log format. In addition, they are asked to compare their "real-world" results against the classic "laws" of basin morphometry presented in their textbook. This permits a discussion of sample size and measurement error versus theoretical relationships presented in a textbook. Designed for a geomorphology course

  2. Developing a statewide public health initiative to reduce infant mortality in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Suzanna; Patrick, Paul; Lincoln, Alicia; Cline, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The Preparing for a Lifetime, It's Everyone's Responsibility initiative was developed to improve the health and well- being of Oklahoma's mothers and infants. The development phase included systematic data collection, extensive data analysis, and multi-disciplinary partnership development. In total, seven issues (preconception/interconception health, tobacco use, postpartum depression, breastfeeding, infant safe sleep, preterm birth, and infant injury prevention) were identified as crucial to addressing infant mortality in Oklahoma. Workgroups were created to focus on each issue. Data and media communications workgroups were added to further partner commitment and support for policy and programmatic changes across multiple agencies and programs. Leadership support, partnership, evaluation, and celebrating small successes were important factors that lead to large scale adoption and support for the state-wide initiative to reduce infant mortality. PMID:25790592

  3. Municipal energy planning: the Oklahoma experience. [Communities of Altus and Edmond

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, M.

    1980-01-01

    Leadership demonstrated in the Oklahoma communities of Altus and Edmond illustrates the importance of municipal planning for energy crises. A natural gas generating plant in Altus had been closed down because wholesale rates from the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) were more attractive. Legal challenges to PSO's efforts to raise rates after 1973 led to a comprehensive management study aimed at reducing system costs without jeopardizing service. The city set a goal of reducing consumption by 30 percent and an action program which included load-scheduling changes, pricing signals to users, plans for a low-head hydroelectric facility to reduce peak loads, and management reorganization. Edmond's officials took the broad, community-wide approach of appointing a citizen advisory committee to make recommendations. The community problem-solving approach has spread to small municipal systems able to draw on local energy and personnel resources. A state-wide program involves utilities in an ad hoc planning committee. (DCK)

  4. In-situ Soil Moisture Coupled with Extreme Temperatures: A Study Based on the Oklahoma Mesonet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, T.; Quiring, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between observed (in-situ) soil moisture and percent hot days (%HD) in Oklahoma is examined using quantile regression. Consistent with results from previous modeling studies and observational studies using precipitation deficits as proxy, soil moisture is found to most strongly impact air temperature in the upper quantile of the %HD distribution. The utility of soil moisture for forecasting extreme heat events in Oklahoma is also assessed. Our results show that %HD can be predicted with reasonable skill using soil moisture anomalies from the previous month. These soil moisture-based forecasts of extreme temperature events can be used to support public health and water resource planning and mitigation activities in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States.

  5. Evaluation of MODIS NDVI and NDWI for vegetation drought monitoring using Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yingxin; Hunt, Eric; Wardlow, Brian; Basara, Jeffrey B.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Verdin, James P.

    2008-11-01

    The evaluation of the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index and normalized difference water index) and soil moisture improves our understanding of how these indices respond to soil moisture fluctuations. Soil moisture deficits are ultimately tied to drought stress on plants. The diverse terrain and climate of Oklahoma, the extensive soil moisture network of the Oklahoma Mesonet, and satellite-derived indices from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provided an opportunity to study correlations between soil moisture and vegetation indices over the 2002-2006 growing seasons. Results showed that the correlation between both indices and the fractional water index (FWI) was highly dependent on land cover heterogeneity and soil type. Sites surrounded by relatively homogeneous vegetation cover with silt loam soils had the highest correlation between the FWI and both vegetation-related indices (r~0.73), while sites with heterogeneous vegetation cover and loam soils had the lowest correlation (r~0.22).

  6. Sharp increase in central Oklahoma seismicity 2009-2014 induced by massive wastewater injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keranen, Kathleen M.; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Weingarten, Matthew; Bekins, Barbara A.; Ge, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional oil and gas production provides a rapidly growing energy source; however high-producing states in the United States, such as Oklahoma, face sharply rising numbers of earthquakes. Subsurface pressure data required to unequivocally link earthquakes to injection are rarely accessible. Here we use seismicity and hydrogeological models to show that distant fluid migration from high-rate disposal wells in Oklahoma is likely responsible for the largest swarm. Earthquake hypocenters occur within disposal formations and upper-basement, between 2-5 km depth. The modeled fluid pressure perturbation propagates throughout the same depth range and tracks earthquakes to distances of 35 km, with a triggering threshold of ~0.07 MPa. Although thousands of disposal wells may operate aseismically, four of the highest-rate wells likely induced 20% of 2008-2013 central US seismicity.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Terry

    2002-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

  8. Observed winds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma City and Manhattan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Hanna; John White; Ying Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Wind and tracer data from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) and the Manhattan Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05)\\u000a urban field experiments are being analyzed to aid in understanding air flow and dispersion near street-level in built-up downtown\\u000a areas. The mean winds are separately calculated for groups of anemometers having similar exposures such as “near street level”\\u000a and “on

  9. Electric and kinematic structure of the Oklahoma mesoscale convective system of 7 June 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steven M.; Schur, Terry J.; Marshall, Thomas C.; Rust, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    Balloon soundings of electric field in Oklahoma mesoscale convective systems (MCS) were obtained by the National Severe Storms Laboratory in the spring of 1989. This study focuses on a sounding made in the rearward edge of an MCS stratiform rain area on 7 June 1989. Data from Doppler radars, a lightning ground-strike location system, satellite, and other sources is used to relate the mesoscale attributes of the MCS to the observed electric-field profile.

  10. Fate and groundwater impacts of produced water releases at OSPER “B” site, Osage County, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yousif K. Kharaka; Evangelos Kakouros; James J. Thordsen; Gil Ambats; Marvin M. Abbott

    2007-01-01

    For the last 5a, the authors have been investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation and ecosystem impacts of inorganic and organic compounds in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) “A” and “B” sites, located in NE Oklahoma. Approximately 1.0ha of land at OSPER “B”, located within the active Branstetter lease, is visibly

  11. Nature of Migrabitumen and Their Relation to Regional Thermal Maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN J. CARDOTT; TIM E. RUBLE; NEIL H. SUNESON

    1993-01-01

    Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern.Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0·75 to 1·80% from west

  12. Nature of migrabitumen and their relation to regional thermal maturity, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Cardott; N. H. Suneson; T. E. Ruble

    2009-01-01

    Two grahamite and three impsonite localities are within an 82-km-long segment of the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma. Grab samples were collected to study the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the migrabitumen at the grahamite-impsonite transition and the relation of the migrabitumen to the regional thermal maturity pattern. Maximum and random bitumen reflectance values increased from 0.75 to 1.80% from

  13. Chromosomal homology among subspecies of Peromyscus maniculatus in Texas and Oklahoma 

    E-print Network

    Van Fleet, Terry Bryce

    1985-01-01

    and are described in the text. Specimens were examined from the following taxa and localities (see Figure 1): Pa omEscus manlculatus luteus. Kansas: Ellis Co. ; 2. 0 mi 5 Hays, 3; Oklahoma: ~Dewe Co. ; 4. 0 mi W Canton, 3. ~Porno sc s maniculatus ozarkarium.... luteus documents the first report of intraspecific telomeric heterochromatin variation in P. maniculatus. Interstitial 25 hate ochroaetin appears to be relatively rara in ~porno aces as only five species have been reported to have it. Autosomal...

  14. Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations. 

    E-print Network

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1969-01-01

    Depreciation Costs and Classification ! of Feedlot Labor ................................................... 31 . Appendix C: Derivation of Cost Curves .................... )I I Highlights Southern Plains (Texas and Oklahoma) feedlot One of the major..., interest, taxes, insurance, repairs and fixed labor - accounted for about 5 percent of the total feeding costs. Depreci- ation and fixed labor represented about 60 percent d the total annual fixed costs. Interest on fixed investments and repairs made...

  15. Relationship of cliff swallows, ectoparasites, and an Alphavirus in west-central Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Hopla, C E; Francy, D B; Calisher, C H; Lazuick, J S

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 250 isolates of a newly recognized virus, related to western equine encephalitis virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), were obtained from cimicid bugs, Oeciacus vicarius; Cliff Swallows, Hirundo pyrrhonata; and House Sparrows, Passer domesticus in a study area in west-central Oklahoma at Buggy Creek and Caddo Canyons. Antigenicity of the virus strains varied slightly from isolate to isolate. This paper summarizes the ecology of the area by describing in general the flora and fauna there. PMID:8381870

  16. Feasibility of heavy oil recovery in the U.S. midcontinent (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I. [BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Midcontinent of the United States (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma) has three heavy oil resource areas: the carbonates of central and western Kansas, the Pennsylvanian Age consolidated sandstone reservoirs of the Tristate Heavy Oil Belt (southeastern Kansas, western Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma), and the unconsolidated or easily friable sand- stone reservoirs of south-central Oklahoma. The heavy oil resource volume of the carbonates is unknown and relatively untested because of the difficulty in producing viscous oil from low-permeability carbonates. Since the 1960s, the Tristate Heavy Oil Belt has been the site of numerous pilots and operations that tested many different techniques for oil production. The region was a proving ground for many thermal enhanced oil recovery projects (steam, cyclic steam, in situ combustion, hot solvent injection, etc.). Most of the projects produced more oil than primary production, but the geology of the formations limited significant economic oil production. The best opportunity for significant, economic heavy oil production is from the steeply dipping, unconsolidated or easily friable sandstone reservoirs of south-central Oklahoma. Several of these reservoirs are thicker, more continuous, have high permeability and can be exploited by using gravity drainage and steam to reduce oil viscosity. The Midcontinent is not anticipated to become a significant heavy oil producer even if oil prices were significantly higher than $151 barrel because of the nature of the resource and the limited refining capability in the area. Local refineries were designed to process light sweet crude and have little heavy ends processing capability to accommodate additional heavy oil.

  17. Digital data sets of depth-duration frequency of precipitation for Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, Alan; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    These geospatial data sets were produced as part of a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. The data sets consist of surface grids of precipitation depths for seven frequencies (expressed as recurrence intervals of 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-years) and 12 durations (15-, 30-, and 60-minutes; 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hours; and 1-, 3-, and 7-days). Eighty-four depth-duration-frequency surfaces were produced from precipitation-station data. Precipitation-station data from which the surfaces were interpolated and contour lines derived from each surface also are included. Contour intervals vary from 0.05 to 0.5 inch. Data were used from precipitation gage stations with at least 10 years of record within Oklahoma and a zone extending about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Three different rain gage networks provided the data (15-minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the station data for each duration for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. Statistical methods were used to estimate precipitation depths for each duration-frequency at each station. These station depth-duration-frequency estimates were interpolated to produce continuous grids with grid-cell spacing of 2,000 meters. Contour lines derived from these surfaces (grids) were used to produce the maps in the 'Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma,' by R.L. Tortorelli, Alan Rea, and W.H. Asquith, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4232. The geospatial data sets are presented in digital form for use with geographic information systems. These geospatial data sets may be used to determine an interpolated value of depth-duration-frequency of precipitation for any point in Oklahoma.

  18. Drought adaptation in rural eastern Oklahoma in the 1930s: lessons for climate change adaptation research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert McLeman; Dick Mayo; Earl Strebeck; Barry Smit

    2008-01-01

    In the mid-1930s, eastern Oklahoma, USA, suffered an unusually harsh mixture of droughts and extreme rainfall events that\\u000a led to widespread crop failure over several years. These climatic conditions coincided with low commodity prices, agricultural\\u000a restructuring and general economic collapse, creating tremendous hardship in rural and agriculturally dependent areas. Using\\u000a a previously developed typology of agricultural adaptation, this paper reports

  19. PALS radar signatures of soil surfaces and vegetated sites in Oklahoma during SGP'99

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. H. Yueh; E. G. Njoku; W. J. Wilson; F. K. Li; T. Jackson; V. Lakshmi

    2000-01-01

    The Passive\\/Active L-\\/S-band (PALS) microwave instrument has been developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to investigate the synergism of radiometer and radar measurements for soil moisture remote sensing. In July 1999, PALS was installed on the NCAR C-130 with six successful flights near the Oklahoma City during the Southern Great Plains 1999 (SGP99) Experiment. The data from these and

  20. Flexural analysis of two broken foreland basins; Late Cenozoic Bermejo basin and Early Cenozoic Green River basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. B. Flemings; T. E. Jordan; S. Reynolds

    1986-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure that generates basin in a broke foreland setting (e.g., the Laramide foreland of Wyoming) is a three-dimensional system related to shortening along basin-bounding faults. The authors modeled the elastic flexure in three dimensions for two broken foreland basins: the early Cenozoic Green River basin and the analogous late Cenozoic Bermejo basin of Argentina. Each basin is located between

  1. Molecular characterization, ecology, and epidemiology of a novel Tymovirus in Asclepias viridis from Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Eun; Feldman, Tracy S; Ali, Akhtar; Wiley, Graham; Muthukumar, Vijay; Roe, Bruce A; Roossinck, Marilyn; Melcher, Ulrich; Palmer, Michael W; Nelson, Richard S

    2012-02-01

    Native virus-plant interactions require more understanding and their study will provide a basis from which to identify potential sources of emerging destructive viruses in crops. A novel tymovirus sequence was detected in Asclepias viridis (green milkweed), a perennial growing in a natural setting in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (TGPP) of Oklahoma. It was abundant within and frequent among A. viridis plants and, to varying extents, within other dicotyledonous and one grass (Panicum virgatum) species obtained from the TGPP. Extracts from A. viridis containing the sequence were infectious to a limited number of species. The virus genome was cloned and determined to be closely related to Kennedya yellow mosaic virus. The persistence of the virus within the Oklahoma A. viridis population was monitored for five successive years. Virus was present in a high percentage of plants within representative areas of the TGPP in all years and was spreading to additional plants. Virus was present in regions adjacent to the TGPP but not in plants sampled from central and south-central Oklahoma. Virus was present in the underground caudex of the plant during the winter, suggesting overwintering in this tissue. The RNA sequence encoding the virus coat protein varied considerably between individual plants (?3%), likely due to drift rather than selection. An infectious clone was constructed and the virus was named Asclepias asymptomatic virus (AsAV) due to the absence of obvious symptoms on A. viridis. PMID:22026416

  2. Estimating Regional Groundwater Variability in Oklahoma from a Combination of in situ and Remotely Sensed Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Basara, J.; Wahr, J.; Famiglietti, J.

    2006-12-01

    Monthly gravity fields provided by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) can be used to estimate changes in the vertically integrated water content for large regions. Using a recently developed filtering technique, we have shown good agreement between total water storage estimates obtained from GRACE and from in situ measurements in Illinois, demonstrating that GRACE can resolve the seasonal cycle of total water storage for areas as small as 200,000 km2. Another location having soil moisture measurements comparable to the spatial resolution of GRACE is the Oklahoma Mesonet, an automated observing network that provides realtime hydrometeorological observations at more than 100 stations in Oklahoma, spanning an area of roughly 180,000 km2. Beginning in the mid-1990's, soil moisture sensors at depths of 5 to 75 cm were installed at many of these sites. In this study, we use these measurements to estimate changes in storage in the unsaturated zone. By removing these soil moisture estimates from remotely sensed estimates of changes in total water storage obtained from GRACE, we can estimate changes in regional groundwater storage at the monthly to seasonal timescale. Here we present our estimates of the seasonal cycle of groundwater for Oklahoma, and discuss possible sources of disagreement.

  3. Processes affecting ?34S and ?18O values of dissolved sulfate in alluvium along the Canadian River, central Oklahoma, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.; Breit, George N.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2009-01-01

    The ?34S and ?18O values for dissolved sulfate in groundwater are commonly used in aquifer studies to identify sulfate reservoirs and describe biogeochemical processes. The utility of these data, however, often is compromised by mixing of sulfate sources within reservoirs and isotope fractionation during sulfur redox cycling. Our study shows that, after all potential sulfate sources are identified and isotopically characterized, the ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4 values differentiate processes such as sulfate-source mixing, sulfide oxidation, barite dissolution, and organosulfur decomposition. During bacterial reduction of sulfate, the values reflect kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation and exchange of oxygen isotopes between sulfate and water. Detailed analysis of the chemistry (Cl and SO4 concentrations) and isotopic composition (?2HH2Oand ?18OH2O) of groundwater in an alluvial aquifer in Central Oklahoma, USA allowed the identification of five distinct end members that supply water to the aquifer (regional groundwater flowing into the study area, river water, leachate from a closed landfill that operated within the site, rain, and surface runoff). The ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4 values in each end member differentiated three sources of sulfate: sulfate dissolved from Early to Late Permian rocks within the drainage basin (?34SSO4 = 8–12‰ and ?18OSO4 = 10‰), iron sulfides oxidized by molecular oxygen during low water-table levels (?34SSO4 = ? 16‰ and ?18OSO4 = 10‰), and organosulfur compounds (predominately ester sulfates) from decomposition of vegetation on the surface and from landfill trash buried in the alluvium (?34SSO4 = 8‰ and ?18OSO4 = 6‰). During bacterial reduction of these sulfate sources, similar isotope fractionation processes are recorded in the parallel trends of increasing ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4 values. When extensive reduction occurs, the kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation (estimated by ?H2S–SO4 = ? 23‰) results in the steady increase of ?34SSO4values to greater than 70‰. Equilibrium isotope fractionation during exchange of sulfate oxygen and water oxygen, a process not commonly observed in field-based studies, is documented in ?18OSO4 values asymptotically approaching 21‰, the value predicted for conditions at the study site (?SO4–H2O = 27‰). These results show that recognition of all potential sulfate sources is a critical first step to resolving complexities in ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4 data. The approach taken in this study can be used in other aquifer systems where the identification of multiple sulfate sources and sulfur redox cycling is important to understanding natural processes and anthropogenic influences.

  4. Well-Production Data and Gas-Reservoir Heterogeneity -- Reserve Growth Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Schmoker, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Oil and gas well production parameters, including peakmonthly production (PMP), peak-consecutive-twelve month production (PYP), and cumulative production (CP), are tested as tools to quantify and understand the heterogeneity of reservoirs in fields where current monthly production is 10 percent or less of PMP. Variation coefficients, defined as VC= (F5-F95)/F50, where F5, F95, and F50 are the 5th, 95th, and 50th (median) fractiles of a probability distribution, are calculated for peak and cumulative production and examined with respect to internal consistency, type of production parameter, conventional versus unconventional accumulations, and reservoir depth. Well-production data for this study were compiled for 69 oil and gas fields in the Lower Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation of the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. Of these, 47 fields represent production from marine clastic facies. The Morrow data were supplemented by data from the Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Middle Ordovician Simpson Group, Middle Pennsylvanian Atoka Formation, and Silurian and Lower Devonian Hunton Group of the Anadarko Basin, one large gas field in Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of north-central Montana (Bowdoin field), and three areas of the Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation continuous-type (unconventional) oil accumulation in the Williston Basin, North Dakota and Montana. Production parameters (PMP, PYP, and CP) measure the net result of complex geologic, engineering, and economic processes. Our fundamental hypothesis is that well-production data provide information about subsurface heterogeneity in older fields that would be impossible to obtain using geologic techniques with smaller measurement scales such as petrographic, core, and well-log analysis. Results such as these indicate that quantitative measures of production rates and production volumes of wells, expressed as dimensionless variation coefficients, are potentially valuable tools for documenting reservoir heterogeneity in older fields for field redevelopment and risk analysis.

  5. Foreland basins and fold belts

    SciTech Connect

    Macqueen, R.W.; Leckie, D.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Inst. of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1992-01-01

    The papers in this book describe six foreland basins and fold belts in terms of their regional setting, stratigraphy, tectonics, and structure, and their oil and gas systems. All of the basins show general similarities, but each differs significantly in detail from the others, posing something of a problem in terms of arriving at a 'typical' foreland basin and fold belt. Some are major hydrocarbon producers; others are not. The major characteristics of the six foreland basins and fold belts are summarized in Tables 1 through 5, which provide a convenient means of comparing and contrasting these basins and their hydrocarbon resources. The Western Canada foreland basin and fold belt serves as the type example for several reasons. These include: its setting and clear relationship to a major orogene of Mesozoic-Cenozoic age; the fact that it is uncomplicated by later overprinting, segmentation, or cover rocks unlike the Ouachita, Eastern Venezuela, and U.S. Rocky Mountain foreland basins and fold belts); the fact that there is a large volume of publicly available data on the basin and an active exploration and research community; and the fact that it has reasonable oil and gas reserves in a well-defined stratigraphic framework.

  6. 5, 1105511090, 2005 Basin convergence

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 11055­11090, 2005 Basin convergence patterns due to low level jets B. de Foy et al. Title and Physics Discussions Distinct wind convergence patterns due to thermal and momentum forcing of the low 5, 11055­11090, 2005 Basin convergence patterns due to low level jets B. de Foy et al. Title Page

  7. Atlantic marginal basins of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    The over 10,000-km long Atlantic margin of Africa is divisible into thirty basins or segments of the margin that collectively contain over 18.6 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 3/ of syn-breakup and post-breakup sediments. Twenty of these basins contain a sufficiently thick volume of sediments to be considered prospects. These basins lie, at least partially, within the 200 m isobath. The distribution of source rocks is broad enough to give potential to each of these basins. The sedimentation patterns, tectonics, and timing of events differ from basin to basin and are related directly to the margin's complex history. Two spreading modes exist: rift and transform. Rifting dates from Late Triassic-Early Jurassic in the northwest to Early Cretaceous south of the Niger Delta. A complex transform fault system separated these two margins. Deep-water communication between the two basins became established in the middle Cretaceous. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of rifting and seafloor spreading has segmented the margin and where observable, basins tend to be bounded by these segments.

  8. MASSACHUSETTS DRAINAGE SUB-BASINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MassGIS has produced a statewide digital datalayer of the approximately 2300 sub-basins as defined and used by the USGS Water Resources Division and the Mass Water Resources Commission and as modified by Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) agencies. These sub-basins...

  9. Estancia Basin dynamic water budget.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Richard P.

    2004-09-01

    The Estancia Basin lies about 30 miles to the east of Albuquerque, NM. It is a closed basin in terms of surface water and is somewhat isolated in terms of groundwater. Historically, the primary natural outlet for both surface water and groundwater has been evaporation from the salt lakes in the southeastern portion of the basin. There are no significant watercourses that flow into this basin and groundwater recharge is minimal. During the 20th Century, agriculture grew to become the major user of groundwater in the basin. Significant declines in groundwater levels have accompanied this agricultural use. Domestic and municipal use of the basin groundwater is increasing as Albuquerque population continues to spill eastward into the basin, but this use is projected to be less than 1% of agricultural use well into the 21st Century. This Water Budget model keeps track of the water balance within the basin. The model considers the amount of water entering the basin and leaving the basin. Since there is no significant surface water component within this basin, the balance of water in the groundwater aquifer constitutes the primary component of this balance. Inflow is based on assumptions for recharge made by earlier researchers. Outflow from the basin is the summation of the depletion from all basin water uses. The model user can control future water use within the basin via slider bars that set values for population growth, water system per-capita use, agricultural acreage, and the types of agricultural diversion. The user can also adjust recharge and natural discharge within the limits of uncertainty for those parameters. The model runs for 100 years beginning in 1940 and ending in 2040. During the first 55 years model results can be compared to historical data and estimates of groundwater use. The last 45 years are predictive. The model was calibrated to match to New Mexico Office of State Engineer (NMOSE) estimates of aquifer storage during the historical period by making adjustments to recharge and outflow that were within the parameters uncertainties. Although results of this calibrated model imply that there may be more water remaining in the aquifer than the Estancia Water Plan estimates, this answer is only another possible result in a range of answers that are based on large parameter uncertainties.

  10. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

    1995-07-07

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geological Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaging in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional and subsequent geologic histories; collect, organize and analyze all available data; conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs to sustain the life expectancy of existing wells with the ultimate objective of increasing oil recovery. The elements of the technology transfer program include developing and publishing play portfolios, holding workshops to release play analyses and identify opportunities in each of the plays, and establishing a computer laboratory that is available for industry users.

  11. Inter-comparison of soil moisture sensors from the soil moisture active passive marena Oklahoma in situ sensor testbed (SMAP-MOISST)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diversity of in situ soil moisture network protocols and instrumentation led to the development of a testbed for comparing in situ soil moisture sensors. Located in Marena, Oklahoma on the Oklahoma State University Range Research Station, the testbed consists of four base stations. Each station ...

  12. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  13. Basin infill architecture and evolution from magnetostratigraphic cross-basin correlations in the southeastern Pyrenean foreland basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Taberner; J. Dinarčs-Turell; J. Giménez; C. Docherty

    1999-01-01

    Magnetostratigraphy, numerical dating, and facies mapping have been combined to provide the first cross-basin correlation of the Eocene southeastern Pyrenean foreland basin in northeastern Spain. This has enabled (1) depositional systems on the northern and south- ern margins of the basin to be dated and correlated across the basin and (2) changes in the rates of sediment accumulation in time

  14. Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

    2012-03-01

    The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma. PMID:22160129

  15. New deeper exploration frontiers in Bass basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. E. Williamson; C. J. Pigram; A. S. Scherl; K. L. Lockwood; M. A. Etheridge; J. C. Branson

    1985-01-01

    The Bass basin is the sister basin to the Gippsland. Both are extensional basins in southeast Australia between Tasmania and the mainland, and both occupy areas in excess of 60,000 km². The Bass and Gippsland basins were resurveyed seismically by the Bureau of Mineral Resources to provide regional correlation and to penetrate seismic energy barriers caused by Eocene coals. Analyses

  16. Effects of the declining groundwater supply in the northern high plains of Oklahoma and Texas on community service expenditures

    E-print Network

    Williford, George Herbert

    1976-01-01

    EFFECTS OF THE DECLINING GROUNDWATER SUPPLY IN THE NORTHERN HIGH PLAINS OF OKLAHOMA AND TEXAS ON COMMUNITY SERVICE EXPENDITURES A Thesis by GEORGE HERBERT WILLIFORD III II, Submi. tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE liay 1976 Major Sub j ec t: Ag r1 cu1tura1 Economi cs EFFECTS OF THE DECLINING GROUNDWATER SUPPLY IN THE NORTHERN HIGH PLAINS OF OKLAHOMA AND TEXAS ON COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  17. Assessment of conservation practices in the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed, southwestern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    The Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed encompasses about 813 square kilometers of rural farm land in Caddo, Custer, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. The Fort Cobb Reservoir and six stream segments were identified on the Oklahoma 1998 303(d) list as not supporting designated beneficial uses because of impairment by nutrients, suspended solids, sedimentation, pesticides, and unknown toxicity. As a result, State and Federal agencies, in collaboration with conservation districts and landowners, started conservation efforts in 2001 to decrease erosion and transport of sediments and nutrients to the reservoir and improve water quality in tributaries. The U.S. Department of Agriculture selected the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in 2003 as 1 of 14 benchmark watersheds under the Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Project with the objective of quantifying the environmental benefits derived from agricultural conservation programs in reducing inflows of sediments and phosphorus to the reservoir. In November 2004, the Biologic, Geographic, Geologic, and Water Disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Agricultural Research Service, Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma, began an interdisciplinary investigation to produce an integrated publication to complement this program. This publication is a compilation of 10 report chapters describing land uses, soils, geology, climate, and water quality in streams and the reservoir through results of field and remote sensing investigations from 2004 to 2007. The investigations indicated that targeting best-management practices to small intermittent streams draining to the reservoir and to the Cobb Creek subwatershed may effectively augment efforts to improve eutrophic to hypereutrophic conditions that continue to affect the reservoir. The three major streams flowing into the reservoir contribute nutrients causing eutrophication, but minor streams draining cultivated fields near the reservoir appeared to be disproportionate contributors of nutrients. Increasing conservation practices on small streams may have a greater effect in mitigating eutrophication in the reservoir than additional installation of such measures on the larger creeks.

  18. The use and tenure of land in Oklahoma held primarily for its mineral potential 

    E-print Network

    Parcher, L. A.

    1955-01-01

    * s Association, Oil and Gas Field Development in United States. Year Book 1943. Vol. XIII, Austin, Texas, p. 466 A. was estimated that 15 percent of all sections in the four coun? ties had one or more producing wells on them. The estimate was based on a...L I B R A R Y fc&M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE USE AND TENURE OF LAND IN OKLAHOMA HELD PRIMARILY FOR ITS MINERAL POTENTIAL A Dis sertation By Loris Alvin Parcher Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas...

  19. Chemical quality of water in abandoned zinc mines in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Playton, Stephen J.; Davis, Robert E.; McClaflin, Roger G.

    1980-01-01

    Onsite measurements of pH, specific conductance, and water temperature show that water in seven mine shafts in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas is stratified. With increasing sampling depth, specific conductance and water temperature tend to increase, and pH tends to decrease. Concentrations of dissolved solids and chemical constituents in mine-shaft water, such as total and dissolved metals and dissolved sulfate also increase with depth. The apparently unstable condition created by cooler, denser water overlying warmer, less dense water is offset by the greater density of the lower water strata due to higher dissolved solids content.

  20. Solar repowering for electric generation. Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The conceptual design and evaluation of solar repowering and electric generating unit of Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) are described in detail. The solar addition would permit, at the design point, a 20% reduction of the fossil fuel consumed by PSO's 150 MWe Northeastern Station Unit 1. The proposed system comprises a tower focus power plant with a water/steam central receiver. This volume presents the trade studies, conceptual design, system performance, economic analysis, and development plan as well as a description of a test program to determine the magnitude of impact that environmental factors have on plant design and performance. (WHK)

  1. A study of dispersed photovoltaic generation on the PSO (Public Service Company of Oklahoma) system

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, W.T. (Center for Energy Studies, Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS (US)); Ramakumar, R. (School of Elec and Computer Engg., Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (US)); Hill, S.R. (Public Service Co. of Oklahoma, P.O. Box 201, Tulsa, OK (US))

    1988-09-01

    The power generated by utility-interactive solar photovoltaic (PV) generators dispersed throughout a utility service area changes with insolation on a minute-by-minute, diurnal, and seasonal basis. The utility must follow these changes with its own generation, just as it now follows normal customer load fluctuations. This paper presents the results of a study of the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) system with simulated dispersed PV generation. It was found that, with high penetrations of PV, as insolation changes, significant variations in power flows occurred on transmission and subtransmission lines that may require changes in system protection and voltage control practices.

  2. Parameterization and application of the AquaCrop model for simulating bioenergy crops in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilga, Navneet Kaur

    The objective of this study was to parameterize the AquaCrop model for two bioenergy crops, switchgrass and forage sorghum, using field measurements from Stillwater, Oklahoma in 2011. The parameterized model was then validated for additional sites at Chickasha and Woodward, Oklahoma. After parameterization at Stillwater, the simulated canopy cover closely matched the measured canopy cover dynamics with a RMSE of 6% in switchgrass and 5% in forage sorghum. The water stress thresholds for canopy expansion and stomatal conductance were similar for switchgrass and forage sorghum, but senescence was induced at 35% available water depletion for forage sorghum compared to 85% for switchgrass. The maximum rooting depth of switchgrass was estimated at 190 cm and that of forage sorghum at 120 cm. The normalized water productivity of switchgrass was found to be 14 g m-2, approximately half that of forage sorghum which was 27 g m-2. The parameterized model reasonably simulated soil water depletion at Stillwater (RMSE < 34 mm) and canopy cover at Chickasha and Woodward (RMSE < 11%) for both crops. This calibrated model was then used to predict ethanol yields as a simulation study at Goodwell, Oklahoma. The corn, forage sorghum and switchgrass were simulated using AquaCrop five water levels: rainfed with initial soil moisture conditions of 60% available water capacity, 80% available water capacity, 100% available water capacity, and irrigation treatments at 70% allowable depletion, and at 50% allowable depletion. The simulation study was done over a period of ten years 2002-2011 to assess the long term performance. County average yields were consistent with simulated grain yields for corn under irrigated and rainfed conditions. Forage sorghum produced 30 % higher theoretical ethanol yields than corn under irrigated environments but not under rainfed environments. Switchgrass did not produce significantly higher theoretical ethanol yields than corn at any water level. Based on this modeling study, forage sorghum may have potential as an alternative to corn in the Oklahoma Panhandle given the advent of cellulosic ethanol production but forage sorghum is unlikely to help meet the challenge of groundwater depletion.

  3. Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-09-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

  5. Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidwell, J.R.; Becker, C.; Hensley, S.; Stark, R.; Meyer, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and ??-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surfacewater site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewaterassociated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. ??Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

  6. Late Mississippian productoid brachiopods Inflatia, Keokukia, and Adairia, Ozark region of Oklahoma and Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, M., Jr.; Henry, T.W.; Treworgy, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Specimens of the Late Mississippian productoid genera Inflatia and Keokukia from northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas, collected from the Boone and "Moorefield' formations, Hindsville Limestone, and Fayetteville Shale, display morphologic similarities and differences that delineate species and determine their biostratigraphic ranges. Generic assignments are based primarily on internal characters. Systematic descriptions include seven species of Inflatia Muir-Wood and Cooper. Also proposed and described is a new genus, Adairia, with its type species Productus (Marginifera) adairensis Drake. All these species of Inflatia, Keokukia and Adairia have biostratigraphically restricted ranges within the Meramecian and Chesterian sequence in the Ozark region. -from Authors

  7. Alpine tectonics of the Pannonian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tari, G. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Pannonian basin is fairly well understood in terms of back-arc extension behind the Carpathian thrust-fold belt. This middle Miocene-Holocene basin, however, is superimposed on an earlier middle Eocene-early Miocene basin traditionally called the Paleogene basin of Hungary. Although the Paleogene stratigraphy of the basin is well known, its structural evolution is not clear; however, a transtensional origin is assumed analogous to the overlying Pannonian basin. The existing data set on the Paleogene basin can be integrated easily into a compressional basin model. Other intra-Carpathian Paleogene basins, such as the Transylvanian and Slovenian basins, are now considered to be flexural in origin. Systematic interpretation of reflection seismic data shows that these Tertiary basins are superimposed on a Cretaceous Alpine thrust-fold belt. The internal geometry of this belt in the basement of the Pannonian basin indicates a close relationship to the surrounding mountain belts (Alps, Carpathians, and Dinarides). Whereas the neogene Pannonian basin is in a mature stage of exploration, the underlying Paleogene flexural basins are much less explored. Furthermore, the Cretaceous thrust-fold belts should be regarded as frontier areas for future oil and gas exploration efforts.

  8. Potential ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis in domestic cats in Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Elisha K; Baum, Kristen A; Pape?, Monica; Cohn, Leah A; Cowell, Annette K; Reichard, Mason V

    2013-02-18

    The ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis, an often-fatal tick-borne apicomplexan that infects domestic cats, has not been evaluated or identified despite its continued emergence. Infection of C. felis is characterized by lethargy, icterus, fever, anorexia, anemia, and death. The natural vertebrate reservoir of C. felis is the bobcat (Lynx rufus). To determine the possible distribution of C. felis in three states where infection is common (Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas), two separate approaches to ecological niche modeling were implemented. First, a model relating several different climatic layers to geographic locations where cases of C. felis infection were confirmed in domestic cats was developed to predict the possible distribution of the parasite. The second model incorporated occurrences of bobcats with environmental layers and land cover suitable for tick vectors to identify areas of overlap where C. felis transmission was likely. Results of both models indicated a high probability of C. felis from central Oklahoma to south-central Missouri. However, other predicted areas of C. felis occurrence varied between the two modeling approaches. Modeling the vertebrate reservoir and the tick vector predicted a broader possible distribution compared to modeling cases of C. felis infection in domestic cats. Our results suggest that C. felis is likely to extend beyond areas predicted by case modeling due to the presence of both the vector and reservoir. PMID:23131576

  9. Endozoochory of seeds and invertebrates by migratory waterbirds in Oklahoma, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Andy J.; Frisch, Dagmar; Michot, Thomas C.; Allain, Larry K.; Barrow, Wylie C.

    2013-01-01

    Given their abundance and migratory behavior, waterbirds have major potential for dispersing plants and invertebrates within North America, yet their role as vectors remains poorly understood. We investigated the numbers and types of invertebrates and seeds within freshly collected faecal samples (n = 22) of migratory dabbling ducks and shorebirds in November 2008 in two parts of Lake Texoma in southern Oklahoma. Killdeer Charadrius vociferus were transporting a higher number and diversity of both plants and invertebrates than the green-winged teal Anas carolinensis. Ten plant taxa and six invertebrate taxa were identified to at least genus level, although viability was not confirmed for most of these taxa. Bryozoan statoblasts (from four species not previously recorded from Oklahoma) were especially abundant in killdeer faeces, while the ostracod Candona simpsoni was detected as a live adult in torpor in the teal faeces. Cyperaceae and Juncaceae were the most abundant plant families represented and Cyperus strigosus seeds germinated after extraction from killdeer faeces. This snapshot study underlines the importance of waterbirds as vectors of passive dispersal of many organisms and the need for more research in this discipline.

  10. Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkle, D.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Fabian, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

  11. Solar repowering for electric generation. Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The Department of Energy contracted for Black and Veatch to develop a conceptual design for solar repowering Northeastern Station Unit 1 (NES 1) of the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO). NES 1 is located about 50 km (30 miles) northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This plant was selected because it is representative of candidate plants for repowering and for solar-fossil hybrid operation; it is located in a moderate insolation region, utilizes an efficient reheat cycle with steam conditions characteristic of modern power plants, and has sufficient land for repowering. NES 1 has a subcritical, single reheat turbine-generator and a gas-fired steam generator. The basic repowering configuration was established through a series of trade studies and the criterion that proven technology be used. The system selected has a water/steam receiver which supplies superheated steam to the turbine at a design point flow rate sufficient to displace 20 percent of the unit's fossil fuel consumption. This volume contains the appendices: (A) system requirements specification, and (B) daily insolation profiles. (WHK)

  12. Solar repowering for electric generation: Northeastern Station Unit 1, Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-15

    The Department of Energy contracted for Black and Veatch to develop a conceptual design for solar repowering Northeastern Station Unit 1 (NES 1) of the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO). NES 1 is located about 50 km (30 miles) northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This plant was selected because it is representative of candidate plants for repowering and for solar-fossil hybrid operation; it is located in a moderate insolation region, utilizes an efficient reheat cycle with steam conditions characteristic of modern power plants, and has sufficient land for repowering. NES 1 has a subcritical, single reheat turbine-generator and a gas-fired steam generator. The basic repowering configuration was established through a series of trade studies and the criterion that proven technology be used. The system selected has a water/steam receiver which supplies superheated steam to the turbine at a design point flow rate sufficient to displace 20 per cent of the unit's fossil fuel consumption. The hybrid nature of the plant's operation eliminates the need for costly thermal storage. A brief overview of the design, performance, and economics is given. (WHK)

  13. Modeling earthquake rate changes in Oklahoma and Arkansas: possible signatures of induced seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of ML?3 earthquakes in the central and eastern United States increased beginning in 2009, particularly in Oklahoma and central Arkansas, where fluid injection has occurred. We find evidence that suggests these rate increases are man?made by examining the rate changes in a catalog of ML?3 earthquakes in Oklahoma, which had a low background seismicity rate before 2009, as well as rate changes in a catalog of ML?2.2 earthquakes in central Arkansas, which had a history of earthquake swarms prior to the start of injection in 2009. In both cases, stochastic epidemic?type aftershock sequence models and statistical tests demonstrate that the earthquake rate change is statistically significant, and both the background rate of independent earthquakes and the aftershock productivity must increase in 2009 to explain the observed increase in seismicity. This suggests that a significant change in the underlying triggering process occurred. Both parameters vary, even when comparing natural to potentially induced swarms in Arkansas, which suggests that changes in both the background rate and the aftershock productivity may provide a way to distinguish man?made from natural earthquake rate changes. In Arkansas we also compare earthquake and injection well locations, finding that earthquakes within 6 km of an active injection well tend to occur closer together than those that occur before, after, or far from active injection. Thus, like a change in productivity, a change in interevent distance distribution may also be an indicator of induced seismicity.

  14. The Leedey, Oklahoma, Chondrite: Fall, petrology, chemistry and an unusual Fe,Ni-FeS inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, T. J.; Ehlmann, A. J.; Moore, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    The Leedey, Oklahoma meteorite shower fell on Nov. 25, 1943, following a fireball which was visible across much of southwestern Oklahoma and north-central Texas. The shower produced 24 stones with a total mass of ~51.5 kg. The stones formed a strewnfield ~18 km in length in the same direction as the observed path of the meteor (N50 W). Leedey is classified as an L6(S3) ordinary chondrite. We report bulk major element chemical analyses from four separate laboratories. Leedey contains an unusual 6 by 8 mm composite Fe,Ni-FeS grain, which is composed of a 3 mm kamacite grain adjacent to a 5 mm troilite grain. A 50-100 micron rim of high-Ni (45-55 wt.%) taenite (tetrataenite) occurs at the boundary between kamacite and troilite. A single, zoned pyrophanite grain is observed at the boundary between the inclusion troilite and host silicates. An origin as a foreign particle incorporated after metamorphism or during impact melting appears unlikely. This particle likely formed by a complex set of processes, including melting in the nebula, parent body metamorphism and reheating by later shock, mirroring the history of the host chondrite.

  15. Microhabitat use, home range, and movements of the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii, in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedle, J.D.; Shipman, P.A.; Fox, S.F.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the ecology of the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii, particularly dentography and behavior. To learn more about the species in Oklahoma, we conducted a telemetry project on 2 small streams at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, an 8,417.5-ha refuge located in east-central Oklahoma. Between June 1999 and August 2000, we fitted 19 M. temminckii with ultrasonic telemetry tags and studied turtle movements and microhahitat use. Turtles were checked 2 to 3 times weekly in summer and sporadically in winter. Several microhabitat variables were measured at each turtle location and a random location to help quantify microhabitat use vs. availability. We recorded 147 turtle locations. Turtles were always associated with submerged cover with a high percentage of overhead canopy cover. Turtles used deeper depths in late summer (but not deeper depths than random locations) and deeper depths in mid-winter (and deeper depths than random locations) than in early summer. They used shallower depths than random locations in early summer. This seasonal shift in depth use might be thermoregulatory, although evidence for this is indirect. The mean linear home range for all turtles was 777.8 m. Females had larger home ranges than males, and juveniles had larger home ranges than adults, although the latter was not statistically significant. Macrochelys temminckii used submerged structures as a core site, and stayed at each core site for an average of 12.3 d.

  16. Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

    1987-09-01

    Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. A geographic analysis of the status of mountain lions in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, J.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Shaw, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic distribution of sightings and sign of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Oklahoma was investigated. Mail survey questionnaires were sent to natural resource professionals throughout Oklahoma to gather temporal and spatial information on sightings of mountain lions from 1985 to 1995. We used a geographic information system (GIS) to compare locations of sightings and sign in the state with ecoregions, deer harvest, human population densities, locations of licensed owners and breeders of mountain lions, and generalized topography. Sightings and sign of mountain lions occurred significantly more often in the Central Rolling Red Plains than elsewhere in the state. Sightings of mountain lions increased with total deer harvest statewide (R2=0.828, P<0.001). Numbers of sightings of mountain lions were correlated negatively with density of the human population (R2=0.885, P=0.017). Surveys are a valuable method to assess the status of rare wildlife species when other methods are not available and when those receiving the survey are qualified.

  18. The Impact of High Wind Events on the Central Business District of Oklahoma City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Dustin; Basara, Jeffrey; Hall, J. R.

    2004-05-01

    It is critical to understand airflow through cities due to the possibilities of biological and chemical terrorist attacks, pollution, and accidental chemical spills. Currently very few studies have used field measurements of wind conditions within a city to study urban air flow. This paper investigates the airflow at specific locations within Oklahoma City during two synoptic high wind events and one convective high wind event using data collected at fifteen different sites within the central business district. For the synoptic cases, wind vector magnitudes and directions were averaged for each site before and after the frontal passage. For all cases, wind speed and direction comparisons were made between the individual PWID sites and some wind flow patterns within the city were deduced. Possible reasons for these wind flows based on building structure, PWID location, and street orientation is also discussed. It was found that air flow through Oklahoma City is extremely complex, though some small and large scale wind flow patterns appeared to emerge. This conclusion emphasizes the need for further study regarding wind flows through cities to better understand how pollutants and chemical/biological agents might flow through a city under a wide variety of weather conditions.

  19. Evaluation of MODIS NDVI and NDWI for vegetation drought monitoring using Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Hunt, E.; Wardlow, B.; Basara, J.B.; Brown, J.F.; Verdin, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index and normalized difference water index) and soil moisture improves our understanding of how these indices respond to soil moisture fluctuations. Soil moisture deficits are ultimately tied to drought stress on plants. The diverse terrain and climate of Oklahoma, the extensive soil moisture network of the Oklahoma Mesonet, and satellite-derived indices from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provided an opportunity to study correlations between soil moisture and vegetation indices over the 2002-2006 growing seasons. Results showed that the correlation between both indices and the fractional water index (FWI) was highly dependent on land cover heterogeneity and soil type. Sites surrounded by relatively homogeneous vegetation cover with silt loam soils had the highest correlation between the FWI and both vegetation-related indices (r???0.73), while sites with heterogeneous vegetation cover and loam soils had the lowest correlation (r???0.22). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanisms in central Oklahoma reveal a complex system of reactivated subsurface strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H. M.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; Earle, P.; Holland, A.; Baldwin, R.; Gassner, A.

    2015-04-01

    The sharp increase in seismicity over a broad region of central Oklahoma has raised concern regarding the source of the activity and its potential hazard to local communities and energy industry infrastructure. Since early 2010, numerous organizations have deployed temporary portable seismic stations in central Oklahoma in order to record the evolving seismicity. In this study, we apply a multiple-event relocation method to produce a catalog of 3639 central Oklahoma earthquakes from late 2009 through 2014. Regional moment tensor (RMT) source parameters were determined for 195 of the largest and best recorded earthquakes. Combining RMT results with relocated seismicity enabled us to determine the length, depth, and style of faulting occurring on reactivated subsurface fault systems. Results show that the majority of earthquakes occur on near-vertical, optimally oriented (NE-SW and NW-SE), strike-slip faults in the shallow crystalline basement. These are necessary first-order observations required to assess the potential hazards of individual faults in Oklahoma.

  1. A Comparative Study of the Ichthyofauna in Selected Streams on the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas A. Ashbaugh; Robert K. Reichert; Steven E. Franklin; Matthew N. Mercer; Heather A. Lanman; Berry S. Mantooth

    This paper lists fishes and their abundances in seine collections from streams of the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge (SPNWR) in Oklahoma. We collected a total of 15 species and one hybrid. Dominant species included the cyprinids Cyprinella lutrensis, Hybognathus placitus, Notropis atherinoides, and the atherinid Menidia beryllina. Shannon-Wiener diversity (H') and evenness measures for sites located in upstream reaches

  2. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the FourCorners Area and Eastern Oklahoma, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma from August, 2009?August, 2011. Using data from a six site area network, a characterization of the magnitude and spatia...

  3. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock-581-3468 Garfield City of Enid Landfill 580-249-4917 Garvin Foster Waste Disposal Landfill 405-238-2012 Jackson City American Environmental Landfill 918-245-7786 Call ahead Pontotoc City of Ada Municipal Landfill 580

  4. Geomorphology and stream habitat relationships with smallmouth bass ( Micropterus dolomieu ) abundance at multiple spatial scales in eastern Oklahoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel C. Dauwalter; Dale K. Splinter; William L. Fisher; Richard A. Marston

    2007-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphic processes structure habitats important to stream fishes. We determined relationships between densities of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) and ecoregions, watershed and reach morphology, and stream habitat in eastern Oklahoma, USA. Watershed and reach morphology were measured at 128 stream sites, and stream habitat and smallmouth bass abundance were measured in 1800 channel units. Variation in stream size, channel

  5. Oklahoma State University Honors Degrees (May. 1969 -May, 2013) Barber Frank A. Chemistry (B.A.) AS MAY 1969

    E-print Network

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma State University Honors Degrees (May. 1969 - May, 2013) Page 1 Barber Frank A. Chemistry (B.A.) AS MAY 1969 Edgar Robert R. History (B.A.) AS MAY 1969 Edmonds Allan L. Mathematics (B.S.) AS MAY 1969 Seebo Thomas C. II Political Science (B.A.) AS MAY 1970 Stewart Elisabeth French (B

  6. HIV on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU): A Study of Five Campuses in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee-Lye; Carlon, Alfonso; Toynes, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Students (N = 1,146) from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma participated in this study. Although students report a moderate level of HIV knowledge, they are deficient on three items related to the role of Nonoxynol-9 on HIV transmission, role of prior STD history on HIV transmission, and meaning of…

  7. Forensic bird-strike identification techniques used in an accident investigation at Wiley Post Airport, Oklahoma, 2008

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ma R

    On March 4, 2008, a Cessna Citation 1 (Model 500) crashed in a wooded area near Wiley Post Airport, Oklahoma, killing all 5 people on board. This paper describes the detailed forensic methods and expertise used by the Smithsonian Institution's Feather Identification Lab to identify the bird that caused this bird-strike incident. We used standard methods of whole-feather analysis, microscopic

  8. 1895-2006 Annual precipitation, long-term trends, persistent variations, and annual precipitation expectations for Oklahoma climate divisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report on annual precipitation for the climate divisions of Oklahoma provides agricultural producers, water resources managers, and conservationist with annual precipitation information for risk-based planning, management, and decision making. Data in this report include long-term trends in av...

  9. Final Report for the Joint Urban 2003 Atmospheric Dispersion Study in Oklahoma City: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2005-01-01

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was designed to collect meteorological and tracer data resolving atmospheric dispersion at scales-of-motion ranging from flows in and around a single city block, in and around several blocks in the downtown Central Business District (CBD), and into the suburban Oklahoma City area a few km from the CBD. Indoor tracer and flow measurements

  10. Daily Fish and Zooplankton Abundances in the Littoral Zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, in Relation to Abiotic Variables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip W. Lienesch; William J. Matthews

    2000-01-01

    Many studies have shown the effects of yearly or monthly environmental conditions on the structure of fish and zooplankton communities. Environmental conditions can also vary greatly on much shorter time scales. We tested the effects of abiotic conditions on the daily abundance of fish and zooplankton in the littoral zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas. After date was removed statistically from

  11. Copyright 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 Knowledge Expectations for METR 1111

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Copyright© 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 Knowledge Expectations for METR 1111 Orientation to Professional Meteorology Purpose: This document describes the typical content for METR 1111. Because no core meteorological knowledge is presented in this course, individual instructors

  12. Copyright 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 Knowledge Expectations for METR 3613

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Copyright© 2004, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma. Rev 04/04 3/27/20041 Knowledge Expectations for METR 3613 Meteorological Measurement Systems Purpose: This document describes the principal completing METR 3613, Meteorological Measurement Systems. Individual instructors may deviate somewhat from

  13. Upper Washita River Experimental Watersheds: Land Cover Data Sets (1974-2007) for Two Southwestern Oklahoma Agricultural Watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A retrospective land cover analysis covering the time period from the early 1970s to early 1990s was conducted to gain a sense of the dynamics of land cover changes on the Little Washita River and Fort Cobb Reservoir experimental watersheds (LWREW, FCREW), located in southwestern Oklahoma. This stu...

  14. Land-use and ground-water data, Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergman, DeRoy L.; Savoca, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, conducted the present study to determine the vulnerability to contamination of ground water beneath tribal lands within the 3,991-acre Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma (map A).

  15. Joseph P. Havliceka, Chuong T. Nguyena, Guoliang Fanb, and Vijay B. Venkataramanb aUniversity of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA

    E-print Network

    Havlicek, Joebob

    , midwave infrared, color fusion 1. INTRODUCTION Military interest in dual-band infrared imaging systems has), small size, uncooled operation with a BST sensor array, spectral response from 0.6 to 14 µm, easilyOklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA ABSTRACT The Electrophysics PV320 is a broadband thermal imaging

  16. Preliminary survey report: Plating Shop, American Airlines, Maintenance and Engineering Center, Tulsa International Airport, Tulsa, Oklahoma, July 1, 1981

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    A visit was made to the Plating Shop of the American Airlines Maintenance and Engineering Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma in order to evaluate control methods in place at this facility. The plating shop was a separate room within a larger building. The tanks were set on concrete pedestals built up from the concrete ventilation duct tunnels which run underneath each line.

  17. Turbine Passage of Juvenile and Adult Fish at a Warmwater Hydroelectric Facility in Northeastern Oklahoma: Monitoring Associated with Relicensing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent M. Sorenson; William L. Fisher; Alexander V. Zale

    1998-01-01

    We estimated annual turbine passage rates and susceptibilities of juvenile and adult fish at the Pensacola Dam hydroelectric facility on Grand Lake O' the Cherokees (Grand Lake) in northeastern Oklahoma as part of the relicensing of the facility. Our study was purposefully exploratory in that its primary objective was to determine if turbine passage of valuable fishes was sufficient to

  18. CANADIAN RIVER COMPACT The state of New Mexico, the state of Texas, and the state of Oklahoma, acting through

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric E.

    CANADIAN RIVER COMPACT The state of New Mexico, the state of Texas, and the state of Oklahoma agreed respecting Canadian river as follows: ARTICLE I The major purposes of this compact [this section for the conservation of the waters of Canadian river. ARTICLE II As used in this compact: (a) the term "Canadian river

  19. Hydrogeologic framework of sedimentary deposits in six structural basins, Yakima River basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, M.A.; Vaccaro, J.J.; Watkins, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework was delineated for the ground-water flow system of the sedimentary deposits in six structural basins in the Yakima River Basin, Washington. The six basins delineated, from north to south are: Roslyn, Kittitas, Selah, Yakima, Toppenish, and Benton. Extent and thicknesses of the hydrogeologic units and total basin sediment thickness were mapped for each basin. Interpretations were based on information from about 4,700 well records using geochemical, geophysical, geologist's or driller's logs, and from the surficial geology and previously constructed maps and well interpretations. The sedimentary deposits were thickest in the Kittitas Basin reaching a depth of greater than 2,000 ft, followed by successively thinner sedimentary deposits in the Selah basin with about 1,900 ft, Yakima Basin with about 1,800 ft, Toppenish Basin with about 1,200 ft, Benton basin with about 870 ft and Roslyn Basin with about 700 ft.

  20. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-print Network

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02

    and consistently identify analogous reference basins for a target basin. My research focused on continuing that work, comprehensively improving the basin analog system in four areas: the basin analog method; the database; the software functionality...

  1. Exploration potential of offshore northern California basins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    A series of exploratory wells was drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, although encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that these offshore basins may be highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the key features of Monterey production in central and southern California are also present in the offshore basins of northern California. A new 5-year leasing plan has scheduled leasing in the northern California OCS starting in early 1989. The first basins on the schedule, the Point Arena and Eel River basins, differ in some respects. The Point Arena basin is more typical of a Monterey basin, with the potential for fractured chert reservoirs and organic-rich sections, deep burial of basinal sections to enhance the generation of higher gravity oils, and complex folding and faulting. The Eel River basin is more clastic-rich in its gas-producing, onshore extension. Key questions in the Eel River basin include whether the offshore, more distal stratigraphy will include Monterey-like biogenic sediments, and whether the basin has oil potential in addition to its proven gas potential. The Outer Santa Cruz basin shares a similar stratigraphy, structure, and hydrocarbon potential with the Point Arena basin. The Santa Cruz-Bodega basin, also with a similar stratigraphy, may have less exploration potential because erosion has thinned the Monterey section in parts of the basin.

  2. Water Accounting from Ungauged Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaanssen, W. G.; Savenije, H.

    2014-12-01

    Water scarcity is increasing globally. This requires a more accurate management of the water resources at river basin scale and understanding of withdrawals and return flows; both naturally and man-induced. Many basins and their tributaries are, however, ungauged or poorly gauged. This hampers sound planning and monitoring processes. While certain countries have developed clear guidelines and policies on data observatories and data sharing, other countries and their basin organization still have to start on developing data democracies. Water accounting quantifies flows, fluxes, stocks and consumptive use pertaining to every land use class in a river basin. The objective is to derive a knowledge base with certain minimum information that facilitates decision making. Water Accounting Plus (WA+) is a new method for water resources assessment reporting (www.wateraccounting.org). While the PUB framework has yielded several deterministic models for flow prediction, WA+ utilizes remote sensing data of rainfall, evaporation (including soil, water, vegetation and interception evaporation), soil moisture, water levels, land use and biomass production. Examples will be demonstrated that show how remote sensing and hydrological models can be smartly integrated for generating all the required input data into WA+. A standard water accounting system for all basins in the world - with a special emphasis on data scarce regions - is under development. First results of using remote sensing measurements and hydrological modeling as an alternative to expensive field data sets, will be presented and discussed.

  3. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Stormwater detention basin sediment removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, W.E. [SCS Engineers, West Nyack, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In the past, stormwater runoff from landfills has been treated mainly by focusing on reducing the peak storm discharge rates so as not to hydraulically impact downstream subsheds. However, with the advent of stricter water quality regulations based on the Federal Clean Water Act, and the related NPDES and SPDES programs, landfill owners and operators are now legally responsible for the water quality of the runoff once it leaves the landfill site. At the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the world`s largest covering over 2000 acres, landfilling activities have been underway since 1945. With the main objective at all older landfill sites having focused on maximizing the available landfill footprint in order to obtain the most possible airspace volume, consideration was not given for the future siting of stormwater basin structures. Therefore, when SCS Engineers began developing the first comprehensive stormwater management plan for the site, the primary task was to locate potential sites for all the stormwater basins in order to comply with state regulations for peak stormwater runoff control. The basins were mostly constructed where space allowed, and were sized to be as large as possible given siting and subshed area constraints. Seventeen stormwater basins have now been designed and are being constructed to control the peak stormwater runoff for the 25-year, 24-hour storm as required by New York State. As an additional factor of safety, the basins were also designed for controlled discharge of the 100-year, 24 hour storm.

  5. Rainbow Basin, CA mapping project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joan Fryxell

    Rainbow Basin is just north of Barstow, CA, and is an excellent badlands-style exposure of the Barstow syncline in the Miocene Barstow Formation. In the first mapping class, their assignment is to map the basic geology of the basin, using a couple of distinctive marker beds within the Barstow Formation. Several faults postdate the fold, and three different ages of alluvial deposits occur within the basin. We camp in the nearby Owl Canyon campground, and spend three days in the field. More time could be spent with an introductory class, but three suffices to get most of the basin on the map. They are charged with writing up descriptions of the rock units they encounter. From the field map, students transfer information to an office copy, add a map explanation, and draw a cross-section through the map area. Mapping is done on a topographic map, specifically developed for the basin, with 10-foot contour intervals. This is a proprietary map, so permission is needed for its use.

  6. Origin of the earth's ocean basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frex, H.

    1977-01-01

    The earth's original ocean basins were mare-type basins produced 4 billion years ago by the flux of asteroid-sized objects responsible for the lunar mare basins. Scaling upwards from the observed number of lunar basins for the greater capture cross-section and impact velocity of the Earth indicates that at least 50 percent of an original global crust would have been converted to basin topography. These basins were flooded by basaltic liquids in times short compared to the isostatic adjustment time for the basin. The modern crustal dichotomy (60 percent oceanic, 40 percent continental crust) was established early in the history of the earth, making possible the later onset of plate tectonic processes. These later processes have subsequently reworked, in several cycles, principally the oceanic parts of the earth's crust, changing the configuration of the continents in the process. Ocean basins (and oceans themselves) may be rare occurrences on planets in other star systems.

  7. Effect of basin physical characteristics on solute fluxes in nine alpine\\/subalpine basins, Colorado, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie K. Sueker; David W. Clow; Joseph N. Ryan; Robert D. Jarrett

    2001-01-01

    Alpine\\/subalpine basins may exhibit substantial variability in solute fluxes despite many apparent similarities in basin characteristics. An evaluation of controls on spatial patterns in solute fluxes may allow development of predictive tools for assessing basin sensitivity to outside perturbations such as climate change or deposition of atmospheric pollutants. Relationships between basin physical characteristics, determined from geographical information system (GIS) tools,

  8. Dynamic reorganization of river basins.

    PubMed

    Willett, Sean D; McCoy, Scott W; Perron, J Taylor; Goren, Liran; Chen, Chia-Yu

    2014-03-01

    River networks evolve as migrating drainage divides reshape river basins and change network topology by capture of river channels. We demonstrate that a characteristic metric of river network geometry gauges the horizontal motion of drainage divides. Assessing this metric throughout a landscape maps the dynamic states of entire river networks, revealing diverse conditions: Drainage divides in the Loess Plateau of China appear stationary; the young topography of Taiwan has migrating divides driving adjustment of major basins; and rivers draining the ancient landscape of the southeastern United States are reorganizing in response to escarpment retreat and coastal advance. The ability to measure the dynamic reorganization of river basins presents opportunities to examine landscape-scale interactions among tectonics, erosion, and ecology. PMID:24604204

  9. We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan-55-040 National Poultry Improvement Plan. A hatchery appearing on this list in no way constitutes endorsement

  10. CESWD-CO-RP (CESWT-OD-RP/2 Nov 90) 1st End Mr. McCauleyjivjFTS SUBJECT: Tenkiller Ferry Lake, Illinois River, Oklahoma,

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Institutions, Social and Rehabilitative Services 260 Last Frontier Council Inc. Boy Scouts of America Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department Total, Recreation-Intensive Use 45 22 72 ( 4 ) 399 711 ( 5 ) 5259 #12

  11. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2002-06-30

    This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

  12. Hydrocarbon entrapment in Alberta deep basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gies

    1984-01-01

    Entrapment of hydrocarbon accumulations in the deepest region of the Alberta sedimentary basin is linked to certain principles of subsurface fluid flow behavior in generally tight sandstones, and to active hydrocarbon generation in adjacent source beds. Similar geologic conditions and associated deep-basin-type hydrocarbon accumulations no doubt exist in the deeper portions of other sedimentary basins. Deep-basin concepts of hydrocarbon entrapment

  13. The Borealis Basin of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Squyres, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    Why the lowlands of Mars are concentrated in the Northern Hemisphere and the highlands in the Southern Hemisphere is probably the most fundamental unsolved problem in martian geology. No explanation that accounts both for this asymmetric distribution and for the isostatic equilibrium across the scarp or sloping transition zone dividing the two provinces has been generally accepted; thinning of the lithosphere in the northern hemisphere by internal processes has been suggested. Because other lowland-highland distributions on Mars, Moon, and Mercury are controlled by impact basins, it is proposed that a giant basin formed early in Mars' history has caused the martian hemispheric dichotomy as well.

  14. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Ternes; W. P. Levins

    1992-01-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window

  15. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window

  16. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins 

    E-print Network

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  17. THE CASE OF BLUE NILE RIVER BASIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abebe Sine; Semu Ayalew

    Blue Nile River Basin has been regionalized into similar flood producing characteristics based on statistical values of at site data. The basin was delineated in to five homogeneous regions. Accordingly, region one comprises the widest portion of the basin, covering 37.6 % of the area. It includes the upper Guder catchment, middle and lower Didesa, lower part of the main

  18. GUNNISON RIVER (COLORADO) BASIN SELENIUM TARGETING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gunnison and Uncompahgre River Basins Targeting Project will gather water quality data necessary to characterize the selenium loads that are being contributed from within the basins. Evaluation of the variabiliy of selenium loading in the basins will guide the implementation...

  19. IMPROVEMENTS IN PUMP INTAKE BASIN DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pump intake basins (or wet wells or pump sumps) designed in accordance with accepted criteria often pose many operation and maintenance problems. The report summarizes field surveys of three trench-type pump intake basins representative of 29 such basins that have been in satisfa...

  20. IMPROVEMENTS IN PUMP INTAKE BASIN DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pump intake basins (or wet wells or pump sumps) designed in accordance with accepted criteria often pose many operation and maintenance problems. he report summarizes field surveys of three trench-type pump intake basins representative of 29 such basins that ave been in satisfact...