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Sample records for anaerobic aggregates determined

  1. Microbial aggregates in anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kosaric, N; Blaszczyk, R

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon aggregation of anaerobic bacteria gives an opportunity to speed up the digestion rate during methanogenesis. The aggregates are mainly composed of methanogenic bacteria which convert acetate and H2/CO2 into methane. Other bacteria are also included in the aggregates but their concentration is rather small. The aggregates may also be formed during acetogenesis or even hydrolysis but such aggregates are not stable and disrupt quickly when not fed. A two stage process seems to be suitable when high concentrated solid waste must be treated. Special conditions are necessary to promote aggregate formation from methanogenic bacteria but aggregates once formed are stable without feeding even for a few years. The structure, texture and activity of bacterial aggregates depend on several parameters: (1)--temperature and pH, (2)--wastewater composition and (3)--hydrodynamic conditions within the reactor. The common influence of all these parameters is still rather unknown but some recommendations may be given. Temperature and pH should be maintained in the range which is optimal for methanogenic bacteria e.g. a temperature between 32 and 50 degrees C and a value pH between 6.5 and 7.5. Wastewaters should contain soluble wastes and the specific loading rate should be around one kgCOD(kgVSS)-1 d-1. The concentration of the elements influences aggregate composition and probably structure and texture. At high calcium concentration a change in the colour of the granules has been observed. Research is necessary to investigate the influence of other elements and organic toxicants on maintenance of the aggregates. Hydrodynamic conditions seem to influence the stability of the granules over long time periods. At low liquid stream rates, aggregates may starve and lysis within the aggregates is possible which results in hollowing of aggregates and their floating. At high liquid stream rates the aggregates may be disrupted and washed out of the reactor as a flocculent

  2. Anaerobic Nitrogen Turnover by Sinking Diatom Aggregates at Varying Ambient Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Peter; Kamp, Anja; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    In the world’s oceans, even relatively low oxygen levels inhibit anaerobic nitrogen cycling by free-living microbes. Sinking organic aggregates, however, might provide oxygen-depleted microbial hotspots in otherwise oxygenated surface waters. Here, we show that sinking diatom aggregates can host anaerobic nitrogen cycling at ambient oxygen levels well above the hypoxic threshold. Aggregates were produced from the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema marinoi and the natural microbial community of seawater. Microsensor profiling through the center of sinking aggregates revealed internal anoxia at ambient 40% air saturation (∼100 μmol O2 L-1) and below. Accordingly, anaerobic nitrate turnover inside the aggregates was evident within this range of ambient oxygen levels. In incubations with 15N-labeled nitrate, individual Skeletonema aggregates produced NO2- (up to 10.7 nmol N h-1 per aggregate), N2 (up to 7.1 nmol N h-1), NH4+ (up to 2.0 nmol N h-1), and N2O (up to 0.2 nmol N h-1). Intriguingly, nitrate stored inside the diatom cells served as an additional, internal nitrate source for dinitrogen production, which may partially uncouple anaerobic nitrate turnover by diatom aggregates from direct ambient nitrate supply. Sinking diatom aggregates can contribute directly to fixed-nitrogen loss in low-oxygen environments in the ocean and vastly expand the ocean volume in which anaerobic nitrogen turnover is possible, despite relatively high ambient oxygen levels. Depending on the extent of intracellular nitrate consumption during the sinking process, diatom aggregates may also be involved in the long-distance export of nitrate to the deep ocean. PMID:26903977

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes in N2-fixing cyanobacterial aggregates.

    PubMed

    Klawonn, Isabell; Bonaglia, Stefano; Brüchert, Volker; Ploug, Helle

    2015-06-01

    Colonies of N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are key players in supplying new nitrogen to the ocean, but the biological fate of this fixed nitrogen remains poorly constrained. Here, we report on aerobic and anaerobic microbial nitrogen transformation processes that co-occur within millimetre-sized cyanobacterial aggregates (Nodularia spumigena) collected in aerated surface waters in the Baltic Sea. Microelectrode profiles showed steep oxygen gradients inside the aggregates and the potential for nitrous oxide production in the aggregates' anoxic centres. (15)N-isotope labelling experiments and nutrient analyses revealed that N(2) fixation, ammonification, nitrification, nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and possibly anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) can co-occur within these consortia. Thus, N. spumigena aggregates are potential sites of nitrogen gain, recycling and loss. Rates of nitrate reduction to ammonium and N(2) were limited by low internal nitrification rates and low concentrations of nitrate in the ambient water. Presumably, patterns of N-transformation processes similar to those observed in this study arise also in other phytoplankton colonies, marine snow and fecal pellets. Anoxic microniches, as a pre-condition for anaerobic nitrogen transformations, may occur within large aggregates (⩾1 mm) even when suspended in fully oxygenated waters, whereas anoxia in small aggregates (<1 to ⩾0.1 mm) may only arise in low-oxygenated waters (⩽25 μM). We propose that the net effect of aggregates on nitrogen loss is negligible in NO(3)(-)-depleted, fully oxygenated (surface) waters. In NO(3)(-)-enriched (>1.5 μM), O(2)-depleted water layers, for example, in the chemocline of the Baltic Sea or the oceanic mesopelagic zone, aggregates may promote N-recycling and -loss processes. PMID:25575306

  4. Aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes in N2-fixing cyanobacterial aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Bonaglia, Stefano; Brüchert, Volker; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of N2-fixing cyanobacteria are key players in supplying new nitrogen to the ocean, but the biological fate of this fixed nitrogen remains poorly constrained. Here, we report on aerobic and anaerobic microbial nitrogen transformation processes that co-occur within millimetre-sized cyanobacterial aggregates (Nodularia spumigena) collected in aerated surface waters in the Baltic Sea. Microelectrode profiles showed steep oxygen gradients inside the aggregates and the potential for nitrous oxide production in the aggregates' anoxic centres. 15N-isotope labelling experiments and nutrient analyses revealed that N2 fixation, ammonification, nitrification, nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and possibly anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) can co-occur within these consortia. Thus, N. spumigena aggregates are potential sites of nitrogen gain, recycling and loss. Rates of nitrate reduction to ammonium and N2 were limited by low internal nitrification rates and low concentrations of nitrate in the ambient water. Presumably, patterns of N-transformation processes similar to those observed in this study arise also in other phytoplankton colonies, marine snow and fecal pellets. Anoxic microniches, as a pre-condition for anaerobic nitrogen transformations, may occur within large aggregates (⩾1 mm) even when suspended in fully oxygenated waters, whereas anoxia in small aggregates (<1 to ⩾0.1 mm) may only arise in low-oxygenated waters (⩽25 μM). We propose that the net effect of aggregates on nitrogen loss is negligible in NO3−-depleted, fully oxygenated (surface) waters. In NO3−-enriched (>1.5 μM), O2-depleted water layers, for example, in the chemocline of the Baltic Sea or the oceanic mesopelagic zone, aggregates may promote N-recycling and -loss processes. PMID:25575306

  5. Determining anaerobic degradation kinetics from batch tests.

    PubMed

    Moreda, Iván López

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from a biomethane potential (BMP) test were used in order to obtain the parameters of a kinetic model of solid wastes anaerobic degradation. The proposed model considers a hydrolysis step with a first order kinetic, a Monod kinetic for the soluble organic substrate degradation and a first order decay of microorganisms. The instantaneous release of methane was assumed. The parameters of the model are determined following a direct search optimization procedure. A 'multiple-shooting' technique was used as a first step of the optimization process. The confidence interval of the parameters was determined by using Monte Carlo simulations. Also, the distribution functions of the parameters were determined. Only the hydrolysis first order constant shows a normal distribution. PMID:27191569

  6. Determination of mercury and organomercurial resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rudrik, J T; Bawdon, R E; Guss, S P

    1985-03-01

    A methodology for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of inorganic and organomercurial compounds for obligate anaerobic bacteria is described. A wide variation in the susceptibility of anaerobic clinical and sewage isolates was observed. Isolates of Bacteroides ruminicola and Clostridium perfringens resistant to mercury were examined for their plasmid content and ability to demonstrate inducible resistance. None of the resistant anaerobes contained any plasmids, while resistant facultative isolates from the same source contained several plasmids. In 24 h, resistant strains of clostridia and Bacteroides volatilized 20 and 43% of the 203Hg2+ added to cultures, while Escherichia coli R100 and a sewage isolate of Enterobacter cloacae volatilized 63 and 27%, respectively, of the added 203Hg2+. Attempts to induce mercury resistance in the aerobic isolates were successful, but no induction was seen in the anaerobes. Thus, mercury resistance in these anaerobic isolates was neither inducible nor plasmid mediated. PMID:4005712

  7. Layered structure of bacterial aggregates produced in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed and filter reactor

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, F.A.; Guiot, S.R.; Costerton, J.W. )

    1990-06-01

    The ultrastructure of bacterial granules that were maintained in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed and filter reactor was examined. The reactor was fed a sucrose medium, and it was operated at 35{degrees}C. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the granular aggregates were three-layered structures. The exterior layer of the granule contained a very heterogeneous population that included rods, cocci, and filaments of various sizes. The middle layer consisted of a slightly less heterogeneous population than the exterior layer. A more ordered arrangement, made up predominantly of bacterial rods, was evident in this second layer. The third layer formed the internal core of the granules. It consisted of large numbers of Methanothrix-like cells. Large cavities, indicative of vigorous gas production, were evident in the third layer. On the basis of these ultrastructural results, a model that presents a possible explanation of granule development is offered.

  8. NMR and MALDI-TOF MS based characterization of exopolysaccharides in anaerobic microbial aggregates from full-scale reactors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Thomas, Ludivine; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Lens, Piet N L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic granular sludge is composed of multispecies microbial aggregates embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Here we characterized the chemical fingerprint of the polysaccharide fraction of EPS in anaerobic granules obtained from full-scale reactors treating different types of wastewater. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals of the polysaccharide region from the granules were very complex, likely as a result of the diverse microbial population in the granules. Using nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), the (1)H NMR signals of reference polysaccharides (gellan, xanthan, alginate) and those of the anaerobic granules revealed that there were similarities between the polysaccharides extracted from granules and the reference polysaccharide alginate. Further analysis of the exopolysaccharides from anaerobic granules, and reference polysaccharides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) revealed that exopolysaccharides from two of the anaerobic granular sludges studied exhibited spectra similar to that of alginate. The presence of sequences related to the synthesis of alginate was confirmed in the metagenomes of the granules. Collectively these results suggest that alginate-like exopolysaccharides are constituents of the EPS matrix in anaerobic granular sludge treating different industrial wastewater. This finding expands the engineered environments where alginate has been found as EPS constituent of microbial aggregates. PMID:26391984

  9. NMR and MALDI-TOF MS based characterization of exopolysaccharides in anaerobic microbial aggregates from full-scale reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Thomas, Ludivine; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Lens, Piet N. L.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic granular sludge is composed of multispecies microbial aggregates embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Here we characterized the chemical fingerprint of the polysaccharide fraction of EPS in anaerobic granules obtained from full-scale reactors treating different types of wastewater. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals of the polysaccharide region from the granules were very complex, likely as a result of the diverse microbial population in the granules. Using nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), the 1H NMR signals of reference polysaccharides (gellan, xanthan, alginate) and those of the anaerobic granules revealed that there were similarities between the polysaccharides extracted from granules and the reference polysaccharide alginate. Further analysis of the exopolysaccharides from anaerobic granules, and reference polysaccharides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) revealed that exopolysaccharides from two of the anaerobic granular sludges studied exhibited spectra similar to that of alginate. The presence of sequences related to the synthesis of alginate was confirmed in the metagenomes of the granules. Collectively these results suggest that alginate-like exopolysaccharides are constituents of the EPS matrix in anaerobic granular sludge treating different industrial wastewater. This finding expands the engineered environments where alginate has been found as EPS constituent of microbial aggregates. PMID:26391984

  10. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  11. Selenite Reduction by Anaerobic Microbial Aggregates: Microbial Community Structure, and Proteins Associated to the Produced Selenium Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Lens, Piet N. L.; Saikaly, Pascal E.

    2016-01-01

    Certain types of anaerobic granular sludge, which consists of microbial aggregates, can reduce selenium oxyanions. To envisage strategies for removing those oxyanions from wastewater and recovering the produced elemental selenium (Se0), insights into the microbial community structure and synthesis of Se0 within these microbial aggregates are required. High-throughput sequencing showed that Veillonellaceae (c.a. 20%) and Pseudomonadaceae (c.a.10%) were the most abundant microbial phylotypes in selenite reducing microbial aggregates. The majority of the Pseudomonadaceae sequences were affiliated to the genus Pseudomonas. A distinct outer layer (∼200 μm) of selenium deposits indicated that bioreduction occurred in the outer zone of the microbial aggregates. In that outer layer, SEM analysis showed abundant intracellular and extracellular Se0 (nano)spheres, with some cells having high numbers of intracellular Se0 spheres. Electron tomography showed that microbial cells can harbor a single large intracellular sphere that stretches the cell body. The Se0 spheres produced by the microorganisms were capped with organic material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of extracted Se0 spheres, combined with a mathematical approach to analyzing XPS spectra from biological origin, indicated that proteins and lipids were components of the capping material associated to the Se0 spheres. The most abundant proteins associated to the spheres were identified by proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins or peptide sequences capping the Se0 spheres were identified as periplasmic outer membrane porins and as the cytoplasmic elongation factor Tu protein, suggesting an intracellular formation of the Se0 spheres. In view of these and previous findings, a schematic model for the synthesis of Se0 spheres by the microorganisms inhabiting the granular sludge is proposed. PMID:27199909

  12. Selenite Reduction by Anaerobic Microbial Aggregates: Microbial Community Structure, and Proteins Associated to the Produced Selenium Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Lens, Piet N L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-01-01

    Certain types of anaerobic granular sludge, which consists of microbial aggregates, can reduce selenium oxyanions. To envisage strategies for removing those oxyanions from wastewater and recovering the produced elemental selenium (Se(0)), insights into the microbial community structure and synthesis of Se(0) within these microbial aggregates are required. High-throughput sequencing showed that Veillonellaceae (c.a. 20%) and Pseudomonadaceae (c.a.10%) were the most abundant microbial phylotypes in selenite reducing microbial aggregates. The majority of the Pseudomonadaceae sequences were affiliated to the genus Pseudomonas. A distinct outer layer (∼200 μm) of selenium deposits indicated that bioreduction occurred in the outer zone of the microbial aggregates. In that outer layer, SEM analysis showed abundant intracellular and extracellular Se(0) (nano)spheres, with some cells having high numbers of intracellular Se(0) spheres. Electron tomography showed that microbial cells can harbor a single large intracellular sphere that stretches the cell body. The Se(0) spheres produced by the microorganisms were capped with organic material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of extracted Se(0) spheres, combined with a mathematical approach to analyzing XPS spectra from biological origin, indicated that proteins and lipids were components of the capping material associated to the Se(0) spheres. The most abundant proteins associated to the spheres were identified by proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins or peptide sequences capping the Se(0) spheres were identified as periplasmic outer membrane porins and as the cytoplasmic elongation factor Tu protein, suggesting an intracellular formation of the Se(0) spheres. In view of these and previous findings, a schematic model for the synthesis of Se(0) spheres by the microorganisms inhabiting the granular sludge is proposed. PMID:27199909

  13. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  14. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  15. Thermodynamics of mixed micelles: Determination of the aggregate composition.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Pierre; Mayaffre, Alain; Turmine, Mireille

    2008-11-01

    In most studies concerning surfactant mixtures, the determination of the composition of mixed micelles is often tricky. This composition can be obtained by different ways. One of them, undoubtedly the most used, supposes, a priori, that the surfactant in the micelle follows the regular solution model. This poses a problem on the thermodynamic point of view because in these studies, a model of behavior is first admitted for deducing a composition. In a correct thermodynamic approach, a composition should first be determined and then, a model of behavior which accounts for the observed physicochemical properties can be found. This approach is all the more questionable since the application of the Gibbs-Duhem relationship to the pseudo-phase allows aggregate composition to be determined simply, without using a solution model, because the composition of the bulk at the threshold of aggregation is known. In this article, we describe and validate a simple procedure, which supplements that proposed by Rodenas et al. [E. Rodenas, M. Valiente, M.D. Villafruela, J. Phys. Chem. B 103 (1999) 4549], and which allows determination of the activities of the components of the micellar aggregate and its composition. The results are compared to those obtained with other approaches such as molecular-thermodynamic model. PMID:18723182

  16. Geobotanical remote sensing for determination of aggregate source material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, Timothy; Mouat, David; Myers, Jeff

    1988-01-01

    Aggregate source material suitable for facility and roadbed construction is often a very limited and highly valuable resource. The location of suitable source material is crucial to construction operations once facility requirements are established. The application of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing to terrain information requirements has proved attractive because of the rapid processing time and extensive spatial coverage associated with remotely gathered imagery. Source material identification may be improved by the remote sensing of vegetation associated with the material, particularly in areas of high vegetative cover. A research study employing remote sensing techniques was initiated to determine if vegetation could be used to discriminate parent materials for suitability as aggregate source material. Two test sites representing potential alluvial and residual source areas were selected in a semiarid region of Central California. Methods developed for the study included field observations of vegetation characteristics associated with the two parent material types along with the analysis of Thematic Mapper Simulator data flown over the test sites. The most useful images were those composites that included bands from two of the techniques (i.e., a Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI) band combined with principal components bands).

  17. Ammonia and temperature determine potential clustering in the anaerobic digestion microbiome.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Saunders, Aaron Marc; He, Ying; Fang, Jing; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2015-05-15

    Anaerobic digestion is regarded as a key environmental technology in the present and future bio-based economy. The microbial community completing the anaerobic digestion process is considered complex, and several attempts already have been carried out to determine the key microbial populations. However, the key differences in the anaerobic digestion microbiomes, and the environmental/process parameters that drive these differences, remain poorly understood. In this research, we hypothesized that differences in operational parameters lead to a particular composition and organization of microbial communities in full-scale installations. A total of 38 samples were collected from 29 different full-scale anaerobic digestion installations, showing constant biogas production in function of time. Microbial community analysis was carried out by means of amplicon sequencing and real-time PCR. The bacterial community in all samples was dominated by representatives of the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, covering 86.1 ± 10.7% of the total bacterial community. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, yet, only the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales correlated with biogas production, confirming their importance in high-rate anaerobic digestion systems. In-depth analysis of operational and environmental parameters and bacterial community structure indicated the presence of three potential clusters in anaerobic digestion. These clusters were determined by total ammonia concentration, free ammonia concentration and temperature, and characterized by an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidales, Clostridiales and Lactobacillales, respectively. None of the methanogenic populations, however, could be significantly attributed to any of the three clusters. Nonetheless, further experimental research will be required to validate the existence of these different clusters, and to which extent the presence of these clusters relates to stable or sub

  18. Individual Preferences and Social Interactions Determine the Aggregation of Woodlice

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Cédric; Broly, Pierre; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Background The aggregation of woodlice in dark and moist places is considered an adaptation to land life and most studies are focused on its functionality or on the behavioural mechanisms related to the individual's response to abiotic factors. Until now, no clear experimental demonstration was available about aggregation resulting from inter-attraction between conspecifics. Methodology/Main Findings We present the dynamics of aggregation, not previously described in detail in literature, as being independent of the experimental conditions: homogeneous and heterogeneous environments with identical or different shelters. Indeed whatever these conditions, the aggregation is very quick. In less than 10 minutes more than 50% of woodlice were aggregated in several small groups in the homogeneous environment or under shelters in the heterogeneous environment. After this fast aggregation, woodlice progressively moved into a single aggregate or under one shelter. Conclusions/Significance Here we show for the first time that aggregation in woodlice implies a strong social component and results from a trade-off between individual preferences and inter-attraction between individuals. Moreover, our results reveal that the response to the heterogeneities affects only the location of the aggregates and not the level of aggregation, and demonstrate the strong inter-attraction between conspecifics which can outweigh individual preferences. This inter-attraction can lead to situations that could seem sub-optimal. PMID:21364761

  19. Dynamic determination of anaerobic acetate kinetics using membrane mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Meyer; Heinzle

    1998-01-20

    A small, stirred, 14.4-mL tank reactor was designed to serve as a measurement cell for short-term investigation of microbial kinetics. A mass spectrometer membrane probe allowed the measurement of the dissolved gases of hydrogen, methane, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. pH was measured by an electrode and controlled by addition of acid or alkali. The highly sensitive measurement of gases with low solubility allowed rapid measurements at very low conversion. In kinetic experiments, a stepwise increase of substrate concentration (method A) and continuous feed of substrate (method B) were used, allowing quick estimation of substrate kinetics. Acetate conversion in mixed culture biofilms from a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Substrate inhibition was found to be negligible in the concentration range studied. Experiments at various pH values showed that the undissociated acid form was the kinetic determinant. Kinetic parameters for Haldane kinetics of protons were KSH = 1.3 x 10(-5) mol m-3 and KIH = 8.1 x 10(-3) mol m-3. With free acid (HAc) as the rate determining species, the kinetic parameters for method A were KSHAc = 0.005 mol m-3 and KIHAc = 100 mol m-3 and for method B were KSHAc = 0.2 mol m-3 and KIHAc = 50 mol m-3. The maximum biomass activity occurred at around pH 6.5. Acetate was exclusively converted to methane and CO2 at pH > 6. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099187

  20. Determination of operating conditions in an anaerobic acid-phase reactor treating dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Kasapgil, B.; Ince, O.; Anderson, G.K.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic material is a multistep process. Two groups of bacteria, namely acidogenic and methanogenic bacteria, are responsible for the acidification and for the methane formation, respectively. The growth requirements of the two groups of bacteria are rather different. In order to create optimum conditions for the process, it was first proposed to separate the process into two phases. Operating variables applicable for the selection and enrichment of microbial populations in phased digesters include digester loading, hydraulic retention time (HRT), pH, temperature, reactor design, and operating mode. By proper manipulation of these operating parameters it is possible to prevent any significant growth of methane bacteria and at the same time achieve the required level of acidification in the first reactor. Further enrichment of two cultures is possible by biomass recycle around each phase. Since the 1970s, phase separation has been introduced into anaerobic digestion technology. However, data concerning the optimization of operating conditions in both acidogenic and methanogenic phase reactors are scarce. This study was therefore carried out for the purposes given below. These were: (1) to determine the best combination of pH and temperature within the ranges studied for the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater; (2) to determine the maximum acidogenic conversion from COD to VFAs, and (3) to determine the changes in the distribution of major VFAs being produced during the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater.

  1. Solution conditions determine the relative importance of nucleation and growth processes in α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Alexander K.; Galvagnion, Céline; Gaspar, Ricardo; Sparr, Emma; Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Linse, Sara; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils by the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein is a hallmark of Parkinson disease. To characterize the microscopic steps in the mechanism of aggregation of this protein we have used in vitro aggregation assays in the presence of preformed seed fibrils to determine the molecular rate constant of fibril elongation under a range of different conditions. We show that α-synuclein amyloid fibrils grow by monomer and not oligomer addition and are subject to higher-order assembly processes that decrease their capacity to grow. We also find that at neutral pH under quiescent conditions homogeneous primary nucleation and secondary processes, such as fragmentation and surface-assisted nucleation, which can lead to proliferation of the total number of aggregates, are undetectable. At pH values below 6, however, the rate of secondary nucleation increases dramatically, leading to a completely different balance between the nucleation and growth of aggregates. Thus, at mildly acidic pH values, such as those, for example, that are present in some intracellular locations, including endosomes and lysosomes, multiplication of aggregates is much faster than at normal physiological pH values, largely as a consequence of much more rapid secondary nucleation. These findings provide new insights into possible mechanisms of α-synuclein aggregation and aggregate spreading in the context of Parkinson disease. PMID:24817693

  2. Sequential extraction of anaerobic digestate sludge for the determination of partitioning of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Neng-min; Qiang-Li; Guo, Xu-jing; Hui-Zhang; Yu-Deng

    2014-04-01

    In China, agricultural use of anaerobic digestate sludge is considered a concern due to high heavy metal content of the sludge. In this study, sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was conducted to determine metal speciation which affects release and mobility of metal significantly. The results of SEP showed that each heavy metal possessed different distribution characteristics. Cu mainly reacted with carboxyl functional group to form the fraction bound to organic matter. Zn and Mn were dominated in the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides and carbonates, respectively. Pb, Ni, Cr, Cd and As were present as the residual fraction. Examination of mobility factors (MFs) indicated that Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn and Cd were more mobile whereas Cr and As were immobilized in anaerobic digestate. Based on the results, it can be stated that Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni and Cd may be grouped as toxic and active components in sludge and should be regarded as the priority pollutants for elimination. Pb should be monitored in terms of its high mobility factors (MF). Cr and As, nevertheless, were the most stable components in sludge. PMID:24580817

  3. Determination of Anaerobic Threshold by Monitoring the O2 Pulse Changes in Endurance Cyclists.

    PubMed

    Nikooie, Rohollah

    2016-06-01

    Nikooie, R. Determination of anaerobic threshold by monitoring the O2 pulse changes in endurance cyclists. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1700-1707, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of anaerobic threshold (AnT)-equivalent to the second turn point for lactate (LTP2)-estimation using the O2 pulse changes in highly trained endurance cyclists who do not show heart rate deflection point (HRDP) during incremental testing. Sixteen endurance cyclists (age, 24.8 ± 4.7 years) and fifteen active men (age, 24.8 ± 3.7 years) performed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) and other hemodynamic variables, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration were measured continuously throughout the test. O2 pulse anaerobic threshold (O2 pulse-AnT) was defined as the second turn point in O2 pulse-workload curve. LTP2 was considered as gold standard assessment of AnT and was applied to confirm the validity of O2 pulse-AnT. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Bland-Altman method were used to determine the relationship and agreement between the O2 corresponding to LTP2 and O2 pulse-AnT, respectively. The active men and 68.7% of the endurance cyclists showed HRDP, whereas all subjects showed O2 pulse-AnT during incremental testing. In both groups, the values for V[Combining Dot Above]O2 corresponding to LTP2 were not significantly different from the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at O2 pulse-AnT. The V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at LTP2 and O2 pulse-AnT were highly correlated (endurance cyclists: R = 0.68; standard error of estimate [SEE] = 3.74 ml·kg·min and active men: R = 0.58; SEE = 2.91 ml·kg·min) and Bland-Altman plot revealed the limit of agreement of O2 at LTP2 and O2 pulse-AnT differences between 5.1 and 8.6 ml·kg·min (95% CI). In summary, results of this study showed that the second turn point in the O2 pulse-workload curve occurs around LTP2. Therefore, using O2 pulse-AnT is recommended for the

  4. Metacercarial aggregation in Digenea (Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi): environmental or species determinism?

    PubMed

    Abrous, M; Vareille-Morel, C; Rondelaud, D; Dreyfuss, G; Cabaret, J

    2001-12-01

    Metacercarial aggregation of Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum daubneyi was studied under experimental conditions to determine if the formation of these aggregates was influenced by environmental factors, or it was a characteristic of trematode species. This process was studied using the confinement of infected snails on the bottom of Petri dishes (diameter, 14 cm) for 3 days. The formation of metacercarial aggregates of F. hepatica was not significantly modified by environmental factors such as intensity and duration of lighting, quality and volume of water. Metacercariae of F. hepatica were more numerous on the Petri dish walls and 63.9% of them constituted aggregates. In contrast, most metacercariae of P. daubneyi were found on the Petri dish bottoms and 78.3% of them were isolated or in groups of two metacercariae each. The mean number of metacercariae per aggregate ranged from 6.7 to 12.2 in the case of F. hepatica, and from 2.7 to 4.5 in the case of P. daubneyi. However, these mean numbers were independent of the site of cercarial attachment. The tendency of cercariae to form metacercarial aggregations was a characteristic of F. hepatica and was species determined. PMID:11818045

  5. Higher Education and the Determination of Aggregate Male Employment by Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenberg, Anders; Wikstrom, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the determinants of age-specific employment rates among Swedish males, focusing on the effect of education on employment. We use cohort specific data for the time period 1984-1996 covering male cohorts aged 21-45. It is found that aggregate age-group-specific employment rates increase with the proportion of the cohort with an…

  6. Determination of critical nucleation number for a single nucleation amyloid-β aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Preetam; Vaidya, Ashwin; Kumar, Amit; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2016-01-01

    Aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide are known to be the key pathological agents in Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ aggregates to form large, insoluble fibrils that deposit as senile plaques in AD brains. The process of aggregation is nucleation–dependent in which the formation of a nucleus is the rate–limiting step, and controls the physiochemical fate of the aggregates formed. Therefore, understanding the properties of nucleus and pre-nucleation events will be significant in reducing the existing knowledge–gap in AD pathogenesis. In this report, we have determined the plausible range of critical nucleation number (n*), the number of monomers associated within the nucleus for a homogenous aggregation model with single unique nucleation event, by two independent methods: A reduced-order stability analysis and ordinary differential equation based numerical analysis, supported by experimental biophysics. The results establish that the most likely range of n* is between 7 and 14 and within, this range, n* = 12 closely supports the experimental data. These numbers are in agreement with those previously reported, and importantly, the report establishes a new modeling framework using two independent approaches towards a convergent solution in modeling complex aggregation reactions. Our model also suggests that the formation of large protofibrils is dependent on the nature of n*, further supporting the idea that pre-nucleation events are significant in controlling the fate of larger aggregates formed. This report has re-opened an old problem with a new perspective and holds promise towards revealing the molecular events in amyloid pathologies in the future. PMID:26774039

  7. Determination of critical nucleation number for a single nucleation amyloid-β aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Preetam; Vaidya, Ashwin; Kumar, Amit; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2016-03-01

    Aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide are known to be the key pathological agents in Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ aggregates to form large, insoluble fibrils that deposit as senile plaques in AD brains. The process of aggregation is nucleation-dependent in which the formation of a nucleus is the rate-limiting step, and controls the physiochemical fate of the aggregates formed. Therefore, understanding the properties of nucleus and pre-nucleation events will be significant in reducing the existing knowledge-gap in AD pathogenesis. In this report, we have determined the plausible range of critical nucleation number (n(*)), the number of monomers associated within the nucleus for a homogenous aggregation model with single unique nucleation event, by two independent methods: A reduced-order stability analysis and ordinary differential equation based numerical analysis, supported by experimental biophysics. The results establish that the most likely range of n(*) is between 7 and 14 and within, this range, n(*) = 12 closely supports the experimental data. These numbers are in agreement with those previously reported, and importantly, the report establishes a new modeling framework using two independent approaches towards a convergent solution in modeling complex aggregation reactions. Our model also suggests that the formation of large protofibrils is dependent on the nature of n(*), further supporting the idea that pre-nucleation events are significant in controlling the fate of larger aggregates formed. This report has re-opened an old problem with a new perspective and holds promise towards revealing the molecular events in amyloid pathologies in the future. PMID:26774039

  8. Determination of the Degree of Gravel Aggregate-Bitumencoverage by Multi-Directional Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulsow, C.

    2012-07-01

    The paper describes the determination of the percentage area of bitumen on partly covered aggregate. This task is a typical issue in material testing in road construction. The asphalt components bitumen and aggregate are subjected to defined mechanical stress in the presence of water in order to test the affine properties of the components. The degree to which the bitumen separates from the aggregate surface serves as an indicator for the quality of the affinity. Until now, examiners have been judging the coverage degree of samples by visual rating. Several research projects attempted to replace the error-prone subjective assessment by automatic procedures. These procedures analyse the different chromaticities of aggregate and bitumen in RGB images. However, these approaches as a whole are not reliable enough because of the rather specific requirements that are made on the environmental conditions when the picture is taken (illumination, exclusion of extraneous light) and also on the lab assistant (manual definition of training areas, management of camera and illumination parameters). Moreover, the analysis is not suitable for all types of rock because of the necessary difference in colour between bitumen and aggregate (e.g. dark rock samples). Contrary to previous approaches, the new multi-directional reflectance measurements use the different surface characteristics of bitumen and aggregate instead of the chromaticities as separation criteria. These differences are made visible by directional lighting with a laser. The diffuse reflection from the aggregate surface and the directional reflection from the optically smoother bitumen produce definitely distinguishable brightnesses in the image. Thus the colour of the material is of no significance. The approach was used in a procedure and assessed. The paper presents the method itself, approaches for the elimination of reflections and first results. Moreover, the measuring principle is compared with existing

  9. An improved procedure for determination of the mean aggregation number of micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuangyan; Tachiya, Masanori; Yan, Zhenning

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a theory of fluorescence quenching in micelles which enables a dynamic approach to the evaluation of the aggregation numbers of micelles is presented. This method is based on a detailed kinetic model of quenching of fluorescent probe developed by Tachiya (1975, 1982) and takes into account that a part of quenchers are associated with micelles but the remaining quenchers are in the aqueous phase. The approach presented is an improvement on a previous fluorescence quenching method (Turro and Yekta, 1978) and is applied to determine the aggregation number of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SAS) in aqueous dipeptide solution using cetylpyridinium chloride as quencher. The values of aggregation number and association constant for quencher-micelle association are presented.

  10. Modelling of slaughterhouse solid waste anaerobic digestion: determination of parameters and continuous reactor simulation.

    PubMed

    López, Iván; Borzacconi, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    A model based on the work of Angelidaki et al. (1993) was applied to simulate the anaerobic biodegradation of ruminal contents. In this study, two fractions of solids with different biodegradation rates were considered. A first-order kinetic was used for the easily biodegradable fraction and a kinetic expression that is function of the extracellular enzyme concentration was used for the slowly biodegradable fraction. Batch experiments were performed to obtain an accumulated methane curve that was then used to obtain the model parameters. For this determination, a methodology derived from the "multiple-shooting" method was successfully used. Monte Carlo simulations allowed a confidence range to be obtained for each parameter. Simulations of a continuous reactor were performed using the optimal set of model parameters. The final steady-states were determined as functions of the operational conditions (solids load and residence time). The simulations showed that methane flow peaked at a flow rate of 0.5-0.8 Nm(3)/d/m(reactor)(3) at a residence time of 10-20 days. Simulations allow the adequate selection of operating conditions of a continuous reactor. PMID:20303732

  11. In vitro susceptibilities of suspected periodontopathic anaerobes as determined by membrane transfer assay.

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, P W; Allen, D N; Childers, N K

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to devise an antimicrobial approach to combating dentomicrobial infections such as periodontal diseases continue to be hampered by the lack of a relevant in vitro method for determining the susceptibility of suspected periodontopathogens to topically applied antimicrobial agents. Proposed here is a novel in vitro method called the membrane transfer technique, which acknowledges those aspects unique to localized pathogenic infections, particularly those associated with anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial lawns representing six suspected periodontopathic bacteria were prepared on membranes and then placed in contact with different concentrations of antimicrobial agents for 5 min. After incubation for 12 to 24 h, MBCs were determined with the aid of a tetrazolium chloride indicator. Four antimicrobial agents (chlorhexidine, iodine, stannous fluoride, and sodium fluoride) were used to test the applicability of the proposed in vitro method. MBCs were derived for each agent except sodium fluoride against all or most of the six bacterial strains tested. The proposed method may also be useful for examining the bactericidal action of topically applied antimicrobial agents against nonoral infections. Images PMID:3439806

  12. DETERMINATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ANAEROBIC DEHALOGENATION: DEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED ORGANICS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes initial efforts: to isolate microorganisms capable of anaerobic dehalogenation; to examine the nutritional requirements of dehalogenating enrichments and a dehalogenating consortium; and to study the genetics of dehalogenation. Enrichments using secondary an...

  13. Noninvasive Determination of Anaerobic Threshold Based on the Heart Rate Deflection Point in Water Cycling.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Brasil, Roxana M; Alberton, Cristine L; Ferreira, Hector K; Bagatini, Natália C; Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    This study compared heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), percentage of maximal HR (%HRmax), percentage of maximal VO2, and cadence (Cad) related to the anaerobic threshold (AT) during a water cycling maximal test between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and ventilatory (VT) methods. In addition, the correlations between both methods were assessed for all variables. The test was performed by 27 men in a cycle ergometer in an aquatic environment. The protocol started at a Cad of 100 b · min(-1) for 3 minutes with subsequent increments of 15 b · min(-1) every 2 minutes until exhaustion. A paired two-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare the variables between the HRDP and VT methods. The Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to correlate the same variables determined by the 2 methods. There was no difference in HR (166 ± 13 vs. 166 ± 13 b · min(-1)), VO2 (38.56 ± 6.26 vs. 39.18 ± 6.13 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), %HRmax (89.24 ± 3.84 vs. 89.52 ± 4.29%), VO2max (70.44 ± 7.99 vs. 71.64 ± 8.32%), and Cad (174 ± 14 b · min(-1) vs. 171 ± 8 b · min(-1)) related to AT between the HRDP and VT methods. Moreover, significant relationships were found between the methods to determine the AT for all variables analyzed (r = 0.57-0.97). The estimation of the HRDP may be a noninvasive and easy method to determine the AT, which could be used to adapt individualized training intensities to practitioners during water cycling classes. PMID:26200195

  14. Determination of Anaerobic Threshold by Heart Rate or Heart Rate Variability using Discontinuous Cycle Ergometry

    PubMed Central

    PARK, SUNG WOOK; BRENNEMAN, MICHAEL; COOKE, WILLIAM H.; CORDOVA, ALBERTO; FOGT, DONOVAN

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to determine if heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) responses would reflect anaerobic threshold (AT) using a discontinuous, incremental, cycle test. AT was determined by ventilatory threshold (VT). Cyclists (30.6±5.9y; 7 males, 8 females) completed a discontinuous cycle test consisting of 7 stages (6 min each with 3 min of rest between). Three stages were performed at power outputs (W) below those corresponding to a previously established AT, one at W corresponding to AT, and 3 at W above those corresponding to AT. The W at the intersection of the trend lines was considered each metric’s “threshold”. The averaged stage data for Ve, HR, and time- and frequency-domain HRV metrics were plotted versus W. The W at the “threshold” for the metrics of interest were compared using correlation analysis and paired-sample t-test. In all, several heart rate-related parameters accurately reflected AT with significant correlations (p≤0.05) were observed between AT W and HR, mean RR interval (MRR), low and high frequency spectral energy (LF and HR, respectively), high frequency peak (fHF), and HFxfHF metrics’ threshold W (i.e., MRRTW, etc.). Differences in HR or HRV metric threshold W and AT for all subjects were less than 14 W. The steady state data from discontinuous protocols may allow for a true indication of steady-state physiologic stress responses and corresponding W at AT, compared to continuous protocols using 1–2 min exercise stages. PMID:27182400

  15. Anaerobic fermentation of glycerol in Paenibacillus macerans: metabolic pathways and environmental determinants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Murarka, Abhishek; Campbell, Paul; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2009-09-01

    Paenibacillus macerans is one of the species with the broadest metabolic capabilities in the genus Paenibacillus, able to ferment hexoses, deoxyhexoses, pentoses, cellulose, and hemicellulose. However, little is known about glycerol metabolism in this organism, and some studies have reported that glycerol is not fermented. Despite these reports, we found that several P. macerans strains are capable of anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. One of these strains, P. macerans N234A, grew fermentatively on glycerol at a maximum specific growth rate of 0.40 h(-1) and was chosen for further characterization. The use of [U-13C]glycerol and further analysis of extracellular metabolites and proteinogenic amino acids via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed identification of ethanol, formate, acetate, succinate, and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO) as fermentation products and demonstrated that glycerol is incorporated into cellular components. A medium formulation with low concentrations of potassium and phosphate, cultivation at acidic pH, and the use of a CO2-enriched atmosphere stimulated glycerol fermentation and are proposed to be environmental determinants of this process. The pathways involved in glycerol utilization and synthesis of fermentation products were identified using NMR spectroscopy in combination with enzyme assays. Based on these studies, the synthesis of ethanol and 1,2-PDO is proposed to be a metabolic determinant of glycerol fermentation in P. macerans N234A. Conversion of glycerol to ethanol fulfills energy requirements by generating one molecule of ATP per molecule of ethanol synthesized. Conversion of glycerol to 1,2-PDO results in the consumption of reducing equivalents, thus facilitating redox balance. Given the availability, low price, and high degree of reduction of glycerol, the high metabolic rates exhibited by P. macerans N234A are of paramount importance for the production of fuels and chemicals. PMID:19617389

  16. Calcium-dependence of synexin binding may determine aggregation and fusion of lamellar bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, N; Spitzer, A R; Chander, A

    1997-01-01

    Synexin (annexin VII) is a member of the annexin family of calcium and phospholipid binding proteins that promote calcium-dependent aggregation and fusion of lipid vesicles or secretory granules. We have previously suggested that synexin may be involved in membrane fusion processes during exocytosis of lung surfactant since it promotes fusion in vitro of lamellar bodies with plasma membranes. In this study, we characterized calcium-dependency of synexin binding to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, since such binding is the initial, and, therefore, may be the rate-limiting step in membrane aggregation and fusion. The binding of biotinylated synexin to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes increased in a calcium-dependent manner reaching a maximum at approx. 200 microM Ca2+. Binding to lamellar bodies was completely inhibited by unlabelled synexin. Gel-overlay analysis showed that synexin bound to an approx. 76 kDa protein in the lamellar body and plasma membrane fractions. The calcium kinetics were noticeably similar for synexin binding to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, aggregation of lamellar bodies, and fusion of lamellar bodies with lipid vesicles. At low calcium concentrations, aggregation of lamellar bodies could be increased with increasing synexin concentration, and arachidonic acid increased all three parameters (binding, aggregation, and fusion) in a similar manner. The effects of calcium and arachidonic acid on these three parameters suggest that synexin binding to lamellar bodies may be a rate-determining step for fusion during surfactant secretion. Furthermore, at near physiological calcium levels, the membrane fusion may be enhanced by elevated concentrations of synexin and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:9078249

  17. Determination of greenhouse gas emission reductions from sewage sludge anaerobic digestion in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-T; Kong, X-J; Zheng, G-D; Chen, C-C

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge is a considerable source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in the field of organic solid waste treatment and disposal. In this case study, total GHG emissions from sludge anaerobic digestion, including direct and indirect emissions as well as replaceable emission reduction due to biogas being reused instead of natural gas, were quantified respectively. The results indicated that no GHG generation needed to be considered during the anaerobic digestion process. Indirect emissions were mainly from electricity and fossil fuel consumption on-site and sludge transportation. Overall, the total GHG emission owing to relative subtraction from anaerobic digestion rather than landfill, and replaceable GHG reduction caused by reuse of its product of biogas, were quantified to be 0.7214 (northern China) or 0.7384 (southern China) MgCO2 MgWS(-1) (wet sludge). PMID:26744944

  18. Cytoplasmic Localization and the Choice of Ligand Determine Aggregate Formation by Androgen Receptor with Amplified Polyglutamine Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthias; Martin, Elke; Schneikert, Jean; Krug, Harald F.; Cato, Andrew C.B.

    2000-01-01

    Polyglutamine tract expansion in androgen receptor is a recognized cause of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked motor neuronopathy. Similar mutations have been identified in proteins associated with other neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have shown that amplified polyglutamine repeat stretches form cellular aggregates that may be markers for these neurodegenerative diseases. Here we describe conditions that lead to aggregate formation by androgen receptor with polyglutamine stretch amplification. In transfection experiments, the mutant, compared with the wild-type receptor, was delayed in its cytoplasmic–nuclear translocation and formed large cytoplasmic aggregates in the presence of androgen. The cytoplasmic environment appears crucial for this aggregation, since retention of both the wild-type and mutant receptors in this cellular compartment by the deletion of their nuclear localization signals resulted in massive aggregation. Conversely, rapid nuclear transport of both receptors brought about by deletion of their ligand binding domains did not result in aggregate formation. However, androgen antagonists that altered the conformation of the ligand binding domain and promoted varying rates of cytoplasmic–nuclear translocation all inhibited aggregate formation. This demonstrates that in addition to the cytoplasmic localization, a distinct contribution of the ligand binding domain of the receptor is necessary for the aggregation. The finding that antiandrogens inhibit aggregate formation may provide the basis for in vivo determination of the role of these structures in SBMA. PMID:10769019

  19. Aerobic and anaerobic determinants of repeated sprint ability in team sports athletes.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Z; Dardouri, W; Haj-Sassi, R; Chamari, K; Souissi, N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine in team sports athletes the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA) indices and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness components. Sixteen team-sport players were included (age, 23.4 ± 2.3 years; weight, 71.2 ± 8.3 kg; height, 178 ± 7 cm; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2 kg · m(-2); estimated VO2max, 54.16 ± 3.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)). Subjects were licensed in various team sports: soccer (n = 8), basketball (n = 5), and handball (n = 3). They performed 4 tests: the 20 m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT), the 30-s Wingate test (WingT), the Maximal Anaerobic Shuttle Running Test (MASRT), and the RSA test (10 repetitions of 30 m shuttle sprints (15 + 15 m with 180° change of direction) with 30 s passive recovery in between). Pearson's product moment of correlation among the different physical tests was performed. No significant correlations were found between any RSA test indices and WingT. However, negative correlations were found between MASRT and RSA total sprint time (TT) and fatigue index (FI) (r = -0.53, p < 0.05 and r = -0.65, p < 0.01, respectively). No significant relationship between VO2max and RSA peak sprint time (PT) and total sprint time (TT) was found. Nevertheless, VO2max was significantly correlated with the RSA FI (r = -0.57, p < 0.05). In conclusion, aerobic fitness is an important factor influencing the ability to resist fatigue during RSA exercise. Our results highlighted the usefulness of MASRT, in contrast to WingT, as a specific anaerobic testing procedure to identify the anaerobic energy system contribution during RSA. PMID:26424923

  20. Aggregation in five-coordinate high-spin natural hemins: Determination of solution structure by sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, S.; Mitra, S. )

    1990-01-25

    {sup 1}H NMR measurements (at 500 MHz) of nuclear spin-spin relaxation time T{sub 2} (from NMR line width) at different temperatures are reported for aggregates of several five-coordinate high-spin iron(III) complexes of proto-, deutero-, and coproporphyrins in solution and are utilized to determine their solution structure. Extensive aggregation of these complexes in solution is observed, and the dominant form of the aggregates is shown to be dimers. The degree of aggregation for these iron(III) porphyrins follows the order proto- >> deutero- > copro-. The line width of the heme methyl resonances was analyzed by using a nonlinear least-squares fit program working in finite difference algorithm. The values of T{sub 2} were used to determine the structural details of the dimer.

  1. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  2. Structural insights into the multi-determinant aggregation of TDP-43 in motor neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, F; Salvatori, I; Iacovelli, F; Mirra, A; Rossi, S; Cozzolino, M; Falconi, M; Valle, C; Carrì, M T

    2016-10-01

    TDP-43 is aggregated in patients with ALS and FLTD through mechanisms still incompletely understood. Since aggregation in the cytosol is most probably responsible for the delocalization and loss of proper RNA-binding function of TDP-43 in the nucleus, interception of the formation of aggregates may represent a useful therapeutic option. In this study, we investigated the relative importance of the N-terminal and C-terminal moieties of TDP-43 in the aggregation process and the weight of each of the six cysteine residues in determining unfolding and aggregation of the different domains. We report that cytoplasmic inclusions formed by WT and mutant TDP-43 in motor neuron-like NSC34 cells are redox-sensitive only in part, and contain at least two components, i.e. oligomers and large aggregates, that are made of different molecular species. The two N-terminal cysteine residues contribute to the seeding for the first step in oligomerization, which is then accomplished by mechanisms depending on the four cysteines in the RNA-recognition motifs. Cysteine-independent large aggregates contain unfolded isoforms of the protein, held together by unspecific hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, truncated isoforms are entrapped exclusively in oligomers. Ab initio modeling of TDP-43 structure, molecular dynamics and molecular docking analysis indicate a differential accessibility of cysteine residues that contributes to aggregation propensity. We propose a model of TDP-43 aggregation involving cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent stages that may constitute a starting point to devise strategies counteracting the formation of inclusions in TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:27317832

  3. The Use of Multiple Regression Models to Determine if Conjoint Analysis Should Be Conducted on Aggregate Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, John W.; Newman, Isadore

    1996-01-01

    In a conjoint-analysis consumer-preference study, researchers must determine whether the product factor estimates, which measure consumer preferences, should be calculated and interpreted for each respondent or collectively. Multiple regression models can determine whether to aggregate data by examining factor-respondent interaction effects. This…

  4. Anaerobic threshold, is it a magic number to determine fitness for surgery?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The use of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiac and respiratory function was pioneered as part of preoperative assessment in the mid 1990s. Surgical procedures have changed since then. The patient population may have aged; however, the physiology has remained the same. The use of an accurate physiological evaluation remains as germane today as it was then. Certainly no ‘magic’ is involved. The author recognizes that not everyone accepts the classical theories of the anaerobic threshold (AT) and that there is some discussion around lactate and exercise. The article looks at aerobic capacity as an important predictor of perioperative mortality and also looks at some aspects of CPET relative to surgical risk evaluation. PMID:24472514

  5. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  6. Conformation determines the seeding potencies of native and recombinant Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J; Isaacs, Adrian M; Hutton, Michael L; Szekeres, Philip G; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled "prion-like" species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs (275)VQIINK(280) and (306)VQIVYK(311) abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  7. Highly sensitive colorimetric determination of amoxicillin in pharmaceutical formulations based on induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhond, Morteza; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Ershadifar, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    A novel, simple and highly sensitive colorimetric method is developed for determination of Amoxicillin (AMX). The system is based on aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in acetate buffer (pH = 4.5) in the presence of the degradation product of Amoxicillin (DPAMX). It was found that the color of gold nanoparticles changed from red to purple and the intensity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of AuNPs decreased. A new absorption band was appeared in the wavelength range of 600-700 nm upon addition of DPAMX. The absorbance ratio at the wavelength of 660 and 525 nm (A660/A525) was chosen as the analytical signal indirectly related to AMX concentration. The linearity of the calibration graph was found over the concentration range of 0.3-4.5 μM AMX with a correlation coefficient of 0.9967. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.15 μM. The applicability of the method was successfully demonstrated by analysis of AMX in pharmaceutical formulations including capsules and oral suspensions.

  8. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles - upscaling an aggregate biophysical model.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-09-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Recent mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate-like pore networks revealed a highly dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites jointly shaped by hydration conditions and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial community abundance and self-organization. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support substantial anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3D angular pore networks. Model aggregates of different sizes were subjected to variable water, carbon and oxygen contents that varied with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain estimates of biogeochemical fluxes from the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2 O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of practical interest for hydrological and climate models. PMID:27152862

  9. Determination of the archaeal and bacterial communities in two-phase and single-stage anaerobic systems by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Guo, Chenghong; Xiao, Keke; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-10-01

    2-Phase anaerobic digestion (AD), where the acidogenic phase was operated at 2day hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the methanogenic phase at 10days HRT, had been evaluated to determine if it could provide higher organic reduction and methane production than the conventional single-stage AD (also operated at 12days HRT). 454 pyrosequencing was performed to determine and compare the microbial communities. The acidogenic reactor of the 2-phase system yielded a unique bacterial community of the lowest richness and diversity, while bacterial profiles of the methanogenic reactor closely followed the single-stage reactor. All reactors were predominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogens, mainly Methanolinea. Unusually, the acidogenic reactor contributed up to 24% of total methane production in the 2-phase system. This could be explained by the presence of Methanosarcina and Methanobrevibacter, and their activities could also help regulate reactor alkalinity during high loading conditions through carbon dioxide production. The enrichment of hydrolytic and acidogenic Porphyromonadaceae, Prevotellaceae, Ruminococcaceae and unclassified Bacteroidetes in the acidogenic reactor would have contributed to the improved sludge volatile solids degradation, and ultimately the overall 2-phase system's performance. Syntrophic acetogenic microorganisms were absent in the acidogenic reactor but present in the downstream methanogenic reactor, indicating the retention of various metabolic pathways also found in a single-stage system. The determination of key microorganisms further expands our understanding of the complex biological functions in AD process. PMID:26456614

  10. Aggregate size and architecture determine microbial activity balance for one-stage partial nitritation and anammox.

    PubMed

    Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Bolca, Selin; Demeestere, Lien; Mast, Jan; Boon, Nico; Carballa, Marta; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-02-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far. In this study, three suspended-growth oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) reactors with different inoculation and operation (mixing and aeration) conditions, designated reactors A, B, and C, were used. The test objectives were (i) to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, >1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR, <0.5) in which AnAOB were not shielded by an AerAOB layer. Voids and channels occupied 13 to 17% of the anoxic zone of AnAOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing. PMID:19948857

  11. Determination of the molecular parameters and studies of the aggregation behavior of polybenzimidazole in solution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shogbon, Christopher; Brousseau, Jean-Luc; Zhang, Haifeng

    2005-03-01

    Static light scattering using a seven angle BI-MwA instrument has been used for the first time to obtain the molecular parameters as well as study the aggregation behavior of previously synthesized m-PBI samples in DMAc/LiCl solvent mixtures. Depolarization ratios for the samples were obtained using a BI-200SM goniometer system. Molecular parameters obtained were m-PBI(118) Mw: 179,300 g/mol; Rg: 36.4 nm; A2: 0.0016 cm^3mol/g^2 and m-PBI(159) Mw: 206,500 g/mol; Rg: 46.6 nm; A2: 0.0020 cm^3mol/g^2. The aggregation behavior of m-PBI(159) was studied as a function of salt concentration (0 to 7 %) at a fixed polymer concentration of 0.3 mg/mL. With increasing salt concentration, Rg decreases initially and goes through three maxima with a minimum Rg of 31.0 nm at 4 % LiCl. This result parallels the previously observed aggregation behavior of corn amylase in DMAc/LiCl. Thus our results suggest a general mechanism for the aggregation of semiflexible polymers which can be controlled by varying polymer or salt concentration.

  12. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) is obtained from soybeans by removing soybean oil and soy carbohydrates. Soy protein nanoparticles were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of SPI and centrifugal separation process. Structurally, SPI is a globular protein and its aggregates in water consist of sphere-like pr...

  13. Determination of the stereochemistry of the aggregation pheromone of harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preparation of a complete stereoisomeric library of 1,10-bisaboladien-3-ols and selected 10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ols was earlier pivotal for the identification of the aggregation pheromone of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys. Herein, we describe syntheses of remaining10,11-epoxy-1...

  14. Substrate Type and Free Ammonia Determine Bacterial Community Structure in Full-Scale Mesophilic Anaerobic Digesters Treating Cattle or Swine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiabao; Rui, Junpeng; Yao, Minjie; Zhang, Shiheng; Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Yan, Zhiying; Li, Xiangzhen

    2015-01-01

    The microbial-mediated anaerobic digestion (AD) process represents an efficient biological process for the treatment of organic waste along with biogas harvest. Currently, the key factors structuring bacterial communities and the potential core and unique bacterial populations in manure anaerobic digesters are not completely elucidated yet. In this study, we collected sludge samples from 20 full-scale anaerobic digesters treating cattle or swine manure, and investigated the variations of bacterial community compositions using high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Clustering and correlation analysis suggested that substrate type and free ammonia (FA) play key roles in determining the bacterial community structure. The COD: NH4+-N (C:N) ratio of substrate and FA were the most important available operational parameters correlating to the bacterial communities in cattle and swine manure digesters, respectively. The bacterial populations in all of the digesters were dominated by phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi. Increased FA content selected Firmicutes, suggesting that they probably play more important roles under high FA content. Syntrophic metabolism by Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Synergistetes and Planctomycetes are likely inhibited when FA content is high. Despite the different manure substrates, operational conditions and geographical locations of digesters, core bacterial communities were identified. The core communities were best characterized by phylum Firmicutes, wherein Clostridium predominated overwhelmingly. Substrate-unique and abundant communities may reflect the properties of manure substrate and operational conditions. These findings extend our current understanding of the bacterial assembly in full-scale manure anaerobic digesters. PMID:26648921

  15. A New Approach for Quantitative Determination of γ-Cyclodextrin in Aqueous Solutions: Application in Aggregate Determinations and Solubility in Hydrocortisone/γ-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex.

    PubMed

    Saokham, Phennapha; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2015-11-01

    Fast and simple high-pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with charged aerosol detector (CAD) was developed for quantitation of γ-cyclodextrin (γCD) in aqueous solutions. The chromatographic system consisted of a C18 column (i.e., the stationary phase) and an aqueous mobile phase containing 7% (v/v) methanol. Calibration curve was obtained over the γCD concentration range of 0.005%-1% (w/v). The limit of detection and quantitation of γCD were 0.0001% and 0.0002% (w/v), respectively. Formation of γCD aggregates in aqueous solution and their critical aggregation concentration (cac) were determined by both conventional dynamic light scattering method and permeation method using HPLC-CAD for quantitative determination of γCD. The cac of γCD was determined to be 0.95% (w/v) and the amount of γCD self-aggregates increased with increasing γCD concentrations. Also, the developed HPLC-CAD method was used to determine the γCD phase-solubility profile in an aqueous hydrocortisone (HC)/γCD complexation medium. The maximum concentration of dissolved γCD and HC was determined to be 1.47% and 0.31% (w/v), respectively. The membrane permeation method was shown to be a reliable method for determination of metastable γCD aggregates. The HPLC-CAD method was successfully applied for quantitative determination of γCD in aqueous solutions during permeation and phase-solubility studies. PMID:26249751

  16. A spectral approach to determine location and orientation of azo dyes within surfactant aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karukstis, Kerry K.; Litz, Jonathan P.; Garber, Matthew B.; Angell, Laura M.; Korir, George K.

    2010-04-01

    The UV-vis absorption properties of azo dyes are known to exhibit a variation with the polarity and acidity of the dye environment. The spectral properties of a series of anionic azo dyes were characterized to further probe the interaction of these dyes with two types of surfactant aggregates: (1) the spherical micelles formed in aqueous solution by alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (C nTAB) surfactants with n = 10-16 and (2) the unilamellar vesicles spontaneously formed in water from binary mixtures of the oppositely-charged double-tailed surfactants cationic didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) and anionic sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or AOT). The observed dye spectra reflect the solvatochromic behavior of the dyes and suggest the location and orientation of the dye within the surfactant aggregates. Deconvolution of the overall spectra into sums of Gaussian curves more readily displays any contributions of tautomeric forms of the azo dyes resulting from intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The rich variation in UV/vis absorption properties of these anionic azo dyes supports their use as sensitive tools to explore the nanostructures of surfactant aggregates.

  17. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  18. In-situ suspended aggregate microextraction of gold nanoparticles from water samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Choleva, Tatiana G; Kappi, Foteini A; Tsogas, George Z; Vlessidis, Athanasios G; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-05-01

    This work describes a new method for the extraction and determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental samples by means of in-situ suspended aggregate microextraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The method relies on the in-situ formation of a supramolecular aggregate phase through ion-association between a cationic surfactant and a benzene sulfonic acid derivative. Gold nanoparticles are physically entrapped into the aggregate phase which is separated from the bulk aqueous solution by vacuum filtration on the surface of a cellulose filter in the form of a thin film. The film is removed from the filter surface and is dissociated into an acidified methanolic solution which is used for analysis. Under the optimized experimental conditions, gold nanoparticles can be efficiently extracted from water samples with recovery rates between 81.0-93.3%, precision 5.4-12.0% and detection limits as low as 75femtomolL(-1) using only 20mL of sample volume. The satisfactory analytical features of the method along with the simplicity indicate the efficiency of this new approach to adequately collect and extract gold nanoparticle species from water samples. PMID:26946014

  19. Prion aggregate structure in yeast cells is determined by the Hsp104-Hsp110 disaggregase machinery

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Jonathan; Clare, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Prions consist of misfolded proteins that have adopted an infectious amyloid conformation. In vivo, prion biogenesis is intimately associated with the protein quality control machinery. Using electron tomography, we probed the effects of the heat shock protein Hsp70 chaperone system on the structure of a model yeast [PSI+] prion in situ. Individual Hsp70 deletions shift the balance between fibril assembly and disassembly, resulting in a variable shell of nonfibrillar, but still immobile, aggregates at the surface of the [PSI+] prion deposits. Both Hsp104 (an Hsp100 disaggregase) and Sse1 (the major yeast form of Hsp110) were localized to this surface shell of [PSI+] deposits in the deletion mutants. Elevation of Hsp104 expression promoted the appearance of this novel, nonfibrillar form of the prion aggregate. Moreover, Sse1 was found to regulate prion fibril length. Our studies reveal a key role for Sse1 (Hsp110), in cooperation with Hsp104, in regulating the length and assembly state of [PSI+] prion fibrils in vivo. PMID:26438827

  20. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Pashley, Clare L.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70 % identical in sequence and share 88 % sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH 2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3 M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  1. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  2. Limitations in Determining Multifractal Spectra from Pore-Solid Soil Aggregate Images

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, A N; Martin, M A; Smucker, A J.M.; Rivers, M L

    2011-11-16

    Multifractal methods have the potential to be useful tools for characterizing spatial distributions of soil pores from microtomographic images of undisturbed soil cores and soil aggregates. The objective of this study was to examine the limitations of multifractal analyses in binary (void and solid) soil images and to explore conditions under which multifractal spectra can be obtained. Multifractal characteristics of binary soil images are bounded within certain limiting values corresponding to nonfractal scaling. In this study, we first addressed the theoretical limitations of multifractal analysis of binary images and examined the nonfractal scaling boundaries in multifractal calculations by the method of moments. Then we developed boundary conditions for multifractal calculations by the direct method. Results revealed that fractal scaling is potentially possible only across a relatively narrow range of cell sizes restricted by the nonfractal scaling boundaries. Moreover, the range of cell sizes where fractal scaling is potentially possible varies with pore size. That is, in multifractal calculations it changes continuously with changes in the q value. For the soil aggregates examined in this study, this range varied from two to eight pixels for low q values to 128 pixels for high q values. The varying range makes calculations of true multifractal spectra for binary soil image data impossible. These results are consistent with a general theoretical notion that binary soil images are not multifractal in a strict mathematical sense. We suggest, however, that application of multifractal formalism can generate 'pseudo-multifractal spectra' that might still be useful for summarizing pore distribution information and for comparing pore data among different agricultural management regimes and soil type.

  3. Determination of Aerosol Oxidative Activity using Silver Nanoparticle Aggregation on Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Dungchai, Wijitar; Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Chailapakul, Orawon; Volckens, John; Henry, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution significantly impacts human health, but the cellular mechanisms of PM-induced toxicity remain poorly understood. A leading hypothesis on the effects of inhaled PM involves the generation of cellular oxidative stress. To investigate PM-induced oxidative stress, analytical methods have been developed to study the chemical oxidation of dithiothreitol (DTT) in the presence of PM. Although DTT readily reacts with several forms of reactive oxygen species, this molecule is not endogenously produced in biological systems. Glutathione (GSH), on the other hand, is an endogenous antioxidant that is produced throughout the body and is directly involved in combating oxidative stress in the lungs and other tissues. We report here a new method for measuring aerosol oxidative activity that uses silver nanoparticle (AgNP) aggregation coupled to glutathione (GSH) oxidation in a paper-based analytical device. In this assay, the residual reduced GSH from the oxidation of reduced GSH to its disulfide induces the aggregation of AgNPs on a paper-based analytical device, which produces a reddish-brown product. Two methods for aerosol oxidative reactivity are presented: one based on change in color intensity using a traditional paper-based techniques and one based on the length of the color product formed using a distance-based device. These methods were validated against traditional spectroscopic assays for DTT and GSH that employ Elman’s reagent. No significant difference was found between the levels measured by all three GSH methods (our two paper-based devices and the traditional method) at the 95% confidence level. PM reactivity towards GSH was less than towards DTT most likely due to the difference in the oxidation potential between the two molecules. PMID:24067623

  4. Determination of the aggregation number and charge of ionic surfactant micelles from the stepwise thinning of foam films.

    PubMed

    Anachkov, Svetoslav E; Danov, Krassimir D; Basheva, Elka S; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P

    2012-11-15

    The stepwise thinning (stratification) of liquid films, which contain micelles of an ionic surfactant, depends on the micelle aggregation number, N(agg), and charge, Z. Vice versa, from the height of the step and the final film thickness one can determine N(agg), Z, and the degree of micelle ionization. The determination of N(agg) is based on the experimental fact that the step height is equal to the inverse cubic root of the micelle concentration. In addition, Z is determined from the final thickness of the film, which depends on the concentration of counterions dissociated from the micelles in the bulk. The method is applied to micellar solutions of six surfactants, both anionic and cationic: sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), sodium laurylethersulfates with 1 and 3 ethylene oxide groups (SLES-1EO and SLES-3EO), and potassium myristate. The method has the following advantages: (i) N(agg) and Z are determined simultaneously, from the same set of experimental data; (ii) N(agg) and Z are determined for each given surfactant concentration (i.e. their concentration dependence is obtained), and (iii) N(agg) and Z can be determined even for turbid solutions, like those of carboxylates, where the micelles coexist with acid-soap crystallites, so that the application of other methods is difficult. The results indicate that the micelles of greater aggregation number have a lower degree of ionization, which can be explained with the effect of counterion binding. The proposed method is applicable to the concentration range, in which the films stratify and the micelles are spherical. This is satisfied for numerous systems representing scientific and practical interest. PMID:22935484

  5. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  6. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  7. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zun; Qian, Yang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Ju, Meiting

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2014 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. •Pretreatment •Organic waste •multiple-stage co-digestion •Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:26420080

  8. Critical Velocity and Anaerobic Paddling Capacity Determined by Different Mathematical Models and Number of Predictive Trials in Canoe Slalom

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Leonardo H. D.; Ferrari, Homero G.; Reis, Ivan G. M.; Scariot, Pedro P. M.; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze if different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models can modify the aerobic and anaerobic estimates from critical velocity protocol applied in canoe slalom. Fourteen male elite slalom kayakers from Brazilian canoe slalom team (K1) were evaluated. Athletes were submitted to four predictive trials of 150, 300, 450 and 600 meters in a lake and the time to complete each trial was recorded. Critical velocity (CV-aerobic parameter) and anaerobic paddling capacity (APC-anaerobic parameter) were obtained by three mathematical models (Linear1=distance-time; Linear 2=velocity-1/time and Non-Linear = time-velocity). Linear 1 was chosen for comparison of predictive trials combinations. Standard combination (SC) was considered as the four trials (150, 300, 450 and 600 m). High fits of regression were obtained from all mathematical models (range - R² = 0.96-1.00). Repeated measures ANOVA pointed out differences of all mathematical models for CV (p = 0.006) and APC (p = 0.016) as well as R² (p = 0.033). Estimates obtained from the first (1) and the fourth (4) predictive trials (150 m = lowest; and 600 m = highest, respectively) were similar and highly correlated (r=0.98 for CV and r = 0.96 for APC) with the SC. In summary, methodological aspects must be considered in critical velocity application in canoe slalom, since different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models resulted in different aerobic and anaerobic estimates. Key points Great attention must be given for methodological concerns regarding critical velocity protocol applied on canoe slalom, since different estimates were obtained depending on the mathematical model and the predictive trials used. Linear 1 showed the best fits of regression. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge and considering practical applications, this model is the easiest one to calculate the estimates from critical velocity protocol. Considering this, the abyss between

  9. Aggregation and secondary loop structure of oligonucleotides do not determine their ability to inhibit TLR9.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Robert F; Goeken, J Adam; Lenert, Petar S

    2011-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is an endosomal DNA sensor that warns us of the presence of infectious danger and triggers a rapid pro-inflammatory response in dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. The consequences of uncontrolled TLR9 activation can be detrimental for the host, contributing to the pathogenesis of bacterial septic shock or autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, we need to develop TLR9 antagonists. We and others have created inhibitory oligonucleotides (INH-ODN) that are capable of sequence-dependent inhibition of TLR9-induced activation in both human and mouse cells. However, it is not clear whether marked differences in INH-ODN activity related to base sequence derived from polymerization of INH-ODNs or their ability to complex with stimulatory CpG-oligonucleotides (ST-ODN). Furthermore, the 5' end of INH-ODNs may assume a particular loop configuration that may be needed for binding to a critical site on TLR9. Here, we show that 1) G-tetrads required for ODN stacking were compatible with INH-ODN activity but were not necessary; 2) there was no relationship between activity and self-association at endosomal pH; 3) there was no evidence for direct binding between ST-ODNs and INH-ODNs; 4) when a 3G sequence was disrupted, despite a preserved stem-loop formation, INH-ODN activity was abolished. These results support the conclusion that certain features of the primary linear sequence are critical for TLR9 inhibition, but changes in secondary structure or in ODN aggregation are irrelevant. PMID:21376154

  10. Determining the Effect of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Aggregation of Amyloid-Beta in Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Suhag; Matticks, John; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease has been linked partially to genetic factors but the predicted environmental components have yet to be determined. In Alzheimer's, accumulation of amyloid-beta protein in the brain forms plaques resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of mental functions. It has been postulated that aluminum influences the aggregation of amyloid-beta. To test this hypothesis, transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, CL2120, was used as a model organism to observe neurodegeneration in nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Behavioral testing, fluorescent staining, and fluorescence microscopy were used to test the effects of aggregation of amyloid-beta in the nervous systems of effected nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the total concentration of aluminum oxide that the worms were exposed to during the experiment. Exposure of transgenic and wild type worms to a concentration of 4 mg mL-1 aluminum oxide showed a decrease in the sinusoidal motion, as well as an infirmity of transgenic worms when compared to control worms. These results support the hypothesis that aluminum may play a role in neurodegeneration in C. elegans, and may influence and increase the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047 DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  11. Midpoint potentials of cytochromes in vesicles of anaerobically-grown Paracoccus denitrificans determined by the indirect coulometric titration method.

    PubMed

    Kula, T; Stellwagen, E; Szentirmay, R; Kuwana, T

    1981-02-12

    1. Multiplicity of redox components with spectral properties similar to b-type cytochromes was established in vesicles derived fro anaerobically-grown Paracoccus denitrificans. 2. Multiplicity of c-type cytochromes was not apparent either from low temperature spectroscopy or potentiometric titrations. 3. Cytochromes a + a3 and a component, only observable at liquid nitrogen temperature, with a spectral maximum at 582.5 nm were detected. 4. Redox cycling of electron transport components using the indirect coulometric titration method was a convenient means of pairing redox potentials and was reproducible in total absorbance changes, midpoint potentials and spectral maxima. PMID:7470501

  12. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  13. Determination and Visualization of pH Values in Anaerobic Digestion of Water Hyacinth and Rice Straw Mixtures Using Hyperspectral Imaging with Wavelet Transform Denoising and Variable Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chu; Ye, Hui; Liu, Fei; He, Yong; Kong, Wenwen; Sheng, Kuichuan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass energy represents a huge supplement for meeting current energy demands. A hyperspectral imaging system covering the spectral range of 874–1734 nm was used to determine the pH value of anaerobic digestion liquid produced by water hyacinth and rice straw mixtures used for methane production. Wavelet transform (WT) was used to reduce noises of the spectral data. Successive projections algorithm (SPA), random frog (RF) and variable importance in projection (VIP) were used to select 8, 15 and 20 optimal wavelengths for the pH value prediction, respectively. Partial least squares (PLS) and a back propagation neural network (BPNN) were used to build the calibration models on the full spectra and the optimal wavelengths. As a result, BPNN models performed better than the corresponding PLS models, and SPA-BPNN model gave the best performance with a correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) of 0.911 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.0516. The results indicated the feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging to determine pH values during anaerobic digestion. Furthermore, a distribution map of the pH values was achieved by applying the SPA-BPNN model. The results in this study would help to develop an on-line monitoring system for biomass energy producing process by hyperspectral imaging. PMID:26901202

  14. Determination and Visualization of pH Values in Anaerobic Digestion of Water Hyacinth and Rice Straw Mixtures Using Hyperspectral Imaging with Wavelet Transform Denoising and Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chu; Ye, Hui; Liu, Fei; He, Yong; Kong, Wenwen; Sheng, Kuichuan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass energy represents a huge supplement for meeting current energy demands. A hyperspectral imaging system covering the spectral range of 874-1734 nm was used to determine the pH value of anaerobic digestion liquid produced by water hyacinth and rice straw mixtures used for methane production. Wavelet transform (WT) was used to reduce noises of the spectral data. Successive projections algorithm (SPA), random frog (RF) and variable importance in projection (VIP) were used to select 8, 15 and 20 optimal wavelengths for the pH value prediction, respectively. Partial least squares (PLS) and a back propagation neural network (BPNN) were used to build the calibration models on the full spectra and the optimal wavelengths. As a result, BPNN models performed better than the corresponding PLS models, and SPA-BPNN model gave the best performance with a correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) of 0.911 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.0516. The results indicated the feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging to determine pH values during anaerobic digestion. Furthermore, a distribution map of the pH values was achieved by applying the SPA-BPNN model. The results in this study would help to develop an on-line monitoring system for biomass energy producing process by hyperspectral imaging. PMID:26901202

  15. Determination of some aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Takayama, Yohichi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    The determination of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids, formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, n-butyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acids in anaerobic digestion process waters was examined using ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection. The analysis of these biologically important carboxylic acids is necessary as a measure for evaluating and controlling the process. The ion-exclusion chromatography system employed consisted of polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin columns (TSKgel OApak-A or TSKgel Super IC-A/C). weakly acidic eluent (benzoic acid), and conductimetric detection. Particle size and cation-exchange capacity were 5 microm and 0.1 meq./ml for TSKgel OApak-A and 3 microm and 0.2 meq./ml for TSKgel Super IC-A/C, respectively. A dilute eluent (1.0-2.0 mM) of benzoic acid was effective for the high resolution and highly conductimetric detection of the carboxylic acids. The good separation of isobutyric and n-butyric acids was performed using the TSKgel Super IC-A/C column (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d. x 2). The simple and good chromatograms were obtained by the optimized ion-exclusion chromatography conditions for real samples from mesophilic anaerobic digestors, thus the aliphatic carboxylic acids were successfully determined without any interferences. PMID:15250416

  16. Investigation of Anaerobic Herbicide Degradation in Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic microbial pesticide degradation has received little attention, particularly in agricultural soils that receive routine inputs of halogenated herbicides. Seasonal rainfall in many regions can produce zones of periodic anaerobiosis in soil. Redox gradients within soil aggregates can also for...

  17. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate pore networks revealed dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites that are jointly shaped by hydration and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support significant anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3-D angular pore networks with profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen that vary with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain biogeochemical fluxes over the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of interest for hydrological and climate models.

  18. Development of three specific PCR-based tools to determine quantity, cellulolytic transcriptional activity and phylogeny of anaerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Dollhofer, Veronika; Callaghan, Tony Martin; Dorn-In, Samart; Bauer, Johann; Lebuhn, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic fungi (AF) decompose plant material with their rhizoid and multiple cellulolytic enzymes. They disintegrate the complex structure of lignocellulosic substrates, making them more accessible and suitable for further microbial degradation. There is also much interest in their use as biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Here, three novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting AF and their transcriptional activity in in vitro cultures and environmental samples were developed. Two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based methods targeting AF were developed: AF-SSU, was designed to quantify the 18S rRNA genes of AF. AF-Endo, measuring transcripts of an endoglucanase gene from the glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5), was developed to quantify their transcriptional cellulolytic activity. The third PCR based approach was designed for phylogenetical analysis. It targets the 28S rRNA gene (LSU) of AF revealing their phylogenetic affiliation. The in silico-designed primer/probe combinations were successfully tested for the specific amplification of AF from animal and biogas plant derived samples. In combination, these three methods represent useful tools for the analysis of AF transcriptional cellulolytic activity, their abundance and their phylogenetic placement. PMID:27220661

  19. The determination of fertilizer quality of the formed struvite from effluent of a sewage sludge anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Ayla; Yilmazel, Y Dilsad; Demirer, Goksel N

    2010-09-15

    The formation of struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O) in wastewater treatment plants can lead to scaling and thus operational problems reducing the treatment efficiency. However, struvite has significant commercial value as an agricultural fertilizer. Therefore, controlled struvite formation in wastewater treatment plants not only presents an opportunity to recover nutrients but also corresponds to the valorization of wastes. NH(4)-N and PO(4)-P removal and recovery from the effluent of a full-scale sewage sludge anaerobic digester via controlled struvite precipitation were investigated in this study. The effect of the residual heavy metal and micropollutant content of the formed struvite on fertilizer quality was also evaluated. Removal efficiencies of NH(4)-N, PO(4)-P and COD were 89.35%, 95% and 39.78% when Mg:N:P molar ratio was 1.5:1:1 and pH was 9.0. Mercury, nickel, zinc and chrome concentrations derived from struvite precipitation were below the regulatory limit for fertilizer usage in Turkey. The precipitate did not contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis conducted on the precipitate indicated a struvite formation. PMID:20605682

  20. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  1. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  2. Effect of humic substances aggregation on the determination of fluoride in water using an ion selective electrode.

    PubMed

    Shen, Junjie; Gagliardi, Simona; McCoustra, Martin R S; Arrighi, Valeria

    2016-09-01

    The control of drinking water quality is critical in preventing fluorosis. In this study humic substances (HS) are considered as representative of natural organic matter (NOM) in water. We show that when HS aggregate the response of fluoride ion selective electrodes (ISE) may be perturbed. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results of both synthetic solutions and natural water sample suggest that low pH and high ionic strength induce HS aggregation. In the presence of HS aggregates, fluoride concentration measured by ISE has a reduction up to 19%. A new "open cage" concept has been developed to explain this reversible phenomenon. The interference of HS aggregation on fluoride measurement can be effectively removed by centrifugation pretreatment. PMID:27276164

  3. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand < 1 g/l) and psychrophilic temperatures (10°C). For the treatment of organic suspensions, there is currently a tendency to evolve from the conventional mesophilic

  4. Aggregate Size and Architecture Determine Microbial Activity Balance for One-Stage Partial Nitritation and Anammox ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck, Siegfried E.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Bolca, Selin; Demeestere, Lien; Mast, Jan; Boon, Nico; Carballa, Marta; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) cooperate in partial nitritation/anammox systems to remove ammonium from wastewater. In this process, large granular microbial aggregates enhance the performance, but little is known about granulation so far. In this study, three suspended-growth oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification (OLAND) reactors with different inoculation and operation (mixing and aeration) conditions, designated reactors A, B, and C, were used. The test objectives were (i) to quantify the AerAOB and AnAOB abundance and the activity balance for the different aggregate sizes and (ii) to relate aggregate morphology, size distribution, and architecture putatively to the inoculation and operation of the three reactors. A nitrite accumulation rate ratio (NARR) was defined as the net aerobic nitrite production rate divided by the anoxic nitrite consumption rate. The smallest reactor A, B, and C aggregates were nitrite sources (NARR, >1.7). Large reactor A and C aggregates were granules capable of autonomous nitrogen removal (NARR, 0.6 to 1.1) with internal AnAOB zones surrounded by an AerAOB rim. Around 50% of the autotrophic space in these granules consisted of AerAOB- and AnAOB-specific extracellular polymeric substances. Large reactor B aggregates were thin film-like nitrite sinks (NARR, <0.5) in which AnAOB were not shielded by an AerAOB layer. Voids and channels occupied 13 to 17% of the anoxic zone of AnAOB-rich aggregates (reactors B and C). The hypothesized granulation pathways include granule replication by division and budding and are driven by growth and/or decay based on species-specific physiology and by hydrodynamic shear and mixing. PMID:19948857

  5. Cell growth in aggregates determines gene expression, proliferation, survival, chemoresistance, and sensitivity to immune effectors in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gravelle, Pauline; Jean, Christine; Familiades, Julien; Decaup, Emilie; Blanc, Amandine; Bezombes-Cagnac, Christine; Laurent, Camille; Savina, Ariel; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Laurent, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas grow as dense aggregates in patients, but whether this spatial organization affects lymphoma cell biology is unknown. We grew follicular lymphoma (FL) cells in vitro as multicellular aggregates of lymphoma cells to investigate this question. Gene expression analysis revealed that 612 genes were differentially expressed when cells grew in multicellular aggregates of lymphoma cells rather than in suspension. These genes correspond to several GO biological processes, such as hypoxia, activation of NF-κB pathway, and negative regulation of cell cycle, a gene signature also found in the transcriptomes from FL biopsies. Pimonidazole staining, HIF-1A accumulation, and VEGFA release confirmed that cells in multicellular aggregates of lymphoma cells actually respond to hypoxia. In adaptation to such conditions, they also displayed an activated NF-κB pathway and a quiescent status far more frequently than in suspension. When cultured in three dimensions, FL cells display resistance to doxorubicin and bendamustine, two drugs largely used in FL therapy, compared to FL cultured in suspension. Finally, multicellular aggregates of lymphoma cells were also found to be less sensitive to purified natural killer cells. To conclude, our study shows that in FL, spatial organization results in dramatic changes in FL biology, including gene expression, proliferation, drug resistance, and immune escape. PMID:24231431

  6. Composition and aggregation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in hyperhaline and municipal wastewater treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jie; Gao, Jun-Min; Chen, You-Peng; Yan, Peng; Dong, Yang; Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Zeng, Ni; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    As important constituents of activated sludge flocs, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play significant roles in pollutants adsorption, the formation and maintenance of microbial aggregates, and the protection of microbes from external environmental stresses. In this work, EPS in activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (M-WWTP) with anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2/O) process and a hyperhaline wastewater treatment plant (H-WWTP) with anaerobic/oxic (A/O) process were extracted by ultrasound method. The proteins and polysaccharides contents in EPS were determined by using a modified Lowry method and anthrone colorimetry respectively to analyze the detail differences in two types of WWTPs. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated proteins and polysaccharides were the dominant components of the two types of EPS, and the aromatic protein-like substances accounted for a larger proportion in EPS proteins. The results of the aggregation test indicated that EPS were good for the sludge aggregation, and the EPS in oxic sludge were more beneficial to sludge aggregation than that in anoxic sludge. Anoxic sludge EPS in H-WWTP showed a negligible effect on sludge aggregation. Comparative study on EPS of different tanks in the M-WWTP and H-WWTP was valuable for understanding the characteristics of EPS isolated from two typical wastewater treatment processes. PMID:27220287

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  8. Aggregation kinetic dataset to determine the stability of the purified and refolded recombinant ppTvCP4 protein of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa E; Ortega-López, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2016-09-01

    The recombinant ppTvCP4 (ppTvCP4r) protein, a specific inhibitor of the proteolytic activity and virulence properties of Trichomonas vaginalis, depending on cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinases (CPs) (http:dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.biocel.2014.12.001[1], http:dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.micinf.2013.09.002[2], http:dx.doi.org/ 10.1155/2015/946787[3]) was stable in the elution buffer up to two months at 4 °C. However, it was prone to aggregate in PBS (functional assay buffer) [1]. Therefore, before functional assays, the aggregation kinetic of refolded ppTvCP4r was determined after the exchange to PBS. Samples of purified and refolded ppTvCP4r (0.15 mg/ml) in PBS were incubated for 0-24 h at 4 and 25 °C, spun down, measured the protein concentration in the supernatant and checked for the presence of aggregated protein in the pellet. The concentration of protein progressively decreased in the supernatant through time at both temperatures as the protein aggregated. Data in this article are related to the research paper [1]. PMID:27331109

  9. The SAWO (Small And Well Organized) avatar teaches the importance of the aggregates on the soil system and how to determine their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Cerdà, Artemi; Jordán, Antonio; Úbeda, Xavier; Pereira, Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure is the key factor that determine the soil quality as control the organic matter turnnover, soil biology and soil erodibility (Cerdà, 1996; 1998; Wick et al., 2014; Gelaw, 2015). There is a need to understand better the factors and the processes that act on the soil aggregation and the dynamics of the soil aggregation, which will make easier to understand the soil system functioning (Jordán et al., 2011; Jordán et al., 2012; Pulido Moncada et al., 2013). Fire, mines, grazing and agricultura (Cerdà, 2000; Mataix Solera et al., 2011; Cerdà et al., 2012; Hallett et al., 2014; Lozano et al., 2013) determines how the soil structure is highly affected by the humankind. And this determines the sustainability of the land managements (García Orenes et al., 2012; K¨ropfl et al., 2013; Mekuria and Aynekulu, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). Aggregates are Small And Well Organized (SAWO) structures that allow the water to flow, the air fill the porous and the life to be diverse and abundant in the soil. The SAWO avatar will teach the importance of the functions and the services of the aggregates to students and other scientists, but also to any audience. This means that the experiments and the vocabulary to be used by SAWO will be very wide and rich. The Avatar SAWO will use different strategies and skills to teach the soil aggregation properties and characteristics. And also, how to measure. Easy to carry out experiments will be shown by SAWO to measure the aggregate stability in the field and in the laboratory, and the soil sampling in the field. The SAWO avatar will play a special attention to the impact of forest fires on aggregate stability changes and how to measure. The SAWO avatar will teach how to take samples in the field, how to transport and manage in the laboratory, and finally which measurements and test can be done to determine the aggregate stability. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of

  10. STakeholder-Objective Risk Model (STORM): Determining the aggregated risk of multiple contaminant hazards in groundwater well catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Binning, P. J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-09-01

    Risk is often defined as the product of probability, vulnerability and value. Drinking water supply from groundwater abstraction is often at risk due to multiple hazardous land use activities in the well catchment. Each hazard might or might not introduce contaminants into the subsurface at any point in time, which then affects the pumped quality upon transport through the aquifer. In such situations, estimating the overall risk is not trivial, and three key questions emerge: (1) How to aggregate the impacts from different contaminants and spill locations to an overall, cumulative impact on the value at risk? (2) How to properly account for the stochastic nature of spill events when converting the aggregated impact to a risk estimate? (3) How will the overall risk and subsequent decision making depend on stakeholder objectives, where stakeholder objectives refer to the values at risk, risk attitudes and risk metrics that can vary between stakeholders. In this study, we provide a STakeholder-Objective Risk Model (STORM) for assessing the total aggregated risk. Or concept is a quantitative, probabilistic and modular framework for simulation-based risk estimation. It rests on the source-pathway-receptor concept, mass-discharge-based aggregation of stochastically occuring spill events, accounts for uncertainties in the involved flow and transport models through Monte Carlo simulation, and can address different stakeholder objectives. We illustrate the application of STORM in a numerical test case inspired by a German drinking water catchment. As one may expect, the results depend strongly on the chosen stakeholder objectives, but they are equally sensitive to different approaches for risk aggregation across different hazards, contaminant types, and over time.

  11. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  12. The SAWO (Small And Well Organized) avatar teaches the importance of the aggregates on the soil system and how to determine their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Cerdà, Artemi; Jordán, Antonio; Úbeda, Xavier; Pereira, Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure is the key factor that determine the soil quality as control the organic matter turnnover, soil biology and soil erodibility (Cerdà, 1996; 1998; Wick et al., 2014; Gelaw, 2015). There is a need to understand better the factors and the processes that act on the soil aggregation and the dynamics of the soil aggregation, which will make easier to understand the soil system functioning (Jordán et al., 2011; Jordán et al., 2012; Pulido Moncada et al., 2013). Fire, mines, grazing and agricultura (Cerdà, 2000; Mataix Solera et al., 2011; Cerdà et al., 2012; Hallett et al., 2014; Lozano et al., 2013) determines how the soil structure is highly affected by the humankind. And this determines the sustainability of the land managements (García Orenes et al., 2012; K¨ropfl et al., 2013; Mekuria and Aynekulu, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). Aggregates are Small And Well Organized (SAWO) structures that allow the water to flow, the air fill the porous and the life to be diverse and abundant in the soil. The SAWO avatar will teach the importance of the functions and the services of the aggregates to students and other scientists, but also to any audience. This means that the experiments and the vocabulary to be used by SAWO will be very wide and rich. The Avatar SAWO will use different strategies and skills to teach the soil aggregation properties and characteristics. And also, how to measure. Easy to carry out experiments will be shown by SAWO to measure the aggregate stability in the field and in the laboratory, and the soil sampling in the field. The SAWO avatar will play a special attention to the impact of forest fires on aggregate stability changes and how to measure. The SAWO avatar will teach how to take samples in the field, how to transport and manage in the laboratory, and finally which measurements and test can be done to determine the aggregate stability. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of

  13. Prediction of Protein Aggregation in High Concentration Protein Solutions Utilizing Protein-Protein Interactions Determined by Low Volume Static Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2016-06-01

    The development of highly concentrated protein formulations is more demanding than for conventional concentrations due to an elevated protein aggregation tendency. Predictive protein-protein interaction parameters, such as the second virial coefficient B22 or the interaction parameter kD, have already been used to predict aggregation tendency and optimize protein formulations. However, these parameters can only be determined in diluted solutions, up to 20 mg/mL. And their validity at high concentrations is currently controversially discussed. This work presents a μ-scale screening approach which has been adapted to early industrial project needs. The procedure is based on static light scattering to directly determine protein-protein interactions at concentrations up to 100 mg/mL. Three different therapeutic molecules were formulated, varying in pH, salt content, and addition of excipients (e.g., sugars, amino acids, polysorbates, or other macromolecules). Validity of the predicted aggregation tendency was confirmed by stability data of selected formulations. Based on the results obtained, the new prediction method is a promising screening tool for fast and easy formulation development of highly concentrated protein solutions, consuming only microliter of sample volumes. PMID:27157445

  14. Molecular microbial diversity of an anaerobic digestor as determined by small-subunit rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Godon, J J; Zumstein, E; Dabert, P; Habouzit, F; Moletta, R

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of a fluidized-bed reactor fed by vinasses (wine distillation waste) was analyzed. After PCR amplification, four small-subunit (SSU) rDNA clone libraries of Bacteria, Archaea, Procarya, and Eucarya populations were established. The community structure was determined by operational taxonomic unit (OTU) phylogenetic analyses of 579 partial rDNA sequences (about 500 bp long). A total of 146 OTUs were found, comprising 133, 6, and 7 from the Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya domains, respectively. A total of 117 bacterial OTU were affiliated with major phyla: low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides, Proteobacteria, high-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and Spirochaetes, where the clone distribution was 34, 26, 17, 6, and 4%, respectively. The other 16 bacterial OTUs represent 13% of the clones. They were either affiliated with narrow phyla such as Planctomyces-Chlamydia, green nonsulfur bacteria, or Synergistes, or deeply branched on the phylogenetic tree. A large number of bacterial OTUs are not closely related to any other hitherto determined sequences. The most frequent bacterial OTUs represents less than 5% of the total bacterial SSU rDNA sequences. However, the 20 more frequent bacterial OTUs describe at least 50% of these sequences. Three of the six Archaea OTUs correspond to 95% of the Archaea population and are very similar to already known methanogenic species: Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina frisius, and Methanobacterium formicicum. In contrast, the three other Archaea OTUs are unusual and are related to thermophilic microorganisms such as Crenarchaea or Thermoplasma spp. Five percent of the sequences analyzed were chimeras and were removed from the analysis. PMID:9212428

  15. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  17. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Determination of aqueous fullerene aggregates in water by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple and solvent-minimized method for the determination of three aqueous fullerene aggregates (nC₆₀, nC₇₀, and aqueous [6,6]-phenyl C₆₁ butyric acid methyl ester (nPCBM)) in water samples is described. The method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure photoionization (LC-APPI-MS/MS). The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the analytes from water samples were systematically investigated and the conditions optimized. The best extraction conditions involved the rapid injection of a mixture of 1.0 mL of 2-propanol (as a disperser solvent) and 10 μL of benzyl bromide (as an extraction solvent) into 10 mL of an aqueous solution (pH 10.0) containing 1% sodium chloride in a conical bottom glass tube. After ultrasonication for 1.0 min and centrifugation at 5000 pm (10 min), the sedimented phase 5.0 μL was directly injected into the LC-APPI-MS/MS system. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 150, 60 and 8 ng L⁻¹ for nPCBM, nC₆₀ and nC₇₀, respectively. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), were less than 12% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 70 and 86%. A standard addition method was used to quantitate three aqueous fullerene aggregates, and the concentrations of these aqueous fullerene aggregates were determined to be in the range from n.d. to 130 ng L⁻¹ in various environmental samples including municipal influent and effluent samples, industrial wastewater samples, and surface water samples. PMID:22209304

  19. Perception of Lay People Regarding Determinants of Health and Factors Affecting It: An Aggregated Analysis from 29 Countries

    PubMed Central

    ZAHRA, Aqeela; LEE, Eun-Whan; SUN, Li-Yuan; PARK, Jae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the perception of lay people regarding determinants of health at global level and factors affecting it. Methods: Data was collected from International Social Survey Program (ISSP) and World Bank website. Multilevel regression analysis was done and lay people’s perception regarding health behavior, environment, poverty and genes as health determinants was assessed. Various socio demographic factors were used as independent variables. Results: The highest percentage of people agreed environment as determinant of health. An inverse relationship was observed between GNI quartiles and an individual’s agreement with poverty, health behavior, and environment as health determinant. There was a significant negative association of females with health damaging behavior (P<0.05) and positive association with environment and genes (P<0.05) as health determinants. Elderly people agreed with poverty as determinant of health (P<0.05). GNI was negatively related to environment (P<0.05) and poverty (P<0.05) as health determinant. Conclusion: The common public is now becoming aware of a broadened concept of health and people belonging to different backgrounds have different perceptions regarding determinants of health. Our results show that highest percentage of people agreed with environment as determinant of health, which is consistent with scientific view of increased burden of disease, caused by environmental factors. Thus, tailored health programs and policies that address an individual’s specific problems are likely to induce a change in behavior and attitude, hence decreasing the disease burden. PMID:26811813

  20. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  1. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  2. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  3. Determination of the Apical Sealing Abilities of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Portland Cement, and Bioaggregate After Irrigation with Different Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, H Melike; Saklar, Feridun; Bayram, Emre; Orucoglu, Hasan; Bozkurt, Alperen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the sealing ability of root-end filling materials such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement, and bioaggregate (BA) after irrigation with different solutions. Materials and Methods: We examined 130 human maxillar central teeth. After cutting the teeth at the cementoenamel junction, the root canals were expanded using nickel-titanium rotary instruments. Root canals were filled with AH-plus and gutta-percha. Then, the roots were cut apically, and 3 mm deep retrograde cavities were prepared. The roots were divided 12 experimental groups, consisting 10 teeth each; the positive and negative control groups contained five teeth each. The retrograde cavities were rinsed using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), chlorhexidine (CHX), BioPure™ mixture of a tetracycline isomer, an acid, and a detergent (MTAD), or distilled water. Next, groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were sealed with MTA; groups 5, 6, 7, and 8 were sealed with Portland cement; and groups 9, 10, 11, and 12 were sealed with BA. Then, apical microleakage was evaluated by using a computerized fluid filtration method. The results of the leakage test were statistically evaluated by the post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results: MTA, Portland cement, and BA root-end filling materials showed the least leakage in the CHX and distilled water groups. The highest leakage was observed in the EDTA and MTAD groups. Conclusions: The sealing ability of BA was as good as that of MTA. EDTA and MTAD increased the apical leakage and CHX and distilled water decreased the leakage of the root-end filling materials examined in this study. PMID:26124593

  4. Anaerobic specimen transport device.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, T D; Jimenez-Ulate, F

    1975-01-01

    A device is described and evaluated for the anaerobic transport of clinical specimens. The device limits the amount of oxygen entering with the sample to a maximum of 2%, which is rapidly removed by reacting with hydrogen in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The viability on swabs of 12 species of anaerobes, four strains of facultative anaerobes and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was maintained during the length of the tests (24 or 48 h). The results demonstrated that this device protected even the more oxygen-sensitive clinical anaerobes from death due to oxygen exposure. This device can be used for swabs as well as for anaerobic collection and liquid and solid specimens. Images PMID:1104656

  5. Determination of methanogenic pathways through carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis for the two-stage anaerobic digestion of high-solids substrates.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tito; Klang, Johanna; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Klocke, Michael; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    This study used carbon isotope (δ(13)C)-based calculations to quantify the specific methanogenic pathways in a two-stage experimental biogas plant composed of three thermophilic leach bed reactors (51-56 °C) followed by a mesophilic (36.5 °C) anaerobic filter. Despite the continuous dominance of the acetoclastic Methanosaeta in the anaerobic filter, the methane (CH4) fraction derived from carbon dioxide reduction (CO2), fmc, varied significantly over the investigation period of 200 days. At organic loading rates (OLRs) below 6.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the average fmc value was 33%, whereas at higher OLRs, with a maximum level of 17.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the fmc values reached 47%. The experiments allowed for a clear differentiation of the isotope fractionation related to the formation and consumption of acetate in both stages of the plant. Our data indicate constant carbon isotope fractionation for acetate formation at different OLRs within the thermophilic leach bed reactors as well as a negligible contribution of homoacetogenesis. These results present the first quantification of methanogenic pathway (fmc values) dynamics for a continually operated mesophilic bioreactor and highlight the enormous potential of δ(13)C analysis for a more comprehensive understanding of the anaerobic degradation processes in CH4-producing biogas plants. PMID:25741999

  6. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  8. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  10. Aggregation of metallochlorophylls - Examination by spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, L. J.; Katz, J. J.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements determine which metallochlorophylls, besides magnesium-containing chlorophylls, possess coordination aggregation properties. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that only zinc pheophytin and zinc methyl pheophorbide showed significant coordination aggregation, whereas divalent nickel and copper did not.

  11. Distinct Spacing Between Anionic Groups: An Essential Chemical Determinant for Achieving Thiophene-Based Ligands to Distinguish β-Amyloid or Tau Polymorphic Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Klingstedt, Therése; Shirani, Hamid; Mahler, Jasmin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Nyström, Sofie; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of protein aggregates is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases and the existence of distinct aggregated morphotypes has been suggested to explain the heterogeneous phenotype reported for these diseases. Thus, the development of molecular probes able to distinguish such morphotypes is essential. We report an anionic tetrameric oligothiophene compound that can be utilized for spectral assignment of different morphotypes of β-amyloid or tau aggregates present in transgenic mice at distinct ages. The ability of the ligand to spectrally distinguish between the aggregated morphotypes was reduced when the spacing between the anionic substituents along the conjugated thiophene backbone was altered, which verified that specific molecular interactions between the ligand and the protein aggregate are necessary to detect aggregate polymorphism. Our findings provide the structural and functional basis for the development of new fluorescent ligands that can distinguish between different morphotypes of protein aggregates. PMID:26013403

  12. Analyzing Data in a Repeated Measures Design: A Procedure Used To Determine If the Aggregate Data Should Be Analyzed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraas, John W.; And Others

    Researchers frequently deal with data that are cyclical in nature. This paper presents a methodological procedure that can be used to determine if a roller-coaster effect exists in repeated measures data. The procedure incorporates three key components. First, the researcher may find it necessary to analyze each participant's data set separately…

  13. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  14. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  15. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  16. Methylene transfer or carbometalation? A theoretical study to determine the mechanism of lithium carbenoid-promoted cyclopropanation reactions in aggregation and solvation States.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhuofeng; Zhao, Cunyuan; Phillips, David Lee

    2007-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations for the lithium carbenoid-promoted cyclopropanations in aggregation and solvation states are presented in order to investigate the controversy of the mechanistic dichotomy, that is, the methylene-transfer mechanism and the carbometalation mechanism. The methylene-transfer mechanism represents the reaction reality, whereas the carbometalation pathway does not appear to compete significantly with the methylene-transfer pathway and should be ruled out as a major factor. A simple model calculation for monomeric lithium carbenoid-promoted cyclopropanations with ethylene in the gas phase is not sufficient to reflect the reaction conditions accurately or to determine the reaction mechanism since its result is inconsistent with the experimental facts. The aggregated lithium carbenoids are the most probable reactive species in the reaction system. The calculated reaction barriers of the methylene-transfer pathways are 10.1 and 8.0 kcal/mol for the dimeric (LiCH2F)2 and tetrameric (LiCH2F)4 species, respectively, compared with the reaction barrier of 16.0 kcal/mol for the monomeric LiCH2F species. In contrast, the reaction barriers of the carbometalation pathways are 26.8 kcal/mol for the dimeric (LiCH2F)2 and 33.9 kcal/mol for the tetrameric (LiCH2F)4 species, compared with the reaction barrier of 12.5 kcal/mol for the monomeric LiCH2F species. The effects of solvation were investigated by explicit coordination of the solvent molecules to the lithium centers. This solvation effect is found to enhance the methylene-transfer pathway, while it is found to impede the carbometalation pathway instead. The combined effects of the aggregation and solvation lead to barriers to reaction in the range of 7.2-9.0 kcal/mol for lithium carbenoid-promoted cyclopropanation reactions along the methylene-transfer pathway. Our computational results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:17253804

  17. The self-assemble of natural cyclodextrins in aqueous solutions: Application of miniature permeation studies for critical aggregation concentration (cac) determinations.

    PubMed

    Saokham, Phennapha; Sá Couto, André; Ryzhakov, Alexey; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-05-30

    Permeation techniques can be applied to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of natural cyclodextrins (CDs) in aqueous solutions although the method is both laborious and time consuming. In the present study, the permeation technique was modified and the influence of osmotic pressure, sampling time, CD concentration and molecular weight-cut off (MWCO) of the membrane were investigated in two different permeation units, that is Franz diffusion cells and Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis. While both the osmotic pressure and CD concentration affect the steady state flux in both permeation units, effects of sampling time and the MWCO of the mounted membrane were only observed in the Franz diffusion cells. The osmotic effect was negligible in the Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis units. The modified permeation technique using Slide-A-Lyzer™ MINI Dialysis units was then used to determine the cac of natural CDs in water. The cac of αCD, βCD and γCD was 1.19±0.17, 0.69±0.05 and 0.93±0.04% (w/v), respectively. The results indicated that the cac values depended on their intrinsic solubility. Moreover, the cac value of γCD in aqueous hydrocortisone/γCD inclusion complex solution was identical to the γCD cac value determined in pure water. PMID:27021466

  18. Applicability of the DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) aggregate degradation test to determine moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixes. Final report, June 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heinicke, J.J.; Vinson, T.S.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-06-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the dimethyl sulfoxide accelerated weathering test (DMSO test) to predict moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. Asphalt-concrete specimens were fabricated using aggregates from three quarries. The specimens were conditioned using vacuum saturation and a series of five freeze/thaw cycles. The resilient modulus (M{sub r}) was obtained before and after each conditioning cycle and the Index of Retained Resilient Modulus (IRM{sub r}) was determined. The results indicate the DMSO test may be used to identify the potential for moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. However, no correlation was determined between the DMSO test results and the IRM{sub r} or fatigue life test results. The strain and temperature dependencies of the M{sub r} were determined for a dense-graded asphalt-concrete mixture. It was concluded that constant stress testing may result in a misinterpretation of the IRM{sub r} and tests conducted within the currently accepted temperature range may result in a plus or minus 20% deviation in the IRM{sub r}. In an accompanying analytical program, the effect of diametral test boundary conditions on the measured value of M{sub r} was evaluated using two- and three-dimensional finite element models. The results indicate that the resilient modulus diametral test is adequately represented by elastic theory and an assumed plane stress condition.

  19. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  20. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  1. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab M; Panchal, Jainik P; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Blum, Janice S; Joubert, Marisa K; Narhi, Linda O; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins have a propensity for aggregation during manufacturing, shipping, and storage. The presence of aggregates in protein drug products can induce adverse immune responses in patients that may affect safety and efficacy, and so it is of concern to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies. In this vein, there is a lack of understanding of the physicochemical determinants of immunological responses and a lack of standardized analytical methods to survey the molecular properties of aggregates associated with immune activation. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic immune mechanisms in the context of interactions with protein aggregates. We then critically examine the literature with emphasis on the underlying immune mechanisms as they relate to aggregate properties. Finally, we highlight the gaps in our current understanding of this issue and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:26869409

  2. Modified ionic liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with spectrofluorimetry for trace determination of ofloxacin in pharmaceutical and biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeeb, M.; Ganjali, M.R.; Norouzi, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Ofloxacin is a quinolone synthetic antibiotic, which acts against resistant mutants of bacteria by inhibiting DNA gyrase. This antibacterial agent is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract, urinary tract and tissue-based infections, which are caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, an efficient modified ionic liquid cold-induced aggregation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (M-IL-CIA-DLLME) was combined with spectrofluorimetry for trace determination of ofloxacin in real samples. Methods In this microextraction method, hydrophobic 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim] [PF6]) ionic liquid (IL) as a microextraction solvent was dispersed into a heated sample solution containing sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF6) (as a common ion) and the analyte of interest. Afterwards, the resultant solution was cooled in an ice-water bath and a cloudy condition was formed due to a considerable decrease of IL solubility. After centrifuging, the enriched phase was introduced to the spectrofluorimeter for the determination of ofloxacin. Results and major conclusion In this technique, the performance of the microextraction method was not influenced by variations in the ionic strength of the sample solution (up to 30% w/v). Furthermore, [Hmim][PF6] IL was chosen as a green microextraction phase and an alternative to traditional toxic organic solvents. Different parameters affecting the analytical performance were studied and optimized. At optimum conditions, a relatively broad linear dynamic range of 0.15-125 µg l-1 and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.029 µg l-1 were obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) obtained for the determination of five replicates of the 10 ml solution containing 50 µg l-1 ofloxacin was 2.7%. Finally, the combined methodology was successfully applied to ofloxacin determination in actual pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. PMID

  3. Bactericidal activity of DU-6859a compared to activities of three quinolones, three beta-lactams, clindamycin, and metronidazole against anaerobes as determined by time-kill methodology.

    PubMed

    Spangler, S K; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1997-04-01

    The activities of DU-6859a, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 11 anaerobes were tested by the broth microdilution and time-kill methods. DU-6859a was the most active drug tested (broth microdilution MICs, 0.06 to 0.5 microg/ml), followed by imipenem (MICs, 0.002 to 4.0 microg/ml). Broth macrodilution MICs were within 3 (but usually 1) dilutions of the broth microdilution MICs. All compounds were bactericidal at the MIC after 48 h; after 24 h, 90% killing was shown for all strains when the compounds were used at four times the MIC. DU-6859a at < or = 0.5 microg/ml was bactericidal after 48 h. PMID:9087503

  4. Hydration and diffusion dynamics shape microbial community composition and function in soil aggregates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in soil hydration conditions (rainfall, evaporation, root water uptake) affect gas and nutrient diffusion and soil microbial community composition and function. The conditions in soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into the core often containing organic carbon (as aggregation agent). The constantly varying soil hydration conditions affect the spatial extent of anoxic conditions in aggregates and thus the sized and self-organization of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. We developed an artificial soil aggregate composed of 3-D angular pore network combined with individual based models of motile microbial cells that grow, move, intercept nutrients and are inhibited by presence or absence of oxygen. The hydration conditions in the model aggregate affect community size, spatial segregation, and growth rates. The opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon were essential to maintenance of aerobic and anaerobic communities within an aggregate (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). Cohabited soil aggregates promoted onset of anaerobic conditions by oxygen consumption by peripheral aerobes. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with experimental data. Results illustrate how aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities are activated by certain hydration conditions that enhance either nitrogen losses or decomposition of organic matter both contributing to GHG emissions.

  5. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    PubMed Central

    Maud, P J; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gross work completed and relative to body weight. However, these differences are reduced when data is adjusted for body weight and further reduced when corrected for FFM. The study found no significant differences between men and women in either anaerobic power or anaerobic capacity when values were given relative to FFM. PMID:3730753

  6. Field response of Colorado potato beetle to the (R)-enantiomer of the male-produced aggregation pheromone CPB I and determination of activity of blends of the (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of the pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult Colorado potato beetles (CPB) are attracted to (S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-oxo-oct-6-ene-1,3-diol [(S)-CPB I], a male-produced aggregation pheromone. Studies were conducted to determine if the opposite enantiomer of the pheromone, (R)-CPB I had an effect on CPB in the field. Results revealed no differe...

  7. Oligomeric baroeffect and gas aggregation states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The baroeffect is analyzed to include a gas that aggregates into higher-order polymers or oligomers. The resulting pressure change is found to vary independently of the molecular weight of the gas components and to depend only on the aggregation or oligomeric order of the gas. With increasing aggregation, diffusive slip velocities are found to increase. The calculations are extended to include general counterdiffusion of two distinct aggregation states (k-, j-mer) for the gas, and the pressure change is derived as a function that is independent of both molecular weight and the absolute aggregation. The only parameter that determines the baroeffect is the ratio of aggregated states, beta = k/j. For gases that reversibly aggregate, possible oscillatory behavior and complex dynamics for pressure are discussed. Gas aggregation may play a role for low-temperature crystal-growth conditions in which vapor concentrations of one (or more) species are high.

  8. THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PHENOLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a series of anaerobic microbial acclimation and treatment performance tests with synthetic phenolic substrates. The research is a feasibility level assessment of substituting anaerobic biodegradation of phenolics for solvent extraction. The tests showe...

  9. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  10. Protein Aggregation/Folding: The Role of Deterministic Singularities of Sequence Hydrophobicity as Determined by Nonlinear Signal Analysis of Acylphosphatase and Aβ(1–40)

    PubMed Central

    Zbilut, Joseph P.; Colosimo, Alfredo; Conti, Filippo; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Manetti, Cesare; Valerio, MariaCristina; Webber, Charles L.; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    The problem of protein folding vs. aggregation was investigated in acylphosphatase and the amyloid protein Aβ(1–40) by means of nonlinear signal analysis of their chain hydrophobicity. Numerical descriptors of recurrence patterns provided the basis for statistical evaluation of folding/aggregation distinctive features. Static and dynamic approaches were used to elucidate conditions coincident with folding vs. aggregation using comparisons with known protein secondary structure classifications, site-directed mutagenesis studies of acylphosphatase, and molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid protein, Aβ(1–40). The results suggest that a feature derived from principal component space characterized by the smoothness of singular, deterministic hydrophobicity patches plays a significant role in the conditions governing protein aggregation. PMID:14645049

  11. Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Ding, Wenchuan; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of anaerobic digestion on biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse. Sugarcane bagasse was anaerobically digested to produce methane. The digested residue and fresh bagasse was pyrolyzed separately into biochar at 600 degrees C in nitrogen environment. The digested bagasse biochar (DBC) and undigested bagasse biochar (BC) were characterized to determine their physicochemical properties. Although biochar was produced from the digested residue (18% by weight) and the raw bagasse (23%) at a similar rate, there were many physiochemical differences between them. Compared to BC, DBC had higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), anion exchange capacity (AEC), hydrophobicity and more negative surface charge, all properties that are generally desirable for soil amelioration, contaminant remediation or wastewater treatment. Thus, these results suggest that the pyrolysis of anaerobic digestion residues to produce biochar may be an economically and environmentally beneficial use of agricultural wastes. PMID:20634061

  12. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  13. Spatial and seasonal factors are key determinants in the aggregation of helminths in their definitive hosts: Pseudamphistomum truncatum in otters (Lutra lutra).

    PubMed

    Sherrard-Smith, E; Perkins, S E; Chadwick, E A; Cable, J

    2015-01-01

    Parasites are typically aggregated within their host populations. The most heavily infected hosts are frequently cited as targets for optimal disease control. Yet a heavily infected individual is not necessarily highly infective and does not automatically contribute a higher proportion of infective parasitic stages than a host with fewer parasites. Here, Pseudamphistomum truncatum (Opisthorchiida) parasitic infection within the definitive otter host (Lutra lutra) is used as a model system. The hypothesis tested is that variation in parasite abundance, aggregation and egg production (fecundity, as a proxy of host infectivity) can be explained by abiotic (season and region) or biotic (host age, sex and body condition) factors. Parasite abundance was affected most strongly by the biotic factors of age and body condition, such that adults and otters with a higher condition index had heavier infections than sub-adults or those with a lower condition index, whilst there were no significant differences in parasite abundance among the seasons, regions (ecological regions defined by river catchment boundaries) or host sexes. Conversely, parasite aggregation was affected most strongly by the abiotic factors of season and region, which were supported by four different measures of parasite aggregation (the corrected moment estimate k, Taylor's Power Law, the Index of Discrepancy D, and Boulinier's J). Pseudamphistomum truncatum was highly aggregated within otters, with aggregation stronger in the Midlands (England) and Wales than in the southwestern region of the United Kingdom. Overall, more parasites were found in fewer hosts during the summer, which coincides with the summer peak in parasite fecundity. Combined, these data suggest that (i) few otters carry the majority of P. truncatum parasites and that there are more infective stages (eggs) produced during summer; and (ii) abiotic factors are most influential when describing parasite aggregation whilst biotic factors have

  14. Anaerobic acidogenesis of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Krones, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if high rate acidogenic fermentation of dairy manure was possible, Whole dairy manure was ground and diluted to 4% total solids and fed to a 10 L anaerobic chemostat operating at 35C and with hydraulic retention times varying between 6 and 50 hours. Several physical and organic parameters of the influent and effluent were measured and compared. The results indicated that the manure was too refractory for high rate liquefaction and hydrolysis. A second experiment was conducted using the same techniques and substrate but varying the substrate pH between 5 and 7. The objectives were to further investigate the pH sensitivity of the acidogenic process and to determine if, by introducing a substrate with a low pH, acidogenesis might proceed more efficiently. The primary result of decreasing the pH was a smaller proportion of methane and an increased proportion of hydrogen in the gas. Liquefaction and hydrolysis continued to be rate limiting and appeared to be a major impediment to two phase anaerobic treatment of dairy manure.

  15. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  16. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  17. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  18. Effects of Sulfidation on ZnO Nanoparticle Dissolution and Aggregation in Sulfate-Containing Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-09-01

    Industrial metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have recently attracted considerable attention because of their potentially hazardous impacts on ecosystems and microbial colonies in biological wastewater treatment plants. NPs dissolution and aggregation greatly determine the fate of such NPs in the environment and are relevant to their potential toxicities. Hence, we investigated the effects of sulfate on the dissolution and aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs). In addition, ZnO-NPs were sulfidized at different sulfide concentrations in an anaerobic abiotic environment to investigate the effects of sulfidation on ZnO-NPs aggregation and solubility. Increasing the sulfate concentration from 0 to 200 mg/L significantly increased ZnO-NPs dissolution from 3.99 to 6.18 mg Zn(2+)/L, whereas ZnO-NPs sulfidation reduced the Zn(2+) dissolution rate from 1.82 mg Zn(2+)/L for pristine ZnO-NPs to 0.59 mg Zn2+/L for sulfidized ones. Increasing the sulfate concentration and the sulfidation of the ZnO-NPs induced aggregation by suppressing electrostatic repulsion. The results indicate that the sulfidation of ZnO-NPs prevents the particle dissolution and is an attractive method of reducing their antimicrobial activity. PMID:26716331

  19. Experimental determination of electrical conductivity during deformation of melt-bearing olivine aggregates: Implications for electrical anisotropy in the oceanic low velocity zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Luca; Gaillard, Fabrice; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Le Trong, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    A novel experimental setup was used to measure in-situ variations of electrical conductivity (EC) during deformation in torsion (simple shear) at 300 MPa confining pressure and temperatures between 873 and 1473 K. This setup is designed to test if deformation of partially molten systems can produce electrical anisotropy. The motivation for this study comes from the observation that the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) at mid-ocean ridges and in particular at the East Pacific Rise is strongly electrically anisotropic. In an initial set of calibration experiments, the variation of EC with temperature (873-1473 K) was determined for Carrara marble, Åheim dunite and basalt-bearing olivine aggregates. EC was then monitored during deformation experiments at 1473 K and measured in the frequency range between 6 MHz and 1 Hz. The electrical response of the different materials tested as a function of frequency, changes significantly depending on the presence, absence, proportion and distribution of melt contained in the specimen. Melt-free samples show a single conduction mechanism whereas melt-bearing samples display two conduction mechanisms linked in series, reflecting the contribution of isolated and connected melt. Impedance was measured along the sample radius, in a direction parallel to the shear gradient inherent in torsion experiments. During the tests, increasing values of the impedance measured suggest that the long range melt connectivity decreases radially, and melt drains from low to high shear stress regions. The conductivity, calculated from impedance measurements, is low and comparable to values measured along mid-ocean ridges. We suggest that electrical anisotropy of the LAB reflects an alternation of melt-enriched and melt-depleted channels elongated in the spreading direction possibly induced by spreading velocity gradients along the ridge. This implies that the observed electrical anisotropy reveals larger scale processes than strain

  20. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  1. 21 CFR 1303.13 - Adjustments of aggregate production quotas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal Register his final order determining the aggregate production for the basic class of controlled... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustments of aggregate production quotas. 1303... Aggregate Production and Procurement Quotas § 1303.13 Adjustments of aggregate production quotas. (a)...

  2. Carbon flux analysis by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the effect of CO2 on anaerobic succinate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2014-05-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using (13)C-labeled glucose and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (~5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H(+):organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  3. Carbon Flux Analysis by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Determine the Effect of CO2 on Anaerobic Succinate Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using 13C-labeled glucose and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (∼5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H+:organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  4. Antimicrobials therapy of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobes predominant in the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora are often a cause of endogenous infections. Anaerobic bacteria are difficult to isolate from infectious sites, and are often overlooked. Anaerobic infections caused by anaerobes can occur in all body sites, including the central nervous system (CNS), oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin and soft tissues. The treatment of these infections is complicated by the slow growth of these organisms, their polymicrobial nature and the growing resistance of anaerobes to antimicrobials agents. Antimicrobials are frequently the only form of therapy needed, but in others, they are an important adjunct to surgical drainage and correction of pathology. Because anaerobes are often recovered with aerobic and facultative bacteria, the chosen antimicrobials should cover all pathogens. The antimicrobials effective against anaerobic organisms are metronidazole, carbapenems, combinations of a beta-lactam and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, chloramphenicol, tigecycline and clindamycin. PMID:26365224

  5. In Vitro Activity of Trovafloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis in Mixed Culture with either Escherichia coli or a Vancomycin- Resistant Strain of Enterococcus faecium Determined by an Anaerobic Time-Kill Technique

    PubMed Central

    Stearne, Lorna E. T.; Kooi, Clarissa; Goessens, Wil H. F.; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.; Gyssens, Inge C.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of trovafloxacin as a possible treatment for intra-abdominal abscesses, we have developed an anaerobic time-kill technique using different inocula to study the in vitro killing of Bacteroides fragilis in pure culture or in mixed culture with either Escherichia coli or a vancomycin-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecium (VREF). With inocula of 5 × 105 CFU/ml and trovafloxacin concentrations of ≤2 μg/ml, a maximum observed effect (Emax) of ≥6.1 (log10 CFU/ml) was attained with all pure and mixed cultures within 24 h. With inocula of 108 CFU/ml, a similar Emax and a similar concentration to produce 50% of Emax (EC50) for B. fragilis were found in both pure cultures and mixed cultures with E. coli. However, to produce a similar killing of B. fragilis in the mixed cultures with VREF, a 14-fold increase in the concentration of trovafloxacin was required. A vancomycin-susceptible strain of E. faecium and a trovafloxacin-resistant strain of E. coli were also found to confer a similar “protective” effect on B. fragilis against the activity of trovafloxacin. Using inocula of 109 CFU/ml, the activity of trovafloxacin was retained for E. coli and B. fragilis and was negligible against VREF. We conclude that this is a useful technique to study the anaerobic killing of mixed cultures in vitro and may be of value in predicting the killing of mixed infections in vivo. The importance of using mixed cultures and not pure cultures is clearly shown by the difference in the killing of B. fragilis in the mixed cultures tested. Trovafloxacin will probably be ineffective in the treatment of infections involving large numbers of enterococci. However, due to its ability to retain activity against large cultures of B. fragilis and E. coli, trovafloxacin could be beneficial in the treatment of intra-abdominal abscesses. PMID:11120973

  6. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  7. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  8. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). PMID:26707985

  9. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  10. Relating surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of cells to gold nanoparticle aggregation as determined by LA-ICP-MS micromapping.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Traub, Heike; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Jakubowski, Norbert; Kneipp, Janina

    2014-11-01

    The cellular response to nanoparticle exposure is essential in various contexts, especially in nanotoxicity and nanomedicine. Here, 14-nm gold nanoparticles in 3T3 fibroblast cells are investigated in a series of pulse-chase experiments with a 30-min incubation pulse and chase times ranging from 15 min to 48 h. The gold nanoparticles and their aggregates are quantified inside the cellular ultrastructure by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry micromapping and evaluated regarding the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. In this way, both information about their localization at the micrometre scale and their molecular nanoenvironment, respectively, is obtained and can be related. Thus, the nanoparticle pathway from endocytotic uptake, intracellular processing, to cell division can be followed. It is shown that the ability of the intracellular nanoparticles and their accumulations and aggregates to support high SERS signals is neither directly related to nanoparticle amount nor to high local nanoparticle densities. The SERS data indicate that aggregate geometry and interparticle distances in the cell must change in the course of endosomal maturation and play a critical role for a specific gold nanoparticle type in order to act as efficient SERS nanoprobe. This finding is supported by TEM images, showing only a minor portion of aggregates that present small interparticle spacing. The SERS spectra obtained after different chase times show a changing composition and/or structure of the biomolecule corona of the gold nanoparticles as a consequence of endosomal processing. PMID:25120183

  11. Determining the role of polymer molecular weight for high-performance all-polymer solar cells: its effect on polymer aggregation and phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunbum; Uddin, Mohammad Afsar; Lee, Changyeon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nguyen, Thanh Luan; Lee, Wonho; Li, Yuxiang; Wang, Cheng; Woo, Han Young; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2015-02-18

    The molecular weight of a conjugated polymer is one of the key factors determining the electrical, morphological, and mechanical properties as well as its solubility in organic solvents and miscibility with other polymers. In this study, a series of semicrystalline poly[(2,5-bis(2-hexyldecyloxy)phenylene)-alt-(5,6-difluoro-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole)] (PPDT2FBT) polymers with different number-average molecular weights (M(n)'s) (PPDT2FBT(L), M(n) = 12 kg/mol; PPDT2FBT(M), M(n) = 24 kg/mol; PPDT2FBT(H), M(n) = 40 kg/mol) were synthesized, and their photovoltaic properties as electron donors for all-polymer solar cells (all-PSCs) with poly[[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-napthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)] (P(NDI2OD-T2)) acceptor were studied. The M(n) effect of PPDT2FBT on the structural, morphological, electrical, and photovoltaic properties was systematically investigated. In particular, tuning the M(n) induced dramatic effects on the aggregation behaviors of the polymers and their bulk heterojunction morphology of all-PSCs, which was thoroughly examined by grazing incident X-ray scattering, resonant soft X-ray scattering, and other microscopy measurements. High M(n) PPDT2FBT(H) promoted a strong "face-on" geometry in the blend film, suppressed the formation of an excessively large crystalline domain, and facilitated molecularly intermixed phases with P(NDI2OD-T2). Therefore, the optimized all-PSCs based on PPDT2FBT(H)/P(NDI2OD-T2) showed substantially higher hole and electron mobilities than those of PPDT2FBT(L)/P(NDI2OD-T2), leading to a power conversion efficiency exceeding 5%, which is one of the highest values for all-PSCs reported thus far. PMID:25605316

  12. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Anders S; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-04-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C12 LAS), which show that C12 LAS was biodegradable under methanogenic conditions. Sorption of C12 LAS on sewage sludge was described with a Freundlich isotherm. The C12 LAS sorption was determined with different concentrations of total solids (TS). In the semi-continuously stirred tank reactor, 18% of the added C12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation. PMID:12685701

  13. Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test as a Procedure to Evaluate Anaerobic Power.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V L; Zagatto, A M; Kalva-Filho, C A; Mendes, O C; Gobatto, C A; Campos, E Z; Papoti, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the running anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a predictor of anaerobic capacity, compare it to the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and to compare the RAST's parameters with the parameters of 30-s all-out tethered running on a treadmill. 39 (17.0±1.4 years) soccer players participated in this study. The participants underwent an incremental test, 10 submaximal efforts [50-95% of velocity correspondent to VO(2MAX) (vVO(2MAX))] and one supramaximal effort at 110% of vVO(2MAX) for the determination of MAOD. Furthermore, the athletes performed the RAST. In the second stage the 30-s all-out tethered running was performed on a treadmill (30-s all-out), and compared with RAST. No significant correlation was observed between MAOD and RAST parameters. However, significant correlations were found between the power of the fifth effort (P5) of RAST with peak and mean power of 30-s all-out (r=0.73 and 0.50; p<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, the parameters from RAST do not have an association with MAOD, suggesting that this method should not be used to evaluate anaerobic capacity. Although the correlations between RAST parameters with 30-s all-out do reinforce the RAST as an evaluation method of anaerobic metabolism, such as anaerobic power. PMID:26422055

  14. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  15. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  16. Recent developments in anaerobic membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, David C

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic membrane reactors (AnMBRs) have recently evolved from aerobic MBRs, with the membrane either external or submerged within the reactor, and can achieve high COD removals (~98%) at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) as low as 3 h. Since membranes stop biomass being washed out, they can enhance performance with inhibitory substrates, at psychrophilic/thermophilic temperatures, and enable nitrogen removal via Anammox. Fouling is important, but addition of activated carbon or resins/precipitants can remove soluble microbial products (SMPs)/colloids and enhance flux. Due to their low energy use and solids production, and solids free effluent, they can enhance nutrient and water recycling. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: compare fouling between aerobic and anaerobic systems; determine how reactor operation influences fouling; evaluate the effect of different additives on membrane fouling; determine whether nitrogen removal can be incorporated into AnMBRs; recover methane solubility from low temperatures effluents; and, establish sound mass and energy balances. PMID:22749372

  17. Microbial life in variably saturated soil aggregates - upscaling gaseous fluxes across distributed aggregate sizes in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies revealed highly dynamic and rich behavior of microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates. Modeling of these processes in three dimensional (unsaturated) pore networks provided insights into the unique conditions essential for coexistence of oxic and anoxic microsites that shape (and respond to) aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. Soil hydration dynamics continuously alter the spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) that flicker in time (hot moments) and support anaerobic microbial activity even in unsaturated and oxic soil profiles. We extend a model for individual-based microbial community growth in 3-D angular pore networks mimicking soil aggregates of different sizes placed in different ambient boundary conditions reflecting profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen in soil. An upscaling scheme was developed to account for aerobic and anaerobic activity within each aggregate class size and soil depth integrated over the aggregate size distribution in the soil for a range of hydration conditions. Results show that dynamic adjustments in microbial community composition affect CO2 and N2O production rates in good agreement with experimental data. The modeling approach addresses a long-standing challenge of linking hydration conditions to dynamic adjustments of microbial communities within "hotspots" with the emergence of "hot moments" reflecting high rates of denitrification and organic matter decomposition.

  18. A review of volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Durant, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Most volcanic ash particles with diameters <63 μm settle from eruption clouds as particle aggregates that cumulatively have larger sizes, lower densities, and higher terminal fall velocities than individual constituent particles. Particle aggregation reduces the atmospheric residence time of fine ash, which results in a proportional increase in fine ash fallout within 10-100 s km from the volcano and a reduction in airborne fine ash mass concentrations 1000 s km from the volcano. Aggregate characteristics vary with distance from the volcano: proximal aggregates are typically larger (up to cm size) with concentric structures, while distal aggregates are typically smaller (sub-millimetre size). Particles comprising ash aggregates are bound through hydro-bonds (liquid and ice water) and electrostatic forces, and the rate of particle aggregation correlates with cloud liquid water availability. Eruption source parameters (including initial particle size distribution, erupted mass, eruption column height, cloud water content and temperature) and the eruption plume temperature lapse rate, coupled with the environmental parameters, determines the type and spatiotemporal distribution of aggregates. Field studies, lab experiments and modelling investigations have already provided important insights on the process of particle aggregation. However, new integrated observations that combine remote sensing studies of ash clouds with field measurement and sampling, and lab experiments are required to fill current gaps in knowledge surrounding the theory of ash aggregate formation.

  19. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study ofmore » aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.« less

  20. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study of aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.

  1. Anaerobic capacity: a maximal anaerobic running test versus the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, N S; Nimmo, M A

    1996-02-01

    The present investigation evaluates a maximal anaerobic running test (MART) against the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) for the determination of anaerobic capacity. Essentially, this involved comparing 18 male students performing two randomly assigned supramaximal runs to exhaustion on separate days. Post warm-up and 1, 3, and 6 min postexercise capillary blood samples were taken during both tests for plasma blood lactate (BLa) determination. In the MART only, blood ammonia (BNH3) concentration was measured, while capillary blood samples were additionally taken after every second sprint for BLa determination. Anaerobic capacity, measured as oxygen equivalents in the MART protocol, averaged 112.2 +/- 5.2 ml.kg-1.min-1. Oxygen deficit, representing the anaerobic capacity in the MAOD test, was an average of 74.6 +/- 7.3 ml.kg-1. There was a significant correlation between the MART and MAOD (r = .83, p < .001). BLa values obtained over time in the two tests showed no significant difference, nor was there any difference in the peak BLa recorded. Peak BNH3 concentration recorded was significantly increased from resting levels at exhaustion during the MART. PMID:8664845

  2. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  3. Diversity Profile of Microbes Associated with Anaerobic Sulfur Oxidation in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor Treating Municipal Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Azrina A.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein analyzed the diversity of microbes involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor used for treating municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. Anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors; however, reactor performance parameters demonstrated that anaerobic conditions were maintained. In order to gain insights into the underlying basis of anaerobic sulfur oxidation, the microbial diversity that exists in the UASB sludge was analyzed comprehensively to determine their identities and contribution to sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples were collected from the UASB reactor over a period of 2 years and used for bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing analyses. T-RFLP and sequencing results both showed that microbial community patterns changed markedly from day 537 onwards. Bacteria belonging to the genus Desulforhabdus within the phylum Proteobacteria and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Fusobacteria were the main groups observed during the period of anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Their abundance correlated with temperature, suggesting that these bacterial groups played roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors. PMID:25817585

  4. Microbial and Physicochemical Characteristics of Compact Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Granules in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Hu, Bao-Lan; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Kartal, Boran; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Jetten, Mike; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a promising new process to treat high-strength nitrogenous wastewater. Due to the low growth rate of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, efficient biomass retention is essential for reactor operation. Therefore, we studied the settling ability and community composition of the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules, which were cultivated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor seeded with aerobic granules. With this seed, the start-up period was less than 160 days at a NH4+-N removal efficiency of 94% and a loading rate of 0.064 kg N per kg volatile suspended solids per day. The formed granules were bright red and had a high settling velocity (41 to 79 m h−1). Cells and extracellular polymeric substances were evenly distributed over the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules. The high percentage of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules could be visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules were determined to be 4.6 × 108 copies ml−1. The results of this study could be used for a better design, shorter start-up time, and more stable operation of anammox systems for the treatment of nitrogen-rich wastewaters. PMID:20190088

  5. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  6. Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Welch, Roy; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Under starvation conditions, a population of myxobacteria aggregates to build a fruiting body whose shape is species-specific and within which the cells sporulate. Early in this process, cells often pass through a "ripple phase" characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves observed during slime mold aggregation that depend on diffusible morphogens, because myxobacteria communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating one another, myxobacterial waves appear to pass through one another unchanged. Under certain conditions, the spacing and location of the nascent fruiting bodies is determined by the wavelength and pattern of the waves. Later in fruiting body development, waves are replaced by streams of cells that circulate around small initial aggregates enlarging and rounding them. Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena.

  7. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  8. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  9. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  10. Molecular Aggregation in Disodium Cromoglycate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gautam; Agra-Kooijman, D.; Collings, P. J.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2012-02-01

    Details of molecular aggregation in the mesophases of the anti-asthmatic drug disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) have been studied using x-ray synchrotron scattering. The results show two reflections, one at wide angles corresponding to π-π stacking (3.32 å) of molecules, and the other at small angles which is perpendicular to the direction of molecular stacking and corresponds to the distance between the molecular aggregates. The latter varies from 35 - 41 å in the nematic (N) phase and 27 -- 32 å in the columnar (M) phase. The temperature evolution of the stack height, positional order correlations in the lateral direction, and orientation order parameter were determined in the N, M, and biphasic regions. The structure of the N and M phases and the nature of the molecular aggregation, together with their dependence on temperature and concentration, will be presented.

  11. Biodegradability of activated sludge organics under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A; Sötemann, S W; Wentzel, M C

    2007-01-01

    From an experimental and theoretical investigation of the continuity of activated sludge organic (COD) compounds along the link between the fully aerobic or N removal activated sludge and anaerobic digestion unit operations, it was found that the unbiodegradable particulate organics (i) originating from the influent wastewater and (ii) generated by the activated sludge endogenous process, as determined from response of the activated sludge system, are also unbiodegradable under anaerobic digestion conditions. This means that the activated sludge biodegradable organics that can be anaerobically digested can be calculated from the active fraction of the waste activated sludge based on the widely accepted ordinary heterotrophic organism (OHO) endogenous respiration/death regeneration rates and unbiodegradable fraction. This research shows that the mass balances based steady state and dynamic simulation activated sludge, aerobic digestion and anaerobic digestion models provide internally consistent and externally compatible elements that can be coupled to produce plant wide steady state and dynamic simulation WWTP models. PMID:17045327

  12. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor

    PubMed Central

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Khelifi, Eltaief; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published. PMID:26887229

  13. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Khelifi, Eltaief; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published. PMID:26887229

  14. C and N accumulations in soil aggregates determine nitrous oxide emissions from cover crop treated rice paddy soils during fallow season.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Prabhat; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-08-15

    Combination of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues are preferably applied in rice paddy soils to increase the rate of organic matter mineralization and to improve plant growth. However, organic matter addition facilitates methane (CH4) emission from rice paddy soil. Mineralization of organic nitrogen (N) increases NO3-N concentrations in soil, which are precursors for the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, N2O is a minor greenhouse gas emitted from submerged rice field and hence is not often considered during calculation of total global warming potential (GWP) during rice cultivation. The hypothesis of this study was that fluxes of N2O emissions might be changed after removal of flooded water from rice field and the effect of cover crops on N2O emissions in the fallow season might be interesting. However, the effects of N-rich plant residues on N2O emission rates in the fallow season and its effect on annual GWP were not studied before. In this experiment, combination of barley (non-leguminous) and hairy vetch (leguminous) biomasses were applied at 9 Mg ha(-1) and 27 Mg ha(-1) rates in rice paddy soil. Cover crop application significantly increased CH4 emission flux while decreased N2O emissions during rice cultivation. The lowest N2O emission was observed in 27 Mg ha(-1) cover crop treated plots. Cover crop applications increased N contents in soil aggregates especially in smaller aggregates (<250 μm), and that proportionately increased the N2O emission potentials of these soil aggregates. Fluxes of N2O emissions in the fallow season were influenced by the N2O emission potentials of soil aggregates and followed opposite trends as those observed during rice cultivation. Therefore, it could be concluded that the doses of cover crop applications for rice cultivation should not be optimized considering only CH4, but N2O should also be considered especially for fallow season to calculate total GWP. PMID:24880551

  15. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  16. Decomposition of organic waste products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine the kinetics of C and N mineralization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These parameters were then used to verify the simulation model, DECOMPOSITION, for the anaerobic system. Incubation experiments were conducted to compare the aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a substrate with a low C:N ratio. Under anaerobic conditions the net mineralization of N occurred more rapidly than that under aerobic conditions. However, the rate of C mineralization as measured by CO{sub 2} evolution was much lower. For the anaerobic decomposition of alfalfa, C mineralization was best described as the sum of the CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} evolved plus the water soluble organic C formed. The kinetics of C mineralization, as determined by this approach, were used to successfully predict the rate and amount of N mineralization from alfalfa undergoing anaerobic decomposition. The decomposition of paper mill sludge, a high C:N ratio substrate, was also evaluated.

  17. Anaerobic threshold: its concept and role in endurance sport.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asok Kumar

    2004-01-01

    aerobic to anaerobic transition intensity is one of the most significant physiological variable in endurance sports. Scientists have explained the term in various ways, like, Lactate Threshold, Ventilatory Anaerobic Threshold, Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation, Onset of Plasma Lactate Accumulation, Heart Rate Deflection Point and Maximum Lactate Steady State. But all of these have great role both in monitoring training schedule and in determining sports performance. Individuals endowed with the possibility to obtain a high oxygen uptake need to complement with rigorous training program in order to achieve maximal performance. If they engage in endurance events, they must also develop the ability to sustain a high fractional utilization of their maximal oxygen uptake (%VO(2) max) and become physiologically efficient in performing their activity. Anaerobic threshold is highly correlated to the distance running performance as compared to maximum aerobic capacity or VO(2) max, because sustaining a high fractional utilization of the VO(2) max for a long time delays the metabolic acidosis. Training at or little above the anaerobic threshold intensity improves both the aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold level. Anaerobic Threshold can also be determined from the speed-heart rate relationship in the field situation, without undergoing sophisticated laboratory techniques. However, controversies also exist among scientists regarding its role in high performance sports. PMID:22977357

  18. Validity and reliability of the Hawaii anaerobic run test.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Iris F; Stickley, Christopher D; Lentz, Melissa A; Wages, Jennifer J; Yanagi, Kazuhiko; Hetzler, Ronald K

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the Hawaii anaerobic run test (HART) by comparing anaerobic capacity measures obtained to those during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Ninety-six healthy physically active volunteers (age, 22.0 ± 2.8 years; height, 163.9 ± 9.5 cm; body mass, 70.6 ± 14.7 kg; body fat %, 19.29 ± 5.39%) participated in this study. Each participant performed 2 anaerobic capacity tests: the WAnT and the HART by random assignment on separate days. The reliability of the HART was calculated from 2 separate trials of the test and then determined through intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Blood samples were collected, and lactate was analyzed both pretest and posttest for each of the 2 exercise modes. Heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were also measured pre- and post-exercise. Hawaii anaerobic run test peak and mean momentum were calculated as body mass times highest or average split velocity, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients between trials of the HART for peak and mean momentum were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively (SEM = 18.8 and 25.7, respectively). Validity of the HART was established through comparison of momentum on the HART with power on the WAnT. High correlations were found between peak power and peak momentum (r = 0.88), as well as mean power and mean momentum (r = 0.94). The HART was considered to be a reliable test of anaerobic power. The HART was also determined to be a valid test of anaerobic power when compared with the WAnT. When testing healthy college-aged individuals, the HART offers an easy and inexpensive alternative maximal effort anaerobic power test to other established tests. PMID:24126898

  19. The accuracy of the DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation) method in determining the optical properties of black carbon fractal-like aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupski, Krzysztof

    2015-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are a product of incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. One of the possibilities of studying the optical properties of BC structures is to use the DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation) method. The main goal of this work was to investigate its accuracy and to approximate the most reliable simulation parameters. For the light scattering simulations the ADDA code was used and for the reference program the superposition T-Matrix code by Mackowski was selected. The study was divided into three parts. First, DDA simulations for a single particle (sphere) were performed. The results proved that the meshing algorithm can significantly affect the particle shape, and therefore, the extinction diagrams. The volume correction procedure is recommended for sparse or asymmetrical meshes. In the next step large fractal-like aggregates were investigated. When sparse meshes are used, the impact of the volume correction procedure cannot be easily predicted. In some cases it can even lead to more erroneous results. Finally, the optical properties of fractal-like aggregates composed of spheres in point contact were compared to much more realistic structures made up of connected, non-spherical primary particles.

  20. Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xu Zhongzi; Lan Xianghui; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

  1. Mid-infrared pulse shaping permits the pathway of amyloid aggregation to be determined with rapid-scan 2D IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanni, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a means for rapidly acquiring 2D IR spectra in a continuous fashion to monitoring protein kinetics. Our method relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that generates precise pulse trains for collecting 2D IR spectra. The phase, amplitude and now the polarization of the pulse trains can be automatically generated without optical alignment, which produces higher accuracy spectra in a much easier fashion than with standard 4-wave mixing. Using this new technology as well as site-specific isotope labeling, we have measured the development of secondary structures for six residues during the aggregation process of the 37-residue polypeptide associated with type 2 diabetes, the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also called amylin. By monitoring the kinetics at six different labeled sites, we find that the peptides initially develop well ordered structures near the ordered loop of the fibrils, followed by formation of the two parallel β-sheets with the N-terminal β-sheet likely forming before the C-terminal sheet. This experimental approach provides residue-by-residue details on the aggregation pathway of hIAPP fibril formation as well as a general methodology for studying other amyloid forming proteins without the use of structure perturbing labels. Moreover, this approach is also applicable to membrane catalyzed amyloid formation, and experiments along these lines will be presented as well.

  2. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  3. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  4. Bouncing behavior of microscopic dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Kley, W.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Bouncing collisions of dust aggregates within the protoplanetary disk may have a significant impact on the growth process of planetesimals. Yet, the conditions that result in bouncing are not very well understood. Existing simulations studying the bouncing behavior used aggregates with an artificial, very regular internal structure. Aims: Here, we study the bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates that are constructed applying different sample preparation methods. We analyze how the internal structure of the aggregate alters the collisional outcome and we determine the influence of aggregate size, porosity, collision velocity, and impact parameter. Methods: We use molecular dynamics simulations where the individual aggregates are treated as spheres that are made up of several hundred thousand individual monomers. The simulations are run on graphic cards (GPUs). Results: Statistical bulk properties and thus bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates depend heavily on the preparation method. In particular, there is no unique relation between the average volume filling factor and the coordination number of the aggregate. Realistic aggregates bounce only if their volume filling factor exceeds 0.5 and collision velocities are below 0.1 ms-1. Conclusions: For dust particles in the protoplanetary nebula we suggest that the bouncing barrier may not be such a strong handicap in the growth phase of dust agglomerates, at least in the size range of ≈100 μm.

  5. A competitive aggregation model for flash nanoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Janine Chungyin; Vigil, R D; Fox, R O

    2010-11-15

    Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP) is a novel approach for producing functional nanoparticles stabilized by amphiphilic block copolymers. FNP involves the rapid mixing of a hydrophobic active (organic) and an amphiphilic di-block copolymer with a non-solvent (water) and subsequent co-precipitation of nanoparticles composed of both the organic and copolymer. During this process, the particle size distribution (PSD) is frozen and stabilized by the hydrophilic portion of the amphiphilic di-block copolymer residing on the particle surface. That is, the particle growth is kinetically arrested and thus a narrow PSD can be attained. To model the co-precipitation process, a bivariate population balance equation (PBE) has been formulated to account for the competitive aggregation of the organic and copolymer versus pure organic-organic or copolymer-copolymer aggregation. Aggregation rate kernels have been derived to account for the major aggregation events: free coupling, unimer insertion, and aggregate fusion. The resulting PBE is solved both by direct integration and by using the conditional quadrature method of moments (CQMOM). By solving the competitive aggregation model under well-mixed conditions, it is demonstrated that the PSD is controlled primarily by the copolymer-copolymer aggregation process and that the energy barrier to aggregate fusion plays a key role in determining the PSD. It is also shown that the characteristic aggregation times are smaller than the turbulent mixing time so that the FNP process is always mixing limited. PMID:20800847

  6. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  7. Cefamandole Therapy in Anaerobic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Scalcini, Marcella C.; Sanders, Charles V.; Lewis, A. Carter

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one adult patients with infections due to anaerobic bacteria were treated with cefamandole. Bacteroides fragilis group (17) and Bacteroides melaninogenicus (13) were the most frequent anaerobes isolated. Duration of therapy varied from 2 to 49 days. Results were judged satisfactory in 26 cases, and unsatisfactory in 1 case. Four cases could not be evaluated. Adverse reactions occurred in 16 patients and included positive direct Coombs' test without hemolysis, transient liver function abnormalities, phlebitis, reversible neutropenia, fever, eosinophilia, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The more significant reactions were associated with prolonged therapy. None was lethal. These data suggest that cefamandole is effective in treatment of most anaerobic infections. PMID:380458

  8. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  9. Retrospective determination of 137Cs specific activity distribution in spruce bark and bark aggregated transfer factor in forests on the scale of the Czech Republic ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Suchara, I; Rulík, P; Hůlka, J; Pilátová, H

    2011-04-15

    The (137)Cs specific activities (mean 32Bq kg(-1)) were determined in spruce bark samples that had been collected at 192 sampling plots throughout the Czech Republic in 1995, and were related to the sampling year. The (137)Cs specific activities in spruce bark correlated significantly with the (137)Cs depositions in areas affected by different precipitation sums operating at the time of the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The ratio of the (137)Cs specific activities in bark and of the (137)Cs deposition levels yielded bark aggregated transfer factor T(ag) about 10.5×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1). Taking into account the residual specific activities of (137)Cs in bark 20Bq kg(-1) and the available pre-Chernobyl data on the (137)Cs deposition loads on the soil surface in the Czech Republic, the real aggregated transfer factor after and before the Chernobyl fallout proved to be T*(ag)=3.3×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1) and T**(ag)=4.0×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1), respectively. The aggregated transfer factors T*(ag) for (137)Cs and spruce bark did not differ significantly in areas unequally affected by the (137)Cs fallout in the Czech Republic in 1986, and the figures for these aggregated transfer factors were very similar to the mean bark T(ag) values published from the extensively affected areas near Chernobyl. The magnitude of the (137)Cs aggregated transfer factors for spruce bark for the pre-Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl period in the Czech Republic was also very similar. The variability in spruce bark acidity caused by the operation of local anthropogenic air pollution sources did not significantly influence the accumulation and retention of (137)Cs in spruce bark. Increasing elevation of the bark sampling plots had a significant effect on raising the remaining (137)Cs specific activities in bark in areas affected by precipitation at the time when the plumes crossed, because the sums of this precipitation increased with elevation (covariable). PMID:21377193

  10. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  11. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  12. [The equation for platelet aggregation rate].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V; Verkhusha, V V; Varfolomeev, S D

    1990-01-01

    A platelet aggregation model in shear flow taking into account the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation limited by aggregated platelets rotation time was considered. For this consideration the average duration of platelets interaction in flow with shear rate value G is shown to be pi/4G. One fibrinogen bond is sufficient to form a solid aggregate between two platelets. The equation for single platelets disappearance rate concerned with intercellular fibrinogen bond formation, stochastic character of bond distribution in collided platelets and hydrodynamically controlled interaction time was obtained. The Hill's approximation for the obtained aggregation rate dependences was suggested and appropriate constants were determined. The qualitative criterion of platelets aggregating systems behavior was introduced. PMID:2245229

  13. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  14. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  15. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    nanoparticle that photoluminesces after exposure to UV; TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles---photocatalytic nanoparticles that generate reactive oxygen species upon UV irradition; and, fullerene nanoparticles used in the filtration experiments, selected for their potential use, small size, and surface chemistry. Our primary methods used to characterize particle and aggregate characteristics include dynamic light scattering used to describe particle size, static light scattering used to characterize aggregate structure (fractal dimension), transmission electron microscopy used to verify primary particle sizes, and electrophoretic mobility measurements to evaluate suspension stability. The reactive property of ZnS that was measured as a function of aggregation was photoluminescence, which was measured using a spectrofluorometer. The reactive property of TiO2 and ZnO that was studied was their ability to generate hydroxyl radicals; these were measured by employing a fluorescent probe that becomes luminescent upon interaction with the hydroxyl radical. To detect the presence of fullerene nanoparticles and calculate removal efficiencies, we used total organic carbon measurements. Additionally, we used UV-vis spectroscopy to approximate the impact of particle shadowing in TiO2 and ZnO aggregates, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to determine how different electrolytes interact with fullerene surface groups. Our findings indicate that the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactivity is material specific. ZnS nanoparticles exhibit a 2-fold increase in band-edge photoluminescence alongside a significant decrease in defect-site photoluminescence. This is attributed to aggregate size-dependent surface tension. Additionally, we used photoluminescence measurements to develop a new method for calculating the critical coagulation concentration of a nanoparticle suspension. The ability of both TiO2 and ZnO to generate hydroxyl radicals was significantly hampered by aggregation. The

  16. A visual assay and spectrophotometric determination of LLM-105 explosive using detection of gold nanoparticle aggregation at two pH values.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Cheng, Yang

    2016-08-01

    We report a simple, rapid, and sensitive assay for visual and spectrophotometric detection of the 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) explosive. The assay is based on different interactions between LLM-105 and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dispersions at two pH values, leading to the formation of dispersed or aggregated AuNPs. Two AuNP dispersions at two pH values were applied to recognize and detect LLM-105 instead of traditional AuNP dispersion under an aptotic pH to improve the anti-interference ability. The developed assay showed excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of 3 ng/mL, and the presence of as low as 0.2 μg/mL LLM-105 can be directly detected with the bare eye. This sensitivity is about six orders of magnitude higher than that of the reported traditional assays. Additionally, the assay exhibited good selectivity toward LLM-105 over other explosives, sulfur-containing compounds, and amines. Graphical abstract A simple, sensitive, and selective assay for LLM-105 was developed based on the pH-dependent interaction between the LLM-105 explosive and gold nanoparticle dispersion. PMID:27230624

  17. Changes in bacterial communities accompanied by aggregation in a fed-batch composting reactor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keiko; Nagao, Norio; Toda, Tatsuki; Kurosawa, Norio

    2008-05-01

    The contents of fed-batch composting (FBC) reactors often aggregate after prolonged operation. This process leads to irreversible breakdown of the decomposition reaction and possible alteration of the bacterial communities. We compared the structures of bacterial communities in reactors under aggregate and optimal conditions. The results of 16S rRNA gene clone analysis showed that populations of the family Bacillaceae (such as Bacillus spp., Cerasibacillus spp., Gracilibacillus spp.), which dominate (98%) under optimal condition, were significantly decreased under aggregate condition. In contrast, populations of the family Staphylococcaceae considerably increased after aggregation and accounted for 53% of the total. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that anaerobes or facultative anaerobes related to Tetragenococcus halophilus, Atopostipes suicloacalis, Jeotgalicoccus pinnipedialis, and Staphylococcus spp. were dominant in the aggregates. These results suggested that aerobic Gram-positive bacteria mainly contributed to organic degradation and that aggregation created some anaerobic environment, which promoted the growth of bacterial communities usually not found in well-functioning FBC reactors. PMID:18231830

  18. Determination of the structure of two novel echistatin variants and comparison of the ability of echistatin variants to inhibit aggregation of platelets from different species.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y L; Huang, T F; Chen, S W; Tsai, I H

    1995-01-01

    Two new variants of short disintegrins were purified from the venom of Echis carinatus leakeyi and named echistatin beta and gamma. These proteins were found to be about 85% similar in amino acid sequence to echistatin alpha which has been well studied. The disulphide pattern of echistatin gamma appeared to be identical with that of echistatin alpha. They all contain the adhesive recognition sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) but inhibit the aggregation of platelets from human and other mammals with different potencies. Echistatin beta and alpha are far more effective on platelets from humans and guinea pigs than those from rabbits and rats whereas echistatin gamma is less discriminating of the platelets of the species tested. This species-dependent platelet sensitivity to echistatin beta and gamma could be attributed to the variations in residues 15, 21, 22 and 27, which are close to or within the RGD loop, rather than to the C-terminal variations after residue 46. Taking advantage of the presence of methionine residues flanking both sides of the ARGDDM motif in echistatin gamma, we deleted this hexapeptide by CNBr cleavage to produce des-(23-28)-echistatin gamma. The modified protein showed c.d. and fluorescent spectra grossly similar to the intact echistatin but its antiplatelet potency decreased more than 200-fold. We thus propose that a favourable conformation of the RGD region is responsible mainly for the high-affinity binding of echistatin to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa as shown previously for the binding of medium-size disintegrin. PMID:7832768

  19. Using aggregated single patient (N-of-1) trials to determine the effectiveness of psychostimulants to reduce fatigue in advanced cancer patients: a rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 29% of deaths in Australia are caused by malignant disease each year and can be expected to increase with population ageing. In advanced cancer, the prevalence of fatigue is high at 70–90%, and can be related to the disease and/or the treatment. The negative impact of fatigue on function (physical, mental, social and spiritual) and quality of life is substantial for many palliative patients as well as their families/carers. Method/design This paper describes the design of single patient trials (n-of-1 s or SPTs) of a psychostimulant, methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) (5 mg bd), compared to placebo as a treatment for fatigue, with a population estimate of the benefit by the aggregation of multiple SPTs. Forty patients who have advanced cancer will be enrolled through specialist palliative care services in Australia. Patients will complete up to 3 cycles of treatment. Each cycle is 6 days long and has 3 days treatment and 3 days placebo. The order of treatment and placebo is randomly allocated for each cycle. The primary outcome is a reduction in fatigue severity as measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-fatigue subscale (FACIT-F). Secondary outcomes include adverse events, quality of life, additional fatigue assessments, depression and Australian Karnovsky Performance Scale. Discussion This study will provide high-level evidence using a novel methodological approach about the effectiveness of psychostimulants for cancer-related fatigue. If effective, the findings will guide clinical practice in reducing this prevalent condition to improve function and quality of life. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000794202 PMID:23617794

  20. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  1. What are the differences between aerobic and anaerobic toxic effects of sulfonamides on Escherichia coli?

    PubMed

    Qin, Mengnan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Long, Xi; Zheng, Min; Qiu, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the environment face the threat of antibiotics. However, most studies investigating the toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics have been conducted on microorganisms in aerobic conditions, while studies examining the anaerobic toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics are still limited. In this study, we determined the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities of sulfonamides (SAs) on Escherichia coli. Next, a comparison of the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities indicated that the SAs could be divided into three groups: Group I: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)>log(1/EC50-aerobic) (EC50-anaerobic/EC50-aerobic, the median effective concentration under anaerobic/aerobic conditions), Group II: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)≈log(1/EC50-aerobic), and Group III: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)anaerobic toxicities will benefit environmental science, and the results of this study will serve as a reference for the risk assessment of chemicals in the environment. PMID:26748048

  2. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural areas the soil erosion and soil loss estimation is vital information in long-term planning. During the initial period of the erosion a part of the soil particles and aggregates get transportable and nutrients and organic matter could be transported due to the effect of water or wind. This preliminary phase was studied with laboratory-scale rainfall simulator. Developed surface crust and aggregate size composition of the runoff was examined in six different slope-roughness-moisture content combination of a Cambisol and a Regosol. The ratio of micro- and macro aggregates in the runoff indicate the stability of the aggregates and determine the transport capacity of the runoff. Both soil samples were taken from field where the water erosion is a potential hazard. During the experiment the whole amount of runoff and sediment was collected through sieve series to a bucket to separate the micro- and macro aggregates. In case of both samples the micro aggregates dominate in the runoff and the runoff rates are similar. Although the runoff of the Regosol - with dominant >1000μm macro aggregate content - contained almost nothing but <50μm sized micro aggregates. Meanwhile the runoff of the Cambisol - with more balanced micro and macro aggregate content - contained dominantly 50-250μm sized micro aggregates and in some case remarkable ratio 250-1000μm sized macro aggregates. This difference occurred because the samples are resistant against drop erosion differently. In case of both sample the selectivity of the erosion and substance matrix redistribution manifested in mineral crusts in the surface where the quartz deposited in place while the lighter organic matter transported with the sediment. The detachment of the aggregates and the redistribution of the particles highly effect on the aggregate composition of the runoff which is connected with the quality of the soil loss. So while the estimation of soil loss quantity is more or less is easy, measuring

  3. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  4. Prevalence and Contribution of Anaerobic Microsites to Carbon Mineralization in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendorf, S. E.; Keiluweit, M.; Gee, K. E.; Kleber, M.; Wanzek, T.; Nico, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) storage, or residence time, is dominantly controlled by the mineralization (oxidation) rate, which is affected by climatic factors (particularly temperature and rainfall) influencing microbial metabolic rates as well as SOM chemistry, mineral-organic associations, and physical protection. Variation in anaerobic respiratory pathways can further, and dramatically, impact carbon oxidation rates. Within the aggregated structure of soils, steep chemical gradients arise from the supply of oxygen and nutrients along macropores that are rapidly consumed (relative to supply) within the micropore domains of aggregate interiors. As a consequence of demand exceeding oxygen supply within soil aggregates and peds, an appreciable fraction of the soil volume may persist in an anaerobic state within upland, agriculturally productive system. Factors limiting oxygen diffusion and availability such as soil texture, soil moisture content, organic matter input, and aggregate size (soil structure) provide central controls on microbial carbon mineralization rates. Here, we combine laboratory studies with manipulations of field samples and in-field measurements to illustrate how soil structure and carbon availability interact to impose anaerobic conditions and associated respiratory constraints on organic matter mineralization rates and thus storage within soils.

  5. PILOT ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PULP MILL EVAPORATOR FOUL CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of three new anaerobic biological treatment technologies were compared and evaluated. Data were obtained from the operation of pilot plants representative of the anaerobic filter, anaerobic upflow sludge bed, and anaerobic fluidized bed. A review of recent literat...

  6. Development of Arsenic and Iron Biogeochemical Gradients upon Anaerobiosis at Soil Aggregate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Pallud, C.; Bedore, P.; Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    In aerated soils, As release is limited due to the strong interaction between As(V) and soil minerals. However, under anaerobic conditions, As desorption is stimulated by As(V) reduction to As(III) and reductive dissolution/transformation of Fe (hydr)oxides, common hosts of As. The effect of As(V) and Fe(III) reduction on As release has been extensively studied in laboratory batch and column systems; correlation of apparent Fe and As reduction, with concomitant release to pore water, has also been noted under field conditions. What remains unresolved is the coupling of biogeochemical and physical processes that ultimately control As transport within structured media such as soils. Soils are heterogeneous porous media that are comprised of individual aggregates having pores that are dominated by diffusive (aggregate interiors) or advective (aggregate exteriors) transport. As a consequence of physical and chemical differences in the interior and the exterior of aggregates, As(III,V) and Fe(II,III) chemical gradients develop. Here, we examine As release from constructed aggregates exposed to fluctuating redox conditions. Artificial aggregates were made with As(V) adsorbed ferrihydrite-coated sand homogeneously inoculated with Shewanella sp. ANA-3 (model As(V) and Fe(III) reducer) and then fused using an agarose binder into spheres. Aggregates were placed in a flow reactor and saturated flow of aerobic or anaerobic artificial groundwater media was initiated. Redox fluctuated in select systems to examine changes in chemical gradient under changing aeration status. Our results show that within aerated solutions, oxidized aggregate exteriors provide a "gprotective barrier"h against As release despite anoxia within diffusively constrained aggregate interiors. During a transition to anaerobic conditions in advective zones, however, As is released and transport is promoted. Our study illustrates the microscale variation in biogeoechemical processes within soils and the

  7. Distributed microbially- and chemically-mediated redox processes controlling arsenic dynamics within Mn-/Fe-oxide constructed aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Samantha C.; Masue-Slowey, Yoko; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Griffis, Sarah D.; Webb, Samuel; Marcus, Matthew A.; Francis, Christopher A.; Fendorf, Scott

    2013-03-01

    The aggregate-based structure of soils imparts physical heterogeneity that gives rise to variation in microbial and chemical processes which influence the speciation and retention of trace elements such as As. To examine the impact of distributed redox conditions on the fate of As in soils, we imposed various redox treatments upon constructed soil aggregates composed of ferrihydrite- and birnessite-coated sands presorbed with As(V) and inoculation with the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3. Aeration of the advecting solution surrounding the aggregates was varied to simulate environmental conditions. We find that diffusion-limited transport within high dissolved organic carbon environments allows reducing conditions to persist in the interior of aggregates despite aerated advecting external solutes, causing As, Mn, and Fe to migrate from the reduced aggregate interiors to the aerated exterior region. Upon transitioning to anoxic conditions in the external solutes, pulses of As, Mn and Fe are released into the advecting solution, while, conversely, a transition to aerated conditions in the exterior resulted in a cessation of As, Mn, and Fe release. Importantly, we find that As(III) oxidation by birnessite is appreciable only in the presence of O2; oxidation of As(III) to As(V) by Mn-oxides ceases under anaerobic conditions apparently as a result of microbially mediated Mn(IV/III) reduction. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering redox conditions and the physical complexity of soils in determining As dynamics, where redox transitions can either enhance or inhibit As release due to speciation shifts in both sorbents (solubilization versus precipitation of Fe and Mn oxides) and sorbates (As).

  8. Oxidation of nanoscale zero-valent iron under sufficient and limited dissolved oxygen: Influences on aggregation behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danlie; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yin, Daqiang

    2015-03-01

    Oxidations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) under aerobic (dissolved oxygen≈8mgL(-1)) and anaerobic (dissolved oxygen <3mgL(-1)) conditions were simulated, and their influences on aggregation behaviors of nZVI were investigated. The two oxidation products were noted as HO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in highly oxygenated water) and LO-nZVI (nZVI oxidized in lowly oxygenated water) respectively. The metallic iron of the oxidized nZVI was almost exhausted (Fe(0)≈8±5%), thus magnetization mainly depended on magnetite content. Since sufficient dissolved oxygen led to the much less magnetite (∼15%) in HO-nZVI than that in LO-nZVI (>90%), HO-nZVI was far less magnetic (Ms=88kAm(-1)) than LO-nZVI (Ms=365kAm(-1)). Consequently, HO-nZVI formed small agglomerates (228±10nm), while LO-nZVI tended to form chain-like aggregations (>1μm) which precipitated rapidly. Based on the EDLVO theory, we suggested that dissolved oxygen level determined aggregation morphologies by controlling the degree of oxidation and the magnitude of magnetization. Then the chain-like alignment of LO-nZVI would promote further aggregation, but the agglomerate morphology of HO-nZVI would eliminate magnetic forces and inhibit the aggregation while HO-nZVI remained magnetic. Our results indicated the fine colloidal stability of HO-nZVI, which might lead to the great mobility in the environment. PMID:25441925

  9. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  10. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  11. Genetic, phenotypic and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based identification of anaerobic bacteria and determination of their antimicrobial susceptibility at a University Hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Tomoyuki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kato, Karin; Hotta, Go; Noguchi, Taro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The accuracies of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the phenotypic method using VITEK 2 were compared to the accuracy of 16S rRNA sequence analysis for the identification of 170 clinically isolated anaerobes. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was also evaluated. Genetic analysis identified 21 Gram-positive species in 14 genera and 29 Gram-negative species in 11 genera. The most frequently isolated genera were Prevotella spp. (n = 46), Bacteroides spp. (n = 25) and Clostridium spp. (n = 25). MALDI-TOF MS correctly identified more isolates compared with VITEK 2 at the species (80 vs. 58%, respectively; p < 0.01) and genus (85 vs. 71%, respectively; p < 0.01) levels. More than 90% of the isolates of the three major genera identified (Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Clostridium species other than Clostridium difficile) were susceptible to beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations, carbapenems, metronidazole and chloramphenicol. MALDI-TOF MS provided better identification results than VITEK2. Commonly used anti-anaerobic agents indicated that the isolates of the three most frequently identified anaerobic genera exhibited good antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:26898667

  12. Anaerobic treatability of waste water from pulp and paper industries.

    PubMed

    Norrman, J; Narbuvold, R; Nyström, L

    1984-01-01

    A black liquor evaporator condensate from a Kraft mill and a waste water from production of corrugating medium were anaerobically treated on a laboratory scale. The composition of the waste waters was determined before and after treatment in fixed bed reactors. Toxicity studies by the Microtox-method showed that both waste waters were highly toxic and a slight decrease in toxicity was achieved by anaerobic treatment. Despite the toxicity efficient anaerobic treatment was obtained. Major components of the condensate were methanol, ethanol, acetone, guaiacol, hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl disulfide. Anaerobic treatment reduced the concentration of the major components considerably with one exception. The concentration of hydrogen sulfide was unchanged. Organic overloading of the fixed bed reactor or a temperature drop resulted in an accumulation of acetone, although methanol and ethanol were degraded. Major components of the waste water from the production of corrugating medium were: Klason-lignin, acid-soluble lignin, carbohydrates, extractives and ash. When the fixed bed reactor was operated at a volumetric load of 1.6 kg COD/m(3).d the following reductions were obtained: Klason - lignin (solids fraction 84%; soluble and colloidal fraction 76%), acid-soluble lignin (solids fraction 56%; soluble and colloidal fraction 7%), carbohydrates (100%), extractives (71%), total-S (80%), COD (73%) and BOD(7) (78%). Kinetic studies showed that condensate was more easily degraded anaerobically than corrugating medium waste water. PMID:14545703

  13. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Amrita B.; Han, Andrew W.; Mehta, Angad P.; Mok, Kenny C.; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P.; Taga, Michiko E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism. PMID:26246619

  14. Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria: myth, magic, or method?

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M

    1991-01-01

    The demand for susceptibility testing of anaerobes has increased, yet consensus as to procedure and interpretation in this area has not been achieved. While routine testing of anaerobic isolates is not needed, certain isolates in specific clinical settings should be tested. Also, laboratories may monitor their local antibiograms by doing periodic surveillance batch testing. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has published a protocol of methods approved for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Both agar and broth microdilution are included; however, the broth disk elution method is no longer approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards because of method-related interpretive errors. A number of newer methods are undergoing evaluation and seem promising. Clinicians and microbiologists reviewing susceptibility reports should be aware of sources of variability in the test results. Variables in susceptibility testing of anaerobes include the media and methods used, organisms chosen for testing, breakpoints chosen for interpretation, antibiotic, and determination of endpoint. Clustering of MICs around the breakpoint may lead to significant variability in test results. Adherence of testing laboratories to approved methods and careful descriptions of the method and the breakpoints used for interpretation would facilitate interlaboratory comparisons and allow problems of emerging resistance to be noted. A variety of resistance mechanisms occurs in anaerobic bacteria, including the production of beta-lactamase and other drug-inactivating enzymes, alteration of target proteins, and inability of the drug to penetrate the bacterial wall. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in the United States and abroad are described. PMID:1747863

  15. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treatment of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H. Jr.; Earley, J.P.; Shen, Yutao.

    1989-09-01

    The work proposed is a laboratory investigation of the AnSBR (Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactors) for treatment of a synthetic coal conversion wastewater. Two different strategies will be pursued. First, an AnSBR will be operated to simulate the Anaerobic Up-flow Sludge Blanket Reactor in an attempt to develop a readily settleable granular sludge. Second, operating strategies will be sought to optimize treatment, without attempting to develop settleable granular sludge. These systems will require development of more elaborate decanting mechanisms, probably including use of tube settler technology. We will use: (1) screening tests to identify compounds which are amenable to anaerobic degradation; (2) to determine those which are toxic or have an inhibitory effect; and (3) to identify the dilution required to achieve anaerobic degradation of the synthetic waste water; acclimation tests of organisms collected from different sources to the synthetic coal conversion wastewater; and Automatic Laboratory AnSBR studies. A 4-liter reactor will be operated to maintain a settleable granular anaerobic sludge when treating the synthetic coal conversion wastewater. 72 refs., 238 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  17. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  18. ANAEROBIC SUBSTRATE TOLERANCE IN'SPOROBOLUS VIRGINICUS' (L.) KUNTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine if and how the two genetically distinct forms, marsh and dune, of Sporobolus virginicus, tolerate anaerobic substrates. The treatments in the hydroponic study, conducted in the greenhouse for approximately 6 months, involved growing the ...

  19. INCREASE OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS FOLLOWING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND CENTRIFUGE DEWATERING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled “Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges”. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bac...

  20. EVALUATION OF ANAEROBIC EXPANDED BED REACTOR FOR SEWAGE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale anaerobic expanded bed reactors were operated at the U.S. EPA Test and Evaluation Facility to determine the effect of relative concentrations between organics and sulfate on the organics removal. The bench scale results showed that less organics were removed as the su...

  1. PARAFFIN CONTROL IN OIL WELLS USING ANAEROBIC MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enrichment and monitoring of the above-described cultures for the ability to degrade waxy paraffins under anaerobic conditions will continue. Experiments will be conducted to determine the nutritional requirements of some of the enrichment cultures to improve growth and deduce...

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic cecal bacterial flora of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the bacterial flora of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of broiler ceca collected from a commercial poultry processing facility were determined. Bacterial isolates from cecal cultures were selected based on the ability of the bacteria to grow in media supplemented with lactate and succ...

  3. Anaerobic Digestion Analysis. Training Module 5.120.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with alkalinity, volatile acids and carbon dioxide determinations for an anaerobic sludge digester. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers total and bicarbonate…

  4. Comparative Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria to Minocycline, Doxycycline, and Tetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Patten, Valerie; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The comparative susceptibility of 622 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria to minocycline, doxycycline, and tetracycline was determined by an agar-dilution technique. In addition to Bacteroides fragilis, a variety of other anaerobic bacteria was resistant to achievable blood concentrations of tetracycline (55% inhibited by 6.25 μg/ml) and doxycycline (58% inhibited by 2.5 μg/ml). In contrast, minocycline was significantly more active (P < 0.05) than both doxycycline and tetracycline, and 70% of strains were inhibited by achievable blood concentrations of this antibiotic (2.5 μg/ml). The enhanced activity of minocycline was particularly striking for Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, P. magnus, P. prevotii, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus. Further evaluation of the clinical efficacy of minocycline against anaerobic infections is indicated. PMID:1137358

  5. Defining Anaerobic Digestion Stability-Full Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demitry, M. E., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale anaerobic digester receiving a mixture of primary and secondary sludge was monitored for one hundred days. A chemical oxygen demand, COD, and a volatile solids, VS, mass balance was conducted to evaluate the stability of the digester and its capability of producing methane gas. The COD mass balance could account for nearly 90% of the methane gas produced while the VS mass balance showed that 91% of the organic matter removed resulted in biogas formation. Other parameters monitored included: pH, alkalinity, VFA, and propionic acid. The values of these parameters showed that steady state had occurred. Finally, at mesophilic temperature and at steady state performance, the anaerobic digester stability was defined as a constant ratio of methane produced per substrate of ΔVS (average ratio=0.404 l/g). This ratio can be used as universal metric to determine the anaerobic digester stability in an easy and inexpensive way.

  6. Fractal dimension and mechanism of aggregation of apple juice particles.

    PubMed

    Benítez, E I; Lozano, J E; Genovese, D B

    2010-04-01

    Turbidity of freshly squeezed apple juice is produced by a polydisperse suspension of particles coming from the cellular tissue. After precipitation of coarse particles by gravity, only fine-colloidal particles remain in suspension. Aggregation of colloidal particles leads to the formation of fractal structures. The fractal dimension is a measure of the internal density of these aggregates and depends on their mechanism of aggregation. Digitized images of primary particles and aggregates of depectinized, diafiltered cloudy apple juice were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Average radius of the primary particles was found to be a = 40 ± 11 nm. Maximum radius of the aggregates, R(L), ranged between 250 and 7750 nm. Fractal dimension of the aggregates was determined by analyzing SEM images with the variogram method, obtaining an average value of D(f) = 2.3 ± 0.1. This value is typical of aggregates formed by rapid flocculation or diffusion limited aggregation. Diafiltration process was found to reduce the average size and polydispersity of the aggregates, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. Average gyration radius of the aggregates before juice diafiltration was found to be R(g) = 629 ± 87 nm. Average number of primary particles per aggregate was calculated to be N = 1174. PMID:21339133

  7. Determination of the aggregate size in detergent solution of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex from chloroplast membranes

    PubMed Central

    Butler, P. J. G.; Kühlbrandt, W.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular mass of an oligomeric integral membrane protein, the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complex from the photosynthetic membranes of chloroplasts, has been determined in detergent solution by analytical ultracentrifugation and measurement of the density increment at constant chemical potential of all diffusible solutes. The technique used eliminates any problems resulting from detergent binding to the protein, is independent of the particular detergent used (in this case the nonionic n-octyl β-D-glucopyranoside), and gives the apparent weight-average molecular mass at different protein concentrations, allowing extrapolation to zero concentration. It means that the solutions of the complex must be brought to dialysis equilibrium with the solvent detergent solution and also requires a reliable method for measuring the protein concentration, for which amino acid analysis was used. The detergent-solubilized complex was a trimer that dissociated into monomers and dimers at low protein concentration. The accurate concentration determinations also allowed the molar chlorophyll-to-protein ratio to be measured as 15, corresponding to 8 chlorophyll a and 7 chlorophyll b molecules. PMID:16593931

  8. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  9. Organic carbon, water repellency and soil stability to slaking at aggregate and intra-aggregate scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán López, Antonio; García-Moreno, Jorge; Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Cerdà, Artemi; Alanís, Nancy; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    intensity of WR in aggregates of different sizes. [ii] the intra-aggregate distribution of OC and the intensity of WR and [iii] the structural stability of soil aggregates relative to the OC content and the intensity of WR in soils under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different treatments (conventional tilling and mulching). Soil samples were collected from an experimental area (Luvic Calcisols and Calcic Luvisols) in the province of Sevilla (Southern Spain) under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different management types (conventional tillage with moldboard plow) and mulching (no-tilling and addition of wheat residues at rates varying between 5 and 8 Mg/ha/year). At each sampling site, soil blocks (50 cm long × 50 cm wide × 10 cm deep) were carefully collected to avoid disturbance of aggregates as much as possible and transported to the laboratory. At field moist condition, undisturbed soil aggregates were separated by hand. In order to avoid possible interferences due to disturbance by handling, aggregates broken during this process were discarded. Individual aggregates were arranged in paper trays and air-dried during 7 days under laboratory standard conditions. After air-drying, part of each sample was carefully divided for different analyses: [i] part of the original samples was sieved (2 mm) to eliminate coarse soil particles and homogenized for characterization of OC and N contents, C/N ratio and texture; [ii] part of the aggregates were dry-sieved (0.25-0.5, 0.5-1 and 1-2 mm) or measured with a caliper (2-5, 5-10 and 10-15 mm) and separated in different sieve-size classes for determination of WR and OC content; [iii] aggregates 10-15 mm in size were selected for obtaining aggregate layers using a soil aggregate erosion (SAE) apparatus and WR and OC content were determined at each layer; finally, [iv] in order to study the relation between stability to slaking, WR and OC, these properties were determined in 90 air-dried aggregates

  10. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  11. Determination of the Transition-State Entropy for Aggregation Suggests How the Growth of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin Polymers can be Slowed

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Galkin, Oleg; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Choudhury, Nihar; Nagel, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with the mutant hemoglobin HbS, which forms polymers in red blood cells of patients. The growth rate of the polymers is several micrometers per second, ensuring that a polymer fiber reaches the walls of an erythrocyte (which has a 7-μm diameter) within a few seconds after its nucleation. To understand the factors that determine this unusually fast rate, we analyze data on the growth rate of the polymer fibers. We show that the fiber growth follows a first-order Kramers-type kinetics model. The entropy of the transition state for incorporation into a fiber is 95 J mol−1 K−1, very close to the known entropy of polymerization. This agrees with a recent theoretical estimate for the hydrophobic interaction and suggests that the gain of entropy in the transition state is due to the release of the last layer of water molecules structured around contact sites on the surface of the HbS molecules. As a result of this entropy gain, the free-energy barrier for incorporation of HbS molecules into a fiber is negligible and fiber growth is unprecedentedly fast. This finding suggests that fiber growth can be slowed by components of the red cell cytosol, native or intentionally introduced, which restructure the hydration layer around the HbS molecules and thus lower the transition state entropy for incorporation of an incoming molecule into the growing fiber. PMID:18280499

  12. Kinetics of anaerobic purification of industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Bolle, W.L.; van Breugel, J.; van Eybergen, G.C.; Kossen, N.W.F.; van Gils, W.

    1986-04-01

    As part of the development of an integral mathematical model describing the up-flow anaerobic sludges blanket (UASB) reactor, the kinetics of the conversion of organic wastes has to be known. The Mondod model is compared with the model proposed by Andrews, et al. Together with the assumption that the substrate for the anaerobic bacteria is formed by nonionized, volatile fatty acids, the Andrews model is able to describe substrate inhibition and reactor failure due to pH changes. From four batch experiments, with different concentrations of microorganisms, it could be concluded with a reliability of over 95% that the Monod model was inadequate and Andrews' model was adequate to describe the measurements. Standard statistical techniques like the X2 and the F-test were used for this purpose. From a parameter sensitivity analysis for the Andrews model it followed that the maximum specific growth rate Mu(A) max of the bacteria and the inhibition constant K, are the parameters which influance the systems most. Thus, these parameters were determined experimentally and most accurately. The other parameters were taken from literature. From a calculation of the Thiele modulus for the particles it follows that transport limitation of the substrate in the flocs is not significant. The efficiency Eta is 0.85 in the worst case. 11 references.

  13. Treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters using anaerobic filters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sandra Luz; Torretta, Vincenzo; Minguelac, Jésus Vázquez; Siñeriz, Faustino; Raboni, Massimo; Copelli, Sabrina; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-scale experimentation allowed comparing the performances of two upflow anaerobic packed-bed filters filled with different packing materials and operating at mesophilic conditions (30 degreeC) for treating slaughterhouse wastewaters. Methane production was experimentally evaluated considering different volumetric organic loading rates as well as feeding overloading conditions. Although filter performances declined with loading rates higher than 6 kg CODin m-3 d-1 , the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained always above 60%. The experimental results allowed for determining kinetic parameters for bacterial growth rate and methane production, following Monod and Chen-Hashimoto models, respectively. Results demonstrated that the reactors reached a cellular retention time significantly greater than the hydraulic retention time. The kinetic parameter values (Ks, l/max) revealed the low microorganisms' affinity for the substrate and confirmed the moderate biodegradability of slaughterhouse wastewater. The kinetic analysis also allowed the comparison of the filters performances with another anaerobic system and the assessment of the parameters useful for real-scale plant design. The system design, applied to a medium-sized Argentinean slaughterhouse, demonstrated to (i) be energetically self-sufficient and (ii) contribute to the plant's water heating requirements. PMID:24600871

  14. Do anaerobic digestates promote dispersion, acidification and water repellency in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkner, Amrei; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Digestates are used as organic fertilizer on agricultural land due to their high amounts of nutrients (e.g. potassium, sodium). It is commonly expected that the application of sludge derived from anaerobic digestion can influence the soil structure and soil stability. Due to the fact that digestates contain large quantities of monovalent salts and long-chained fatty acids, the consequence of sludge amendment can be soil degradation caused by acidification, dispersion and increased water-repellency. Thus, water infiltration can be impeded which results in a preservation of stable soil aggregates. However, a diminished water infiltration can support water erosion and preferential flow of easy soluble nutrients into the groundwater. Our research was conducted with different digestates derived from maize, wheat and sugar beet to examine occurring processes in soils of two different textures after the application of anaerobic sludges. Particularly, we focused on the wetting properties of the soil. For this purpose, the wetting behavior was investigated by determining the sorptivity-based Repellency Index with moist samples and the contact angle with homogenized, air-dried soil material. Further surveys were carried out to assess the flow behavior of digestates application and the deformation of the particle-to-particle association by microscaled shearing. Additionally, the acidification process in the soil as a result of sludge application was investigated. To account for the dispersive impact of digestates, the turbidity of soil suspensions was ascertained. We summarize from the results that the digestates have a clear impact on the water repellency of the soil. We recognized a shift to more hydrophobic conditions. Partially, the pH remains on a high level due to the alkaline digestate, but several samples show a decline of pH, depending on the soil texture, respectively. However, soil structure was weakened as was shown by an increase of turbidity. As a conclusion, we

  15. Aggregation of commercial heparin samples in storage.

    PubMed

    Racey, T J; Rochon, P; Awang, D V; Neville, G A

    1987-04-01

    The size distribution of heparin aggregates in commercial heparin preparations was examined with the technique of quasi-elastic light scattering. The size distributions were initially examined to determine if any relationship existed between the physical state of the heparin preparation, its age, and its biological activity. It was found that commercial heparin samples change their aggregation state in storage. The amount of aggregation appears to be related to the amount of time in storage and to the storage history. Storage of the samples under conditions of refrigeration and handling represents the storage history that most noticeably increases the aggregation state of the heparin preparations. These aggregates, once formed, appear to be stable. The biological activity of the heparin samples (as measured by the official test) was found to still fall within the accepted limits, independent of the aggregation state of the samples. It is not known what effect, if any, a change in the physical state of the commercial preparation should have on its biological activity. PMID:3598891

  16. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. PMID:24907580

  17. Anaerobic digestate from biogas production as a resource for improving soil fertility: effects on crop yield and soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Vignozzi, Nadia; Valboa, Giuseppe; Papini, Rossella; Fabiani, Arturo; Simoncini, Stefania; Mocali, Stefano; Piccolo, Raimondo

    2013-04-01

    Soil fertility is fundamental in determining crops productivity in all farming systems. Production of biogas through anaerobic digestion of energy crops generates residues that can represent a valuable resource to sustain and improve soil fertility and to increase soil organic matter content. Residues from anaerobic digestion contain organic fractions and available nutrients, that can thus be returned to the cultivation soil as fertilizer and soil conditioner. However, some unknown aspects of digested residues utilization remain to explore: i) the nutrient supply and the real potential for mineral fertilization substitution, ii) the impact on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities, iii) the direct and indirect effects on soil structure, organic matter and C mineralization. The aim of the present research was to gain a better understanding of these aspects, evaluating the effects of anaerobic digestate application on soil properties and maize yield. With the main focus of comparing mineral fertilization (250 Kg N ha-1) with digested residues addition (at the dose of 25 % and 50 % of mineral fertilizer), a triplicate sets of plots were designed in a field experiment on a silty-clay loam soil in the southern Po Valley (Italy). The amount of applied residues was calculated according to its N content in order to fertilizer each plots with the same amount of total nitrogen. Residues from digestion showed a N content of 0.4 % (60 % as N-NH4) and a C/N ratio of 3. Changes in soil quality after residues application were studied with a holistic approach, involving microbiological, physical and chemical aspects of soil fertility. In particular, we determined: the abundance and diversity of bacterial and fungal soil communities; the soil organic matter content, its distribution within soil aggregates and the C mineralization potential; cation exchange capacity; the main macro and micro nutrients; bulk density; aggregate stability. No significant

  18. The effect of music during warm-up on consecutive anaerobic performance in elite adolescent volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, M; Meckel, Y; Nemet, D; Eliakim, A

    2007-04-01

    Music is believed to improve athletic performance. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of arousing music during warm-up on anaerobic performance in elite national level adolescent volleyball players. Twenty-four players (12 males and 12 females) performed the Wingate Anaerobic Test following a 10-minute warm-up with and without music (two separate occasions, random order). During warm-up with music, mean heart rate was significantly higher. Following the warm-up with music, peak anaerobic power was significantly higher in all volleyball players (10.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 11.1 +/- 0.3 Watts/kg, p < 0.05, without and with music, respectively). Gender did not influence the effect of music on peak anaerobic power. Music had no significant effect on mean anaerobic output or fatigue index in both genders. Music affects warm-up and may have a transient beneficial effect on anaerobic performance. PMID:17024625

  19. Anaerobic degradation of monoazo dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of two monoazo dyes, acid red 88 (AR88) and acid orange 7, was studied utilizing serum bottle assays. When either dye was present between .05 and 50 mg/L as the sole substrate, inhibition was demonstrated, with no mineralization occurring. However, when a supplemental carbon and energy source was available no inhibition was evidence with mineralization occurring at intermediate concentrations. The degradation of AR88 and metabolite formation was examined utilizing laboratory-scale semi-continuous anaerobic reactors. Addition of 50 mg/L of dye resulted in >98% removal, although mineralization was not achieved. Metabolites identified were naphthionic acid, 2-naphthol, 1,2-naphthoquinone, isoquinoline, and quinacridone. The presence of the metabolites, some of which were products of complexation and polymerization, exerted a slight inhibitory effect on the non-methanogens. The availability of a supplemental carbon source demonstrated an effect on the metabolites that are evolved and the rate at which they are formed.

  20. Anaerobic digestion of brewery byproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, J.D.; Kormi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery in the brewery industry by mesophilic anaerobic digesion of process by-products is technically feasible. The maximum achievable loading rate is 6g dry substrate/L-day. CH4 gas production declines as the loading rate increases in the range 2-6 g/L day. CH4 production increases in the range 8-15 days; optimal design criteria are a 10-day detention time with a loading rate of 6 g dry substrate/L day.

  1. Aggregates: Waste and recycled materials; new rapid evaluation technology. Soils, geology, and foundations; materials and construction. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    ;Contents: Engineering Properties of Shredded Tires in Lightweight Fill Applications; Using Recovered Glass as Construction Aggregate Feedstock; Utilization of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate in Portland Cement Concrete Mixtures; Waste Foundry Sand in Asphalt Concrete; Toward Automating Size-Gradation Analysis of Mineral Aggregate; Evaluation of Fine Aggregate Angularity Using National Aggregate Association Flow Test; Siliceous Content Determination of Sands Using Automatic Image Analysis; and Methodology for Improvement of Oxide Residue Models for Estimation of Aggregate Performance Using Stoichiometric Analysis.

  2. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  3. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  4. Velvet pad surface sampling of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria: an in vitro laboratory model.

    PubMed Central

    Raahave, D; Friis-Møller, A

    1982-01-01

    Velvet pads have been evaluated in an experimental, laboratory model, simulating intraoperative sampling of Staphylococcus epidermis, Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis. After sampling, the pad was placed in a transport medium and kept in an anaerobic atmosphere, before being shaken and rinsed, followed by anaerobic and aerobic culture. This technique permitted quantitatively high recoveries of the test bacteria. Velvet pad sampling could be a measure to determine the density of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria during operation in an effort to predict the risk of postoperative wound sepsis. Images PMID:6757273

  5. Photophoretic force on aggregate grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Kimery, Jesse B.; Wurm, Gerhard; de Beule, Caroline; Kuepper, Markus; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-01-01

    The photophoretic force may impact planetary formation by selectively moving solid particles based on their composition and structure. This generates collision velocities between grains of different sizes and sorts the dust in protoplanetary discs by composition. This numerical simulation studied the photophoretic force acting on fractal dust aggregates of μm-scale radii. Results show that aggregates tend to have greater photophoretic drift velocities than spheres of similar mass or radii, though with a greater spread in the velocity. While the drift velocities of compact aggregates continue to increase as the aggregates grow larger in size, fluffy aggregates have drift velocities which are relatively constant with size. Aggregates formed from an initially polydisperse size distribution of dust grains behave differently from aggregates formed from a monodisperse population, having smaller drift velocities with directions which deviate substantially from the direction of illumination. Results agree with microgravity experiments which show the difference of photophoretic forces with aggregation state.

  6. Kinetics of biogas production in Anaerobic Filters.

    PubMed

    Krümpel, Johannes; Schäufele, Friedrich; Schneider, Johannes; Jungbluth, Thomas; Zielonka, Simon; Lemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates methane production kinetics from individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) in an Upflow Anaerobic Filter (AF). 1gCOD in the form of acetic (HAc), propionic (HPr) or butyric acid (HBu) was injected into the AF while operating at an organic loading rate (OLRCOD) of 3.5gL(-1)d(-1). A new method is introduced to separate gas production of the baseload from the product formation of VFA degradation after the injection. The lag phase, fractional rate of gas production and half-life has been determined for the methane production of the three VFAs. The half-lives were in the order HAc

  7. CFD simulation of mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mitsuharu; Goel, Rajeev; Komatsu, Kazuya; Yasui, Hidenari; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Li, Y Y; Noike, Tatsuya

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model incorporating the rheological properties of sludge was developed and applied to quantify mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with experimental tracer response curve. In order to predict the dynamics of mixing, a new parameter, UI (uniformity index) was defined. The visual patterns of tracer mixing in simulation were well reflected in the dynamic variation in the value of UI. The developed model and methods were applied to determine the required time for complete mixing in a full-scale digester at different solid concentrations. This information on mixing time is considered to be useful in optimizing the feeding cycles for better digester performance. PMID:19081247

  8. Optimal policies for aggregate recycling from decommissioned forest roads.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Sessions, John

    2008-08-01

    To mitigate the adverse environmental impact of forest roads, especially degradation of endangered salmonid habitat, many public and private land managers in the western United States are actively decommissioning roads where practical and affordable. Road decommissioning is associated with reduced long-term environmental impact. When decommissioning a road, it may be possible to recover some aggregate (crushed rock) from the road surface. Aggregate is used on many low volume forest roads to reduce wheel stresses transferred to the subgrade, reduce erosion, reduce maintenance costs, and improve driver comfort. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for aggregate to be recovered and used elsewhere on the road network, at a reduced cost compared to purchasing aggregate from a quarry. This article investigates the potential for aggregate recycling to provide an economic incentive to decommission additional roads by reducing transport distance and aggregate procurement costs for other actively used roads. Decommissioning additional roads may, in turn, result in improved aquatic habitat. We present real-world examples of aggregate recycling and discuss the advantages of doing so. Further, we present mixed integer formulations to determine optimal levels of aggregate recycling under economic and environmental objectives. Tested on an example road network, incorporation of aggregate recycling demonstrates substantial cost-savings relative to a baseline scenario without recycling, increasing the likelihood of road decommissioning and reduced habitat degradation. We find that aggregate recycling can result in up to 24% in cost savings (economic objective) and up to 890% in additional length of roads decommissioned (environmental objective). PMID:18481140

  9. Phosphorus recovery from wastewater by struvite crystallization: property of aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhilong; Shen, Yin; Ye, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoji; Chen, Shaohua; Shi, Jianwen

    2014-05-01

    Struvite crystallization is a promising method to remove and recover phosphorus from wastewater to ease both the scarcity of phosphorus rock resources and water eutrophication worldwide. To date, although various kinds of reactor systems have been developed, supporting methods are required to control the struvite fines flushing out of the reactors. As an intrinsic property, aggregation is normally disregarded in the struvite crystallization process, although it is the key factor in final particle size and therefore guarantees phosphorus recovery efficiency. The present study developed a method to analyze the characteristics of struvite aggregates using fractal geometry, and the influence of operational parameters on struvite aggregation was evaluated. Due to its typical orthorhombic molecular structure, struvite particles are prone to crystallize into needle or rod shapes, and aggregate at the corners or edges of crystals. The determined fractal dimension (Dpf) of struvite aggregates was 1.52-1.31, with the corresponding range of equivalent diameter (d0.5) at 295.9-85.4 μm. Aggregates formed in relatively low phosphorus concentrations (3.0-5.0 mmol/L) and mildly alkaline conditions (pH 9.0-9.5) displayed relatively compact structures, large aggregate sizes and high aggregation strength. Increasing pH values led to continuous decrease of aggregate sizes, while the variation of Dpf was insignificant. As to the aggregate evolution, fast growth in a short time followed by a long steady stage was observed. PMID:25079629

  10. Optimal Policies for Aggregate Recycling from Decommissioned Forest Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matthew; Sessions, John

    2008-08-01

    To mitigate the adverse environmental impact of forest roads, especially degradation of endangered salmonid habitat, many public and private land managers in the western United States are actively decommissioning roads where practical and affordable. Road decommissioning is associated with reduced long-term environmental impact. When decommissioning a road, it may be possible to recover some aggregate (crushed rock) from the road surface. Aggregate is used on many low volume forest roads to reduce wheel stresses transferred to the subgrade, reduce erosion, reduce maintenance costs, and improve driver comfort. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for aggregate to be recovered and used elsewhere on the road network, at a reduced cost compared to purchasing aggregate from a quarry. This article investigates the potential for aggregate recycling to provide an economic incentive to decommission additional roads by reducing transport distance and aggregate procurement costs for other actively used roads. Decommissioning additional roads may, in turn, result in improved aquatic habitat. We present real-world examples of aggregate recycling and discuss the advantages of doing so. Further, we present mixed integer formulations to determine optimal levels of aggregate recycling under economic and environmental objectives. Tested on an example road network, incorporation of aggregate recycling demonstrates substantial cost-savings relative to a baseline scenario without recycling, increasing the likelihood of road decommissioning and reduced habitat degradation. We find that aggregate recycling can result in up to 24% in cost savings (economic objective) and up to 890% in additional length of roads decommissioned (environmental objective).