Science.gov

Sample records for anaerobic cometabolic conversion

  1. Anaerobic Cometabolic Conversion of Benzothiophene by a Sulfate-Reducing Enrichment Culture and in a Tar-Oil-Contaminated Aquifer†

    PubMed Central

    Annweiler, Eva; Michaelis, Walter; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic cometabolic conversion of benzothiophene was studied with a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture growing with naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy. The sulfate-reducing bacteria were not able to grow with benzothiophene as the primary substrate. Metabolite analysis was performed with culture supernatants obtained by cometabolization experiments and revealed the formation of three isomeric carboxybenzothiophenes. Two isomers were identified as 2-carboxybenzothiophene and 5-carboxybenzothiophene. In some experiments, further reduced dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene was identified. No other products of benzothiophene degradation could be determined. In isotope-labeling experiments with a [13C]bicarbonate-buffered culture medium, carboxybenzothiophenes which were significantly enriched in the 13C content of the carboxyl group were formed, indicating the addition of a C1 unit from bicarbonate to benzothiophene as the initial activation reaction. This finding was consistent with the results of earlier studies on anaerobic naphthalene degradation with the same culture, and we therefore propose that benzothiophene was cometabolically converted by the same enzyme system. Groundwater analyses of the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer from which the naphthalene-degrading enrichment culture was isolated exhibited the same carboxybenzothiophene isomers as the culture supernatants. In addition, the benzothiophene degradation products, in particular, dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene, were significantly enriched in the contaminated groundwater to concentrations almost the same as those of the parent compound, benzothiophene. The identification of identical metabolites of benzothiophene conversion in the sulfate-reducing enrichment culture and in the contaminated aquifer indicated that the same enzymatic reactions were responsible for the conversion of benzothiophene in situ. PMID:11679329

  2. A new dynamic model for bioavailability and cometabolism of micropollutants during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo-Mirquez, Liliana; Lardon, Laurent; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Patureau, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) are present in wastewater and sludge. Their possible impact to the environment contributes to their increasing scientific and social interest. Anaerobic digestion has been shown as a potential biological process for removal of these compounds. An accurate description of OMP distribution in the environmental system can be used to better understand which compartment is used for degradation and to improve their depletion in conventional wastewater treatment technologies. In this work, we proposed a dynamical model with a four-compartment distribution to describe the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) fate during anaerobic digestion. The model is calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from two continuous reactors fed with primary and secondary sludge operated under mesophilic conditions. A non-linear least square method was used to optimize the model parameters. The resulted model is in accordance with the experimental data. The PAH biodegradation rate is well modeled when considering the aqueous fraction (including free and sorbed to dissolved/colloidal matter PAHs) as the bioavailable compartment. It was also demonstrated in the simulations that the PAHs biodegradation is linked to a mechanism of cometabolism. The model proposed is potentially useful to better understand the micropollutant distribution, predict the fate of PAHs under anaerobic condition and help to optimize the operation process for their depletion. PMID:21719065

  3. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Biological treatment of TNT-contaminated soil. 1: Anaerobic cometabolic reduction and interaction of TNT and metabolites with soil components

    SciTech Connect

    Daun, G.; Lenke, H.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reuss, M.

    1998-07-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), found as a major contaminant at armament plants from the two world wars, is reduced by a variety of microorganisms when electron donors such as glucose are added. This study shows that the cometabolic reduction of TNT to 2,4,6-triaminotoluene by an undefined anaerobic consortium increased considerably with increasing TNT concentrations and decreased with decreasing concentrations and feeding rates of glucose. The interactions of TNT and its reduction products with montmorillonitic clay and humic acids were investigated in abiotic adsorption experiments and during the microbial reduction of TNT. The results indicate that reduction products of TNT particularly hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes and 2,4,6-triaminotoluene bind irreversibly to soil components, which would prevent or prolong mineralization of the contaminants. Irreversible binding also hinders a further spread of the contaminants through soil or leaching into the groundwater.

  5. Cometabolic bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-15

    Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

  6. Recalcitrance of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) to cometabolic degradation by pure cultures of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Megharaj, M; Jovcic, A; Boul, H L; Thiele, J H

    1997-08-01

    Pure cultures of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria capable of oxidation and reductive dehalogenation of chloroethylenes, and aerobic bacteria involved in biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were screened for their ability to cometabolize the persistent pollutant 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE). Bacterial cultures expressing methane monooxygenase (Methylosinus trichosporium), propane monooxygenase (Mycobacterium vaccae) and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhodococcus globerulus), as well as bacteria reductively dechlorinating chloroethylenes (Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium butyricum) could not degrade DDE. Cell-free extracts of M. trichosporium, M. vaccae, P. fluorescens and R. globerulus were also unable to transform DDE, indicating that cell wall and membrane diffusion barriers were not biodegradation limiting. These studies suggest that these bacteria can not degrade DDE, even when provided with cosubstrates that induce chlorophenyl- and dichloroethylene-group transforming enzymes. PMID:9294241

  7. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treatment of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H. Jr.; Earley, J.P.; Shen, Yutao.

    1989-09-01

    The work proposed is a laboratory investigation of the AnSBR (Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactors) for treatment of a synthetic coal conversion wastewater. Two different strategies will be pursued. First, an AnSBR will be operated to simulate the Anaerobic Up-flow Sludge Blanket Reactor in an attempt to develop a readily settleable granular sludge. Second, operating strategies will be sought to optimize treatment, without attempting to develop settleable granular sludge. These systems will require development of more elaborate decanting mechanisms, probably including use of tube settler technology. We will use: (1) screening tests to identify compounds which are amenable to anaerobic degradation; (2) to determine those which are toxic or have an inhibitory effect; and (3) to identify the dilution required to achieve anaerobic degradation of the synthetic waste water; acclimation tests of organisms collected from different sources to the synthetic coal conversion wastewater; and Automatic Laboratory AnSBR studies. A 4-liter reactor will be operated to maintain a settleable granular anaerobic sludge when treating the synthetic coal conversion wastewater. 72 refs., 238 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Evidence for Cometabolism in Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Stuart N.; O'Mara, Nancy L.; Alexander, Martin

    1980-01-01

    A procedure was developed to demonstrate cometabolism in models of natural ecosystems. The procedure involves showing the formation of metabolic products in high yield and the lack of incorporation of substrate carbon into cellular constituents. Samples of four 14C-labeled herbicides (trifluralin, profluralin, fluchloralin, and nitrofen) were incubated with sewage aerobically and under discontinuous anaerobiosis for 88 days, and fresh sewage was added at intervals. Products were formed from each of the herbicides in nonsterile, but not in sterile, sewage. The yield of recovered products reached 87% for profluralin and more than 90% for fluchloralin and trifluralin, and the number of products ranged from 6 for nitrofen to 12 for fluchloralin. Concentrating the sewage microflora 40-fold greatly enhanced the rate of conversion. None of the radioactivity from the herbicide entered the nucleoside pool of the sewage microflora. The lack of incorporation of substrate carbon into cells and the almost stoichiometric conversion of the substrate to organic products indicate that members of the microbial community were cometabolizing the test compounds. PMID:16345657

  9. Design Of Bioremediation Systems For Groundwater (Aerobic and Anaerobic Plus Representative Case Studies)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioremediation in the subsurface. The basics of aerobic, cometabolic, and anaerobic bioremediation are presented. Case studies from the Delaware Sand & Gravel Superfund Site, Dover Cometabolic Research Project and the SABR...

  10. Final Project Report - Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloriethylene Co-Metabolism: Co-Metabolic Enzyme Activity Probes and Modeling Co-Metabolism and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert C; Orr, Brennon R; Lee, M Hope; Delwiche, Mark

    2010-02-26

    Trichloroethene (TCE) (also known as trichloroethylene) is a common contaminant in groundwater. TCE is regulated in drinking water at a concentration of 5 µg/L, and a small mass of TCE has the potential to contaminant large volumes of water. The physical and chemical characteristics of TCE allow it to migrate quickly in most subsurface environments, and thus large plumes of contaminated groundwater can form from a single release. The migration and persistence of TCE in groundwater can be limited by biodegradation. TCE can be biodegraded via different processes under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Anaerobic biodegradation is widely recognized, but aerobic degradation is less well recognized. Under aerobic conditions, TCE can be oxidized to non hazardous conditions via cometabolic pathways. This study applied enzyme activity probes to demonstrate that cometabolic degradation of TCE occurs in aerobic groundwater at several locations, used laboratory microcosm studies to determine aerobic degradation rates, and extrapolated lab-measured rates to in situ rates based on concentrations of microorganisms with active enzymes involved in cometabolic TCE degradation. Microcosms were constructed using basalt chips that were inoculated with microorganisms to groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory Test Area North TCE plume by filling a set of Flow-Through In Situ Reactors (FTISRs) with chips and placing the FTISRs into the open interval of a well for several months. A parametric study was performed to evaluate predicted degradation rates and concentration trends using a competitive inhibition kinetic model, which accounts for competition for enzyme active sites by both a growth substrate and a cometabolic substrate. The competitive inhibition kinetic expression was programmed for use in the RT3D reactive transport package. Simulations of TCE plume evolution using both competitive inhibition kinetics and first order decay were performed.

  11. Anaerobic conversion of microalgal biomass to sustainable energy carriers--a review.

    PubMed

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2013-05-01

    This review discusses anaerobic production of methane, hydrogen, ethanol, butanol and electricity from microalgal biomass. The amenability of microalgal biomass to these bioenergy conversion processes is compared with other aquatic and terrestrial biomass sources. The highest energy yields (kJ g(-1) dry wt. microalgal biomass) reported in the literature have been 14.8 as ethanol, 14.4 as methane, 6.6 as butanol and 1.2 as hydrogen. The highest power density reported from microalgal biomass in microbial fuel cells has been 980 mW m(-2). Sequential production of different energy carriers increases attainable energy yields, but also increases investment and maintenance costs. Microalgal biomass is a promising feedstock for anaerobic energy conversion processes, especially for methanogenic digestion and ethanol fermentation. The reviewed studies have mainly been based on laboratory scale experiments and thus scale-up of anaerobic utilization of microalgal biomass for production of energy carriers is now timely and required for cost-effectiveness comparisons. PMID:23021960

  12. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. PMID:26630583

  13. Selective conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen by anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yafeng; Wan, Jingjing; Han, Sheng; Zhang, Shicheng; Luo, Gang

    2016-02-01

    A new method for the conversion of CO to H2 was developed by anaerobic mixed culture in the current study. Higher CO consumption rate was obtained by anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) compared to waste activated sludge (WAS) at 55 °C and pH 7.5. However, H2 was the intermediate and CH4 was the final product. Fermentation at pH 5.5 by AGS inhibited CH4 production, while the lower CO consumption rate (50% of that at pH 7.5) and the production of acetate were found. Fermentation at pH 7.5 with the addition of chloroform achieved efficient and selective conversion of CO to H2. Stable and efficient H2 production was achieved in a continuous reactor inoculated with AGS, and gas recirculation was crucial to increase the CO conversion efficiency. Microbial community analysis showed that high abundance (44%) of unclassified sequences and low relative abundance (1%) of known CO-utilizing bacteria Desulfotomaculum were enriched in the reactor. PMID:26692523

  14. Bio-energy conversion performance, biodegradability, and kinetic analysis of different fruit residues during discontinuous anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Yan, Hu; Liu, Yan; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Ruihong; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2016-06-01

    Huge amounts of fruit residues are produced and abandoned annually. The high moisture and organic contents of these residues makes them a big problem to the environment. Conversely, they are a potential resource to the world. Anaerobic digestion is a good way to utilize these organic wastes. In this study, the biomethane conversion performances of a large number of fruit residues were determined and compared using batch anaerobic digestion, a reliable and easily accessible method. The results showed that some fruit residues containing high contents of lipids and carbohydrates, such as loquat peels and rambutan seeds, were well fit for anaerobic digestion. Contrarily, residues with high lignin content were strongly recommended not to be used as a single substrate for methane production. Multiple linear regression model was adopted to simulate the correlation between the organic component of these fruit residues and their experimental methane yield, through which the experimental methane yield could probably be predicted for any other fruit residues. Four kinetic models were used to predict the batch anaerobic digestion process of different fruit residues. It was shown that the modified Gompertz and Cone models were better fit for the fruit residues compared to the first-order and Fitzhugh models. The first findings of this study could provide useful reference and guidance for future studies regarding the applications and potential utilization of fruit residues. PMID:27039123

  15. Cometabolism of low concentrations of propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate in sewage and lake water.

    PubMed

    Novick, N J; Alexander, M

    1985-04-01

    Low concentrations of propachlor (2-chloro-N-isopropylacetanilide) and alachlor [2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide] were not mineralized, cycloate (S-ethyl-N-ethylthiocyclohexanecarbamate) was slowly or not mineralized, and aniline and cyclohexylamine were readily mineralized in sewage and lake water. Propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate were extensively metabolized, but the products were organic. Little conversion of propachlor and alachlor was evident in sterilized sewage or lake water. The cometabolism of propachlor was essentially linear with time in lake water and was well fit by zero-order kinetics in short periods and by first-order kinetics in longer periods in sewage. The rate of cometabolism in sewage was directly proportional to propachlor concentration at levels from 63 pg/ml to more than 100 ng/ml. Glucose but not aniline increased the yield of products formed during propachlor cometabolism in sewage. No microorganism able to use propachlor as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated, but bacteria isolated from sewage and lake water metabolized this chemical. During the metabolism of this herbicide by two of the bacteria, none of the carbon was assimilated. Our data indicate that cometabolism of these pesticides takes place at concentrations of synthetic compounds that commonly occur in natural waters. PMID:4004208

  16. Cometabolism of low concentrations of propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate in sewage and lake water.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, N J; Alexander, M

    1985-01-01

    Low concentrations of propachlor (2-chloro-N-isopropylacetanilide) and alachlor [2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)acetanilide] were not mineralized, cycloate (S-ethyl-N-ethylthiocyclohexanecarbamate) was slowly or not mineralized, and aniline and cyclohexylamine were readily mineralized in sewage and lake water. Propachlor, alachlor, and cycloate were extensively metabolized, but the products were organic. Little conversion of propachlor and alachlor was evident in sterilized sewage or lake water. The cometabolism of propachlor was essentially linear with time in lake water and was well fit by zero-order kinetics in short periods and by first-order kinetics in longer periods in sewage. The rate of cometabolism in sewage was directly proportional to propachlor concentration at levels from 63 pg/ml to more than 100 ng/ml. Glucose but not aniline increased the yield of products formed during propachlor cometabolism in sewage. No microorganism able to use propachlor as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated, but bacteria isolated from sewage and lake water metabolized this chemical. During the metabolism of this herbicide by two of the bacteria, none of the carbon was assimilated. Our data indicate that cometabolism of these pesticides takes place at concentrations of synthetic compounds that commonly occur in natural waters. PMID:4004208

  17. Conversion of Cn-Unsaturated into Cn-2-Saturated LCFA Can Occur Uncoupled from Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Ana J; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Guedes, Ana P; Stams, Alfons J M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2016-03-15

    Fat, oils, and grease present in complex wastewater can be readily converted to methane, but the energy potential of these compounds is not always recyclable, due to incomplete degradation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) released during lipids hydrolysis. Oleate (C18:1) is generally the dominant LCFA in lipid-containing wastewater, and its conversion in anaerobic bioreactors results in palmitate (C16:0) accumulation. The reason why oleate is continuously converted to palmitate without further degradation via β-oxidation is still unknown. In this work, the influence of methanogenic activity in the initial conversion steps of unsaturated LCFA was studied in 10 bioreactors continuously operated with saturated or unsaturated C16- and C18-LCFA, in the presence or absence of the methanogenic inhibitor bromoethanesulfonate (BrES). Saturated Cn-2-LCFA accumulated both in the presence and absence of BrES during the degradation of unsaturated Cn-LCFA, and represented more than 50% of total LCFA. In the presence of BrES further conversion of saturated intermediates did not proceed, not even when prolonged batch incubation was applied. As the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA degradation proceed uncoupled from methanogenesis, accumulation of saturated LCFA can be expected. Analysis of the active microbial communities suggests a role for facultative anaerobic bacteria in the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA biodegradation. Understanding this role is now imperative to optimize methane production from LCFA. PMID:26810160

  18. Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered for Anaerobic Conversion of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Sugars to Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced high-throughput screening has resulted in the discovery of several yeast strains that are capable of anaerobically utilizing pentose, as well as hexose sugars. The growth and ethanol production of these developed strains will be described. The paradigm for using genetically engineered Sac...

  19. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene in a bubble column bioscrubber.

    PubMed

    Hecht, V; Brebbermann, D; Bremer, P; Deckwer, W D

    1995-08-20

    A bubble column bioreactor was used as bioscrubber to carry out a feasibility study for the cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). Phenol was used as cosubstrate and inducer. The bioreactor was operated like a conventional chemostat with regard to the cosubstrate and low dilution rates were used to minimize the liquid outflow. TCE degradation measurements were carried out using superficial gas velocities between 0.47and 4.07 cm s(-1) and TCE gas phase loads between 0.07 and 0.40 mg L(-1) Depending on the superficial gas velocity used, degrees of conversion between 30% and 80% were obtained. A simplified reactor model using plug flow for the gas phase, mixed flow for the liquid phase, and pseudo first order reaction kinetics for the conversionof TCE was established. The model is able to give a reasonable approximation of the experimental data. TCE degradation at the used experimental conditions is mainly limited by reaction rate rather than by mass transfer rate. The model can be used to calculate the reactor volume and the biomass concentration for a required conversion. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc. PMID:18623422

  20. Insights into plant biomass conversion from the genome of the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii DSM 6725

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Phuongan; Kataeva, Irina; Yang, Sung-Jae; Zhou, Fengfeng; Yin, Yanbin; Chou, Wenchi; Poole, Farris L.; Westpheling, Janet; Hettich, Robert; Giannone, Richard; Lewis, Derrick L.; Kelly, Robert; Gilbert, Harry J.; Henrissat, Bernard; Xu, Ying; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2011-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii DSM 6725 utilizes various polysaccharides and grows efficiently on untreated high-lignin grasses and hardwood at an optimum temperature of ∼80°C. It is a promising anaerobic bacterium for studying high-temperature biomass conversion. Its genome contains 2666 protein-coding sequences organized into 1209 operons. Expression of 2196 genes (83%) was confirmed experimentally. At least 322 genes appear to have been obtained by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Putative functions were assigned to 364 conserved/hypothetical protein (C/HP) genes. The genome contains 171 and 88 genes related to carbohydrate transport and utilization, respectively. Growth on cellulose led to the up-regulation of 32 carbohydrate-active (CAZy), 61 sugar transport, 25 transcription factor and 234 C/HP genes. Some C/HPs were overproduced on cellulose or xylan, suggesting their involvement in polysaccharide conversion. A unique feature of the genome is enrichment with genes encoding multi-modular, multi-functional CAZy proteins organized into one large cluster, the products of which are proposed to act synergistically on different components of plant cell walls and to aid the ability of C. bescii to convert plant biomass. The high duplication of CAZy domains coupled with the ability to acquire foreign genes by LGT may have allowed the bacterium to rapidly adapt to changing plant biomass-rich environments. PMID:21227922

  1. Linking pyrolysis and anaerobic digestion (Py-AD) for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Daniele; Torri, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Biogas is a mixture of CO2 and CH4 produced by a consortia of Bacteria and Archeae operating in anaerobic digestion (AD) plants. Biogas can be burnt as such in engines to produce electricity and heat or upgraded into biomethane. Biomethane is a drop-in fuel that can be injected in the natural gas grid or utilised as a transport fuel. While a wide array of biomass feedstock can be degraded into biogas, unconverted lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose end up in the co-product digestate leaving a large portion of chemical energy unutilised. Pyrolysis (Py) transforms in a single step and without chemical reagents the lignocellulose matrix into gaseous (syngas), liquid (bio-oil, pyrolysis oil) and solid (biochar) fractions for the development of renewable fuels and materials. The Py route applied downstream to AD is actively investigated in order to valorise the solid digestate presently destined only for soil applications. Coupling Py upstream to AD is an emerging field of research aimed at expanding the feedstock towards biologically recalcitrant substrates (wood, paper, sludge). The biomethanation potential was demonstrated for gaseous (H2/CO) and water soluble pyrolysis products, while the influence of insoluble pyrolytic lignin remains fairly unexplored. Biochar can promote the production of biomethane by acting as a support for microorganism colonisation, conductor for direct interspecies electron transfer, sorbent for hydrophobic inhibitors, and reactant for in situ biogas upgrading. Enhancing the advantages (carbon source) over the side effects (toxicity) of Py fractions represents the main challenge of Py-AD. This can be addressed by increasing the selectivity of the thermochemical process or improving the ecological flexibility of mixed bacterial consortia towards chemically complex environments. PMID:26948108

  2. Modeling of trihalomethane cometabolism in nitrifying biofilters.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2007-01-01

    The computer program AQUASIM was used to model biofilter experiments seeded with Lake Austin, Texas mixed-culture nitrifiers. These biofilters degraded four trihalomethanes (THMs) (trichloromethane (TCM) or chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM) or bromoform) commonly found in treated drinking water. Apparent steady-state data from the biofilter experiments and supporting batch experiments were used to estimate kinetic parameters for TCM, DBCM and ammonia degradation. Subsequently, the model was verified against other experimental biofilter data. To allow for full-scale simulations, BDCM and TBM rate constants were estimated using data from batch kinetic studies. Finally, the model was used to simulate full-scale filter performance under different filter surface loading rates and THM speciation seen in practice. Overall, total THM removals ranged from 16% to 54% in these simulations with influent total THM concentrations of 75-82microg/L, which illustrates the potential of THM cometabolism to have a significant impact on treated water quality. PMID:17129595

  3. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  4. Cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Allen C.; Wilson, Timothy P.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory microcosms were used to determine the concentrations of oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that optimize trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in sediment and ground-water samples from a TCE-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, Morris County, New Jersey. The mechanism for degradation is the cometabolic activity of methanotrophic bacteria. The laboratory data will be used to support a field study designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of combining air sparging with cometabolic degradation of TCE for the purpose of aquifer remediation. Microcosms were constructed in autoclaved 250-mL (milliliter) amber glass bottles with valves for repeated headspace sampling. Equal volumes (25 mL) of sediment and ground water, collected from a depth of 40 feet, were added. TCE was added to attain initial aqueous concentrations equal to the field level of 1,400 mu g/L (micrograms per liter). Nine microcosms were constructed with initial headspace O2 concentrations of 5%, 10%, or 14% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5%, 3%, or 5%, with nitrogen making up the balance. Sterile controls, controls without CH4, and controls without sediment were also constructed. A 4-mL gas sample was removed periodically and TCE, O2 , CH4 , and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured by using gas chromatography. As biodegradation proceeded, the decrease in O2, CH4 , and TCE concentrations and the production of CO2 were monitored. An initial acclimation period of at least 100 days was observed in those microcosms in which significant microbial activity occurred, as determined from decreases in O2 and CH4 concentrations and an increase in CO2 content. Degradation of TCE occurred with O2 concentrations of 2.7 to 8.7% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5 to 3.5%. Microcosms that initially contained 10% O2 and 3% CH4 showed the greatest microbial activity and the greatest amount of TCE degradation. The greatest rates of TCE degradation occurred when O2 and CH4 headspace concentrations reached

  5. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Distribution System Relevant Mixed Culture Nitrifiers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine (NH2Cl) is increasingly used as a residual disinfectant. A major problem related to NH2Cl is nitrification in distribution systems, leading to rapid NH2Cl residual loss. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia (NH3) to nitrite, can cometabolize chem...

  6. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Nitrosomonas europaea under Distribution System Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch kinetic experiments were carried out with a pure culture of N. europaea to characterize the kinetics of NH2Cl cometabolism. Nitrite, nitrate, NH2Cl, ammonia and pH were measured. The experiments were performed at a variety of conditions relevant to distribution system nitri...

  7. Modelling cometabolic biotransformation of organic micropollutants in nitrifying reactors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E; Carballa, M; Omil, F; Lema, J M

    2014-11-15

    Cometabolism is the ability of microorganisms to degrade non-growth substrates in the presence of primary substrates, being the main removal mechanism behind the biotransformation of organic micropollutants in wastewater treatment plants. In this paper, a cometabolic Monod-type kinetics, linking biotransformation of micropollutants with primary substrate degradation, was applied to a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) reactor operated under different operational conditions (hydraulic retention time (HRT) and nitrifying activity). A dynamic model of the bioreactor was built taking into account biotransformation, sorption and volatilization. The micropollutant transformation capacity (Tc), the half-saturation constant (Ksc) and the solid-liquid partitioning coefficient (Kd) of several organic micropollutants were estimated at 25 °C using an optimization algorithm to fit experimental data to the proposed model with the cometabolic Monod-type biotransformation kinetics. The cometabolic Monod-type kinetic model was validated under different HRTs (1.0-3.7 d) and nitrification rates (0.12-0.45 g N/g VSS d), describing more accurately the fate of those compounds affected by the biological activity of nitrifiers (ibuprofen, naproxen, erythromycin and roxithromycin) compared to the commonly applied pseudo-first order micropollutant biotransformation kinetics, which does not link biotransformation of micropollutants to consumption of primary substrate. Furthermore, in contrast to the pseudo-first order biotransformation constant (k(biol)), the proposed cometabolic kinetic coefficients are independent of operational conditions such as the nitrogen loading rate applied. Also, the influence of the kinetic parameters on the biotransformation efficiency of NAS reactors, defined as the relative amount of the total inlet micropollutant load being biotransformed, was assessed considering different HRTs and nitrification rates. PMID:25150522

  8. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  9. High-throughput pyrosequencing analysis of bacteria relevant to cometabolic and metabolic degradation of ibuprofen in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifei; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Guibing; Liu, Yu; Ng, Wun Jern; Appan, Adhityan; Tan, Soon Keat

    2016-08-15

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceutical residues including ibuprofen on the aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates has attracted growing attention to the pharmaceutical pollution control using constructed wetlands, but there lacks of an insight into the relevant microbial degradation mechanisms. This study investigated the bacteria associated with the cometabolic and metabolic degradation of ibuprofen in a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system by high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis. The ibuprofen degradation dynamics, bacterial diversity and evenness, and bacterial community structure in a planted bed with Typha angustifolia and an unplanted bed (control) were compared. The results showed that the plants promoted the microbial degradation of ibuprofen, especially at the downstream zones of wetland. However, at the upstream one-third zone of wetland, the presence of plants did not significantly enhance ibuprofen degradation, probably due to the much greater contribution of cometabolic behaviors of certain non-ibuprofen-degrading microorganisms than that of the plants. By analyzing bacterial characteristics, we found that: (1) The aerobic species of family Flavobacteriaceae, family Methylococcaceae and genus Methylocystis, and the anaerobic species of family Spirochaetaceae and genus Clostridium_sensu_stricto were the most possible bacteria relevant to the cometabolic degradation of ibuprofen; (2) The family Rhodocyclaceae and the genus Ignavibacterium closely related to the plants appeared to be associated with the metabolic degradation of ibuprofen. PMID:27110975

  10. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27196729

  11. Toward Narrowing Fermentation Endproduct Distribution in Undefined Mixed Culture Anaerobic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Corn Fiber to Butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of second-generation renewable energy sources to useful products is gaining attention as an alternative to traditional conversion of sugar and starch-based renewable energy crops. The natural recalcitrance of second-generation energy resources, such as (ligno)cellulosic feedstock, makes ...

  12. STRATEGIES FOR THE AEROBIC CO-METABOLISM OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS. (R825689C019)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Recent field and laboratory studies have evaluated the potential for aerobic co-metabolism of chlorinated solvents. Different co-metabolic substrates and different methods of application have been tried, including growing indigenous microbes in situ, an...

  13. High pressure homogenization and two-phased anaerobic digestion for enhanced biogas conversion from municipal waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Wahidunnabi, Abdullahil K; Eskicioglu, Cigdem

    2014-12-01

    This study compared advanced anaerobic digestion combining two-phased anaerobic digestion (2PAD) with high pressure homogenization (HPH) pretreatment to conventional anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge at laboratory scale. The study began with examination of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) solubilization due to HPH pretreatment at different pressure (0-12,000 psi) and chemical dose (0.009-0.036 g NaOH/g total solids). Homogenizing pressure was found as the most significant factor (p-value < 0.05) for increasing solubilization of particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biopolymers in TWAS. Based on the preliminary results, a pretreatment with chemical dose of 0.009 g NaOH/g total solids and pressure of 12,000 psi was selected for digester studies. Upon acclimation of anaerobic inocula to pretreatments, a total number of twelve lab-scale digesters were operated under scenarios including single-stage (control), 2PAD, and HPH coupled with 2PAD (HPH + 2PAD) at sludge retention times (SRTs) of 20, 14 and 7 days. Between mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures, mesophilic digestion was found to benefit more from pretreatments. Relative (to control) improvements in methane yield and volatile solids (VS) removals increased noticeably as SRT was shortened from 20 to 14 and 7 days. HPH + 2PAD system was found to achieve the maximum methane production (0.61-1.32 L CH4/Ldigester-d) and VS removals (43-64%). Thermophilic control, 2PAD and HPH + 2PAD systems resulted in significant pathogen removals meeting Class A biosolids requirements according to Organic Matter Recycling Regulations (OMRR) of British Columbia (BC) at 20 d SRT. Energy analysis indicated that all the digestion scenarios attained positive energy balance with 2PAD system operated at 20 d SRT producing the maximum net energy of 4.76 GJ/tonne CODadded. PMID:25243656

  14. Cometabolic degradation of lincomycin in a Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) and its microbial community.

    PubMed

    Li, Yancheng; Zhou, Jian; Gong, Benzhou; Wang, Yingmu; He, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Cometabolism technology was employed to degrade lincomycin wastewater in Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR). In contrast with the control group, the average removal rate of lincomycin increased by 56.0% and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) increased by 52.5% in the cometabolic system with glucose as growth substrate. Under the same condition, Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP) was 85.1±7.3mV in cometabolic system and 198.2±8.4mV in the control group, indicating that glucose changed the bulk ORP and created an appropriate growing environment for function bacteria. Functional groups of lincomycin were effectively degraded in cometabolic system proved by FTIR and GC-MS. Meanwhile, results of DGGE and 16S rDNA showed great difference in dominant populations between cometabolic system and the control group. In cometabolic system, Roseovarius (3.35%), Thiothrix (2.74%), Halomonas (2.49%), Ignavibacterium (2.02%), and TM7_genus_incertae_sedis (1.93%) were verified as dominant populations at genus level. Cometabolism may be synergistically caused by different functional dominant bacteria. PMID:27183234

  15. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    PubMed

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  16. Carbon conversion efficiency and population dynamics of a marine algae-bacteria consortium growing on simplified synthetic digestate: first step in a bioprocess coupling algal production and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Christophe; Bougaran, Gaël; Garnier, Matthieu; Hamelin, Jérôme; Leboulanger, Christophe; Le Chevanton, Myriam; Mostajir, Behzad; Sialve, Bruno; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Fouilland, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Association of microalgae culture and anaerobic digestion seems a promising technology for sustainable algal biomass and biogas production. The use of digestates for sustaining the growth of microalgae reduces the costs and the environmental impacts associated with the substantial algal nutrient requirements. A natural marine algae-bacteria consortium was selected by growing on a medium containing macro nutrients (ammonia, phosphate and acetate) specific of a digestate, and was submitted to a factorial experimental design with different levels of temperature, light and pH. The microalgal consortium reached a maximum C conversion efficiency (i.e. ratio between carbon content produced and carbon supplied through light photosynthetic C conversion and acetate) of 3.6%. The presence of bacteria increased this maximum C conversion efficiency up to 6.3%. The associated bacterial community was considered beneficial to the total biomass production by recycling the carbon lost during photosynthesis and assimilating organic by-products from anaerobic digestion. PMID:22728186

  17. Aerobic Microbial Cometabolism of Benzothiophene and 3-Methylbenzothiophene

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Phillip M.; Grbić-Galić, Dunja

    1991-01-01

    A culture enriched by growth on 1-methylnaphthalene was used to study the aerobic biotransformations of benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. Neither of the sulfur heterocyclic compounds would support growth, but they were transformed by the culture growing on 1-methylnaphthalene or glucose or peptone. Cometabolism of benzothiophene yielded benzothiophene-2,3-dione, whereas that of 3-methylbenzothiophene yielded 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfoxide and the corresponding sulfone. The identities of the dione and sulfone were verified by comparison with authentic standards. The identity of the sulfoxide was surmised from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results. Oxidation preferentially occurred at carbons 2 and 3 in benzothiophene, but when carbon 3 was substituted with a methyl group, as in 3-methylbenzothiophene, the sulfur atom was oxygenated. The predominant microorganism in the enrichment culture was a Pseudomonas strain, designated BT1, which mineralized aromatic but not aliphatic hydrocarbons. This isolate cometabolized benzothiophene and 3-methylbenzothiophene. There was no evidence that it could metabolize 3-methylbenzothiophene sulfone. When 3-methylbenzothiophene was added to Prudhoe Bay crude oil, the sulfur heterocycle was oxidized to its sulfoxide and sulfone by strain BT1 as it grew on the aromatic hydrocarbons in the crude oil. Benzothiophene-2,3-dione was found to be chemically unstable when incubated with Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Thus its formation from benzothiophene in the presence of crude oil could not be determined. PMID:16348471

  18. Energy conversion of biomass crops and agroindustrial residues by combined biohydrogen/biomethane system and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Corneli, Elisa; Dragoni, Federico; Adessi, Alessandra; De Philippis, Roberto; Bonari, Enrico; Ragaglini, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of ensiled giant reed, ensiled maize, ensiled olive pomace, wheat bran for combined systems (CS: dark fermentation+anaerobic digestion (AD)) producing hydrogen-rich biogas (biohythane), tested in batch under basic operational conditions (mesophilic temperatures, no pH control). Substrates were also analyzed under a single stage AD batch test, in order to investigate the effects of DF on estimated energy recovery (ER) in combined systems. In CS, maize and wheat bran exhibited the highest hydrogen potential (13.8 and 18.9NLkgVS(-1)) and wheat bran the highest methane potential (243.5NLkgVS(-1)). In one-stage AD, giant reed, maize and wheat bran showed the highest methane production (239.5, 267.3 and 260.0NLkgVS(-1)). Butyrate/acetate ratio properly described the dark fermentation, correlating with hydrogen production (r=0.92). Wheat bran proved to be a promising residue for CS in terms of hydrogen/methane potential and ER. PMID:27038259

  19. COMETABOLISM OF TRIHALOMETHANES BY NITRIFYING BIOFILTERS UNDER DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PLANT CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: FP916412
    Title: Cometabolism of Trihalomethanes by Nitrifying Biofilters Under Drinking Water Treatment Plant Conditions
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): David G. Wahman
    Institution: University of Texas at Austin
    EPA ...

  20. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  1. Cometabolic degradation of organic wastewater micropollutants by activated sludge and sludge-inherent microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Majewsky, Marius

    2014-08-01

    Municipal wastewaters contain a multitude of organic trace pollutants. Often, their biodegradability by activated sludge microorganisms is decisive for their elimination during wastewater treatment. Since the amounts of micropollutants seem too low to serve as growth substrate, cometabolism is supposed to be the dominating biodegradation process. Nevertheless, as many biodegradation studies were performed without the intention to discriminate between metabolic and cometabolic processes, the specific contribution of the latter to substance transformations is often not clarified. This minireview summarizes current knowledge about the cometabolic degradation of organic trace pollutants by activated sludge and sludge-inherent microorganisms. Due to their relevance for communal wastewater contamination, the focus is laid on pharmaceuticals, personal care products, antibiotics, estrogens, and nonylphenols. Wherever possible, reference is made to the molecular process level, i.e., cometabolic pathways, involved enzymes, and formed transformation products. Particular cometabolic capabilities of different activated sludge consortia and various microbial species are highlighted. Process conditions favoring cometabolic activities are emphasized. Finally, knowledge gaps are identified, and research perspectives are outlined. PMID:24866947

  2. Cometabolic degradation of TCE and DCE without intermediate toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bielefeldt, A.R.; Stensel, H.D.; Strand, S.E.

    1995-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) cometabolic degradation by a filamentous, phenol-oxidizing enrichment from a surface-water source were investigated in batch tests. No intermediate toxicity effects were evident during TCE or DCE degradation for loadings up to 0.5 mg TCE/mg VSS or 0.26 mg DCE/mg VSS. Phenol addition up to 40 mg/L did not inhibit TCE or DCE degradation. TCE specific degradation rates ranged from 0.28 to 0.51 g TCE/g VSS-d with phenol present, versus an average endogenous rate of 0.18 g TCE/g VSS-d. DCE specific degradation rates ranged from 0.79 to 2.92 g DCE/g VSS-d with phenol present, versus 0.27 to 1.5 g DCE/g VSS-d for endogenous conditions. There was no inhibition of DCE degradation rates at concentrations as high as 83 mg/L. TCE degradation rates declined between 40 and 130 mg/L TCE. Perchloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chloroform were not degraded.

  3. Cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in a biofilm reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, J.P.; Arvin, E.; Jensen, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in an aerobic biofilm system with toluene as primary substrate was investigated. TCE degradation rate was first-order, giving an average first-order surface removal rate constant, k{sub 1,a}, of 0.26 m/d. TCE was probably degraded by a toluene-induced enzyme. However, if toluene was provided in high concentrations, degradation of TCE was inhibited. Furthermore, it appeared that TCE inhibited toluene degradation. This inhibition increased with the TCE concentration in the reactor, but it decreased with an increasing toluene concentration. The authors conclude that these interactions could be the result of a competitive inhibition between TCE and toluene. Practically, this shows that degradation of TCE can be maximized if an optimum concentration of toluene is provided. An example presented in this paper reveals that the optimum toluene concentration was in the range of 200 to 500 {micro}g/L for a TCE inlet concentration of 135 {micro}g/L. Under these optimal conditions, the TCE degradation rate was 0.045 g m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}, leading to a first-order surface removal rate constant of 0.4 m/d and a transformation yield of 0.05 g TCE/g toluene degraded.

  4. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  5. Cometabolic degradation kinetics of TCE and phenol by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Min; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Huang, Chih; Lin, Jui-Che

    2008-08-01

    Modeling of cometabolic kinetics is important for better understanding of degradation reaction and in situ application of bio-remediation. In this study, a model incorporated cell growth and decay, loss of transformation activity, competitive inhibition between growth substrate and non-growth substrate and self-inhibition of non-growth substrate was proposed to simulate the degradation kinetics of phenol and trichloroethylene (TCE) by Pseudomonas putida. All the intrinsic parameters employed in this study were measured independently, and were then used for predicting the batch experimental data. The model predictions conformed well to the observed data at different phenol and TCE concentrations. At low TCE concentrations (<2 mg l(-1)), the models with or without self-inhibition of non-growth substrate both simulated the experimental data well. However, at higher TCE concentrations (>6 mg l(-1)), only the model considering self-inhibition can describe the experimental data, suggesting that a self-inhibition of TCE was present in the system. The proposed model was also employed in predicting the experimental data conducted in a repeated batch reactor, and good agreements were observed between model predictions and experimental data. The results also indicated that the biomass loss in the degradation of TCE below 2 mg l(-1) can be totally recovered in the absence of TCE for the next cycle, and it could be used for the next batch experiment for the degradation of phenol and TCE. However, for higher concentration of TCE (>6 mg l(-1)), the recovery of biomass may not be as good as that at lower TCE concentrations. PMID:18586301

  6. Cometabolic bioreactor demonstration at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Donaldson, T.L.; Jennings, H.L.; Morris, M.I.; Palumbo, A.V.; Herbes, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a demonstration of cometabolic technology for bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents. The technology demonstration was located at a seep from the K-1070-C/D Classified Burial Ground at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The technology demonstration was designed to evaluate the performance of two different types of cometabolic processes. In both cases, the TCE is cometabolized in the sense that utilization of a different primary substrate is necessary to obtain the simultaneous cometabolism of TCE. Trichloroethylene alone is unable to support growth and maintenance of the microorganisms. Methanotrophic (methane-utilizing) technology was demonstrated first; aromatic-utilizing microorganisms were demonstrated later. The demonstration was based on scaleup of laboratory and bench-scale prototype equipment that was used to establish the technical feasibility of the processes.This report documents the operation of the methanotrophic bioreactor system to treat the seep water at the demonstration site. The initial objectives were to demonstrate stable operation of the bioreactors and associated equipment, including the pretreatment and effluent polishing steps; and evaluate the biodegradation of TCE and other organics in the seep water for the three operating modes--air oxidation pretreatment, steam-stripping pretreatment, and no pretreatment.

  7. Cometabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether by a new microbial consortium ERS.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Li, Danni; Yan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The release of methyl tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) into the environment has increased the worldwide concern about the pollution of MTBE. In this paper, a microbial consortium was isolated from the soil sample near an oil station, which can degrade MTBE directly with a low biomass yield and MTBE degrading efficiency. Further research has indicated that this consortium can degrade MTBE efficiently when grown on n-octane as the cometabolic substrate. The results of 16S rDNA based on phylogenetic analysis of the selected operating taxonomic units (OTUs) involved in the consortium revealed that one OTU was related to Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which could cometabolically degrade MTBE on the growth of n-octane. This may help explain why n-octane could be the optimal cometabolic substrate of the consortium for MTBE degradation. Furthermore, the degradation of MTBE was observed along with the consumption of n-octane. Different K s values for MTBE were observed for cells grown with or without n-octane, suggesting that different enzymes are responsible for the oxidation of MTBE in cells grown on n-octane or MTBE. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism. PMID:25697553

  8. Exploring methane-oxidizing communities for the co-metabolic degradation of organic micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Benner, Jessica; De Smet, Delfien; Ho, Adrian; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Heylen, Kim; Boon, Nico

    2015-04-01

    Methane-oxidizing cultures from five different inocula were enriched to be used for co-metabolic degradation of micropollutants. In a first screening, 18 different compounds were tested for degradation with the cultures as well as with four pure methane-oxidizing bacterial (MOB) strains. The tested compounds included pharmaceuticals, chemical additives, pesticides, and their degradation products. All enriched cultures were successful in the degradation of at least four different pollutants, but the compounds degraded most often were sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and benzotriazole (BTZ). Addition of acetylene, a specific methane monooxygenase (MMO) inhibitor, revealed that SMX and BTZ were mainly degraded co-metabolically by the present MOB. The pure MOB cultures exhibited less degradation potential, while SMX and BTZ were also degraded by three of the four tested pure strains. For MOB, copper (Cu(2+)) concentration is often an important factor, as several species have the ability to express a soluble MMO (sMMO) if the Cu(2+) concentration is low. In literature, this enzyme is often described to have a broader compound range for co-metabolic degradation of pollutants, in particular when it comes to aromatic structures. However, this study indicated that co-metabolic degradation of the aromatic compounds SMX and BTZ was possible at high Cu(2+) concentration, most probably catalyzed by pMMO. PMID:25487887

  9. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Wang, Shan; Yan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE) was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C₅-C₈), accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L) and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition. PMID:27608032

  10. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 in a chemostat with toluene as the primary substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Landa, A S; Sipkema, E M; Weijma, J; Beenackers, A A; Dolfing, J; Janssen, D B

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 is capable of cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) if the organism is grown on certain aromatic compounds. To obtain more insight into the kinetics of TCE degradation and the effect of TCE transformation products, we have investigated the simultaneous conversion of toluene and TCE in steady-state continuous culture. The organism was grown in a chemostat with toluene as the carbon and energy source at a range of volumetric TCE loading rates, up to 330 mumol/liter/h. The specific TCE degradation activity of the cells and the volumetric activity increased, but the efficiency of TCE conversion dropped when the TCE loading was elevated from 7 to 330 mumol/liter/h. At TCE loading rates of up to 145 mumol/liter/h, the specific toluene conversion rate and the molar growth yield of the cells were not affected by the presence of TCE. The response of the system to varying TCE loading rates was accurately described by a mathematical model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and competitive inhibition. A high load of 3,400 mumol of TCE per liter per h for 12 h caused inhibition of toluene and TCE conversion, but reduction of the TCE load to the original nontoxic level resulted in complete recovery of the system within 2 days. These results show that P. cepacia can stably and continuously degrade toluene and TCE simultaneously in a single-reactor system without biomass retention and that the organism is more resistant to high concentrations and shock loadings of TCE than Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. PMID:7524444

  11. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  12. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  13. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of coloured textile effluents using sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C B; Carliell, C M; Wheatley, A D

    2002-04-01

    Conventional biological wastewater treatment plants do not easily degrade the dyes and polyvinyl alcohols (PVOH) in textile effluents. Results are reported on the possible advantages of anaerobic/aerobic cometabolism in sequenced redox reactors. A six phase anaerobic/aerobic sequencing laboratory scale batch reactor was developed to treat a synthetic textile effluent. The wastewater included PVOH from desizing and an azo dye (Remazol Black). The reactor removed 66% of the applied total organic carbon (load F: M 0.15) compared to 76% from a control reactor without dye. Colour removal was 94% but dye metabolites caused reactor instability. Aromatic amines from the anaerobic breakdown of the azo dyes were not completely mineralised by the aerobic phase. Breakdown of PVOH by the reactor (20-30%) was not as good as previous reports with entirely aerobic cultures. The anaerobic cultures were able to tolerate the oxygen and methane continued to be produced but there was a deterioration in settlement. PMID:12092574

  14. DEAMOX--new biological nitrogen removal process based on anaerobic ammonia oxidation coupled to sulphide-driven conversion of nitrate into nitrite.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey; Gladchenko, Marina; Mulder, Arnold; Versprille, Bram

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports about the successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for treatment of typical strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. To generate sulphide and ammonia, a Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor was used as a pre-treatment step. The UASB effluent was split and partially fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part was directly fed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance and volumetric nitrogen loading rates of the DEAMOX reactor well above 1000 mgN/l/d with total nitrogen removal efficiencies of around 90% were obtained after long-term (410 days) optimisation of the process. Important prerequisites for this performance are appropriate influent ratios of the key species fed to the DEAMOX reactor, namely influent N-NO(x)/N-NH(4) ratios >1.2 (stoichiometry of the anammox reaction) and influent S-H(2)S/N-NO(3) ratios >0.57 mgS/mgN (stoichiometry of the sulphide-driven denitrification of nitrate to nitrite). The paper further describes some characteristics of the DEAMOX sludge as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterisation. PMID:16893559

  15. Effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time on performance of a prototype single-stage anaerobic digester for conversion of food wastes to biogas and energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Ratanatamskul, Chavalit; Saleart, Tawinan

    2016-04-01

    Food wastes have been recognized as the largest waste stream and accounts for 39.25 % of total municipal solid waste in Thailand. Chulalongkorn University has participated in the program of in situ energy recovery from food wastes under the Ministry of Energy (MOE), Thailand. This research aims to develop a prototype single-stage anaerobic digestion system for biogas production and energy recovery from food wastes inside Chulalongkorn University. Here, the effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time were investigated as the main key parameters for the system design and operation. From the results obtained in this study, it was found that the sludge recirculation rate of 100 % and the mixing time of 60 min per day were the most suitable design parameters to achieve high efficiencies in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total solids (TS), and total volatile solid (TVS) removal and also biogas production by this prototype anaerobic digester. The obtained biogas production was found to be 0.71 m(3)/kg COD and the composition of methane was 61.6 %. Moreover, the efficiencies of COD removal were as high as 82.9 % and TVS removal could reach 83.9 % at the optimal condition. Therefore, the developed prototype single-stage anaerobic digester can be highly promising for university canteen application to recover energy from food wastes via biogas production. PMID:25864735

  16. The Co-Metabolism within the Gut-Brain Metabolic Interaction: Potential Targets for Drug Treatment and Design.

    PubMed

    Obrenovich, Mark; Flückiger, Rudolf; Sykes, Lorraine; Donskey, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    We know that within the complex mammalian gut is any number of metabolic biomes. The gut has been sometimes called the "second brain" within the "gut-brain axis". A more informative term would be the gut-brain metabolic interactome, which is coined here to underscore the relationship between the digestive system and cognitive function or dysfunction as the case may be. Co-metabolism between the host and the intestinal microbiota is essential for life's processes. How diet, lifestyle, antibiotics and other factors shape the gut microbiome constitutes a rapidly growing area of research. Conversely, the gut microbiome also affects mammalian systems. Metabolites of the gut-brain axis are potential targets for treatment and drug design since the interaction or biochemical interplay results in net metabolite production or end-products with either positive or negative effects on human health. This review explores the gut-brain metabolic interactome, with particular emphasis on drug design and treatment strategies and how commensal bacteria or their disruption lead to dysbiosis and the effect this has on neurochemistry. Increasing data indicate that the intestinal microbiome can affect neurobiology, from mental and even behavioral health to memory, depression, mood, anxiety, obesity, cravings and even the creation and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. PMID:26831263

  17. NADH-regulated metabolic model for growth of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene and optimization of bioreactor system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipkema, E.M.; Koning, W. de; Ganzeveld, K.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    2000-04-01

    A metabolic model describing growth of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and cometabolic contaminant conversion is used to optimize trichloroethene (TCE) conversion in a bioreactor system. Different process configurations are compared: a growing culture and a nongrowing culture to which TCE is added at both constant and pulsed levels. The growth part of the model, presented in the preceding article, gives a detailed description of the NADH regeneration required for continued TCE conversion. It is based on the metabolic pathways, includes Michaelis--Menten type enzyme kinetics, and uses NADH as an integrating and controlling factor. Here the model is extended to include TCE transformation, incorporating the kinetics of contaminant conversion, the related NADH consumption, toxic effects, and competitive inhibition between TCE and methane. The model realistically describes the experimentally observed negative effects of the TCE conversion products, both on soluble methane monooxygenase through the explicit incorporation of the activity of this enzyme and on cell viability through the distinction between dividing and nondividing cells. In growth-based systems, the toxicity of the TCE conversion products causes rapid cell death, which leads to wash-out of suspended cultures at low TCE loads. Enzyme activity, which is less sensitive, is hardly affected by the toxicity of the TCE conversion products and ensures high conversions (>95%) up to the point of wash-out. Pulsed addition of TCE leads to a complete loss of viability. However, the remaining enzyme activity can still almost completely covert the subsequently added large TCE pulses. This emphasizes the inefficient use of enzyme activity in growth-based systems. A comparison of growth-based and similar non-growth-based systems reveals that the highest TCE conversions per amount of cells grown can be obtained in the latter. Using small amounts of methane, NADH limitation in the second step of this two-step system can be

  18. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  19. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  20. Field evidence for co-metabolism of trichloroethene stimulated by addition of electron donor to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark E; Brodie, Eoin L; Radtke, Corey W; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E; Lee, M Hope; Swift, Dana L; Colwell, Frederick S

    2010-06-15

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH(4) in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta(13)C of the CH(4) increases from -56 per thousand in the source area to -13 per thousand with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 per thousand to -13 per thousand, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH(4)-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with (13)C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE. PMID:20476753

  1. Inhibition, Inactivation, and Recovery of Ammonia-Oxidizing Activity in Cometabolism of Trichloroethylene by Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M. R.; Russell, S. A.; Ely, R. L.; Williamson, K. J.; Arp, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of the cometabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) by the ammonia-oxidizing soil bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea in short-term (<10-min) incubations were investigated. Three individual effects of TCE cometabolism on this bacterium were characterized. First, we observed that TCE is a potent competitive inhibitor of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea. The K(infi) value for TCE (30 (mu)M) is similar to the K(infm) for ammonia (40 (mu)M). Second, we examined the toxicity associated with TCE cometabolism by N. europaea. Stationary-phase cells of N. europaea oxidized approximately 60 nmol of TCE per mg of protein before ammonia-oxidizing activity was completely inactivated by reactive intermediates generated during TCE oxidation. At the TCE concentrations used in these experiments, ammonia did not provide significant protection against inactivation. Third, we have determined the ability of cells to recover ammonia-oxidizing activity after exposure to TCE. Cells recovering from TCE inactivation were compared with cells recovering from the specific inactivation of ammonia-oxidizing activity by light. The recovery kinetics were indistinguishable when 40% or less of the activity was inactivated. However, at increased levels of inactivation, TCE-inactivated cells did not recover as rapidly as light-inactivated cells. The kinetics of recovery appear to be dependent on both the extent of inactivation of ammonia-oxidizing activity and the degree of specificity of the inactivating treatment. PMID:16534997

  2. Biogenic Hydrogen Conversion of De-Oiled Jatropha Waste via Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor Operation: Process Performance, Microbial Insights, and CO2 Reduction Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-01-01

    We report the semicontinuous, direct (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation) hydrogen fermentation of de-oiled jatropha waste (DJW). The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was studied and results show that the stable and peak hydrogen production rate of 1.48 L/L∗d and hydrogen yield of 8.7 mL H2/g volatile solid added were attained when the reactor was operated at HRT 2 days (d) with a DJW concentration of 200 g/L, temperature 55°C, and pH 6.5. Reduced HRT enhanced the production performance until 1.75 d. Further reduction has lowered the process efficiency in terms of biogas production and hydrogen gas content. The effluent from hydrogen fermentor was utilized for methane fermentation in batch reactors using pig slurry and cow dung as seed sources. The results revealed that pig slurry was a feasible seed source for methane generation. Peak methane production rate of 0.43 L CH4/L∗d and methane yield of 20.5 mL CH4/g COD were observed at substrate concentration of 10 g COD/L, temperature 30°C, and pH 7.0. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that combination of celluloytic and fermentative bacteria were present in the hydrogen producing ASBR. PMID:24672398

  3. Biogenic hydrogen conversion of de-oiled jatropha waste via anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation: process performance, microbial insights, and CO2 reduction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-01-01

    We report the semicontinuous, direct (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation) hydrogen fermentation of de-oiled jatropha waste (DJW). The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was studied and results show that the stable and peak hydrogen production rate of 1.48 L/L ∗ d and hydrogen yield of 8.7 mL H2/g volatile solid added were attained when the reactor was operated at HRT 2 days (d) with a DJW concentration of 200 g/L, temperature 55 °C, and pH 6.5. Reduced HRT enhanced the production performance until 1.75 d. Further reduction has lowered the process efficiency in terms of biogas production and hydrogen gas content. The effluent from hydrogen fermentor was utilized for methane fermentation in batch reactors using pig slurry and cow dung as seed sources. The results revealed that pig slurry was a feasible seed source for methane generation. Peak methane production rate of 0.43 L CH4/L ∗ d and methane yield of 20.5 mL CH4/g COD were observed at substrate concentration of 10 g COD/L, temperature 30 °C, and pH 7.0. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that combination of cellulolytic and fermentative bacteria were present in the hydrogen producing ASBR. PMID:24672398

  4. Microbial degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether with anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Chou, Hsi-Ling; Peng, Yu-Huei

    2012-04-30

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant additives for many plastic and electronic products. Owing to their ubiquitous distribution in the environment, multiple toxicity to humans, and increasing accumulation in the environment, the fate of PBDEs is of serious concern for public safety. In this study, the degradation of 4-monobrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-3) in anaerobic sludge and the effect of carbon source addition were investigated. BDE-3 can be degraded by two different anaerobic sludge samples. The by-products, diphenyl ether (DE) and bromide ions, were monitored, indicating the reaction of debromination within these anaerobic samples. Co-metabolism with glucose facilitated BDE-3 biodegradation in terms of kinetics and efficiency in the Jhongsing sludge. Through the pattern of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments in denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the composition of the microbial community was analyzed. Most of the predominant microbes were novel species. The fragments enriched in BDE-3-degrading anaerobic sludge samples are presumably Clostridium sp. This enrichment coincides with the H(2) gas generation and the facilitation of debromination during the degradation process. Findings of this study provide better understanding of the biodegradation of brominated DEs and can facilitate the prediction of the fate of PBDEs in the environment. PMID:22370205

  5. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zun; Qian, Yang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Ju, Meiting

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2014 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. •Pretreatment •Organic waste •multiple-stage co-digestion •Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:26420080

  6. Metabolism and Cometabolism of Cyclic Ethers by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Kristin; Cuiffetti, Lynda; Hyman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400) grows on gaseous n-alkanes and diethyl ether. n-Alkane-grown mycelia of this strain also cometabolically oxidize the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). In this study, we characterized the ability of this fungus to metabolize and cometabolize a range of cyclic ethers, including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and 1,4-dioxane (14D). This strain grew on THF and other cyclic ethers, including tetrahydropyran and hexamethylene oxide. However, more vigorous growth was consistently observed on the lactones and terminal diols potentially derived from these ethers. Unlike the case in all previous studies of microbial THF oxidation, a metabolite, γ-butyrolactone, was observed during growth of this fungus on THF. Growth on THF was inhibited by the same n-alkenes and n-alkynes that inhibit growth of this fungus on n-alkanes, while growth on γ-butyrolactone or succinate was unaffected by these inhibitors. Propane and THF also behaved as mutually competitive substrates, and propane-grown mycelia immediately oxidized THF, without a lag phase. Mycelia grown on propane or THF exhibited comparable high levels of hemiacetal-oxidizing activity that generated methyl formate from mixtures of formaldehyde and methanol. Collectively, these observations suggest that THF and n-alkanes may initially be oxidized by the same monooxygenase and that further transformation of THF-derived metabolites involves the activity of one or more alcohol dehydrogenases. Both propane- and THF-grown mycelia also slowly cometabolically oxidized 14D, although unlike THF oxidation, this reaction was not sustainable. Specific rates of THF, 14D, and MTBE degradation were very similar in THF- and propane-grown mycelia. PMID:19581469

  7. Microbial community adaptation influences long-chain fatty acid conversion during anaerobic codigestion of fats, oils, and grease with municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Ziels, Ryan M; Karlsson, Anna; Beck, David A C; Ejlertsson, Jörgen; Yekta, Sepehr Shakeri; Bjorn, Annika; Stensel, H David; Svensson, Bo H

    2016-10-15

    Codigesting fats, oils, and greases with municipal wastewater sludge can greatly improve biomethane recovery at wastewater treatment facilities. Process loading rates of fats, oils, and greases have been previously tested with little knowledge of the digester microbial community structure, and high transient fat loadings have led to long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation and digester upsets. This study utilized recently-developed quantitative PCR assays for syntrophic LCFA-degrading bacteria along with 16S amplicon sequencing to relate changes in microbial community structure to LCFA accumulation during transient loading increases to an anaerobic codigester receiving waste restaurant oil and municipal wastewater sludge. The 16S rRNA gene concentration of the syntrophic β-oxidizing genus Syntrophomonas increased to ∼15% of the Bacteria community in the codigester, but stayed below 3% in the control digester that was fed only wastewater sludge. Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum were the dominant methanogenic genera enriched in the codigester, and together comprised over 80% of the Archaea community by the end of the experimental period. Constrained ordination showed that changes in the codigester Bacteria and Archaea community structures were related to measures of digester performance. Notably, the effluent LCFA concentration in the codigester was positively correlated to the specific loading rate of waste oil normalized to the Syntrophomonas 16S rRNA concentration. Specific loading rates of 0-1.5 × 10(-12) g VS oil/16S gene copies-day resulted in LCFA concentrations below 30 mg/g TS, whereas LCFA accumulated up to 104 mg/g TS at higher transient loading rates. Based on the community-dependent loading limitations found, enhanced biomethane production from high loadings of fats, oils and greases can be achieved by promoting a higher biomass of slow-growing syntrophic consortia, such as with longer digester solids retention times. This work also

  8. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  9. Pilot-scale conversion of lime-treated wheat straw into bioethanol: quality assessment of bioethanol and valorization of side streams by anaerobic digestion and combustion

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Ronald HW; Bakker, Robert R; Boersma, Arjen R; Bisschops, Iemke; Pels, Jan R; de Jong, Ed; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Reith, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The limited availability of fossil fuel sources, worldwide rising energy demands and anticipated climate changes attributed to an increase of greenhouse gasses are important driving forces for finding alternative energy sources. One approach to meeting the increasing energy demands and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is by large-scale substitution of petrochemically derived transport fuels by the use of carbon dioxide-neutral biofuels, such as ethanol derived from lignocellulosic material. Results This paper describes an integrated pilot-scale process where lime-treated wheat straw with a high dry-matter content (around 35% by weight) is converted to ethanol via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by commercial hydrolytic enzymes and bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). After 53 hours of incubation, an ethanol concentration of 21.4 g/liter was detected, corresponding to a 48% glucan-to-ethanol conversion of the theoretical maximum. The xylan fraction remained mostly in the soluble oligomeric form (52%) in the fermentation broth, probably due to the inability of this yeast to convert pentoses. A preliminary assessment of the distilled ethanol quality showed that it meets transportation ethanol fuel specifications. The distillation residue, which contained non-hydrolysable and non-fermentable (in)organic compounds, was divided into a liquid and solid fraction. The liquid fraction served as substrate for the production of biogas (methane), whereas the solid fraction functioned as fuel for thermal conversion (combustion), yielding thermal energy, which can be used for heat and power generation. Conclusion Based on the achieved experimental values, 16.7 kg of pretreated wheat straw could be converted to 1.7 kg of ethanol, 1.1 kg of methane, 4.1 kg of carbon dioxide, around 3.4 kg of compost and 6.6 kg of lignin-rich residue. The higher heating value of the lignin-rich residue was 13.4 MJ thermal energy per kilogram (dry basis). PMID

  10. Biocatalysis conversion of methanol to methane in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor: Long-term performance and inherent deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueqin; Zhen, Guangyin; Chen, Mo; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-12-01

    Long-term performance of methanol biocatalysis conversion in a lab-scale UASB reactor was evaluated. Properties of granules were traced to examine the impact of methanol on granulation. Methanolic wastewater could be stably treated during initial 240d with the highest biogas production rate of 18.6 ± 5.7 L/Ld at OLR 48 g-COD/Ld. However, the reactor subsequently showed severe granule disintegration, inducing granule washout and process upsets. Some steps (e.g. increasing influent Ca(2+) concentration, etc.) were taken to prevent rising dispersion, but no clear improvement was observed. Further characterizations in granules revealed that several biotic/abiotic factors all caused the dispersion: (1) depletion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and imbalance of protein/polysaccharide ratio in EPS; (2) restricted formation of hard core and weak Ca-EPS bridge effect due to insufficient calcium supply; and (3) simplification of species with the methanol acclimation. More efforts are required to solve the technical deficiencies observed in methanolic wastewater treatment. PMID:26441026

  11. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand < 1 g/l) and psychrophilic temperatures (10°C). For the treatment of organic suspensions, there is currently a tendency to evolve from the conventional mesophilic

  12. Phenol- and Toluene-Degrading Microbial Populations from an Aquifer in Which Successful Trichloroethene Cometabolism Occurred

    PubMed Central

    Fries, M. R.; Forney, L. J.; Tiedje, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the bacterial populations that grew in a Moffett Field, Calif., aquifer following three sequential field tests of phenol- or toluene-driven cometabolism of trichloroethene (TCE). Reducing the toluene and phenol concentrations in most-probable-number (MPN) tubes from 50 to 5 ppm increased the population density measured for these degraders by 1.5 and 1 log units, respectively, suggesting that natural populations might be quite sensitive to these substrates. Phenol and toluene degraders were isolated from the terminal MPN dilution tubes; 63 genetically distinct strains were identified among the 273 phenol- and toluene-degrading isolates obtained. TCE was cometabolized by 60% of the genetically distinct strains. Most strains (57%) grew on both phenol and toluene, and 78% of these strains hybridized to the toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) probe. None of the strains hybridized to probes from the four other toluene oxygenase pathways. Gram-positive strains comprised 30% of the collection; all of these grew on phenol, and 47% of them also grew on toluene, but none hybridized to the TOM probe. Among the gram-negative strains, 86% of those that grew on both toluene and phenol hybridized to the TOM probe, while only 5% of those that were TOM-positive grew on toluene alone. A larger proportion of TCE degraders was found among gram-negative than gram-positive strains and among organisms that grew on phenol than those that grew on toluene. Hybridization of strains to the TOM probe was somewhat predictive of their TCE-cometabolizing ability, especially for strains isolated on toluene, but there was also a significant number (20%) of strains that hybridized to the TOM probe but were poor TCE cooxidizers. No Moffett Field isolates were as effective as Burkholderia cepacia G4 in cooxidizing TCE. Most of the aquifer strains ranged from moderately effective to ineffective in TCE cooxidation. Such populations, however, apparently accounted for the successful phenol

  13. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  14. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  15. Metabolic fingerprint of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in microbial-mammalian co-metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2014-12-01

    There is growing awareness that intestinal microbiota alters the energy harvesting capacity of the host and regulates metabolism. It has been postulated that intestinal microbiota are able to degrade unabsorbed dietary components and transform xenobiotic compounds. The resulting microbial metabolites derived from the gastrointestinal tract can potentially enter the circulation system, which, in turn, affects host metabolism. Yet, the metabolic capacity of intestinal microbiota and its interaction with mammalian metabolism remains largely unexplored. Here, we review a metabolic pathway that integrates the microbial catabolism of methionine with mammalian metabolism of methanethiol (MT), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which together provide evidence that supports the microbial origin of dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) in the human metabolome. Understanding the pathway of DMSO2 co-metabolism expends our knowledge of microbial-derived metabolites and motivates future metabolomics-based studies on ascertaining the metabolic consequences of intestinal microbiota on human health, including detoxification processes and sulfur xenobiotic metabolism. PMID:25245235

  16. Co-metabolism of DDT by the newly isolated bacterium, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangli; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Li; Liang, Bin; Chen, Kai; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2010-01-01

    Microbial degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) is the most promising way to clean up DDT residues found in the environment. In this paper, a bacterium designated as wax, which was capable of co-metabolizing DDT with other carbon sources, was isolated from a long-term DDT-contaminated soil sample by an enrichment culture technique. The new isolate was identified as a member of the Pseudoxanthomonas sp., based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, as well as by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In the presence of 100 mg l-1 glucose, the wax strain could degrade over 95% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 20 mg l-1, in 72 hours, and could degrade over 60% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 100 mg l-1, in 144 hours. The wax strain had the highest degradation efficiency among all of the documented DDT-degrading bacteria. The wax strain could efficiently degrade DDT at temperatures ranging from 20 to 37°C, and with initial pH values ranging from 7 to 9. The bacterium could also simultaneously co-metabolize 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichlorethylene (DDE), and other organochlorine compounds. The wax strain could also completely remove 20 mg kg-1 of DDT from both sterile and non-sterile soils in 20 days. This study demonstrates the significant potential use of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax for the bioremediation of DDT in the environment. PMID:24031514

  17. Kinetics of trichloroethylene cometabolism and toluene biodegradation: Model application to soil batch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    El-Farhan, Y.H.; Scow, K.M.; Fan, S.; Rolston, D.E.

    2000-06-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in soil under aerobic conditions requires the presence of another compound, such as toluene, to support growth of microbial populations and enzyme induction. The biodegradation kinetics of TCE and toluene were examined by conducting three groups of experiments in soil: toluene only, toluene combined with low TCE concentrations, and toluene with TCE concentrations similar to or higher than toluene. The biodegradation of TCE and toluene and their interrelationships were modeled using a combination of several biodegradation functions. In the model, the pollutants were described as existing in the solid, liquid, and gas phases of soil, with biodegradation occurring only in the liquid phase. The distribution of the chemicals between the solid and liquid phase was described by a linear sorption isotherm, whereas liquid-vapor partitioning was described by Henry's law. Results from 12 experiments with toluene only could be described by a single set of kinetic parameters. The same set of parameters could describe toluene degradation in 10 experiments where low TCE concentrations were present. From these 10 experiments a set of parameters describing TCE cometabolism induced by toluene also was obtained. The complete set of parameters was used to describe the biodegradation of both compounds in 15 additional experiments, where significant TCE toxicity and inhibition effects were expected. Toluene parameters were similar to values reported for pure culture systems. Parameters describing the interaction of TCE with toluene and biomass were different from reported values for pure cultures, suggesting that the presence of soil may have affected the cometabolic ability of the indigenous soil microbial populations.

  18. Systematic prediction of health-relevant human-microbial co-metabolism through a computational framework

    PubMed Central

    Heinken, Almut; Thiele, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is well known to affect host metabolic phenotypes. The systemic effects of the gut microbiota on host metabolism are generally evaluated via the comparison of germfree and conventional mice, which is impossible to perform for humans. Hence, it remains difficult to determine the impact of the gut microbiota on human metabolic phenotypes. We demonstrate that a constraint-based modeling framework that simulates “germfree” and “ex-germfree” human individuals can partially fill this gap and allow for in silico predictions of systemic human-microbial co-metabolism. To this end, we constructed the first constraint-based host-microbial community model, comprising the most comprehensive model of human metabolism and 11 manually curated, validated metabolic models of commensals, probiotics, pathogens, and opportunistic pathogens. We used this host-microbiota model to predict potential metabolic host-microbe interactions under 4 in silico dietary regimes. Our model predicts that gut microbes secrete numerous health-relevant metabolites into the lumen, thereby modulating the molecular composition of the body fluid metabolome. Our key results include the following: 1. Replacing a commensal community with pathogens caused a loss of important host metabolic functions. 2. The gut microbiota can produce important precursors of host hormone synthesis and thus serves as an endocrine organ. 3. The synthesis of important neurotransmitters is elevated in the presence of the gut microbiota. 4. Gut microbes contribute essential precursors for glutathione, taurine, and leukotrienes. This computational modeling framework provides novel insight into complex metabolic host-microbiota interactions and can serve as a powerful tool with which to generate novel, non-obvious hypotheses regarding host-microbe co-metabolism. PMID:25901891

  19. Cometabolic Degradation of Trichloroethene by Rhodococcus sp. Strain L4 Immobilized on Plant Materials Rich in Essential Oils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suttinun, Oramas; Müller, Rudolf; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2010-01-01

    The cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus sp. L4 was limited by the loss of enzyme activity during TCE transformation. This problem was overcome by repeated addition of inducing substrates, such as cumene, limonene, or cumin aldehyde, to the cells. Alternatively, Rhodococcus sp. L4 was immobilized on plant materials which contain those inducers in their essential oils. Cumin seeds were the most suitable immobilizing material, and the immobilized cells tolerated up to 68 μM TCE and degraded TCE continuously. The activity of immobilized cells, which had been inactivated partially during TCE degradation, could be reactivated by incubation in mineral salts medium without TCE. These findings demonstrate that immobilization of Rhodococcus sp. L4 on plant materials rich in essential oils is a promising method for efficient cometabolic degradation of TCE. PMID:20472723

  20. Pilot-scale field tests for the methanotrophic technology cometabolic bioreactor demonstration at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Herbes, S.E.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes a demonstration of cometabolic technology for bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated and aromatic solvents conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The technology demonstration is located at a seep from the K-1070-C/D Classified Burial Ground at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Funding for this demonstration is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Program, Office of Technology Development.

  1. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene during co-metabolic degradation by methanotrophic bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brungard, K.L.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Johnson, C.A.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2003-01-01

    Changes in the carbon isotope ratio (??13C) of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (t-DCE) were measured during its co-metabolic degradation by Methylomonas methanica, a type I methanotroph, and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a type II methanotroph. In closed-vessel incubation experiments with each bacterium, the residual t-DCE became progressively enriched in 13C, indicating isotopic fractionation. From these experiments, the biological fractionation during t-DCE co-metabolism, expressed as ??, was measured to be -3.5??? for the type I culture and -6.7??? for the type II culture. This fractionation effect and subsequent enrichment in the ??13C of the residual t-DCE can thus be applied to determine the extent of biodegradation of DCE by these organisms. Based on these results, isotopic fractionation clearly warrants further study, as measured changes in the ??13C values of chlorinated solvents could ultimately be used to monitor the extent of biodegradation in laboratory or field settings where co-metabolism by methanotrophs occurs. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Using co-metabolism to accelerate synthetic starch wastewater degradation and nutrient recovery in photosynthetic bacterial wastewater treatment technology.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yufeng; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Starch wastewater is a type of nutrient-rich wastewater that contains numerous macromolecular polysaccharides. Using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) to treat starch wastewater can reduce pollutants and enhance useful biomass production. However, PSB cannot directly degrade macromolecular polysaccharides, which weakens the starch degradation effect. Therefore, co-metabolism with primary substances was employed in PSB wastewater treatment to promote starch degradation. The results indicated that co-metabolism is a highly effective method in synthetic starch degradation by PSB. When malic acid was used as the optimal primary substrate, the chemical oxygen demand, total sugar, macromolecules removal and biomass yield were considerably higher than when primary substances were not used, respectively. Malic acid was the primary substrate that played a highly important role in starch degradation. It promoted the alpha-amylase activity to 46.8 U and the PSB activity, which induced the degradation of macromolecules. The products in the wastewater were ethanol, acetic acid and propionic acid. Ethanol was the primary product throughout the degradation process. The introduction of co-metabolism with malic acid to treat wastewater can accelerate macromolecules degradation and bioresource production and weaken the acidification effect. This method provides another pathway for bioresource recovery from wastewater. This approach is a sustainable and environmentally friendly wastewater treatment technology. PMID:26360302

  3. Potential of Cometabolic Transformation of Polysaccharides and Lignin in Lignocellulose by Soil Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Větrovský, Tomáš; Steffen, Kari Timo; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    While it is known that several Actinobacteria produce enzymes that decompose polysaccharides or phenolic compounds in dead plant biomass, the occurrence of these traits in the environment remains largely unclear. The aim of this work was to screen isolated actinobacterial strains to explore their ability to produce extracellular enzymes that participate in the degradation of polysaccharides and their ability to cometabolically transform phenolic compounds of various complexities. Actinobacterial strains were isolated from meadow and forest soils and screened for their ability to grow on lignocellulose. The potential to transform 14C-labelled phenolic substrates (dehydrogenation polymer (DHP), lignin and catechol) and to produce a range of extracellular, hydrolytic enzymes was investigated in three strains of Streptomyces spp. that possessed high lignocellulose degrading activity. Isolated strains showed high variation in their ability to produce cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes and were able to mineralise up to 1.1% and to solubilise up to 4% of poplar lignin and to mineralise up to 11.4% and to solubilise up to 64% of catechol, while only minimal mineralisation of DHP was observed. The results confirm the potential importance of Actinobacteria in lignocellulose degradation, although it is likely that the decomposition of biopolymers is limited to strains that represent only a minor portion of the entire community, while the range of simple, carbon-containing compounds that serve as sources for actinobacterial growth is relatively wide. PMID:24551229

  4. Biodegradation and cometabolic modeling of selected beta blockers during ammonia oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sathyamoorthy, Sandeep; Chandran, Kartik; Ramsburg, C Andrew

    2013-11-19

    Accurate prediction of pharmaceutical concentrations in wastewater effluents requires that the specific biochemical processes responsible for pharmaceutical biodegradation be elucidated and integrated within any modeling framework. The fate of three selected beta blockers-atenolol, metoprolol, and sotalol-was examined during nitrification using batch experiments to develop and evaluate a new cometabolic process-based (CPB) model. CPB model parameters describe biotransformation during and after ammonia oxidation for specific biomass populations and are designed to be integrated within the Activated Sludge Models framework. Metoprolol and sotalol were not biodegraded by the nitrification enrichment culture employed herein. Biodegradation of atenolol was observed and linked to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and heterotrophs but not nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Results suggest that the role of AOB in atenolol degradation may be disproportionately more significant than is otherwise suggested by their lower relative abundance in typical biological treatment processes. Atenolol was observed to competitively inhibit AOB growth in our experiments, though model simulations suggest inhibition is most relevant at atenolol concentrations greater than approximately 200 ng·L(-1). CPB model parameters were found to be relatively insensitive to biokinetic parameter selection suggesting the model approach may hold utility for describing pharmaceutical biodegradation during biological wastewater treatment. PMID:24112027

  5. Final Progress Report: Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Cometabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2010-02-19

    Our goal within the overall project is to demonstrate the presence and abundance of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) enzymes and their genes within the microbial community of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Area North (TAN) site. MMOs are thought to be the primary catalysts of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater at this location. The actual presence of the proteins making up MMO complexes would provide direct evidence for its participation in TCE degradation. The quantitative estimation of MMO genes and their translation products (sMMO and pMMO proteins) and the knowledge about kinetics and substrate specificity of MMOs will be used to develop mathematical models of the natural attenuation process in the TAN aquifer. The model will be particularly useful in prediction of TCE degradation rate in TAN and possibly in the other DOE sites. Bacteria known as methanotrophs produce a set of proteins that assemble to form methane monooxygenase complexes (MMOs), enzymes that oxidize methane as their natural substrate, thereby providing a carbon and energy source for the organisms. MMOs are also capable of co-metabolically transforming chlorinated solvents like TCE into nontoxic end products such as carbon dioxide and chloride. There are two known forms of methane monooxygenase, a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO) and a cytoplasmic soluble form (sMMO). pMMO consists of two components, pMMOH (a hydroxylase comprised of 47-, 27-, and 24-kDa subunits) and pMMOR (a reductase comprised of 63 and 8-kDa subunits). sMMO consists of three components: a hydroxylase (protein A-250 kDa), a dimer of three subunits (α2β2γ2), a regulatory protein (protein B-15.8 kDa), and a reductase (protein C-38.6 kDa). All methanotrophs will produce a methanol dehydrogenase to channel the product of methane oxidation (methanol) into the central metabolite formaldehyde. University of Idaho (UI) efforts focused on proteomic analyses using mass

  6. Cometabolic Degradation of Dibenzofuran and Dibenzothiophene by a Newly Isolated Carbazole-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain▿

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Zhonghui; Yu, Bo; Li, Li; Wang, Ying; Ma, Cuiqing; Feng, Jinhui; Deng, Zixin; Xu, Ping

    2007-01-01

    A carbazole-utilizing bacterium was isolated by enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil. The isolate, designated Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5, could utilize carbazole (CA) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Washed cells of strain XLDN2-5 were shown to be capable of degrading dibenzofuran (DBF) and dibenzothiophene (DBT). Examination of metabolites suggested that XLDN2-5 degraded DBF to 2-hydroxy-6-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienic acid and subsequently to salicylic acid through the angular dioxygenation pathway. In contrast to DBF, strain XLDN2-5 could transform DBT through the ring cleavage and sulfoxidation pathways. Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5 could cometabolically degrade DBF and DBT in the growing system using CA as a substrate. After 40 h of incubation, 90% of DBT was transformed, and CA and DBF were completely removed. These results suggested that strain XLDN2-5 might be useful in the bioremediation of environments contaminated by these compounds. PMID:17337542

  7. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum.

    PubMed

    Hou, X

    2012-04-01

    A cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into bioethanol requires that the xylose released from the hemicellulose fraction (20-40% of biomass) can be fermented. Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, efficiently ferments glucose but it lacks the ability to ferment xylose. Xylose-fermenting yeast such as Pichia stipitis requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, it is demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions Spathaspora passalidarum showed high ethanol production yield, fast cell growth, and rapid sugar consumption with xylose being consumed after glucose depletion, while P. stipitis was almost unable to utilize xylose under these conditions. It is further demonstrated that for S. passalidarum, the xylose conversion takes place by means of NADH-preferred xylose reductase (XR) and NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Thus, the capacity of S. passalidarum to utilize xylose under anaerobic conditions is possibly due to the balance between the cofactor's supply and demand through this XR-XDH pathway. Only few XRs with NADH preference have been reported so far. 2-Deoxy glucose completely inhibited the conversion of xylose by S. passalidarum under anaerobic conditions, but only partially did that under aerobic conditions. Thus, xylose uptake by S. passalidarum may be carried out by different xylose transport systems under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The presence of glucose also repressed the enzymatic activity of XR and XDH from S. passalidarum as well as the activities of those enzymes from P. stipitis. PMID:22124720

  8. Progress and Challenges in Developing Metabolic Footprints from Diet in Human Gut Microbial Cometabolism12

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Linda C; Raiten, Daniel J; Hubbard, Van S; Starke-Reed, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Homo sapiens harbor trillions of microbes, whose microbial metagenome (collective genome of a microbial community) using omic validation interrogation tools is estimated to be at least 100-fold that of human cells, which comprise 23,000 genes. This article highlights some of the current progress and open questions in nutrition-related areas of microbiome research. It also underscores the metabolic capabilities of microbial fermentation on nutritional substrates that require further mechanistic understanding and systems biology approaches of studying functional interactions between diet composition, gut microbiota, and host metabolism. Questions surrounding bacterial fermentation and degradation of dietary constituents (particularly by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) and deciphering how microbial encoding of enzymes and derived metabolites affect recovery of dietary energy by the host are more complex than previously thought. Moreover, it is essential to understand to what extent the intestinal microbiota is subject to dietary control and to integrate these data with functional metabolic signatures and biomarkers. Many lines of research have demonstrated the significant role of the gut microbiota in human physiology and disease. Probiotic and prebiotic products are proliferating in the market in response to consumer demand, and the science and technology around these products are progressing rapidly. With high-throughput molecular technologies driving the science, studying the bidirectional interactions of host-microbial cometabolism, epithelial cell maturation, shaping of innate immune development, normal vs. dysfunctional nutrient absorption and processing, and the complex signaling pathways involved is now possible. Substantiating the safety and mechanisms of action of probiotic/prebiotic formulations is critical. Beneficial modulation of the human microbiota by using these nutritional and biotherapeutic strategies holds considerable promise as next

  9. Progress and challenges in developing metabolic footprints from diet in human gut microbial cometabolism.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Linda C; Raiten, Daniel J; Hubbard, Van S; Starke-Reed, Pamela

    2015-05-01

    Homo sapiens harbor trillions of microbes, whose microbial metagenome (collective genome of a microbial community) using omic validation interrogation tools is estimated to be at least 100-fold that of human cells, which comprise 23,000 genes. This article highlights some of the current progress and open questions in nutrition-related areas of microbiome research. It also underscores the metabolic capabilities of microbial fermentation on nutritional substrates that require further mechanistic understanding and systems biology approaches of studying functional interactions between diet composition, gut microbiota, and host metabolism. Questions surrounding bacterial fermentation and degradation of dietary constituents (particularly by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes) and deciphering how microbial encoding of enzymes and derived metabolites affect recovery of dietary energy by the host are more complex than previously thought. Moreover, it is essential to understand to what extent the intestinal microbiota is subject to dietary control and to integrate these data with functional metabolic signatures and biomarkers. Many lines of research have demonstrated the significant role of the gut microbiota in human physiology and disease. Probiotic and prebiotic products are proliferating in the market in response to consumer demand, and the science and technology around these products are progressing rapidly. With high-throughput molecular technologies driving the science, studying the bidirectional interactions of host-microbial cometabolism, epithelial cell maturation, shaping of innate immune development, normal vs. dysfunctional nutrient absorption and processing, and the complex signaling pathways involved is now possible. Substantiating the safety and mechanisms of action of probiotic/prebiotic formulations is critical. Beneficial modulation of the human microbiota by using these nutritional and biotherapeutic strategies holds considerable promise as next

  10. Product toxicity and cometabolic competitive inhibition modeling of chloroform and trichloroethylene transformation by methanotrophic resting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cohen, L; McCarty, P L

    1991-01-01

    The rate and capacity for chloroform (CF) and trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture of resting cells (no exogenous energy source) and formate-fed cells were measured. As reported previously for TCE, formate addition resulted in an increased CF transformation rate (0.35 day-1 for resting cells and 1.5 day-1 for formate-fed cells) and transformation capacity (0.0065 mg of CF per mg of cells for resting cells and 0.015 mg of CF per mg of cells for formate-fed cells), suggesting that depletion of energy stores affects transformation behavior. The observed finite transformation capacity, even with an exogenous energy source, suggests that toxicity was also a factor. CF transformation capacity was significantly lower than that for TCE, suggesting a greater toxicity from CF transformation. The toxicity of CF, TCE, and their transformation products to whole cells was evaluated by comparing the formate oxidation activity of acetylene-treated cells to that of non-acetylene-treated cells with and without prior exposure to CF or TCE. Acetylene arrests the activity of methane monooxygenase in CF and TCE oxidation without halting cell activity toward formate. Significantly diminished formate oxidation by cells exposed to either CR or TCE without acetylene compared with that with acetylene suggests that the solvents themselves were not toxic under the experimental conditions but their transformation products were. The concurrent transformation of CF and TCE by resting cells was measured, and results were compared with predictions from a competitive-inhibition cometabolic transformation model. The reasonable fit between model predictions and experimental observations was supportive of model assumptions. PMID:1905516

  11. A modeling approach to describe ZVI-based anaerobic system.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-10-15

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is increasingly being added into anaerobic reactors to enhance the biological conversion of various less biodegradable pollutants (LBPs). Our study aimed to establish a new structure model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate such a ZVI-based anaerobic reactor. Three new processes, i.e., electron release from ZVI corrosion, H2 formation from ZVI corrosion, and transformation of LBPs, were integrated into ADM1. The established model was calibrated and tested using the experimental data from one published study, and validated using the data from another work. A good relationship between the predicted and measured results indicates that the proposed model was appropriate to describe the performance of the ZVI-based anaerobic system. Our model could provide more precise strategies for the design, development, and application of anaerobic systems especially for treating various LBPs-containing wastewaters. PMID:23932771

  12. Temporal variation selects for diet-microbe co-metabolic traits in the gut of Gorilla spp.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andres; Rothman, Jessica M; Petrzelkova, Klara; Yeoman, Carl J; Vlckova, Klara; Umaña, Juan D; Carr, Monica; Modry, David; Todd, Angelique; Torralba, Manolito; Nelson, Karen E; Stumpf, Rebecca M; Wilson, Brenda A; Blekhman, Ran; White, Bryan A; Leigh, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    Although the critical role that our gastrointestinal microbes play in host physiology is now well established, we know little about the factors that influenced the evolution of primate gut microbiomes. To further understand current gut microbiome configurations and diet-microbe co-metabolic fingerprints in primates, from an evolutionary perspective, we characterized fecal bacterial communities and metabolomic profiles in 228 fecal samples of lowland and mountain gorillas (G. g. gorilla and G. b. beringei, respectively), our closest evolutionary relatives after chimpanzees. Our results demonstrate that the gut microbiomes and metabolomes of these two species exhibit significantly different patterns. This is supported by increased abundance of metabolites and bacterial taxa associated with fiber metabolism in mountain gorillas, and enrichment of markers associated with simple sugar, lipid and sterol turnover in the lowland species. However, longitudinal sampling shows that both species' microbiomes and metabolomes converge when hosts face similar dietary constraints, associated with low fruit availability in their habitats. By showing differences and convergence of diet-microbe co-metabolic fingerprints in two geographically isolated primate species, under specific dietary stimuli, we suggest that dietary constraints triggered during their adaptive radiation were potential factors behind the species-specific microbiome patterns observed in primates today. PMID:26315972

  13. Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene in a coupled anaerobic/aerobic biobarrier.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae; Bae, Wookeun; Oh, Juhyun; Bae, Jisu

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in a biobarrier with polyethylene glycol (PEG) carriers was studied. Toluene/methanol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were used as electron donors and an electron acceptor source, respectively, in order to develop a biologically active zone. The average removal efficiencies for TCE and toluene were over 99.3%, leaving the respective residual concentrations of ∼12 and ∼57μg/L, which are below or close to the groundwater quality standards. The removal efficiency for CT was ∼98.1%, with its residual concentration (65.8μg/L) slightly over the standards. TCE was aerobically cometabolized with toluene as substrate while CT was anaerobically dechlorinated in the presence of electron donors, with the respective stoichiometric amount of chloride released. The oxygen supply at equivalent to 50% chemical oxygen demand of the injected electron donors supported successful toluene oxidation and also allowed local anaerobic environments for CT reduction. The originally augmented (immobilized in PEG carriers) aerobic microbes were gradually outcompeted in obtaining substrate and oxygen. Instead, newly developed biofilms originated from indigenous microbes in soil adapted to the coupled anaerobic/aerobic environment in the carrier for the simultaneous and almost complete removal of CT, TCE, and toluene. The declined removal rates when temperature fell from 28 to 18°C were recovered by doubling the retention time (7.2 days). PMID:27054665

  14. Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C

    1993-01-01

    Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

  15. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  16. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  17. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  18. Anaerobic specimen transport device.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, T D; Jimenez-Ulate, F

    1975-01-01

    A device is described and evaluated for the anaerobic transport of clinical specimens. The device limits the amount of oxygen entering with the sample to a maximum of 2%, which is rapidly removed by reacting with hydrogen in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The viability on swabs of 12 species of anaerobes, four strains of facultative anaerobes and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was maintained during the length of the tests (24 or 48 h). The results demonstrated that this device protected even the more oxygen-sensitive clinical anaerobes from death due to oxygen exposure. This device can be used for swabs as well as for anaerobic collection and liquid and solid specimens. Images PMID:1104656

  19. Versatile transformations of hydrocarbons in anaerobic bacteria: substrate ranges and regio- and stereo-chemistry of activation reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Jarling, René; Kühner, Simon; Basílio Janke, Eline; Gruner, Andrea; Drozdowska, Marta; Golding, Bernard T.; Rabus, Ralf; Wilkes, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons proceeds either via addition to fumarate or by hydroxylation in various microorganisms, e.g., sulfate-reducing or denitrifying bacteria, which are specialized in utilizing n-alkanes or alkylbenzenes as growth substrates. General pathways for carbon assimilation and energy gain have been elucidated for a limited number of possible substrates. In this work the metabolic activity of 11 bacterial strains during anaerobic growth with crude oil was investigated and compared with the metabolite patterns appearing during anaerobic growth with more than 40 different hydrocarbons supplied as binary mixtures. We show that the range of co-metabolically formed alkyl- and arylalkyl-succinates is much broader in n-alkane than in alkylbenzene utilizers. The structures and stereochemistry of these products are resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anaerobic hydroxylation of alkylbenzenes does not only occur in denitrifiers but also in sulfate reducers. We propose that these processes play a role in detoxification under conditions of solvent stress. The thermophilic sulfate-reducing strain TD3 is shown to produce n-alkylsuccinates, which are suggested not to derive from terminal activation of n-alkanes, but rather to represent intermediates of a metabolic pathway short-cutting fumarate regeneration by reverse action of succinate synthase. The outcomes of this study provide a basis for geochemically tracing such processes in natural habitats and contribute to an improved understanding of microbial activity in hydrocarbon-rich anoxic environments. PMID:26441848

  20. Anaerobic biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene with different primary substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jiayang; Suidan, M.T.; Venosa, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    The cometabolic biotransformation of 2,4-DNT with ethanol, methanol, acetic acid or hydrogen as the primary substrate was investigated under anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic cultures for 2,4-DNT biotransformation were acclimated in three chemostats that were fed with 2,4-DNT and either ethanol, methanol, or acetic acid. The pH and temperature in the tests were maintained at 7.2 and 35{degrees}C, respectively. 2,4-DNT was completely biotransformed to 2,4-DAT via 4-A-2-NT or 2-A-4-NT under anaerobic conditions regardless of the primary substrate. However, the rate of 2,4-DNT biotransformation was much higher with the addition of ethanol than that with the addition of either methanol or acetic acid. As the primary substrate for anaerobic biotransformation of 2,4-DNT, ethanol has a great advantage over methanol or acetic acid. Hydrogen served as an electron donor for the reductive biotransformation of 2,4-DNT to 2,4-DAT. Biotransformation of 2,4-DNT was not observed without any primary substrate. 2+DNT was not completely transformed to 2,4-DAT unless enough ethanol was added to produce twice or more hydrogen stoichiometrically required for 2,4-DNT transformation. The addition of high concentration of ethanol accelerated the reductive transformation of 2,4-DNT. The presence of 2,4-DNT, 4-A-2-NT, and 2-A-4-NT inhibited the acetogenesis of ethanol as well as the methanogeneses of methanol, acetate, and hydrogen. High energy is required to support the growth of the anaerobic bacteria which transform 2,4-DNT, 4-A-2-NT, and 2-A-4-NT to 2,4-DAT.

  1. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  2. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  3. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  4. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  5. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  6. Laboratory evaluation of a two-stage treatment system for TCE cometabolism by a methane-oxidizing mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.H.; McCarty, P.L.

    1997-08-20

    The objective of this research was to evaluate several factors affecting the performance of a two-stage treatment system employing methane-oxidizing bacteria for trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation. The system consists of a completely mixed growth reactor and a plug-flow transformation reactor in which the TCE is cometabolized. Laboratory studies were conducted with continuous growth reactors and batch experiments simulating transformation reactor conditions. Performance was characterized in terms of TCE transformation capacity (T{sub C}, g TCE/g cells), transformation yield (T{sub Y}, g TCE/g CH{sub 4}), and the rate coefficient ratio k{sub TCE}/K{sub S,TCE} (L/mg-d). The growth reactor variables studied were solids retention time (SRT) and nutrient nitrogen (N) concentration. Formate and methane were evaluated as potential transformation reactor amendments.

  7. Kinetics of Methyl t-Butyl Ether Cometabolism at Low Concentrations by Pure Cultures of Butane-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Speitel, Gerald E.; Georgiou, George

    2001-01-01

    Butane-oxidizing Arthrobacter (ATCC 27778) bacteria were shown to degrade low concentrations of methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE; range, 100 to 800 μg/liter) with an apparent half-saturation concentration (Ks) of 2.14 mg/liter and a maximum substrate utilization rate (kc) of 0.43 mg/mg of total suspended solids per day. Arthrobacter bacteria demonstrated MTBE degradation activity when grown on butane but not when grown on glucose, butanol, or tryptose phosphate broth. The presence of butane, tert-butyl alcohol, or acetylene had a negative impact on the MTBE degradation rate. Neither Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b nor Streptomyces griseus was able to cometabolize MTBE. PMID:11319100

  8. Soil aeration to achieve co-metabolic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in the presence of inducer compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbeis, J.J.; Bourquin, A.W.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical distribution facility in Denver has been found to have soil and ground water contaminated with a wide variety of organic compounds, primarily toluene and chlorinated solvents, and their breakdown products. Since toluene and chlorobenzenes (both present at the site) have been shown to be inducers for an aerobic enzyme pathway that can degrade trichloroethene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride, field and laboratory studies are being conducted to determine if cometabolic aerobic biodegradation of these and other compounds is occurring in soils that have been aerated with soil vapor extraction (SVE). Studies summarized in this paper include in situ respiration tests to estimate overall biodegradation rate in aerated soils within the influence of a SVE system, sampling to determine if in situ biodegradation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in ground water has occurred, and a laboratory column study simulating bioventing of unremediated soils.

  9. Co-metabolic degradation of benzo(e)pyrene by halophilic bacterial consortium at different saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Arulazhagan, P; Sivaraman, C; Kumar, S Adish; Aslam, M; Banu, J Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with high molecular weight (more than three benzene rings) were difficult to degrade in saline environment. The present study details about the bacterial consortium enriched from industrial sludge from salt manufacturing company, Tuticorin, Tamilnadu (India), which was capable of degrading 1, 4 dioxane (Emerging micropollutant) and also phenanthrene as sole carbon source under saline condition. The halophilic bacterial consortium was able to degrade low molecular weight (LMW) phenanthrene, but unable to degrade high molecular weight (HMW) benzo(e)pyrene. To overcome this problem, phenanthrene was added as co-substrate along with benzo(e)pyrene which enhanced the biodegradation process by co-metabolism under saline conditions. The consortium potentially degraded 80% and 99% of benzo(e)pyrene in 7 days and phenanthrene in 5 days at 30 g l⁻¹ of NaCl concentration. When the saline concentration increased to 60 g l⁻¹, degradation of phenanthrene (97% in 8 days) and benzo(e)pyrene (65% in 10 days) was observed. Further increase in saline concentration to 90 g I⁻¹ of NaCI showed reduction in the percent degradation of phenanthrene and benzo(e)pyrene leads to 30.3% and 9% respectively in 6 days. Potential bacterial strains, present in PAHs degrading bacterial consortium were identified as Achromobacter sp. AYS3 (JQ419751), Marinobacter sp. AYS4 (JQ419752) and Rhodanobacter sp. AYS5 (JQ419753). The present study details about the effect of salinity on PAHs degradation and vital role of co-metabolism on biodegradation of benzo(e)pyrene with phenanthrene under saline conditions. PMID:24812998

  10. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of space mission wastes.

    PubMed

    Chynoweth, D P; Owens, J M; Teixeira, A A; Pullammanappallil, P; Luniya, S S

    2006-01-01

    The technical feasibility of applying leachbed high-solids anaerobic digestion for reduction and stabilization of the organic fraction of solid wastes generated during space missions was investigated. This process has the advantages of not requiring oxygen or high temperature and pressure while producing methane, carbon dioxide, nutrients, and compost as valuable products. Anaerobic biochemical methane potential assays run on several waste feedstocks expected during space missions resulted in ultimate methane yields ranging from 0.23 to 0.30 L g-1 VS added. Modifications for operation of a leachbed anaerobic digestion process in space environments were incorporated into a new design, which included; (1) flooded operation to force leachate through densified feedstock beds; and (2) separation of biogas from leachate in a gas collection reservoir. This mode of operation resulted in stable performance with 85% conversion of a typical space solid waste blend, and a methane yield of 0.3 Lg per g VS added after a retention time of 15 days. These results were reproduced in a full-scale prototype system. A detailed analysis of this process was conducted to design the system sized for a space mission with a six-person crew. Anaerobic digestion compared favorably with other technologies for solid waste stabilization. PMID:16784202

  12. Process configuration role in anaerobic biotransformations

    SciTech Connect

    Speece, R.E.

    1998-07-01

    Defining the environmental conditions which would enable anaerobic processes to consistently produce effluents containing only non-detectable concentrations of degradable organics would remove one of the main drawbacks to wider application of this important treatment technology. Recently specific metabolic intermediates formed in the anaerobic biotransformation of complex organics have been found to enhance or curtail process performance. Using acrylate and acrolein as representative hazardous chemicals, modifications in staging and reactor operation procedures have been observed in the author's laboratory to profoundly impact the rate and completeness of the biotransformation process. Specific metabolic intermediates formed in the biotransformation of complex substrates to a large extent will control a given process performance and process configuration greatly impacts the metabolic pathway, thus impacting the intermediates formed as well. There is a growing body of literature to indicate that process performance in anaerobic biotransformation is greatly impacted by reactor configuration. There is also some evidence that metabolic precursors impact the subsequent efficiency of conversion of volatile fatty acids (VFA) ultimately to CH{sub 4}. But although profound differences in the performance of anaerobic biotransformation are reported for various process configurations, there are no published criteria to guide the rational design of stages/phased processes. Clarification of the relative merits of single stage, two stage, two phase, granules and biofilms as well as CSTR and plug flow modes in the biotransformation of hazardous pollutants would be foundational for future research and development.

  13. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    PubMed Central

    Maud, P J; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gross work completed and relative to body weight. However, these differences are reduced when data is adjusted for body weight and further reduced when corrected for FFM. The study found no significant differences between men and women in either anaerobic power or anaerobic capacity when values were given relative to FFM. PMID:3730753

  14. Sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin removal using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor.

    PubMed

    Chatila, Sami; Amparo, Maura R; Carvalho, Lucas S; Penteado, Eduardo D; Tomita, Inês N; Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lima Gomes, Paulo C F; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (SMTX) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, which explains their occurrence in wastewater. Anaerobic reactors are low-cost, simple and suitable technology to wastewater treatment, but there is a lack of studies related to the removal efficiency of antibiotics. To overcome this knowledge gap, the objective of this study was to evaluate the removal kinetics of SMTX and CIP using a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor. Two different concentrations were evaluated, for SMTX 20 and 40 μg L(-1); for CIP 2.0 and 5.0 μg L(-1). The affluent and effluent analysis was carried out in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with the sample preparation procedure using an off-line solid-phase extraction. This method was developed, validated and successfully applied for monitoring the affluent and effluent samples. The removal efficiency found for both antibiotics at the two concentrations studied was 97%. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) exhibited kinetic constants that were different from that observed for the antibiotics, indicating the absence of co-metabolism. Also, though the antibiotic concentration was increased, there was no inhibitory effect in the removal of COD and antibiotics. PMID:26465824

  15. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The anaerobic, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been chosen for catalysis of the biological water gas shift reaction. In addition, two other anaerobic, photosynthetic bacteria, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroblum phaeobacteroides, have been evaluated as candidates for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur. Growth and H{sub 2}S uptake studies in the presence of basal medium indicated that C. thlosulfatophilum is a much superior organism. C. phaeobacteroldes showed sporatic growth at best, with growth always slower than C. thlosulfatophilum. Also, when C. phaeobacteroides experienced slow growth, no H{sub 2}S consumption was observed. C. thiosulfatophilum always showed superior growth and H{sub 2}S uptake, and thus will be selected as the bacterium for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur.

  16. THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PHENOLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a series of anaerobic microbial acclimation and treatment performance tests with synthetic phenolic substrates. The research is a feasibility level assessment of substituting anaerobic biodegradation of phenolics for solvent extraction. The tests showe...

  17. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  19. Antimicrobials therapy of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobes predominant in the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora are often a cause of endogenous infections. Anaerobic bacteria are difficult to isolate from infectious sites, and are often overlooked. Anaerobic infections caused by anaerobes can occur in all body sites, including the central nervous system (CNS), oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin and soft tissues. The treatment of these infections is complicated by the slow growth of these organisms, their polymicrobial nature and the growing resistance of anaerobes to antimicrobials agents. Antimicrobials are frequently the only form of therapy needed, but in others, they are an important adjunct to surgical drainage and correction of pathology. Because anaerobes are often recovered with aerobic and facultative bacteria, the chosen antimicrobials should cover all pathogens. The antimicrobials effective against anaerobic organisms are metronidazole, carbapenems, combinations of a beta-lactam and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, chloramphenicol, tigecycline and clindamycin. PMID:26365224

  20. Anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jothimani, P; Kalaichelvan, G; Bhaskaran, A; Selvaseelan, D Augustine; Ramasamy, K

    2003-09-01

    Many aromatic compounds and their monomers are existing in nature. Besides they are introduced into the environment by human activity. The conversion of these aromatic compounds is mainly an aerobic process because of the involvement of molecular oxygen in ring fission and as an electron acceptor. Recent literatures indicated that ring fission of monomers and obligomers mainly occurs in anaerobic environments through anaerobic respiration with nitrate, sulphate, carbon dioxide or carbonate as electron acceptors. These anaerobic processes will help to work out the better situation for bioremediation of contaminated environments. While there are plenty of efforts to reduce the release of these chemicals to the environment, already contaminated sites need to be remediated not only to restore the sites but to prevent the leachates spreading to nearby environment. Basically microorganisms are better candidates for breakdown of these compounds because of their wider catalytic mechanisms and the ability to act even in the absence of oxygen. These microbes can be grouped based on their energy mechanisms. Normally, the aerobic counterparts employ the enzymes like mono-and-dioxygenases. The end product is basically catechol, which further may be metabolised to CO2 by means of quinones reductases cycles. In the absense of reductases compounds, the reduced catechols tend to become oxidised to form many quinone compounds. The quinone products are more recalcitrant and lead to other aesthetic problems like colour in water, unpleasant odour, etc. On the contrary, in the reducing environment this process is prevented and in a cascade of pathways, the cleaved products are converted to acetyl co-A to be integrated into other central metabolite paths. The central metabolite of anaerobic degradation is invariably co-A thio-esters of benzoic acid or hydroxy benzoic acid. The benzene ring undergoes various substitution and addition reactions to form chloro-, nitro-, methyl- compounds

  1. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  2. Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F.

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

  3. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  4. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lee, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  5. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester.

  6. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  7. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  8. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  9. Anaerobic biotransformation of organoarsenical pesticides monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Yenal, U.; Feld, J.A.; Kopplin, M.; Gandolfi, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) are extensively utilized as pesticides, introducing large quantities of arsenic into the environment. Once released into the environment, these organoarsenicals are subject to microbial reactions. Aerobic biodegradation of MMAV and DMAV has been evaluated, but little is known about their fate in anaerobic environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biotransformation of MMAV and DMAV in anaerobic sludge. Biologically mediated conversion occurred under methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions but not in the presence of nitrate. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) was consistently observed as an important metabolite of MMAV degradation, and it was recovered in molar yields ranging from 5 to 47%. The main biotransformation product identified from DMAV metabolism was MMAV, which was recovered in molar yields ranging from 8 to 65%. The metabolites indicate that reduction and demethylation are important steps in the anaerobic bioconversion of MMAV and DMAV, respectively. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  10. Microcosm Studies to Evaluate Aerobic Cometabolism of Low Concentrations of 1,4-Dioxane by Isobutane-utilizing Microorganisms in the Presence of Chlorinated Solvent Co-contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, H. M.; Azizian, M.; Hyman, M. R.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its use as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents, 1,4-dioxane (1,4D), a probable human carcinogen, is a common co-contaminant in solvent spills at industrial and military sites and landfills. Its persistence in large groundwater plumes at low concentrations makes it a relevant candidate for in-situ bioremediation via cometabolism. Microcosm studies are being performed to evaluate the capability of aerobic microorganisms to cometabolize mixtures of 1,4D and chlorinated solvents, such as trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), and 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1DCE), with isobutane as the primary substrate. Microcosms were constructed using aquifer solids from Fort Carson, Colorado, a site contaminated with 1,4D and TCE, to assess the isobutane uptake and transformation of 1,4D and chlorinated solvents by microorganisms native to the site. Additional microcosms were augmented with Rhodococcus rhodochrous, a bacterium shown to cometabolize 1,4D and chlorinated solvents. Results indicate that native microcosms cometabolized 1,4D upon stimulation with isobutane after a lag period of about 15 days. TCE was also transformed, but at significantly slower rates. The presence of 1,4D and TCE at 500 and 300 ppb, respectively, did not inhibit the growth of native microorganisms on isobutane, with isobutane uptake and 1,4D transformation occurring simultaneously. Bioaugmented microcosms transformed 1,4D immediately after inoculation with R. rhodochrous. Tests in bioaugmented microorganisms indicated that the presence of TCE at low concentrations inhibits but does not block the transformation of 1,4D. Results from the microcosms will be used to design field tests to be performed at Fort Carson. Additional microcosm studies will compare the stimulation of native and bioaugmented microcosms and the transformation of mixtures of 1,4D, 1,1,1TCA and 1,1DCE. Molecular methods will analyze the monoxygenase enzymes expressed in the native and bioaugmented microcosms.

  11. Co-metabolism of methyl- and chloro-substituted catechols by an Achromobacter sp. possessing a new meta-cleaving oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Co-metabolism of 3-methylcatechol, 4-chlorocatechol and 3,5-dichlorocatechol by an Achromobacter sp. was shown to result in the accumulation of 2-hydroxy-3-methylmuconic semialdehyde, 4-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and 3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde respectively. Formation of these products indicated that cleavage of the aromatic nucleus of the substituted catechols was accomplished by a new meta-cleaving enzyme, catechol 1,6-oxygenase. This enzyme was equally active on both chloro- and methyl-substituted catechols. PMID:5492853

  12. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If

  13. Metabolism of Diethyl Ether and Cometabolism of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Filamentous Fungus, a Graphium sp

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, L. K.; Curry, S. S.; Ciuffetti, L. M.; Hyman, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, evidence for two novel metabolic processes catalyzed by a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. strain ATCC 58400, is presented. First, our results indicate that this Graphium sp. can utilize the widely used solvent diethyl ether (DEE) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The kinetics of biomass accumulation and DEE consumption closely followed each other, and the molar growth yield on DEE was indistinguishable from that with n-butane. n-Butane-grown mycelia also immediately oxidized DEE without the extracellular accumulation of organic oxidation products. This suggests a common pathway for the oxidation of both compounds. Acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated gaseous hydrocarbons completely inhibited the growth of this Graphium sp. on DEE and DEE oxidation by n-butane-grown mycelia. Second, our results indicate that gaseous n-alkane-grown Graphium mycelia can cometabolically degrade the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The degradation of MTBE was also completely inhibited by acetylene, ethylene, and other unsaturated hydrocarbons and was strongly influenced by n-butane. Two products of MTBE degradation, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were detected. The kinetics of product formation suggest that TBF production temporally precedes TBA accumulation and that TBF is hydrolyzed both biotically and abiotically to yield TBA. Extracellular accumulation of TBA accounted for only a maximum of 25% of the total MTBE consumed. Our results suggest that both DEE oxidation and MTBE oxidation are initiated by cytochrome P-450-catalyzed reactions which lead to scission of the ether bonds in these compounds. Our findings also suggest a potential role for gaseous n-alkane-oxidizing fungi in the remediation of MTBE contamination. PMID:16535667

  14. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    PubMed

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  15. Treating dinitrotoluene in propellant wastewater using anaerobic fluidized-bed bioreactors containing granular activated carbon (GAC). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, S.W.; May, E.R.; Suidan, M.T.; Berchtold, S.R.; Vanderloop, S.

    1995-03-01

    Production of single-base propellants for military use involves several steps in which dinitrotoluene (DNT) is transferred to wastewater. DNT is a listed hazardous material, and its presence in the wastewater causes noncompliance with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Existing wastewater treatment processes have not been able to consistently control DNT in the effluent. The major source of DNT in propellant production also contains substantial amounts of ethanol and/or ether. An emerging technology, anaerobic fluidized-bed bioreactors containing granular activated carbon (GAC), is an excellent candidate for treatment of DNT at this point source because DNT is both adsorbable and slowly biodegradable, and the ethanol and ether provide a good substrate for co-metabolization. Bench scale anaerobic fluidized-bed reactors were tested using synthetic wastewater in a university laboratory, with excellent results. One reactor was then transported to Radford Army Ammunition Plant for direct testing on actual wastewater. Although the bioactivity in the reactor was unstable during widely varying ethanol and ether influent concentrations (primarily due to loss of pH control), the buffer capacity provided by the GAC was able to retain the DNT within the reactor, rather than discharging it to the effluent. The results are promising, and a demonstration of this technology is planned by the Army Environmental Center.

  16. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic PCB biodegradation in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Studies have identified two distinct biological processes capable of biotransforming polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): aerobic oxidative processes and anaerobic reductive processes. It is now known that these two complementary activities are occurring naturally in the environment. Anaerobic PCB dechlorination, responsible for the conversion of highly chlorinated PCBs to lightly chlorinated ortho-enriched congeners, has been documented extensively in the Hudson River and has been observed at many other sites throughout the world. The products from this anaerobic process are readily degradable by a wide range of aerobic bacteria, and it has now been shown that this process is occurring in surficial sediments in the Hudson River. The widespread anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs that has been observed in many river and marine sediments results in reduction of both the potential risk from and potential exposure to PCBs. The reductions in potential risk include reduced dioxin like toxicity and reduced carcinogenicity. The reduced PCB exposure realized upon dechlorination is manifested by reduced bioaccumulation in the food chain and by the increased anaerobic degradability of these products. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  19. A critical review of experimental and predicted methane generation from anaerobic codigestion.

    PubMed

    Bond, T; Brouckaert, C J; Foxon, K M; Buckley, C A

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being considered as a treatment option for an extensive range of waste biomass, due to the potential for energy recovery, in the form of methane production, and lower sludge volumes relative to aerobic treatment processes. Furthermore, when two substrates are codigested (i.e. digested together), added benefits are foreseeable, such as increased methane production and detoxification of toxic compounds via cometabolic degradation pathways. The objectives of this study were to compare experimental and predicted methane production from codigestion literature studies in order to objectively evaluate digester performance. Two predictive methods were used, both assuming methane yields are additive: literature values for digestion of single substrates and a stoichiometric method using model substrates to represent different substrates. Waste sources included in the analysis were primary sewage sludge, waste activated sludge, cow manure, waste paper, grease trap sludge, fat oil and grease and algal sludge. It was found that methane production could approximately be predicted using both methods, with literature methane yields from the same study being the most accurate predictor. One important finding from this study was that the assumption that methane yields are additive is a reasonable one. Furthermore, both predictive methods may be usefully employed as a screening tool to compare methane yields between different types and blends of substrates. PMID:22173424

  20. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  1. Co-metabolic biodegradation of acetamiprid by Pseudoxanthomonas sp. AAP-7 isolated from a long-term acetamiprid-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Zhao, Yanjiao; Gao, Hao; Yue, Wenlong; Xiong, Minghua; Li, Feng; Zhang, Hui; Ge, Wei

    2013-12-01

    An AAP-degrading bacterium, AAP-7, was isolated from AAP-polluted soil. AAP-7 was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas sp. on the basis of the comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. The strain was able to transformate more than 80% AAP by means of co-metabolism and degraded AAP via hydrolysis or demethylation to form (E)-3-(((6-chloropyridin-3yl)methyl)(methyl)amino)acrylonitrile and N-((6-chloropyridin-3yl)methyl)-N-methylprop-1-en-2-amine, both of which transformed into ultimate product, which was 1-(6-chloropyridin-3yl)-N-methylmethanamine. A novel degradation pathway was proposed based on these metabolites. AAP could be transformed with a maximum specific degradation rate, half-saturation constant and inhibit constant of 1.775/36 h, 175.3 mg L(-1), and 396.5 mg L(-1), respectively, which proved that the degradation rate of AAP could be restrained at high AAP concentration. This paper highlights a significant potential use of co-metabolic cultures of microbial cells for the cleanup of AAP-contaminated soil. PMID:24177159

  2. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  3. Metric Conversion

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-12

    ... 1,000,000 1,000,000 micrometers nano- 1,000,000,000 1,000,000,000 nanometers ... conversions, see the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publications: NIST Guide to SI Units: ...

  4. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  5. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  6. Involvement of cytochromes in the anaerobic biotransformation of tetrachloromethane by Shewanella putrefaciens 200.

    PubMed Central

    Picardal, F W; Arnold, R G; Couch, H; Little, A M; Smith, M E

    1993-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens 200 is an obligate respiratory bacterium that can utilize a variety of terminal electron acceptors, e.g., NO3-, NO2-, Fe(III), and trimethylamine N-oxide, in the absence of O2. The bacterium catalyzed the reductive transformation of tetrachloromethane (CT) under anaerobic conditions. The only identified product was trichloromethane (CF), but CF production was not stoichiometric. No dichloromethane, chloromethane, or methane was produced. A chloride mass balance indicated that fully dechlorinated products were not formed. Studies with [14C]CT suggested that a portion of the transformed CT reacted with biomass to form unidentified soluble and insoluble products. Intermediate production of a trichloromethyl radical can explain observed product distribution without significant CO2 formation. Evidence suggests that respiratory c-type cytochromes are responsible for the dehalogenation ability of S. putrefaciens 200. Previous growth under microaerobic conditions ([O2], < 2.5 microM) results in (i) a 2.6-fold increase in specific heme c content and (ii) a 2.3-fold increase in specific rates of anaerobic CT transformation. Manipulation of heme content by growth on iron-free medium or medium amended with delta-aminolevulinic acid showed that CT transformation rates increase with increases in specific heme c content. Transformation of CT is inhibited by CO. Dehalogenation studies with periplasmic, cytoplasmic, and membrane fractions indicated that only periplasmic and membrane fractions possessed dehalogenation ability. Cytochromes c were the predominant cytochromes present. Membranes were also found to contain smaller amounts of cytochrome b. Observed CT transformation patterns are consistent with a cometabolic description involving fortuitous CT reduction by reduced c-type cytochromes. PMID:8285682

  7. Kinetics of anaerobic purification of industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Bolle, W.L.; van Breugel, J.; van Eybergen, G.C.; Kossen, N.W.F.; van Gils, W.

    1986-04-01

    As part of the development of an integral mathematical model describing the up-flow anaerobic sludges blanket (UASB) reactor, the kinetics of the conversion of organic wastes has to be known. The Mondod model is compared with the model proposed by Andrews, et al. Together with the assumption that the substrate for the anaerobic bacteria is formed by nonionized, volatile fatty acids, the Andrews model is able to describe substrate inhibition and reactor failure due to pH changes. From four batch experiments, with different concentrations of microorganisms, it could be concluded with a reliability of over 95% that the Monod model was inadequate and Andrews' model was adequate to describe the measurements. Standard statistical techniques like the X2 and the F-test were used for this purpose. From a parameter sensitivity analysis for the Andrews model it followed that the maximum specific growth rate Mu(A) max of the bacteria and the inhibition constant K, are the parameters which influance the systems most. Thus, these parameters were determined experimentally and most accurately. The other parameters were taken from literature. From a calculation of the Thiele modulus for the particles it follows that transport limitation of the substrate in the flocs is not significant. The efficiency Eta is 0.85 in the worst case. 11 references.

  8. Cefamandole Therapy in Anaerobic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Scalcini, Marcella C.; Sanders, Charles V.; Lewis, A. Carter

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one adult patients with infections due to anaerobic bacteria were treated with cefamandole. Bacteroides fragilis group (17) and Bacteroides melaninogenicus (13) were the most frequent anaerobes isolated. Duration of therapy varied from 2 to 49 days. Results were judged satisfactory in 26 cases, and unsatisfactory in 1 case. Four cases could not be evaluated. Adverse reactions occurred in 16 patients and included positive direct Coombs' test without hemolysis, transient liver function abnormalities, phlebitis, reversible neutropenia, fever, eosinophilia, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The more significant reactions were associated with prolonged therapy. None was lethal. These data suggest that cefamandole is effective in treatment of most anaerobic infections. PMID:380458

  9. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  10. Biotechnological research and development for biomass conversion to chemicals and fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villet, R.

    1980-08-01

    Revitalization of the older fermentation industry and development of biotechnology largely based on lignocellulose are proposed. Specific research projects are outlined in these two areas and also for the following: microbial formation of hydrocarbons; methane from anaerobic digestion; lignin; methanol. For cellulose conversion to ethanol the relative merits using added cellulases or, alternatively, direct fermentation with anaerobic thermophiles, are discussed. In selecting suitable feedstocks for biotechnological processes there is a need to use a production extraction conversion system as a basis for evaluation.

  11. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  12. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  13. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  14. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K. T.; Johnson, E. R.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E. C.; Gaddy, J. L.

    1993-09-01

    Based upon the results of this culture screening study, Rhodospirillum rubrum is recommended for biocatalysis of the water gas shift reaction and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum is recommended for H2S conversion to elemental sulfur. Both bacteria require tungsten light for growth and can be co-cultured together if H2S conversion is not complete (required concentration of at least 1 ppM), thereby presenting H2 uptake by Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum. COS degradation may be accomplished by utilizing various CO-utilizing bacteria or by indirectly converting COS to elemental sulfur after the COS first undergoes reaction to H2 in water. The second alternative is probably preferred due to the low expected concentration of COS relative to H2S. Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. Rhodospirillum rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H2O yields CO2 + H2. Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum is also a photosynthetic anaerobic bacteria, and converts H2S and COS to elemental sulfur.

  15. Conversation Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jiang

    1998-01-01

    Describes an activity for use in the conversational English-as-a-foreign-language classroom. The activity involves having each student say one or two sentences that continues a story being made up as the activity goes along. Students were positive about the activity, because saying only one or two sentences helped them not to feel pressured or…

  16. Assessing the Feasibility of In-Situ Aerobic Cometabolism of Chlorinated Solvents by a Single-Well Push-Pull and Natural Gradient Drift Tests in McClellan AFB, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Istok, J. D.; Semprini, L.

    2001-12-01

    A single-well push-pull test has been developed to evaluate in-situ aerobic cometabolic treatment of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE). A series of single-well natural gradient drift and push-pull tests were conducted in two monitoring wells at the McClellan Air Force Base, CA, where aquifer is contaminated mainly with c-DCE and TCE. Transport characteristics of dissolved solutes [bromide (tracer), propane (growth substrate), ethylene, propylene (nontoxic surrogates to probe for CAH transformation activity), DO and nitrate (nutrient)] were evaluated in push-pull transport tests by injecting 200-L of groundwater containing the solutes into the aquifer (Push), providing a rest period of 18 hours (Reaction), and then extracting 400-L of the test solution/groundwater mixtures (Pull). Mass balances showed over 95% of the injected bromide was recovered, and the recoveries of the other solutes were comparable with bromide. The dispersion of all the solutes was similar indicating sorption or other partitioning processes were minimal. These results indicate that bromide could be used as a conservative tracer for biological activity tests and that little loss of the dissolved gaseous substrates occurred prior to biostimulation of the aquifer. A series of biostimulation tests were performed by injecting 500 L-groundwater containing propane (6 mg/L), DO (25 mg/L), nitrate (9 mg/L as N) and bromide (100 mg/L) into the aquifer. Temporal groundwater samples were obtained from the injection well under natural gradient drift conditions. With repeating biostimulation tests the rates of both propane and DO utilization were increased significantly. The results demonstrated that the progress of biostimulation could be assessed by injecting and monitoring under natural gradient drift conditions. Successive push-pull activity tests were performed after biostimulation was achieved using the same procedures as

  17. Pulse power enhancement of the anaerobic digester process

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot study of the effects of Pulse Power Processing on an anaerobic digester system was completed at the Decatur Utilities Dry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, in Decatur Alabama, in September, 1995. This patented method generates several significant effects when all biosolids material is treated as it enters the anaerobic system. Intense, high peak-power plasma arcs are created, one at each end of the parabolic processing chamber, to produce an amplified synergy of alterations to the digester sludge flowing between them. The millisecond electric discharges generate localized temperatures as high as 30,000 K{degrees}, followed by a rapid cooling of the flowing liquid, which produces acoustic shock waves with pressures approaching 5,000 atmospheres. This destructive force: ruptures many of the cell walls of the bacteria and other single-cell organisms, releasing their vacuole fluids; breaks carbon bonds to form smaller organic compounds; and pulverizes large particle conglomerates, increasing the overall surface area of the solids. These beneficial results serve to boost the nutrient source for the anaerobes in the digester. In conjunction with LTV radiation, the formation of excited chemical radicals (including OH{sup -}), and the changes in ionic charge through alteration of the zeta potential, the bioreactor system is turbocharged to enhance the conversion of volatile biosolids to methane gas, which is the natural respiratory by-product of anaerobic digestion.

  18. The role of anaerobic digestion in the emerging energy economy.

    PubMed

    Batstone, Damien John; Virdis, Bernardino

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the default process for biological conversion of residue organics to renewable energy and biofuel in the form of methane. However, its scope of application is expanding, due to availability of new technologies, and the emerging drivers of energy and nutrient conservation and recovery. Here, we outline two of these new application areas, namely wastewater nutrient and energy recovery, and generation of value added chemicals through mixed culture biotechnology. There exist two options for nutrient and energy recovery from domestic wastewater: low energy mainline and partition-release-recovery. Both are heavily dependent on anaerobic digestion as an energy generating and nutrient release step, and have been enabled by new technologies such as low emission anaerobic membrane processes. The area of mixed culture biotechnology has been previously identified as a key industrial opportunity, but is now moving closer to application due application of existing and new technologies. As well as acting as a core technology option in bioproduction, anaerobic digestion has a key role in residual waste valorization and generation of energy for downstream processing. These new application areas and technologies are emerging simultaneously with substantial advances in knowledge of underlying mechanisms such as electron transfer, understanding of which is critical to development of the new application areas. PMID:24534620

  19. Influence of the endogenous storage lipid poly-[beta]-hydroxybutyrate on the reducing power availability during cometabolism of trichloroethylene and naphthalene by resting methanotrophic mixed cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Henrysson, T.; McCarty, P.L. )

    1993-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most frequently detected toxic contaminants in ground water. TCE degradation by methanotrophs is a cometabolic process in which methane, but not TCE, is used as the primary substrate for energy and cell carbon. Developing a bioreactor in which cells can degrade TCE without competition is of interest in in-situ treatments. This study determines what relationship might exist between the poly-[beta]-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) content in methanotrophic cells and their naphthalene oxidation rates. In addition, the relationship between TCE transformation rate and capacity and PHB content is examined. Finally, the possibilities for manipulation of the PHB content are examined, as is the effect of PHB on the observed decrease in methane monooxygenase activity with resting aerobic cells. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Anaerobic degradation of inedible crop residues produced in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwingel, W. R.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor seeded with organisms from an anaerobic lagoon was used to study the degradation of inedible crop residues from potato and wheat crops grown in a closed environment. Conversion of this biomass into other products was also evaluated. Degradation of wheat volatile solids was about 25% where that of potato was about 50%. The main product of the anaerobic fermentation of both crops was acetic acid with smaller quantities of propionate and butyrate produced. Nitrate, known to be high in concentration in inedible potato and wheat biomass grown hydroponically, was converted to ammonia in the anaerobic reactor. Both volatile fatty acid and ammonia production may have implications in a crop production system.

  1. Anaerobic degradation of inedible crop residues produced in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, W R; Sager, J C

    1996-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor seeded with organisms from an anaerobic lagoon was used to study the degradation of inedible crop residues from potato and wheat crops grown in a closed environment. Conversion of this biomass into other products was also evaluated. Degradation of wheat volatile solids was about 25% where that of potato was about 50%. The main product of the anaerobic fermentation of both crops was acetic acid with smaller quantities of propionate and butyrate produced. Nitrate, known to be high in concentration in inedible potato and wheat biomass grown hydroponically, was converted to ammonia in the anaerobic reactor. Both volatile fatty acid and ammonia production may have implications in a crop production system. PMID:11538974

  2. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  3. Conversational sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  4. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giovanna . E-mail: giovanna.speranza@unimi.it; Morelli, Carlo F.; Cairoli, Paola; Mueller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH{sub 2} -O- to =N-CH{sub 2} - without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  5. PILOT ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PULP MILL EVAPORATOR FOUL CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of three new anaerobic biological treatment technologies were compared and evaluated. Data were obtained from the operation of pilot plants representative of the anaerobic filter, anaerobic upflow sludge bed, and anaerobic fluidized bed. A review of recent literat...

  6. MECHANISMS, CHEMISTRY, AND KINETICS OF ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF CDCE AND VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This three year research project will study the anaerobic biological conversion of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to ethene. The study will be conducted in three separate phases, the first to better understand the mechanisms involved in cDCE and VC biodegra...

  7. REGIOSPECIFIC DECHLORINATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL BY DICHLOROPHENOL-ADAPTED MICROORGANISMS IN FRESHWATER, ANAEROBIC SEDIMENT SLURRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated in anaerobic sediments that contained nonadapted or 2,4- or 3,4-dichlorophenol-adapted microbial communities. daptation of sediment communities increased the rate of conversion of 2,4- or 3,4-DCP to monochlo...

  8. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  9. Anaerobic processes in waste treatment: Methane production. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and applications of methane gas production by anaerobic conversion of waste materials, primarily agricultural and animal wastes, but including refuse and sewage wastes. Articles discuss the anaerobic processes involved in waste digestion, the microorganisms responsible for bioconversion of wastes, environmental variables and toxins, and energy production using biogas generators. Both large and small scale systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Anaerobic processes in waste treatment: Methane production. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and applications of methane gas production by anaerobic conversion of waste materials, primarily agricultural and animal wastes, but including refuse and sewage wastes. Articles discuss the anaerobic processes involved in waste digestion, the microorganisms responsible for bioconversion of wastes, environmental variables and toxins, and energy production using biogas generators. Both large and small scale systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  12. Dry anaerobic methane fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of relatively dry organics directly to biogas increases the potential of using large amounts of organics such as mixtures of crop residues and animal manures on the farm, crop residues, and urban solid wastes. Besides the use of the dry fermentation process on farms and in centralized facilities, the possibility of using this concept as a residential energy generating system exists. Existing crop residues can be used to generate biogas without major water needs problems. Requirements for an efficient reaction include initial solid content less than 30%, an active methanogenic slurry addition of 40% dry weight (depending on the substrate), and a reaction period of 60-300 days, depending on the reactor temperatures. Further analyses are required to clarify the controlling parameters and the economic feasibility.

  13. Converse Piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springborg, Michael; Kirtman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Piezoelectricity results from a coupling between responses to mechanical and electric perturbations and leads to changes in the polarization due to strain or stress or, alternatively, the occurrence of strain as a function of an applied external, electrostatic field (i.e., converse piezoelectricity). Theoretical studies of those properties for extended systems require accordingly that their dipole moment or polarization can be calculated. However, whereas the definition of the operator for the dipole moment for any finite system is trivial, it is only within the last 2 decades that the expressions for the equivalent operator in the independent-particle approximation for the infinite and periodic system have been presented. Here, we demonstrate that the so called branch dependence of the polarization for the infinite, periodic system is related to physical observables in contrast to what often is assumed. This is related to the finding that converse piezoelectric properties depend both on the surfaces of the samples of interest even for samples with size well above the thermodynamic limit. However, we shall demonstrate that these properties can be calculated without explicitly taking the surfaces into account. Both the foundations and results for real system shall be presented.

  14. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  15. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  16. Energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, J.M.

    1982-02-16

    Energy conversion capable of receiving input energy in thermal or radiant form at a variable rate and releasing energy in thermal, radiant or electrical form independent of rate is accomplished by providing a buffer member of a material that has three criteria: a melting temperature above 1300/sup degree/ K, a thermal conductance greater than 0.1 in calories per square centimeter per centimeter per degree per second and a latent heat of fusion of the order of 1 kilocalorie per mole. The converter can absorb energy of multiple types, store it and then release it in a form compatible with the prospective use. Sunlight of daylight duration and varying intensity is converted to steady 24 hour a day electrical output.

  17. Induction and repression of outer membrane proteins by anaerobic growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, V L; Campbell, L A; Palermo, D A; Evans, T M; Klimpel, K W

    1987-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is generally considered to be an obligate aerobe; it can, however, grow in the absence of oxygen by anaerobic respiration by using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. The outer membrane protein compositions of aerobically and anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae strains were compared by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Anaerobically grown strains expressed at least three proteins (Pan 1 to Pan 3) at much higher levels than did aerobically grown cells. Conversely, at least five other proteins (Pox 1 to Pox 5) were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in aerobically grown cells. None of the Pan or Pox proteins were heat modifiable, and none of the heat-modifiable protein IIs or other major outer membrane proteins (protein I, protein III, pilin, or H-8 protein) were significantly altered in expression by anaerobic growth. There were also no apparent differences in lipopolysaccharide composition in aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci. The regulation of protein expression by oxygen availability suggests that anaerobic growth is a physiologically significant state for this organism. Images PMID:3106220

  18. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. PMID:24907580

  19. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  20. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  1. Anaerobic treatment of coconut husk liquor for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Leitão, R C; Araújo, A M; Freitas-Neto, M A; Rosa, M F; Santaella, S T

    2009-01-01

    The market for coconut water causes environmental problems as it is one of the major agro-industrial solid wastes in some developing countries. With the aim of reusing the coconut husk, Embrapa developed a system for processing this raw material. During the dewatering stage Coconut Husk Liquor (CHL) is generated with chemical oxygen demand (COD) varying from 60 to 70 g/L due to high concentrations of sugars and tannins. The present study evaluated the feasibility of anaerobic treatment of CHL through Anaerobic Toxicity Assay and the operation of a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor. Results showed that CHL can be treated through a UASB reactor operating with an OLR that reaches up to 10 kg/m3.d and that is maintained stable during the whole operation. With this operational condition, the removal efficiency was higher than 80% for COD and approximately 78% for total tannins, and biogas production was 20 m3 of biogas or 130 KWh per m3 of CHL. Seventy-five percent of the biogas composition was methane and toxicity tests demonstrated that CHL was not toxic to the methanogenic consortia. Conversely, increasing the concentration of CHL leads to increased methanogenic activity. PMID:19448321

  2. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes. PMID:24762045

  3. Metabolic Regulation as a Consequence of Anaerobic 5-Methylthioadenosine Recycling in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    North, Justin A.; Sriram, Jaya; Chourey, Karuna; Ecker, Christopher D.; Sharma, Ritin; Wildenthal, John A.; Hettich, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodospirillum rubrum possesses a novel oxygen-independent, aerobic methionine salvage pathway (MSP) for recycling methionine from 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA), the MTA-isoprenoid shunt. This organism can also metabolize MTA as a sulfur source under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also function anaerobically as well. In this study, deep proteomics profiling, directed metabolite analysis, and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed metabolic changes in response to anaerobic growth on MTA versus sulfate as sole sulfur source. The abundance of protein levels associated with methionine transport, cell motility, and chemotaxis increased in the presence of MTA over that in the presence of sulfate. Purine salvage from MTA resulted primarily in hypoxanthine accumulation and a decrease in protein levels involved in GMP-to-AMP conversion to balance purine pools. Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) metabolic protein levels for lipid metabolism were lower in abundance, whereas poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis and storage were increased nearly 10-fold. The known R. rubrum aerobic MSP was also shown to be upregulated, to function anaerobically, and to recycle MTA. This suggested that other organisms with gene homologues for the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also possess a functioning anaerobic MSP. In support of our previous findings that ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is required for an apparently purely anaerobic MSP, RubisCO transcript and protein levels both increased in abundance by over 10-fold in cells grown anaerobically on MTA over those in cells grown on sulfate, resulting in increased intracellular RubisCO activity. These results reveal for the first time global metabolic responses as a consequence of anaerobic MTA metabolism compared to using sulfate as the sulfur source. PMID:27406564

  4. Anaerobic degradation of monoazo dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of two monoazo dyes, acid red 88 (AR88) and acid orange 7, was studied utilizing serum bottle assays. When either dye was present between .05 and 50 mg/L as the sole substrate, inhibition was demonstrated, with no mineralization occurring. However, when a supplemental carbon and energy source was available no inhibition was evidence with mineralization occurring at intermediate concentrations. The degradation of AR88 and metabolite formation was examined utilizing laboratory-scale semi-continuous anaerobic reactors. Addition of 50 mg/L of dye resulted in >98% removal, although mineralization was not achieved. Metabolites identified were naphthionic acid, 2-naphthol, 1,2-naphthoquinone, isoquinoline, and quinacridone. The presence of the metabolites, some of which were products of complexation and polymerization, exerted a slight inhibitory effect on the non-methanogens. The availability of a supplemental carbon source demonstrated an effect on the metabolites that are evolved and the rate at which they are formed.

  5. Anaerobic digestion of brewery byproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, J.D.; Kormi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery in the brewery industry by mesophilic anaerobic digesion of process by-products is technically feasible. The maximum achievable loading rate is 6g dry substrate/L-day. CH4 gas production declines as the loading rate increases in the range 2-6 g/L day. CH4 production increases in the range 8-15 days; optimal design criteria are a 10-day detention time with a loading rate of 6 g dry substrate/L day.

  6. The extent of co-metabolism of glucose and galactose by Lactococcus lactis changes with the expression of the lacSZ operon from Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Solem, Christian; Koebmann, Brian; Jensen, Peter R

    2008-05-01

    The lactose transporter and beta-galactosidase from Streptococcus thermophilus, encoded by the lacSZ operon, were introduced into the lactose-negative strain Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and the expression of the lacSZ operon was modulated by substitution of the native promoter with randomized synthetic promoters. A series of strains with various expression levels of lacSZ were examined for their fermentation of lactose. Strains with a high expression level were found to metabolize lactose in a similar manner to S. thermophilus, i.e. the galactose moiety of lactose was excreted to the growth medium and only glucose was metabolized in glycolysis. Interestingly, strains with low expression of the operon showed a mixed acid metabolism and co-metabolism of galactose and glucose. The lactose flux increased gradually with increasing expression of the lacSZ operon until an optimum was observed at intermediate beta-galactosidase activities of 2000-3000 Miller units. At higher expression levels, the flux decreased. These strains had a glycolytic flux comparable with those of reference strains with the standard lactococcal PTS(lac) (lactose phosphotransferase transport system) lactose transporter, which indicates that lactose transport is not rate-limiting for glycolysis in Lactococcus. Finally, an additional ATP drain was introduced into the fastest growing strain, CS2004, to test whether the ATP demand controlled glycolysis under these conditions, but in fact no increase in glycolytic flux was observed. PMID:17822381

  7. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  8. Interaction of acetogens and methanogens in anaerobic freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Jones, J G; Simon, B M

    1985-04-01

    Anaerobic decomposition processes in the profundal sediments of Blelham Tarn (English Lake District) are often limited during late summer by the input of organic carbon. The concentration of acetate in the interstitial water fell from about 100 microM (immediately after sedimentation of the spring diatom bloom) to a relatively constant value of about 20 microM in late summer, during which acetate utilization appeared to be balanced by production. Addition of chloroform and molybdate caused an accumulation of cold acetate in large sediment cores and of [14C]acetate in small cores to which [14C]bicarbonate had been added. In both cases chloroform caused the greater accumulation, implying that acetoclastic methanogens were the more active consumers. The conversion of 14CO2 to [14C]acetate was inversely related, with depth, to its conversion to 14CH4. Methanogenesis from CO2 decreased during late summer, whereas acetogenesis and acetoclastic methanogenesis increased over the same time period. The production of acetate from CO2 was generally equivalent to less than 10% of the acetate carbon utilized but could be as high as 25% of that value. Hydrogen consumption by acetogens could be as high as 50% of that utilized in methanogenesis. The role of acetogenic bacteria in anaerobic processes may therefore be of greater significance in lakes such as Blelham Tarn than in more eutrophic systems. PMID:4004224

  9. Initial reactions in anaerobic ethylbenzene oxidation by a denitrifying bacterium, strain EB1.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, H A; Johnson, H A; Reinhard, M; Spormann, A M

    1996-01-01

    Initial reactions in anaerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene were investigated in a denitrifying bacterium, strain EB1. Cells of strain EB1 mineralized ethylbenzene to CO2 under denitrifying conditions, as demonstrated by conversion of 69% of [14C]ethylbenzene to 14CO2. In anaerobic suspensions of strain EB1 cells metabolizing ethylbenzene, the transient formation and consumption of 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, and an as yet unidentified compound were observed. On the basis of growth experiments and spectroscopic data, the unknown compound is proposed to be benzoyl acetate. Cell suspension experiments using H2(18)O demonstrated that the hydroxyl group of the first product of anoxic ethylbenzene oxidation, 1-phenylethanol, is derived from water. A tentative pathway for anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization by strain EB1 is proposed. PMID:8824622

  10. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste: Utility of process residues as a soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.; Kay, B.D.

    1995-12-31

    Tuna processing wastes (sludges high in fat, oil, and grease [FOG]) and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal challenge. The biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products, including methane and fertilizer-grade residue, through anaerobic high-solids digestion is currently in scale-up development. The suitability of the anaerobic digestion residues as a soil amendment was evaluated through extensive chemical analysis and greenhouse studies using corn as an indicator crop. Additionally, native Samoan soil was used to evaluate the specific application rates for the compost. Experiments established that anaerobic residues increase crop yields in direct proportion to increases in the application rate. Additionally, nutrient saturation was not demonstrated within the range of application rates evaluated for the Samoan soil. Beyond nutrient supplementation, organic residue amendment to Samoan soil imparts enhanced water and nutrient-binding capacities.

  11. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H[sub 2]0 [yields] CO[sub 2] + H[sub 2]. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H[sub 2]S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25[degree] and 30[degree]C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30[degree], 32[degree] or 34[degree]C. The rate of conversion of COs and H[sub 2]O to CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30[degree]C was found to be 0.243 h[sup [minus]1]. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: [mu] = [sub 351] + I[sub o]/[sup 0.152]I[sub o]. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  12. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasson, K. T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E. R.; Clausen, E. C.; Gaddy, J. L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H2O yields CO2 + H2. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H2S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25 and 30 C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30, 32 or 34 C. The rate of conversion of COs and H2O to CO2 and H2S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30 C was found to be 0.243 h(sup -1). The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: mu = (sub 351) + I(sub o)/(sup 0.152)I(sub o). Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  13. Anaerobic infections in children: a prospective survey.

    PubMed Central

    Thirumoorthi, M C; Keen, B M; Dajani, A S

    1976-01-01

    Over an 18-month period, cultures from 95 infants and children yielded 146 anaerobic organisms in 110 clinical specimens. Bacteroides was the most frequently isolated anaerobe, followed by Propionibacterium and Clostridium species. Intra-abdominal sources, soft tissues, and blood were the three major sources (82%) of isolation of anaerobes. Whereas most patients (58%) were over 5 years of age and only 11% were newborns, anaerobic infections constituted a rather uniform proportion of all infections, regardless of sources, in all age groups. Anaerobes accounted for only 2.9% of all positive cultures encountered from the various sources. Rates of recovery of anaerobes from intra-abdominal sources were significantly the highest, and from soft-tissue infections they were significantly the lowest. The anaerobic bacteremias observed were of no clinical significance when Propionibacterium species were isolated; however, recovery of other anaerobes from the blood, and primarily Bacteroides species, was usually associated with clinical disease. Except in blood cultures, anaerobes almost invariably coexisted with facultative bacteria. PMID:1270594

  14. Basic Laboratory Culture Methods for Anaerobic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Herbert J.

    Oxygen is either limiting or absent in many ecosystems. Anaerobic bacteria are often key players in such environments and these organisms have important roles in geo-elemental cycling, agriculture, and medicine. The metabolic versatility of anaerobes is exploited in a variety of industrial processes including fermented food production, biochemical synthesis, and bioremediation. There has been recent considerable interest in developing and enhancing technologies that employ anaerobes as biocatalysts. The study of anaerobic bacteria requires specialized techniques, and specific methods are described for the culture and manipulation of these microbes.

  15. Single stage biological nitrogen removal by nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in biofilm systems.

    PubMed

    Helmer, C; Tromm, C; Hippen, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Seyfried, C F; Kunst, S

    2001-01-01

    In full scale wastewater treatment plants with at times considerable deficits in the nitrogen balances, it could hitherto not be sufficiently explained which reactions are the cause of the nitrogen losses and which micro-organisms participate in the process. The single stage conversion of ammonium into gaseous end-products--which is henceforth referred to as deammonification--occurs particularly frequently in biofilm systems. In the meantime, one has succeeded to establish the deammonification processes in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch tests with the biofilm covered carriers, it was possible for the first time to examine the nitrogen conversion at the intact biofilm. Depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, two autotrophic nitrogen converting reactions in the biofilm could be proven: one nitritation process under aerobic conditions and one anaerobic ammonium oxidation. With the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, ammonium as electron donor was converted with nitrite as electron acceptor. The end-product of this reaction was N2. Ammonium and nitrite did react in a stoichiometrical ratio of 1:1.37, a ratio which has in the very same dimension been described for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1.31 +/- 0.06). Via the oxygen concentration in the surrounding medium, it was possible to control the ratio of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the nitrogen conversion of the biofilm. Both processes were evenly balanced at a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l, so that it was possible to achieve a direct, almost complete elimination of ammonium without addition of nitrite. One part of the provided ammonium did participate in the nitritation, the other in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Through the aerobic ammonium oxidation into nitrite within the outer oxygen supplied layers of the biofilm, the reaction partner was produced for the anaerobic ammonium oxidation within the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:11379106

  16. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  17. Anaerobic digestion potential for ecological and decentralised sanitation in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek; Feng, Yucheng; Behrendt, Joachim; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    The potential of anaerobic digestion in ecological and decentralised sanitation has been investigated in this research. Different anaerobic digestion systems were proposed for the treatment of sewage, grey water, black water and faeces. Moreover, mathematical models based on anaerobic digestion model no.1 (ADM1) were developed for determination of a suitable design for each system. For stable performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating sewage, the model results indicated that optimisation of wastewater conversion to biogas (not COD removal) should be selected for determination of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor. For the treatment of sewage or black water in a UASB septic-tank, the model results showed that the sludge removal period was the main parameter for determination of the HRT. At such HRT, both COD removal and wastewater conversion are also optimised. The model results demonstrated that for treatment of faeces in an accumulation (AC) system at temperature > or = 25 degrees C, the filling period of the system should be higher than 60 days. For maximisation of the net biogas production (i.e. reduction of biogas losses as dissolved in the effluent), the separation between grey water, urine and faeces and reduction of water consumption for faeces flushing are required. Furthermore, the faeces and kitchen organic wastes and grey water are digested in, respectively, an AC system and UASB reactor, while the urine is stored. PMID:16841726

  18. Random UV-C mutagenesis of Scheffersomyces (formerly Pichia) stipitis NRRL Y-7124 to improve anaerobic growth on lignocellulosic sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeast strains for anaerobic conversion of lignocellulosic sugars to ethanol were produced from Scheffersomyces (formerly Pichia) stipitis NRRL Y-7124 using UV-C mutagenesis. Random UV-C mutagenesis potentially produces large numbers of mutations broadly and uniformly over the whole genome to genera...

  19. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in pilot scale for treatment of tofu industry wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Rahayu, Suparni Setyowati; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-29

    The small industry of tofu production process releases the waste water without being processed first, and the wastewater is directly discharged into water. In this study, Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor in Pilot Scale for Treatment of Tofu Industry was developed through an anaerobic process to produce biogas as one kind of environmentally friendly renewable energy which can be developed into the countryside. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental characteristics of organic matter elimination of industrial wastewater with small tofu effective method and utilize anaerobic active sludge with Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR) to get rural biogas as an energy source. The first factor is the amount of the active sludge concentration which functions as the decomposers of organic matter and controlling selectivity allowance to degrade organic matter. The second factor is that HRT is the average period required substrate to react with the bacteria in the Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR).The results of processing the waste of tofu production industry using ASBR reactor with active sludge additions as starter generates cumulative volume of 5814.4 mL at HRT 5 days so that in this study it is obtained the conversion 0.16 L of CH{sub 4}/g COD and produce biogas containing of CH{sub 4}: 81.23% and CO{sub 2}: 16.12%. The wastewater treatment of tofu production using ASBR reactor is able to produce renewable energy that has economic value as well as environmentally friendly by nature.

  20. Performance assessment of two-stage anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zhang; Pin-Jing, He

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the performance of the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes in a lab-scale setup. The semi-continuous experiment showed that the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes had a bioconversion rate of 83%, biogas yield of 338 mL x (g chemical oxygen demand (COD))(-1) and total solid conversion of 63% when the entire two-phase anaerobic digestion process was subjected to an organic loading rate (OLR) of 10.7 g x (L d)(-1). In the hydrolysis-acidogenesis process, the efficiency of solubilization decreased from 72.6% to 41.1%, and the acidogenesis efficiency decreased from 31.8% to 17.8% with an increase in the COD loading rate. On the other hand, the performance of the subsequent methanogenic process was not susceptible to the increase in the feeding COD loading rate in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis stage. Lactic acid was one of the main fermentation products, accounting for over 40% of the total soluble COD in the fermentation liquid. The batch experiments indicated that the lactic acid was the earliest predominant fermentation product, and distributions of fermentation products were pH dependent. Results showed that increasing the feeding OLR of kitchen wastes made the two-stage anaerobic digestion process more effective. Moreover, there was a potential improvement in the performance of anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes with a corresponding improvement in the hydrolysis process. PMID:24701925

  1. Degradation of furfural (2-furaldehyde) to methane and carbon dioxide by an anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Grohmann, K.

    1991-12-31

    Furfural, a byproduct formed during the thermal/chemical pretreatment of hemicellulosic biomass, was degraded to methane and carbon dioxide under anaerobic conditions. The consortium of anaerobic microbes responsible for the degradation was enriched using small continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) systems with daily batch feeding of biomass pretreatment liquor and continuous addition of furfural. Although the continuous infusion of furfural was initially inhibitory to the anaerobic CSTR system, adaptation of the consortium occurred rapidly with high rates of furfural addition. Addition rates of 7.35 mg furfural/700-mL reactor/d resulted in biogas productions of 375%, of that produced in control CSTR systems, fed the biomass pretreatment liquor only. The anaerobic CSTR system fed high levels of furfural was stable, with a sludge pH of 7.1 and methane gas composition of 69%, compared to the control CSTR, which had a pH of 7.2 and 77% methane. CSTR systems in which furfural was continuously added resulted in 80% of the theoretically expected biogas. Intermediates in the anaerobic biodegradation of furfural were determined by spike additions in serum-bottle assays using the enriched consortium from the CSTR systems. Furfural was converted to several intermediates, including furfuryl alcohol, furoic acid, and acetic acid, before final conversion to methane and carbon dioxide.

  2. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in pilot scale for treatment of tofu industry wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahayu, Suparni Setyowati; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-01

    The small industry of tofu production process releases the waste water without being processed first, and the wastewater is directly discharged into water. In this study, Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor in Pilot Scale for Treatment of Tofu Industry was developed through an anaerobic process to produce biogas as one kind of environmentally friendly renewable energy which can be developed into the countryside. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental characteristics of organic matter elimination of industrial wastewater with small tofu effective method and utilize anaerobic active sludge with Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR) to get rural biogas as an energy source. The first factor is the amount of the active sludge concentration which functions as the decomposers of organic matter and controlling selectivity allowance to degrade organic matter. The second factor is that HRT is the average period required substrate to react with the bacteria in the Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR).The results of processing the waste of tofu production industry using ASBR reactor with active sludge additions as starter generates cumulative volume of 5814.4 mL at HRT 5 days so that in this study it is obtained the conversion 0.16 L of CH4/g COD and produce biogas containing of CH4: 81.23% and CO2: 16.12%. The wastewater treatment of tofu production using ASBR reactor is able to produce renewable energy that has economic value as well as environmentally friendly by nature.

  3. Combined treatment of olive mill wastewater by Fenton's reagent and anaerobic biological process.

    PubMed

    Amor, Carlos; Lucas, Marco S; García, Juan; Dominguez, Joaquín R; De Heredia, J Beltrán; Peres, José A

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the application of Fenton's reagent process combined with anaerobic digestion to treat an olive mill wastewater (OMW). Firstly, OMW was pre-treated by chemical oxidation in a batch reactor with Fenton's reagent, using a fixed H2O2/COD ratio of 0.20, pH = 3.5 and a H2O2/Fe(2+) molar ratio of 15:1. This advanced oxidation treatment allowed reaching reductions of 17.6 and 82.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total polyphenols (TP), respectively. Secondly, OMW treatment by anaerobic digestion was performed using previously adapted microorganisms immobilized in Sepiolite. These biological tests were carried out varying the substrate concentration supplied to the reactor and COD conversions from 52 to 74% were obtained. Afterwards, Fenton's reagent followed by anaerobic digestion was applied to OMW treatment. This combined process presented a significant improvement on organic load removal, reaching COD degradations from 64 to 88%. Beyond the pollutant load removal, it was also monitored the yield of methane generated throughout anaerobic experiments. The methane produced ranged from 281 cm(3) to 322 cm(3) of CH4/g COD removed. Additionally, a methane generation kinetic study was performed using the Monod Model. The application of this model allowed observing a kinetic constant increase of the combined process (kFN = 0.036 h(-1)) when compared to the single anaerobic process (kF = 0.017 h(-1)). PMID:25560262

  4. Anaerobic processes in waste treatment: Methane production. July 1978-March 1990 (A Bibliography from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for July 1978-March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and applications of methane gas production by anaerobic conversion of waste materials, primarily agricultural and animal wastes, but including refuse and sewage wastes. Articles discuss the anaerobic processes involved in waste digestion, the microorganisms responsible for bioconversion of wastes, environmental variables and toxins, and energy production using biogas generators. Both large and small scale systems are considered. (Contains 334 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Factor Analysis of Various Anaerobic Power Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, James M.; And Others

    A study investigated the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and of numerous anaerobic power tests with measures obtained on an isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty-one male college students performed several anaerobic power tests, including: the vertical jump using the Lewis formula; the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test; the Wingate…

  6. Inhibition of anaerobic digestion process: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Cheng, Jay J; Creamer, Kurt S

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive waste treatment practice in which both pollution control and energy recovery can be achieved. Many agricultural and industrial wastes are ideal candidates for anaerobic digestion because they contain high levels of easily biodegradable materials. Problems such as low methane yield and process instability are often encountered in anaerobic digestion, preventing this technique from being widely applied. A wide variety of inhibitory substances are the primary cause of anaerobic digester upset or failure since they are present in substantial concentrations in wastes. Considerable research efforts have been made to identify the mechanism and the controlling factors of inhibition. This review provides a detailed summary of the research conducted on the inhibition of anaerobic processes. The inhibitors commonly present in anaerobic digesters include ammonia, sulfide, light metal ions, heavy metals, and organics. Due to the difference in anaerobic inocula, waste composition, and experimental methods and conditions, literature results on inhibition caused by specific toxicants vary widely. Co-digestion with other waste, adaptation of microorganisms to inhibitory substances, and incorporation of methods to remove or counteract toxicants before anaerobic digestion can significantly improve the waste treatment efficiency. PMID:17399981

  7. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  8. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  9. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  10. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  11. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  12. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  13. Cometabolism of Methyl tertiary Butyl Ether and Gaseous n-Alkanes by Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 Grown on C5 to C8 n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 grew well on toluene, n-alkanes (C5 to C8), and 1° alcohols (C2 to C8) but not on other aromatics, gaseous n-alkanes (C1 to C4), isoalkanes (C4 to C6), 2° alcohols (C3 to C8), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), or tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown under carbon-limited conditions on n-alkanes in the presence of MTBE (42 μmol) oxidized up to 94% of the added MTBE to TBA. Less than 3% of the added MTBE was oxidized to TBA when cells were grown on either 1° alcohols, toluene, or dextrose in the presence of MTBE. Concentrated n-pentane-grown cells oxidized MTBE to TBA without a lag phase and without generating tertiary butyl formate (TBF) as an intermediate. Neither TBF nor TBA was consumed by n-pentane-grown cells, while formaldehyde, the expected C1 product of MTBE dealkylation, was rapidly consumed. Similar Ks values for MTBE were observed for cells grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes (12.95 ± 2.04 mM), suggesting that the same enzyme oxidizes MTBE in cells grown on each n-alkane. All growth-supporting n-alkanes (C5 to C8) inhibited MTBE oxidation by resting n-pentane-grown cells. Propane (Ki = 53 μM) and n-butane (Ki = 16 μM) also inhibited MTBE oxidation, and both gases were also consumed by cells during growth on n-pentane. Cultures grown on C5 to C8 n-alkanes also exhibited up to twofold-higher levels of growth in the presence of propane or n-butane, whereas no growth stimulation was observed with methane, ethane, MTBE, TBA, or formaldehyde. The results are discussed in terms of their impacts on our understanding of MTBE biodegradation and cometabolism. PMID:14660389

  14. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying 13C- and 15N-labeled substrates simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Blank, Lars M; Desphande, Rahul R; Schmid, Andreas; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-06-01

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly (13)C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously--i.e., (13)C and (15)N--in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with (13)C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both (13)C-labeled glucose and (15)N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. PMID:22543713

  15. Anaerobic acidogenesis of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Krones, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if high rate acidogenic fermentation of dairy manure was possible, Whole dairy manure was ground and diluted to 4% total solids and fed to a 10 L anaerobic chemostat operating at 35C and with hydraulic retention times varying between 6 and 50 hours. Several physical and organic parameters of the influent and effluent were measured and compared. The results indicated that the manure was too refractory for high rate liquefaction and hydrolysis. A second experiment was conducted using the same techniques and substrate but varying the substrate pH between 5 and 7. The objectives were to further investigate the pH sensitivity of the acidogenic process and to determine if, by introducing a substrate with a low pH, acidogenesis might proceed more efficiently. The primary result of decreasing the pH was a smaller proportion of methane and an increased proportion of hydrogen in the gas. Liquefaction and hydrolysis continued to be rate limiting and appeared to be a major impediment to two phase anaerobic treatment of dairy manure.

  16. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25457225

  17. Spectrum and treatment of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery. Because anaerobes generally are isolated mixed with aerobes, the antimicrobial chosen should provide for adequate coverage of both. The most effective antimicrobials against anaerobes are: metronidazole, the carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem), chloramphenicol, the combinations of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitors (ampicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate, amoxicillin plus sulbactam, piperacillin plus tazobactam), tigecycline, cefoxitin and clindamycin. PMID:26620376

  18. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  19. Document Conversion Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovee, Donna

    1990-01-01

    Discusses digital imaging technology and examines document database conversion considerations. Two types of document imaging systems are described: (1) a work in process system, and (2) a storage and retrieval system. Conversion methodology is outlined, and a document conversion scenario is presented as a practical guide to conversion. (LRW)

  20. Segregation of biomass in cyclic anaerobic/aerobic granular sludge allows the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Mari K H; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Kuenen, J Gijs; Yang, Jingjing; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-09-01

    A cyclic anaerobic/aerobic bubble column reactor was run for 420 days to study the competition for nitrite between nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Anammox) at low temperatures. An anaerobic feeding period with nitrite and ammonium in the influent followed by an aerated period was applied resulting in a biomass specific conversion rate of 0.18 ± 0.02 [gN(2) - N · gVSS(-1)· day(-1)] when the dissolved oxygen concentration was maintained at 1.0 mgO(2) · L(-1). An increase in white granules was observed in the reactor which were mainly located at the top of the settled sludge bed, whereas red granules were located at the bottom. FISH, activity tests, and qPCR techniques revealed that red biomass was dominated by Anammox bacteria and white granules by NOB. Granules from the top of the sludge bed were smaller and therefore had a higher aerobic volume fraction, a lower density, and consequently a slower settling rate. Sludge was manually removed from the top of the settled sludge bed to selectively remove NOB which resulted in an increased overall biomass specific N-conversion rate of 0.32 ± 0.02 [gN(2) - N · gVSS(-1) · day(-1)]. Biomass segregation in granular sludge reactors gives an extra opportunity to select for specific microbial groups by applying a different SRT for different microbial groups. PMID:21744798

  1. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  2. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  3. Pashto Conversation Manual and Pashto Conversation Tapescript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegey, Habibullah; Robson, Barbara

    This conversation manual and tapescript are part of a set of materials that have been developed to teach oral and written Afghan Pashto to English speakers. In addition to the conversation manual and tapescript, the set consists of a beginning textbook, an intermediate textbook, a reader, and a set of taped lessons that correlate with the…

  4. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Pristane by Nitrate Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K. S.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    In recent sediments, microbial biodegradation provides a control on the long-term preservation of organic matter, through the preferential loss of certain biomolecules and the alteration and concentration of other more recalcitrant molecules. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons derived from membrane lipids, has been demonstrated by both aerobic and strictly anaerobic culturing experiments. The isoprenoid pristane, once considered stable under anaerobic conditions, is in fact degraded by a denitrifying microcosm (BREGNARD et al., 1997) and a methanogenic, sulphate-reducing enrichment culture (GROSSI, 2000). We recently demonstrated pristane biodegradation and accompanying loss of nitrate by an activated sludge isolate. The measured nitrate consumption accounts for a 7.1 +/- 0.4 mg loss of pristane, 4.74% of the initial substrate, in 181 days, assuming pristane conversion to CO2. We have characterized the microorganisms active in the biodegradation process, through the creation of a 16S rDNA clone library, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Experiments are in progress to enrich cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria that utilize pristane as a sole carbon source and to characterize reaction mechanisms in pristane-oxidizing pathways.

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Sliekers, A. Olav; Lavik, Gaute; Schmid, Markus; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Strous, Marc; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions. The conversion of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean. Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N2 in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors. Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, 15N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific `ladderane' membrane lipids indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings indicates that anammox might be important in the oceanic nitrogen cycle.

  7. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  8. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  9. Anaerobic microbial transformations in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollag, J.M.; Berry, D.F.; Chanmugathas, P.

    1985-04-01

    The first draft of a literature review article entitled, ''Metabolism of Homocyclic (Benzenoid) and Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds by Microorganisms Under Anaerobic Conditions'' is completed. The article covers biodegradation of both heterocyclic and homocyclic aromatic compounds under a variety of conditions including nitrate reducing, fermentation, sulfate reducing, and methanogensis. Laboratory experiments have been designed to study the anaerobic biotransformation processes involving organic substance derived from energy residual wastes. The test compounds selected for the initial anaerobic biodegradation experiments include aniline, indole, and pyridine. A Hungate apparatus is presently in operation.

  10. Anaerobic Oxidation of Benzene by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ferroglobus placidus▿†

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) was studied in Ferroglobus placidus in order to learn more about how such a stable molecule could be metabolized under strict anaerobic conditions. F. placidus conserved energy to support growth at 85°C in a medium with benzene provided as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. The stoichiometry of benzene loss and Fe(III) reduction, as well as the conversion of [14C]benzene to [14C]carbon dioxide, was consistent with complete oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with electron transfer to Fe(III). Benzoate, but not phenol or toluene, accumulated at low levels during benzene metabolism, and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]benzene. Analysis of gene transcript levels revealed increased expression of genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzene versus growth on acetate, but genes involved in phenol degradation were not upregulated during growth on benzene. A gene for a putative carboxylase that was more highly expressed in benzene- than in benzoate-grown cells was identified. These results suggest that benzene is carboxylated to benzoate and that phenol is not an important intermediate in the benzene metabolism of F. placidus. This is the first demonstration of a microorganism in pure culture that can grow on benzene under strict anaerobic conditions and for which there is strong evidence for degradation of benzene via clearly defined anaerobic metabolic pathways. Thus, F. placidus provides a much-needed pure culture model for further studies on the anaerobic activation of benzene in microorganisms. PMID:21742914

  11. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  12. Physiological and functional diversity of phenol degraders isolated from phenol-grown aerobic granules: Phenol degradation kinetics and trichloroethylene co-metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic granule is a novel form of microbial aggregate capable of degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. Aerobic granules have been formed on phenol as the growth substrate, and used to co-metabolically degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), a synthetic solvent not supporting aerobic microbial growth. Granule formation process, rate limiting factors and the comprehensive toxic effects of phenol and TCE had been systematically studied. To further explore their potential at the level of microbial population and functions, phenol degraders were isolated and purified from mature granules in this study. Phenol and TCE degradation kinetics of 15 strains were determined, together with their TCE transformation capacities and other physiological characteristics. Isolation in the presence of phenol and TCE exerted stress on microbial populations, but the procedure was able to preserve their diversity. Wide variation was found with the isolates' kinetic behaviors, with the parameters often spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Haldane kinetics described phenol degradation well, and the isolates exhibited actual maximum phenol-dependent oxygen utilization rates of 9-449 mg DO g DW(-1) h(-1), in phenol concentration range of 4.8-406 mg L(-1). Both Michaelis-Menten and Haldane types were observed for TCE transformation, with the actual maximum rate of 1.04-21.1 mg TCE g DW(-1) h(-1) occurring between TCE concentrations of 0.42-4.90 mg L(-1). The TCE transformation capacities and growth yields on phenol ranged from 20-115 mg TCE g DW(-1) and 0.46-1.22 g DW g phenol(-1), respectively, resulting in TCE transformation yields of 10-70 mg TCE g phenol(-1). Contact angles of the isolates were between 34° and 82°, suggesting both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cell surface. The diversity in the isolates is a great advantage, as it enables granules to be versatile and adaptive under different operational conditions. PMID:26720328

  13. Biotechnology of biomass conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers: An introduction to biomass crops; The microbiology of fermentation processes; The production of ethanol from biomass crops, such as sugar cane and rubbers; The energy of biomass conversion; and The economics of biomass conversion.

  14. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  15. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    significant achievements were: (1) Coal decarboxylation was achieved by batch bioreactor systems using adapted anaerobic microbial consortium. (2) Two new isolates with coal decarboxylation potential were obtained from adapted microbial consortia. (3) CHN and TG anaysis of anaerobically biotreated coals have shown an increase in the H/C ratio and evolution rate of volatile carbon which could be a better feedstock for the liquefaction process.

  16. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  17. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  18. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-01

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF ADVANCED PROCESSES FOR CONVERSION OF COAL AND BIOMASS INTO CLEAN ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomass and coal conversion into clean energy is compared on an economic and environmental basis in three regional scenarios: (1) electric power from direct combustion of wood versus conventional coal combustion in the South Central U.S., (2) synthetic pipeline gas from anaerobic...

  1. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic materials in excess sludge by bioaugmentation and pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Jimin; Cao, Yali

    2016-03-01

    This study attempted to enhance anaerobic conversion of lignocellulosic materials in excess sludge by bioaugmentation and pretreatment. The results reveal that highly active lignocellulolytic microorganisms (Clostridium stercorarium and Bacteroides cellulosolvens) could be enriched from anaerobic sludge in ordinarily operated anaerobic digester (AD). Inoculating these microorganisms into AD could substantially enhance the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose. However, this effect of bioaugmentation was shielded for raw excess sludge due to lignin incrustation in native biosolids. For this problem, pretreatments including acid, alkali, thermal and ultrasonic methods were effectively used to deconstruct the lignin incrustation, in which thermal pretreatment was demonstrated to be the most effective one. Then, pretreatment associated with bioaugmentation was successfully used to enhance the energy conversion of lignocellulosic materials, which resulted in the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin to 68.8-78.2%, 77.4-89% and 15.4-33.7% respectively and thus increased the CH4 production by 210-246%, compared with ordinary AD. PMID:26712660

  2. Improvement of anaerobic soil disinfestation.

    PubMed

    Runia, W T; Molendirk, L P G; Ludeking, D J W; Schomaker, C H

    2012-01-01

    With increasing worldwide restrictions for soil fumigants, growers loose an important tool to control soilborne pests and pathogens. Environmentally friendly alternatives are urgently needed and anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) may be one of them. Traditional ASD with fresh grass is already applied in open field vegetables but the mode of action is unknown. Therefore, trials were performed under controlled conditions using soil-filled buckets, in which several processed defined organic materials were incorporated and compared with fresh grass. The effect of inundation was also studied. Target organisms were Pratylenchus penetrans, Meloidogyne hapla, Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. Results showed that grass (traditional ASD) was less effective than the organic materials. All materials proved to be effective at 16 degrees C against all target organisms. However, exposure time, dosages, soil type and the temperature at which the experiments were performed influenced the effectiveness. P. penetrans was eliminated most easily whereas V. dahliae was most difficult to control. Efficacy was higher in sandy soil than in light marine clay. Inundation at 16 degrees C proved to be effective against P. penetrans and G. pallida in both soil types at sufficient exposure times. A soil temperature of 8 degrees C was sometimes too low for efficacy. Gas production of CO2, NH3, H2S, CH4 and N2O and gas consumption of O2 and production of fatty acids during ASD proved to depend on type of organic materials, soil type, temperature, dosage and exposure time. This first step in unravelling the mode of action has already shown several critical parameters for efficacy. Additional knowledge about the complete mechanisms of action may lead to a more reliable, effective and quicker soil disinfestation. PMID:23885444

  3. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated alkenes are widely found in contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. The highly chlorinated alkene (i.e., PCE) is not subject to aerobic biotransformation. The aim of this research was to explore the potential of using anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification, sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis) for chlorinated alkenes biotransformation. Contaminated soil samples were used throughout this study. Soil microcosms simulating field anoxic conditions with various nutrients amendment, liquid microcosms as well as enrichment liquid cultures were developed to delineate the dechlorination process. The effect of biomass, chlorinated alkenes concentration and site specific conditions (e.g., temperature and pH) on the dechlorination and the primary metabolic process was investigated. The role of sorption and nutritional needs (i.e., electron donor) were also studied. A preliminary study revealed that denitrification was the least affected by low temperatures as compared to sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis. Although dechlorination took place under sequential denitrifying and methanogenic conditions and under sulfate-reducing conditions, further studies concluded that fermentative and methanogenic bacteria were responsible for the observed dechlorination. In most cases, dechlorination of PCE or TCE resulted in the accumulation of cDCE. However, a VC-producing culture was developed from the PCE-contaminated soil. In general, the dechlorination process could be enhanced by increasing electron donor and biomass concentration. At relatively low concentrations, the dechlorination rate was also increased with increasing chlorinated alkene concentration. Dechlorination even proceeded at high chlorinated alkene concentrations when methane production was inhibited. However, as the concentration of the chlorinated alkenes increased, severe toxicity eventually halted the dechlorination process.

  4. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  5. Animal model for anaerobic lung abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Kannangara, D W; Thadepalli, H; Bach, V T; Webb, D

    1981-01-01

    There are no satisfactory animal models for the study of anaerobic lung abscess. Aspiration of food, gastric mucin, or hydrochloric acid, or any combination of these, along with oropharyngeal bacteria, is commonly believed to cause aspiration pneumonia and lung abscess. In the animal model described, none of the adjuvants was effective in producing anaerobic lung abscesses. Anaerobic bacteria derived from dental scrapings of a healthy adult (Peptococcus morbillorum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium lentum, and Bacteroides fragilis), when inoculated transtracheally without any adjuvants into New Zealand male white rabbits, consistently produced lung abscesses. Neither B fragilis by itself nor a mixture of P. morbillorum, F. nucleatum, and E. lentum without the addition of B. fragilis produced lung abscesses. The bacterial isolates used in this study were stored in prereduced chopped-meat-glucose medium and subcultured several times and were found effective in reproducing anaerobic lung abscesses repeatedly. This animal model is suitable for the study of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of B. fragilis-associated anaerobic lung abscess. Images PMID:7216463

  6. Integrated treatment of municipal sewage sludge by deep dewatering and anaerobic fermentation for biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Wentian; Wei, Huangzhao; Sun, Chenglin

    2015-02-01

    The increasing sludge generated in wastewater treatment plants poses a threat to the environment. Based on the traditional processes, sludge dewatered by usual methods was further dewatered by hydraulic compression and the filtrate released was treated by anaerobic fermentation. The difficulties in sludge dewatering were associated with the existence of sludge flocs or colloidal materials. A suitable CaO dosage of 125 mg/g dry sludge (DS) could further decrease the moisture content of sludge from 82.4 to 50.9 %. The filtrate from the dewatering procedure was a potential substrate for biohydrogen production. Adding zero-valent iron (ZVI) into the anaerobic system improved the biohydrogen yield by 20 %, and the COD removal rate was lifted by 10 % as well. Meanwhile, the sludge morphology and microbial community were altered. The novel method could greatly reduce the sludge volume and successfully treated filtrate along with the conversion of organics into biohydrogen. PMID:25192669

  7. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning. PMID:27236402

  8. Problems Caused by Microbes and Treatment Strategies Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation and Biocorrosion: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suflita, Joseph M.; Duncan, Kathleen E.

    The anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons is important for the intrinsic remediation of spilt fuels (Gieg and Suflita, 2005), for the conversion of hydrocarbons to clean burning natural gas (Gieg et al., 2008; Jones et al., 2008) and for the fundamental cycling of carbon on the planet (Caldwell et al., 2008). However, the same process has also been implicated in a host of difficult problems including reservoir souring (Jack and Westlake, 1995), oil viscosity alteration (Head et al., 2003), compromised equipment performance and microbiologically influenced corrosion (Duncan et al., 2009). Herein, we will focus on the role of anaerobic microbial communities in catalysing biocorrosion activities in oilfield facilities. Biocorrosion is a costly problem that remains relatively poorly understood. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms requires reliable information on the carbon and energy sources supporting biofilm microorganisms capable of catalysing such activities.

  9. Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for increasing anaerobic biodegradability to methane

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, K.; Bachmann, A.; Beard, V.L.; Levy, J.; McCarty, P.L.

    1985-05-01

    This is a report of the second-year activities of a three-year study to determine the feasibility of using heat pretreatment to increase the anaerobic bioconvertibility to methane of lignocellulosic materials. A new methane fermentation process termed the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was found capable of loading rates up to 30 kg COD/m/sup 3/ day for dilute organic solutions, and proved to be simple, easy to operate, and reliable. In studies of temperature and pH effects on lignocellulose pretreatment, pH between 2 and 2.5 was found optimum for cellulose hydrolysis, resulting in minimum acid or base decomposition of the sugars formed. In a bench-scale study of the overall pretreatment/methane-fermentation system, staged pretreatment of white fir under optimum conditions resulted in 58% conversion of the carbohydrate heat content and 35% of overall white fir heat content into methane gas. 224 refs., 45 figs., 39 tabs.

  10. Conversing with Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    I/NET, Inc., is making the dream of natural human-computer conversation a practical reality. Through a combination of advanced artificial intelligence research and practical software design, I/NET has taken the complexity out of developing advanced, natural language interfaces. Conversational capabilities like pronoun resolution, anaphora and ellipsis processing, and dialog management that were once available only in the laboratory can now be brought to any application with any speech recognition system using I/NET s conversational engine middleware.

  11. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, A. H.; Bakker, T. W.; Kramer, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by anaerobic bacteria, and how much cavitation increases the total biogas yield. An increase in yield is only the case if cavitation can further disrupt otherwise inaccessible cell membrane structures and long chain organic molecules. In this study the influence of hydrodynamic cavitation on sludge that was already digested for 30 days was investigated. The total biogas yield could indeed be increased. The effect of the backpressure behind the venturi tube on the yield could not yet be established.

  12. Hybrid biothermal conversion of biomass to methane

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Novil, M.; Tarman, P.B.; Chynoweth, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Combining biochemical and thermochemical gasification in the Biothermgas process results in an economic process with a higher conversion efficiency and a greater choice of feedstocks that can be processed than biological or thermochemical processes used separately. The biogasification component can receive high mositure feeds, can convert major portions of feed at low temperature and pressure, and can be used for methanation of synthesis gas. The thermochemical gasifier converts refractory organic residues from the anaerobic digesters and provides gases than can be used for heating, mixing, and simulating methanogenesis in the biological component. The operating parameters for gasification of Bermuda grass by the Biothermgas process and for gasification of municipal solid waste-sewage sludge blend by the Biothermgas process with biomethanation are reported.

  13. Comparison of static, in-vessel composting of MSW with thermophilic anaerobic digestion and combinations of the two processes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lee; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    The biological stabilisation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) into a form stable enough for land application can be achieved via aerobic or anaerobic treatments. To investigate the rates of degradation (e.g. via electron equivalents removed, or via carbon emitted) of aerobic and anaerobic treatment, OFMSW samples were exposed to computer controlled laboratory-scale aerobic (static in-vessel composting), and anaerobic (thermophilic anaerobic digestion with liquor recycle) treatment individually and in combination. A comparison of the degradation rates, based on electron flow revealed that provided a suitable inoculum was used, anaerobic digestion was the faster of the two waste conversion process. In addition to faster maximum substrate oxidation rates, anaerobic digestion (followed by post-treatment aerobic maturation), when compared to static composting alone, converted a larger fraction of the organics to gaseous end-products (CO2 and CH4), leading to improved end-product stability and maturity, as measured by compost self-heating and root elongation tests, respectively. While not comparable to windrow and other mixed, highly aerated compost systems, our results show that in the thermophilic, in-vessel treatment investigated here, the inclusion of a anaerobic phase, rather than using composting alone, improved hydrolysis rates as well as oxidation rates and product stability. The combination of the two methods, as used in the DiCOM process, was also tested allowing heat generation to thermophilic operating temperature, biogas recovery and a low odour stable end-product within 19 days of operation. PMID:19345576

  14. UV-C mutagenesis of Kluyveromyces marxianus NRRL Y-1109 strain for improved anaerobic growth at elevated temperature on pentose and hexose sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More robust industrial yeast strains from Kluyveromyces marxianus NRRL Y-1109 and have been produced using UV-C irradiation specifically for anaerobic conversion of lignocellulosic sugar streams to fuel ethanol at elevated temperature (45°C). This type of random mutagenesis offers the possibility o...

  15. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Amy V.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) via “reverse methanogenesis” and is catalyzed by a homolog of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and SRB, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, “intra-aerobic” pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appear to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase). Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an “intra-aerobic” denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ PMID:23717304

  16. Nutrient removal and microbial granulation in an anaerobic process treating inorganic and organic nitrogenous wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y H; Kim, H C

    2004-01-01

    The sustainable anaerobic nitrogen removal and microbial granulation were investigated by using a laboratory anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor, treating synthetic (inorganic and organic) wastewater and piggery waste. From inorganic synthetic wastewater, lithoautotrophic ammonium oxidation to nitrite/nitrate was observed by an addition of hydroxylamine. Also, the results revealed that the Anammox intermediates (particularly, hydrazine) contents in the substrate would be one of the important parameters for success of the anaerobic nitrogen removal process. The results from organic synthetic wastewater show that if the Anammox organism were not great enough in the startup of the process, denitritation and anaerobic ammonification would be a process prior to the Anammox reaction. The anaerobic ammonium removal from the piggery waste was performed successfully, probably due to the Anammox intermediates contained in the substrate. This reactor shows a complex performance including the Anammox reaction and HAP crystallization, as well as having partial denitritation occurring simultaneously. From the activity test, the maximum specific N conversion rate was 0.1 g NH4-N/g VSS/day (0.77 g T-N/g VSS/day), indicating that potential denitritation is quite high. The NO2-N/NH4-N ratio to Anammox is 1.17. The colour of the biomass treating the piggery waste changed from black to dark red. It was also observed that the red-colored granular sludge had a diameter of 1-2 mm. The settleability assessment of the granular sludge revealed that the granular sludge had a good settleability even though it was worse than that of seed granular sludge. PMID:15537009

  17. Recovery of methane-rich gas from solid-feed anaerobic digestion of ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea).

    PubMed

    Sankar Ganesh, P; Sanjeevi, R; Gajalakshmi, S; Ramasamy, E V; Abbasi, S A

    2008-03-01

    Studies are presented on new types of anaerobic digesters in which chopped or dry crushed Ipomoea carnea was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop commercially viable means of utilizing the otherwise very harmful plant. Two types of solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SFADs) were studied. The first type had a single vessel in which the bottom 35% portion was separated from the top portion by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cowdung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the reactor led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The leachate, rich in the VFAs, was passed through the perforated PVC sheet and collected in the lower portion of the vessel. The other type of reactors had two vessels, the first one was fully charged with the weed and the second received the VFA leachate. With both types were attached upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) which converted the leachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 70% methane. All SFADs developed very consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 17 weeks of start. The two-compartment reactors yielded significantly more biogas than the single-compartment reactors of corresponding total volume, and the reactors with which anaerobic filters (AF) were attached yielded more biogas than the ones without AF. The best performing units generated 2.41m(3) of biogas per m(3) of digester volume, as compared to 0.1-0.2m(3) of biogas, m(-3)d(-1), obtainable with conventional digesters. This indicates the viability of this technology. The spent weed can be vermicomposted directly to obtain good soil-conditioner cum fertilizer; earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae produced 540mg vermicast per animal every day, achieving near total conversion of feed to vermicast in 20 days. The proposed systems, thus, makes it possible to accomplish total utilization of ipomoea. PMID:17368892

  18. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  19. Anaerobes: a new aetiology in cavitary pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, J M; Hitado, J; Gea, G; Colmeiro, A; Lanza, A M; Muñoz, J A; Mosquera, J A

    1982-01-01

    The role of mycobacteria in the cavitation of large pneumoconiotic masses is well established. In other cases softness is attributed to an ischaemic or aseptic necrosis. Five cases are described in which cavitation of the pulmonary masses was caused by anaerobic bacteria, confirmed by the growth of such bacterial in cultures after transtracheal or transpleural puncture. Repeated cultures for mycobacteria gave negative results. Two cases were acute, having serious complications such as bronchopleural fistula, empyema, and serious respiratory insufficiency. The role of anaerobes in cavitary pneumoconiosis has not been recognised previously, probably because of the special conditions required to culture these bacteria and the infrequent use of transtracheal puncture in the diagnosis of this entity. The prevalence of anaerobes as agents capable of cavitating pneumoconiotic masses remains to be established. Images PMID:6128024

  20. Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Ding, Wenchuan; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of anaerobic digestion on biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse. Sugarcane bagasse was anaerobically digested to produce methane. The digested residue and fresh bagasse was pyrolyzed separately into biochar at 600 degrees C in nitrogen environment. The digested bagasse biochar (DBC) and undigested bagasse biochar (BC) were characterized to determine their physicochemical properties. Although biochar was produced from the digested residue (18% by weight) and the raw bagasse (23%) at a similar rate, there were many physiochemical differences between them. Compared to BC, DBC had higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), anion exchange capacity (AEC), hydrophobicity and more negative surface charge, all properties that are generally desirable for soil amelioration, contaminant remediation or wastewater treatment. Thus, these results suggest that the pyrolysis of anaerobic digestion residues to produce biochar may be an economically and environmentally beneficial use of agricultural wastes. PMID:20634061

  1. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  2. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  3. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of high strength wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegant, W.M.; Claassen, J.A.; Lettinga, G.

    1985-09-01

    Investigations on the thermophilic anaerobic treatment of high-strength wastewaters (14-65 kg COD/mT) are presented. Vinasse, the wastewater of alcohol distilleries, was used as an example of such wastewaters. Semicontinuously fed digestion experiments at high retention times revealed that the effluent quality of digestion at 55C is comparable with that at 30C at similar loading rates. The amount of methane formed per kilogram of vinasse drops almost linearly with increasing vinasse concentrations. The treatment of vinasse was also investigated using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

  4. Computer-assisted identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R W; Kellogg, S T

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed to identify anaerobic bacteria by using simultaneous pattern recognition via a Bayesian probabilistic model. The system is intended for use as a rapid, precise, and reproducible aid in the identification of unknown isolates. The program operates on a data base of 28 genera comprising 238 species of anaerobic bacteria that can be separated by the program. Input to the program consists of biochemical and gas chromatographic test results in binary format. The system is flexible and yields outputs of: (i) most probable species, (ii) significant test results conflicting with established data, and (iii) differential tests of significance for missing test results. PMID:345970

  5. Sequential degradation of chlorophenols in anaerobic freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate in the freshwater sediment samples was investigated. Studies of the enrichment cultures and a pure culture, adaptation times, correlation of substrate degradation and product accumulation, maximal observed transformation rates, temperature and pH ranges for the transformation provided the bases for the proposed sequential pathway for degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol. At least six different bacterial species were required to catalyze following reactions: (1) the dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol; (2) the dechlorination of 4-chlorophenol; (3) the para-carboxylation of phenol; (4) the reductive dehydroxylation of para-hydroxybenzoate; (5) the degradation of benzoate to acetate, H[sub 2] and CO[sub 2]; and (6) the conversion of H[sub 2]/CO[sub 2] and acetate to methane. The rate limiting reaction in the pathway was the dechlorination of 4-chlorophenol. A new species, Clostridium [open quote]hydroxybenzoicum[close quote], isolated from the enrichment, catalyzed the carboxylation of phenol at the para-position to 4-hydroxybenzoate by a reversible decarboxylation/carboxylation enzyme. 3,4-Dihydroxybenzoate was decarboxylated by a second enzyme in this organism. The activities were biotin and ATP independent. The bacterium, in a pure culture, did not benefit from the decarboxylation reaction but apparently it benefited in the phenol-degrading enrichment culture. Of 46 strains (42 species) tested, only three exhibited hydroxybenzoate decarboxylation activities:Clostridium thermoaceticum, Clostridium thermoautotrophicum,Clostridium scatologenes. The history of the sediment determined the first step in the anaerobic degradation.

  6. Dynamics of the anaerobic process: effects of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pind, Peter F; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-06-30

    A complex and fast dynamic response of the anaerobic biogas system was observed when the system was subjected to pulses of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). It was shown that a pulse of specific VFAs into a well-functioning continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system operating on cow manure affected both CH(4) yield, pH, and gas production and that a unique reaction pattern was seen for the higher VFAs as a result of these pulses. In this study, two thermophilic laboratory reactors were equipped with a novel VFA-sensor for monitoring specific VFAs online. Pulses of VFAs were shown to have a positive effect on process yield and the levels of all VFA were shown to stabilize at a lower level after the biomass had been subjected to several pulses. The response to pulses of propionate or acetate was different from the response to butyrate, iso-butyrate, valerate, or iso-valerate. High concentrations of propionate affected the degradation of all VFAs, while a pulse of acetate affected primarily the degradation of iso-valerate or 2-methylbutyrate. Pulses of n-butyrate, iso-butyrate, and iso-valerate yielded only acetate, while degradation of n-valerate gave both propionate and acetate. Product sensitivity or inhibition was shown for the degradation of all VFAs tested. Based on the results, it was concluded that measurements of all specific VFAs are important for control purposes and increase and decrease in a specific VFA should always be evaluated in close relationship to the conversion of other VFAs and the history of the reactor process. It should be pointed out that the observed dynamics of VFA responses were based on hourly measurements, meaning that the response duration was much lower than the hydraulic retention time, which exceeds several days in anaerobic CSTR systems. PMID:12701145

  7. Common conversion factors.

    PubMed

    2001-05-01

    This appendix presents tables of some of the more common conversion factors for units of measure used throughout Current Protocols manuals, as well as prefixes indicating powers of ten for SI units. Another table gives conversions between temperatures on the Celsius (Centigrade) and Fahrenheit scales. PMID:18770653

  8. Assessment through Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Danling; Lamme, Linda L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents conversations with parents, teachers, and children around portfolios that provide a better picture of a child's growth and understanding than standardized test scores ever can. Concludes that the involvement of students, teachers, and parents in conversation about children's literacy development brings the potential of a common vision and…

  9. Marathi Conversational Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berntsen, Maxine; Nimbkar, Jai

    This volume is an elementary Marathi conversation text for adult learners of Marathi, both foreign and Indian. Designed to be used in conjunction with "Marathi Structural Patterns. Book One," the volume presents over 80 conversations that include material required in everyday situations. Each section contains basic and more difficult…

  10. Energy conversion alternatives study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  11. NUCLEAR CONVERSION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-09-13

    A nuclear conversion apparatus is described which comprises a body of neutron moderator, tubes extending therethrough, uranium in the tubes, a fluid- circulating system associated with the tubes, a thorium-containing fluid coolant in the system and tubes, and means for withdrawing the fluid from the system and replacing it in the system whereby thorium conversion products may be recovered.

  12. Changing Our Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a principal is inspired to change the conversations with students and staff members from discipline and deficit to hope and planning for future achievement. He wants conversations to be more about academic goals and decision making and less about discipline and random acceptance of postsecondary plans. He has asked all staff…

  13. Caffeine and anaerobic performance: ergogenic value and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Davis, J K; Green, J Matt

    2009-01-01

    The effect caffeine elicits on endurance performance is well founded. However, comparatively less research has been conducted on the ergogenic potential of anaerobic performance. Some studies showing no effect of caffeine on performance used untrained subjects and designs often not conducive to observing an ergogenic effect. Recent studies incorporating trained subjects and paradigms specific to intermittent sports activity support the notion that caffeine is ergogenic to an extent with anaerobic exercise. Caffeine seems highly ergogenic for speed endurance exercise ranging in duration from 60 to 180 seconds. However, other traditional models examining power output (i.e. 30-second Wingate test) have shown minimal effect of caffeine on performance. Conversely, studies employing sport-specific methodologies (i.e. hockey, rugby, soccer) with shorter duration (i.e. 4-6 seconds) show caffeine to be ergogenic during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Recent studies show caffeine affects isometric maximal force and offers introductory evidence for enhanced muscle endurance for lower body musculature. However, isokinetic peak torque, one-repetition maximum and muscular endurance for upper body musculature are less clear. Since relatively few studies exist with resistance training, a definite conclusion cannot be reached on the extent caffeine affects performance. It was previously thought that caffeine mechanisms were associated with adrenaline (epinephrine)-induced enhanced free-fatty acid oxidation and consequent glycogen sparing, which is the leading hypothesis for the ergogenic effect. It would seem unlikely that the proposed theory would result in improved anaerobic performance, since exercise is dominated by oxygen-independent metabolic pathways. Other mechanisms for caffeine have been suggested, such as enhanced calcium mobilization and phosphodiesterase inhibition. However, a normal physiological dose of caffeine in vivo does not indicate this mechanism plays a

  14. Optimizing anaerobic soil disinfestation: an alternative to soil fumigation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil disinfestation methods using anaerobic decomposition of organic matter were developed in the Netherlands and Japan as an ecological alternative to MeBr. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) works by creating a combination of anaerobic soil conditions and readily available carbon pools to stimula...

  15. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  16. The Influence of Hydration on Anaerobic Performance: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Justin A.; Green, James M.; Bishop, Phillip A.; Richardson, Mark T.; Neggers, Yasmin H.; Leeper, James D.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the influence of dehydration on muscular strength and endurance and on single and repeated anaerobic sprint bouts. Describing hydration effects on anaerobic performance is difficult because various exercise modes are dominated by anaerobic energy pathways, but still contain inherent physiological differences. The critical…

  17. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Mosey, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  18. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Mosey, F.E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion with the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  19. Studies on upflow anaerobic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandani, Nanik Sobhraj

    The thesis presents a critical review of the available literature on the various studies carried out on various aspects of Upflow Anaerobic Filter (UAF) throughout the world. Young and McCarty (1969) did the pioneering work in developing UAF in 1969, since then several studies have been carried out by different researchers using different substrates under different operating conditions and variety of supporting media. However, the most significant modification of the original reactor developed by Young and McCarty (1968), has been the development and use of high porosity media. The use of high porosity media, in fact, has changed the character of the reactor, from basically a fixed film reactor to a fixed film reactor in which the contribution by the suspended bio-solids, entrapped in the numerous media pores, in the substrate removal is quite significant that is to say that the reactor no longer remains a biological reactor which can be modeled and designed on the basis of biofilm kinetics only. The thesis presents an attempt to validate the developed mathematical model(s) by using the laboratory scale reactor performance data and the calculated values of reaction kinetic and bio-kinetic constants. To simplify the verification process, computer programmes have been prepared using the "EXCELL" software and C language. The results of the "EXCELL" computer program runs are tabulated at table no. 7.1 to 7.5. The verification of various mathematical models indicate that the model III B, i.e. Non ideal plug flow model assumed to consist of Complete Mix Reactors in series based on reaction kinetics, gives results with least deviation from the real situation. An interesting observation being that the model offers least deviation or nearly satisfies the real situation for a particular COD removal efficiency, for a particular OLR, eg. the least deviations are obtained at COD removal efficiency of 89% for OLR 2, 81.5% for OLR 4, 78.5% for OLR 6 . However, the use of the

  20. Analysis of denitrification in swine anaerobic lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a common management practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very sophisticated. To get a better understanding of the processes which occur i...

  1. Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihu; Zeng, Raymond J; Burow, Luke C; Lant, Paul; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-10-01

    The microorganisms responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to denitrification have not been clearly elucidated. Three recent publications suggested it can be achieved by a denitrifying bacterium with or without the involvement of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. A key factor limiting the progress in this research field is the shortage of enrichment cultures performing denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO). In this study, DAMO cultures were enriched from mixed inoculum including sediment from a freshwater lake, anaerobic digester sludge and return activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. Two reactors, operated at 35°C and at 22°C, respectively, showed simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrate reduction after several months of operation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the 35°C enrichment showed the presence of an archaeon closely related to other DAMO archaea and a dominated bacterium belonging to the yet uncultivated NC10 phylum. This culture preferred nitrite to nitrate as the electron acceptor. The present study suggests that the archaea are rather methanotrophs than methanogens. The highest denitrification rate achieved was 2.35 mmol NO3 (-) -N gVSS(-1)  day(-1) . The culture enriched at 22°C contained the same NC10 bacterium observed in the culture enriched at 35°C but no archaea. PMID:23765890

  2. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  3. Biodegradability of leathers through anaerobic pathway.

    PubMed

    Dhayalan, K; Fathima, N Nishad; Gnanamani, A; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, B Unni; Ramasami, T

    2007-01-01

    Leather processing generates huge amounts of both solid and liquid wastes. The management of solid wastes, especially tanned leather waste, is a challenging problem faced by tanners. Hence, studies on biodegradability of leather become imperative. In this present work, biodegradability of untanned, chrome tanned and vegetable tanned leather under anaerobic conditions has been addressed. Two different sources of anaerobes have been used for this purpose. The effect of detanning as a pretreatment method before subjecting the leather to biodegradation has also been studied. It has been found that vegetable tanned leather leads to more gas production than chrome tanned leather. Mixed anaerobic isolates when employed as an inoculum are able to degrade the soluble organics of vegetable tanned material and thus exhibit an increased level of gas production during the initial days, compared to the results of the treatments that received the anaerobic sludge. With chrome tanned materials, there was not much change in the volume of the gas produced from the two different sources. It has been found that detanning tends to improve the biodegradability of both types of leathers. PMID:16740383

  4. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADABILITY OF NON-PETROLEUM OILS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has demonstrated that vegetable oils are amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. This is in contrast to petroleum oils. Vegetable oils are already oxygenated because they are composed of fatty acids and glycerols, which contribute to the biodegradability. A strategy has be...

  5. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  6. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Anders S; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-04-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C12 LAS), which show that C12 LAS was biodegradable under methanogenic conditions. Sorption of C12 LAS on sewage sludge was described with a Freundlich isotherm. The C12 LAS sorption was determined with different concentrations of total solids (TS). In the semi-continuously stirred tank reactor, 18% of the added C12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation. PMID:12685701

  7. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  8. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. PMID:26684184

  9. Recovery of anaerobic, facultative, and aerobic bacteria from clinical specimens in three anaerobic transport systems.

    PubMed Central

    Helstad, A G; Kimball, J L; Maki, D G

    1977-01-01

    With aspirated specimens from clinical infections, we evaluated the recovery of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria in three widely used transport systems: (i) aspirated fluid in a gassed-out tube (FGT), (ii) swab in modified Cary and Blair transport medium (SCB), and (iii) swab in a gassed-out tube (SGT). Transport tubes were held at 25 degrees C and semiquantitatively sampled at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h. Twenty-five clinical specimens yielded 75 anaerobic strains and 43 isolates of facultative and 3 of aerobic bacteria. Only one anaerobic isolate was not recovered in the first 24 h, and then, only in the SGT. At 48 h, 73 anaerobic strains (97%) were recovered in the FGT, 69 (92%) in the SCB, and 64 (85%) in the SGT. Two problems hindered the recovery of anaerobes in the SCB and SGT systems: first die-off of organisms, as evidenced by a decrease in colony-forming units of 20 strains (27%) in the SCB and 25 strains (33%) in the SGT, as compared with 7 strains (9%) in the FGT, over 48 h; and second, overgrowth of facultative bacteria, more frequent with SCB and SGT. The FGT method was clearly superior at 48 h to the SCB and SGT systems in this study and is recommended as the preferred method for transporting specimens for anaerobic culture. PMID:328525

  10. Engineering and two-stage evolution of a lignocellulosic hydrolysate-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for anaerobic fermentation of xylose from AFEX pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Parreiras, Lucas S; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B; Bice, Benjamin D; Bonfert, Brandi L; Pinhancos, Rebeca C; Balloon, Allison J; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T; Simmons, Blake A; Hodge, David B; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Dale, Bruce E; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  11. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    PubMed Central

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  12. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. PMID:27041258

  13. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  14. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  15. Conversion of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, N. N.; Shilov, A. E.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research related to the conversion and practical utilization of solar energy. Topics discussed include semiconductor photovoltaic cells, orbital solar power stations, chemical and biological methods of solar energy conversion, and solar energy applications. Papers are included on new theoretical models of solar cells and prospects for increasing their efficiency, metrology and optical studies of solar cells, and some problems related to the thermally induced deformations of large space structures.

  16. Conversational Flow Promotes Solidarity

    PubMed Central

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H.

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of “we-ness”. Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay). Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition) increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed. PMID:24265683

  17. Application of urea dosing for alkalinity supply during anaerobic digestion of vinasse.

    PubMed

    Boncz, M A; Formagini, E L; Santos, L da S; Marques, R D; Paulo, P L

    2012-01-01

    Pushed by demand for renewable energy, the ethanol industry in Brazil is expanding. However, production of 1 m(3) of ethanol generates around 13 m(3) of liquid residues (vinasse), so this expansion results in an increasing need for a more adequate destination of these residues. Nowadays the vinasse is dispersed on the sugar cane fields in the practice of fertirrigation, but anaerobic digestion of this residue may be a better solution, additionally offering an alternative source of energy, able to complement hydroelectric power supply in the dry season. However, when trying to digest vinasse at reduced hydraulic retention times, complications arise from its strong tendency toward acidification, upsetting the fragile balance of transformations normally occurring under anaerobic conditions. For successful operation of an anaerobic treatment process with acceptable hydraulic residence times, increasing alkalinity levels inside the reactor is neces-sary. In the present work we show that pH regulation by means of urea dosing, in spite of the risk posed by ammonia toxicity towards methanogenic biomass, can be a viable alternative to avoid vinasse acidification. The ammonia formed in urea conversion remains in solution, rather than escaping to the biogas, and so its use as fertiliser can offset its cost of application in the process. PMID:23032778

  18. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  19. Application of protein misfolding cyclic amplification to detection of prions in anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Gilroyed, Brandon H; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Price, Luke M; Reuter, Tim; Czub, Stefanie; Graham, Catherine; Balachandran, Arumuga; McAllister, Tim A; Belosevic, Miodrag; Neumann, Norman F

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional physio-chemical resistance of prions to established decontamination procedures poses a challenge to assessing the suitability of applied inactivation methods. Prion detection is limited by the sensitivity level of Western blotting or by the cost and time factors of bioassays. In addition, prion detection assays can be limited by either the unique or complex nature of matrices associated with environmental samples. To investigate anaerobic digestion (AD) as a practical and economical approach for potential conversion of specified risk materials (SRM) into value added products (i.e., renewable energy), challenges associated with detection of prions in a complex matrix need to be overcome to determine potential inactivation. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay, with subsequent Western blot visualization, was used to detect prions within the AD matrix. Anaerobic digestate initially inhibited the PMCA reaction and/or Western blot detection. However, at concentrations of ≤1% of anaerobic digestate, 263K scrapie prions could be amplified and semi-quantitatively detected. Infectious 263K prions were also proven to be bioavailable in the presence of high concentrations of digestate (10-90%). Development of the PMCA application to digestate provides extremely valuable insight into the potential degradation and/or fate of prions in complex biological matrices without requiring expensive and time-consuming bioassays. PMID:26272376

  20. Evaluation of single vs. staged mesophilic anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste with and without microwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin

    2013-08-15

    Effects of single and dual stage (acidogenic-methanogenic) mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of kitchen waste (KW) was evaluated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20, 15, 12 and 9 d with and without thermal microwave (MW) pretreatment (145 °C). Anaerobic acidification in terms of acid accumulation was superior compared to microaerophilic acidification. Maximum anaerobic acidification of KW was determined to occur with an HRT of 2 d which was then selected for the acidification stage. The dual stage AD system fed with untreated KW produced the maximum biogas and volatile solids (VS) stabilization efficiencies at the shortest HRT of 9 d. Conversely, for free liquid resulting from MW pretreatment of KW the two stage reactor at 20 d HRT produced three fold more methane compared with the untreated free liquid control. However, MW pretreatment and AD of the free liquid fraction only, was not a sustainable treatment option. For KW, staging of the AD process had a greater positive impact on waste stabilization and methane yield compared to single stage reactors or MW pretreatment. KW can be characterized as being a readily biodegradable solid waste; concomitantly it is recommended that digester staging without MW pretreatment be employed to maximize methane yield and production. PMID:23648266

  1. Anaerobic gut fungi: Advances in isolation, culture, and cellulolytic enzyme discovery for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Charles H; Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi are an early branching family of fungi that are commonly found in the digestive tract of ruminants and monogastric herbivores. It is becoming increasingly clear that they are the primary colonizers of ingested plant biomass, and that they significantly contribute to the decomposition of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. As such, anaerobic fungi harbor a rich reservoir of undiscovered cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes that can potentially transform the conversion of lignocellulose into bioenergy products. Despite their unique evolutionary history and cellulolytic activity, few species have been isolated and studied in great detail. As a result, their life cycle, cellular physiology, genetics, and cellulolytic metabolism remain poorly understood compared to aerobic fungi. To help address this limitation, this review briefly summarizes the current body of knowledge pertaining to anaerobic fungal biology, and describes progress made in the isolation, cultivation, molecular characterization, and long-term preservation of these microbes. We also discuss recent cellulase- and cellulosome-discovery efforts from gut fungi, and how these interesting, non-model microbes could be further adapted for biotechnology applications. PMID:24788404

  2. Novel anaerobic digestion process with sludge ozonation for economically feasible power production from biogas.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Yasui, H; Goel, R; Li, Y Y; Noike, T

    2011-01-01

    A novel process scheme was developed to achieve economically feasible energy recovery from anaerobic digestion. The new process scheme employs a hybrid configuration of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion with sludge ozonation: the ozonated sludge is first degraded in a thermophilic digester and then further degraded in a mesophilic digester. In small-scale pilot experiments of the new process scheme, degradation of VSS improved by 3.5% over the control (mesophilic-only configuration) with 20% less ozone consumption. Moreover, biogas conversion also improved by 7.1% over the control. Selective enrichment of inorganic compounds during centrifugation produced a dewatered sludge cake with very low water content (59.4%). This low water content in the sludge cake improved its auto-thermal combustion potential during incineration and added to the overall energy savings. We conducted a case study to evaluate power generation from biogas for a municipal wastewater treatment plant with an average dry weather flow of 43,000 m3/d. Electricity production cost was 5.2 ¢/kWh for the advanced process with power generation, which is lower than the current market price of 7.2 ¢/kWh. The new anaerobic digestion scheme with power generation may reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 1,000 t-CO(2)/year compared with the conventional process without power generation. PMID:21508552

  3. Effect of inorganic carbon on anaerobic ammonium oxidation enriched in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dexiang; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guangming; Guo, Liang; Yue, Xiu

    2008-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidation microorganism from methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge and the effect of inorganic carbon (sodium bicarbonate) on anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The enrichment of anammox bacteria was carried out in a 7.0-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and the effect of bicarbonate on anammox was conducted in a 3.0-L SBR. Research results, especially the biomass, showed first signs of anammox activity after 54 d cultivation with synthetic wastewater, when the pH was controlled between 7.5 and 8.3, the temperature was 35 degrees C. The anammox activity increased as the influent bicarbonate concentration increased from 1.0 to 1.5 g/L, and then, was inhibited as the bicarbonate concentration approached 2.0 g/L. However, the activity could be restored by the reduction of bicarbonate concentration to 1.0 g/L, as shown by rapid conversion of ammonium, and nitrite and nitrate production with normal stoichiometry. The optimization of the bicarbonate concentration in the reactor could increase the anammox rate up to 66.4 mgN/(L x d). PMID:18817072

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  5. Partitioning of Cd in geochemical fractions of anaerobic estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, Joseph H.; Alden, Raymond W.

    1992-05-01

    Distribution of Cd in geochemical fractions of anaerobic estuarine sediments was determined before and after treatment of the sediments with added Cd. Portions of three sediment types (sandy, silty, and clayey) were treated with 5 and 10 mg kg -1 Cd as CdCl 2 and each type had an untreated control. Sediments were sampled at the start and at the conclusion of a 14 day laboratory bioaccumulation study. Each set was promptly extracted using a sequential technique for exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulphide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. In the non-treated sediments, approximately 64% of the naturally occurring Cd was in the acid extractable phase with most of the balance in the organicsulphide phase (OSP). There was a similar amount of Cd in the acid extractable phase of all treatments of all sediments. For the treated sediments, the majority of the Cd was found in the OSP and ranged from 56% to 85% for all treatments and sediments. At the end of the experiment, a greater and more consistent level of Cd was present in the OSP (from 76% to 92%). These results show an initially rapid conversion of most of the added soluble Cd to the OSP with conversion of up to 92% of applied Cd to this phase within 14 days. The bulk of the OSP Cd is postulated to occur as sulphides which are an important reservoir of sediment Cd. Addition of Cd had no effect on the geochemical distribution of native Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, or Zn.

  6. Anaerobic ferrous oxidation by heterotrophic denitrifying enriched culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Xing, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Meng; Ghulam, Abbas; Zhao, Zhi-Qing; Li, Wei; Wang, Lan

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic denitrifying enriched culture (DEC) from a lab-scale high-rate denitrifying reactor was discovered to perform nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidation (NAFO). The DEC was systematically investigated to reveal their denitrification activity, their NAFO activity, and the predominant microbial population. The DEC was capable of heterotrophic denitrification with methanol as the electron donor, and autotrophic denitrification with ferrous salt as the electron donor named NAFO. The conversion ratios of ferrous-Fe and nitrate-N were 87.41 and 98.74 %, and the consumption Fe/N ratio was 2.3:1 (mol/mol). The maximum reaction velocity and half saturation constant of Fe were 412.54 mg/(l h) and 8,276.44 mg/l, and the counterparts of N were 20.87 mg/(l h) and 322.58 mg/l, respectively. The predominant bacteria were Hyphomicrobium, Thauera, and Flavobacterium, and the predominant archaea were Methanomethylovorans, Methanohalophilus, and Methanolobus. The discovery of NAFO by heterotrophic DEC is significant for the development of wastewater treatment and the biogeochemical iron cycle and nitrogen cycle. PMID:24619339

  7. Efficiency of the anaerobic digestion of amine wastes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Hovland, Jon; Bakke, Rune

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory-scale anaerobic degradation of monoethanolamine waste (MEAw) with co-substrate organics was conducted at room temperature and organic loading rates from 0.19 to 5.03 kg COD/m(3) day for 486 days in a hybrid digester. 90 % feed COD conversion to methane was obtained at the lower loads and only 45 % at the highest MEA waste/COD ratio (MEAwr) of 0.62 due to inhibition of methanogenesis. Inhibition at comparable loads decreased with time, implying that the culture adapted to the challenging feed. Methane yield was negatively correlated to MEAwr applied and inhibition avoided at MEAwr <0.5. Acetate accumulation implies inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis that can be caused by ammonia, a product of MEAw degradation. Moderate total ammonia nitrogen and free ammonia nitrogen accumulation, maximum 2.2 g N/l and 90 mg N/l, respectively suggests, however, that other components of MEAw, and/or degradation products of such, also inhibit methanogenesis, disturbing the digester performance. PMID:23912885

  8. Kinetic and inhibition studies for the aerobic cometabolism of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and 1,1-dichloroethane by a butane-grown mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young; Arp, Daniel J; Semprini, Lewis

    2002-12-01

    Batch kinetic and inhibition studies were performed for the aerobic cometabolism of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA) by a butane-grown mixed culture. These chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are often found together as cocontaminants in groundwater. The maximum degradation rates (k(max)) and half-saturation coefficients (K(s)) were determined in single compound kinetic tests. The highest k(max) was obtained for butane (2.6 micromol/mg TSS/h) followed by 1,1-DCE (1.3 micromol/mg TSS/h), 1,1-DCA (0.49 micromol/mg TSS/h), and 1,1,1-TCA (0.19 micromol/mg TSS/h), while the order of K(s) from the highest to lowest was 1,1-DCA (19 microM), butane (19 microM), 1,1,1-TCA (12 microM) and 1,1-DCE (1.5 microM). The inhibition types were determined using direct linear plots, while inhibition coefficients (K(ic) and K(iu)) were estimated by nonlinear least squares regression (NLSR) fits to the kinetic model of the identified inhibition type. Two different inhibition types were observed among the compounds. Competitive inhibition among CAHs was indicated from direct linear plots, and the CAHs also competitively inhibited butane utilization. 1,1-DCE was a stronger inhibitor than the other CAHs. Mixed inhibition of 1,1,1-TCA, 1,1-DCA, and 1,1-DCE transformations by butane was observed. Thus, both competitive and mixed inhibitions are important in cometabolism of CAHs by this butane culture. For competitive inhibition between CAHs, the ratio of the K(s) values was a reasonable indicator of competitive inhibition observed. Butane was a strong inhibitor of CAH transformation, having a much lower inhibition coefficient than the K(s) value of butane, while the CAHs were weak inhibitors of butane utilization. Model simulations of reactor systems where both the growth substrate and the CAHs are present indicate that reactor performance is significantly affected by inhibition type and inhibition coefficients. Thus

  9. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  10. FCPP application to utilize anaerobic digester gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yoshio; Kusama, Nobuyuki; Wada, Katsuya

    1996-12-31

    Toshiba and a municipal organization of Yokohama city are jointly conducting a program to utilize ADG (Anaerobic Digester Gas) more effectively. ADG which contains about 60% methane is produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge and has been used as an energy source for heating digestion tanks in sewage treatment plants and/or for combustion engine fuel. This program is focused on operating a commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant on ADG because of its inherently high fuel efficiency and low emissions characteristics. According to the following joint program, we have successfully demonstrated an ADG fueled FCPP The success of this study promises that the ADG fueled FCPP, an environment-friendly power generation system, will be added to the line-up of PC25{trademark}C applications.

  11. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Adrien A P; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment. PMID:26520998

  12. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P.; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  13. New anaerobic process of nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Mulder, A; Versprille, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for the treatment of strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite within an anaerobic biofilm. The achieved results with a nitrogen loading rate of higher than 1,000 mg/L/d and nitrogen removal of around 90% look very promising because they exceed (by 9-18 times) the corresponding nitrogen removal rates of conventional activated sludge systems. The paper describes also some characteristics of DEAMOX sludge, as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterization. PMID:17163025

  14. Potential for anaerobic treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Schlottfeldt, G.A.B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of experiments on 3 laboratory-scale reactors loaded with whey at different daily rates showed that a daily loading of 85 lb COD/1000 cubic feet achieved a COD reduction efficiency of 86% with a gas yield (50% methane) of 5 cubic feet/gal of treated whey. High microorganism population and pH control were essential for stable operation. Overall 1st order COD removal rate constants were 1.13, 0.70 and 1.73/day at 35, 50 and 60 degrees Celcius respectively. The economic impact of anaerobic whey treatment was evaluated for small, medium and large cheese plants, and annual operating costs were projected for a 20-year period. Among several systems that were compared, the anaerobic treatment of whey was shown to be the only one that had a potential of paying for itself. Treatment costs represented from 0.85 to 2.6% of the mean US milk price to producers.

  15. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P. Chergui, Majed; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  16. Recent developments in anaerobic membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, David C

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic membrane reactors (AnMBRs) have recently evolved from aerobic MBRs, with the membrane either external or submerged within the reactor, and can achieve high COD removals (~98%) at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) as low as 3 h. Since membranes stop biomass being washed out, they can enhance performance with inhibitory substrates, at psychrophilic/thermophilic temperatures, and enable nitrogen removal via Anammox. Fouling is important, but addition of activated carbon or resins/precipitants can remove soluble microbial products (SMPs)/colloids and enhance flux. Due to their low energy use and solids production, and solids free effluent, they can enhance nutrient and water recycling. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: compare fouling between aerobic and anaerobic systems; determine how reactor operation influences fouling; evaluate the effect of different additives on membrane fouling; determine whether nitrogen removal can be incorporated into AnMBRs; recover methane solubility from low temperatures effluents; and, establish sound mass and energy balances. PMID:22749372

  17. Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test as a Procedure to Evaluate Anaerobic Power.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V L; Zagatto, A M; Kalva-Filho, C A; Mendes, O C; Gobatto, C A; Campos, E Z; Papoti, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the running anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a predictor of anaerobic capacity, compare it to the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and to compare the RAST's parameters with the parameters of 30-s all-out tethered running on a treadmill. 39 (17.0±1.4 years) soccer players participated in this study. The participants underwent an incremental test, 10 submaximal efforts [50-95% of velocity correspondent to VO(2MAX) (vVO(2MAX))] and one supramaximal effort at 110% of vVO(2MAX) for the determination of MAOD. Furthermore, the athletes performed the RAST. In the second stage the 30-s all-out tethered running was performed on a treadmill (30-s all-out), and compared with RAST. No significant correlation was observed between MAOD and RAST parameters. However, significant correlations were found between the power of the fifth effort (P5) of RAST with peak and mean power of 30-s all-out (r=0.73 and 0.50; p<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, the parameters from RAST do not have an association with MAOD, suggesting that this method should not be used to evaluate anaerobic capacity. Although the correlations between RAST parameters with 30-s all-out do reinforce the RAST as an evaluation method of anaerobic metabolism, such as anaerobic power. PMID:26422055

  18. Schistosoma mansoni: effects of in vitro serotonin (5-HT) on aerobic and anaerobic carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Mettrick, D F; Podesta, R B

    1985-08-01

    The effect of Serotonin on carbohydrate metabolism, excreted end products, and adenine nucleotide pools in Schistosoma mansoni was determined following 60 min in vitro incubations under air (= 21% O2) and anaerobic (95% N2:5% CO2) conditions. In the presence of 0.25 mM Serotonin, glucose uptake increased by 82-84% and lactate excretion increased by 77-78%; levels of excreted lactate were significantly higher under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. The tissue pools of glucose, hexosephosphates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, pyruvate, and lactate were significantly increased under anaerobic conditions compared to air incubation; the presence of Serotonin decreased tissue glucose pools and increased the size of the pyruvate and lactate tissue pools. The glycolytic carbon pool was significantly greater under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions, irrespective of Serotonin. Serotonin increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-monophosphate levels under aerobic conditions; neither Serotonin nor gas phase significantly affected total adenine nucleotide levels or the adenylate energy charge. Serotonin increased energy requirements by S. mansoni due to increased muscle contractions; demand was met by enhanced rates of carbohydrate metabolism. Irrespective of gas phase, 74-78% of available carbohydrate was converted to lactate. In the presence of Serotonin, conversion of glucose to lactate was reduced to 63-67%. In view of the requirements by S. mansoni for an abundant supply of glycoprotein and glycolipid precursors for surface membrane renewal, it is suggested that carbohydrate (glucose and glycogen) that was not converted to lactate may have been incorporated into biosynthetic processes leading to membrane synthesis. PMID:4018216

  19. Isomolybdate conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating solution and process forms a stable and corrosion-resistant layer on metal substrates or layers or, more preferably, on a boehmite layer or other base conversion coating. The conversion coating process involves contacting the substrate, layer or coating with an aqueous alkali metal isomolybdate solution in order to convert the surface of the substrate, layer or coating to a stable conversion coating. The aqueous alkali metal molybdates are selected from sodium molybdate (Na.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), lithium molybdate (Li.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), potassium molybdate (K.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), or combinations thereof, with the most preferred alkali metal molybdate being sodium molybdate. The concentration of alkali metal molybdates in the solution is preferably less than 5% by weight. In addition to the alkali metal molybdates, the conversion coating solution may include alkaline metal passivators selected from lithium nitrate (LiNO.sub.3), sodium nitrate (NaNO.sub.3), ammonia nitrate (NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3), and combinations thereof; lithium chloride, potassium hexafluorozirconate (K.sub.2 ZrF.sub.6) or potassium hexafluorotitanate (K.sub.2 TiF.sub.6).

  20. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  1. Hog farm in California uses anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes a system of covered lagoons which help address the waste management problems of hog farmers as well as producing methane used to power generators. Four advantages of anaerobic digestion are described along with the system: energy production from methane; fertilizer for fields; economic development in rural areas; and improved water quality through reduction of nonpoint source pollution. Address for full report is given.

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of surrogate naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Lindsay N; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Surface bitumen extraction from the Alberta's oil sands region generates large settling basins known as tailings ponds. The oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in these ponds contain solid and residual bitumen-associated compounds including naphthenic acids (NAs) that can potentially be biodedgraded by indigenous tailings microorganisms. While the biodegradation of some NAs is known to occur under aerobic conditions, little is understood about anaerobic NA biodegradation even though tailings ponds are mainly anoxic. Here, we investigated the potential for anaerobic NA biodegradation by indigenous tailings microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established from anoxic tailings that were amended with 5 single-ringed surrogate NAs or acid-extractable organics (AEO) from OSPW and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Surrogate NA depletion was observed under all anaerobic conditions tested to varying extents, correlating to losses in the respective electron acceptor (sulfate or nitrate) or the production of predicted products (Fe(II) or methane). Tailings-containing cultures incubated under the different electron-accepting conditions resulted in the enrichment and putative identification of microbial community members that may function in metabolizing surrogate NAs under the various anoxic conditions. In addition, more complex NAs (in the form of AEO) was observed to drive sulfate and iron reduction relative to controls. Overall, this study has shown that simple surrogate NAs can be biodegraded under a variety of anoxic conditions, a key first step in understanding the potential anaerobic metabolism of NAs in oil sands tailings ponds and other industrial wastewaters. PMID:26724449

  3. Anaerobic Life at Extremely High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, Karl O.

    1984-12-01

    Continental and submarine solfataric fields turned out to contain various extremely thermophilic anaerobic organisms which all belong to the archaebacteria. They are living autotrophically on sulphur, hydrogen and CO2 or by methanogenesis or heterotrophically on different organic substrates by sulphur respiration or, less frequently, by fermentation. The most extremely thermophilic isolates are growing between 80 and 110°C with an optimum around 105°C.

  4. Anaerobic expanded bed treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Switzenbaum, M.S.; Danskin, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of anaerobic attached film expanded bed (AAFEB) for whey treatment is described and the potential for implementation of substitute natural gas from whey is discussed. A significant portion (less than or equal to 46%) of the energy needs at cheese-production plants could be recovered by CH/sub 4/ manufactured from whey. Efficient treatment of whey is possible by AAFEB at low retention times and at high organic loading rates.

  5. Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.E.; Aller, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf is strongly controlled by dynamic physical sedimentation processes. Rapidly accumulating, physically reworked deltaic sediments characteristic of much of the shelf typically support what appear to be low rates of steady state anaerobic methane oxidation at depths of 5-8 m below the sediment-water interface. Methane oxidation in these cases is responsible for < {approximately}10% of the {Sigma}CO{sub 2} inventory in the oxidation zone and is limited largely by the steady-state diffusive flux of methane into the overlying sulfate reduction zone. In contrast, a large area of the shelf has been extensively eroded, reexposing once deeply buried (>10 m) methane-charged sediment directly to seawater. In this nonsteady-state situation, methane is a major source of recently produced {Sigma}CO{sub 2} and an important reductant for sulfate. These observations suggest that authigenic sedimentary carbonates derived from anaerobic methane oxidation may sometimes reflect physically enhanced nonsteady-state exposure of methane to sulfate in otherwise biogeochemically unreactive deposits. The concentration profiles of CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} in the eroded deposit were reproduced by a coupled reaction-transport model. This area of the shelf was reexposed to seawater approximately 5-10 years ago based on the model results and the assumption that the erosion of the deposit occurred as a single event that has now ceased. The necessary second order rate constant for anaerobic methane oxidation was {le}0.1 mM{sup -1} d{sup -1}.

  6. Mathematical modelling of the anaerobic hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Soroa, S; Gomez, J; Ayesa, E; Garcia-Heras, J L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new mathematical model for the anaerobic hybrid reactor (AHR) (a UASB reactor and an anaerobic filter in series) and its experimental calibration and verification. The model includes a biochemical part and a mass transport one, which considers the AHR as two contact reactors in series. The anaerobic process transformations are described by the model developed by Siegrist et al. The fraction (F) of solids in the clarification zone of the UASB reactor that leaves this first reactor is the key physical parameter to be estimated. The main parameters of the model were calibrated using experimental results from a bench-scale AHR fed with real slaughterhouse wastewater. The fraction of inert particulate COD in the influent and the factor F were estimated by a trial and error procedure comparing experimental and simulated results of the mass of solids in the lower tank and the VSS concentration in the AHR effluent. A good fit was obtained. The final verification was carried out by comparing a set of experiments with simulated data. The model's capability to predict the process performance was thus proved. PMID:16939085

  7. Alternating Current Influences Anaerobic Electroactive Biofilm Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Lean; Lu, Lu; Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Li, Nan; Wang, Heming; Park, Jaedo; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-09-01

    Alternating current (AC) is known to inactivate microbial growth in suspension, but how AC influences anaerobic biofilm activities has not been systematically investigated. Using a Geobacter dominated anaerobic biofilm growing on the electrodes of microbial electrochemical reactors, we found that high frequency AC ranging from 1 MHz to 1 kHz (amplitude of 5 V, 30 min) showed only temporary inhibition to the biofilm activity. However, lower frequency (100 Hz, 1.2 or 5 V) treatment led to 47 ± 19% permanent decrease in limiting current on the same biofilm, which is attributed to the action of electrohydrodynamic force that caused biofilm damage and loss of intercellular electron transfer network. Confocal microscopy images show such inactivation mainly occurred at the interface between the biofilm and the electrode. Reducing the frequency further to 1 Hz led to water electrolysis, which generated gas bubbles that flushed all attached cells out of the electrode. These findings provide new references on understanding and regulating biofilm growth, which has broader implications in biofouling control, anaerobic waste treatment, energy and product recovery, and general understanding of microbial ecology and physiology. PMID:27485403

  8. Anaerobic O-demethylation of phenylmethylethers

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, A.C.; Young, L.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Anaerobic O-demethylation (AOD) of phenylmethylethers is a process of both basic and applied significance. The aryl-O-methyl ethers are abundant in natural products, particularly as components of lignin. They are present as methoxylated lignin monomers in anaerobic environments and can be completely degraded there by mixed microbial populations. AOD is an essential early step in this process, and it is also a key reaction in the utilization of the O-methyl substituent as a C-one substrate by acetogens. An understanding of the AOD reaction mechanism might suggest new ways in which chemicals could be derived from lignocellulosic materials. The biochemical mechanism for the anaerobic cleavage of the aryl-O-methyl ether bond is an intriguing, but relatively unexplored process. In contrast to aerobic O-demethylating enzymes, AOD appears to involve methyl group transfer. Thus, novel biochemical information on an important biotransformation reaction will be gained from the research proposed. Recently, we have shown that AOD activity is inducible and have developed an assay for detecting AOD activity in cell-free extracts of Acetobacterium woodii. AOD activity is stimulated in vitro by the addition of ATP (1mM) and pyruvate (30 mM), the K{sub M} for vanillate being 0.4 mM. In collaboration with protein purification experts, we proposed to purify the AOD enzyme and characterize the protein(s) and the enzymatic reaction involved. 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Microbial conversion of coals to clean fuel forms

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, S.; Isbister, J.; Hawley, B.; Forgacs, T.; Reed, L.; Anspach, G.; Middaugh, T.

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic cultures have been used for the production of methane and alcohols from coal. Cultures were adapted from natural inocula collected from sources such as sewage sludge and horse manure. A 1% (w/v) slurry of leonardite, lignite, or subbituminous coal was used in the incubations. Methane was produced from all cultures, including some untreated coals, to a greater extent than in control cultures. Over several months of adaptation, methane production capacity increased considerably. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were identified as intermediates in the conversion of coal to methane. A proposed scheme for the conversion is breakdown of the coal polymer by a series of organisms and metabolism of the fragments to methane precursors such as VFAs. A mixture of short chain alcohols was produced by cultures grown in the presence of methane inhibitors. These cultures after prolonged adaptation show potential for use in larger scale bioreactors for the production of gaseous and liquid fuels.

  10. Mechanisms, Chemistry, and Kinetics of Anaerobic Biodegradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    2000-12-01

    Anaerobic biological processes can result in PCE and TCE destruction through conversion to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) then to vinyl chloride (VC), and finally to ethene. Here, the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) serve as electron acceptors in energy metabolism, requiring electron donors such as hydrogen from an external source. The purpose of this study was to learn more about the biochemistry of cDCE and VC conversion to ethene, to better understand the requirements for electron donors, and to determine factors affecting the rates of CAH degradation and organism growth. The biochemistry of reductive dehalogenation of VC was studied with an anaerobic mixed culture enriched on VC. In other studies on electron donor needs for dehalogenation of cDCE and VC, competition for hydrogen was found to occur between the dehalogenators and other microorganisms such as methanogens and homoacetogens in a benzoate-acclimated dehalogenating methanogenic mixed culture. Factors affecting the relative rates of destruction of the solvents and their intermediate products were evaluated. Studies using a mixed PCE-dehalogenating culture as well as the VC enrichment for biochemical studies suggested that the same species was involved in both cDCE and VC dechlorination, and that cDCE and VC competitively inhibited each other's dechlorination rate.

  11. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  12. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  13. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  14. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  15. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  16. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  17. Digital optical conversion module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1988-07-01

    A digital optical conversion module is used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  18. High-rate two-phase process for the anaerobic degradation of cellulose, employing rumen microorganisms for an efficient acidogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gijzen, H.J.; Zwart, K.B.; Verhagen, F.J.M.; Vogels, G.D.

    1988-04-05

    A novel two-stage anaerobic process for the microbial conversion of cellulose into biogas has been developed. In the first phase, a mixed population of rumen bacteria and ciliates was used in the hydrolysis and fermentation of cellulose. The volatile fatty acids (VFA) produced in this acidogenic reactor were subsequently converted into biogas in a UASB-type methanogenic reactor. A stepwise increase of the loading rate from 11.9 to 25.8 g volatile solids/L reactor volume/day (g VS/L/day) did not affect the degradation efficiency in the acidogenic reactor, whereas the methanogenic reactor appeared to be overloaded at the highest loading rate. Cellulose digestion was almost complete at all loading rates applied. The two-stage anaerobic process was also tested with a closed fluid circuit. In this instance total methane production was 0.438 L CH/sub 4//g VS added, which is equivalent to 98% of the theoretical value. The application of rumen microorganisms in combination with a high-rate methane reactor is proposed as a means of efficient anaerobic degradation of cellulosic residues to methane. Because this newly developed two-phase system is based on processes and microorganisms from the ruminant, it will be referred to as Rumen Derived Anaerobic Digestion (RUDAD)-process.

  19. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  20. Anaerobic Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in Pilot-Scale Anaerobic EGSB Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qiu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yin-Sheng; Chang, Yoon-Seong; Li, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of untreated palm oil mill effluent (POME) pose threat to aquatic environment due to the presence of very high organic content. The present investigation involved two pilot-scale anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors, continuously operated for 1 year to treat POME. Setting HRT at 9.8 d, the anaerobic EGSB reactors reduced COD from 71179 mg/L to 12341 mg/L and recycled half of sludge by a dissolved air flotation (DAF). The average effluent COD was 3587 mg/L with the consistent COD removal efficiency of 94.89%. Adding cationic polymer (PAM) dose of 30 mg/L to DAF unit and recycling its half of sludge caused granulation of anaerobic sludge. Bacilli and small coccid bacteria were the dominant microbial species of the reactor. The reactor produced 27.65 m(3) of biogas per m(3) of POME which was utilized for electricity generation. PMID:26167485

  1. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  2. Accessory apartment conversion programs.

    PubMed

    Retsinas, J; Retsinas, N P

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, state housing finance agencies have joined with state units on aging to develop programs to help the frail, elderly homeowner. Under an accessory apartment conversion program, a low-income homeowner will borrow money at a reduced interest rate to underwrite conversion of excess space into a rental apartment. The tenant will provide additional income as well as, ideally, certain kinds of personal assistance and a friendly presence. To date, few elderly clients have used this option. The initial rationale for the program is explained as are plausible reasons for the fact that it has not met expectations. PMID:10186784

  3. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  4. Evaluation of a microtiter system for identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Savuto, P S; Ellner, P D

    1984-01-01

    The Anaerobe Combo Panel (American MicroScan, Mahwah, N.J.) was evaluated for its ability to identify anaerobic bacteria. The frozen, 96-well panel utilizes 24 biochemical reactions and four antimicrobial agents for species identification. The Anaerobe Combo Panel was used to test 114 clinical isolates of strict anaerobes. Reactions were read after 48 h, and the results were compared with those obtained with the PRAS II system (Scott Laboratories, Inc., Fiskeville, R.I.). Discrepancies between the two systems were resolved by gas-liquid chromatography. With the Anaerobe Combo Panel, 84% of the organisms were able to grow, and 89% of these were correctly identified to genus level and 78% to species level. The Anaerobe Combo Panel was easy to inoculate and read, but some of the reactions were difficult to interpret, and not all of the derived codes were found in the code book. PMID:6378969

  5. The aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology of perirectal abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H

    1997-01-01

    The microbiology of perirectal abscesses in 144 patients was studied. Aerobic or facultative bacteria only were isolated in 13 (9%) instances, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 27 (19%) instances, and mixed aerobic and anaerobic flora were isolated in 104 (72%) instances. A total of 325 anaerobic and 131 aerobic or facultative isolates were recovered (2.2 anaerobic isolates and 0.9 aerobic isolates per specimen). The predominant anaerobes were as follows: Bacteroides fragilis group (85 isolates), Peptostreptococcus spp. (72 isolates), Prevotella spp. (71 isolates), Fusobacterium spp. (21 isolates), Porphyromonas spp. (20 isolates), and Clostridium spp. (15 isolates). The predominant aerobic and facultative bacteria were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (34 isolates), Streptococcus spp. (28 isolates), and Escherichia coli (19 isolates). These data illustrate the polymicrobial aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of perirectal abscesses. PMID:9350771

  6. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands. PMID:27154570

  7. Clinical review: Bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the microbiology, diagnosis and management of bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children. Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Fusobacterium sp. were the most common clinically significant anaerobic isolates. The strains of anaerobic organisms found depended, to a large extent, on the portal of entry and the underlying disease. Predisposing conditions include: malignant neoplasms, immunodeficiencies, chronic renal insufficiency, decubitus ulcers, perforation of viscus and appendicitis, and neonatal age. Organisms identical to those causing anaerobic bacteremia can often be recovered from other infected sites that may have served as a source of persistent bacteremia. When anaerobes resistant to penicillin are suspected or isolated, antimicrobial drugs such as clindamycin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, cefoxitin, a carbapenem, or the combination of a beta-lactamase inhibitor and a penicillin should be administered. The early recognition of anaerobic bacteremia and administration of appropriate antimicrobial and surgical therapy play a significant role in preventing mortality and morbidity in pediatric patients. PMID:12133179

  8. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Project status report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The anaerobic, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been chosen for catalysis of the biological water gas shift reaction. In addition, two other anaerobic, photosynthetic bacteria, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroblum phaeobacteroides, have been evaluated as candidates for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur. Growth and H{sub 2}S uptake studies in the presence of basal medium indicated that C. thlosulfatophilum is a much superior organism. C. phaeobacteroldes showed sporatic growth at best, with growth always slower than C. thlosulfatophilum. Also, when C. phaeobacteroides experienced slow growth, no H{sub 2}S consumption was observed. C. thiosulfatophilum always showed superior growth and H{sub 2}S uptake, and thus will be selected as the bacterium for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur.

  9. Anaerobic codigestion of dairy manure and food manufacturing waste for renewable energy generation in New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Matthew J.

    Anaerobic digestion is a microbiological process that converts biodegradable organic material into biogas, consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. Anaerobic digestion technologies have been integrated into wastewater treatment facilities nationwide for many decades to increase the economic viability of the treatment process by converting a waste stream into two valuable products: biogas and fertilizer. Thus, anaerobic digestion offers potential economic and environmental benefits of organic waste diversion and renewable energy generation. The use of biogas has many applications, including cogeneration, direct combustion, upgrading for conversion to feed a fuel cell, and compression for injection into the natural gas grid or for vehicular use. The potential benefits of waste diversion and renewable energy generation are now being realized by major organic waste generators in New York State, in particular the food manufacturing and dairy industries, thus warranting an analysis of the energy generation potential for these waste products. Anaerobic codigestion of dairy manure and food-based feedstocks reflects a cradle-to- cradle approach to organic waste management. Given both of their abundance throughout New York State, waste-to-energy processes represent promising waste management strategies. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the current technical and economic feasibility of anaerobically codigesting existing dairy manure and food manufacturing waste feedstocks in New York State to produce high quality biogas for renewable energy generation. The first element to determining the technical feasibility of anaerobic codigestion potential in New York State was to first understand the feedstock availability. A comprehensive survey of existing organic waste streams was conducted. The key objective was to identify the volume and composition of dairy manure and liquid-phase food manufacturing waste streams available in New York State to make

  10. Enhanced anaerobic fermentation with azo dye as electron acceptor: simultaneous acceleration of organics decomposition and azo decolorization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Jingxin; Chen, Shuo; Afzal, Shahzad

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of hydrogen during anaerobic processes usually results in low decomposition of volatile organic acids (VFAs). On the other hand, hydrogen is a good electron donor for dye reduction, which would help the acetogenic conversion in keeping low hydrogen concentration. The main objective of the study was to accelerate VFA composition through using azo dye as electron acceptor. The results indicated that the azo dye serving as an electron acceptor could avoid H2 accumulation and accelerate anaerobic digestion of VFAs. After adding the azo dye, propionate decreased from 2400.0 to 689.5mg/L and acetate production increased from 180.0 to 519.5mg/L. It meant that the conversion of propionate into acetate was enhanced. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the abundance of propionate-utilizing acetogens with the presence of azo dye was greater than that in a reference without azo dye. The experiments via using glucose as the substrate further demonstrated that the VFA decomposition and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increased by 319.7mg/L and 23.3% respectively after adding the azo dye. Therefore, adding moderate azo dye might be a way to recover anaerobic system from deterioration due to the accumulation of H2 or VFAs. PMID:25288539

  11. Anaerobic Metabolism and Bioremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathy, Raj

    Nitroaromatic compounds pollute soil, water, and food via use of pesticides, plastics, pharmaceuticals, landfill dumping of industrial wastes, and the military use of explosives. Biotransformation of trinitrotoluene and other nitroaromatics by aerobic bacteria in the laboratory has been frequently reported, but the anaerobic bacterial metabolism of nitroaromatics has not been studied as extensively perhaps due to the difficulty in working with anaerobic cultures and the slow growth of anaerobes. Sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria can metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment.

  12. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  13. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  14. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  15. Leadership is a conversation.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate. PMID:22741420

  16. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  17. National conversion pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, D.; Nichols, F.; Lily, A.

    1994-12-31

    Manufacturing Sciences Corporation (MSC) has undertaken a project from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to convert buildings that are currently contaminated at Rocky Flats into buildings that are capable of producing commercial products. This conversion project is called the National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP). The mission of the NCPP is to explore and demonstrate at the Rocky Flats site the feasibility of economic conversion at DOE facilities. This project was officially started on April 1 with the signing of a Cooperative Assistance Agreement between MSC and the DOE. The NCPP was jointly announced by Roy Romer, Governor of the State of Colorado; Mark Silverman, Manager of the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Office; Jack McGraw, Activity Administrator for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8; and Tom Looby, Director of the Office of Environment from the Colorado Department of Health. On March 25, 1994, Hazel O`Leary, the Secretary of the DOE, toured the site of the NCPP and heartily endorsed the project as an example of how the DOE and commercial industry can jointly accomplish the conversion and cleanup of government facilities into productive commercial ventures.

  18. Economics of Grassland Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we provide an overview of economic factors that contribute to changes in grassland area including the relative profitability of crop and livestock production, effects of land productivity, and effects of conversion costs. We also identify other potential socio-economic influences on gr...

  19. Electromechanical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text on electromechanical energy conversion (motors and generators) was developed under contract with the U.S. Office of Education as Number 12 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series. (DH)

  20. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  1. A Conversation about Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Mao, Minnie Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of the Lindau Meeting, we present a dialogue between a Nobel laureate and a young researcher. This interchange started online, where it continues to unfold. Here is a digest of this conversation, which has developed across time and space.

  2. Teaching Conversation with Trivia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a rationale for utilizing trivia to teach conversation. Shows how trivia-based materials fit into communicative language teaching approaches and provides examples of trivia-based activities and explains how to use them in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  3. Conversational Involvement and Loneliness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the relationship of conversational involvement and loneliness among college students. Found that lonely participants in this study had lower rates of talkativeness, interruptions, and attention than the nonlonely; they were also perceived as less involved and less interpersonally attractive. (PD)

  4. On-farm acidification and anaerobic storage for preservation and improved conversion of switchgrass into ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treating biomass on-farm with dilute acid following harvesting has the advantages of preventing excess mass losses during storage and helping to prepare it for biochemical processing to biofuels. As the biomass is stored wet it also dispenses with the need for field-drying of the biomass. As long as...

  5. The conversion of anaerobic digestion waste into biofuels via a novel Thermo-Catalytic Reforming process.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Johannes; Meyer, Johannes; Ouadi, Miloud; Apfelbacher, Andreas; Binder, Samir; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Producing energy from biomass and other organic waste residues is essential for sustainable development. Fraunhofer UMSICHT has developed a novel reactor which introduces the Thermo-Catalytic Reforming (TCR®) process. The TCR® is a process which can convert any type of biomass and organic feedstocks into a variety of energy products (char, bio-oil and permanent gases). The aim of this work was to demonstrate this technology using digestate as the feedstock and to quantify the results from the post reforming step. The temperature of a post reformer was varied to achieve optimised fuel products. The hydrogen rich permanent gases produced were maximised at a post reforming temperature of 1023 K. The highly de-oxygenated liquid bio-oil produced contained a calorific value of 35.2 MJ/kg, with significantly improved fuel physical properties, low viscosity and acid number. Overall digestate showed a high potential as feedstock in the Thermo-Catalytic Reforming to produce pyrolysis fuel products of superior quality. PMID:26190827

  6. Anaerobic conversion of lignocellulosic corn fiber to butyric acid, a substrate for microbial butanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many factors, including sharply fluctuating fuel prices and questions regarding the sustainability of fuel produced from potential food crops, have bolstered interest in renewable fuels from alternative feedstocks. We tested pretreated and nonpretreated corn fiber for its susceptibility to hydrolys...

  7. Solar energy conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S.

    2008-03-01

    If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces

  8. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part IV: energy conversion from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The study considers the feasibility of energy conversion from wastes. Specifically, the study analyzes the potential for energy recovery from urban wastes in Jamaica, with the Kingston area serving as a case study, and assesses the feasibility of building a prototype demonstration unit for energy recovery from solid wastes at the University of the West Indies (UWI)-Mona Campus. Steam-generating waterwall combustion, refuse-derived fuel systems, pyrolysis, anaerobic biological conversion (biogas), and gas recovery from landfills are discussed as alternative systems for energy recovery from urban wastes.

  9. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for simulating anaerobic mesophilic sludge digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Carlos Esquerre, Karla Matos Queiroz, Luciano

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The behavior of a anaerobic reactor was evaluated through modeling. • Parametric sensitivity analysis was used to select most sensitive of the ADM1. • The results indicate that the ADM1 was able to predict the experimental results. • Organic load rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the process. - Abstract: Improving anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by monitoring common indicators such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), gas composition and pH is a suitable solution for better sludge management. Modeling is an important tool to assess and to predict process performance. The present study focuses on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the dynamic behavior of a reactor fed with sewage sludge under mesophilic conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis is used to select the most sensitive ADM1 parameters for estimation using a numerical procedure while other parameters are applied without any modification to the original values presented in the ADM1 report. The results indicate that the ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to predict the experimental results of effluent acetate, propionate, composites and biogas flows and pH with reasonable accuracy. The simulation of the effect of organic shock loading clearly showed that an organic shock loading rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the reactor. The results demonstrate that simulations can be helpful to support decisions on predicting the anaerobic digestion process of sewage sludge.

  10. [Distribution and removal of anaerobic antibiotic resistant bacteria during mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge].

    PubMed

    Tong, Juan; Wang, Yuan-Yue; Wei Yuan, Song

    2014-10-01

    Sewage sludge is one of the major sources that releasing antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistant genes (ARG) into the environment since it contains large amount of ARB, but there is little information about the fate of the anaerobic ARB in the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge. Therefore, the distribution, removal and seasonal changes of tetracycline and β-lactam antibiotics resistant bacteria in the mesophilic egg-shaped digesters of a municipal wastewater treatment plant were investigated for one year in this study. Results showed that there were higher amounts of ARB and higher resistance rate of β-lactam antibiotics than that of tetracycline antibiotics in the sewage sludge. All ARB could be significantly reduced during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion process by 1.48-1.64 log unit (P < 0.05). Notably, the ampicillin and cephalothin resistance rates were significantly increased after anaerobic digestion by 12.0% and 14.3%, respectively (P < 0.05). The distribution of ARB in the sewage sludge had seasonal change characteristics. Except for chlorotetracycline resistant bacteria, there were more ARB in the sewage sludge in cold season than in warm season (P < 0.05). PMID:25693388

  11. Oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yao; Jost, Carsten; Mumme, Jan; Wang, Kaijun; Linke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system, the effect of microaeration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of maize straw was investigated under batch conditions and in the UASS with AF system. Aeration intensities of 0-431mL O2/gvs were conducted as pretreatment under batch conditions. Aeration pretreatment obviously enhanced anaerobic digestion and an aeration intensity of 431mL O2/gvs increased the methane yield by 82.2%. Aeration intensities of 0-355mL O2/gvs were conducted in the process liquor circulation of the UASS with AF system. Dissolved oxygen (DO) of UASS and AF reactors kept around 1.39±0.27 and 0.99±0.38mg/L, respectively. pH was relatively stable around 7.11±0.04. Volatile fatty acids and soluble chemical oxygen demand concentration in UASS reactor were higher than those in AF reactor. Methane yield of the whole system was almost stable at 85±7mL/gvs as aeration intensity increased step by step. The UASS with AF system showed good oxygen tolerance capacity. PMID:27372134

  12. Anaerobic capacity: a maximal anaerobic running test versus the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, N S; Nimmo, M A

    1996-02-01

    The present investigation evaluates a maximal anaerobic running test (MART) against the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) for the determination of anaerobic capacity. Essentially, this involved comparing 18 male students performing two randomly assigned supramaximal runs to exhaustion on separate days. Post warm-up and 1, 3, and 6 min postexercise capillary blood samples were taken during both tests for plasma blood lactate (BLa) determination. In the MART only, blood ammonia (BNH3) concentration was measured, while capillary blood samples were additionally taken after every second sprint for BLa determination. Anaerobic capacity, measured as oxygen equivalents in the MART protocol, averaged 112.2 +/- 5.2 ml.kg-1.min-1. Oxygen deficit, representing the anaerobic capacity in the MAOD test, was an average of 74.6 +/- 7.3 ml.kg-1. There was a significant correlation between the MART and MAOD (r = .83, p < .001). BLa values obtained over time in the two tests showed no significant difference, nor was there any difference in the peak BLa recorded. Peak BNH3 concentration recorded was significantly increased from resting levels at exhaustion during the MART. PMID:8664845

  13. Horse manure as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Hadin, Sa; Eriksson, Ola

    2016-10-01

    Horse keeping is of great economic, social and environmental benefit for society, but causes environmental impacts throughout the whole chain from feed production to manure treatment. According to national statistics, the number of horses in Sweden is continually increasing and is currently approximately 360,000. This in turn leads to increasing amounts of horse manure that have to be managed and treated. Current practices could cause local and global environmental impacts due to poor performance or lack of proper management. Horse manure with its content of nutrients and organic material can however contribute to fertilisation of arable land and recovery of renewable energy following anaerobic digestion. At present anaerobic digestion of horse manure is not a common treatment. In this paper the potential for producing biogas and biofertiliser from horse manure is analysed based on a thorough literature review in combination with mathematical modelling and simulations. Anaerobic digestion was chosen as it has a high degree of resource conservation, both in terms of energy (biogas) and nutrients (digestate). Important factors regarding manure characteristics and operating factors in the biogas plant are identified. Two crucial factors are the type and amount of bedding material used, which has strong implications for feedstock characteristics, and the type of digestion method applied (dry or wet process). Straw and waste paper are identified as the best materials in an energy point of view. While the specific methane yield decreases with a high amount of bedding, the bedding material still makes a positive contribution to the energy balance. Thermophilic digestion increases the methane generation rate and yield, compared with mesophilic digestion, but the total effect is negligible. PMID:27396682

  14. Anaerobic wastewater treatment of concentrated sewage using a two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket- anaerobic filter system.

    PubMed

    Halalsheh, Maha M; Abu Rumman, Zainab M; Field, Jim A

    2010-01-01

    A two-stage pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket - anaerobic filter (UASB-AF) reactors system treating concentrated domestic sewage was operated at 23 degrees C and at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 15 and 4 h, respectively. Excess sludge from the downstream AF stage was returned to the upstream UASB reactor. The aim was to obtain higher sludge retention time (SRT) in the UASB reactor for better methanization of suspended COD. The UASB-AF system removed 55% and 65% of the total COD (COD(tot)) and suspended COD (COD(ss)), respectively. The calculated SRT in the UASB reactor ranged from 20-35 days. The AF reactor removed the washed out sludge from the first stage reactor with average COD(ss) removal efficiency of 55%. The volatile fatty acids concentration in the effluent of the AF was 39 mg COD/L compared with 78 mg COD/L measured for the influent. The slightly higher COD(tot) removal efficiency obtained in this study compared with a single stage UASB reactor was achieved at 17% reduction in the total volume. PMID:20390881

  15. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) enrichment of anaerobic microbial consortia in a coal fed chemostat, (2) characterization of biocoal products and examination of liquefaction potential, (3) isolation of decarboxylating organisms and evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation. The project began on September 12, 1990. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Biomethane production from vinasse in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors inoculated with granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Barros, Valciney Gomes de; Duda, Rose Maria; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the anaerobic conversion of vinasse into biomethane with gradual increase in organic loading rate (OLR) in two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, R1 and R2, with volumes of 40.5 and 21.5L in the mesophilic temperature range. The UASB reactors were operated for 230 days with a hydraulic detection time (HDT) of 2.8d (R1) and 2.8-1.8d (R2). The OLR values applied in the reactors were 0.2-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 0.2-11.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2. The average total chemical oxygen demand (totalCOD) removal efficiencies ranged from 49% to 82% and the average conversion efficiencies of the removed totalCOD into methane were 48-58% in R1 and 39-65% in R2. The effluent recirculation was used for an OLR above 6gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R1 and 8gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) in R2 and was able to maintain the pH of the influent in R1 and R2 in the range from 6.5 to 6.8. However, this caused a decrease for 53-39% in the conversion efficiency of the removed totalCOD into methane in R2 because of the increase in the recalcitrant COD in the influent. The largest methane yield values were 0.181 and 0.185 (L) CH4 (gtotalCOD removed)(-1) in R1 and R2, respectively. These values were attained after 140 days of operation with an OLR of 5.0-7.5gtotalCOD (Ld)(-1) and totalCOD removal efficiencies around 70 and 80%. PMID:27289246

  17. Wind energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Longrigg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  18. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  19. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  20. Catalytic conversions of chlorodecalin

    SciTech Connect

    Takhistov, U.V.; Kovyazin, V.E.

    1985-10-01

    This paper studies catalytic conversions of chlorinated decahydronaphthalene (chlorodecalin), since the introduction of chlorine into the hydrocarbon molecule would facilitate formation of the original carbonium ion required for conversion to adamantane. Analysis of the fractions obtained showed that two main products are formed: the tricyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/ and the bicyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/. Therefore, the C/sub 10/H/sub 17/ cation formed by removal of chlorine from chlorodecalin, C/sub 10/H/sub 17/CI, undergoes changes in two directions: addition of hydride ions from other chlorodecalin molecules to form Decalin, and loss of a proton to give a tricyclic system of the adamantane weries and its isomer. Introduction of a substituent (chlorine) into the Decalin molecule made it possible to conduct the process at low temperatures.

  1. Praxis conversion utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.M.; Greenwood, J.R.; Shapiro, R.

    1981-12-02

    The Praxis Conversion Utilities are a set of Praxis routines which convert data objects to/from Ascii strings. For instance, the AsciiInteger function converts an array of characters to an integer value. These routines are implemented as a consistent set of utilities with complete control over the various formatting options and fill characters. Most of the parameters for each routine are optional such that they are easy to invoke for standard cases, yet allowing the detailed control when necessary.

  2. Off-Ice Anaerobic Power Does Not Predict On-Ice Repeated Shift Performance in Hockey.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ben J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    Peterson, BJ, Fitzgerald, JS, Dietz, CC, Ziegler, KS, Baker, SE, and Snyder, EM. Off-ice anaerobic power does not predict on-ice repeated shift performance in hockey. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2375-2381, 2016-Anaerobic power is a significant predictor of acceleration and top speed in team sport athletes. Historically, these findings have been applied to ice hockey although recent research has brought their validity for this sport into question. As ice hockey emphasizes the ability to repeatedly produce power, single bout anaerobic power tests should be examined to determine their ability to predict on-ice performance. We tested whether conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests could predict on-ice acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift performance. Forty-five hockey players, aged 18-24 years, completed anthropometric, off-ice, and on-ice tests. Anthropometric and off-ice testing included height, weight, body composition, vertical jump, and Wingate tests. On-ice testing consisted of acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift fatigue tests. Vertical jump (VJ) (r = -0.42; r = -0.58), Wingate relative peak power (WRPP) (r = -0.32; r = -0.43), and relative mean power (WRMP) (r = -0.34; r = -0.48) were significantly correlated (p ≤ 0.05) to on-ice acceleration and top speed, respectively. Conversely, none of the off-ice tests correlated with on-ice repeated shift performance, as measured by first gate, second gate, or total course fatigue; VJ (r = 0.06; r = 0.13; r = 0.09), WRPP (r = 0.06; r = 0.14; r = 0.10), or WRMP (r = -0.10; r = -0.01; r = -0.01). Although conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests predict single bout on-ice acceleration and top speed, they neither predict the repeated shift ability of the player, nor are good markers for performance in ice hockey. PMID:26808844

  3. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  4. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  5. Identification, distribution, and toxigenicity of obligate anaerobes in polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Daily, O P; Joseph, S W; Gillmore, J D; Colwell, R R; Seidler, R J

    1981-01-01

    A seasonal occurrence of obligately anaerobic bacteria, predominantly of the genera Bacteroides and Clostridium, in a polluted water site has been observed. The number of anaerobes varied from 1.8 X 10(3) cells/ml in the warmer months to 10 cells/ml in winter. Several isolates were toxigenic, indicating a potential human health hazard. PMID:7235706

  6. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  7. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  8. LOVES CREEK ANAEROBIC, UPFLOW (ANFLOW) PILOT PLANT: PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic filter technology for municipal wastewater treatment has been studied in Knoxville, Tennessee with a 190-m exp 3 /d facility from August 1981 to October 1983. The ORNL project (described by the acronym ANFLOW for the anaerobic, upflow characteristics of the technology) ...

  9. Evidence of hydrolytic route for anaerobic cyanide degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D

    1992-01-01

    Products observed during anaerobic cyanide transformation are consistent with a hydrolytic pathway (HCN + H2O <--> HCONH2 + H2O <--> HCOOH + NH3). Formate, the most frequently observed product, was generally converted to bicarbonate. Formamide was rapidly hydrolyzed to formate upon exposure to the anaerobic consortium but was not detected as an intermediate of cyanide transformation. PMID:1444430

  10. Denitrification in anaerobic lagoons used to treat swine wastewater.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are commonly used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very complex. This study of anaerobic lagoons had twofold objectives: 1] quantify denitrification e...

  11. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation and Soil Borne Pest Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing m...

  12. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  13. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  14. Treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters using anaerobic filters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sandra Luz; Torretta, Vincenzo; Minguelac, Jésus Vázquez; Siñeriz, Faustino; Raboni, Massimo; Copelli, Sabrina; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-scale experimentation allowed comparing the performances of two upflow anaerobic packed-bed filters filled with different packing materials and operating at mesophilic conditions (30 degreeC) for treating slaughterhouse wastewaters. Methane production was experimentally evaluated considering different volumetric organic loading rates as well as feeding overloading conditions. Although filter performances declined with loading rates higher than 6 kg CODin m-3 d-1 , the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained always above 60%. The experimental results allowed for determining kinetic parameters for bacterial growth rate and methane production, following Monod and Chen-Hashimoto models, respectively. Results demonstrated that the reactors reached a cellular retention time significantly greater than the hydraulic retention time. The kinetic parameter values (Ks, l/max) revealed the low microorganisms' affinity for the substrate and confirmed the moderate biodegradability of slaughterhouse wastewater. The kinetic analysis also allowed the comparison of the filters performances with another anaerobic system and the assessment of the parameters useful for real-scale plant design. The system design, applied to a medium-sized Argentinean slaughterhouse, demonstrated to (i) be energetically self-sufficient and (ii) contribute to the plant's water heating requirements. PMID:24600871

  15. The anaerobic digestion of solid organic waste.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Anjum, Muzammil; Mahmood, Tariq; Dawson, Lorna

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of solid organic waste is thought to be reaching critical levels in almost all regions of the world. These organic wastes require to be managed in a sustainable way to avoid depletion of natural resources, minimize risk to human health, reduce environmental burdens and maintain an overall balance in the ecosystem. A number of methods are currently applied to the treatment and management of solid organic waste. This review focuses on the process of anaerobic digestion which is considered to be one of the most viable options for recycling the organic fraction of solid waste. This manuscript provides a broad overview of the digestibility and energy production (biogas) yield of a range of substrates and the digester configurations that achieve these yields. The involvement of a diverse array of microorganisms and effects of co-substrates and environmental factors on the efficiency of the process has been comprehensively addressed. The recent literature indicates that anaerobic digestion could be an appealing option for converting raw solid organic wastes into useful products such as biogas and other energy-rich compounds, which may play a critical role in meeting the world's ever-increasing energy requirements in the future. PMID:21530224

  16. Anaerobic expanded bed treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Switzenbaum, M.S.; Danskin, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of whey offers the dual advantage of energy production and pollution control. The energy produced is in the form of methane which is a valuable form of energy in that it is easily separated from the liquid digesting whey, has a high caloric value and can be used for heating and cooking at the cheese plants where it is produced. Based on the data of a survey conducted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, it was shown that a significant portion (up to 46%) of the energy needs (in natural gas and oil) at cheese production plants in New York State could be recovered by methane generated from whey produced as a by-product of cheese manufacturing at the plants. Finally, the results of a preliminary feasibility study of a new type of innovative, compact, high rate, anaerobic fixed film process show that efficient treatment of whey is possible at low retention times, and at high organic loading rates.

  17. Anaerobic biodegradation of hexazinone in four sediments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Xu, Shuxia; Tan, Chengxia; Wang, Xuedong

    2009-05-30

    Anaerobic biodegradation of hexazinone was investigated in four sediments (L1, L2, Y1 and Y2). Results showed that the L2 sediment had the highest biodegradation potential among four sediments. However, the Y1 and Y2 sediments had no capacity to biodegrade hexazinone. Sediments with rich total organic carbon, long-term contamination history by hexazinone and neutral pH may have a high biodegradation potential because the former two factors can induce the growth of microorganisms responsible for biodegradation and the third factor can offer suitable conditions for biodegradation. The addition of sulfate or nitrate as electron acceptors enhanced hexazinone degradation. As expected, the addition of electron donors (lactate, acetate or pyruvate) substantially inhibited the degradation. In natural environmental conditions, the effect of intermediate A [3-(4-hydroxycyclohexyl)-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H, 3H)dione] on anaerobic hexazinone degradation was negligible because of its low level. PMID:18824297

  18. Anaerobic degradation kinetics of a cholesteryl ester.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, S; Viñas, M

    2003-01-01

    The most important components of wool scouring effluent grease are esters of sterols. Cholesteryl palmitate (CP) is the main ester in this grease. In this paper, the influence of the ester concentration in the anaerobic digestion and the relative rate of the different degradation steps, are studied. The experiment was carried out to measure methane production in the anaerobic degradation of acetate, palmitic acid (PA) and CP. A first-order kinetic model was assumed for hydrolysis and Monod models were assumed for both the methanogenic and acetogenic steps. Maximum hydrolysis rate was found to be around 20 times faster than the maximum methanogenic reaction rate during the experience. The lanolin emulsion drop size effect was also evaluated employing fine and coarse stock lanolin emulsions and no adapted sludge. Concentrations of 13.7 to 4.6 gCOD x l(-1) were employed. In a previous study, the effect of palmitic acid emulsion size was found important when similar sludge was tested. When esters are degraded, a significant effect of drop size on the degradation rate was not found. The difference between CP and PA emulsions behavior could be due to the fact that cholesterol produced during the ester degradation has a protective effect on the sludge. PMID:14640211

  19. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  20. Relevance of Routine Use of the Anaerobic Blood Culture Bottle▿

    PubMed Central

    Grohs, Patrick; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Podglajen, Isabelle; Hanras, Xavier; Eckert, C.; Buu-Hoï, A.; Varon, E.; Gutmann, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Using the BacT/Alert automated system, we conducted a 1-year retrospective study on blood cultures, focusing on the relevance of routine use of the anaerobic bottle. The rate of patients with positive blood cultures was 19.7%. Among these, 13.5% had a positive anaerobic bottle in the absence of any aerobic bottle, and 2/3 of these grew with nonobligate anaerobes. These patients were hospitalized in 20 out of 26 wards of the hospital group. For 65.4% of the monomicrobial-positive blood cultures growing Enterobacteriaceae, the anaerobic bottle detected growth earlier than the corresponding aerobic bottle. These data suggest that, in our institution, the use of an anaerobic bottle is still relevant. PMID:17581942

  1. Anaerobic digestion of hog wastes: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszkiewicz, J.A.; Bujoczek, G.

    1996-12-31

    The principles and overview of research, development and implementation of anaerobic digestion for hog wastes are discussed. Based on economic evaluations, an anaerobic technology is cost-effective, especially for a larger herd and becomes more competitive with aerobic treatment. Nevertheless, the rate of treatment is more sensitive and dependent on the particular fraction of manure being processed. Considering the different factors affecting anaerobic digestion, a complete mixed reactor with solids recycle (having high solids retention time and low hydraulic retention time) was found to be the more reliable system with regards to methane generation and manure stabilization. By solids recycle one can obtain significant saving in the reactor volume required, while still achieving the expected degree of treatment. It was also found that even though treatment using advanced anaerobic systems when compared with simple anaerobic systems is more expensive, the rate of return on investment and efficiency of the process are higher.

  2. Determination of mercury and organomercurial resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rudrik, J T; Bawdon, R E; Guss, S P

    1985-03-01

    A methodology for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of inorganic and organomercurial compounds for obligate anaerobic bacteria is described. A wide variation in the susceptibility of anaerobic clinical and sewage isolates was observed. Isolates of Bacteroides ruminicola and Clostridium perfringens resistant to mercury were examined for their plasmid content and ability to demonstrate inducible resistance. None of the resistant anaerobes contained any plasmids, while resistant facultative isolates from the same source contained several plasmids. In 24 h, resistant strains of clostridia and Bacteroides volatilized 20 and 43% of the 203Hg2+ added to cultures, while Escherichia coli R100 and a sewage isolate of Enterobacter cloacae volatilized 63 and 27%, respectively, of the added 203Hg2+. Attempts to induce mercury resistance in the aerobic isolates were successful, but no induction was seen in the anaerobes. Thus, mercury resistance in these anaerobic isolates was neither inducible nor plasmid mediated. PMID:4005712

  3. Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange by anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange (MO) by anaerobic sludge in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors were investigated. The anaerobic sludge was found to have a saturated adsorption capacity of 36 ± 1 mg g MLSS(-1) to MO. UV/visible spectrophotometer and high-performance liquid chromatography analytical results indicated that the MO adsorption and decolorization occurred simultaneously in this system. This process at various substrate concentrations could be well simulated using a modified two-stage model with apparent pseudo first-order kinetics. Furthermore, a noncompetitive inhibition kinetic model was also developed to describe the MO decolorization process at high NaCl concentrations, and an inhibition constant of 3.67 g NaCl l(-1) was estimated. This study offers an insight into the adsorption and decolorization processes of azo dyes by anaerobic sludge and provides a better understanding of the anaerobic dye decolorization mechanisms. PMID:21279343

  4. Integrated bioprocess for conversion of gaseous substrates to liquids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Chakraborty, Sagar; Kumar, Amit; Woolston, Benjamin; Liu, Hongjuan; Emerson, David; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In the quest for inexpensive feedstocks for the cost-effective production of liquid fuels, we have examined gaseous substrates that could be made available at low cost and sufficiently large scale for industrial fuel production. Here we introduce a new bioconversion scheme that effectively converts syngas, generated from gasification of coal, natural gas, or biomass, into lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. We present an integrated conversion method comprising a two-stage system. In the first stage, an anaerobic bioreactor converts mixtures of gases of CO2 and CO or H2 to acetic acid, using the anaerobic acetogen Moorella thermoacetica The acetic acid product is fed as a substrate to a second bioreactor, where it is converted aerobically into lipids by an engineered oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica We first describe the process carried out in each reactor and then present an integrated system that produces microbial oil, using synthesis gas as input. The integrated continuous bench-scale reactor system produced 18 g/L of C16-C18 triacylglycerides directly from synthesis gas, with an overall productivity of 0.19 g⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) and a lipid content of 36%. Although suboptimal relative to the performance of the individual reactor components, the presented integrated system demonstrates the feasibility of substantial net fixation of carbon dioxide and conversion of gaseous feedstocks to lipids for biodiesel production. The system can be further optimized to approach the performance of its individual units so that it can be used for the economical conversion of waste gases from steel mills to valuable liquid fuels for transportation. PMID:26951649

  5. Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Miklós; Mentel, Marek; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Henze, Katrin; Woehle, Christian; Gould, Sven B.; Yu, Re-Young; van der Giezen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Major insights into the phylogenetic distribution, biochemistry, and evolutionary significance of organelles involved in ATP synthesis (energy metabolism) in eukaryotes that thrive in anaerobic environments for all or part of their life cycles have accrued in recent years. All known eukaryotic groups possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, mapping the origin of mitochondria to the eukaryotic common ancestor, and genome sequence data are rapidly accumulating for eukaryotes that possess anaerobic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes, or mitosomes. Here we review the available biochemical data on the enzymes and pathways that eukaryotes use in anaerobic energy metabolism and summarize the metabolic end products that they generate in their anaerobic habitats, focusing on the biochemical roles that their mitochondria play in anaerobic ATP synthesis. We present metabolic maps of compartmentalized energy metabolism for 16 well-studied species. There are currently no enzymes of core anaerobic energy metabolism that are specific to any of the six eukaryotic supergroup lineages; genes present in one supergroup are also found in at least one other supergroup. The gene distribution across lineages thus reflects the presence of anaerobic energy metabolism in the eukaryote common ancestor and differential loss during the specialization of some lineages to oxic niches, just as oxphos capabilities have been differentially lost in specialization to anoxic niches and the parasitic life-style. Some facultative anaerobes have retained both aerobic and anaerobic pathways. Diversified eukaryotic lineages have retained the same enzymes of anaerobic ATP synthesis, in line with geochemical data indicating low environmental oxygen levels while eukaryotes arose and diversified. PMID:22688819

  6. Anaerobic Antimicrobial Therapy After Necrotizing Enterocolitis in VLBW Infants

    PubMed Central

    Autmizguine, Julie; Hornik, Christoph P.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Clark, Reese H.; Cotten, C. Michael; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of anaerobic antimicrobial therapy for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) on clinical outcomes in very low birth weight (≤1500 g) infants. METHODS: We identified very low birth weight infants with NEC from 348 US NICUs from 1997 to 2012. Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was defined by antibiotic exposure on the first day of NEC. We matched (1:1) infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy with infants who were not exposed by using a propensity score stratified by NEC severity (medical and surgical). The primary composite outcome was in-hospital death or intestinal stricture. We assessed the relationship between anaerobic antimicrobial therapy and outcome by using a conditional logistic regression on the matched cohort. RESULTS: A total of 1390 infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy were matched with 1390 infants not exposed. Mean gestational age and birth weight were 27 weeks and 946 g, respectively, and were similar in both groups. We found no significant difference in the combined outcome of death or strictures, but strictures as a single outcome were more common in the anaerobic antimicrobial therapy group (odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–2.72). Among infants with surgical NEC, mortality was less common with anaerobic antimicrobial therapy (odds ratio 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was not associated with the composite outcome of death or strictures but was associated with an increase in intestinal strictures. This higher incidence of intestinal strictures may be explained by the fact that death is a competing outcome for intestinal strictures, and mortality was slightly lower in the anaerobic cohort. Infants with surgical NEC who received anaerobic antimicrobial therapy had lower mortality. PMID:25511117

  7. Are incidence and epidemiology of anaerobic bacteremia really changing?

    PubMed

    Vena, A; Muñoz, P; Alcalá, L; Fernandez-Cruz, A; Sanchez, C; Valerio, M; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    Incidence, prognosis and need of performing blood cultures for anaerobic bacteria are under debate, mainly due to the belief that the presence of anaerobes in blood can be easily suspected on clinical basis. We aimed to assess these three points in a retrospective analysis of a 10-year experience in our tertiary hospital. All episodes of significant anaerobic bacteremia diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 were included. Risk factors for mortality and clinical predictability of anaerobic bacteremia were evaluated in 113 randomly selected episodes. Overall incidence of anaerobic bacteremia was 1.2 episodes/1000 admissions, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. B. fragilis group (38.1 %) and Clostridium spp. (13.7 %) were the most frequent isolated microorganisms. As for the clinical study, 43.4 % of the patients had a comorbidity classified as ultimately fatal or rapidly fatal according to the McCabe and Jackson scale. Clinical manifestations suggestive of anaerobic involvement were present in only 55 % of the patients. Twenty-eight patients (24.8 %) died during the hospitalization. Independent predictive factors of mortality were a high Charlson's comorbidity index and presentation with septic shock, whereas, an adequate source control of the infection was associated with a better outcome. In our centre, incidence of anaerobic bacteremia remained stable during the last decade. The routine use of anaerobic BCs seems to be adequate, since in about half of the cases anaerobes could not be suspected on clinical bases. Moreover, prompt source control of infection is essential in order to reduce mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26017663

  8. Crucial Conversations about America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John C.; Protheroe, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    It's up to school leaders to shift the momentum away from conversations based on misperceptions and toward those that study critical issues about school improvement. "Crucial Conversations About America's Schools" talks about how to do this and provides examples of how to reframe conversations on the hot-button but important topics of…

  9. The Personal Enjoyment of Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Paul W.

    Conversation reminds us that we are not alone, that shared language is the opportunity to try on our many masks to see how many of them we can do without. The variety of pleasures accrued from conversation--"layers of pleasure"--deepen only as they move away from the individual orbits into the circle of mutual experience. When conversation is…

  10. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  11. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  12. Solar photothermophotovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, L. D.

    A solar photothermophotovoltaic (PTPV) process for solar energy conversion is proposed in which concentrated solar radiation impinges on a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell with a back surface reflector. The above band-gap blackbody radiation is converted into electricity, while the below band-gap radiation is reflected back to the blackbody. Computer modeling has shown the PTPV system to be much less sensitive to parasitic losses than a comparable TPV system, and to operate at a significantly lower blackbody absorber/emitter temperature. PTPV efficiency is also shown to be as much as 50 percent higher than that for a comparable photovoltaic system.

  13. Reductive dehalogenation and conversion of 2-chlorophenol to 3-chlorobenzoate in a methanogenic sediment community: Implications for predicting the environmental fate of chlorinated pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.G.; Stahl, D.A.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-11-01

    Biotransformation of 2-chlorophenol by a methanogenic sediment community resulted in the transient accumulation of phenol and benzoate. 3-Chlorobenzoate was a more persistent product of 2-chlorophenol metabolism. The anaerobic biotransformation of phenol to benzoate presumably occurred via para-carboxylation and dehydroxylation reactions, which may also explain the observed conversion of 2-chlorophenol to 3-chlorobenzoate.

  14. Modeling of simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation in a membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Shi, Ying; Hu, Shihu; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2014-08-19

    Nitrogen removal by using the synergy of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) microorganisms in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) has previously been demonstrated experimentally. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation by DAMO and Anammox microorganisms in an MBfR for the first time. In this model, DAMO archaea convert nitrate, both externally fed and/or produced by Anammox, to nitrite, with methane as the electron donor. Anammox and DAMO bacteria jointly remove the nitrite fed/produced, with ammonium and methane as the electron donor, respectively. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using the long-term (over 400 days) dynamic experimental data from the MBfR, as well as two independent batch tests at different operational stages of the MBfR. The model satisfactorily describes the methane oxidation and nitrogen conversion data from the system. Modeling results show the concentration gradients of methane and nitrogen would cause stratification of the biofilm, where Anammox bacteria mainly grow in the biofilm layer close to the bulk liquid and DAMO organisms attach close to the membrane surface. The low surface methane loadings result in a low fraction of DAMO microorganisms, but the high surface methane loadings would lead to overgrowth of DAMO bacteria, which would compete with Anammox for nitrite and decrease the fraction of Anammox bacteria. The results suggest an optimal methane supply under the given condition should be applied not only to benefit the nitrogen removal but also to avoid potential methane emissions. PMID:25055054

  15. Enforced ATP futile cycling increases specific productivity and yield of anaerobic lactate production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, Oliver; Bettenbrock, Katja; Klamt, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The manipulation of cofactor pools such as ATP or NAD(P)H has for long been recognized as key targets for metabolic engineering of microorganisms to improve yields and productivities of biotechnological processes. Several works in the past have shown that enforcing ATP futile cycling may enhance the synthesis of certain products under aerobic conditions. However, case studies demonstrating that ATP wasting may also have beneficial effects for anaerobic production processes are scarce. Taking lactic acid as an economically relevant product, we demonstrate that induction of ATP futile cycling in Escherichia coli leads to increased yields and specific production rates under anaerobic conditions, even in the case where lactate is already produced with high yields. Specifically, we constructed a high lactate producer strain KBM10111 (= MG1655 ΔadhE::Cam ΔackA-pta) and implemented an IPTG-inducible overexpression of ppsA encoding for PEP synthase which, together with pyruvate kinase, gives rise to an ATP consuming cycle. Under induction of ppsA, KBM10111 exhibits a 25% higher specific lactate productivity as well as an 8% higher lactate yield. Furthermore, the specific substrate uptake rate was increased by 14%. However, trade-offs between specific and volumetric productivities must be considered when ATP wasting strategies are used to shift substrate conversion from biomass to product synthesis and we discuss potential solutions to design optimal processes. In summary, enforced ATP futile cycling has great potential to optimize a variety of production processes and our study demonstrates that this holds true also for anaerobic processes. PMID:25899755

  16. Metal enzymes in "impossible" microorganisms catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and methane.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Joachim; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium and methane are inert molecules and dedicated enzymes are required to break up the N-H and C-H bonds. Until recently, only aerobic microorganisms were known to grow by the oxidation of ammonium or methane. Apart from respiration, oxygen was specifically utilized to activate the inert substrates. The presumed obligatory need for oxygen may have resisted the search for microorganisms that are capable of the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and of methane. However extremely slowly growing, these "impossible" organisms exist and they found other means to tackle ammonium and methane. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria use the oxidative power of nitric oxide (NO) by forging this molecule to ammonium, thereby making hydrazine (N2H4). Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizers (N-DAMO) again take advantage of NO, but now apparently disproportionating the compound into dinitrogen and dioxygen gas. This intracellularly produced dioxygen enables N-DAMO bacteria to adopt an aerobic mechanism for methane oxidation.Although our understanding is only emerging how hydrazine synthase and the NO dismutase act, it seems clear that reactions fully rely on metal-based catalyses known from other enzymes. Metal-dependent conversions not only hold for these key enzymes, but for most other reactions in the central catabolic pathways, again supported by well-studied enzymes from model organisms, but adapted to own specific needs. Remarkably, those accessory catabolic enzymes are not unique for anammox bacteria and N-DAMO. Close homologs are found in protein databases where those homologs derive from (partly) known, but in most cases unknown species that together comprise an only poorly comprehended microbial world. PMID:25707470

  17. Control of interspecies electron flow during anaerobic digestion: role of floc formation in syntrophic methanogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, J.H.; Chartrain, M.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The flora of an anaerobic whey-processing chemostat was separated by anaerobic sedimentation techniques into a free-living bacterial fraction and a bacterial floc fraction. The floc fraction constituted a major part (i.e., 57% total protein) of the total microbial population in the digestor, and it accounted for 87% of the total CO/sub 2/-dependent methanogenic activity and 76% of the total ethanol-consuming acetogenic activity. Lactose was degraded by both cellular fractions, but in the free flora fraction it was associated with higher intermediary levels of H/sub 2/, ethanol, butyrate, and propionate production. Electron microscopic analysis of flocs showed bacterial diversity and juxtapositioning of tentative Desulfovibrio and Methanobacterium species without significant microcolony formation. Ethanol, an intermediary product of lactose-hydrolyzing bacteria, was converted to acetate and methane within the flocs by interspecies electron transfer. Ethanol-dependent methane formation was compartmentalized and closely coupled kinetically within the flocs but without significant formation of H/sub 2/ gas. Physical disruption of flocs into fragments of 10- to 20-..mu..m diameter initially increased the H/sub 2/ partial pressure but did not change the carbon transformation kinetic patterns of ethanol metabolism or demonstrate a significant role for H/sub 2/ in CO/sub 2/ reduction to methane. The data demonstrate that floc formation in a whey-processing anaerobic digestor functions in juxtapositioning cells for interspecies electron transfer during syntrophic ethanol conversion into acetate and methane but by a mechanism which was independent of the available dissolved H/sub 2/ gas pool in the ecosystem.

  18. ANAMMOX and partial denitritation in anaerobic nitrogen removal from piggery waste.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y H; Hwang, I S; Min, K S

    2004-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium removal from a piggery waste with high strength (56 g COD/L and 5 g T-N/L) was investigated using a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor at a mesophilic condition. Based on the nitrogen and carbon balance in the process, the contribution of autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms was also evaluated in terms of the influent NO2-N/NH4-N ratio (1:0.8 and 1:1.2 for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively). The result of this research demonstrates that the anaerobic ammonium removal from the piggery waste, using the UASB reactor, can be performed successfully. Furthermore, it appears that by using granular sludge as the seed biomass, the ANAMMOX reaction can start more quickly. Average nitrogen conversion was 0.59 kg T-N/m3 reactor-day (0.06 kg T-N/kg VSS/day) and 0.66 kg T-N/m3 reactor-day (0.08 kg T-N/kg VSS/day) for Phase 1 and Phase 2. The NO2-N/NH4-N removal ratio by the ANAMMOX was 1.48 and 1.79 for Phase 1 and Phase 2. The higher nitrite contents (about 50%) in the substrate resulted in higher nitrite nitrogen removal by the partial denitritation, as well as the ANAMMOX reaction, implying higher potential of partial denitritation. However, the result reveals that the ANAMMOX reaction was influenced less by the degree of partial denitritation, and the ANAMMOX bacteria did not compete with denitritation bacteria. The colour of the biomass at the bottom of the reactor changed from dark gray to dark red, which was accompanied by an increase in cytochrome content. At the end of the experiment, red-coloured granular sludge with diameter of 1-2 mm at the lower part of the reactor was also observed. PMID:15137418

  19. Natural gas conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to design and operate a laboratory apparatus for the catalytic reforming of natural gas in order to provide data for a large-scale process. To accelerate the assembly and calibration of this equipment, a request has been made to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for assistance, under the DOE's Industrial Visitor Exchange Program. Pr. Heinz Heinemann (Catalysis), Dr. John Apps (Geochemistry) and Dr. Robert Fulton (Mechanical Engineering) have expressed interest in supporting our request. Pr. Heinemann's recent results on the conversion of Petroleum Coke residues into CO2 and H2 mixtures using highly basic metal oxides catalysts, similar to ours, are very encouraging regarding the possibility of converting the Coke residue on our catalyst into Syngas in the Regenerator/riser, as proposed. To minimize Coke formation in the vapor phase, by the Plasmapyrolytic Methane Conversion reactions, the experimental data of H. Drost et al. (Ref. 12) have been reviewed. Work is underway to design equipment for the safe and non-polluting disposal of the two gaseous product streams of the flow loop. 2 refs.

  20. Energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1985-09-16

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

  1. Energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1987-01-01

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

  2. Direct somatic lineage conversion.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-10-19

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  3. Conversion program in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  4. Micromechanical power conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noworolski, J. Mark

    A new concept in power conversion, based on electromechanical energy storage, is developed. Mechanical energy storage using Silicon offers a 2 order of magnitude improvement in volumetric energy storage density over conventional approaches using magnetic components. Two broad classes of electromechanical power converter topologies are introduced and analyzed: resonant and boost. Both are shown to scale well to smaller electromechanical device dimensions. A novel self-aligned micromachined polysilicon on nitride (SAMPSON) process flow was developed to fabricate mumechanical devices suitable for the boost conversion function. The process utility includes simplified fabrication of conventional surface micromachined resonators. Calculations showed that well-designed boost converters can achieve step-up factors in excess of 10 while using only a single mumechanical device. Boost converter tests utilizing discrete devices and the fabricated mumechanical elements demonstrated a step-up factor of 1.7. Measurements conducted on representative test devices indicate that power densities an order of magnitude higher than those in conventional power converters are attainable.

  5. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  6. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    PubMed

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<3.2 %) in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rates of substrate utilization were slightly higher in aerobic reactors, but COD stabilization occurred simultaneously in the anaerobic reactors, confirming its suitability for anaerobic digestion. Inert COD in anaerobic conditions was lower than in aerobic conditions. On the other hand, COD from metabolic products in the anaerobic reactors was higher than in the aerobic ones, indicating an increased release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) by anaerobic microorganisms. The results indicated that carbohydrates were satisfactorily degraded and protein-like substances were the major components remaining after biological degradation of vinasse. PMID:25957273

  7. Bioaugmentation of overloaded anaerobic digesters restores function and archaeal community.

    PubMed

    Tale, V P; Maki, J S; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Adding beneficial microorganisms to anaerobic digesters for improved performance (i.e. bioaugmentation) has been shown to decrease recovery time after organic overload or toxicity upset. Compared to strictly anaerobic cultures, adding aerotolerant methanogenic cultures may be more practical since they exhibit higher methanogenic activity and can be easily dried and stored in ambient air for future shipping and use. In this study, anaerobic digesters were bioaugmented with both anaerobic and aerated, methanogenic propionate enrichment cultures after a transient organic overload. Digesters bioaugmented with anaerobic and moderately aerated cultures recovered 25 and 100 days before non-bioaugmented digesters, respectively. Increased methane production due to bioaugmentation continued a long time, with 50-120% increases 6 to 12 SRTs (60-120 days) after overload. In contrast to the anaerobic enrichment, the aerated enrichments were more effective as bioaugmentation cultures, resulting in faster recovery of upset digester methane and COD removal rates. Sixty days after overload, the bioaugmented digester archaeal community was not shifted, but was restored to one similar to the pre-overload community. In contrast, non-bioaugmented digester archaeal communities before and after overload were significantly different. Organisms most similar to Methanospirillum hungatei had higher relative abundance in well-operating, undisturbed and bioaugmented digesters, whereas organisms similar to Methanolinea tarda were more abundant in upset, non-bioaugmented digesters. Bioaugmentation is a beneficial approach to increase digester recovery rate after transient organic overload events. Moderately aerated, methanogenic propionate enrichment cultures were more beneficial augments than a strictly anaerobic enrichment. PMID:25528544

  8. Degradation of natural and synthetic polyesters under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zeid, D M; Müller, R J; Deckwer, W D

    2001-03-30

    Often, degradability under anaerobic conditions is desirable for plastics claimed to be biodegradable, e.g. in anaerobic biowaste treatment plants, landfills and in natural anaerobic sediments. The biodegradation of the natural polyesters poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate-co-11.6%-beta-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and the synthetic polyester poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was studied in two anaerobic sludges and individual polyester degrading anaerobic strains were isolated, characterized and used for degradation experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. Incubation of PHB and PHBV films in two anaerobic sludges exhibited significant degradation in a time scale of 6-10 weeks monitored by weight loss and biogas formation. In contrast to aerobic conditions, PHB was degraded anaerobically more rapidly than the copolyester PHBV, when tested with either mixed cultures or a single strained isolate. PCL tends to degrade slower than the natural polyesters PHB and PHBV. Four PHB and PCL degrading isolates were taxonomically identified and are obviously new species belonging to the genus Clostridium group I. The depolymerizing enzyme systems of PHB and PCL degrading isolates are supposed to be different. Using one isolated strain in an optimized laboratory degradation test with PHB powder, the degradation time was drastically reduced compared to the degradation in sludges (2 days vs. 6-10 weeks). PMID:11245900

  9. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). PMID:26707985

  10. Dispersal of non-sporeforming anaerobic bacteria from the skin.

    PubMed Central

    Benediktsdóttir, E.; Hambraeus, A.

    1982-01-01

    Dispersal of non-sporeforming anaerobic bacteria was studied. Skin samples were taken from the subjects, and dispersed from different parts of the body was examined. The number of anaerobic bacteria dispersed was not correlated to their density on the surface of skin area exposed. The highest density of anaerobic bacteria on the skin was found in the face and upper trunk, but the highest yield of anaerobic bacteria dispersed came from the lower trunk. The dominant anaerobic bacteria dispersed were Propionibacterium acnes, but Propionibacterium avidum, Propionibacterium granulosum and Gram-positive cocci were also isolated from the dispersal samples. Peptococcus magnus was the most common coccus isolated. For the less frequently isolated bacteria, the best correlation was found between the perineal flora and airborne bacteria. A comparison was also made of bacterial dispersal by naked and dressed subjects. The dispersal of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was higher when the subjects were dressed in conventional operating theatre cotton clothing than when they were naked. The increased dispersal of anaerobic bacteria when the subjects were dressed was mainly due to increased dispersal of Propionibacterium sp. PMID:6806353

  11. Calorimetric studies of the growth of anaerobic microbes.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideo; Maeda, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Akiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    This article aims to validate the use of calorimetry to measure the growth of anaerobic microbes. It has been difficult to monitor the growth of strict anaerobes while maintaining optimal growth conditions. Traditionally, optical density and ATP concentration are usually used as measures of the growth of anaerobic microbes. However, to take these measurements it is necessary to extract an aliquot of the culture, which can be difficult while maintaining anaerobic conditions. In this study, calorimetry was used to continuously and nondestructively measure the heat generated by the growth of anaerobic microbes as a function of time. Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium cellulovorans were used as representative anaerobic microbes. Using a multiplex isothermal calorimeter, we observed that peak time (tp) of C. acetobutylicum heat evolution increased as the inoculation rate decreased. This strong correlation between the inoculation rate and tp showed that it was possible to measure the growth rate of anaerobic microbes by calorimetry. Overall, our results showed that there is a very good correlation between heat evolution and optical density/ATP concentration, validating the use of the method. PMID:27012376

  12. Low temperature calcium hydroxide treatment enhances anaerobic methane production from (extruded) biomass.

    PubMed

    Khor, Way Cern; Rabaey, Korneel; Vervaeren, Han

    2015-01-01

    Ca(OH)2 treatment was applied to enhance methane yield. Different alkali concentration, incubation temperature and duration were evaluated for their effect on methane production and COD conversion efficiency from (non-)extruded biomass during mesophilic anaerobic digestion at lab-scale. An optimum Ca(OH)2 pretreatment for grass is found at 7.5% lime loading at 10°C for 20h (37.3% surplus), while mild (50°C) and high temperatures perform sub-optimal. Ca(OH)2 post-treatment after fast extrusion gives an additional surplus compared to extruded material of 15.2% (grass), 11.2% (maize straw) and 8.2% (sprout stem) regarding methane production. COD conversion improves accordingly, with additional improvements of 10.3% (grass), 9.0% (maize straw) and 6.8% (sprout stem) by Ca(OH)2 post-treatment. Therefore, Ca(OH)2 pretreatment and post-treatment at low temperature generate an additional effect regarding methane production and COD conversion efficiency. Fast extrusion gives a higher energy efficiency ratio compared to slow extrusion. PMID:25461001

  13. Anaerobic Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in Pilot-Scale Anaerobic EGSB Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qiu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yin-Sheng; Chang, Yoon-Seong; Li, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of untreated palm oil mill effluent (POME) pose threat to aquatic environment due to the presence of very high organic content. The present investigation involved two pilot-scale anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors, continuously operated for 1 year to treat POME. Setting HRT at 9.8 d, the anaerobic EGSB reactors reduced COD from 71179 mg/L to 12341 mg/L and recycled half of sludge by a dissolved air flotation (DAF). The average effluent COD was 3587 mg/L with the consistent COD removal efficiency of 94.89%. Adding cationic polymer (PAM) dose of 30 mg/L to DAF unit and recycling its half of sludge caused granulation of anaerobic sludge. Bacilli and small coccid bacteria were the dominant microbial species of the reactor. The reactor produced 27.65 m3 of biogas per m3 of POME which was utilized for electricity generation. PMID:26167485

  14. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Evans, B.S.

    1993-11-29

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period.

  15. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. PMID:24630580

  16. Anaerobic dechlorination and the bioremediation of PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Quensen, J.F. III; Boyd, S.A.; Tiedje, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The recently discovered process of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of PCBs promises to overcome some of the limitations of aerobic PCB biodegradation. This process, first suspected from the altered chromatographic pattern observed for Hudson River sediment samples, has been duplicated in the laboratory. The process removes meta and para chlorines, resulting in a PCB mixture that is both less toxic and more aerobically degradable. It is active at higher PCB concentrations (at least 5,000 ppm), and does not require induction by biphenyl or a monochlorinated biphenyl. The literature on the aerobic biodegradation of PCBs is briefly reviewed for the purpose of pointing out the limitations of aerobic PCB degradation that an anaerobic pretreatment can be expected to overcome, and the results of our own research on the reductive dechlorination of PCBs is summarized.

  17. Kinetics of biogas production in Anaerobic Filters.

    PubMed

    Krümpel, Johannes; Schäufele, Friedrich; Schneider, Johannes; Jungbluth, Thomas; Zielonka, Simon; Lemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates methane production kinetics from individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) in an Upflow Anaerobic Filter (AF). 1gCOD in the form of acetic (HAc), propionic (HPr) or butyric acid (HBu) was injected into the AF while operating at an organic loading rate (OLRCOD) of 3.5gL(-1)d(-1). A new method is introduced to separate gas production of the baseload from the product formation of VFA degradation after the injection. The lag phase, fractional rate of gas production and half-life has been determined for the methane production of the three VFAs. The half-lives were in the order HAc

  18. CFD simulation of mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mitsuharu; Goel, Rajeev; Komatsu, Kazuya; Yasui, Hidenari; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Li, Y Y; Noike, Tatsuya

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model incorporating the rheological properties of sludge was developed and applied to quantify mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with experimental tracer response curve. In order to predict the dynamics of mixing, a new parameter, UI (uniformity index) was defined. The visual patterns of tracer mixing in simulation were well reflected in the dynamic variation in the value of UI. The developed model and methods were applied to determine the required time for complete mixing in a full-scale digester at different solid concentrations. This information on mixing time is considered to be useful in optimizing the feeding cycles for better digester performance. PMID:19081247

  19. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  20. Degradation of methyl bromide in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Strohmaler, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) was anaerobically degraded in saltmarsh sediments after reaction with sulfide. The product of this nucleophilic substitution reaction was methanethiol, which underwent further chemical and bacterial reactions to form dimethyl sulfide. These two gases appeared transiently during sediment incubations because they were metabolized by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A second, less significant reaction of MeBr was the exchange with chloride, forming methyl chloride, which was also susceptible to attack by sulfide. Incubation of 14C-labeled methyl iodide as an analogue of MeBr resulted in the formation of 14CH4 and 14CO2 and also indicated that sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens metabolized the methylated sulfur intermediates. These results suggest that exposed sediments with abundant free sulfide, such as coastal salt-marshes, may constitute a sink for atmospheric MeBr.

  1. Anaerobic polymers as high vacuum leak sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic polymers are useful as solventless leak sealants with good vacuum properties at moderate temperatures. Loctite 290 can seal leaks in a range generally encountered in carefully constructed ultrahigh vacuum and high vacuum systems. It was found that small leaks are sealed best under vacuum, whereas large leaks should be sealed at atmospheric pressure. The high-temperature behavior of Loctite 290 is limited by its fast cure, which prevents deep penetration into small leaks; cracking eventually occurs at the entrance to the leak. Repeated thermal cycling to about 300 C is possible, however, provided viscosity, curing time, and leak size are properly matched to ensure penetration into the body of the leak. This may require special formulations for high temperature vacuum applications.

  2. Determining anaerobic degradation kinetics from batch tests.

    PubMed

    Moreda, Iván López

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from a biomethane potential (BMP) test were used in order to obtain the parameters of a kinetic model of solid wastes anaerobic degradation. The proposed model considers a hydrolysis step with a first order kinetic, a Monod kinetic for the soluble organic substrate degradation and a first order decay of microorganisms. The instantaneous release of methane was assumed. The parameters of the model are determined following a direct search optimization procedure. A 'multiple-shooting' technique was used as a first step of the optimization process. The confidence interval of the parameters was determined by using Monte Carlo simulations. Also, the distribution functions of the parameters were determined. Only the hydrolysis first order constant shows a normal distribution. PMID:27191569

  3. Anaerobic bacteraemia: a 10-year retrospective epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Steven; Wybo, Ingrid; Naessens, Anne; Echahidi, Fedoua; Van der Beken, Mieke; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Vermeulen, Stefan; Piérard, Denis

    2016-06-01

    In order to identify current trends in anaerobic bacteraemia, a 10-year retrospective study was performed in the University Hospital Brussel, Belgium. All clinically relevant bacteraemia detected from 2004 until 2013 were included. Medical records were reviewed in an attempt to define clinical parameters that might be associated with the occurrence of anaerobic bacteraemia. 437 of the isolated organisms causing anaerobic bacteraemia were thawed, subcultured and reanalyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). There were an average of 33 cases of anaerobic bacteraemia per year during 2004-2008 compared to an average of 27 cases per year during 2009-2013 (P = 0.017), corresponding to a decrease by 19% between the first and the latter period. Also, the total number of cases of anaerobic bacteraemia per 100,000 patient days decreased from 17.3 in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 13.7 in the period 2009 to 2013 (P = 0.023). Additionally, the mean incidence of anaerobic bacteraemia decreased during the study period (1.27/1000 patients in 2004 vs. 0.94/1000 patients in 2013; P = 0.008). In contrast, the proportion of isolated anaerobic bacteraemia compared to the number of all bacteraemia remained stable at 5%. Bacteroides spp. and Parabacteroides spp. accounted for 47.1% of the anaerobes, followed by 14.4% Clostridium spp., 12.6% non-spore-forming Gram-positive rods, 10.5% anaerobic cocci, 8.2% Prevotella spp. and other Gram-negative rods and 7.1% Fusobacterium spp. The lower gastrointestinal tract (47%) and wound infections (10%) were the two most frequent sources for bacteraemia, with the origin remaining unknown in 62 cases (21%). The overall mortality rate was 14%. Further studies focusing on the antimicrobial susceptibility and demographic background of patients are needed to further objectify the currently observed trends. PMID:26923749

  4. Ureolytic phosphate precipitation from anaerobic effluents.

    PubMed

    Desmidt, E; Verstraete, W; Dick, J; Meesschaert, B D; Carballa, M

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the elimination of phosphate from industrial anaerobic effluents was evaluated at lab-scale. For that purpose, the ureolytic method previously developed for the precipitation of Ca(2 + ) from wastewater as calcite was adapted for the precipitation of phosphate as struvite. In the first part of the study, computer simulations using MAPLE and PHREEQC were performed to model phosphate precipitation from wastewater as struvite. The results obtained showed that relative high concentrations of ammonium and magnesium are needed to precipitate phosphate as struvite. The total molar concentrations ratio of Mg(2 + ):PO(4) (3-)-P:NH(4) (+) required to decrease PO(4) (3-)-P concentrations from 20 to 6 mg PO(4) (3-)-P/l at pH 8.4-8.5 was estimated on 4.6:1:8. In the second part of the study, lab-scale experiments with either synthetic wastewater or the anaerobic effluent from a vegetable processing industry were carried out in batch and continuous mode. Overall, the continuous operation at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.4 h and an added molar concentration [Mg(2 + )]:[PO(4) (3-)-P]:[NH(4) (+)] ratio of 1.6:1:2.3 resulted in a constant pH value in the reactor (around 8.5) and an efficient phosphate removal (>90%) to residual levels of 1-2 mg PO(4) (3-)-P/l. Different operational conditions, such as the initial phosphate concentration, HRT and the use of CaCl(2) or MgO instead of MgCl(2), were analysed and the performance of the reactor was satisfactory under a broad range of them. Yet, overall, optimal results (higher phosphate removal) were obtained with MgCl(2). PMID:19474493

  5. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag(+) under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5mgL(-1), the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100mgL(-1) as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag(+). Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100mgL(-1) as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. PMID:27016684

  6. Determination of operating conditions in an anaerobic acid-phase reactor treating dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Kasapgil, B.; Ince, O.; Anderson, G.K.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic material is a multistep process. Two groups of bacteria, namely acidogenic and methanogenic bacteria, are responsible for the acidification and for the methane formation, respectively. The growth requirements of the two groups of bacteria are rather different. In order to create optimum conditions for the process, it was first proposed to separate the process into two phases. Operating variables applicable for the selection and enrichment of microbial populations in phased digesters include digester loading, hydraulic retention time (HRT), pH, temperature, reactor design, and operating mode. By proper manipulation of these operating parameters it is possible to prevent any significant growth of methane bacteria and at the same time achieve the required level of acidification in the first reactor. Further enrichment of two cultures is possible by biomass recycle around each phase. Since the 1970s, phase separation has been introduced into anaerobic digestion technology. However, data concerning the optimization of operating conditions in both acidogenic and methanogenic phase reactors are scarce. This study was therefore carried out for the purposes given below. These were: (1) to determine the best combination of pH and temperature within the ranges studied for the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater; (2) to determine the maximum acidogenic conversion from COD to VFAs, and (3) to determine the changes in the distribution of major VFAs being produced during the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater.

  7. Microbial Populations Associated with Treatment of an Industrial Dye Effluent in an Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Plumb, Jason J.; Bell, Joanne; Stuckey, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted probes together with construction of an archaeal 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone library was used to characterize the microbial populations of an anaerobic baffled reactor successfully treating industrial dye waste. Wastewater produced during the manufacture of food dyes containing several different azo and other dye compounds was decolorized and degraded under sulfidogenic and methanogenic conditions. Use of molecular methods to describe microbial populations showed that a diverse group of Bacteria and Archaea was involved in this treatment process. FISH enumeration showed that members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria and bacteria in the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides phylum, together with sulfate-reducing bacteria, were prominent members of a mixed bacterial population. A combination of FISH probing and analysis of 98 archaeal 16S rDNA clone inserts revealed that together with the bacterial population, a methanogenic population dominated by Methanosaeta species and containing species of Methanobacterium and Methanospirillum and a relatively unstudied methanogen, Methanomethylovorans hollandica, contributed to successful anaerobic treatment of the industrial waste. We suggest that sulfate reducers, or more accurately sulfidogenic bacteria, together with M. hollandica contribute considerably to the treatment process through metabolism of dye-associated sulfonate groups and subsequent conversion of sulfur compounds to carbon dioxide and methane. PMID:11425746

  8. Chemical characterization and anaerobic biodegradability of hydrothermal liquefaction aqueous products from mixed-culture wastewater algae.

    PubMed

    Tommaso, Giovana; Chen, Wan-Ting; Li, Peng; Schideman, Lance; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the chemical characteristics and the anaerobic degradability of the aqueous product from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL-ap) from the conversion of mixed-culture algal biomass grown in a wastewater treatment system. The effects of the HTL reaction times from 0 to 1.5 h, and reaction temperatures from 260 °C to 320 °C on the anaerobic degradability of the HTL-ap were quantified using biomethane potential assays. Comparing chemical oxygen demand data for HTL-ap from different operating conditions, indicated that organic matter may partition from organic phase to aqueous phase at 320 °C. Moderate lag phase and the highest cumulative methane production were observed when HTL-ap was obtained at 320 °C. The longest lag phase and the smallest production rate were observed in the process fed with HTL-ap obtained at 300 °C. Nevertheless, after overcoming adaptation issues, this HTL-ap led to the second highest accumulated specific methane production. Acetogenesis was identified as a possible rate-limiting pathway. PMID:25455086

  9. Increased Gut Redox and Depletion of Anaerobic and Methanogenic Prokaryotes in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Million, Matthieu; Tidjani Alou, Maryam; Khelaifia, Saber; Bachar, Dipankar; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Dione, Niokhor; Brah, Souleymane; Hugon, Perrine; Lombard, Vincent; Armougom, Fabrice; Fromonot, Julien; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Fabre, Alexandre; Guieu, Régis; Sokhna, Cheikh; Henrissat, Bernard; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with inadequate diet, low levels of plasma antioxidants and gut microbiota alterations. The link between gut redox and microbial alterations, however, remains unexplored. By sequencing the gut microbiomes of 79 children of varying nutritional status from three centers in Senegal and Niger, we found a dramatic depletion of obligate anaerobes in malnutrition. This was confirmed in an individual patient data meta-analysis including 107 cases and 77 controls from 5 different African and Asian countries. Specifically, several species of the Bacteroidaceae, Eubacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococceae families were consistently depleted while Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistently enriched. Further analyses on our samples revealed increased fecal redox potential, decreased total bacterial number and dramatic Methanobrevibacter smithii depletion. Indeed, M. smithii was detected in more than half of the controls but in none of the cases. No causality was demonstrated but, based on our results, we propose a unifying theory linking microbiota specificity, lacking anaerobes and archaea, to low antioxidant nutrients, and lower food conversion. PMID:27183876

  10. Increased Gut Redox and Depletion of Anaerobic and Methanogenic Prokaryotes in Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Million, Matthieu; Tidjani Alou, Maryam; Khelaifia, Saber; Bachar, Dipankar; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Dione, Niokhor; Brah, Souleymane; Hugon, Perrine; Lombard, Vincent; Armougom, Fabrice; Fromonot, Julien; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Fabre, Alexandre; Guieu, Régis; Sokhna, Cheikh; Henrissat, Bernard; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with inadequate diet, low levels of plasma antioxidants and gut microbiota alterations. The link between gut redox and microbial alterations, however, remains unexplored. By sequencing the gut microbiomes of 79 children of varying nutritional status from three centers in Senegal and Niger, we found a dramatic depletion of obligate anaerobes in malnutrition. This was confirmed in an individual patient data meta-analysis including 107 cases and 77 controls from 5 different African and Asian countries. Specifically, several species of the Bacteroidaceae, Eubacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococceae families were consistently depleted while Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistently enriched. Further analyses on our samples revealed increased fecal redox potential, decreased total bacterial number and dramatic Methanobrevibacter smithii depletion. Indeed, M. smithii was detected in more than half of the controls but in none of the cases. No causality was demonstrated but, based on our results, we propose a unifying theory linking microbiota specificity, lacking anaerobes and archaea, to low antioxidant nutrients, and lower food conversion. PMID:27183876

  11. Continuous detoxification, transformation, and degradation of nitrophenols in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, B.A.; Razo-Flores, E.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    1996-08-20

    The anaerobic transformation and degradation of nitrophenols by granular sludge was investigated in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors continuously fed with a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixture as the primary substrate. During the start-up, subtoxic concentrations of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP), 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), and 2, 4-dinitrophenol (2, 4-DNP) were utilized. 4-NP and 2, 4-DNP were readily converted to the corresponding aromatic amine; whereas 2-NP was converted to nonaromatic products via intermediate formation of 2-aminophenol (2-AP). These conversions led to a dramatic detoxification of the mononitrophenols because the reactors treated the nitrophenolics at the concentrations which were over 25 times higher than those that caused severe inhibition. VFA removal efficiencies greater than 99% were achieved in both reactors at loading rates greater than 11.4 g COD per liter of reactor volume per day even at volumetric loading of mononitrophenols up to 910 mg/L {center_dot} d. The sludges obtained from each of the reactors at the end of the continuous experiments were assayed for their specific nitrophenol reducing activity in the presence of different primary substrates. Reduction rates of 45 and 26 mg/g volatile suspended solids per day were observed for 2-NP and 4-NP, respectively, when utilizing the VFA mixture as primary substrate.

  12. Geographic differences in digoxin inactivation, a metabolic activity of the human anaerobic gut flora.

    PubMed Central

    Mathan, V I; Wiederman, J; Dobkin, J F; Lindenbaum, J

    1989-01-01

    The inactivation of digoxin by conversion to reduced metabolites (digoxin reduction products, or DRP), a function of the anaerobic gut flora, was studied in normal volunteers from southern India and the United States. Digoxin was metabolised to DRP by 28 (13.7%) of 204 healthy south Indians in contrast to 67 (36.0%) of 186 New Yorkers (p less than 1 X 10(-6)). Only 1.0% of Indians compared with 14.0% of Americans excreted large amounts of metabolites (greater than 40% DRP) in the urine (p less than 1 X 10(-5)). Of 104 urban Indians, 23 (22.1%) were metabolisers, in contrast with five of 100 rural villagers (p less than 0.001). Within the urban group, digoxin metabolism correlated with education, frequency of animal protein intake, and most significantly, personal income. Organisms capable of reducing digoxin in vitro were found with similar frequencies in stool cultures from Indians and Americans. In the cultures of some subjects, DRP production was inhibited at lower dilutions but expressed at higher dilutions. We conclude that variations in drug metabolism between population groups may result from differences in the metabolic activity of the anaerobic gut flora probably mediated by environmentally determined factors. PMID:2759492

  13. Energy recovery from the effluent of plants anaerobically digesting urban solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-03-01

    The parameters of concentration, time, temperature, and pH to find optimum conditions for enzymatically converting unreacted cellulose in the effluent of an anaerobic digester to glucose for ultimate conversion to methane, and then to project the economics to a 100 tons per day plant was studied. The amount of cellulose hydrolysis for enzyme concentrations from 5 to 1000 CIU/gram of substrate using either filter paper or anaerobically digested municipal solid waste (MSW) reacted over periods of time of from 0 to 72 hours is illustrated. The feasibility of recycling enzymes by ultrafilter capture was studied and it is shown that the recovered enzyme is not denatured by any of several possible enzyme loss mechanisms chemical, physical, or biological. Although rather stable enzyme substrate complexes seem to be formed, various techniques permit a 55% enzyme recovery. Posttreatment of digested MSW by cellulase enzymes produces nearly a threefold increase in biomethanation. The value of the additional methane produced in the process is not sufficient to support the cost of enzymes.

  14. A new method of two-phase anaerobic digestion for fruit and vegetable waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Xiaoji; Ma, Hailing; Wu, Jing; Zuo, Jiane; Wang, Kaijun

    2016-07-01

    A novel method of two-phase anaerobic digestion where the acid reactor is operated at low pH 4.0 was proposed and investigated. A completely stirred tank acid reactor and an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed methane reactor were operated to examine the possibility of efficient degradation of lactate and to identify their optimal operating conditions. Lactate with an average concentration of 14.8g/L was the dominant fermentative product and Lactobacillus was the predominant microorganism in the acid reactor. The effluent from the acid reactor was efficiently degraded in the methane reactor and the average methane yield was 261.4ml/gCOD removed. Organisms of Methanosaeta were the predominant methanogen in granular sludge of methane reactor, however, after acclimation hydrogenotrophic methanogens enriched, which benefited for the conversion of lactate to acetate. The two-phase AD system exhibited a low hydraulic retention time of 3.56days and high methane yield of 348.5ml/g VS removed. PMID:26995617

  15. Comparative evaluation of anaerobic digestion for sewage sludge and various organic wastes with simple modeling.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Taira; Wang, Feng; Tsumori, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and other organic wastes, such as kitchen garbage, food waste, and agricultural waste, at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a promising method for both energy and material recovery. Substrate characteristics and the anaerobic digestion performance of sewage sludge and various organic wastes were compared using experiments and modeling. Co-digestion improved the value of digested sewage sludge as a fertilizer. The relationship between total and soluble elemental concentrations was correlated with the periodic table: most Na and K (alkali metals) were soluble, and around 20-40% of Mg and around 10-20% of Ca (alkaline earth metals) were soluble. The ratio of biodegradable chemical oxygen demand of organic wastes was 65-90%. The methane conversion ratio and methane production rate under mesophilic conditions were evaluated using a simplified mathematical model. There was reasonably close agreement between the model simulations and the experimental results in terms of methane production and nitrogen concentration. These results provide valuable information and indicate that the model can be used as a pre-evaluation tool to facilitate the introduction of co-digestion at WWTPs. PMID:26031329

  16. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 10, Appendix H: Anaerobic digestion of MSW

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    While municipal solid waste (MSW) thermoconversion and recycling technologies have been described in Appendices A through E, this appendix addresses the role of bioconversion technologies in handling the organic fraction in MSW and sewage sludge. Much of the organic matter in MSW, consisting mainly of paper, food waste, and yard waste, has potential for conversion, along with sewage sludge, through biochemical processes to methane and carbon dioxide providing a measurable, renewable energy resource potential. The gas produced may be treated for removal of carbon dioxide and water, leaving pipeline quality gas. The process also has the potential for producing a stabilized solid product that may be suitable as a fuel for combustion or used as a compost fertilizer. Anaerobic digestion can occur naturally in an uncontrolled environment such as a landfill, or it can occur in a controlled environment such as a confined vessel. Landfill gas production is discussed in Appendix F. This appendix provides information on the anaerobic digestion process as it has been applied to produce methane from the organic fraction of MSW in enclosed, controlled reactors.

  17. Performance evaluation of the sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor system for municipal sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Ohtsuki, Kota; Maharjan, Namita; Ono, Shinya; Dehama, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system, combined with an anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor (A2SBR), has been used for municipal sewage treatment for over 2 years. The present system achieved a removal rate of 95±14% for BOD, 74±22% for total nitrogen, and 78±25% for total phosphorus, including low water temperature conditions. Sludge conversion rates during the operational period were 0.016 and 0.218 g-VSS g-COD-removed(-1) for the UASB, and DHS, respectively, which are similar to a conventional UASB-DHS system, which is not used of sulfur-redox-reaction, for sewage treatment. Using the sulfur-redox reaction made advanced treatment of municipal wastewater with minimal sludge generation possible, even in winter. Furthermore, the occurrence of a unique phenomenon, known as the anaerobic sulfur oxidation reaction, was confirmed in the UASB reactor under the winter season. PMID:26773951

  18. Clostridium difficile: the anaerobe that made the grade.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Jon S

    2012-04-01

    Unlike other anaerobic bacteria of clinical importance, Clostridium difficile has managed to enter into the realm of public awareness. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous "superbug" responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This report picks out key moments, particularly in the UK, which tracked the rise in both the public and political awareness of this organism. PMID:22293217

  19. Neural fuzzy modeling of anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.H.; Zhang, X.

    1999-12-01

    Anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems are difficult to model because their performance is complex and varies significantly with different reactor configurations, influent characteristics, and operational conditions. Instead of conventional kinetic modeling, advanced neural fuzzy technology was employed to develop a conceptual adaptive model for anaerobic treatment systems. The conceptual neural fuzzy model contains the robustness of fuzzy systems, the learning ability of neural networks, and can adapt to various situations. The conceptual model was used to simulate the daily performance of two high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment systems with satisfactory results obtained.

  20. [Methanogenic destruction of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, Iu V; D'iakonova, A T; Gladchenko, M A; Kaliuzhnyĭ, S A; Kotova, I B; Stams, A; Netrusov, A I

    2011-01-01

    Destruction of a number of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols gradually transforming into benzoate. It was shown that isolated microbial communities are capable of converting the initial substrates--benzyl alcohol, benzoate, salicylic acid, and golden yellow azo dye--into biogas without a lag-phase but with different velocities. Aromatic and linear intermediates of biodestruction of aromatic amines by obtained enrichment cultures were determined for the first time. Selective effect of aromatic substrates on a microbial community that was expressed in decrease in diversity and gradual change of dominant morphotypes was revealed. PMID:22232897

  1. Energy and CO2 balance of maize and grass as energy crops for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Gerin, Patrick A; Vliegen, François; Jossart, Jean-Marc

    2008-05-01

    Energy crops can be used to feed anaerobic digesters and produce renewable energy. However, sustainability of this option requires that it contributes to a net production of renewable energy and a net reduction of fossil CO2 emission. In this paper, the net balance of CO2 emission and renewable energy production is assessed for maize and grass energy crops produced in several agricultural systems relevant for Southern Belgium and surrounding areas. The calculated net energy yields are 8-25 (maize) and 7.4-15.5 (grass) MWh of renewable CH4 per MWh of fossil energy invested, depending on the agricultural option considered. After conversion to electricity, the specific CO2 emissions range from 31 to 104 kg(CO2)MWhelectricity(-1), depending on the case considered. This corresponds to a significant reduction in CO2 emissions compared to the current reference gas-steam turbine technology which produces 456 kg(CO2)MWhelectricity(-1). PMID:17574409

  2. Effect of leachate recirculation on mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-03-01

    The effects of using untreated leachate for supplemental water addition and liquid recirculation on anaerobic digestion of food waste was evaluated by combining cyclic water recycle operations with batch mesophilic biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays. Cyclic BMP assays indicated that using an appropriate fraction of recycled leachate and fresh make up water can stimulate methanogenic activity and enhance biogas production. Conversely increasing the percentage of recycled leachate in the make up water eventually causes methanogenic inhibition and decrease in the rate of food waste stabilization. The decrease in activity is exacerbated as the number cycles increases. Inhibition is possibly attributed to accumulation and elevated concentrations of ammonia as well as other waste by products in the recycled leachate that inhibit methanogenesis. PMID:22088957

  3. TREATMENT OF METHANOLIC WASTEWATER BY ANAEROBIC DOWN-FLOW HANGING SPONGE (ANDHS) REACTOR AND UASB REACTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumino, Haruhiko; Wada, Keiji; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    Anaerobic down-flow hanging sponge (AnDHS) reactor and UASB reactor were operated at 30℃ for over 400 days in order to investigate the process performance and the sludge characteristics of treating methanolic wastewater (2 gCOD/L). The settings OLR of AnDHS reactor and of UASB reactor were 5.0 -10.0 kgCOD/m3/d and 5.0 kgCOD/m3/d. The average of the COD removal demonstrated by both reactors were over 90% throughout the experiment. From the results of methane producing activities and the PCR-DGGE method, most methanol was directly converted to methane in both reactors. The conversion was carried out by different methanogens: one closely related to Methanomethylovorans hollandica in the AnDHS retainted sludge and the other closely related to Methanosarcinaceae and Metanosarciales in the UASB retainted sludge.

  4. Life Cycle Assessment of high ligno-cellulosic biomass pyrolysis coupled with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Righi, Serena; Bandini, Vittoria; Marazza, Diego; Baioli, Filippo; Torri, Cristian; Contin, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    A Life Cycle Assessment is conducted on pyrolysis coupled to anaerobic digestion to treat corn stovers and to obtain bioenergy and biochar. The analysis takes into account the feedstock treatment process, the fate of products and the indirect effects due to crop residue removal. The biochar is considered to be used as solid fuel for coal power plants or as soil conditioner. All results are compared with a corresponding fossil-fuel-based scenario. It is shown that the proposed system always enables relevant primary energy savings of non-renewable sources and a strong reduction of greenhouse gases emissions without worsening the abiotic resources depletion. Conversely, the study points out that the use of corn stovers for mulch is critical when considering acidification and eutrophication impacts. Therefore, removal of corn stovers from the fields must be planned carefully. PMID:27107341

  5. Substrate milling pretreatment as a key parameter for Solid-State Anaerobic Digestion optimization.

    PubMed

    Motte, J-C; Escudié, R; Hamelin, J; Steyer, J-P; Bernet, N; Delgenes, J-P; Dumas, C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of milling pretreatment on performances of Solid-State Anaerobic Digestion (SS-AD) of raw lignocellulosic residue is still controverted. Three batch reactors treating different straw particle sizes (milled 0.25 mm, 1 mm and 10 mm) were followed during 62 days (6 sampling dates). Although a fine milling improves substrate accessibility and conversion rate (up to 30% compared to coarse milling), it also increases the risk of media acidification because of rapid and high acids production during fermentation of the substrate soluble fraction. Meanwhile, a gradual adaptation of microbial communities, were observed according to both reaction progress and methanogenic performances. The study concluded that particle size reduction affected strongly the performances of the reaction due to an increase of substrate bioaccessibility. An optimization of SS-AD processes thanks to particle size reduction could therefore be applied at farm or industrial scale only if a specific management of the soluble compounds is established. PMID:25305647

  6. Diversity Profile of Microbes Associated with Anaerobic Sulfur Oxidation in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor Treating Municipal Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Azrina A.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein analyzed the diversity of microbes involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor used for treating municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. Anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors; however, reactor performance parameters demonstrated that anaerobic conditions were maintained. In order to gain insights into the underlying basis of anaerobic sulfur oxidation, the microbial diversity that exists in the UASB sludge was analyzed comprehensively to determine their identities and contribution to sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples were collected from the UASB reactor over a period of 2 years and used for bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing analyses. T-RFLP and sequencing results both showed that microbial community patterns changed markedly from day 537 onwards. Bacteria belonging to the genus Desulforhabdus within the phylum Proteobacteria and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Fusobacteria were the main groups observed during the period of anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Their abundance correlated with temperature, suggesting that these bacterial groups played roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors. PMID:25817585

  7. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium. PMID:26717697

  8. Microbial and Physicochemical Characteristics of Compact Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Granules in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Hu, Bao-Lan; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Kartal, Boran; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Jetten, Mike; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a promising new process to treat high-strength nitrogenous wastewater. Due to the low growth rate of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, efficient biomass retention is essential for reactor operation. Therefore, we studied the settling ability and community composition of the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules, which were cultivated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor seeded with aerobic granules. With this seed, the start-up period was less than 160 days at a NH4+-N removal efficiency of 94% and a loading rate of 0.064 kg N per kg volatile suspended solids per day. The formed granules were bright red and had a high settling velocity (41 to 79 m h−1). Cells and extracellular polymeric substances were evenly distributed over the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing granules. The high percentage of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules could be visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA genes of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the granules were determined to be 4.6 × 108 copies ml−1. The results of this study could be used for a better design, shorter start-up time, and more stable operation of anammox systems for the treatment of nitrogen-rich wastewaters. PMID:20190088

  9. Conversion of (Meth)acrylic acids to methane granular sludge: Initiation by specific anerobic microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Shtarkman, N.B.; Obraztova, A.Y.; Laurinavichyus, K.S.; Galushko, A.S.; Akimenko, V.K.

    1995-03-01

    The role of a specific anaerobic microflora in the initiation of degradation of (meth)acrylic acids to methane by granular sludge from a UASB reactor was investigated. Associations of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the anaerobic sludge, which was used for a long time for treatment of wastewater from (meth)acrylate production, were able to realize the initial stage of (meth)acrylic acid decomposition, i.e., a conversion of acrylic and methacrylic acids to propionic and isobutyric acids, respectively. When added to granules, these association played a role of an {open_quotes}initiator{close_quotes} of the degradation process, which was then continued by the granular sludge microflora utilizing propionate and isobutyrate. Some characteristics of the granules adapted to propionate or isobutyrate are presented. The rates of propionate and isobutyrate consumption by adapted granules is, respectively, 21 and 53 times higher than the values obtained for nonadapted granules. A combined use of {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria and adapted granules provided degradation of (meth)acrylic acids with a maximum methane yield. The possibility is discussed of employing the granules, which are adapted to short-chain fatty acids, and the {open_quotes}initiating{close_quotes} bacteria, which accomplish the initial steps of the organic material decomposition to lower fatty acids, for the conversion of various chemical compounds to methane. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Laser plasmadynamic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of electrons ions by interacting an intense laser beam with cesium vapor is considered. Theoretical calculation shows that the conversion efficiency is as high as 40 percent if the entire photon energy is utilized in ionizing the cesium vapor that is generated initially by the incoming laser beam. An output voltage is expected to be generated across two electrodes, one of which is the liquid cesium, by keeping the other electrode at a different work function. Evaluation of the laser plasmadynamic (LPD) converter was performed using pulsed ruby and Nd-glass lasers. Although the results obtained to date indicate an efficiency smaller than that of theoretical predictions, an unoptimized LPD converter did demonstrate the capability of converting laser energy at large power levels. The limitations in the performance may by due to converter geometry, the types of lasers used, and other limitations inherent to the cesium plasma.

  11. Optomechanical down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeblacher, Simon; Hofer, Sebastian; Wieczorek, Witlef; Vanner, Michael; Hammerer, Klemens; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    One of the central interactions in quantum optics is two-mode squeezing, also known as down-conversion. It has been used in a multitude of pioneering experiments to demonstrate non-classical states of light and it is at the heart of generating quantum entanglement in optical fields. Here we demonstrate first experimental results towards the optomechanical analogue, in which an optical and a mechanical mode interact via a two-mode squeezing operation. In addition, we make use of the fact that large optomechanical coupling strengths provide access to an interaction regime beyond the rotating wave approximation. This allows for simultaneous cooling of the mechanical mode, which will eventually enable the preparation of pure initial mechanical states and is hence an important precondition to achieve the envisioned optomechanical entanglement.

  12. Gyroharmonic conversion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J. L.; LaPointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.

    1999-05-07

    Generation of high power microwaves has been observed in experiments where a 250-350 kV, 20-30 A electron beam accelerated in a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) passes through a cavity tuned gyroharmonic) and at 8.6 GHz (3rd harmonic) will be described. Theory indicates that high conversion efficiency can be obtained for a high quality beam injected into CARA, and when mode competition can be controlled. Comparisons will be made between the experiments and theory. Planned 7th harmonic experiments will also be described, in which phase matching between the TE-72 mode at 20 GHz, and the TE-11 mode at 2.86 GHz, allows efficient 20 GHz co-generation within the CARA waveguide itself.

  13. Gyroharmonic conversion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.; Ganguly, A.K.; LaPointe, M.A.

    1999-05-01

    Generation of high power microwaves has been observed in experiments where a 250{endash}350 kV, 20{endash}30 A electron beam accelerated in a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) passes through a cavity tuned gyroharmonic) and at 8.6 GHz (3rd harmonic) will be described. Theory indicates that high conversion efficiency can be obtained for a high quality beam injected into CARA, and when mode competition can be controlled. Comparisons will be made between the experiments and theory. Planned 7th harmonic experiments will also be described, in which phase matching between the TE-72 mode at 20 GHz, and the TE-11 mode at 2.86 GHz, allows efficient 20 GHz co-generation within the CARA waveguide itself. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Automated FORTRAN conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    The most pratical solution to the conversion of FORTRAN to other programming languages which STO and a few others have adopted, uses an intermediate language that is easy to translate FORTRAN into, and allows for source codes in other languages to be generated automatically. The intermediate language is the union of all other programming languages (and the trick is to create a useful union) with some extensions that reflect the nature of the algorithms. The benefits of this approach are many. First the original FORTRAN program has to be rewritten only once, and then only parts of the program: most FORTRAN code passes through without and change (i.e., assignment and simple IF statements). Software tools are provided to ease this initial translation. Once in the intermediate language, the algorithm can then be obtained in any other language automatically. An example of a subroutine from the Rispack library in ten different languages is given.

  15. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of selected Italian agricultural and industrial residues (grape seeds and leather dust): combined methane production and digestate characterization.

    PubMed

    Caramiello, C; Lancellotti, I; Righi, F; Tatàno, F; Taurino, R; Barbieri, L

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental evaluation of methane production (obtained by anaerobic digestion) and detailed digestate characterization (with physical-chemical, thermo-gravimetric and mineralogical approaches) was conducted on two organic substrates, which are specific to Italy (at regional and national levels). One of the substrates was grape seeds, which have an agricultural origin, whereas the other substrate was vegetable-tanned leather dust, which has an industrial origin. Under the assumed experimental conditions of the performed lab-scale test series, the grape seed substrate exhibited a resulting net methane production of 175.0 NmL g volatile solids (VS)(-1); hence, it can be considered as a potential energy source via anaerobic digestion. Conversely, the net methane production obtained from the anaerobic digestion of the vegetable-tanned leather dust substrate was limited to 16.1 NmL gVS(-1). A detailed characterization of the obtained digestates showed that there were both nitrogen-containing compounds and complex organic compounds present in the digestate that was obtained from the mixture of leather dust and inoculum. As a general perspective of this experimental study, the application of diversified characterization analyzes could facilitate (1) a better understanding of the main properties of the obtained digestates to evaluate their potential valorization, and (2) a combination of the digestate characteristics with the corresponding methane productions to comprehensively evaluate the bioconversion process. PMID:24191456

  17. Start-up and operation strategies on the liquefied food waste anaerobic digestion and a full-scale case application.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shen, Fei; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Liu, Yanping; Zhu, Baoning; Chufo, Akiber; Jaffar, Muhammad; Li, Xiujin

    2014-11-01

    Batch anaerobic digestion was employed to investigate the efficient start-up strategies for the liquefied food waste, and sequencing batch digestion was also performed to determine maximum influent organic loading rate (OLR) for efficient and stable operation. The results indicated that the start-up could be well improved using appropriate wastewater organic load and food-to-microorganism ratios (F/M). When digestion was initialized at low chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 20.0 gCOD L(-1), the start-up would go well using lower F/M ratio of 0.5-0.7. The OLR 7.0 gCOD L(-1) day(-1) was recommended for operating the ASBR digestion, in which the COD conversion of 96.7 ± 0.53% and biomethane yield of 3.5 ± 0.2 L gCOD(-1) were achieved, respectively. The instability would occur when OLR was higher than 7.0 gCOD L(-1) day(-1), and this instability was not recoverable. Lipid was suggested to be removed before anaerobic digestion. The anaerobic digestion process in engineering project ran well, and good performance was achieved when the start-up and operational strategies from laboratory study were applied. For case application, stable digestion performance was achieved in a digester (850 m(3) volume) with biogas production of 1.0-3.8 m(3) m(-3) day(-1). PMID:24861312

  18. Reducing waste contamination from animal-processing plants by anaerobic thermophilic fermentation and by flesh fly digestion.

    PubMed

    Marchaim, U; Gelman, A; Braverman, Y

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no market in Israel for the large amounts of waste from fish- and poultry-processing plants. Therefore, this waste is incinerated, as part of the measures to prevent the spread of pathogens. Anaerobic methanogenic thermophilic fermentation (AMTF) of wastes from the cattle-slaughtering industry was examined previously, as an effective system to treat pathogenic bacteria, and in this article, we discuss a combined method of digestion by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria and by flesh flies, as a means of waste treatment. The AMTF process was applied to the wastes on a laboratory scale, and digestion by rearing of flesh fly (Phaenicia sericata) and housefly (Musca domestica) larvae on the untreated raw material was done on a small scale and showed remarkable weight conversion to larvae. The yield from degradation of poultry waste by flesh fly was 22.47% (SD = 3.89) and that from fish waste degradation was 35.34% (SD = 12.42), which is significantly higher than that from rearing houseflies on a regular rearing medium. Bacterial contents before and after thermophilic anaerobic digestion, as well as the changes in the chemical composition of the components during the rearing of larvae, were also examined. PMID:12794287

  19. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. PMID:23941705

  20. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  1. Mathematical modeling of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor has been widely applied for domestic wastewater treatment in many developing countries, there is no sufficient mathematical model for proper design and operation of the reactor. An empirical model based on non-linear regression was developed to represent the physical and chemical removal of suspended solids (SS) in the reactor. Moreover, a simplified dynamic model based on ADM1 and the empirical model for SS removal was developed for anaerobic digestion of the entrapped SS and dissolved matter in the wastewater. The empirical model showed that effluent suspended chemical oxygen demand (COD(ss)) concentration is directly proportional to the influent COD(ss) concentration and inversely proportional to both the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor and wastewater temperature. For obtaining sufficient COD(ss) removal, the HRT of the UASB reactor must be higher than 4 h, and higher HRT than 12 h slightly improved COD(ss) removal. The dynamic model results showed that the required time for filling the reactor with sludge mainly depends on influent total chemical oxygen demand (COD(t)) concentration and HRT. The influent COD(t) concentration, HRT and temperature play a crucial role on the performance of the reactor. The results indicated that shorter HRT is needed for optimization of COD(t) removal, as compared with optimization of COD(t) conversion to methane. Based on the model results, the design HRT of the UASB reactor should be selected based on the optimization of wastewater conversion and minimization of biodegradable SS accumulation in the sludge bed, not only based on COD removal, to guarantee a stable reactor performance. PMID:23128617

  2. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor

    PubMed Central

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Khelifi, Eltaief; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published. PMID:26887229

  3. Nitrification and denitrification gene abundances in swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although anaerobic lagoons are used globally for livestock waste treatment, their detailed microbial cycling of nitrogen is only beginning to become understood. Within this cycling, nitrification can be performed by organisms which produce the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). For denitrification,...

  4. Culturing and Maintaining Clostridium difficile in an Anaerobic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Suárez, Jose M.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, sporogenic bacterium that is primarily responsible for antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and is a significant nosocomial pathogen. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to isolate and cultivate and is extremely sensitive to even low levels of oxygen in the environment. Here, methods for isolating C. difficile from fecal samples and subsequently culturing C. difficile for preparation of glycerol stocks for long-term storage are presented. Techniques for preparing and enumerating spore stocks in the laboratory for a variety of downstream applications including microscopy and animal studies are also described. These techniques necessitate an anaerobic chamber, which maintains a consistent anaerobic environment to ensure proper conditions for optimal C. difficile growth. We provide protocols for transferring materials in and out of the chamber without causing significant oxygen contamination along with suggestions for regular maintenance required to sustain the appropriate anaerobic environment for efficient and consistent C. difficile cultivation. PMID:24084491

  5. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  6. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  7. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Khelifi, Eltaief; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published. PMID:26887229

  8. Biodegradability of activated sludge organics under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A; Sötemann, S W; Wentzel, M C

    2007-01-01

    From an experimental and theoretical investigation of the continuity of activated sludge organic (COD) compounds along the link between the fully aerobic or N removal activated sludge and anaerobic digestion unit operations, it was found that the unbiodegradable particulate organics (i) originating from the influent wastewater and (ii) generated by the activated sludge endogenous process, as determined from response of the activated sludge system, are also unbiodegradable under anaerobic digestion conditions. This means that the activated sludge biodegradable organics that can be anaerobically digested can be calculated from the active fraction of the waste activated sludge based on the widely accepted ordinary heterotrophic organism (OHO) endogenous respiration/death regeneration rates and unbiodegradable fraction. This research shows that the mass balances based steady state and dynamic simulation activated sludge, aerobic digestion and anaerobic digestion models provide internally consistent and externally compatible elements that can be coupled to produce plant wide steady state and dynamic simulation WWTP models. PMID:17045327

  9. Investigation of Anaerobic Herbicide Degradation in Agricultural Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic microbial pesticide degradation has received little attention, particularly in agricultural soils that receive routine inputs of halogenated herbicides. Seasonal rainfall in many regions can produce zones of periodic anaerobiosis in soil. Redox gradients within soil aggregates can also for...

  10. THIAMINE AND NICOTINIC ACID: ANAEROBIC GROWTH FACTORS FOR MUCOR ROUXII

    PubMed Central

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S.; Nickerson, Walter J.

    1961-01-01

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S. (Rutgers, the State University, New Brunswick, N. J.), and Walter J. Nickerson. Thiamine and nicotinic acid: Anaerobic growth factors for Mucor rouxii. J. Bacteriol. 82:142–148. 1961.—Mucor rouxii requires preformed thiamine and nicotinic acid for anaerobic growth. Such requirements are not manifested during aerobic incubation. Aerobically, the fungus was shown to be able to synthesize both vitamins. The yeastlike form and the filamentous form of anaerobically grown M. rouxii exhibit the same vitamin requirements. Thiamine can be substituted by its thiazole moiety. Under certain conditions, nicotinic acid was partly substituted by tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Anaerobically. the fungus (thiamine requiring) was about ten times more susceptible to pyrithiamine antagonism than the same organism grown aerobically (thiamine independent). PMID:16561911

  11. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  12. Characteristics, process parameters, and inner components of anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  13. Comparison of microbial activity in anaerobic and microaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Jenicek, P; Celis, C A; Koubova, J; Pokorna, D

    2011-01-01

    Microaerobic alternative of anaerobic digestion offers many advantages especially when sulfide concentration in the digester is high. For better understanding of the microaerobic technology more detailed characterization of biomass activity is needed. Two equal digesters were operated under the same condition except of microaeration in one of them. During long term operation of anaerobic and microaerobic digesters the sludge quality and the biomass activity was monitored. The activity of sulfide oxidizing bacteria of microaerobic biomass was significantly higher in comparison with anaerobic biomass. The activity of sulfate reducing bacteria was comparable. The activity of methanogenic bacteria activity depended on sulfide concentration more than on microaeration. The extent of foaming problems was lower in the microaerobic than in the anaerobic digester. PMID:21977645

  14. Bioenergy from stillage anaerobic digestion to enhance the energy balance ratio of ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Garcia, Marcelo Loureiro

    2015-10-01

    The challenges associated with the availability of fossil fuels in the past decades intensified the search for alternative energy sources, based on an ever-increasing demand for energy. In this context, the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) as a core treatment technology in industrial plants should be highlighted, since this process combines the pollution control of wastewaters and the generation of bioenergy, based on the conversion of the organic fraction to biogas, a methane-rich gaseous mixture that may supply the energetic demands in industrial plants. In this context, this work aimed at assessing the energetic potential of AD applied to the treatment of stillage, the main wastewater from ethanol production, in an attempt to highlight the improvements in the energy balance ratio of ethanol by inserting the heating value of methane as a bioenergy source. At least 5-15% of the global energy consumption in the ethanol industry could be supplied by the energetic potential of stillage, regardless the feedstock (i.e. sugarcane, corn or cassava). The association between bagasse combustion and stillage anaerobic digestion in sugarcane-based distilleries could provide a bioenergy surplus of at least 130% of the total fossil fuel input into the ethanol plant, considering only the energy from methane. In terms of financial aspects, the economic gains could reach US$ 0.1901 and US$ 0.0512 per liter of produced ethanol, respectively for molasses- (Brazil) and corn-based (EUA) production chains. For large-scale (∼1000 m(3)EtOH per day) Brazilian molasses-based plants, an annual economic gain of up to US$ 70 million could be observed. Considering the association between anaerobic and aerobic digestion, for the scenarios analyzed, at least 25% of the energetic potential of stillage would be required to supply the energy consumption with aeration, however, more suitable effluents for agricultural application could be produced. The main conclusion from this work

  15. ANAEROBIC SOIL DISINFESTATION IN MICROCOSMS OF TWO SANDY SOILS.

    PubMed

    Stremińska, M A; Runia, W T; Termorshuizen, A J; Feil, H; Van Der Wurff, A W G

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) has been proposed as an alternative control method of soil-borne plant pathogens. It involves adding a labile carbon source, irrigating the soil to stimulate decomposition of organic material and then covering the soil with air-tight plastic to limit gas exchange. During the ASD process, soil microorganisms switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. As a result, by-products of anaerobic metabolism are released into the soil environment such as various organic acids and gases. These by-products are reported to have a negative effect on survival of soil-borne plant pathogens. However, the efficacy of ASD to reduce soil-borne pathogens in practice may vary significantly. Therefore, we studied the efficacy of the ASD process in two different soils. In addition, it was investigated whether a pre-treatment with an anaerobic bacterial inoculum prior to ASD affected the efficacy of the process. Two sandy soils (dune sand and glacial sand) were inoculated in 2 L soil microcosms. We tested the efficacy of ASD treatment against the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. For each soil, three treatments were used: control treatment (no Herbie addition, aerobic incubation), ASD 1 (organic substrate addition, anaerobic incubation) and ASD 2 (organic substrate and anaerobic bacterial inoculum addition, anaerobic incubation). Soil microcosms were incubated in the dark at 20°C for two weeks. We observed that anaerobic soil disinfestation treatments were highly effective against Potato Cyst Nematode (PCN), with pathogen being eradicated totally in all but one ASD treatment (glacial sand ASD2) within two weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes (spore-forming bacteria, often fermentative) in total bacteria increased significantly in ASD treated soils. Numbers of these bacteria correlated positively with increased concentrations of acetic and butyric acids in soil water phase in ASD treatments. PMID:26084078

  16. Validity and reliability of the Hawaii anaerobic run test.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Iris F; Stickley, Christopher D; Lentz, Melissa A; Wages, Jennifer J; Yanagi, Kazuhiko; Hetzler, Ronald K

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the Hawaii anaerobic run test (HART) by comparing anaerobic capacity measures obtained to those during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Ninety-six healthy physically active volunteers (age, 22.0 ± 2.8 years; height, 163.9 ± 9.5 cm; body mass, 70.6 ± 14.7 kg; body fat %, 19.29 ± 5.39%) participated in this study. Each participant performed 2 anaerobic capacity tests: the WAnT and the HART by random assignment on separate days. The reliability of the HART was calculated from 2 separate trials of the test and then determined through intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Blood samples were collected, and lactate was analyzed both pretest and posttest for each of the 2 exercise modes. Heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were also measured pre- and post-exercise. Hawaii anaerobic run test peak and mean momentum were calculated as body mass times highest or average split velocity, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients between trials of the HART for peak and mean momentum were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively (SEM = 18.8 and 25.7, respectively). Validity of the HART was established through comparison of momentum on the HART with power on the WAnT. High correlations were found between peak power and peak momentum (r = 0.88), as well as mean power and mean momentum (r = 0.94). The HART was considered to be a reliable test of anaerobic power. The HART was also determined to be a valid test of anaerobic power when compared with the WAnT. When testing healthy college-aged individuals, the HART offers an easy and inexpensive alternative maximal effort anaerobic power test to other established tests. PMID:24126898

  17. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  18. Evaluation of the BBL Crystal Anaerobe identification system.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, J J; Wiggs, L S; Miller, J M

    1997-01-01

    The BBL Crystal Anaerobe (ANR) identification system was evaluated, and the results were compared with those from conventional anaerobic methods. We tested 322 clinically significant anaerobic bacteria according to the manufacturer's instructions. The system identified correctly 286 of 322 (88.8%) of the anaerobic bacteria tested. Of these, 263 of 322 (81.7%) were identified correctly on initial testing and 49 were identified correctly only to the genus level; on repeat testing, 23 of 49 (46.9%) were identified correctly to both the genus and the species levels. A total of 26 (8.5%) were misidentified at the species level, and 10 (3.1%) were not identified. Performance characteristics for individual strains varied. The system correctly identified all tested strains of Campylobacter, Desulfomonas, Desulfovibrio, Leptotrichia, Mobiluncus, Peptostreptococcus, Porphyromonas, Provetella, Propionibacterium, Tisierella, and Veillonella and 36 of 37 (97.3%) Actinomyces strains, 42 of 46 (91.3%) B. fragilis group strains, 79 of 103 (76.7%) Clostridium strains, (however, the system failed to identify any of the 7 C. innocuum and 9 C. tetani strains tested), and 8 of 15 (53.3%) Bacteroides strains. This system was easy to use, did not involve the addition of reagents, and was faster than conventional anaerobic procedures. It would be a useful addition to the anaerobe laboratory of most hospitals. PMID:9399517

  19. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  20. Anaerobic threshold: its concept and role in endurance sport.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asok Kumar

    2004-01-01

    aerobic to anaerobic transition intensity is one of the most significant physiological variable in endurance sports. Scientists have explained the term in various ways, like, Lactate Threshold, Ventilatory Anaerobic Threshold, Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation, Onset of Plasma Lactate Accumulation, Heart Rate Deflection Point and Maximum Lactate Steady State. But all of these have great role both in monitoring training schedule and in determining sports performance. Individuals endowed with the possibility to obtain a high oxygen uptake need to complement with rigorous training program in order to achieve maximal performance. If they engage in endurance events, they must also develop the ability to sustain a high fractional utilization of their maximal oxygen uptake (%VO(2) max) and become physiologically efficient in performing their activity. Anaerobic threshold is highly correlated to the distance running performance as compared to maximum aerobic capacity or VO(2) max, because sustaining a high fractional utilization of the VO(2) max for a long time delays the metabolic acidosis. Training at or little above the anaerobic threshold intensity improves both the aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold level. Anaerobic Threshold can also be determined from the speed-heart rate relationship in the field situation, without undergoing sophisticated laboratory techniques. However, controversies also exist among scientists regarding its role in high performance sports. PMID:22977357