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Sample records for anaerobic digester gas

  1. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  2. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at water treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids....

  3. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  4. Minimization of greenhouse gas emission by application of anaerobic digestion process with biogas utilization.

    PubMed

    Yasui, H; Komatsu, K; Goel, R; Matsuhashi, R; Ohashi, A; Harada, H

    2005-01-01

    To assess the impact on greenhouse gas emission, different process schemes for municipal sludge treatment were evaluated based on the data from pilot-scale experiments and review of annual operation reports. A modified anaerobic digestion process with partial ozonation of digested sludge to improve biological degradability and the conventional anaerobic digestion process were compared with respect to the energy demand in each process schemes. Options for beneficial use of biogas included (1) application of biogas for power production and (2) recovery as an alternative to natural gas utilization. The analysis indicated that the partial ozonation process with power production led to minimal greenhouse gas emission because the extra energy production from this scheme was expected to cover all of the energy demand for the plant operation. Moreover, the final amount of dewatered sludge cake was only 40% of that expected from the conventional process, this significantly minimizes the potential for greenhouse gas emission in the subsequent sludge incineration processes. PMID:16180476

  5. Euler-Lagrange CFD modelling of unconfined gas mixing in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Dapelo, Davide; Alberini, Federico; Bridgeman, John

    2015-11-15

    A novel Euler-Lagrangian (EL) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) finite volume-based model to simulate the gas mixing of sludge for anaerobic digestion is developed and described. Fluid motion is driven by momentum transfer from bubbles to liquid. Model validation is undertaken by assessing the flow field in a labscale model with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Conclusions are drawn about the upscaling and applicability of the model to full-scale problems, and recommendations are given for optimum application. PMID:26379205

  6. Anaerobic digestion with partial ozonation minimises greenhouse gas emission from sludge treatment and disposal.

    PubMed

    Yasui, H; Matsuhashi, R; Noike, T; Harada, H

    2006-01-01

    A novel anaerobic digestion process combined with partial ozonation on digested sludge was demonstrated for improving sludge digestion and biogas recovery by full-scale testing for 2 years and its performance was compared with a simultaneously operated conventional anaerobic digestion process. The novel process requires two essential modifications, which are ozonation for enhancing the biological degradability of sludge organics and concentrating of solids in the digester through a solid/liquid separation for extension of SRT. These modifications resulted in high VSS degradation efficiency of ca. 88%, as much as 1.3 times of methane production and more than 70% reduction in dewatered sludge cake production. Based on the performance, its energy demands and contribution for minimisation of greenhouse gas emission was evaluated throughout an entire study of sludge treatment and disposal schemes in a municipality for 130,000 p.e. The analysis indicated that the novel process with power generation from biogas would lead to minimal greenhouse gas emission because the extra energy production from the scheme was expected to cover all of the energy demand for the plant operation, and the remarkable reduction in dewatered sludge cake volumes makes it possible to reduce N2O discharge and consumption of fossil fuel in the subsequent sludge incineration processes. PMID:16605039

  7. An evaluation of the social and private efficiency of adoption: anaerobic digesters and greenhouse gas mitigation.

    PubMed

    Manning, D T; Hadrich, J C

    2015-05-01

    Climate science has begun to recognize the important role of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emissions, including methane. Given the important contribution of methane, anaerobic digesters (ADs) on dairy farms in the U.S. present an opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We quantify the social and private costs and benefits of ADs that have been adopted in California and find that, despite high initial costs, large reductions in GHG emissions bring significant social benefits and represent good social investments given a $36 per-ton social cost of carbon. Subsidies that lower the initial private investment cost can help align socially and privately optimal adoption decisions. PMID:25706409

  8. Recovery of ammonia from anaerobically digested manure using gas-permeable membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) can be recovered from different types of wastewaters. Among these wastewaters, anaerobically digested swine manure (digestate) is one with the highest N content in ammonia form. It is desirable to reduce the high ammonia content in swine manure because it reduces biogas production by in...

  9. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS AT THE YONKERS, NY, WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the results of a 2-year field test to assess the performance of a specially modified commercial phosphoric acid 200 kW fuel cell power plant to recover energy from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) which has been cleansed of contaminants (sulfur and halide compoun...

  10. Anaerobic digestion submarine in Abbey farmyard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    An anaerobic digestion system and fiber separation plant installed at Bethlehem Abbey (Northern Ireland) produces biogas for central heating and grain drying, and a compost which is bagged and sold. According to one report, it even keeps the monks warm at night. Designed by James Murcott of Farm Gas Ltd., the digester (shaped like a submarine) receives 10% solids slurry.

  11. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

  12. Meta-analysis of greenhouse gas emissions from anaerobic digestion processes in dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nicole D; Tuomisto, Hanna L; McCulloch, Malcolm D

    2015-04-21

    This meta-analysis quantifies the changes in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dairy farms, caused by anaerobically digesting (AD) cattle manure. As this is a novel quantifiable synthesis of the literature, a database of GHG emissions from dairy farms is created. Each case in the database consists of a baseline (reference with no AD system) and an AD scenario. To enable interstudy comparison, emissions are normalized by calculating relative changes (RCs). The distributions of RCs are reported by specific GHGs and operation units. Nonparametric tests are applied to the RCs in order to identify a statistical difference of AD with respect to baseline scenarios (Wilcoxon rank test), correlations (Spearman test), and best estimation for changes in emissions (Kernel density distribution estimator). From 749 studies identified, 30 papers yield 89 independent cases. The median reductions in emissions from the baseline scenarios, according to operation units, are -43.2% (n.s.) for storage, -6.3% for field application of slurries, -11.0% for offset of energy from fossil fuel, and +0.4% (n.s.) for offset of inorganic fertilizers. The leaks from digesters are found to significantly increase the emissions from baseline scenarios (median = +1.4%). PMID:25790272

  13. Recovery of methane-rich gas from solid-feed anaerobic digestion of ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea).

    PubMed

    Sankar Ganesh, P; Sanjeevi, R; Gajalakshmi, S; Ramasamy, E V; Abbasi, S A

    2008-03-01

    Studies are presented on new types of anaerobic digesters in which chopped or dry crushed Ipomoea carnea was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop commercially viable means of utilizing the otherwise very harmful plant. Two types of solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SFADs) were studied. The first type had a single vessel in which the bottom 35% portion was separated from the top portion by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cowdung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the reactor led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The leachate, rich in the VFAs, was passed through the perforated PVC sheet and collected in the lower portion of the vessel. The other type of reactors had two vessels, the first one was fully charged with the weed and the second received the VFA leachate. With both types were attached upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) which converted the leachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 70% methane. All SFADs developed very consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 17 weeks of start. The two-compartment reactors yielded significantly more biogas than the single-compartment reactors of corresponding total volume, and the reactors with which anaerobic filters (AF) were attached yielded more biogas than the ones without AF. The best performing units generated 2.41m(3) of biogas per m(3) of digester volume, as compared to 0.1-0.2m(3) of biogas, m(-3)d(-1), obtainable with conventional digesters. This indicates the viability of this technology. The spent weed can be vermicomposted directly to obtain good soil-conditioner cum fertilizer; earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae produced 540mg vermicast per animal every day, achieving near total conversion of feed to vermicast in 20 days. The proposed systems, thus, makes it possible to accomplish total utilization of ipomoea. PMID:17368892

  14. Anaerobic digestion of agricultural and other substrates--implications for greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Pucker, J; Jungmeier, G; Siegl, S; Pötsch, E M

    2013-06-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, expressed in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-eq), of different Austrian biogas systems were analyzed and evaluated using life-cycle assessment (LCA) as part of a national project. Six commercial biogas plants were investigated and the analysis included the complete process chain: viz., the production and collection of substrates, the fermentation of the substrates in the biogas plant, the upgrading of biogas to biomethane (if applicable) and the use of the biogas or biomethane for heat and electricity or as transportation fuel. Furthermore, the LCA included the GHG emissions of construction, operation and dismantling of the major components involved in the process chain, as well as the use of by-products (e.g. fermentation residues used as fertilizers). All of the biogas systems reduced GHG emissions (in CO2-eq) compared with fossil reference systems. The potential for GHG reduction of the individual biogas systems varied between 60% and 100%. Type of feedstock and its reference use, agricultural practices, coverage of storage tanks for fermentation residues, methane leakage at the combined heat and power plant unit and the proportion of energy used as heat were identified as key factors influencing the GHG emissions of anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:23739470

  15. Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent

    E-print Network

    Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent: Significant Energy Savings over Traditional Activated Sludge Treatment This report presents results for an anaerobic digestion system operated;Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  16. Anaerobic digestion of ultrasonicated sludge at different solids concentrations - Computation of mass-energy balance and greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Pilli, Sridhar; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2016-01-15

    Two cases of anaerobic digestion (AD) of sludge, namely (i) with pre-treatment and (ii) without pre-treatment, were assessed using mass-energy balance and the corresponding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For a digestion period of 30 days, volatile solids degradation of the control sludge and the ultrasonicated secondary sludge was 51.4% and 60.1%, respectively. Mass balance revealed that the quantity of digestate required for dewatering, transport and land application was the lowest (20.2 × 10(6) g dry sludge/day) for ultrasonicated secondary sludge at 31.4 g TS/L. Furthermore, for ultrasonicated secondary sludge at 31.4 g TS/L, the maximum net energy (energy output - energy input) of total dry solids (TDS) was 7.89 × 10(-6) kWh/g and the energy ratio (output/input) was 1.0. GHG emissions were also reduced with an increase in the sludge solids concentration (i.e., 40.0 g TS/L < 30.0 g TS/L < 20.0 g TS/L). Ultrasonication pre-treatment proved to be efficient and beneficial for enhancing anaerobic digestion efficiency of the secondary sludge when compared to the primary and mixed sludge. PMID:26546884

  17. Anaerobic digestion of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Jerger, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Woody biomass without pretreatment is generally considered to be refractive to anaerobic decomposition. This refractory property is attributed to its low moisture content, crystalline nature of the cellulose, and complex association of the component carbohydrates with lignin. This study investigated the methane fermentation (anaerobic digestion) of various wood species using conventional anaerobic digestion and batch anaerobic biogasification potential assays. Most experiments were conducted at 35/sup 0/C with a particle size in the range of 1 to 2 mm, and with a full complement of inorganic nutrient supplements. Conventional CSTR semicontinuous feed anaerobic digestion resulted in low methane yields and low conversion (less than 5% organic reduction). Significantly higher conversion (as high as 54%) and higher methane yields (as high as 5.4 SCF/lb VS added) were observed for several hardwood species in ABP assays employing low loading and long residence times (60 days). One softwood (loblolly pine) and eucalyptus were refractory under these conditions. Pretreatments, including particle size reduction and NaOH, increased rates but not total conversion. These results demonstrate that woody biomass can be decomposed by the methane fermentation and support the potential for development of this process for commercial wood conversion applications. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Identification and characterization of odorous gas emission from a full-scale food waste anaerobic digestion plant in China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Ren, Lianhai; Song, Minying; Wang, Xiaowei; Ni, Zhe; Nie, Xiaoqin

    2015-10-01

    Odorous gas emission characteristic along with the successive processes of a typical full-scale food waste (FW) anaerobic digestion plant in China was investigated in September and January. Seasonal variations in pollutant concentration and principal component analysis (PCA) showed markedly different characteristics between the two months. However, the main reason for the seasonal difference at the sorting process differed from the reason for the seasonal difference at other treatment units. Most odorous volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations tested near an anaerobic digestion tank were similar and low in both months. Odor indices, including odor contribution (OC) and odor activity value (OAV) of various odorants, were further calculated to evaluate the malodor degree and contribution to the nuisance smell of any odorant. Brought about by people's different dietary habits, H2S and sulfocompounds were found to be dominant contributors to the large total OVA in the January test. By contrast, oxygenated organic compounds played an important role on the sum of OVA in September. PMID:26364066

  19. Kinetic modeling and experimentation of anaerobic digestion

    E-print Network

    Rea, Jonathan (Jonathan E.)

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digesters convert organic waste (agricultural and food waste, animal or human manure, and other organic waste), into energy (in the form of biogas or electricity). An added benefit to bio-digestion is a leftover ...

  20. An anaerobic digester at a food processing plant in Teramo, Italy, treats poultry slaughterhouse wastewater and breading waste to create biogas that powers a boiler and

    E-print Network

    An anaerobic digester at a food processing plant in Teramo, Italy, treats poultry slaughterhouse, while biological processes are typically centered on anaerobic digestion. However, there are more, including combustion, gasification, pyrolization, anaerobic digestion, and landfill gas (LFG) recovery

  1. Cultivation of marine microalgae using shale gas flowback water and anaerobic digestion effluent as the cultivation medium.

    PubMed

    Racharaks, Ratanachat; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The potential of shale gas flowback water and anaerobic digestion (AD) effluent to reduce the water and nutrient requirements for marine microalgae cultivation was evaluated with the following strains: Nannochloropsis salina, Dunaliella tertiolecta, and Dunaliella salina. N. salina and D. tertiolecta achieved the highest biomass productivity in the medium composed of flowback water and AD effluent (6% v/v). Growth in the above unsterilized medium was found to be comparable to that in sterilized commercial media with similar initial inorganic nitrogen concentrations, salinity, and pH levels. Specific growth rates of 0.293 and 0.349 day(-1) and average biomass productivities of 225 and 275 mg L(-1)day(-1) were obtained for N. salina and D. tertiolecta, respectively. The lipid content and fatty acid profile of both strains in the medium were also comparable to those obtained with commercial nutrients and salts. PMID:25989090

  2. Anaerobic digestion of brewery byproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, J.D.; Kormi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery in the brewery industry by mesophilic anaerobic digesion of process by-products is technically feasible. The maximum achievable loading rate is 6g dry substrate/L-day. CH4 gas production declines as the loading rate increases in the range 2-6 g/L day. CH4 production increases in the range 8-15 days; optimal design criteria are a 10-day detention time with a loading rate of 6 g dry substrate/L day.

  3. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25457225

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  5. Fate of Trace Metals in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, F G; van Hullebusch, E D; Guibaud, G; Collins, G; Svensson, B H; Carliell-Marquet, C; Vink, J P M; Esposito, G; Frunzo, L

    2015-01-01

    A challenging, and largely uncharted, area of research in the field of anaerobic digestion science and technology is in understanding the roles of trace metals in enabling biogas production. This is a major knowledge gap and a multifaceted problem involving metal chemistry; physical interactions of metal and solids; microbiology; and technology optimization. Moreover, the fate of trace metals, and the chemical speciation and transport of trace metals in environments--often agricultural lands receiving discharge waters from anaerobic digestion processes--simultaneously represents challenges for environmental protection and opportunities to close process loops in anaerobic digestion. PMID:26337848

  6. Defining Anaerobic Digestion Stability-Full Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demitry, M. E., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale anaerobic digester receiving a mixture of primary and secondary sludge was monitored for one hundred days. A chemical oxygen demand, COD, and a volatile solids, VS, mass balance was conducted to evaluate the stability of the digester and its capability of producing methane gas. The COD mass balance could account for nearly 90% of the methane gas produced while the VS mass balance showed that 91% of the organic matter removed resulted in biogas formation. Other parameters monitored included: pH, alkalinity, VFA, and propionic acid. The values of these parameters showed that steady state had occurred. Finally, at mesophilic temperature and at steady state performance, the anaerobic digester stability was defined as a constant ratio of methane produced per substrate of ?VS (average ratio=0.404 l/g). This ratio can be used as universal metric to determine the anaerobic digester stability in an easy and inexpensive way.

  7. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  8. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for simulating anaerobic mesophilic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Carlos; Esquerre, Karla; Matos Queiroz, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Improving anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by monitoring common indicators such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), gas composition and pH is a suitable solution for better sludge management. Modeling is an important tool to assess and to predict process performance. The present study focuses on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the dynamic behavior of a reactor fed with sewage sludge under mesophilic conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis is used to select the most sensitive ADM1 parameters for estimation using a numerical procedure while other parameters are applied without any modification to the original values presented in the ADM1 report. The results indicate that the ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to predict the experimental results of effluent acetate, propionate, composites and biogas flows and pH with reasonable accuracy. The simulation of the effect of organic shock loading clearly showed that an organic shock loading rate above of 35kg/m(3) day affects the performance of the reactor. The results demonstrate that simulations can be helpful to support decisions on predicting the anaerobic digestion process of sewage sludge. PMID:25458762

  9. Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M.

    2011-12-14

    In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

  10. Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

    1990-04-01

    The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge.

  11. Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    E-print Network

    Kinetics of inactivation of indicator pathogens during thermophilic anaerobic digestion Sudeep C Thermophilic anaerobic digestion Pathogen inactivation Ascaris suum Helminth eggs Poliovirus Enteric viruses a b s t r a c t Thermophilic anaerobic sludge digestion is a promising process to divert waste

  12. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  13. Whole farm impact of anaerobic digestion and biogas use on a New York dairy farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic digestion of manure for biogas production is one of many options for reducing the carbon footprint of milk production. This process reduces greenhouse gas emissions but increases the potential nitrogen and phosphorus losses from the farm. An anaerobic digester component was added to the In...

  14. Net greenhouse gas emissions from manure management using anaerobic digestion technology in a beef cattle feedlot in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa Junior, Ciniro; Cerri, Carlos E P; Pires, Alexandre V; Cerri, Carlos C

    2015-02-01

    As part of an agreement during the COP15, the Brazilian government is fostering several activities intended to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. One of them is the adoption of anaerobic digester (AD) for treating animal manure. Due to a lack of information, we developed a case study in order to evaluate the effect of such initiative for beef cattle feedlots. We considered the net GHG emissions (CH4 and N2O) from the manure generated from 140 beef heifers confined for 90 days in the scope "housing to field application" by including field measurements, literature values, and the offset generated by the AD system through the replacement of conventional sources of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and electricity, respectively. Results showed that direct GHG emissions accounted for 0.14 ± 0.06 kg of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO?eq) per kg of animal live weight gain (lwg), with ~80% originating from field application, suggesting that this emission does not differ from the conventional manure management (without AD) typically done in Brazil (0.19 ± 0.07 kg of CO?eq per kg lwg(-1)). However, 2.4 MWh and 658.0 kg of N-manure were estimated to be generated as a consequence of the AD utilization, potentially offsetting 0.13 ± 0.01 kg of CO?eq kg lwg(-1) or 95% (±45%) of total direct emissions from the manure management. Although, by replacing fossil fuel sources, i.e. diesel oil, this offset could be increased to 169% (±47%). In summary, the AD has the potential to significantly mitigate GHG emissions from manure management in beef cattle feedlots, but the effect is indirect and highly dependent on the source to be replaced. In spite of the promising results, more and continuous field measurements for decreasing uncertainties and improving assumptions are required. Identifying shortcomings would be useful not only for the effectiveness of the Brazilian government, but also for worldwide plans in mitigating GHG emissions from beef production systems. PMID:25461102

  15. Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

    1990-01-01

    A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

  16. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  17. Hog farm in California uses anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article describes a system of covered lagoons which help address the waste management problems of hog farmers as well as producing methane used to power generators. Four advantages of anaerobic digestion are described along with the system: energy production from methane; fertilizer for fields; economic development in rural areas; and improved water quality through reduction of nonpoint source pollution. Address for full report is given.

  18. High-rate thermophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shelef, G.; Kimchie, S.; Grynberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    There are many settlements in Israel known as Kibbutzim which provide an interface between the agricultural sector, the industrial sector, and a community with a high per capita energy consumption. Hence, these settlements provide an ideal site for the operation of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of agricultural wastes and the utilization of the resultant energy supply. While the substrate initially used in this study was dairy-cow manure collected from the concrete floors of corrals, the contribution of other organic wastes such as straw, cotton plants, and chicken manure was also evaluated. It has been reported in the literature that some materials when added to the anaerobic digestion process lead to enhancement of gas production and improvement in digester operation. Hence, the effects on the performance of highly loaded thermophilic digesters of several materials such as activated carbon, cobalt salts, and calcium hydroxide were examined in this study. Pilot-plant units of 1000 and 10,000 liter were an intergral part of the study program. These units were used to verify results obtained with the 4-liter laboratory units. An energy survey was conducted on the larger units. These units were also used to supply large quantities of gas for utilization experiments and to provide the large quantities of digested sludge required for animal-feeding trials and fertilizer experiments. The pilot-plant units also afforded the opportunity to solve technical problems which would arise in full-size units.

  19. Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy

    E-print Network

    Zaks, David P. M.

    Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria ...

  20. Bioaugmentation of overloaded anaerobic digesters restores function and archaeal community.

    PubMed

    Tale, V P; Maki, J S; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Adding beneficial microorganisms to anaerobic digesters for improved performance (i.e. bioaugmentation) has been shown to decrease recovery time after organic overload or toxicity upset. Compared to strictly anaerobic cultures, adding aerotolerant methanogenic cultures may be more practical since they exhibit higher methanogenic activity and can be easily dried and stored in ambient air for future shipping and use. In this study, anaerobic digesters were bioaugmented with both anaerobic and aerated, methanogenic propionate enrichment cultures after a transient organic overload. Digesters bioaugmented with anaerobic and moderately aerated cultures recovered 25 and 100 days before non-bioaugmented digesters, respectively. Increased methane production due to bioaugmentation continued a long time, with 50-120% increases 6 to 12 SRTs (60-120 days) after overload. In contrast to the anaerobic enrichment, the aerated enrichments were more effective as bioaugmentation cultures, resulting in faster recovery of upset digester methane and COD removal rates. Sixty days after overload, the bioaugmented digester archaeal community was not shifted, but was restored to one similar to the pre-overload community. In contrast, non-bioaugmented digester archaeal communities before and after overload were significantly different. Organisms most similar to Methanospirillum hungatei had higher relative abundance in well-operating, undisturbed and bioaugmented digesters, whereas organisms similar to Methanolinea tarda were more abundant in upset, non-bioaugmented digesters. Bioaugmentation is a beneficial approach to increase digester recovery rate after transient organic overload events. Moderately aerated, methanogenic propionate enrichment cultures were more beneficial augments than a strictly anaerobic enrichment. PMID:25528544

  1. Foaming phenomenon in bench-scale anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Siebels, Amanda M; Long, Sharon C

    2013-04-01

    The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (The District) in Madison, Wisconsin has been experiencing seasonal foaming in their anaerobic biosolids digesters, which has occurred from mid-November to late June for the past few years. The exact cause(s) of foaming is unknown. Previous research findings are unclear as to whether applications of advanced anaerobic digestion processes reduce the foaming potential of digesters. The object of this study was to investigate how configurations of thermophilic and acid phase-thermophilic anaerobic digestion would affect foaming at the bench-scale level compared to single stage mesophilic digestion for The District. Bench-scale anaerobic digesters were fed with a 4 to 4.5% by dry weight of solids content blend of waste activated sludge (WAS) and primary sludge from The District. Foaming potential was monitored using Alka-Seltzer and aeration foaming tests. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digester had a higher foaming potential than the bench-scale mesophilic digester. These results indicate that higher temperatures increase the foaming potential of the bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The bench-scale acid phase-thermophilic digesters had a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) volatile solids destruction and a greater percent (approximately 5 to 10%) total solids destruction when compared to the bench-scale mesophilic digester. Overall, for the full-scale foaming experienced by The District, it appears that adding an acid phase or switching to thermophilic digestion would not alleviate The District's foaming issues. PMID:23697241

  2. Effects of turbulence modelling on prediction of flow characteristics in a bench-scale anaerobic gas-lift digester.

    PubMed

    Coughtrie, A R; Borman, D J; Sleigh, P A

    2013-06-01

    Flow in a gas-lift digester with a central draft-tube was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different turbulence closure models. The k-? Shear-Stress-Transport (SST), Renormalization-Group (RNG) k-?, Linear Reynolds-Stress-Model (RSM) and Transition-SST models were tested for a gas-lift loop reactor under Newtonian flow conditions validated against published experimental work. The results identify that flow predictions within the reactor (where flow is transitional) are particularly sensitive to the turbulence model implemented; the Transition-SST model was found to be the most robust for capturing mixing behaviour and predicting separation reliably. Therefore, Transition-SST is recommended over k-? models for use in comparable mixing problems. A comparison of results obtained using multiphase Euler-Lagrange and singlephase approaches are presented. The results support the validity of the singlephase modelling assumptions in obtaining reliable predictions of the reactor flow. Solver independence of results was verified by comparing two independent finite-volume solvers (Fluent-13.0sp2 and OpenFOAM-2.0.1). PMID:23624047

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM AN ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. he fuel cell is being used for this application becaus...

  4. State Of The Science On Cogeneration Of Heat And Power From Anaerobic Digestion Of Municipal Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will report on work underway to inventory facilities currently utilizing biogas from anaerobic digestion and speak with practitioners to learn: techniques for preparing residuals for digestion, methods to use for cleaning biogas (e.g., of siloxane), and how gas...

  5. Anaerobic Digestion II. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the second of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include classification of digester by function, roof design, and temperature range, mixing systems, gas system components, operational control basics, and general safety considerations. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The…

  6. Comparison of digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters as inocula for solid state anaerobic digestion of yard trimmings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuqing; Wang, Feng; Lin, Long; Li, Yebo

    2016-01-01

    To select a proper inoculum for the solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of yard trimmings, digestate from solid anaerobic digesters and dewatered effluent from liquid anaerobic digesters were compared at substrate-to-inoculum (S/I) ratios from 0.2 to 2 (dry basis), and total solids (TS) contents from 20% to 35%. The highest methane yield of around 244L/kg VSfeed was obtained at an S/I ratio of 0.2 and TS content of 20% for both types of inoculum. The highest volumetric methane productivity was obtained with dewatered effluent at an S/I ratio of 0.6 and TS content of 24%. The two types of inoculum were found comparable regarding methane yields and volumetric methane productivities at each S/I ratio, while using dewatered effluent as inoculum reduced the startup time. An S/I ratio of 1 was determined to be a critical level and should be set as the upper limit for mesophilic SS-AD of yard trimmings. PMID:26575617

  7. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste: Technical developments

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The anaerobic biogasification of organic wastes generates two useful products: a medium-Btu fuel gas and a compost-quality organic residue. Although commercial-scale digestion systems are used to treat municipal sewage wastes, the disposal of solid organic wastes, including municipal solid wastes (MSW), requires a more cost-efficient process. Modern biogasification systems employ high-rate, high-solids fermentation methods to improve process efficiency and reduce capital costs. The design criteria and development stages are discussed. These systems are also compared with conventional low-solids fermentation technology.

  8. Tumble-mix anaerobic digestion of dry beef manure

    SciTech Connect

    Kottwitz, D.; Schulte, D.D.

    1982-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion of beef manure at an influent total solids concentration of 26% was demonstrated using an innovative tumble-mix fermenter. At an organic loading rate of 4.7 kg VS m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ and a 23% VS influent concentration, a 54% volatile solids reduction was achieved. The average biogas production was 1.37 m/sup 3/ m-/sup 3/ d-/sup 1/ with a gas quality of 54% CH/sub 4/.

  9. Low-temperature anaerobic digestion for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Rory M; Hughes, Dermot; Collins, Gavin; Mahony, Thérèse; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2012-06-01

    Methanogenesis is an important biogeochemical process for the degradation of organic matter within cold environments, and is associated with the release of the potent greenhouse gas, methane. Cold methanogenesis has been harnessed, in engineered systems, as low-temperature anaerobic digestion (LTAD) for wastewater treatment and bioenergy generation. LTAD represents a nascent wastewater treatment biotechnology, which offers an attractive alternative to conventional aerobic and anaerobic processes. Successful, high-rate, LTAD of sewage and industrial wastewaters (e.g. from the brewery, food-processing and pharmaceutical sectors), with concomitant biogas generation, has been demonstrated at laboratory-scale and pilot-scale. A holistic, polyphasic approach, which integrates bioprocess, physiological and molecular biological datasets has been critical to the development of the LTAD concept. PMID:22176749

  10. Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production

    E-print Network

    Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production Accepted 24 May 2013 Available online Keywords: Anaerobic digestion Ammonia Bioenergy Bioammonia Hydrogen Anaerobic digestion-bioammonia to hydrogen (ADBH) a b s t r a c t During anaerobic digestion, organic matter

  11. Parasite ova in anaerobically digested sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Arther, R.G.; Fitzgerald, P.R.; Fox, J.C.

    1981-08-01

    The Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago produces anaerobically digested wastewater sludge from a 14-day continuous-flow process maintained at 35 degrees Celcius. Some of the sludge is ultimately applied to strip-mined lands in Central Illinois (Fulton County) as a soil conditioner and fertilizer. Parasitic nematode ova were isolated from freshly processed samples, as well as from samples collected from storage lagoons, using a system of continuous sucrose solution gradients. The mean number of ova per 100 g of dry sludge was 203 Ascaris spp., 173 Toxocara spp., 48 Toxascaris leonina, and 36 Trichuris spp. An assessment of the viability of these ova was determined by subjecting the ova to conditions favorable for embryonation. Recovered ova were placed in 1.5% formalin and aerated at 22 degrees Celcius for 21 to 28 days. Development of ova isolated from freshly digested sludge occurred in 64% of the Ascaris spp., 53% of the Toxocara, 63% of the Toxascaris leonina, and 20% of the Trichuris spp. Viability was also demonstrated in ova recovered from sludge samples held in storage lagoons for a period of up to 5 years; embryonation occurred in 24% of the Ascaris spp., 10% of the Toxocara spp., 43% of the Toxascaris leonina, and 6% of the Trichuris spp. (Refs. 24).

  12. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters Anaerobic digester type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank to bank, impermeable 0.975 Modular, impermeable 0.70 Complete mix, fixed film,...

  13. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters Anaerobic digester type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank to bank, impermeable 0.975 Modular, impermeable 0.70 Complete mix, fixed film, or plug...

  14. Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

    2007-09-17

    are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit...

  15. INCREASE OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS FOLLOWING ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND CENTRIFUGE DEWATERING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled “Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges”. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bac...

  16. Design of an anaerobic digester in Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    Bouaziz, Alexandre N. (Alexandre Nathanel)

    2014-01-01

    .In response to the future Quebec, Canada regulations prohibiting landfilling of organic matter by 2020, EBI, a waste management company located near Montreal is considering constructing an anaerobic digester. This thesis ...

  17. Methane enrichment digestion experiments at the anaerobic experimental test unit at Walt Disney World. Final report, March 1989-August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Hill, A.H.

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the project was to determine the technical feasibility of utilizing a novel concept in anaerobic digestion, in-situ methane enrichment digestion or MED for producing utility-grade gas from a pilot-scale anaerobic digester. MED tests conducted during this program consistently achieved digester product gas with a methane (CH4) content of greater than 90% (on a dry-, nitrogen-free basis). The MED concept, because it requires relatively simple equipment and modest energy input, has the potential to simplify gas cleanup requirements and substantially reduce the cost of converting wastes and biomass to pipeline quality gas.

  18. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Mosey, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  19. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Mosey, F.E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion with the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  20. Using contaminated plants involved in phytoremediation for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zewei; Wang, Shengxiao; Wang, Ting; Chang, Zhizhou; Shen, Zhenguo; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anaerobic digestion capability of five plants and the effects of copper (Cu) and S,S'-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS, a chelator widely used in chelant-assisted phytoremediation) on biogas production to determine a feasible disposal method for plants used in remediation. The results showed that in addition to Phytolacca americana L., plants such as Zea mays L., Brassica napus L., Elsholtzia splendens Nakai ex F. Maekawa, and Oenothera biennis L. performed well in biogas production. Among these, O. biennis required the shortest period to finish anaerobic digestion. Compared to normal plants with low Cu content, the plants used in remediation with increased Cu levels (100 mg kg(-1)) not only promoted anaerobic digestion and required a shorter anaerobic digestion time, but also increased the methane content in biogas. When the Cu content in plants increased to 500, 1000, and 5000 mg kg(-1), the cumulative biogas production decreased by 12.3%, 14.6%, and 41.2%, respectively. Studies also found that EDDS conspicuously restrained biogas production from anaerobic digestion. The results suggest that anaerobic digestion has great potential for the disposal of contaminated plants and may provide a solution for the resource utilization of plants used in remediation. PMID:25397976

  1. Municipal Development of Anaerobic Digestion/ Combined Heat and Power in Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Brenda

    With a commercial food waste ban going into effect in Massachusetts in October 2014, businesses, institutions, and municipalities are considering alternatives to landfills and incinerators for organic waste. Anaerobic digestion is one such alternative. Similar to composting, but in an environment devoid of oxygen, anaerobic digestion produces byproducts such as methane (which can be burned for heat or electricity) and liquid or solid digestate (which can be used as fertilizer, cattle bedding, and more). Thus, disposal of food waste and other organic materials can become a source of revenue rather than just an expense. Municipalities interested in developing anaerobic digestion/combined heat and power (AD/CHP) facilities have the benefit of desirable options for sites, such as landfill gas facilities and wastewater treatment plants, and potential feedstocks in source-separated residential or municipal food waste or wastewater. This thesis examines the opportunities and challenges for municipal development of AD/CHP facilities in Massachusetts.

  2. Industrial symbiosis: corn ethanol fermentation, hydrothermal carbonization, and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brandon M; Jader, Lindsey R; Schendel, Frederick J; Hahn, Nicholas J; Valentas, Kenneth J; McNamara, Patrick J; Novak, Paige M; Heilmann, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    The production of dry-grind corn ethanol results in the generation of intermediate products, thin and whole stillage, which require energy-intensive downstream processing for conversion into commercial animal feed products. Hydrothermal carbonization of thin and whole stillage coupled with anaerobic digestion was investigated as alternative processing methods that could benefit the industry. By substantially eliminating evaporation of water, reductions in downstream energy consumption from 65% to 73% were achieved while generating hydrochar, fatty acids, treated process water, and biogas co-products providing new opportunities for the industry. Processing whole stillage in this manner produced the four co-products, eliminated centrifugation and evaporation, and substantially reduced drying. With thin stillage, all four co-products were again produced, as well as a high quality animal feed. Anaerobic digestion of the aqueous product stream from the hydrothermal carbonization of thin stillage reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) by more than 90% and converted 83% of the initial COD to methane. Internal use of this biogas could entirely fuel the HTC process and reduce overall natural gas usage. PMID:23568780

  3. Fate of 17B-estradiol in anaerobic lagoon digesters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of [14C]17B-estradiol ([14C]E2) was monitored for 42 d in triplicate 10 L anaerobic digesters. Total radioactive residues (TRR) decreased rapidly in the liquid layer of the digesters and reached a steady-state value of 19-24% of the initial dose after 4 days. LC/MS/MS analyses of the liqu...

  4. Denitrification in anaerobic digesters: A review of recent studies

    SciTech Connect

    Akunna, J.C.

    1996-11-01

    Wastewaters from food processing industries (and domestic activities) are usually treated principally for organic carbon removal. But recent standards have generated interests in nitrogen and phosphorus removal. This has led to the addition of nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal units in the existing treatment plants, thus increasing the cost of treatment operations. The need to reduce treatment costs has led to research on ways to carry out many treatment processes in a single system. One of these systems consists of anaerobic and aerobic units in series with effluent recycle. In the anaerobic unit, anaerobic digestion and denitrification take place simultaneously producing methane and nitrogen gas while in the aerobic unit, ammonia oxidation to nitrate (nitrification) takes place. This process configuration appears to give lesser problems associated with operations such as the addition of raw wastewater or external organic carbon to ensure complete denitrification. In this paper a review of the results of recent studies are presented, with special emphasis on the factors affecting treatment efficiencies (i.e., denitrification, ammonia production from nitrate, and methane production efficiencies).

  5. Anaerobic digestion of bio-waste: A mini-review focusing on territorial and environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Franco; Cavinato, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Scientific and industrial experiences, together with economical and policies changes of last 30?years, bring anaerobic digestion among the most environmental friendly and economically advantageous technologies for organic waste treatment and management in Europe. In this short review, the role of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes is discussed, considering the opportunity of a territorial friendly approach, without barriers, where different organic wastes are co-treated. This objective can be achieved through two proposed strategies: one is the anaerobic digestion applied as a service for the agricultural and farming sector; the other as a service for citizen (biowaste, diapers and wastewater treatment integration). The union of these two strategies is an environmental- and territorial-friendly process that aims to produce renewable energy and fertiliser material, with a low greenhouse gas emission and nutrients recovery. The advantage of forthcoming application of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes, even for added value bioproducts production and new energy carriers, are finally discussed. Among several advantages of anaerobic digestion, the role of the environmental controller was evaluated, considering the ability of minimising the impacts exploiting the biochemical equilibrium and sensitivity as a quality assurance for digestate. PMID:25687916

  6. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  7. Bioaugmentation for improved recovery of anaerobic digesters after toxicant exposure.

    PubMed

    Schauer-Gimenez, Anne E; Zitomer, Daniel H; Maki, James S; Struble, Craig A

    2010-06-01

    Bioaugmentation was investigated as a method to decrease the recovery period of anaerobic digesters exposed to a transient toxic event. Two sets of laboratory-scale digesters (SRT = 10 days, OLR = 2 g COD/L-day), started with inoculum from a digester stabilizing synthetic municipal wastewater solids (MW) and synthetic industrial wastewater (WW), respectively, were transiently exposed to the model toxicant, oxygen. Bioaugmented digesters received 1.2 g VSS/L-day of an H2-utilizing culture for which the archaeal community was analyzed. Soon after oxygen exposure, the bioaugmented digesters produced 25-60% more methane than non-bioaugmented controls (p < 0.05). One set of digesters produced lingering high propionate concentrations, and bioaugmentation resulted in significantly shorter recovery periods. The second set of digesters did not display lingering propionate, and bioaugmented digesters recovered at the same time as non-bioaugmented controls. The difference in the effect of bioaugmentation on recovery may be due to differences between microbial communities of the digester inocula originally employed. In conclusion, bioaugmentation with an H(2)-utilizing culture is a potential tool to decrease the recovery period, decrease propionate concentration, and increase biogas production of some anaerobic digesters after a toxic event. Digesters already containing rapidly adaptable microbial communities may not benefit from bioaugmentation, whereas other digesters with poorly adaptable microbial communities may benefit greatly. PMID:20427070

  8. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  9. Steam pressure disruption of municipal solid waste enhances anaerobic digestion kinetics and biogas yield.

    PubMed

    Liu, H W; Walter, H K; Vogt, G M; Vogt, H S; Holbein, B E

    2002-01-20

    Biomass waste, including municipal solid waste (MSW), contains lignocellulosic-containing fiber components that are not readily available as substrates for anaerobic digestion due to the physical shielding of cellulose imparted by the nondigestible lignin. Consequently, a substantial portion of the potentially available carbon is not converted to methane and the incompletely digested residues from anaerobic digestion generally require additional processing prior to their return to the environment. We investigated and developed steam pressure disruption as a treatment step to render lignocellulosic-rich biomass more digestible and as a means for increasing methane energy recovery. The rapid depressurization after steam heating (240 degrees C, 5 min.) of the nondigested residues following a 30-day primary digestion of MSW caused a visible disruption of fibers and release of soluble organic components. The disrupted material, after reinoculation, provided a rapid burst in methane production at rates double those observed in the initial digestion. This secondary digestion proceeded without a lag phase in gas production, provided approximately 40% additional methane yields, and was accompanied by a approximately 40% increase in volatile solids reduction. The secondary digestate was found to be enriched in lignin and significantly depleted in cellulose and hemi-cellulose components when compared to primary digestate. Thus, steam pressure disruption treatment rendered lignocellulosic substrates readily accessible to anaerobic digestion bacteria and improved both the kinetics of biogas production and the overall methane yield from MSW. Steam pressure disruption is central to a new anaerobic digestion process approach including sequential digestion stages and integrated energy recovery, to improve process yields, provide cogenerated energy for process needs, and to provide effective reuse and recycling of waste biomass materials. PMID:11753918

  10. Anaerobic digestion of hog wastes: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszkiewicz, J.A.; Bujoczek, G.

    1996-12-31

    The principles and overview of research, development and implementation of anaerobic digestion for hog wastes are discussed. Based on economic evaluations, an anaerobic technology is cost-effective, especially for a larger herd and becomes more competitive with aerobic treatment. Nevertheless, the rate of treatment is more sensitive and dependent on the particular fraction of manure being processed. Considering the different factors affecting anaerobic digestion, a complete mixed reactor with solids recycle (having high solids retention time and low hydraulic retention time) was found to be the more reliable system with regards to methane generation and manure stabilization. By solids recycle one can obtain significant saving in the reactor volume required, while still achieving the expected degree of treatment. It was also found that even though treatment using advanced anaerobic systems when compared with simple anaerobic systems is more expensive, the rate of return on investment and efficiency of the process are higher.

  11. Improvement of fruit and vegetable waste anaerobic digestion performance and stability with co-substrates addition.

    PubMed

    Bouallagui, H; Lahdheb, H; Ben Romdan, E; Rachdi, B; Hamdi, M

    2009-04-01

    The effect of fish waste (FW), abattoir wastewater (AW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) addition as co-substrates on the fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) anaerobic digestion performance was investigated under mesophilic conditions using four anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBR) with the aim of finding the better co-substrate for the enhanced performance of co-digestion. The reactors were operated at an organic loading rate of 2.46-2.51 g volatile solids (VS)l(-1)d(-1), of which approximately 90% were from FVW, and a hydraulic retention time of 10 days. It was observed that AW and WAS additions with a ratio of 10% VS enhanced biogas yield by 51.5% and 43.8% and total volatile solids removal by 10% and 11.7%, respectively. However FW addition led to improvement of the process stability, as indicated by the low VFAs/Alkalinity ratio of 0.28, and permitted anaerobic digestion of FVW without chemical alkali addition. Despite a considerable decrease in the C/N ratio from 34.2 to 27.6, the addition of FW slightly improved the gas production yield (8.1%) compared to anaerobic digestion of FVW alone. A C/N ratio between 22 and 25 seemed to be better for anaerobic co-digestion of FVW with its co-substrates. The most significant factor for enhanced FVW digestion performance was the improved organic nitrogen content provided by the additional wastes. Consequently, the occurrence of an imbalance between the different groups of anaerobic bacteria which may take place in unstable anaerobic digestion of FVW could be prevented. PMID:19117663

  12. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for describing anaerobic digestion of grass, maize, green weed silage, and industrial glycerine.

    PubMed

    Biernacki, Piotr; Steinigeweg, Sven; Borchert, Axel; Uhlenhut, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic waste plays an important role for the development of sustainable energy supply based on renewable resources. For further process optimization of anaerobic digestion, biogas production with the commonly used substrates, grass, maize, and green weed silage, together with industrial glycerine, were analyzed by the Weender analysis/van Soest method, and a simulation study was performed, based on the International Water Association's (IWA) Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). The simplex algorithm was applied to optimize kinetic constants for disintegration and hydrolysis steps for all examined substrates. Consequently, new parameters were determined for each evaluated substrate, tested against experimental cumulative biogas production results, and assessed against ADM1 default values for disintegration and hydrolysis kinetic constants, where the ADM1 values for mesophilic high rate and ADM1 values for solids were used. Results of the optimization lead to a precise prediction of the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of complex substrates. PMID:23131640

  13. Biogasification of sorghum in a novel anaerobic digester

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Biljetina, R.; Isaacson, H.R.; Hayes, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) conducted pilot-scale anaerobic digestion experiments with ensiled sorghum in a 160 ft/sup 3/ digester at the experimental test unit (ETU) facility at the Walt Disney World Resort Complex in Florida. The study focused on improving bioconversion efficiencies and process stability by employing a novel reactor concept developed at IGT. Steady-state performance data were collected from the ETU as well as from a laboratory-scale conventional stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at loading rates of 0.25 and 0.50 lb organic matter/ft/sup 3/-day at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures, respectively. This paper will describe the ETU facility, novel digester design and operating techniques, and the results obtained during 12 months of stable and uninterrupted operation of the ETU and the CSTR which showed that methane yields anad rates from the ETU were 20% to 50% higher than those of the CSTR. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Distinctive non-methanogen archaeal populations in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens define the archaeal communities involved in anaerobic digestion. Recently, non-methanogen archaeal populations have been unexpectedly identified in anaerobic digestion processes. To gain insight into the ecophysiology of these uncharacterized archaeal populations, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis was performed on a collection of non-methanogen archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from anaerobic digesters of broad geographic distribution, revealing a distinct clade formed by these sequences in subgroup 6 of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group in the newly proposed archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota. This exclusive phylogenetic assemblage enabled the development of a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay specifically targeting these non-methanogen archaeal populations in anaerobic digestion. Application of the qPCR assay in continuous anaerobic digesters indicated that these archaeal populations were minor constituents of the archaeal communities, and the abundance of these populations remained relatively constant irrespective of process perturbations. Analysis of the archaeal populations in methanogenic communities further revealed the co-occurrence of these non-methanogen archaea with acetoclastic methanogens. Nevertheless, the low abundance of non-methanogen archaea as compared with acetoclastic methanogens suggests that the non-methanogen archaeal populations were not major players in animal waste-fed methanogenic processes investigated in this study and the functions of these archaeal populations remain to be identified. PMID:26373725

  15. Anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadanaparthi, Sai Krishna Reddy

    Dairy and potato are two important agricultural commodities in Idaho. Both the dairy and potato processing industries produce a huge amount of waste which could cause environmental pollution. To minimize the impact of potential pollution associated with dairy manure (DM) and potato waste (PW), anaerobic co-digestion has been considered as one of the best treatment process. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste in terms of process stability, biogas generation, construction and operating costs, and potential revenue. For this purpose, I conducted 1) a literature review, 2) a lab study on anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste at three different temperature ranges (ambient (20-25°C), mesophilic (35-37°C) and thermophilic (55-57°C) with five mixing ratios (DM:PW-100:0, 90:10, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60), and 3) a financial analysis for anaerobic digesters based on assumed different capital costs and the results from the lab co-digestion study. The literature review indicates that several types of organic waste were co-digested with DM. Dairy manure is a suitable base matter for the co-digestion process in terms of digestion process stability and methane (CH4) production (Chapter 2). The lab tests showed that co-digestion of DM with PW was better than digestion of DM alone in terms of biogas and CH4 productions (Chapter 3). The financial analysis reveals DM and PW can be used as substrate for full size anaerobic digesters to generate positive cash flow within a ten year time period. Based on this research, the following conclusions and recommendations were made: ? The ratio of DM:PW-80:20 is recommended at thermophilic temperatures and the ratio of DM:PW-90:10 was recommended at mesophilic temperatures for optimum biogas and CH4 productions. ? In cases of anaerobic digesters operated with electricity generation equipment (generators), low cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of 600/cow) operating at thermophilic temperatures are recommended. • The ratio of DM:PW-90:10 or 80:20 is recommended while operating low cost plug flow digesters at thermophilic temperatures. ? In cases of anaerobic digesters operated without electricity generation equipment (generators), completely mixed or high or low cost plug flow digesters can be used. • The ratio of DM:PW-80:20 is recommended for completely mixed digesters operated at thermophilic temperatures; • The ratio of DM:PW-90:10 or 80:20 is recommended for high cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of 1,000/cow) operated at thermophilic temperatures; • All of the four co-digested mixing ratios (i.e. DM:PW-90:10 or 80:20 or 60:40 or 40:60) are good for low cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of $600/cow) operated at thermophilic temperatures. The ratio of DM:PW-90:10 is recommended for positive cash flow within the ten year period if the low cost plug flow digesters are operated at mesophilic temperatures.

  16. Energetic and biochemical valorization of cork boiling wastewater by anaerobic digestion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In addition to energy benefits, anaerobic digestion offers other interesting advantages. The cork industry is of great environmental, economic and social significance in the western Mediterranean region, with Portugal being the world-leading producer and exporter. Cork boiling wastewater (CBW) is a toxic and recalcitrant organic effluent produced by this sector, which constitutes a serious environmental hazard. However, there is no documented research on anaerobic treatment/valorization performed with this effluent. The work presented here was developed with the aim to use the anaerobic digestion process to convert the CBW polluting organic load into an energy carrier gas and valuable molecules for industry. Results No lag phases were observed and a methane yield of 0.126 to 0.142 m3 kg-1 chemical oxygen demand (COD)added was registered in the mesophilic consortium experiments carried out in batch flasks at 37?±?1°C. Anaerobic digestion can be advantageously connected to ultrafiltration or electrochemical processes, due to the following: 1) reduction of ellagic acid content and consequent decrease of CBW viscosity; and 2) increase in conductivity after the anaerobic process, avoiding the electrolyte application of the electrochemical process. The improvement of several CBW biochemical features shows that anaerobic digestion may provide additionally useful molecules. The rise in concentration of some of these compounds, belonging to the benzoic acid family (gallic, protocatechuic, vanillic and syringic acids), is responsible for the increase of antiradical activity of the phenolic fraction. Additionally, some enzymatic activity was also observed and while the laccase activity increased in the digested effluent by anaerobiosis, xylanase was formed in the process. Conclusions The multidisciplinary approach adopted allowed the valorization of CBW in terms of energy and valuable biomolecules. By exploiting the anaerobic digestion process potential, a novel methodology to toxic and recalcitrant cork processing wastewater was developed. PMID:24847378

  17. Improved ADM1 model for anaerobic digestion process considering physico-chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Piccard, Sarah; Zhou, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The "Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1" (ADM1) was modified in the study by improving the bio-chemical framework and integrating a more detailed physico-chemical framework. Inorganic carbon and nitrogen balance terms were introduced to resolve the discrepancies in the original bio-chemical framework between the carbon and nitrogen contents in the degraders and substrates. More inorganic components and solids precipitation processes were included in the physico-chemical framework of ADM1. The modified ADM1 was validated with the experimental data and used to investigate the effects of calcium ions, magnesium ions, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen on anaerobic digestion in batch reactor. It was found that the entire anaerobic digestion process might exist an optimal initial concentration of inorganic nitrogen for methane gas production in the presence of calcium ions, magnesium ions and inorganic phosphorus. PMID:26253912

  18. Surfactants in anaerobic digestion of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.; Madamwar, D.

    1994-05-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste and cheese whey, with enriched methane content, the effect of various surfactants was studied. Among the surfactants tested, Tween 80 and sodium lauryl sulphate showed the maximum enhancement in gas production as well as methane content, indicating better process performance. The Tween 80 dosed digester (300 {mu}L/L) produced about 3.5 L gas/L of digester/d with 70% methane. Results also indicated increased percent COD reduction in the presence of Tween 80. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Model selection, identification and validation in anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Donoso-Bravo, Andres; Mailier, Johan; Martin, Cristina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Aceves-Lara, César Arturo; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion enables waste (water) treatment and energy production in the form of biogas. The successful implementation of this process has lead to an increasing interest worldwide. However, anaerobic digestion is a complex biological process, where hundreds of microbial populations are involved, and whose start-up and operation are delicate issues. In order to better understand the process dynamics and to optimize the operating conditions, the availability of dynamic models is of paramount importance. Such models have to be inferred from prior knowledge and experimental data collected from real plants. Modeling and parameter identification are vast subjects, offering a realm of approaches and methods, which can be difficult to fully understand by scientists and engineers dedicated to the plant operation and improvements. This review article discusses existing modeling frameworks and methodologies for parameter estimation and model validation in the field of anaerobic digestion processes. The point of view is pragmatic, intentionally focusing on simple but efficient methods. PMID:21920578

  20. Technology assessment of anaerobic digesters for Arkansas farms

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, D.; Shadduck, G.; Abeles, T.

    1980-01-01

    The anaerobic process is briefly outlined. The availability and suitability of various manures in Arkansas for bioconversion to methane are examined. Chicken, turkey, and cattle manures are considered. The authors conclude that the economics of digester systems based on gas utilization alone have been marginal for most small farm applications. Feasibility of the systems are often predicted on 100% utilization of the gas produced. Often, because most livestock farms today tend to be monoculture operations, energy utilization on the farmsite heavily favors one type of energy. If conversion of the biogas to electricity is required, or, if seasonal farm energy loads are such that a large percentage of the gas goes underutilized during off-peak months, a preliminary analysis for direct combustion that showed profitability, could end up with heavy red ink for the first several years of operation. As this assessment and other studies point out, renewable energy technologies in general and digesters in particular need to be perceived as total systems and not just as energy producing devices. They need to be carefully integrated into the farming operations. In many cases, they will provide a catalyst to change the operation in ways which make for greater economic and energy stability. Thus, this assessment is not to be viewed as an evaluation of digesters as a narrow technology, but as a tool which can provide opportunities, many of which are as yet unrealized. It should also be clear that the current state-of-the-art is quite simple and that as the technology is put into practice, many new alternatives in systems design and application will materialize, in many instances, as a result of stimulating the last bastion of creative ingenuity, the farmer.

  1. Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study

    SciTech Connect

    Frank J. Hartz; Rob Taylor; Grant Davies

    2011-12-30

    One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

  2. Biogas by semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunsheng; Su, Haijia; Wang, Zhenbin; Tan, Tianwei; Qin, Peiyong

    2015-04-01

    The semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste was investigated in 1-L and 20-L continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), to identify the optimum operation condition and the methane production of the semi-continuous anaerobic process. Results from a 1-L digester indicated that the optimum organic loading rate (OLR) for semi-continuous digestion is 8 g VS/L/day. The corresponding methane yield and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction were 385 mL/g VS and 80.2 %, respectively. Anaerobic digestion was inhibited at high OLRs (12 and 16 g VS/L/day), due to volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation. Results from a 20-L digester indicated that a higher methane yield of 423 mL/g VS was obtained at this larger scale. The analysis showed that the methane production at the optimum OLR fitted well with the determined kinetics equation. An obvious decrease on the methane content was observed at the initial of digestion. The increased metabolization of microbes and the activity decrease of methanogen caused by VFA accumulation explained the lower methane content at the initial of digestion. PMID:25773980

  3. Anaerobic digestion as a waste disposal option for American Samoa

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C

    1993-01-01

    Tuna sludge and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal problem as well as an emerging opportunity for use in renewable fuel production. This research project focuses on the biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products including methane and fertilizer-grade residue through anaerobic high solids digestion. In this preliminary study, the anaerobic bioconversion of tuna sludge with MSW appears promising.

  4. Comparative analysis of anaerobically digested wastes flow properties.

    PubMed

    Mbaye, S; Dieudé-Fauvel, E; Baudez, J C

    2014-11-01

    The flow curve of anaerobically digested wastes from different origins was determined through rheological measurements. Regardless of their origin, samples can be divided into two families: simple non-Newtonian liquids well modelled by basic power law below 10%DC and viscoelastic liquids with a yield stress, well modelled by a Herschel-Bulkley model above. In all the cases, the rheological behaviour is driven by both the organic content and the volatile fraction (organic content/solid content), indicating that anaerobic digestion tends to smooth the rheological characteristics of organic wastes, whichever their origins. PMID:25052338

  5. An adaptive strategy to control anaerobic digesters for wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, O.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Cuervo, F.; Femat, R.

    1996-10-01

    The design and implementation of a new adaptive controller for anaerobic digesters is presented using a general nonlinear model and an uncertainties estimation scheme. The primary advantage of this controller over standard adaptive controllers is that biogas flow rate measurements are not required. The resulting controller is similar in form to standard adaptive controllers and can be tuned analogously. The adaptive control strategy has been implemented in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester showing good performance and robustness against changes in the feed load.

  6. Waste heat utilization in an anaerobic digestion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissevain, Brett

    Anaerobic digestion has great potential as an energy source. Not only does it provide an effective method for waste mitigation, but it has the potential to generate significant quantities of fuel and electricity. In order to ensure efficient digestion and biomass utilization, however, the system must be continuously maintained at elevated temperatures. It is technically feasible to supplement such a system with outside energy, but it is more cost effective to heat the system using only the produced biogas. While there is considerable literature covering the theory of anaerobic digestion, there are very few practical studies to show how heat utilization affects system operation. This study considers the effect of major design variables (i.e. heat exchanger efficiencies and biogas conditioning) on promoting a completely self-sustaining digestion system. The thesis considers a real world system and analyzes how it can be improved to avoid the need of an external energy source.

  7. Modified Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 for dry and semi-dry anaerobic digestion of solid organic waste.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Flavia; Chatellier, Patrice; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Frunzo, Luigi; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The role of total solids (TS) content in anaerobic digestion of selected complex organic matter, e.g. rice straw and food waste, was investigated. A range of TS from wet (4.5%) to dry (23%) was evaluated. A modified version of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1 for a complex organic substrate is proposed to take into account the effect of the TS content on anaerobic digestion. A linear function that correlates the kinetic constants of three specific processes (i.e. disintegration, acetate and propionate up-take) was included in the model. Results of biomethanation and volatile fatty acids production tests were used to calibrate the proposed model. Model simulations showed a good agreement between numerical and observed data. PMID:25311887

  8. Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

  9. Anaerobic digestion of animal waste: effect of mixing.

    PubMed

    Karim, Khursheed; Thomas Klasson, K; Hoffmann, Rebecca; Drescher, Sadie R; Depaoli, David W; Al-Dahhan, M H

    2005-09-01

    Six laboratory scale biogas mixed anaerobic digesters were operated to study the effect of biogas recycling rates and draft tube height on their performance. The digesters produced methane at 0.40-0.45 L per liter of digester volume per day. A higher methane production rate was observed in unmixed digesters, while increased biogas circulation rate reduced methane production. However, different draft tube heights caused no difference in the methane production rate. Air infiltration (up to 15% oxygen in the biogas) was observed in the digesters mixed by biogas recirculation. Slight air permeability of tubing or leakage on the vacuum side of the air pump may have caused the observed air infiltration. The similar performance of the mixed and unmixed digesters might be the result of the low solids concentration (50 g dry solids per liter of slurry) in the fed animal slurry, which could be sufficiently mixed by the naturally produced biogas. PMID:15978994

  10. Design of a large-scale anaerobic digestion facility for the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kayhanian, M.; Jones, D.

    1996-12-31

    The California Prison Industry Authority, in conjunction with the City of Folsom, operates a 100 ton/d municipal solid waste (MSW) recovery facility using inmate labor. Through manual sorting, all useful organic and inorganic materials are recycled for marketing. The remaining organic material will be further processed to remove hazardous and inert material and prepared as a feedstock for an anaerobic digestion process. The clean organic waste (approximately 78 ton/d) will then be shredded and completely mixed with sewage water prior feeding to the digester. Off gas from the digester will be collected as a fuel for the steam boiler or combusted in a waste gas burner. Steam will be injected directly into the digester for heating. The anaerobically digested material will be moved to compost area where it will be mixed with wood faction of yard waste and processed aerobically for the production of compost material as a soil amendment. Anaerobic digesters will be constructed in two phases. The first phase consists of the construction of one 26 ton/d digester to confirm the suitability of feeding and mixing equipment. Modifications will be made to the second and third digesters, in the second phase, based on operating experience of the first digester. This paper discusses important design features of the anaerobic digestion facility.

  11. Labscale Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Elements Used in Anaerobic Digestion

    E-print Network

    Labscale Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Elements Used in Anaerobic Digestion This report presents performance data for an anaerobic digestion system (at a 10-liter scale) utilizing corncob biochar as biofilm support. The system operated on grease-trap wastewater and high-rate anaerobic digestion of this material

  12. Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into Biogas: System@cornell.edu URL: http://www.jove.com/video/3978/ DOI: 10.3791/3978 Keywords: Anaerobic Digestion, J.G., Spirito, C.M., Angenent, L.T. Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic

  13. Anaerobic digestion of municipal, industrial, and livestock wastes for energy recovery and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Sax, R.I.; Lusk, P.D.

    1995-11-01

    The degradation of carbonaceous organic material by anaerobic bacteria leads to the production of methane gas (biogas) at the theoretical stoichiometric conversion rate of 0.35-cubic meters of methane per kilogram of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) reasonably close proximity to the site of this digestion process. The untreated biogas generated from anaerobic digestion typically contains from 55% to 75% methane content, with the balance consisting mainly of carbon dioxide and a small, but important, amount of hydrogen sulfide. The untreated biogas is normally saturated with water vapor at the temperature of the digestion process which typically is in the mesophilic range 25 to 38 degrees Celsius. This overview paper describes the types of anaerobic technologies which are presently used for the digestion of various type of municipal, industrial and livestock manure wastes, summarizes the principal developments which have taken place in the field during the past several years, and discusses the energy recovery economics for each of the three usage applications. The paper stratifies the use of anaerobic digestion technology for the treatment of wastewaters from industry (an application which has increased dramatically during the past decade) by geographical region, by industry type, very various categories of food processing, and by technology type, in all cases taking account of system size to emphasize the economics of energy production.

  14. An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

  15. Hydrogen production from the dissolution of nano zero valent iron and its effect on anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Xi; Guo, Jialiang; Zhang, Chunyang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI) has shown inhibition on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion due to its reductive decomposition of cell membrane. The inhibition was accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen gas due to rapid NZVI dissolution. It is not clear whether and how rapid hydrogen release from NZVI dissolution directly affects anaerobic digestion. In this study, the hydrogen release kinetics from NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) dissolution in deionized water under anaerobic conditions was first evaluated. The first-order NZVI dissolution rate constant was 2.62 ± 0.26 h(-1) with its half-life of 0.26 ± 0.03 h. Two sets of anaerobic digestion experiments (i.e., in the presence of glucose or without any substrate but at different anaerobic sludge concentrations) were performed to study the impact of H2 release from rapid NZVI dissolution, in which H2 was generated in a separate water bottle containing NZVI (i.e., ex situ H2 or externally supplied from NZVI dissolution) before hydrogen gas was introduced to anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the digestion bottle reached as high as 0.27 atm due to rapid NZVI dissolution, resulting in temporary inhibition of methane production. Nevertheless, the 5-d cumulative methane volume in the group with ex situ H2 production due to NZVI dissolution was actually higher than that of control, suggesting NZVI inhibition on methanogenesis is solely due to the reductive decomposition of cell membrane after direct contact with NZVI. PMID:26521217

  16. Kinetic model for anaerobic digestion of biogas biological sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Gossett, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was the development and evaluation of a comprehensive kinetic model capable of predicting digester performance when fed biological sludge. Preliminary conversion mechanisms such as cell deaths, lysis, and hydrolysis responsible for rendering viable biological sludge organisms to available substrate were studied in depth. The results of this study indicate that hydrolysis of the dead, particulate biomass - primarily consisting of protein - is the slowest step, and therefore kinetically controls the overall process of an anaerobic digestion of biological sludge. A kinetic model was developed which could accurately describe digester performance and predict effluent quality.

  17. A STUDY OF LAND APPLICATION OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-scale research project was conducted in 2004-2005 to evaluate land application of anaerobically digested biosolids at agronomic levels. Biosolids had not been applied to this land previously. For this study, biosolids wee applied in a 100-m diameter circle by a side dis...

  18. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass, and food w...

  19. Anaerobic Digestion. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. These materials include: (1) unit overview; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines; (4) student worksheets for each lesson (with answers); and (5) two copies of a final quiz (with and without answers). Lesson 1 is a review of the theory of…

  20. STABILIZATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE BY TWO-PHASE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research described in the report was concerned with evaluation of alternative approaches to anaerobic digestion, a process commonly used on the residual stream from wastewater treatment. The principal approach studied was that of separating the acid- and methane-forming phase...

  1. Anaerobic digestion of the liquid fraction of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, V.; Dahlberg, S.; Lindley, J.A.

    1983-06-01

    The authors tested several solid liquid separation systems suitable for processing dairy manure prior to anaerobic digestion. None of the systems tried have completely satisfied the requirements. Evaluated effects of separation on biogas production. Unseparated dairy manure produced more biogas than the liquid fraction.

  2. Anaerobic Digestion Analysis. Training Module 5.120.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with alkalinity, volatile acids and carbon dioxide determinations for an anaerobic sludge digester. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers total and bicarbonate…

  3. Inactivation of selected bacterial pathogens in dairy cattle manure by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (balloon type digester).

    PubMed

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E; Mamphweli, Sampson N; Meyer, Edson L; Okoh, Anthony I; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%-99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days) < Escherichia coli sp. (62 days) < Salmonella sp. (133 days) from a viable count of 10.1 × 103, 3.6 × 105, 7.4 × 103 to concentrations below the detection limit (DL = 102 cfu/g manure), respectively. This disparity in survival rates may be influenced by the inherent characteristics of these bacteria, available nutrients as well as the stages of the anaerobic digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days. PMID:25026086

  4. Anaerobic co-digestion of livestock and vegetable processing wastes: fibre degradation and digestate stability.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Gómez, Xiomar; Morán, Antonio; García-González, Mari Cruz

    2013-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion of livestock wastes (swine manure (SM) and poultry litter (PL)) and vegetable processing wastes (VPW) mixtures was evaluated in terms of methane yield, volatile solids removal and lignocellulosic material degradation. Batch experiments were performed with 2% VS (volatile solids) to ensure complete conversion of TVFAs (total volatile fatty acids) and to avoid ammonia inhibition. Experimental methane yields obtained for the mixtures resulted in higher values than those obtained from the sum of the methane yields from the individual components. VPW addition to livestock wastes before anaerobic digestion also resulted in improved VS elimination. In SM-VPW co-digestions, CH4 yield increased from 111 to 244 mL CH4 g VS added(-1), and the percentage of VS removed increased from 50% to 86%. For PL-VPW co-digestions, the corresponding values were increased from 158 to 223 mL CH4 g VS added(-1) and from 70% to 92% VS removed. Hemicelluloses and more than 50% of cellulose were degraded during anaerobic digestion. Thermal analyses indicated that the stabilization of the wastes during anaerobic digestion resulted in significantly less energy being released by digestate samples than fresh samples. PMID:23540357

  5. Inactivation of Selected Bacterial Pathogens in Dairy Cattle Manure by Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion (Balloon Type Digester)

    PubMed Central

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Mamphweli, Sampson N.; Meyer, Edson L.; Okoh, Anthony I.; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%–99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days) < Escherichia coli sp. (62 days) < Salmonella sp. (133 days) from a viable count of 10.1 × 103, 3.6 × 105, 7.4 × 103 to concentrations below the detection limit (DL = 102 cfu/g manure), respectively. This disparity in survival rates may be influenced by the inherent characteristics of these bacteria, available nutrients as well as the stages of the anaerobic digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days. PMID:25026086

  6. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass after ultrasound pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Passos, Fabiana; Astals, Sergi; Ferrer, Ivet

    2014-11-01

    High rate algal ponds are an economic and sustainable alternative for wastewater treatment, where microalgae and bacteria grow in symbiosis removing organic matter and nutrients. Microalgal biomass produced in these systems can be valorised through anaerobic digestion. However, microalgae anaerobic biodegradability is limited by the complex cell wall structure and therefore a pretreatment step may be required to improve the methane yield. In this study, ultrasound pretreatment at a range of applied specific energy (16-67 MJ/kg TS) was investigated prior to microalgae anaerobic digestion. Experiments showed how organic matter solubilisation (16-100%), hydrolysis rate (25-56%) and methane yield (6-33%) were improved as the pretreatment intensity increased. Mathematical modelling revealed that ultrasonication had a higher effect on the methane yield than on the hydrolysis rate. A preliminary energy assessment indicated that the methane yield increase was not high enough as to compensate the electricity requirement of ultrasonication without biomass dewatering (8% VS). PMID:25002372

  7. Anaerobic digestion of yard waste with hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-03-01

    The digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass is limited by its high content of refractory components. The objective of this study is to investigate hydrothermal pretreatment and its effects on anaerobic digestion of sorted organic waste with submerged fermentation. Hydrothermal pretreatment (HT) was performed prior to anaerobic digestion, and three agents were examined for the HT: hot compressed water, alkaline solution, and acidic solution. The concentrations of glucose and xylose were the highest in the sample pretreated in acidic solution. Compared with that of the untreated sample, the biogas yields from digesting the samples pretreated in alkaline solution, acidic solution, and hot water increased by 364, 107, and 79%, respectively. The decrease of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in liquid phase followed the same order as for the biogas yield. The initial ammonia content of the treated samples followed the order sample treated in acidic solution > sample treated in alkaline solution > sample treated in hot water. The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were low, indicating that the anaerobic digestion process was running at continuously stable conditions. PMID:24425302

  8. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.R. . E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion I. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the first of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include the five basic functions of an anaerobic digester, basic theory of the biological processes involved, basic equipment necessary for digestion, and the products of digestion. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  10. Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

  11. [Effect of alkaline treatment on anaerobic digestion of rice straw].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Yin; Zheng, Zheng; Luo, Yan; Zou, Xing-Xing; Fang, Cai-Xi

    2010-09-01

    The biogas yields of rice straw during anaerobic digestion can be improved by alkaline pretreatment, while it increased the cost because of large amount of alkaline. In order to decrease the amount, 3 sets of experiments were performed using straw with alkaline treatment (pretreatment), digested straw with alkaline treatment (post-treatment) and straw digested directly (control). The results showed that cell wall of straw was destroyed by 5% NaOH treated for 48h, the COD (chemical oxygen demand), total nitrogen, NO(3-) -N and NH(4+) -N were increased from 2 311.11, 175.40, 5.02 and 117.82 mg/L to 10488.89, 417.84, 248.64 and 141.44 mg/L respectively. It suggested that not only lignocellulose but also some nitrogenous materials were destroyed or broken down by alkaline treatment. The lignin structure was destroyed through alkaline treatment that caused the decreased lignin, but the crystallinity index (C(r)I) of cellulose increased from 0.592 3 to 0.662 2. The results of anaerobic digestion showed that the total solid of straw decreased 50.47% after anaerobic digestion treatment leading to less workload and only 50% alkaline used. However, the biogas yield of post-treatment and pretreatment were 382.32 mL/g of TS(added) and 375.84 mL/g of TS(added). Lignin content of control increased while decreased in pretreatment and post-treatment. After anaerobic digestion, crystalline of cellulose was destroyed significantly, and crystalline and amorphous of post-treatment were destroyed more severely than that of pretreatment. From all those mentioned above, post-treatment of straw with alkaline was economical and feasible for biogas production. PMID:21072948

  12. Optimizing the Logistics of Anaerobic Digestion of Manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoori, Emad; Flynn, Peter C.

    Electrical power production from the combustion of biogas from anaerobic digestion (AD) of manure is a means of recovering energy from animal waste. We evaluate the lowest cost method of moving material to and from centralized AD plants serving multiple confined feeding operations. Two areas are modeled, Lethbridge County, Alberta, Canada, an area of concentrated beef cattle feedlots, and Red Deer County, Alberta, a mixed-farming area with hog, dairy, chicken and beef cattle farms, and feedlots. We evaluate two types of AD plant: ones that return digestate to the source confined feeding operation for land spreading (current technology), and ones that process digestate to produce solid fertilizer and a dischargeable water stream (technology under development). We evaluate manure and digestate trucking, trucking of manure with return of digestate by pipelines, and pipelining of manure plus digestate. We compare the overall cost of power from these scenarios to farm or feedlot-based AD units. For a centralized AD plant with digestate return for land spreading the most economical transport option for manure plus digestate is by truck for the mixed-farming area and by pipelines for the concentrated feedlot area. For a centralized AD plant with digestate processing, the most economical transport option is trucking of manure for both cases.

  13. Study of Resource Recovery and Epidemiology in an Anaerobic Digester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Cao, Song; Hunt, M. D.; Fu, Xuping

    1995-01-01

    Three 4-liter packed bed anaerobic digesters were fabricated and operated at 35 degrees C, pH around 7, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20, 10 and 5 days to study the resource recovery and epidemiology in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). A simulated wastewater, consisted of shower water, clothwash water, dishwasher water, handwash water, and urine flush water was used as the feeding solution. Under steady-state operation, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium wer monitored in the digester input and output solutions. The volume and the CH4/CO2 ratios in the biogas produced from the anaerobic digesters were measured. The results indicate about 90 percent of TOC is converted while only 5-8 percent of N-P-K are consumed in the digester. A multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis was used as the indicator bacterium in the epidemiology study. The levels of Salmonella choleraesuis in the influent and the effluent wer determined and decimal decay rate constants, k(d), were estimated. The k(d) values were greater at higher initial doses than lower doses for the same HR, and greater for batch digestion (7.89/d) than for continuous digestion (4.28, 3.82, and 3.82/d for 20, 10, and 5 d HRT, respectively).

  14. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  15. Dynamic simulation model for anaerobic digestion of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    A simple yet useful dynamic simulator for the anaerobic digestion of cellulosic feedstock has been developed. The incentive for this simulator is a need for guidance in design and optimization of an anaerobic digestin process for volume reduction and stabilization of low-level radioactive wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These wastes are primarily blotter and other paper and cotton/polyester clothing. Anaerobic digestion will convert a substantial mass (and hence volume) of waste to gaseous products which can be flared or simply released. The remaining sludge will contain the radionuclides and is expected to have only 5 to 10% of the original waste volume. This stabilized sludge will be more suitable for disposal by shallow land burial than is the original untreated waste. The liquid effluent will go to existing treatment facilities for hot liquids at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). An anaerobic digestion process can be scaled to handle small or modest quantities of waste and is expected to be vastly superior to incineration in this regard.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of stillage to produce bioenergy in the sugarcane-to-ethanol industry.

    PubMed

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Garcia, Marcelo Loureiro

    2014-01-01

    Stillage is the main wastewater from ethanol production, containing a high chemical oxygen demand in addition to acidic and corrosive characteristics. Though stillage may be used as a soil fertilizer, its land application may be considered problematic due its high polluting potential. Anaerobic digestion represents an effective alternative treatment to reduce the pollution load of stillage. In addition, the methane gas produced within the process may be converted to energy, which can be directly applied to the treatment plant. The objective of this paper was to investigate the energetic potential of anaerobic digestion applied to stillage in the sugarcane ethanol industry. An overall analysis of the results indicates energy recovery capacity (ERC) values for methane ranging from 3.5% to 10%, respectively, for sugarcane juice and molasses. The processes employed to obtain the fermentable broth, as well as the distillation step, represent the main limiting factors to the energetic potential feasibility. Considering financial aspects the annual savings could reach up to US$ 30 million due to anaerobic digestion of stillage in relatively large-scale distilleries (365,000 m3 of ethanol per year). The best scenarios were verified for the association between anaerobic digestion of stillage and combustion of bagasse. In this case, the fossil fuels consumption in distilleries could be fully ceased, such the ERC of methane could reach values ranging from 140% to 890%. PMID:24600872

  17. Electrochemical mineralization of anaerobically digested olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M R; Marques, I P; Correia, J P

    2012-09-01

    A novel approach was developed for the energetic valorisation and treatment of olive mill wastewater (OMW), combining anaerobic digestion and electrochemical oxidation. The electrochemical treatment was proposed as the final step to mineralize the remaining OMW fraction from the anaerobic reactor. The electrooxidation of anaerobically digested OMW was investigated over dimensionally stable anodes (DSAs). RuO(2) based anode was significantly more efficient than IrO(2)-type DSA, mainly for the COD removal. IrO(2) based anode promoted a selective oxidation of phenols and colour removal. For instance, after an electrolysis charge of 10.4 × 10(4) C L(-1), COD removals of 14 and 99%, phenols removals of 91 and 100% and colour removals of 85 and 100% were obtained for IrO(2) and RuO(2) DSAs-type, respectively. The electrochemical post-treatment was effectively performed without using a supporting electrolyte and in the presence of the solids that remained from the anaerobic process. The achievement of the required effluent quality for sewer systems disposal depends on the operating conditions of the anaerobic process. Consequently, special care must be taken with the chloride and nitrogen levels that may surpass the legal discharge limits. The electrochemical oxidation over RuO(2) based DSA is an appropriate second-step treatment for OMW disposal, after the recovery of its energetic potential. PMID:22687524

  18. Anaerobic digestion for energy production and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Lettinga, G.; Haandel, A.C. Vaan

    1993-12-31

    Anaerobic digestion is the decomposition of complex molecules into simpler substances by micro-organisms in the absence of oxygen. Anaerobic digestion processes can be employed for resource conservation, for the production of biogas and other useful end products from biomass, and for environmental protection through waste and wastewater treatment. Modern high-rate anaerobic wastewater-treatment processes can effectively remove organic pollutants from wastewater at a cost far below that of conventional aerobic processes. These anaerobic wastewater treatment processes can also be profitably applied for the generation of biogas from energy crops such as sugarcane. In fact, these methods might even be an attractive alternative for the alcohol fermentation extensively employed in Brazil for the production of fuel alcohol from sugarcane. The potential of modern anaerobic processes for this purpose has not yet been widely recognized. This paper describes the principles and use of these processes and demonstrates their prospects for producing energy from sugarcane (1) by treating vinasse, the wastewater generated during the production of ethanol from sugarcane, and (2) as a direct method for producing biogas from sugarcane juice.

  19. Early warning indicators for monitoring the process failure of anaerobic digestion system of food waste.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; He, Qingming; Wei, Yunmei; He, Qin; Peng, Xuya

    2014-11-01

    To determine reliable state parameters which could be used as early warning indicators of process failure due to the acidification of anaerobic digestion of food waste, three mesophilic anaerobic digesters of food waste with different operation conditions were investigated. Such parameters as gas production, methane content, pH, concentrations of volatile fatty acid (VFA), alkalinity and their combined indicators were evaluated. Results revealed that operation conditions significantly affect the responses of parameters and thus the optimal early warning indicators of each reactor differ from each other. None of the single indicators was universally valid for all the systems. The universally valid indicators should combine several parameters to supply complementary information. A combination of total VFA, the ratio of VFA to total alkalinity (VFA/TA) and the ratio of bicarbonate alkalinity to total alkalinity (BA/TA) can reflect the metabolism of the digesting system and realize rapid and effective early warning. PMID:25218457

  20. Anaerobic digestion of pulp and paper mill wastewater and sludge.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-15

    Pulp and paper mills generate large amounts of waste organic matter that may be converted to renewable energy in form of methane. The anaerobic treatment of mill wastewater is widely accepted however, usually only applied to few selected streams. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates in full-scale reactors range between 30 and 90%, and methane yields are 0.30-0.40 m(3) kg(-1) COD removed. Highest COD removal rates are achieved with condensate streams from chemical pulping (75-90%) and paper mill effluents (60-80%). Numerous laboratory and pilot-scale studies have shown that, contrary to common perception, most other mill effluents are also to some extent anaerobically treatable. Even for difficult-to-digest streams such as bleaching effluents COD removal rates range between 15 and 90%, depending on the extent of dilution prior to anaerobic treatment, and the applied experimental setting. Co-digestion of different streams containing diverse substrate can level out and diminish toxicity, and may lead to a more robust microbial community. Furthermore, the microbial population has the ability to become acclimated and adapted to adverse conditions. Stress situations such as toxic shock loads or temporary organic overloading may be tolerated by an adapted community, whereas they could lead to process disturbance with an un-adapted community. Therefore, anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing elevated levels of inhibitors or toxicants should be initiated by an acclimation/adaptation period that can last between a few weeks and several months. In order to gain more insight into the underlying processes of microbial acclimation/adaptation and co-digestion, future research should focus on the relationship between wastewater composition, reactor operation and microbial community dynamics. The potential for engineering and managing the microbial resource is still largely untapped. Unlike in wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of mill biosludge (waste activated sludge) and primary sludge is still in its infancy. Current research is mainly focused on developing efficient pretreatment methods that enable fast hydrolysis of complex organic matter, shorter sludge residence times and as a consequence, smaller sludge digesters. Previous experimental studies indicate that the anaerobic digestibility of non-pretreated biosludge from pulp and paper mills varies widely, with volatile solids (VS) removal rates of 21-55% and specific methane yields ranging between 40 and 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Pretreatment can increase the digestibility to some extent, however in almost all reported cases, the specific methane yield of pretreated biosludge did not exceed 200 mL g(-1) VS fed. Increases in specific methane yield mostly range between 0 and 90% compared to non-pretreated biosludge, whereas larger improvements were usually achieved with more difficult-to-digest biosludge. Thermal treatment and microwave treatment are two of the more effective methods. The heat required for the elevated temperatures applied in both methods may be provided from surplus heat that is often available at pulp and paper mills. Given the large variability in specific methane yield of non-pretreated biosludge, future research should focus on the links between anaerobic digestibility and sludge properties. Research should also involve mill-derived primary sludge. Although biosludge has been the main target in previous studies, primary sludge often constitutes the bulk of mill-generated sludge, and co-digestion of a mixture between both types of sludge may become practical. The few laboratory studies that have included mill primary sludge indicate that, similar to biosludge, the digestibility can range widely. Long-term studies should be conducted to explore the potential of microbial adaptation to lignocellulosic material which can constitute more than half of the organic matter in pulp and paper mill sludge. PMID:25150519

  1. SALE OF SURPLUS DIGESTER AND LANDFILL GAS TO PUBLIC UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane gas produced by anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge can be upgraded to pipeline quality and sold to a public utility for injection into a natural gas distribution system. Upgrading the gas typically involves treatment for removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfid...

  2. Development of a new genetic algorithm to solve the feedstock scheduling problem in an anaerobic digester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cram, Ana Catalina

    As worldwide environmental awareness grow, alternative sources of energy have become important to mitigate climate change. Biogas in particular reduces greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming and has the potential of providing 25% of the annual demand for natural gas in the U.S. In 2011, 55,000 metric tons of methane emissions were reduced and 301 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions were avoided through the use of biogas alone. Biogas is produced by anaerobic digestion through the fermentation of organic material. It is mainly composed of methane with a rage of 50 to 80% in its concentration. Carbon dioxide covers 20 to 50% and small amounts of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and nitrogen. The biogas production systems are anaerobic digestion facilities and the optimal operation of an anaerobic digester requires the scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a specific time horizon. The availability times, biomass quantities, biogas production rates and storage decay rates must all be taken into account for maximal biogas production to be achieved during the planning horizon. Little work has been done to optimize the scheduling of different types of feedstock in anaerobic digestion facilities to maximize the total biogas produced by these systems. Therefore, in the present thesis, a new genetic algorithm is developed with the main objective of obtaining the optimal sequence in which different feedstocks will be processed and the optimal time to allocate to each feedstock in the digester with the main objective of maximizing the production of biogas considering different types of feedstocks, arrival times and decay rates. Moreover, all batches need to be processed in the digester in a specified time with the restriction that only one batch can be processed at a time. The developed algorithm is applied to 3 different examples and a comparison with results obtained in previous studies is presented.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates new opportunities for proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products, including a renewable fuel. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided, based on estimates of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

  4. Novel anaerobic digestion process with sludge ozonation for economically feasible power production from biogas.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Yasui, H; Goel, R; Li, Y Y; Noike, T

    2011-01-01

    A novel process scheme was developed to achieve economically feasible energy recovery from anaerobic digestion. The new process scheme employs a hybrid configuration of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion with sludge ozonation: the ozonated sludge is first degraded in a thermophilic digester and then further degraded in a mesophilic digester. In small-scale pilot experiments of the new process scheme, degradation of VSS improved by 3.5% over the control (mesophilic-only configuration) with 20% less ozone consumption. Moreover, biogas conversion also improved by 7.1% over the control. Selective enrichment of inorganic compounds during centrifugation produced a dewatered sludge cake with very low water content (59.4%). This low water content in the sludge cake improved its auto-thermal combustion potential during incineration and added to the overall energy savings. We conducted a case study to evaluate power generation from biogas for a municipal wastewater treatment plant with an average dry weather flow of 43,000 m3/d. Electricity production cost was 5.2 ¢/kWh for the advanced process with power generation, which is lower than the current market price of 7.2 ¢/kWh. The new anaerobic digestion scheme with power generation may reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 1,000 t-CO(2)/year compared with the conventional process without power generation. PMID:21508552

  5. Survival of multidrug-resistant bacteria in thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and waste milk.

    PubMed

    Beneragama, Nilmini; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Lateef, Suraju A; Yamashiro, Takaki; Ihara, Ikko; Umetsu, Kazutaka

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion is considered as a promising method to manage animal waste with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Current research was conducted to investigate the survival of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDRB) resistant to three groups of antibiotics: (i) cefazolin, neomycin, vancomycin, kanamycin (group 1); (ii) penicillin, oxytetracycline, ampicillin, streptomycin (group 2); and (iii) cefazolin, neomycin, vancomycin, kanamycin, penicillin, oxytetracycline, ampicillin, streptomycin (group 3), in anaerobic digestion of dairy manure and co-digestion of dairy manure and waste milk at 37°C and 55°C for 22 days, respectively. The population densities of three groups of MDRB on peptone, tryptone, yeast and glucose agar plates incubated at 30°C for 7 days before and after digestion showed 100% destruction in both digestates at thermophilic temperature. Overall reduction of more than 90% of three groups of MDRB was observed in mesophilic digestion with no significant differences (P?>?0.05) between manure and milk mixture. Co-digestion of dairy manure and waste milk always produced significantly (P?gas and methane gas than digestion of manure alone at both temperatures. Gas production in each case was significantly (P?digestion than in mesophilic digestion. The results demonstrate that thermophilic co-digestion of dairy manure and waste milk offers more benefits in terms of the environment and economy. PMID:23607603

  6. Marine biomass program: anaerobic digestion systems development and stability study. Final report 1 Feb-31 Dec 82

    SciTech Connect

    Fannin, K.F.; Srivastava, V.J.; Mensinger, J.D.; Chynoweth, D.P.

    1983-07-01

    Marine biomass represents a significant potential worldwide energy resource that can be converted to methane by anaerobic digestion. Through efficient biomass production, harvesting, and conversion techniques, competitive methane gas costs are achievable. The objective of this research project is to develop and define an anaerobic digestion process for producing methane from giant brown kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). Kelp continues to show superior performance as a feedstock for gas production when compared with other particulate biomass feedstocks. Further work on upflow solids reactors and two-phase reactor systems is expected to improve gas cost estimates over those made using other state-of-the-art reactors.

  7. Influent Fractionation for Modeling Continuous Anaerobic Digestion Processes.

    PubMed

    Lübken, Manfred; Kosse, Pascal; Koch, Konrad; Gehring, Tito; Wichern, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The first dynamic model developed to describe anaerobic digestion processes dates back to 1969. Since then, considerable improvements in identifying the underlying biochemical processes and associated microorganisms have been achieved. These have led to an increasing complexity of both model structure and the standard set of stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. Literature has always paid attention to kinetic parameter estimation, as this determines model accuracy with respect to predicting the dynamic behavior of biogas systems. As sufficient computing power is easily available nowadays, sophisticated linear and nonlinear parameter estimation techniques are applied to evaluate parameter uncertainty. However, the uncertainty of influent fractionation in these parameter optimization procedures is generally neglected. As anaerobic digestion systems are currently increasingly used to convert a broad variety of organic biomass to methane, the lack of generally accepted guidelines for input characterization adapted to the simulation model's characteristics is a considerable limitation of model application to these substrates. Directly after the introduction of the standardized Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1), several publications pointed out that the model's requirement of a detailed influent characterization can hardly be fulfilled. The main shortcoming of the model application was addressed in the reliable and practical identification of the model's input state variables for particulate and soluble carbohydrates, proteins and lipids, as well as for the inerts. Several authors derived biomass characterization procedures, most of them dedicated to a particular substrate, and some of them being of general nature, but none of these approaches have resulted in a practical standard protocol so far. This review provides an overview of existing approaches that improve substrate influent characterization to be used for state of the art anaerobic digestion models. PMID:26337847

  8. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass: Challenges, opportunities and research needs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Cristina; Sialve, Bruno; Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Integration of anaerobic digestion (AD) with microalgae processes has become a key topic to support economic and environmental development of this resource. Compared with other substrates, microalgae can be produced close to the plant without the need for arable lands and be fully integrated within a biorefinery. As a limiting step, anaerobic hydrolysis appears to be one of the most challenging steps to reach a positive economic balance and to completely exploit the potential of microalgae for biogas and fertilizers production. This review covers recent investigations dealing with microalgae AD and highlights research opportunities and needs to support the development of this resource. Novel approaches to increase hydrolysis rate, the importance of the reactor design and the noteworthiness of the microbial anaerobic community are addressed. Finally, the integration of AD with microalgae processes and the potential of the carboxylate platform for chemicals and biofuels production are reviewed. PMID:26454349

  9. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    PubMed

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. PMID:25562581

  10. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-10-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6?g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion. PMID:25799161

  11. [Agroindustrial wastes methanization and bacterial composition in anaerobic digestion].

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, María E; Pérez-Fabiel, Sergio; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The tons of organic waste that are annually generated by agro-industry, can be used as raw material for methane production. For this reason, it is important to previously perform biodegradability tests to organic wastes for their full scale methanization. This paper addresses biodegradability, methane production and the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria during anaerobic digestion of banana, mango and papaya agroindustrial wastes. Mango and banana wastes had higher organic matter content than papaya in terms of their volatile solids and total solid rate (94 and 75% respectively). After 63 days of treatment, the highest methane production was observed in banana waste anaerobic digestion: 63.89ml CH4/per gram of chemical oxygen demand of the waste. In the PCR-DGGE molecular analysis, different genomic footprints with oligonucleotides for eubacteria and archeobacteria were found. Biochemical methane potential results proved that banana wastes have the best potential to be used as raw material for methane production. The result of a PCR- DGGE analysis using specific oligonucleotides enabled to identify the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria present during the anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial wastes throughout the process. PMID:26365369

  12. Simulation of low temperature anaerobic digestion of dairy and swine manure q

    E-print Network

    Simulation of low temperature anaerobic digestion of dairy and swine manure q D.T. Hill *, S performance data from digesters using animal waste in this temperature range have been lacking, thus allowing Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Animal-waste; Simulation; Anaerobic-digestion; Swine

  13. HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION USING CARBON SUPPORT FOR BIOFILM IMMOBILIZATION

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION USING CARBON SUPPORT FOR BIOFILM IMMOBILIZATION A THESIS SUBMITTED-rate anaerobic digestion reactor system utilizing corn cob biochar as biofilm support was characterized at 10 of approximately 85% with a methane production rate of 0.89 m3 m-3 d-1 were achieved for digestion of the synthetic

  14. The Effect of Enzyme Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Jose Tall Wheat Grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and Beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 35°C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations w...

  15. Anaerobic digestion of livestock manures in the USA: A current opportunities casebook

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    Growth and concentration of the livestock industry creates opportunities for the proper disposal of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine and poultry farms. One manure management system provides not only pollution prevention but also converts a manure management problem into a new profit center. Economic evaluations and case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of livestock manures is a commercially-available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable co-products including a cost-effective alternative fuel for livestock production operations. This Casebook examines some of the current opportunities for the recovery of methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal manures. An introduction to the engineering economies of these technologies is provided and possible end-use applications for methane gas generated by the digestion process are discussed. The economic evaluations are based on engineering studies of digesters that generate electricity from the recovered methane. Regression models, which can be used to estimate digester cost and internal rate of return, are developed from the evaluations. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes}, are provided as a reality check.

  16. Liquid-liquid extraction of short-chain organic acids from anaerobic digesters

    SciTech Connect

    Wene, E.G.; Antonopoulos, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic digesters with glucose or municipal solid waste (MSW) feed were operated to maximize production of short-chain organic acids. Digester effluent was extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or trioctylamine (TOA) in heptane or 2-heptanone as the water immiscible phase. Digester effluent was recycled to digesters after extraction. Both TOPO and TOA in organic solvents effectively extract organic acids from anaerobic digester fluid. Longer chain acids have a higher distribution coefficient than shorter-chain acids. Long term extraction of digester fluid with recycle was not toxic to the anaerobic production of short-chain acids.

  17. CFD simulation of mixing in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that characterizes mechanical draft tube mixing in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters was developed. Simulation of flow patterns were carried out with a propeller rotating from 400 to 750rpm, assuming liquid manure to be Newtonian (water) and non-Newtonian fluids depending on the total solids (TS) concentration. Power number and flow number of the propeller in water mixing were validated against lab specifications and experimental data from a field test. The rotational direction and placement of the propeller were examined to identify the primary pumping mode and the optimum position of the propeller fixed inside the tube. Quantitative comparisons of two mixing methods and two digester shapes indicated that mechanical draft tube mixing is more efficient than external pumped recirculation, and that the egg shape provides for more efficient mixing than the cylindrical shape. Furthermore, scale-up rules for mixing in egg-shaped digesters were investigated. PMID:19913870

  18. Critical comparison of different model structures for the applied simulation of the anaerobic digestion of agricultural energy crops.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, Sören; Nelles, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Different model structures were compared to simulate the characteristic process variables of the anaerobic digestion of maize, sugar beet and grain silage. Depending on the type and number of the required components, it can be shown that in comparison to the complex Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) different simplified model structures can describe the gas production rate, ammonia nitrogen and acetate concentration or pH value equally well. Since the reduction of the predominantly fast kinetics of the methanogenesis, acetogenesis or acidogenesis will only have little effect on the simulation of the specific gas production, it can be proven that the hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step during the uninhibited anaerobic digestion of complex particulate substrates. However, the stoichiometric comparison reveals that the model protein gelatine is not suitable for a representative characterization of agricultural energy crops. PMID:25497056

  19. Control strategy for maximum anaerobic co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    García-Gen, Santiago; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M

    2015-09-01

    A control strategy for optimising the performance of anaerobic co-digestion in terms of methane productivity, digestate quality and process stability is presented. A linear programming approach is adopted to calculate the feeding of multiple substrates for maximum methane productivity, subjected to restrictions based on experimental and heuristic knowledge. Process stability is quantitatively assessed by an empirical diagnosis function comparing alkalinity ratio measurements against reference values (outputs between (-1,1]). A second empirical diagnosis function is defined to compare methane flow rate measurements against a reference value of maximum capacity (outputs between (0,1]). A variable-gain control function (outputs between (-1,1]), derived from the diagnosis functions, is defined to determine the quantitative change applied to the most active constraint of the substrate blend optimisation problem leading to a new set-point of feeding substrates blend. The control strategy works in a closed-loop architecture under which the process performance for each blend of substrates is continuously assessed. The system was successfully validated in a 1 m(3) hybrid Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket - Anaerobic Filter (UASB-AF) reactor, treating blends of substrates (gelatine, glycerine and pig manure supernatant) at OLR values between 0.71 and 6.33 gCOD/L d over a period of 210 days at mesophilic conditions. PMID:26001824

  20. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  1. Anaerobic digestion performance of vinegar residue in continuously stirred tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Ruihong; He, Yanfeng; Wang, Wen; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of vinegar residue was investigated in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The influence of organic loading rate (OLR) and effluent recirculation on AD performance of vinegar residue was tested. Five OLRs, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1), were used. The highest volumetric methane productivity of 581.88 mL L(-1) was achieved at OLR of 2.5 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1). Effluent reflux ratio was set as 50%, the results showed that effluent recirculation could effectively neutralize the acidity of vinegar residue, raise the pH of the feedstock, and enhance the buffering capacity of the AD system. Anaerobic digestion of vinegar residue could be a promising way not only for converting this waste into gas energy but also alleviating environmental pollution which might be useful for future industrial application. PMID:25838040

  2. Optimization of solid state anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW by digestate recirculation: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Michele, Pognani; Giuliana, D'Imporzano; Carlo, Minetti; Sergio, Scotti; Fabrizio, Adani

    2015-01-01

    Dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of OFMSW was optimized in order to produce biogas avoiding the use of solid inoculum. Doing so the dry AD was performed irrigating the solid waste with liquid digestate (flow rate of 1:1.18-1:0.9 w/w waste/digestate; 21d of hydraulic retention time - HRT) in order to remove fermentation products inhibiting AD process. Results indicated that a high hydrolysis rate of organic matter (OM) and partial biogas production were obtained directly during the dry AD. Hydrolysate OM was removed from digester by the percolate flow and it was subsequently used to feed a liquid anaerobic digester. During dry AD a total loss of 36.9% of total solids was recorded. Methane balance indicated that 18.4% of potential methane can be produced during dry AD and 49.7% by the percolate. Nevertheless results obtained for liquid AD digestion indicated that only 20.4% and 25.7% of potential producible methane was generated by adopting 15 and 20 days of HRT, probably due to the AD inhibition due to high presence of toxic ammonia forms in the liquid medium. PMID:25305682

  3. Hydrolytic activity of alpha-amylase in anaerobic digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Y; Ohashi, A; Imachi, H; Harada, H

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis is usually considered to be a rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. For improving anaerobic solid waste treatments, it is essential to elucidate the mechanism of hydrolysis. In this study, alpha-amylase, one of the hydrolytic enzymes, was investigated for the elucidation of more precise mechanism of hydrolysis. Alpha-amylase activity of solid starch-degrading bacteria (SDB) was estimated through batch experiments with several different substrates and with distinction between cell-bound and cell-free alpha-amylase. Monitoring of newly isolated strains of SDB was done by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results indicated that cell-bound alpha-amylase is chiefly responsible for the hydrolysis in the digested sludge, providing very useful information that the contact between microbial cells and solids is significantly important. The activity of alpha-amylase of the digested sludge remained quite low when not required, but increased as they recognized appropriate substrates. Several-fold higher activity was obtained for starch or maltose as compared to glucose only. PMID:16180437

  4. Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

    1994-08-01

    The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

  5. Impact of physical pre-treatment of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste on greenhouse-gas emissions and the economy in a Swedish anaerobic digestion system.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, My; Holmström, David; Bohn, Irene; Bisaillon, Mattias; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2015-04-01

    Several methods for physical pre-treatments of source sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SSOFMSW) before for anaerobic digestion (AD) are available, with the common feature that they generate a homogeneous slurry for AD and a dry refuse fraction for incineration. The selection of efficient methods relies on improved understanding of how the pre-treatment impacts on the separation and on the slurry's AD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the performance of physical pre-treatment of SSOFMSW on greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions and on the economy of an AD system including a biogas plant with supplementary systems for heat and power production in Sweden. Based on the performance of selected Swedish facilities, as well as chemical analyses and BMP tests of slurry and refuse, the computer-based evaluation tool ORWARE was improved as to accurately describe mass flows through the physical pre-treatment and anaerobic degradation. The environmental and economic performance of the evaluated system was influenced by the TS concentration in the slurry, as well as the distribution of incoming solids between slurry and refuse. The focus to improve the efficiency of these systems should primarily be directed towards minimising the water addition in the pre-treatment provided that this slurry can still be efficiently digested. Second, the amount of refuse should be minimised, while keeping a good quality of the slurry. Electricity use/generation has high impact on GHG emissions and the results of the study are sensitive to assumptions of marginal electricity and of electricity use in the pre-treatment. PMID:25661691

  6. Anaerobic digestion of food waste using yeast.

    PubMed

    Suwannarat, Jutarat; Ritchie, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Fermentative breakdown of food waste seems a plausible alternative to feeding food waste to pigs, incineration or garbage disposal in tourist areas. We determined the optimal conditions for the fermentative breakdown of food waste using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in incubations up to 30days. Yeast efficiently broke down food waste with food waste loadings as high as 700g FW/l. The optimum inoculation was ?46×10(6)cells/l of culture with a 40°C optimum (25-40°C). COD and BOD were reduced by ?30-50%. Yeast used practically all the available sugars and reduced proteins and lipids by ?50%. Yeast was able to metabolize lipids much better than expected. Starch was mobilized after very long term incubations (>20days). Yeast was effective in breaking down the organic components of food waste but CO2 gas and ethanol production (?1.5%) were only significant during the first 7days of incubations. PMID:25987287

  7. Enrichment and specific quantification of Methanocalculus in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; He, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Members of the genus Methanocalculus are characterized as hydrogenotrophic methanogens and present in diverse natural and engineered environments. Methanocalculus populations were enriched from anaerobic digesters treating dairy waste using formate as the substrate. Methanocalculus sequences retrieved from the enrichment cultures were subsequently used to develop a Methanocalculus-specific TaqMan qPCR assay to determine the abundance of Methanocalculus populations in the environment, representing the first quantitative tool specifically targeting Methanocalculus. The Methanocalculus-specific primer/probe set was shown to have high coverage with perfect match to >80% of all Methanocalculus 16S rRNA gene sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP). High specificity of the qPCR assay was also validated by both in silico and experimental analyses. Amplification efficiency of the qPCR assay was determined to be 91.9%, which is satisfactory for quantitative applications. Results from the Methanocalculus-specific qPCR analysis of formate-enriched methanogenic cultures were consistent with those from clone library analysis of the same cultures, validating the accuracy of the qPCR assay. Subsequent field application of the qPCR assay found low relative abundance of Methanocalculus in anaerobic digesters treating dairy waste, accounting for 0.01% of the archaeal populations. The qPCR results were consistent with the lack of detection of Methanocalculus in previous studies of the same anaerobic digesters with clone library analyses, which are less sensitive than qPCR. Thus, the Methanocalculus-specific qPCR assay developed in this study is a highly sensitive tool for the rapid and efficient quantification of Methanocalculus populations in methanogenic environments and understanding of the ecological functions of these methanogens. PMID:26059102

  8. Deploying anaerobic digesters: Current status and future possibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.; Wheeler, P.; Rivard, C.

    1996-01-01

    Unmanaged pollutants from putrescible farm, industrial, and municipal wastes degrade in the environment, and methane emitted from their decomposition may contribute to global climate change. Under modern environmental regulations, these wastes are becoming difficult to dispose of using traditional means. One waste management system, anaerobic digestion or AD, not only provides pollution prevention but can also convert a disposal problem into a new profit center. This report is drawn from a special session of the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Tegoprens in anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cheese whey, poultry waste, and cattle dung for improved biomethanation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, C.; Sastry, V.; Madamwar, D.

    1996-01-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve the anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cattle dung, poultry waste, and cheese whey, the effect of various doses of Tegoprens: T-3012, T-3099, T-5842, T-5843, T-5851, T-5852 has been studied, in bench-scale digesters. Among them, Tegoprens 3022 showed more than a 45% increase in gas production with higher methane content. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Investigation of Poultry Waste for Anaerobic Digestion: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Christopher R.

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological conversion technology which is being used to produce bioenergy all over the world. This energy is created from biological feedstocks, and can often use waste products from various food and agricultural processors. Biogas from AD can be used as a fuel for heating or for co-generation of electricity and heat and is a renewable substitute to using fossil fuels. Nutrient recycling and waste reduction are additional benefits, creating a final product that can be used as a fertilizer in addition to energy benefits. This project was conducted to investigate the viability of three turkey production wastes as AD feedstock: two turkey litters and a material separated from the turkey processing wastewater using dissolved air flotation (DAF) process. The DAF waste contained greases, oils and other non-commodity portions of the turkey. Using a variety of different process methods, types of bacteria, loading rates and food-to-microorganism ratios, optimal loading rates for the digestion of these three materials were obtained. In addition, the co-digestion of these materials revealed additional energy benefits. In this study, batch digestion tests were carried out to treat these three feedstocks, using mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, using loading rates of 3 and 6 gVS/L They were tested separately and also as a mixture for co-digestion. The batch reactor used in this study had total and working volumes of 1130 mL and 500 mL, respectively. The initial organic loading was set to be 3 gVS/L, and the food to microorganism ratio was either 0.6 or 1.0 for different treatments based on the characteristics of each material. Only thermophilic (50 +/- 2ºC) temperatures were tested for the litter and DAF wastes in continuous digestion, but mesophilic and thermophilic batch digestion experiments were conducted. The optimum digestion time for all experiments was 14 days. The biogas yields of top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste under mesophilic batch conditions all at 3 gVS/L loading were determined to be 148.6 +/- 7.82, 176.5 +/- 11.1 and 542.0 +/- 37.9 mL/ gVS, respectively and were 201.9 +/- 10.0, 210.4 +/- 29.3, and 419.3 +/- 12.1 mL/gVS, respectively, for initial loading of 6 gVS/L. Under thermophilic batch conditions, the top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste had the biogas yields of 255.3 +/- 7.9, 313.4 +/- 30.1and 297.4 +/- 33.8 mL/gVS for loading rate of 3 gVS/L and 233.8 +/- 45.3, 306.5 +/- 11.8 and 185.1 +/- 0.85 mL/gVS for loading rate of 6 gVS/L. The biogas yields from co-digestion of the mixed litter and DAF waste at 3 gVS/L were 461.8 +/- 41.3 mL/gVS under thermophilic conditions. The results from batch anaerobic digestion tests were then used for designing continuous digestion experiments. All the continuous digestion experiments were conducted by using an Anaerobic Phase Solids (APS) digester system operated at a thermophilic temperature. The total volume of the continuous digester system was 4.8 L and the working volume was around 4.4 L. The APS digester system had two hydrolysis reactors and one biogasification reactor. Feedstock was loaded into the hydrolysis reactors in batches. The feedstock digestion time was 14 days and the average organic loading rate (OLR) of the system was 3 gVS/L/day. The experiment has three distinct feedstock stages, first with turkey litter waste, a co-digestion of DAF and turkey litter waste, followed by DAF waste. The biogas yields were determined to be 305.2 +/- 70.6 mL/gVS/d for turkey mixed litter, 455.8 +/- 77.2 mL/gVS/d during the mixture of mixed litter and DAF waste, and 382.0 +/- 39.6 mL/gVS for DAF waste. The biogas yields from the thermophilic batch test yields compare with that of the continuous digester yields. For experiments utilizing turkey litter, batch tests yielded 313.4 +/- 30.1mL/gVS biogas and 305.2 +/- 70.6 mL/gVS/d for continuous experiments. For experiments using codigestion of turkey litter and DAF waste, batches yielded 461.8 +/- 41.3 mL/gVS biogas comparing well to continuous digester operation that yielded 455.8 +/- 77.

  11. Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

  12. Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on the reduction of gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages were evaluated in this study. Screened dairy manure containing 3.5% volatile solids (VS) was either anaerobically digested or aerobically treated prior to storage in air-tight vessel...

  13. Speciation modeling of ammonia and other major solutes in anaerobic digesters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic digestion of high-nitrogen wastes can be inhibited by high concentrations of un-ionized ammonia, NH**3 (aq). Understanding the toxicity of NH**3 (aq) to anaerobic digestion requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling its concentration. Previous work on ammonia toxicity in an...

  14. Evaluation of biogas production by dry anaerobic digestion of switchgrass-animal manure mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological method used to convert organic wastes into a stable product for land application without adverse environmental effects. The biogas produced can be used as an alternative renewable energy source. Dry anaerobic digestion (> 15% TS; total solid) has an advantage ov...

  15. Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W.; Hongtao, W.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre-treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source-sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre-treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170 °C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control, and methane conversion ratio on carbon basis was enhanced to 30.6%. The digestion period was less than 6 days when pre-treatment temperature was above 130 °C. The organic part of sorted waste is mainly constituted of kitchen garbage and leaf. Model kitchen garbage was completely liquidized at 130 °C for one hour and the methane yield was 276 ml/g VS. Addition of alkali enhance hydroxylation rate and methane yield slightly. The biogas potential of leaf could be observed by pre-treatment above 150 °C under alkaline condition.

  16. Household anaerobic digester for bioenergy production in developing countries: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Surendra, K C; Takara, Devin; Jasinski, Jonas; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Access to clean and affordable energy is vital for advancing development objectives, particularly in rural areas of developing countries. There are some three billion people in these regions, however, who lack consistent access to energy and rely on traditional solid fuels such as firewood, cattle manure, and crop residues for meeting cooking and heating needs. Excessive use of such highly polluting resources creates serious environmental, social and public health issues. In this context, household digesters (which convert readily available feedstocks such as cattle manure, human excreta, and crop residues into biogas) have the potential to play a significant role in supplying methane as a clean, renewable energy resource for remote geographies. In addition to bioenergy production, the slurry generated from anaerobic digestion is rich in nutrients and can improve the physical, chemical, and biological attributes of soil when applied to agricultural land. This type of approach has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously improving the quality of life. Despite a long history of research and innovation for the development and optimization of household digesters, little is known and has been reported for the application of these systems in decentralized communities. The primary purpose of this paper seeks to review the dearth of literature pertaining to small-scale anaerobic digesters in remote geographies and in regions where much of the world's population reside. PMID:24350427

  17. Anaerobic digestion of high-strength cheese whey utilizing semicontinuous digesters and chemical flocculant addition

    SciTech Connect

    Barford, J.P.; Cail, R.G.; Callander, I.J.; Floyd, E.J.

    1986-11-01

    Semicontinuous digesters were used to anaerobically treat high-strength whey (70 kg/cubic m COD). A maximum loading of 16.1 kg COD/cubic m/day was obtained with soluble COD removal efficiencies greater than 99%. The use of a chemical flocculant resulted in an increased biomass concentration in the digester compared to a control, thus enabling correspondingly higher space loadings to be applied. With the onset of substantial levels of granulation of the biomass, flocculant dosage was able to be discontinued. This article discusses the performance of the digesters in detail and, briefly, the long-term operational difficulties experienced and the control strategies employed on such systems. 24 references.

  18. Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Semi-annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S; Farooq, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Daly, Jr, E L; Chriswell, C

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of municipal waste has been demonstrated to be feasible in bench scale experiments by Pfeffer (1974). Approximately, 50% reduction in mass and production of 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas/ton have been estimated. The gas composition is estimated to be 50% methane and 50% carbon monoxide. The technical and economic feasibility of anaerobic digestion with an ultimate objective of commercialization are discussed. A plant has been built at Pompano Beach, Florida on an existing shredding and landfill operation site. The plant design capacity is 100 tons/day. Two digesters have been constructed to be used in parallel. The process consists of primary shredding, metal separation, secondary shredding, air classification and digestion of light fraction. Sewage sludge was used to seed the initial mixture in the digester. The output slurry is vacuum filtered and the filter cake disposed on an existing landfill. The filtrate is recycled. Excess filtrate is sprayed on the landfill. At present the output gas is being flared. A flow chart for the plant is presented. It is imperative that environmental investigations be conducted on new energy technology prior to commercialization. A project was initiated to characterize all input and output streams and to assess the potential for ground water contamination by landfill disposal of effluents. Detailed chemical, biological and physical characterization efforts supported by leaching and modelling studies are being conducted to achieve the stated objectives. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. The environmental investigations were started in August 1978. Sengupta et al (1979a) reported the first year's efforts.

  19. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xumeng; Matsumoto, Tracie; Keith, Lisa; Li, Yebo

    2014-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass and food wastes, such as taro, papaya, and sweet potato, are limited. In this study, these tropical biomass wastes were evaluated for biogas production by liquid AD (L-AD) and/or solid-state AD (SS-AD), depending on feedstock characteristics. When albizia leaves and chips were used as feedstocks, L-AD had greater methane yields (161 and 113 L kg(-1)VS, respectively) than SS-AD (156.8 and 59.6 L kg(-1)VS, respectively), while SS-AD achieved 5-fold higher volumetric methane productivity than L-AD. Mono-digestion and co-digestion of taro skin, taro flesh, papaya, and sweet potato achieved methane yields from 345 to 411 L kg(-1)VS, indicating the robustness of AD technology. PMID:25022835

  20. Stabilization and gasification of soft-drink manufacturing waste by conventional and two-phase anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery and waste stabilization accomplished simultaneously in the beverage industry by anaerobic digestion are investigated. The applicability and limitation of the conventional high-rate anaerobic digestion process are tested. A rapid-rate waste conversion process, two-phase anaerobic digestion, developed for enhanced net energy production with COD reduction comparable to that obtainable by application of a conventional digestion process is discussed. The high-rate digestion run was developed from a mixed MSW-sludge-biomass-fed inoculum.

  1. Unconventional anaerobic digester designs for improving methane yields from sea kelp

    SciTech Connect

    Fannin, K.F.; Srivastava, V.J.; Chynoweth, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were performed as part of an ongoing comprehensive research program to develop and optimize the anaerobic digestion process for producing methane from sea kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). Laboratory-scale studies focused on digester design and operating techniques applicable toward the goal of increasing methane yields and production rates over those observed in previous studies using conventional stirred tank reactors (STR). Two unconventional anaerobic digesters, an upflow solids reactor and a baffle flow reactor, were used to study the anaerobic digestion performance of kelp; both digesters permit solids retention times that are longer than the hydraulic retention times. The performance of the unconventional digesters was compared with that of the STR on the basis of methane yield and process stability. These studies demonstrated that, although digester performance was markedly affected by kelp variability, the methane yield in both unconventional digesters exceeded 70% of the theoretical yield and was substantialy higher than that of the STR. Utilization of simple digester designs that promoted long solids retention times improved the anaerobic digester performance significantly over that observed in conventional anaerobic digestion processes.

  2. Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved and untreated food waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Autoclaving decreased the formation of NH4-N and H{sub 2}S during food waste digestion. • Stable digestion was achieved with untreated and autoclaved FW at OLR 6 kg VS/m{sup 3}day. • Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. • Highest CH{sub 4} yields were observed at OLR 3 kg VS/m{sup 3}day with untreated FW. • Autoclaved FW produced highest CH{sub 4} yields during OLR 4 kgVS/m{sup 3}day. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved (160 °C, 6.2 bar) and untreated source segregated food waste (FW) was compared over 473 days in semi-continuously fed mesophilic reactors with trace elements supplementation, at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2, 3, 4 and 6 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d. Methane yields at all OLR were 5–10% higher for untreated FW (maximum 0.483 ± 0.013 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 3 kg VS/m{sup 3} d) than autoclaved FW (maximum 0.439 ± 0.020 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS at 4 kg VS/m{sup 3} d). The residual methane potential of both digestates at all OLRs was less than 0.110 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg VS, indicating efficient methanation in all cases. Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. Reactors fed on autoclaved FW showed lower ammonium and hydrogen sulphide concentrations, probably due to reduced protein hydrolysis as a result of formation of Maillard compounds. In the current study this reduced biodegradability appears to outweigh any benefit due to thermal hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic components.

  3. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion, yet in temperate climate digesters, require a considerable amount of additional heat en...

  4. Enhancement of Anaerobic Digestion to Treat Saline Sludge from Recirculating Aquaculture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guo-zhi; Ma, Niannian; Li, Ping; Tan, Hong-xin; Liu, Wenchang

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of carbohydrate addition and the use of ultrasonication as a pretreatment for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of saline aquacultural sludge was assessed. Analyses were conducted using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), which included stopped gas production attributed to the saline inhibition. After increasing the C?:?N ratio, gas production was observed, and the total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency increased from 75% to 80%. The TCOD removal efficiency of the sonication period was approximately 85%, compared to 75% for the untreated waste. Ultrasonication of aquaculture sludge was also found to enhance the gas production rate and the TCOD removal efficiency. The average volatile fatty acid (VFA) to alkalinity ratios ranged from 0.1 to 0.05, confirming the stability of the digesters. Furthermore, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), VFA, and PO43? concentrations increased in the effluents. There was a 114% greater gas generation during the ultrasonication period, with an average production of 0.08?g COD/L·day?1. PMID:26301258

  5. Enumeration of Organohalide Respirers in Municipal Wastewater Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan JK; Boothe, Melissa A; Fiddler, Brice A; Lozano, Tania M; Rahi, Russel K; Krzmarzick, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Organohalide contaminants such as triclosan and triclocarban have been well documented in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), but the degradation of these contaminants is not well understood. One possible removal mechanism is organohalide respiration by which bacteria reduce the halogenated compound. The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance of organohalide-respiring bacteria in eight WWTP anaerobic digesters. The obligate organohalide respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi was the most abundant and averaged 3.3 × 107 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram, while the Dehalobacter was much lower at 2.6 × 104 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. The genus Sulfurospirillum spp. was also detected at 1.0 × 107 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. No other known or putatively organohalide-respiring strains in the Dehalococcoidaceae family were found to be present nor were the genera Desulfitobacterium or Desulfomonile. PMID:26508873

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste and pig manure with different mixing ratios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hailin; Duan, Na; Lin, Cong; Li, Xue; Zhong, Mingzhu

    2015-07-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste (KW) and pig manure (PM) with seven different PM to KW total solids (TS) ratios of 1:0, 5:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:5 and 0:1 was conducted at mesophilic temperature (35 ± 1 °C) to investigate the feasibility and process performance. The co-digestion of PM and KW was found to be an available way to enhance methane production compared with solo-digestion of PM or KW. The ratio of PM to KW of 1:1 got the highest biodegradability (BDA) of 85.03% and a methane yield of 409.5 mL/gVS. For the co-digestion of KW and PM, there was no obvious inhibition of ammonia nitrogen because it was in an acceptable range from 1380 mg/L to 2020 mg/L in the whole process. However, severe methane inhibition and long lag phase due to the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was observed while the KW content was over 50%, and in the lag phase, propionic acid and butyric acid made up the major constituents of the total VFAs. The technical digestion time (T80: the time it takes to produce 80% of the digester's maximum gas production) of the above 7 ratios was 15, 21, 22, 27, 49, 62 and 61 days, respectively. In this study, a mixing ratio of 1:1 for PM and KW was found to maximize BDA and methane yield, provided a short digestion time and stable digestion performance and was therefore recommended for further study and engineering application. PMID:25617184

  7. Investigation of Non-Newtonian Flow in Anaerobic Digesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, Jeremy M.

    This thesis examines how the non-Newtonian characteristics of liquid hog manure affect the flow conditions within a steady-flow anaerobic digester. There are three main parts to this thesis. In the first part of this thesis, the physical properties of liquid hog manure and their variation with temperature and solids concentration are experimentally determined. Naturally-settled manure sampled from an outdoor storage lagoon is studied, and density, viscosity, and particle size distribution are measured. Hog manure with total solids concentrations of less than 3.6% exhibits Newtonian behaviour; manure between 3.6% and 6.5% total solids is pseudoplastic, and fits the power law; manure with more than 6.5% total solids exhibits non-Newtonian and time-dependent characteristics. The second part of this thesis investigates the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids---represented by tap water and xanthan gum solution, respectively---within four lab-scale reactor geometries, using residence time distribution (RTD) experiments. The effect of reactor geometry, flow rate, and fluid viscosity are evaluated. In the third part of this thesis, flow conditions within lab-scale and pilot-scale anaerobic digester reactors are simulated using three-dimensional modeling techniques. The RTDs of lab-scale reactors as predicted by the 3D numerical models compare well to the experimental results. The 3D models are also validated using data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. Finally, the viscous properties of liquid hog manure at 3% and 8% total solids are incorporated into the models, and the results are evaluated.

  8. Microalgae to biofuels: life cycle impacts of methane production of anaerobically digested lipid extracted algae.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jason C; Hanif, Asma; Sharvelle, Sybil; Bradley, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the biochemical methane production for whole and lipid extracted Nannochloropsis salina. Results show whole microalgae produced 430 cm(3)-CH4 g-volatile solids(-1) (g-VS) (?=60), 3 times more methane than was produced by the LEA, 140 cm(3)-CH4 g-VS(-1) (?=30). Results illustrate current anaerobic modeling efforts in microalgae to biofuel assessments are not reflecting the impact of lipid removal. On a systems level, the overestimation of methane production is shown to positively skew the environmental impact of the microalgae to biofuels process. Discussion focuses on a comparison results to those of previous anaerobic digestion studies and quantifies the corresponding change in greenhouse gas emissions of the microalgae to biofuels process based on results from this study. PMID:25181698

  9. Enhancement on biodegradation and anaerobic digestion efficiency of activated sludge using a dual irradiation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingnan; Tsukahara, Kenichiro; Yang, Rongyong; Zhang, Zhenya; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2011-11-01

    A dual irradiation process involving aerobic thermophilic irradiation pretreatment (ATIP) and intermittent irradiation anaerobic digestion was developed to improve the digestion of waste-activated sludge. First, the effect of ATIP on further anaerobic digestion of activated sludge in batch mode was investigated. When exposed to ATIP for 24 h, the digestion reactor gave the highest methane yield, removed the most dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and showed the most effective reduction of VS compared to other irradiation times. This process was further enhanced by using an anaerobic fluidised-bed reactor packed with carbon felt in semi-continuous mode for digesting the pretreated activated sludge under intermittent irradiation conditions. Dual irradiation for 24 h followed by 60 min of anaerobic irradiation processing per day turned out to be optimal. This resulted in 65.3% of VS reduction, 83.9% of DOC removal ratio and 538 ml/g-VS of methane yield. PMID:21945660

  10. DIGESTER GAS - FUEL CELL - PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Dr.-Eng. Dirk Adolph; Dipl.-Eng. Thomas Saure

    2002-03-01

    GEW has been operating the first fuel cell in Europe producing heat and electricity from digester gas in an environmentally friendly way. The first 9,000 hours in operation were successfully concluded in August 2001. The fuel cell powered by digester gas was one of the 25 registered ''Worldwide projects'' which NRW presented at the EXPO 2000. In addition to this, it is a key project of the NRW State Initiative on Future Energies. All of the activities planned for the first year of operation were successfully completed: installing and putting the plant into operation, the transition to permanent operation as well as extended monitoring till May 2001.

  11. Biomass production, anaerobic digestion, and nutrient recycling of small benthic or floating seaweeds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    A number of experiments have been carried out supporting the development of a seaweed-based ocean energy farm. Beginning in 1976, forty-two species of seaweed indigenous to the coastal waters of Central Florida were screened for high biomass yields in intensive culture. Gracilaria tikvahiae achieved the highest annual yield of 34.8 g dry wt/m/sup 2/ day. Yield has been found to vary inversely with seawater exchange rate, apparently because of carbon dioxide limitation at low exchange rates. Gracilaria was anaerobically digested in 120 liter and 2 liter reactors. Gas yields in the large digesters averaged 0.4 1/g volatile solids (.24 1 CH/sub 4//gv.s.) with a bioconversion efficiency of 48%. Studies of the suitability of digester residue as a nutrient source for growing Gracilaria have been conducted. Nitrogen recycling efficiency from harvested plant through liquid digestion residue to harvested plant approached 75%. Studies of nutrient uptake and storage by Gracilaria, Ascophyllum, and Sargassum showed that nutrient starved plants are capable of rapidly assimilating and storing inorganic nutrients which may be used later for growth when no nutrients are present in the medium. A shallow water seaweed farm was proposed which would produce methane from harvested seaweed and use digester residues as a concentrated source of nutrients for periodic fertilizations.

  12. Phycoremediation coupled production of algal biomass, harvesting and anaerobic digestion: possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Sanjeev Kumar; Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree; Vijay, Virendra Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion is a versatile and environment friendly fuel which traditionally utilizes cattle dung as the substrate. In the recent years, owing to its high content of biodegradable compounds, algal biomass has emerged as a potential feedstock for biogas production. Moreover, the ability of algae to treat wastewater and fix CO2 from waste gas streams makes it an environmental friendly and economically feasible feedstock. The present review focuses on the possibility of utilizing wastewater as the nutrient and waste gases as the CO2 source for algal biomass production and subsequent biogas generation. Studies describing the various harvesting methods of algal biomass as well as its anaerobic digestion have been compiled and discussed. Studies targeting the most recent advancements on biogas enrichment by algae have been discussed. Apart from highlighting the various advantages of utilizing algal biomass for biogas production, limitations of the process such as cell wall resistivity towards digestion and inhibitions caused due to ammonia toxicity and the possible strategies for overcoming the same have been reviewed. The studies compiled in the present review indicate that if the challenges posed in translating the lab scale studies on phycoremediation and biogas production to pilot scale are overcome, algal biogas could become the sustainable and economically feasible source of renewable energy. PMID:23827782

  13. Survey of the Anaerobic Biodegradation Potential of Organic Chemicals in Digesting Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, Nigel S.; Wilson, Valerie

    1989-01-01

    The degradation potential of 77 organic chemicals under methanogenic conditions was examined with an anaerobic digesting sludge from the United Kingdom. Degradation was assessed in terms of net total gas (CH4 plus CO2) produced, expressed as a percentage of the theoretical production (ThGP). The compounds tested were selected from various chemical groups and included substituted phenols and benzoates, pesticides, phthalic acid esters, homocyclic and heterocyclic ring compounds, glycols, and monosubstituted benzenes. The results obtained were in good agreement with published surveys of biodegradability in U.S. digesting sludges and other methanogenic environments. In general, the presence of chloro or nitro groups inhibited anaerobic gas production, while carboxyl and hydroxyl groups facilitated biodegradation. The relationship between substituent position and susceptibility to methanogenic degradation was compound dependent. The following chemicals were completely degraded (?80% ThGP) at a concentration of 50 mg of carbon per liter: phenol, 2-aminophenol, 4-cresol, catechol, sodium benzoate, 4-aminobenzoic acid, 3-chlorobenzoic acid, phthalic acid, ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol, sodium stearate, and quinoline. 3-Cresol, 4-chlorobenzoic acid, dimethyl phthalate, and pyridine were partially degraded. Although the remaining chemicals tested were either persistent or toxic, their behavior may differ at more environmentally realistic chemical-to-biomass ratios. Our findings suggest that biodegradability assessments made with sludge from one source can be extrapolated to sludge from another source with a reasonable degree of confidence and should help in predicting the fate of an organic chemical during the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge. PMID:16347851

  14. Anaerobic digestion of spent bedding from deep litter piggery housing.

    PubMed

    Tait, Stephan; Tamis, Jelmer; Edgerton, Bruce; Batstone, Damien J

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates spent litter from deep litter piggery housing as a potential substrate for farm-scale anaerobic digestion. Degradability and degradation rates were evaluated under mesophilic conditions for unused, lightly soiled (used by weaner/small pigs), and heavily soiled (used by finishing/large pigs) wheat straw, barley straw, and rice husks bedding. Apparent first order hydrolysis rate coefficients varied, but were comparable across all samples analysed (<0.1 day(-1)). Spent wheat straw was generally more degradable (approximately 60%) than spent barley straw, while spent barley straw was comparable to raw straw (40-50%), but with higher hydrolysis rates, indicating better accessibility. Rice husks were relatively poorly degradable (<20%), but degradability was improved by weathering in a pig shed. Digestion of spent barley and wheat straw litter was significantly faster (approximately twice the rate) at low (8% solids) than high (14% solids) solids loading. Rice husks degradation kinetics were not significantly influenced by solids concentration. Intrinsic methanogenic activity of heavily soiled spent wheat straw and rice husks bedding was initially poor, but achieved full activity after 40-60 days, indicating that reactor operation without external inoculum may be possible with care. PMID:19097776

  15. Modeling temperature variations in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; López-Cruz, Irineo L; Domaschko, Max

    2011-05-01

    A model that predicts temperature changes in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester was developed based on fundamental thermodynamic laws. The methodology utilized two simulation strategies. In the first, model equations were solved through a searching routine based on a minimal square optimization criterion, from which the overall heat transfer coefficient values, for both biodigester and heat exchanger, were determined. In the second, the simulation was performed with variable values of these overall coefficients. The prediction with both strategies allowed reproducing experimental data within 5% of the temperature span permitted in the equipment by the system control, which validated the model. The temperature variation was affected by the heterogeneity of the feeding and extraction processes, by the heterogeneity of the digestate recirculation through the heating system and by the lack of a perfect mixing inside the biodigester tank. The use of variable overall heat transfer coefficients improved the temperature change prediction and reduced the effect of a non-ideal performance of the pilot plant modeled. PMID:21120536

  16. In-storage psychrophilic anaerobic digestion: acclimated microbial kinetics.

    PubMed

    King, Susan; Courvoisier, Pierre; Guiot, Serge; Barrington, Suzelle

    2012-01-01

    In-storage psychrophilic anaerobic digestion develops by microbial acclimation in covered swine-manure storage tanks, producing CH4 and stabilizing organic matter. To optimize the system's performance, the process kinetics must be understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate kinetic parameters describing the major stages in the digestion process, and to investigate the effect of temperature acclimation on these parameters. Specific activity tests were performed using manure inocula and five substrates at three incubation temperatures. Extant substrate activities were determined analytically for each case, and intrinsic kinetic parameters for glucose uptake were estimated by grid search fitting to the Monod model. The results demonstrate that this acclimated microbial community exhibits different kinetic parameters to those of the mesophilic communities currently modelled in the literature, with increased activity at low temperatures, varying with substrate and temperature. For glucose, the higher uptake is accompanied by lower microbial yield and half-saturation constant. Decomposing these values suggests that active psychrophilic and mesophilic microbial populations co-exist within the community. This work also confirms that a new method of assessing microbial substrate kinetics must be developed for manure microbial communities, separating microbial mass from other suspended organics. PMID:22988638

  17. Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved and untreated food waste.

    PubMed

    Tampio, Elina; Ervasti, Satu; Paavola, Teija; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles; Rintala, Jukka

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of autoclaved (160°C, 6.2 bar) and untreated source segregated food waste (FW) was compared over 473 days in semi-continuously fed mesophilic reactors with trace elements supplementation, at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2, 3, 4 and 6 kg volatile solids(VS)/m(3)d. Methane yields at all OLR were 5-10% higher for untreated FW (maximum 0.483±0.013 m(3) CH4/kg VS at 3 kg VS/m(3) d) than autoclaved FW (maximum 0.439±0.020 m(3) CH4/kg VS at 4 kg VS/m(3) d). The residual methane potential of both digestates at all OLRs was less than 0.110 m(3) CH4/kg VS, indicating efficient methanation in all cases. Use of acclimated inoculum allowed very rapid increases in OLR. Reactors fed on autoclaved FW showed lower ammonium and hydrogen sulphide concentrations, probably due to reduced protein hydrolysis as a result of formation of Maillard compounds. In the current study this reduced biodegradability appears to outweigh any benefit due to thermal hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic components. PMID:24238799

  18. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 10, Appendix H: Anaerobic digestion of MSW

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    While municipal solid waste (MSW) thermoconversion and recycling technologies have been described in Appendices A through E, this appendix addresses the role of bioconversion technologies in handling the organic fraction in MSW and sewage sludge. Much of the organic matter in MSW, consisting mainly of paper, food waste, and yard waste, has potential for conversion, along with sewage sludge, through biochemical processes to methane and carbon dioxide providing a measurable, renewable energy resource potential. The gas produced may be treated for removal of carbon dioxide and water, leaving pipeline quality gas. The process also has the potential for producing a stabilized solid product that may be suitable as a fuel for combustion or used as a compost fertilizer. Anaerobic digestion can occur naturally in an uncontrolled environment such as a landfill, or it can occur in a controlled environment such as a confined vessel. Landfill gas production is discussed in Appendix F. This appendix provides information on the anaerobic digestion process as it has been applied to produce methane from the organic fraction of MSW in enclosed, controlled reactors.

  19. Assessing solid digestate from anaerobic digestion as feedstock for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Teater, Charles; Yue, Zhengbo; MacLellan, James; Liu, Yan; Liao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol production using solid digestate (AD fiber) from a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) anaerobic digester was assessed comparing to an energy crop of switchgrass, and an agricultural residue of corn stover. A complete random design was fulfilled to optimize the reaction conditions of dilute alkali pretreatment. The most effective dilute alkali pretreatment conditions for raw CSTR AD fiber were 2% sodium hydroxide, 130 °C, and 3 h. Under these pretreatment conditions, the cellulose concentration of the AD fiber was increased from 34% to 48%. Enzymatic hydrolysis of 10% (dry basis) pretreated AD fiber produced 49.8 g/L glucose, while utilizing 62.6% of the raw cellulose in the AD fiber. The ethanol fermentation on the hydrolysate had an 80.3% ethanol yield. The cellulose utilization efficiencies determined that the CSTR AD fiber was a suitable biorefining feedstock compared to switchgrass and corn stover. PMID:20971637

  20. Changes in bacterial and archaeal communities in anaerobic digesters treating different organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mo; Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Kwanyong; Chantrasakdakul, Phrompol; Kim, Daegi; Park, Ki Young

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize microbial communities in anaerobic batch digesters treating different representative organic sources (sewage sludge, food waste, septage). Among the digesters, the anaerobic digester of food waste had the highest methanogen density, producing a peak value methane yield of 813.2mLCH4/gVS. In all the digesters, acetoclastic Methanosarcinales and hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales were the most dominant methanogen groups, but their proportion among the methanogens varied depending on the organic sources. The bacteria community in the anaerobic digestion (AD) of food waste and septage was distinctly different from that found in the AD of sewage sludge (primary sludge and waste activated sludge). Shifts in both bacterial and archaeal community structures could be related to differences in chemical properties, production, and accumulation of intermediates digested from organic wastes having different characteristics. These findings could prove useful in optimizing the microbial community to enhance AD process treating organic wastes. PMID:26184789

  1. Enhancing the quality of bio-oil and selectivity of phenols compounds from pyrolysis of anaerobic digested rice straw.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajin; Lin, Yunqin; Wu, Shubin; Liu, Chao; Lei, Ming; Zeng, Chao

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the thermal decomposition characteristics and pyrolytic products of anaerobic digested rice straw (ADRS) by thermogravimetric (TG) and pyrolysis-gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) analysis. Compared with the raw rice straw (RS), the thermal decomposition temperature of ADRS was shifted to higher temperature zone and the second decomposition zone of cellulose (Toffset(c)-Tpeak) became narrower (14 °C less), which indicated that the composition of rice straw were changed significantly by the anaerobic digestion pretreatment. Py-GC/MS analysis showed that the quality of the bio-oil and the selectivity of pyrolytic products could be obviously improved by anaerobic digestion. The total yields of alcohols, acids, aldehydes, furans, anhydrosugars, and ketones pyrolysis substances decreased, while the yield of phenols increased. The yield of 4-Vinylphenol (4-VP) increased from 29.33%, 8.21% and 5.76% to 34.93%, 12.46% and 7.68% at 330, 450 and 650 °C, respectively, after anaerobic digestion. PMID:25647031

  2. Effect of pretreatments on the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of sunflower heads

    SciTech Connect

    Polat, H.; Selcuk, N.; Soyupak, S. )

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, the effects of hydraulic retention time and alkali treatment on methane production rate from the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of 2% sunflower-head/water mixtures are investigated. The experiments were carried out in laboratory-scale fermenters, fed with 1 liter of untreated, 2 g of NaOH/100 g total solids (TS), and 5 g NaOH/100 g TS alkali-treated sunflower-head/water mixtures, respectively, and maintained at 55{degrees} C. Digestion experiments were performed for hydraulic retention times of 8, 10, and 15 days. The amount and composition of produced gas were measured until steady state was attained in each run. The steady-state methane production rates were found to decrease with hydraulic retention time and increase with alkali dosage used for pretreatment.

  3. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge of low organic content in a novel digester.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Jiang, Y; Cao, Z P; Li, Z H; Hu, Y Y; Li, H Z; Zuo, J E; Wang, K J

    2015-01-01

    A novel digester, termed an internal circulation anaerobic digester (ICAD), was developed to intensify sludge digestion. It consists of reaction zone, settling zone, thickening zone, riser and downcomer. Internal circulation in the digester is intensified by backflow biogas. The mesophilic ICAD treating thermal pretreated waste activated sludge with volatile suspended solids (VSS)/suspended solids (SS) of 0.45-0.49 was conducted in this study to reduce and stabilize the low organic content sludge. The results showed that the VSS removal rate and biogas rate reached 46.0% and 0.72 m(3)/kg VSS(fed) at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days. VSS/SS and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of the effluent sludge ranged from 0.39 to 0.41 and 274 mg/L to 473 mg/L, respectively, under various HRTs from 10 to 27 days. The degradation ability of ICAD derived from the improved mass transfer by internal circulation and long solid retention time at short HRT is compared with continuous stirred tank reactor. PMID:26360757

  4. Utilisation of energy from digester gas and sludge incineration at Hamburg's Köhlbrandhöft WWTP.

    PubMed

    Thierbach, R D; Hanssen, H

    2002-01-01

    At Hamburg's Köhlbrandhöft WWTP the demand for external energy supply is minimised by state of the art sludge treatment. The sludge is subjected to thickening, anaerobic digestion, dewatering, drying and incineration. The digester gas is used in a combined gas and steam turbine process. The sludge incineration also produces steam, which is also used in the steam turbine that follows the gas turbine. The turbines produce electricity, partially expanded steam is used for the sludge drying process. Heat from the condensation of vapours from sludge drying is used to heat the anaerobic digesters. The overall process requires no external heat or fuel and produces 60% of the WWTP's electricity demand. PMID:12361039

  5. Recovery of energy from Taro (Colocasia esculenta) with solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SOFADs).

    PubMed

    Bindu, T; Ramasamy, E V

    2008-01-01

    We present studies on solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SOFADs) in which chopped Colocasia esculenta was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop an efficient means of utilizing the semi-aquatic weed that is otherwise an environmental nuisance. Two types of SOFADs were studied. The first type had a single vessel with two compartments. The lower portion of the digester, 25% of the total volume, was separated from the upper by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cow dung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the digester led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The bioleachate, rich in the VFAs, passed through the perforated PVC disk and was collected in the lower compartment of the digester. The other type of digesters, referred to as anaerobic multi-phase high-solids digesters (AMHDs), had the same type of compartmentalized digester unit as the first type and an additional methaniser unit. Up-flow anaerobic filters (UAFs) were used as methaniser units, which converted the bioleachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 60% methane. All SOFADs developed a consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 20 weeks from the start. Among the two types of digesters studied, the AMHDs were found to perform better with a twofold increase in biogas yield compared to the first type of digesters. PMID:17382532

  6. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Chicken Processing Wastewater and Crude Glycerol from Biodiesel 

    E-print Network

    Foucault, Lucas Jose

    2011-10-21

    The main objective of this thesis was to study the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wastewater from a chicken processing facility and of crude glycerol from local biodiesel operations. The AD of these substrates was conducted in bench-scale reactors...

  7. Testing the profitability of Anaerobic Digestion in a large-scale UK dairy farm 

    E-print Network

    Coz Leniz, Luis Fernando

    2011-11-24

    ’s livestock agricultural sector has tremendous potential to take advantage of this technology, as it produces over 150 million tonnes of animal manure annually. This is a commonly used input to feed anaerobic digestion plants. Furthermore, AD brings additional...

  8. Study on anaerobic digestion treatment of hazardous colistin sulphate contained pharmaceutical sludge.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fubin; Wang, Dongling; Li, Zifu; Ohlsen, Thomas; Hartwig, Peter; Czekalla, Sven

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical sludge is considered as a hazardous substance with high treatment and disposal fees. Anaerobic digestion could not only transform the hazardous substance into activated sludge, but also generate valuable biogas. This research had two objectives. First: studying the feasibility of anaerobic digestion and determining the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of pharmaceutical sludge under different Inoculum to substrate TS ratios (ISRs) of 0, 0.65, 2.58 and 10.32 in mesophilic condition of 37±1°C. Secondly, investigating the removal efficiency of colistin sulphate during anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the use of anaerobic digestion to treat the pharmaceutical sludge is feasible and that it can completely eliminate the colistin sulphate. The highest biogas production from pharmaceutical sludge is 499.46 mL/g TS at an ISR of 10.32. PMID:25490101

  9. DESTRUCTION BY ANAEROBIC MESOPHILIC AND THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION OF VIRUSES AND INDICATOR BACTERIA INDIGENOUS TO DOMESTIC SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In raw sludges and in mesophilically and thermophilically digested anaerobic sludges, large variations in numbers of viruses occurred over narrow ranges of numbers of fecal coliforms, total coliforms, and fecal streptococci, demonstrating that the bacteria are poor quantitative r...

  10. Anaerobic digestion of alkaline bleaching wastewater from a kraft pulp and paper mill using UASB technique.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Madeleine; Truong, Xu-Bin; Björn, Annika; Ejlertsson, Jörgen; Bastviken, David; Svensson, Bo H; Karlsson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of alkaline kraft elemental chlorine-free bleaching wastewater in two mesophilic, lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors resulted in significantly higher biogas production (250±50 vs. 120±30 NmL g [Formula: see text]) and reduction of filtered total organic carbon (fTOC) (60±5 vs. 43±6%) for wastewater from processing of hardwood (HW) compared with softwood (SW). In all cases, the gas production was likely underestimated due to poor gas separation in the reactors. Despite changes in wastewater characteristics, a stable anaerobic process was maintained with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) between 7 and 14?h. Lowering the HRT (from 13.5 to 8.5?h) did not significantly affect the process, and the stable performance at 8.5?h leaves room for further decreases in HRT. The results show that this type of wastewater is suitable for a full-scale implementation, but the difference in methane potential between SW and HW is important to consider both regarding process dimensioning and biogas yield optimization. PMID:25441833

  11. Techno-economic evaluation of stillage treatment with anaerobic digestion in a softwood-to-ethanol process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replacing the energy-intensive evaporation of stillage by anaerobic digestion is one way of decreasing the energy demand of the lignocellulosic biomass to the ethanol process. The biogas can be upgraded and sold as transportation fuel, injected directly into the gas grid or be incinerated on-site for combined heat and power generation. A techno-economic evaluation of the spruce-to-ethanol process, based on SO2-catalysed steam pretreatment followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, has been performed using the commercial flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus™. Various process configurations of anaerobic digestion of the stillage, with different combinations of co-products, have been evaluated in terms of energy efficiency and ethanol production cost versus the reference case of evaporation. Results Anaerobic digestion of the stillage showed a significantly higher overall energy efficiency (87-92%), based on the lower heating values, than the reference case (81%). Although the amount of ethanol produced was the same in all scenarios, the production cost varied between 4.00 and 5.27 Swedish kronor per litre (0.38-0.50 euro/L), including the reference case. Conclusions Higher energy efficiency options did not necessarily result in lower ethanol production costs. Anaerobic digestion of the stillage with biogas upgrading was demonstrated to be a favourable option for both energy efficiency and ethanol production cost. The difference in the production cost of ethanol between using the whole stillage or only the liquid fraction in anaerobic digestion was negligible for the combination of co-products including upgraded biogas, electricity and district heat. PMID:20843330

  12. Biodegradability of wastewater and activated sludge organics in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Ikumi, D S; Harding, T H; Ekama, G A

    2014-06-01

    The investigation provides experimental evidence that the unbiodegradable particulate organics fractions of primary sludge and waste activated sludge calculated from activated sludge models remain essentially unbiodegradable in anaerobic digestion. This was tested by feeding the waste activated sludge (WAS) from three different laboratory activated sludge (AS) systems to three separate anaerobic digesters (AD). Two of the AS systems were Modified Ludzack - Ettinger (MLE) nitrification-denitrification (ND) systems and the third was a membrane University of Cape Town (UCT) ND and enhanced biological P removal system. One of the MLE systems and the UCT system were fed the same real settled wastewater. The other MLE system was fed raw wastewater which was made by adding a measured constant flux (gCOD/d) of macerated primary sludge (PS) to the real settled wastewater. This PS was also fed to a fourth AD and a blend of PS and WAS from settled wastewater MLE system was fed to a fifth AD. The five ADs were each operated at five different sludge ages (10-60d). From the measured performance results of the AS systems, the unbiodegradable particulate organic (UPO) COD fractions of the raw and settled wastewaters, the PS and the WAS from the three AS systems were calculated with AS models. These AS model based UPO fractions of the PS and WAS were compared with the UPO fractions calculated from the performance results of the ADs fed these sludges. For the PS, the UPO fraction calculated from the AS and AD models matched closely, i.e. 0.30 and 0.31. Provided the UPO of heterotrophic (OHO, fE_OHO) and phosphorus accumulating (PAO, fE_PAO) biomass were accepted to be those associated with the death regeneration model of organism "decay", the UPO of the WAS calculated from the AS and AD models also matched well - if the steady state AS model fE_OHO = 0.20 and fE_PAO = 0.25 values were used, then the UPO fraction of the WAS calculated from the AS models deviated significantly from those calculated with the AD models. Therefore in plant wide wastewater treatment models the characterization of PS and WAS as defined by the AS models can be applied without modification in AD models. The observed rate limiting hydrolysis/acidogenesis rates of the sludges are listed. PMID:24699419

  13. Occurrence and Fate of Trace Contaminants during Aerobic and Anaerobic Sludge Digestion and Dewatering.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Paula; Kleywegt, Sonya; Payne, Michael; Svoboda, M Lewina; Lee, Hing-Biu; Reiner, Eric; Kolic, Terry; Metcalfe, Chris; Smyth, Shirley Anne

    2015-07-01

    Digestion of municipal wastewater biosolids is a necessary prerequisite to their beneficial use in land application, in order to protect public health and the receiving environment. In this study, 13 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), 11 musks, and 17 polybrominated diphenyl ethers were analyzed in 84 samples including primary sludge, waste activated sludge, digested biosolids, dewatered biosolids, and dewatering centrate or filtrate collected from five wastewater treatment plants with aerobic or anaerobic digestion. Aerobic digestion processes were sampled during both warm and cold temperatures to analyze seasonal differences. Among the studied compounds, triclosan, triclocarban, galaxolide, and BDE-209 were the substances most frequently detected under different treatment processes at levels up to 30,000 ng/g dry weight. Comparing aerobic and anaerobic digestion, it was observed that the levels of certain PPCPs and musks were significantly higher in anaerobically digested biosolids, relative to the residues from aerobic digestion. Therefore, aerobic digestion has the potential advantage of reducing levels of PPCPs and musks. On the other hand, anaerobic digestion has the advantage of recovering energy from the biosolids in the form of combustible gases while retaining the nutrient and soil conditioning value of this resource. PMID:26437100

  14. Anaerobic digestibility of the waste activated sludge discharged from large-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyong; Wen, Xianghua; Xu, Meilan; Qi, Meng; Huang, Xia

    2012-12-01

    Anaerobic digestibility of the waste activated sludge (WAS) discharged from large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and conventional activated sludge processes (CASs) were compared using batch trials. Four wastewater treatment plants were sampled. Results showed that the sludge from MBRs had poor anaerobic digestibility as it had lower volatile solid (VS) reduction rate and lower maximum biogas production rate. The partial sludge stabilization during the long sludge retention time (SRT) typically applied in MBRs was the possible reason. On the other hand, the difference in wastewater composition had a great impact on the properties of activated sludge and the downstream sludge digestion. Inorganic matter accumulation in the WAS may hinder the access of microorganisms to substrate. The humic-like substances accumulating in the activated sludge was expected to contribute to the worse digestibility and these substances were observed to be released during anaerobic digestion through three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. PMID:23131311

  15. Anaerobic digestion challenge of raw olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, M A; Gonçalves, M R; Marques, I P

    2011-12-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) was digested in its original composition (100% v/v) in an anaerobic hybrid. High concentrations (54-55 kg COD m(-3)), acid pH (5.0) and lack of alkalinity and nitrogen are some OMW adverse characteristics. Loads of 8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) provided 3.7-3.8 m3 biogas m(-3) d(-1) (63-64% CH4) and 81-82% COD removal. An effluent with basic pH (8.1) and high alkalinity was obtained. A good performance was also observed with weekly load shocks (2.7-4.1, 8.4-10.4 kg COD m(-3) d(-1)) by introducing piggery effluent and OMW alternately. Biogas of 3.0-3.4 m3 m(-3) d(-1) (63-69% CH4) was reached. Developed biomass (350 days) was neither affected by raw OMW nor by organic shocks. Through the effluents complementarity concept, a stable process able of degrading the original OMW alone was obtained. Unlike what is referred, OMW is an energy resource through anaerobiosis without additional expenses to correct it or decrease its concentration/toxicity. PMID:21983408

  16. The future of anaerobic digestion and biogas utilization.

    PubMed

    Holm-Nielsen, J B; Al Seadi, T; Oleskowicz-Popiel, P

    2009-11-01

    One of the common tendencies of animal production activities in Europe and in developed countries in general is to intensify the animal production and to increase the size of the animal production units. High livestock density is always accompanied by production of a surplus of animal manure, representing a considerable pollution threat for the environment in these areas. Avoiding over-fertilization is not only important for environmental protection reasons but also for economical reasons. Intensive animal production areas need therefore suitable manure management, aiming to export and to redistribute the excess of nutrients from manure and to optimize their recycling. Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and slurries offers several benefits by improving their fertilizer qualities, reducing odors and pathogens and producing a renewable fuel - the biogas. The EU policies concerning renewable energy systems (RES) have set forward a fixed goal of supplying 20% of the European energy demands from RES by year 2020. A major part of the renewable energy will originate from European farming and forestry. At least 25% of all bioenergy in the future can originate from biogas, produced from wet organic materials such as: animal manure, whole crop silages, wet food and feed wastes, etc. PMID:19217772

  17. Biological carbon dioxide utilisation in food waste anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Bajón Fernández, Y; Green, K; Schuler, K; Soares, A; Vale, P; Alibardi, L; Cartmell, E

    2015-12-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment of anaerobic digesters (AD) was previously identified as a potential on-site carbon revalorisation strategy. This study addresses the lack of studies investigating this concept in up-scaled units and the need to understand the mechanisms of exogenous CO2 utilisation. Two pilot-scale ADs treating food waste were monitored for 225 days, with the test unit being periodically injected with CO2 using a bubble column. The test AD maintained a CH4 production rate of 0.56 ± 0.13 m(3) CH4·(kg VSfed d)(-1) and a CH4 concentration in biogas of 68% even when dissolved CO2 levels were increased by a 3 fold over the control unit. An additional uptake of 0.55 kg of exogenous CO2 was achieved in the test AD during the trial period. A 2.5 fold increase in hydrogen (H2) concentration was observed and attributed to CO2 dissolution and to an alteration of the acidogenesis and acetogenesis pathways. A hypothesis for conversion of exogenous CO2 has been proposed, which requires validation by microbial community analysis. PMID:26143589

  18. PLFA profiles for microbial community monitoring in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenauer, Thomas; Illmer, Paul

    2012-07-01

    The use of municipal solid waste as feedstock for biogas production offers an interesting possibility for waste treatment with the beneficial effect of gaining a green energy source. The involved processes are very complex, and many different organisms connected via a dynamic food web are associated with them. These complex interactions within these microbial communities are still not clearly understood. Therefore, a phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profile analysis method, well established in aerobic but still not as common in anaerobic systems, was used to throw some light on this matter. In the present investigation, a 750 m³ biogas reactor (Roppen, Austria) was monitored over a half-year period. During this period, four different phases in terms of gas production could be determined: low (I), increasing (II), high (III), and decreasing (IV) gas production. In combination with the PLFA profiles, we were able to identify changes in the microbial community associated with these phases. PMID:22491989

  19. Assessment of the state of the art of technologies for the processing of digestate residue from anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, W; Drosg, B

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely used as an important source of renewable energy. With the increasing number and capacity of biogas plants also, adequate treatment technologies for whole digestate - the residue from anaerobic digestion - are gaining attention. In this study the state of the art of digestate processing is analysed, and currently used treatment schemes and the various technological processes involved are evaluated. The study combines data and experiences from existing large-scale digestate processing facilities in Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Italy, as well as know-how from technology providers and relevant research projects. However, the field of digestate processing is still quite new and little detailed information about the performance of different technologies at industrial scale is available. Digestate processing is gaining importance since digestate utilisation can become an important bottleneck when increasing biogas production. In addition, the production of renewable fertiliser from digestate is increasingly of interest to replace fossil fertilisers. This study is the first profound attempt to establish an assessment of the state-of-the-art technologies in use. PMID:23656941

  20. ENERGY AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTERS AND BIOFUELS FOR RURAL WASTE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technological and socioeconomic assessment of anaerobic digester feasibility for small to mid-size livestock operations was undertaken. Three full scale digesters and one pilot scale facility were under various degrees of monitoring and evaluation to assess design and operation...

  1. Biochar produced from anaerobically-digested fiber reduces phosphorus in dairy lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air dried to < 8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential...

  2. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF MESOPHILIC AND THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION. PHASE 2. STEADY STATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted of the relative performance of anaerobic digestion systems under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Fifty liter laboratory scale digesters were fed primary sludge from the Allentown, PA Waste Water Treatment Plant. Long-term, steady-state performance da...

  3. The environmental sustainability of anaerobic digestion as a biomass valorization technology.

    PubMed

    De Meester, Steven; Demeyer, Jens; Velghe, Filip; Peene, Andy; Van Langenhove, Herman; Dewulf, Jo

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the environmental sustainability of anaerobic digestion from three perspectives. First, reference electricity is compared to electricity production from domestic organic waste and energy crop digestion. Second, different digester feed possibilities in an agricultural context are studied. Third, the influence of applying digestate as fertilizer is investigated. Results highlight that biomass is converted at a rational exergy (energy) efficiency ranging from 15.3% (22.6) to 33.3% (36.0). From a life cycle perspective, a saving of over 90% resources is achieved in most categories when comparing biobased electricity to conventional electricity. However, operation without heat valorization results in 32% loss of this performance while using organic waste (domestic and agricultural residues) as feedstock avoids land resources. The use of digestate as a fertilizer is beneficial from a resource perspective, but causes increased nitrogen and methane emissions, which can be reduced by 50%, making anaerobic digestion an environmentally competitive bioenergy technology. PMID:22864176

  4. Modeling the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse: extension of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) with sulfate reduction for a very high strength and sulfate rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Ernesto L; Spanjers, Henri; Solon, Kimberly; Amerlinck, Youri; Nopens, Ingmar; Dewulf, Jo

    2015-03-15

    This research presents the modeling of the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse, hereby extending the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 with sulfate reduction for a very high strength and sulfate rich wastewater. Based on a sensitivity analysis, four parameters of the original ADM1 and all sulfate reduction parameters were calibrated. Although some deviations were observed between model predictions and experimental values, it was shown that sulfates, total aqueous sulfide, free sulfides, methane, carbon dioxide and sulfide in the gas phase, gas flow, propionic and acetic acids, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and pH were accurately predicted during model validation. The model showed high (±10%) to medium (10%-30%) accuracy predictions with a mean absolute relative error ranging from 1% to 26%, and was able to predict failure of methanogenesis and sulfidogenesis when the sulfate loading rate increased. Therefore, the kinetic parameters and the model structure proposed in this work can be considered as valid for the sulfate reduction process in the anaerobic digestion of cane-molasses vinasse when sulfate and organic loading rates range from 0.36 to 1.57 kg [Formula: see text]  m(-3) d(-1) and from 7.66 to 12 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), respectively. PMID:25589435

  5. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Petroni, Gianluca; Mancini, Daniele; Geri, Alberto; Palma, Luca Di; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs) have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2?mW/m2. The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate. PMID:26273609

  6. Influence of lactic acid on the two-phase anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cai, Wei-min; He, Pin-jing

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of lactic acid on the methanogenesis, anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes was firstly conducted in a two-phase anaerobic digestion process, and performance of two digesters fed with lactic acid and glucose was subsequently compared. The results showed that the lactic acid was the main fermentation products of hydrolysis-acidification stage in the two-phase anaerobic digestion process for kitchen wastes. The lactic acid concentration constituted approximately 50% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in the hydrolysis-acidification liquid. The maximum organic loading rate was lower in the digester fed with lactic acid than that fed with glucose. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and COD removal were deteriorated in the methanogenic reactor fed with lactic acid compared to that fed with glucose. The specific methanogenic activity (SMA) declined to 0.343 g COD/(gVSSxd) when the COD loading were designated as 18.8 g/(Lxd) in the digester fed with lactic acid. The propionic acid accumulation occurred due to the high concentration of lactic acid fed. It could be concluded that avoiding the presence of the lactic acid is necessary in the hydrolysis-acidification process for the improvement of the two-phase anaerobic digestion process of kitchen wastes. PMID:17915737

  7. Feasibility assessment tool for urban anaerobic digestion in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lohri, Christian Riuji; Rodi?, Ljiljana; Zurbrügg, Christian

    2013-09-15

    This paper describes a method developed to support feasibility assessments of urban anaerobic digestion (AD). The method not only uses technical assessment criteria but takes a broader sustainability perspective and integrates technical-operational, environmental, financial-economic, socio-cultural, institutional, policy and legal criteria into the assessment tool developed. Use of the tool can support decision-makers with selecting the most suitable set-up for the given context. The tool consists of a comprehensive set of questions, structured along four distinct yet interrelated dimensions of sustainability factors, which all influence the success of any urban AD project. Each dimension answers a specific question: I) WHY? What are the driving forces and motivations behind the initiation of the AD project? II) WHO? Who are the stakeholders and what are their roles, power, interests and means of intervention? III) WHAT? What are the physical components of the proposed AD chain and the respective mass and resource flows? IV) HOW? What are the key features of the enabling or disabling environment (sustainability aspects) affecting the proposed AD system? Disruptive conditions within these four dimensions are detected. Multi Criteria Decision Analysis is used to guide the process of translating the answers from six sustainability categories into scores, combining them with the relative importance (weights) attributed by the stakeholders. Risk assessment further evaluates the probability that certain aspects develop differently than originally planned and assesses the data reliability (uncertainty factors). The use of the tool is demonstrated with its application in a case study for Bahir Dar in Ethiopia. PMID:23722149

  8. Effect of seasonal changes in quantities of biowaste on full scale anaerobic digester performance

    SciTech Connect

    Illmer, P. Gstraunthaler, G.

    2009-01-15

    A 750,000 l digester located in Roppen/Austria was studied over a 2-year period. The concentrations and amounts of CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S and several other process parameters like temperature, retention time, dry weight and input of substrate were registered continuously. On a weekly scale the pH and the concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N and volatile fatty acids (acetic, butyric, iso-butyric, propionic, valeric and iso-valeric acid) were measured. The data show a similar pattern of seasonal gas production over 2 years of monitoring. The consumption of VFA and not the hydrogenotrophic CH{sub 4} production appeared to be the limiting factor for the investigated digestion process. Whereas the changes in pH and the concentrations of most VFA did not correspond with changes in biogas production, the ratio of acetic to propionic acid and the concentration of H{sub 2} appeared to be useful indicators for reactor performance. However, the most influential factors for the anaerobic digestion process were the amount and the quality of input material, which distinctly changed throughout the year.

  9. Navigating wastewater energy recovery strategies: a life cycle comparison of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and conventional treatment systems with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Cao, Ling; Love, Nancy G; Raskin, Lutgarde; Skerlos, Steven J

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate emerging anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology in comparison with conventional wastewater energy recovery technologies. Wastewater treatment process modeling and systems analyses were combined to evaluate the conditions under which AnMBR may produce more net energy and have lower life cycle environmental emissions than high rate activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (HRAS+AD), conventional activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (CAS+AD), and an aerobic membrane bioreactor with anaerobic digestion (AeMBR+AD). For medium strength domestic wastewater treatment under baseline assumptions at 15 °C, AnMBR recovered 49% more energy as biogas than HRAS+AD, the most energy positive conventional technology considered, but had significantly higher energy demands and environmental emissions. Global warming impacts associated with AnMBR were largely due to emissions of effluent dissolved methane. For high strength domestic wastewater treatment, AnMBR recovered 15% more net energy than HRAS+AD, and the environmental emissions gap between the two systems was reduced. Future developments of AnMBR technology in low energy fouling control, increased flux, and management of effluent methane emissions would make AnMBR competitive with HRAS+AD. Rapid advancements in AnMBR technology must continue to achieve its full economic and environmental potential as an energy recovery strategy for domestic wastewater. PMID:24742289

  10. Feasibility and interest of the anammox process as treatment alternative for anaerobic digester supernatants in manure processing--an overview.

    PubMed

    Magrí, Albert; Béline, Fabrice; Dabert, Patrick

    2013-12-15

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (ANR) is based on the combination of partial nitritation (PN) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). It is a promising alternative for the subsequent treatment of biogas digester supernatants in livestock manure processing and nitrogen surplus scenarios. However, as no full-scale experiences in the treatment of manure digestates by ANR have been published to date, future field studies addressing treatment of this kind of effluent would be of great interest. Some topics to be considered in these studies would be coupling anaerobic digestion and ANR, analysis of the factors that affect the process, comparing reactor configurations, microbial ecology, gas emissions, and achieving robust performance. This paper provides an overview of published studies on ANR. Specific issues related to the applicability of the process for treating manure digestates are discussed. The energy requirements of ANR are compared with those of other technological alternatives aimed at recovering nitrogen from digester supernatants. The results of the assessment were shown to depend on the composition of the supernatant. In this regard, the PN-anammox process was shown to be more competitive than other alternatives particularly at concentrations of up to 2 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3). PMID:24161806

  11. Assessment of the potential for biogas production from wheat straw leachate in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket digesters.

    PubMed

    Idrus, S; Banks, C J; Heaven, S

    2012-01-01

    Wheat straw is a major potential source of waste biomass for renewable energy production, but its high salt content causes problems in combustion. The salts can be removed by washing, but this process also removes a proportion of the organic material which could potentially be recovered by anaerobic digestion of the washwater leachate. This approach would maximise the overall energy yield in an integrated process in which washwater could be recycled after further desalting. Leachate from cold water washing with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 1.2 g l?¹ was fed to mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) digesters at a loading rate of 1 g COD l?¹ day?¹ to determine the energy yield and any detrimental effects of the leached salts on the process. The specific methane production was 0.29 l CH? g?¹ COD(added), corresponding to a COD removal rate of 84%. Light metal cations in the leachate, especially potassium, were found to accumulate in the digesters and appeared to have a synergistic effect up to a concentration of ?6.5 mg K g?¹ wet weight of the granular sludge, but further accumulation caused inhibition of methanogenesis. It was shown that gas production in the inhibited digesters could be restored within 12 days by switching the feed to a synthetic sewage, which washed the accumulated K out of the digesters. PMID:23109593

  12. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris on sugarcane vinasse: the effect of anaerobic digestion pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sheyla Santa Isabel; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; de Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Chinalia, Fábio Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Microalgae farming has been identified as the most eco-sustainable solution for producing biodiesel. However, the operation of full-scale plants is still limited by costs and the utilization of industrial and/or domestic wastes can significantly improve economic profits. Several waste effluents are valuable sources of nutrients for the cultivation of microalgae. Ethanol production from sugarcane, for instance, generates significant amounts of organically rich effluent, the vinasse. After anaerobic digestion treatment, nutrient remaining in such an effluent can be used to grow microalgae. This research aimed to testing the potential of the anaerobic treated vinasse as an alternative source of nutrients for culturing microalgae with the goal of supplying the biodiesel industrial chain with algal biomass and oil. The anaerobic process treating vinasse reached a steady state at about 17 batch cycles of 24 h producing about 0.116 m(3)CH4 kgCODvinasse (-1). The highest productivity of Chlorella vulgaris biomass (70 mg l(-1) day(-1)) was observed when using medium prepared with the anaerobic digester effluent. Lipid productivity varied from 0.5 to 17 mg l(-1) day(-1). Thus, the results show that it is possible to integrate the culturing of microalgae with the sugarcane industry by means of anaerobic digestion of the vinasse. There is also the advantageous possibility of using by-products of the anaerobic digestion such as methane and CO2 for sustaining the system with energy and carbon source, respectively. PMID:24013860

  13. Ultrasonic and Thermal Pretreatments on Anaerobic Digestion of Petrochemical Sludge: Dewaterability and Degradation of PAHs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Weizhong; Wong, Jonathan W. C.; Yong, Xiaoyu; Yan, Binghua; Zhang, Xueying; Jia, Honghua

    2015-01-01

    Effects of different pretreatment methods on sludge dewaterability and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion were studied. Results showed that the total biogas production volume in the thermal pretreatment system was 4 and 5 times higher than that in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system, and the corresponding volatile solid removal efficiencies reached 28%, 15%, and 8%. Phenanthrene, paranaphthalene, fluoranthene, benzofluoranthene, and benzopyrene removal rates reached 43.3%, 55.5%, 30.6%, 42.9%, and 41.7%, respectively, in the thermal pretreatment system, which were much higher than those in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system. Moreover, capillary suction time (CST) of sludge increased after pretreatment, and then reduced after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, indicating that sludge dewaterability was greatly improved after anaerobic digestion. The decrease of protein and polysaccharide in the sludge could improve sludge dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. This study suggested that thermal pretreatment might be a promising enhancement method for petrochemical sludge solubilization, thus contributing to degradation of the PAHs, biogas production, and improvement of dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. PMID:26327510

  14. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  15. Ultrasonic and Thermal Pretreatments on Anaerobic Digestion of Petrochemical Sludge: Dewaterability and Degradation of PAHs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Weizhong; Wong, Jonathan W C; Yong, Xiaoyu; Yan, Binghua; Zhang, Xueying; Jia, Honghua

    2015-01-01

    Effects of different pretreatment methods on sludge dewaterability and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion were studied. Results showed that the total biogas production volume in the thermal pretreatment system was 4 and 5 times higher than that in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system, and the corresponding volatile solid removal efficiencies reached 28%, 15%, and 8%. Phenanthrene, paranaphthalene, fluoranthene, benzofluoranthene, and benzopyrene removal rates reached 43.3%, 55.5%, 30.6%, 42.9%, and 41.7%, respectively, in the thermal pretreatment system, which were much higher than those in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system. Moreover, capillary suction time (CST) of sludge increased after pretreatment, and then reduced after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, indicating that sludge dewaterability was greatly improved after anaerobic digestion. The decrease of protein and polysaccharide in the sludge could improve sludge dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. This study suggested that thermal pretreatment might be a promising enhancement method for petrochemical sludge solubilization, thus contributing to degradation of the PAHs, biogas production, and improvement of dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. PMID:26327510

  16. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Raw and Pre-treated Brewery Spent Grain Utilizing Solid State Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Panji?ko, Mario; Zupan?i?, Gregor Drago; Zeli?, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The brewery spent grain (BSG) represents approximately 85% of the total quantity of by-products from the brewing industry. The biogas production from the BSG has been the subject of several studies in recent years, due to relatively high energy consumption in the brewing process and due to the increasing energy costs. The biodegradability of raw and pre-treated BSG in a single-stage and two-stage solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) system was determined in this study. The results show that the BSG have a biogas potential of 120 L/kg. In the single-stage system, the biogas yield obtained from raw BSG (87.4 L/kg) was almost equal to the yield obtained from the pre-treated BSG (89.1 L/kg), while the methane yield was 51.9 and 55.3 L/kg and the biodegradation was 62.0% and 62.2% for raw and pre-treated BSG, respectively. In two-stage SS-AD the pre-treated BSG showed better results, with the biogas yield of 103.2 L/kg and the biodegradation of 73.6%, while the biogas yield obtained from raw BSG was 89.1 L/kg, with the biodegradation of 63.5%. In two-stage process the obtained methane yields from raw and pre-treated BSG were identical (58.7 L/kg). PMID:26680709

  17. Comparison of sludge digestion under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with a focus on the degradation of proteins at mesophilic temperature.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liming; Wang, Tianfeng; Li, Tianshui; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2013-07-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic digestion are popular methods for the treatment of waste activated sludge. However, the differences in degradation of sludge during aerobic and anaerobic digestion remain unclear. In this study, the sludge degradation during aerobic and anaerobic digestion was investigated at mesophilic temperature, focused on protein based on the degradation efficiency and degree of humification. The duration of aerobic and anaerobic digestion was about 90 days. The final degradation efficiency of volatile solid was 66.1 ± 1.6% and 66.4 ± 2.4% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The final degradation efficiency of protein was 67.5 ± 1.4% and 65.1 ± 2.6% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The degradation models of volatile solids were consistent with those of protein under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The solubility of protein under aerobic digestion was greater than that under anaerobic digestion. Moreover, the humification index of dissolved organic matter of aerobic digestion was greater than that during anaerobic digestion. PMID:23685650

  18. Energy and CO2 balance of maize and grass as energy crops for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Gerin, Patrick A; Vliegen, François; Jossart, Jean-Marc

    2008-05-01

    Energy crops can be used to feed anaerobic digesters and produce renewable energy. However, sustainability of this option requires that it contributes to a net production of renewable energy and a net reduction of fossil CO2 emission. In this paper, the net balance of CO2 emission and renewable energy production is assessed for maize and grass energy crops produced in several agricultural systems relevant for Southern Belgium and surrounding areas. The calculated net energy yields are 8-25 (maize) and 7.4-15.5 (grass) MWh of renewable CH4 per MWh of fossil energy invested, depending on the agricultural option considered. After conversion to electricity, the specific CO2 emissions range from 31 to 104 kg(CO2)MWhelectricity(-1), depending on the case considered. This corresponds to a significant reduction in CO2 emissions compared to the current reference gas-steam turbine technology which produces 456 kg(CO2)MWhelectricity(-1). PMID:17574409

  19. MICROBIAL DESTRUCTIONS ACHIEVED BY FULL-SCALE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of studies undertaken to investigate the pathogen reducing capabilities of conventional sludge stabilization procedures, microbial reductions produced by mesophilic and thermophilic digestion at the Los Angeles Hyperion Plant were examined. Samples from the digester feed ...

  20. Anaerobic digestion and gasification coupling for wastewater sludge treatment and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Nicolas; Rousse, Daniel R; Hausler, Robert

    2014-06-27

    Sewage sludge management is an energy intensive process. Anaerobic digestion contributes to energy efficiency improvement but is limited by the biological process. A review has been conducted prior to experimentation in order to evaluate the mass and energy balances on anaerobic digestion followed by gasification of digested sludge. The purpose was to improve energy recovery and reuse. Calculations were based on design parameters and tests that are conducted with the anaerobic digester of a local wastewater treatment plant and a small commercial gasification system. Results showed a very significant potential of energy recovery. More than 90% of the energy content from sludge was extracted. Also, approximately the same amount of energy would be transferred in both directions between the digester (biogas) and the gasifier (thermal energy). This extraction resulted in the same use of biogas as the reference scenario but final product was a totally dry biochar, which represented a fraction of the initial mass. Phosphorus was concentrated and significantly preserved. This analysis suggests that anaerobic digestion followed by dehydration, drying and gasification could be a promising and viable option for energy and nutrient recovery from municipal sludge in replacement of conventional paths. PMID:24972600

  1. Small scale units testing low cost anaerobic digestion (AD) systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the potential for low technology and low cost digesters for small dairies, BARC and researchers from the University of Maryland installed six modified Taiwanese-model field-scale (FS) digesters near the original dairy manure digester. The FS units receive the same post-separated liquid ...

  2. Comparative metagenomic analysis of bacterial populations in three full-scale mesophilic anaerobic manure digesters.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Benoit; Wright, André-Denis G

    2014-03-01

    While the use of anaerobic digestion to generate methane as a source of bioenergy is increasing worldwide, our knowledge of the microbial communities that perform biomethanation is very limited. Using next-generation sequencing, bacterial population profiles were determined in three full-scale mesophilic anaerobic digesters operated on dairy farms in the state of Vermont (USA). To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metagenomic analysis on the bacterial population of anaerobic digesters using dairy manure as their main substrate. A total of 20,366 non-chimeric sequence reads, covering the V1-V2 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, were assigned to 2,176 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a genetic distance cutoff value of 5 %. Based on their limited sequence identity to validly characterized species, the majority of OTUs identified in our study likely represented novel bacterial species. Using a naïve Bayesian classifier, 1,624 anaerobic digester OTUs could be assigned to 16 bacterial phyla, while 552 OTUs could not be classified and may belong to novel bacterial taxonomic groups that have yet to be described. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi were the most highly represented bacteria overall, with Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi showing the least and the most variation in abundance between digesters, respectively. All digesters shared 132 OTUs, which as a "core" group represented 65.4 to 70.6 % of sequences in individual digesters. Our results show that bacterial populations from microbial communities of anaerobic manure digesters can display high levels of diversity despite sharing a common core substrate. PMID:24085391

  3. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, S.; Karimi-Jashni, A.; Sartaj, M.

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

  4. Pharmaceutically active compounds in sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic and aerobic digestion, wastewater stabilization ponds and composting.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2015-01-15

    Sewage sludge disposal onto lands has been stabilized previously but still many pollutants are not efficiently removed. Special interest has been focused on pharmaceutical compounds due to their potential ecotoxicological effects. Nowadays, there is scarce information about their occurrence in different sludge stabilization treatments. In this work, the occurrence of twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds has been studied in sludge from four sludge stabilization treatments: anaerobic digestion, aerobic digestion, composting and lagooning. The types of sludge evaluated were primary, secondary, anaerobically-digested and dehydrated, composted, mixed, aerobically-digested and dehydrated and lagoon sludge. Nineteen of the twenty-two pharmaceutically active compounds monitored were detected in sewage sludge. The most contaminated samples were primary sludge, secondary sludge and mixed sludge (the average concentrations of studied compounds in these sludges were 179, 310 and 142 ?g/kg dm, respectively) while the mean concentrations found in the other types of sewage sludge were 70 ?g/kg dm (aerobically-digested sludge), 63 ?g/kg dm (lagoon sludge), 12 ?g/kg dm (composted sludge) and 8 ?g/kg dm (anaerobically-digested sludge). The antibiotics ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were found at the highest concentration levels in most of the analyzed sludge samples (up to 2660 and 4328 ?g/kg dm, respectively). Anaerobic-digestion treatment reduced more considerably the concentration of most of the studied compounds than aerobic-digestion (especially in the case of bezafibrate and fluoroquinolones) and more than anaerobic stabilization ponds (in the case of acetaminophen, atenolol, bezafibrate, carbamazepine, 17?-ethinylestradiol, naproxen and salicylic acid). Ecotoxicological risk assessment, of sludge application onto soils, has also been evaluated. Risk quotients, expressed as the ratio between the predicted environmental concentration and the predicted non-effect concentration, were lower than 1 for all the pharmaceutically active compounds so no significant risks are expected to occur due to the application of sewage sludge onto soils, except for 17?-ethinylestradiol when chronic toxicity was considered. PMID:24909712

  5. Anaerobic digestion of gelatinous water at laboratory and pilot scale and nitrogen inhibition.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sosa, D; Rafrafi, Y; Torrijos, M; Bernet, N; Buitron, G; Bosque, F; Delgenès, J P

    2008-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of the liquid residue (gelatinous water) coming from the production of fat from animal residue, was studied at laboratory and pilot scale. Biodegradability (>98%) and biogas potential (675 mL of biogas/g of COD(applied)) of this wastewater are very high. However, due to the high content on nitrogen, an inhibition of the anaerobic activity was observed for quite low concentrations of N-NH(3). Dilution of the wastewater and pH regulation in the reactor around 7.3 are the 2 solutions which were investigated to overcome the nitrogen inhibition at industrial scale. These two solutions were validated at laboratory scale in an anaerobic SBR and then onsite at pilot scale in a continuous reactor. A stable anaerobic digestion was observed in both reactors showing that no nitrogen inhibition was obtained when N-NH(3) concentration in the reactor was kept low. PMID:18547924

  6. In situ volatile fatty acids influence biogas generation from kitchen wastes by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiyang; Zhao, Mingxing; Miao, Hengfeng; Huang, Zhenxing; Gao, Shumei; Ruan, Wenquan

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is considered to be an efficient way of disposing kitchen wastes, which can not only reduce waste amounts, but also produce biogas. However, the excessive accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) caused by high organic loads will inhibit anaerobic digestion intensively. Effects of the VFA composition on biogas generation and microbial community are still required for the investigation under various organic loads of kitchen wastes. Our results showed that the maximum specific methane production was 328.3 ml g TS(-1), and acetic acid was the main inhibitor in methanogenesis. With the increase of organic load, aceticlastic methanogenesis was more sensitive to acetic acid than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Meanwhile, methanogenic microbial community changed significantly, and few species grew well under excessive organic loads. This study provides an attempt to reveal the mechanism of VFA inhibition in anaerobic digestion of kitchen wastes. PMID:24811447

  7. Enhanced stabilization of digested sludge during long-term storage in anaerobic lagoons.

    PubMed

    Lukicheva, Irina; Pagilla, Krishna; Tian, Guanglong; Cox, Albert; Granato, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to study changes in anaerobically stored digested sludge under different lengths of storage time to evaluate the quality of final product biosolids. The analyses of collected data suggest the organic matter degradation occurrence in the anaerobic environment of the lagoon approximately within the first year. After that, the degradation becomes very slow, which is likely caused by unfavorable environmental conditions. The performance of lagoon aging of digested sludge was also compared to the performance of lagoon aging of anaerobically digested and dewatered sludge. It was concluded that both of these processes result in biosolids of comparative quality and that the former provides more economical solution to biosolids handling by eliminating the need for mechanical dewatering. PMID:24851324

  8. Evaluating a model of anaerobic digestion of organic wastes through system identification

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, R.P.; Kiely, G.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), on its own or co-digested with primary sewage sludge (PSS), produces high quality biogas, suitable as renewable energy. Parameter estimation and evaluation of a two-stage mathematical model of the anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of MSW and PSS are described. Measured data are from a bench scale laboratory experiment using a continuously stirred tank reactor and operated at 36 C for 115 days. The two-stage model simulates acidogenesis and methanogenesis, including ammonia inhibition. Model parameters are estimated using an output error, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Sensitivity of the estimated parameter values and the model outputs to non-estimated model parameters and measurement errors are evaluated. The estimated mathematical model successfully predicts the performance of the anaerobic reactor. Sensitivity results provide guidance for improving the model structure and experimental procedures.

  9. Should We Build “Obese” or “Lean” Anaerobic Digesters?

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Aurelio; Coats, Erik; Brinkman, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Conventional anaerobic digesters (ADs) treating dairy manure are fed with raw or fermented manure rich in volatile fatty acids (VFAs). In contrast, pre-fermented AD (PF-AD) is fed with the more recalcitrant, fiber-rich fraction of manure that has been pre-fermented and depleted of VFAs. Thus, the substrate of PF-AD may be likened to a lean diet rich in fibers while the pre-fermentation stage fermenter is fed a relatively rich diet containing labile organic substances. Previous results have shown that conventional and pre-fermented ADs fed with raw or pre-fermented manure, respectively, produced comparable methane yields. The primary objective of this study was to characterize, using next-generation DNA sequencing, the bacterial communities in various bioreactors (pre-fermentation stage fermenter; various operational arrangements PF-AD; conventional single-stage AD; and a full scale AD) and compare the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratios in these different systems. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes constituted the two most abundant phyla in all AD samples analyzed, as well as most of the samples analyzed in the fermenters and manure samples. Higher relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, ranging from 26% to 51% of bacteria, tended to be associated with PF-AD samples, while the highest relative abundance of Firmicutes occurred in the fermenter (maximum of 76% of bacteria) and manure (maximum of 66% of bacteria) samples. On average, primary stage fermenters exhibited microbiological traits linked to obesity: higher F/B ratios and a ‘diet’ that is less fibrous and more labile compared to that fed to PF-AD. On the other hand, microbial characteristics associated with leanness (lower F/B ratios combined with fibrous substrate) were associated with PF-AD. We propose that bacterial communities in AD shift depending on the quality of substrate, which ultimately results in maintaining VFA yields in PF-AD, similar to the role of bacterial communities and a high fiber diet in lean mice. PMID:24831948

  10. Modeling and Application of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based Assay for Biotoxicity in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2015-11-17

    The sensitivity of anaerobic digestion metabolism to a wide range of solutes makes it important to be able to monitor toxicants in the feed to anaerobic digesters to optimize their operation. In this study, a rapid fluorescence measurement technique based on resazurin reduction using a microplate reader was developed and applied for the detection of toxicants and/or inhibitors to digesters. A kinetic model was developed to describe the process of resazurin reduced to resorufin, and eventually to dihydroresorufin under anaerobic conditions. By modeling the assay results of resazurin (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM) reduction by a pure facultative anaerobic strain, Enterococcus faecalis, and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge, with or without 10 mg L(-1) spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP), we found it was clear that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for the reduction of resazurin to resorufin, k1, was a good measure of "toxicity". With lower biomass density and the optimal resazurin addition (0.1 mM), the toxicity of 10 mg L(-1) PCP for E. faecalis and fresh anaerobic sludge was detected in 10 min. By using this model, the toxicity differences among seven chlorophenols to E. faecalis and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge were elucidated within 30 min. The toxicity differences determined by this assay were comparable to toxicity sequences of various chlorophenols reported in the literature. These results suggest that the assay developed in this study not only can quickly detect toxicants for anaerobic digestion but also can efficiently detect the toxicity differences among a variety of similar toxicants. PMID:26457928

  11. Economic and environmental analysis of four different configurations of anaerobic digestion for food waste to energy conversion using LCA for: a food service provider case study.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, Matthew

    2013-07-15

    The US disposes of more than 34 million tons of food waste in landfills per year. As this food waste decomposes it generates methane gas and negatively contributes to global warming. Diverting theses organic food wastes from landfills and to emerging technologies will prevent these wastes and greenhouse gas emissions while at the same time generating a source renewable energy by collecting the emitted gases. From a waste prevention standpoint, instead of the food waste decomposing at local landfills, it is being converted into an energy source and the by-product may be used as a fertilizer (Fine and Hadas, 2012). The purpose of this study was to compare four different configurations of anaerobic digestion of organic waste to energy technologies from an economic, energy, and emissions standpoint using LCA via a case study at a large food services provider in Northwest Ohio, USA. The technologies studied included two-stage anaerobic digestion system using ultrasound pre-treating, two stage continuous combined thermophilic acidogenic hydrogenesis and mesophilic with recirculation of the digested sludge, long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements, and single stage anaerobic digestion. Using LCA, these scenarios were compared to landfill disposal of the food waste. The findings from the case study indicated that implementing on-site waste to energy systems will result in lower operation costs and lower environmental impacts. In addition, a standardized environmental and economic comparison of competing food waste to energy technologies is provided. PMID:23583791

  12. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production.

    PubMed

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Escobar, Federico; Fu, Xinmei; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester. PMID:21975301

  13. AN INNOVATIVE DESIGN FOR ANAEROBIC CO-DIGESTION OF ANIMAL WASTES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN RURAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the aim of the Phase I project to develop an innovative anaerobic co-digestion design for the treatment of dairy manure and poultry waste, our Phase I team has evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of the anaerobic co-digestion design concept with a thorough in...

  14. Anaerobic digestion for simultaneous sewage sludge treatment and CO biomethanation: process performance and microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Wang, Wen; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-09-17

    Syngas is produced by thermal gasification of both nonrenewable and renewable sources including biomass and coal, and it consists mainly of CO, CO2, and H2. In this paper we aim to bioconvert CO in the syngas to CH4. A novel technology for simultaneous sewage sludge treatment and CO biomethanation in an anaerobic reactor was presented. Batch experiments showed that CO was inhibitory to methanogens, but not to bacteria, at CO partial pressure between 0.25 and 1 atm under thermophilic conditions. During anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge supplemented with CO added through a hollow fiber membrane (HFM) module in continuous thermophilic reactors, CO did not inhibit the process even at a pressure as high as 1.58 atm inside the HFM, due to the low dissolved CO concentration in the liquid. Complete consumption of CO was achieved with CO gas retention time of 0.2 d. Results from high-throughput sequencing analysis showed clear differences of the microbial community structures between the samples from liquid and biofilm on the HFM in the reactor with CO addition. Species close to Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus were the two main archaeal species involved in CO biomethanation. However, the two species were distributed differently in the liquid phase and in the biofilm. Although the carboxidotrophic activities test showed that CO was converted by both archaea and bacteria, the bacterial species responsible for CO conversion are unknown. PMID:23952148

  15. High-solids anaerobic digestion of mixed municipal and industrial waste

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszkiewicz, J.A.; Poggi-Varaldo, H.M.

    1997-11-01

    Laboratory studies on dry anaerobic digestion of mixture of paper, kitchen food waste, and sewage sludge have demonstrated the optimum performance at total solids (TS) at the range of 30--35% TS. The thermophilic process (at 55 C) was found to be superior to a mesophilic (35 C) one, both in terms of volatile solid (VS) reduction and specific gas production, but was somewhat less stable at short mass retention times (MRT). The efficiency of total volatile solids destruction and the decrease in the oxygen demand were found to be proportional to the product of the mass retention time and temperature (d {center_dot} C). Pilot studies, conducted on a mixture of sewage sludge, mixed paper, food waste, and solids from a potato processing conducted on site in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, Canada, have demonstrated the feasibility of running the process at loads exceeding 9 kg TS/m{sup 3} {center_dot} d and producing biogas at 140 m{sup 3} of wet solids fed to the composter. The residual oxygen demand per unit mass of the dry compost was 20 mg O{sub 2}/g {center_dot} h, which indicated a need for aerobic postcuring of the anaerobically produced compost.

  16. Modeling of two-phase anaerobic process treating traditional Chinese medicine wastewater with the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaobo; Hu, Dongxue; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Ren, Nanqi; Zhu, Haibo

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to implement a mathematical model to simulate two-phase anaerobic digestion (TPAD) process which consisted of an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor in series treating traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) wastewater. A model was built on the basis of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) while considering complete mixing model for the CSTR, and axial direction discrete model and mixed series connection model for the UASB. The mathematical model was implemented with the simulation software package MATLABTM/Simulinks. System performance, in terms of COD removal, volatile fatty acids (VFA) accumulation and pH fluctuation, was simulated and compared with the measured values. The simulation results indicated that the model built was able to well predict the COD removal rate (-4.8-5.0%) and pH variation (-2.9-1.4%) of the UASB reactor, while failed to simulate the CSTR performance. Comparing to the measured results, the simulated acetic acid concentration of the CSTR effluent was underpredicted with a deviation ratios of 13.8-23.2%, resulting in an underprediction of total VFA and COD concentrations despite good estimation of propionic acid, butyric acid and valeric acid. It is presumed that ethanol present in the raw wastewater was converted into acetic acid during the acidification process, which was not considered by the model. Additionally, due to the underprediction of acetic acid the pH of CSTR effluent was overestimated. PMID:19477121

  17. Evaluation on direct interspecies electron transfer in anaerobic sludge digestion of microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Increase of methanogenesis in methane-producing microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) is frequently believed as a result of cathodic reduction of CO2. Recent studies indicated that this electromethanogenesis only accounted for a little part of methane production during anaerobic sludge digestion. Instead, direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) possibly plays an important role in methane production. In this study, anaerobic digestion of sludge were investigated in a single-chamber MEC reactor, a carbon-felt supplemented reactor and a common anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effects of DIET on the sludge digestion. The results showed that adding carbon felt into the reactor increased 12.9% of methane production and 17.2% of sludge reduction. Imposing a voltage on the carbon felt further improved the digestion. Current calculation showed that the cathodic reduction only contributed to 27.5% of increased methane production. Microbial analysis indicated that DIET played an important role in the anaerobic sludge digestion in the MEC. PMID:26492177

  18. Microbial management of anaerobic digestion: exploiting the microbiome-functionality nexus.

    PubMed

    Carballa, Marta; Regueiro, Leticia; Lema, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic reactors are mostly operated based on the monitoring of process parameters and empirical expert knowledge due to the limitations of microbial-based management. This review analyzes the requirements to conduct microbial management in anaerobic digestion, emphasizing the importance of understanding the anaerobic microbiome and the need of establishing microbial indicators of optimal performance. The strategies currently applied to shape the reactor microbiome are explored and we assess critically the different types of management (retrospective, prospective and proactive). We conclude that future research should lead to more useful data or insights to accomplish proactive management, seen as stimulation and anticipation rather than remediation. PMID:25682574

  19. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    PubMed

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (<12h) had a positive effect on the AD process. The highest enhancement of the biomethane production with an increase by 44-46% was achieved with a thermophilic pretreatment at 50°C for 6-12h or a thermal pretreatment at 80°C for 1.5h. Thermophilic pretreatments at higher temperatures (>55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment. PMID:26272711

  20. Research on Anaerobic Digestion: Optimization and Scalability of Mixed High-strength Food Processing Wastes for Renewable Biogas Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhongtang; Hitzhusen, Fredrick

    2012-12-27

    This research project developed and improved anaerobic digestion technologies, created a comprehensive Inventory of Ohio Biomass and a database of microorganisms of anaerobic digesters, and advanced knowledge and understanding of the underpinning microbiology of the anaerobic digestion process. The results and finding of this research project may be useful for future development and implementation of anaerobic digesters, especially at livestock farms. Policy makers and investors may also find the information on the biomass availability in Ohio and valuation of energy projects useful in policy making and making of investment decisions. The public may benefit from the information on biogas as an energy source and the potential impact of anaerobic digester projects on their neighborhoods.

  1. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  2. Monitoring methanogenic population dynamics in a full-scale anaerobic digester to facilitate operational management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie; Williams, Haydn; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Esteves, Sandra

    2013-07-01

    Microbial populations in a full-scale anaerobic digester fed on food waste were monitored over an 18-month period using qPCR. The digester exhibited a highly dynamic environment in which methanogenic populations changed constantly in response to availability of substrates and inhibitors. The methanogenic population in the digester was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, suggesting that aceticlastic methanogenesis was the main route for the production of methane. Sudden losses (69%) in Methanosaetaceae were followed by a build-up of VFAs which were subsequently consumed when populations recovered. A build up of ammonium inhibited Methanosaetaceae and resulted in shifts from acetate to hydrogen utilization. Addition of trace elements and alkalinity when propionate levels were high stimulated microbial growth. Routine monitoring of microbial populations and VFAs provided valuable insights into the complex processes occurring within the digester and could be used to predict digester stability and facilitate digester optimization. PMID:23707910

  3. Contribution of anaerobic digesters to emissions mitigation and electricity generation under U.S. climate policy.

    PubMed

    Zaks, David P M; Winchester, Niven; Kucharik, Christopher J; Barford, Carol C; Paltsev, Sergey; Reilly, John M

    2011-08-15

    Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria that produce methane, which can be collected and combusted to generate electricity. ADs also reduce odors and pathogens that are common with manure storage and the digested manure can be used as a fertilizer. There are relatively few ADs in the U.S., mainly due to their high capital costs. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model to test the effects of a representative U.S. climate stabilization policy on the adoption of ADs which sell electricity and generate methane mitigation credits. Under such policy, ADs become competitive at producing electricity in 2025, when they receive methane reduction credits and electricity from fossil fuels becomes more expensive. We find that ADs have the potential to generate 5.5% of U.S. electricity. PMID:21761880

  4. Is the continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion process well suited for all substrates?

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two-stage anaerobic digestion systems are often considered to be advantageous compared to one-stage processes. Although process conditions and fermenter setups are well examined, overall substrate degradation in these systems is controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how substrates with different fibre and sugar contents (hay/straw, maize silage, sugar beet) influence the degradation rate and methane production. Intermediates and gas compositions, as well as methane yields and VS-degradation degrees were recorded. The sugar beet substrate lead to a higher pH-value drop 5.67 in the acidification reactor, which resulted in a six time higher hydrogen production in comparison to the hay/straw substrate (pH-value drop 5.34). As the achieved yields in the two-stage system showed a difference of 70.6% for the hay/straw substrate, and only 7.8% for the sugar beet substrate. Therefore two-stage systems seem to be only recommendable for digesting sugar rich substrates. PMID:26519699

  5. Anaerobic Digestion of Laminaria japonica Waste from Industrial Production Residues in Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale

    PubMed Central

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Thomsen, Claudia; Thomsen, Laurenz; Benz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g?1 volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g?1 VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH4 recovery of 189 L kg?1 VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH4 and 38% CO2 was recorded. PMID:26393620

  6. Contribution of Anaerobic Digesters to Emissions Mitigation and Electricity Generation Under U.S. Climate Policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Livestock husbandry in the U.S. significantly contributes to many environmental problems, including the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG). Anaerobic digesters (ADs) break down organic wastes using bacteria that produce methane, which can be collected and combusted to generate electricity. ADs also reduce odors and pathogens that are common with manure storage and the digested manure can be used as a fertilizer. There are relatively few ADs in the U.S., mainly due to their high capital costs. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model to test the effects of a representative U.S. climate stabilization policy on the adoption of ADs which sell electricity and generate methane mitigation credits. Under such policy, ADs become competitive at producing electricity in 2025, when they receive methane reduction credits and electricity from fossil fuels becomes more expensive. We find that ADs have the potential to generate 5.5% of U.S. electricity. PMID:21761880

  7. Anaerobic Digestion of Laminaria japonica Waste from Industrial Production Residues in Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Thomsen, Claudia; Thomsen, Laurenz; Benz, Roland

    2015-09-01

    The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g(-1) volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g(-1) VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH? recovery of 189 L kg(-1) VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH? and 38% CO? was recorded. PMID:26393620

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF THERMOPHILIC AEROBIC-ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AT HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the successful operation of a new and novel approach to digestion of sludge at the Hagerstown wastewater treatment plant. The process, known as dual digestion, involved the coupling of a full-scale experimental aerobic reactor to an existing full-scale anaer...

  9. Continuous thermal hydrolysis and anaerobic digestion of sludge. Energy integration study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Elvira, S I; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data obtained from the operation in a pilot plant are used to perform mass and energy balances to a global process combining units of thermal hydrolysis (TH) of secondary sludge, anaerobic digestion (AD) of hydrolysed secondary sludge together with fresh primary sludge, and cogeneration from biogas by using a gas engine in which the biogas produces electricity and heat from the exhaust gases. Three scenarios were compared, corresponding to the three digesters operated: C (conventional AD, 17 days residence time), B (combined TH + AD, same time), and A (TH + AD at half residence time). The biogas production of digesters B and A was 33 and 24% better, respectively when compared with C. In the case of the combined TH + AD process (scenarios A and B), the key factors in the energy balance were the recovery of heat from hot streams, and the concentration of sludge. The results of the balances showed that for 8% DS concentration of the secondary sludge tested in the pilot plant, the process can be energetically self-sufficient, but a fraction of the biogas must by-pass the gas engine to be directly burned. From an economic point of view, scenario B is more profitable in terms of green energy and higher waste removal, while scenario A reduces the digester volume required by a half. Considering a population of 100,000 inhabitants, the economic benefit is 87,600 €/yr for scenario A and 132,373 €/yr for B. This value can be increased to 223,867 €/yr by increasing the sludge concentration of the feeding to the TH unit to a minimum value that allows use of all the biogas to produce green energy. This concentration is 13% DS, which is still possible from a practical point of view. Additional benefits gained with the combined TH + AD process are the enhancement of the digesters rheology and the possibility of getting Class A biosolids. The integration study presented here set the basis for the scale-up to a demonstration plant. PMID:22546800

  10. Effective reduction of enteric bacteria and viruses during the anaerobic digestion of biomass and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fannin, K.F.; Hsu, P.H.; Mensinger, J.; Cahill, C.

    1984-01-01

    Natural resource depletion increases the amount of waste requiring efficient and affordable disposal alternatives. Through effective management, many of these so-called wastes can be utilized as important energy and agricultural resources. One such management approach involves the utilization of emergent aquatic plant species, such as water hyacinth, to remove nutrients from the wastewater during growth. This process produces an energy-containing biomass that can then be anaerobically digested either separately or with other waste components to produce energy-containing methane and an effluent residue containing significant quantities of protein and nutrients. This residue can be utilized as an effective fertilizer, soil conditioner, or animal feed supplement provided it is rendered reasonably safe from such contaminants as enteric microorganisms. This study was conducted to identify the digester operating parameters that affect the survival of enteric bacteria and viruses during the anaerobic digestion of blends of water hyacinth and primary sewage sludge. Solids retetion time and temperature were demonstrated to be important parameters affecting the survival of poliovirus, f-2 coliphage, Streptoccus fecalis, and Escherichia coli during anaerobic digestion. The die-off rates of the coliphages were similar to those of the poliovirus at 35/sup 0/C. S. fecalis appeared to be the most stable of any of the bacteria and viruses studied. All organisms were more stable at 25 than at 35/sup 0/C. The data demonstrate that the concentration of enteric bacteria and viruses can be effectively reduced during anaerobic digestion using techniques, such as increased solids retention times and mesophilic temperatures, that are consistent with achieving high methane yields. The survival of enteric viruses during anaerobic digestion may be affected by the characteristics of the feedstock as well as by the process operating conditions.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge pretreated by a combined ultrasound and chemical process.

    PubMed

    Seng, Bunrith; Khanal, Samir Kumar; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2010-03-01

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) requires a long digestion time because of a rate-limiting hydrolysis step - the first phase of anaerobic digestion. Pretreatment of WAS facilitates the hydrolysis step and improves the digestibility. This study examined the effects of ultrasonic, chemical, and combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatments on WAS disintegration and its subsequent digestion at different solids retention times (SRTs). The efficient conditions for each pretreatment were evaluated based on per cent soluble chemical oxygen demand (%SCOD). The results showed that the combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatment resulted in better WAS disintegration, based on %SCOD release, compared with individual chemical and ultrasonic pretreatments. At the optimum operating conditions of the combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatment (NaOH dose of 10 mg g(-1) TS (total solids) and specific energy input of 3.8 kJ g(-1)TS), the %SCOD release was 18.1% +/- 0.5%, whereas 13.5% +/- 0.9%, 13.0% +/- 0.5% and 1.1% +/- 0.1% corresponded to individual chemical (50 mg g(-1) TS) and ultrasonic (3.8 kJ g(-1) TS) pretreatments and control (without pretreatment), respectively. The anaerobic digestion studies in continuous stirred tank reactors showed an increase in methane production of 23.4% +/- 1.3% and 31.1 +/- 1.2% for digesters fed with WAS pretreated with ultrasonic and combined chemical-ultrasonic, respectively, with respect to controls at the effective SRT of 15 days. The highest total solids removal was achieved in the digester fed with ultrasonic pretreated WAS (16.6% +/- 0.3%), whereas the highest volatile solids removal was achieved from the digester fed with combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreated WAS (24.8 +/- 0.4%). The findings from this study are a useful contribution to new pretreatment techniques in the field of sludge treatment technology through anaerobic digestion. PMID:20426267

  12. Anaerobic Digestion of Saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass for Biogas Production and Pretreatment of Particleboard Material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop an integrated process to produce biogas and high-quality particleboard using saline creeping wild ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides through anaerobic digestion (AD). Besides producing biogas, AD also serves as a pretreatment method to remove the wax la...

  13. Fungal pretreatment of albizia chips for enhanced biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albizia biomass is a forestry waste, and holds a great potential in biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD). However, low methane yields from albizia chips were observed due to their recalcitrant structure. In this study, albizia chips were pretreated by Ceriporiopsis subvermisp...

  14. Water as a leaching medium for hydrolysis of sorghum in anaerobic digestion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Egg, R.; Coble, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of using water to leach hydrolysis products from sorghum used as an anaerobic digestion feedstock. The pH of the leachate had no effect on the cumulative COD measured in the leachate. Milling the sorghum with a three roll mill prior to leaching appeared to slightly increase the hydrolysis of structural carbohydrates in the sorghum.

  15. Test/QA Plan For Verification Of Anaerobic Digester For Energy Production And Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ETV-ESTE Program conducts third-party verification testing of commercially available technologies that improve the environmental conditions in the U.S. A stakeholder committee of buyers and users of such technologies guided the development of this test on anaerobic digesters...

  16. Anaerobic Digestion. Selected Instructional Activities and References. Instructional Resources Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Robert D., Comp.

    Focusing specifically on the wastewater treatment process of anaerobic digestion, this document identifies instructional and reference materials for use by professionals in the field in the development and implementation of new programs or in the updating of existing programs. It is designed to help trainers, plant operators, educators, engineers,…

  17. Evaluation of biochar-anaerobic potato digestate mixtures as renewable components of horticultural potting media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various formulations are used in horticultural potting media, with sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite and perlite currently among the most common components. We are examining a dried anaerobic digestate remaining after the fermentation of potato processing wastes to replace organic components such as p...

  18. Utilization of Re-processed Anaerobically Digested Fiber from Dairy Manure as a Container Media Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solid fraction (fiber) from the effluent of the anaerobic digestion of dairy manure by plug flow technology yields material that has consistent physical properties (total porosity, air filled porosity at saturation, and water holding capacity) to perform satisfactorily as a plant growth media su...

  19. Wastewater polishing by a channelized macrophyte-dominated wetland and anaerobic digestion of the harvested phytomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Constructed wetlands (CW) offer a mechanism to meet regulatory standards for wastewater treatment while minimizing energy inputs. To optimize CW wastewater polishing activities and investigate integration of CW with energy production from anaerobic digestion we constructed a pair of three-tier ch...

  20. ENZYME ADDITION TO THE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER PRIMARY SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluates the effects of enzyme augmentation on municipal wastewater (MWW) sludge anaerobic digestion. The primary objective was to examine the impact of using enzymes to enhance the degradation of the cellulosic and the oil- and grease-rich sludge fractions. The additi...

  1. Hypoxia Glossary of Terms Anaerobic digestion: Decomposition of biological wastes by micro-organisms, usually

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    1 Hypoxia Glossary of Terms Anaerobic digestion: Decomposition of biological wastes by micro-organisms). Bioenergy: Useful, renewable energy produced from organic matter - the conversion of the complex carbohydrates in organic matter to energy. Organic matter may either be used directly as a fuel, processed

  2. Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties. Introduction Micro-scale biomethanation (0.1­1.0 ton per day, tpd) is increasingly being tried

  3. Improvement of anaerobic digester performance by wastewater recirculation through an aerated membrane.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine wastewater from an anaerobic digester was recirculated through a silicone hose located in an external aeration chamber to determine its effect on wastewater malodorants and biogas composition. The silicone hose acted as a semipermeable membrane for the passage of small molecules. In the first...

  4. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF FOOD WASTE AND DAIRY MANURE FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of continuously mixed anaerobic digesters was evaluated in the laboratory for treating manure, food waste and their mixtures at 35 ± 2oC and a hydraulic retention time of 20 days. The first mixture was composed of 32% and 68%, and the second was composed of 48% and 52% food waste and...

  5. Pathogen inactivation in liquid dairy manure during anaerobic and aerobic digestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Pandey, P.; Castillo, A. R.; Vaddella, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Controlling manure-borne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are crucial for protecting surface and ground water as well as mitigating risks to human health. In California dairy farms, flushing of dairy manure (mainly animal feces and urine) from freestall barns and subsequent liquid-solid manure separation is a common practice for handling animal waste. The liquid manure fraction is generally pumped into the settling ponds and it goes into aerobic and/or anaerobic lagoons for extended period of time. Considering the importance of controlling pathogens in animal waste, the objective of the study was to understand the effects of anaerobic and aerobic digestions on the survival of three human pathogens in animal waste. The pathogen inactivation was assessed at four temperatures (30, 35, 42, and 50 °C), and the relationships between temperature and pathogen decay were estimated. Results showed a steady decrease of E. coli levels in aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes over the time; however, the decay rates varied with pathogens. The effect of temperature on Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes survival was different than the E. coli survival. In thermophilic temperatures (42 and 50 °C), decay rate was considerable greater compared to the mesophilic temperatures (30 and 35°C). The E. coli log reductions at 50 °C were 2.1 in both aerobic and anaerobic digestions after 13 days of incubation. The Salmonella spp. log reductions at 50 °C were 5.5 in aerobic digestion, and 5.9 in anaerobic digestion. The Listeria monocytogenes log reductions at 50 °C were 5.0 in aerobic digestion, and 5.6 in anaerobic digestion. The log reduction of E. coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogens at 30 °C in aerobic environment were 0.1, 4.7, and 5.6, respectively. In anaerobic environment, the corresponding reductions were 0.4, 4.3, and 5.6, respectively. We anticipate that the outcomes of the study will help improving the existing animal waste management processes to control manure-borne pathogens.

  6. Toxicity and biodegradability of olive mill wastewaters in batch anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, M. Universite de Provence, Marseille )

    1992-11-01

    The anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of olive mill wastewaters (OMW) were studied in batch anaerobic digestion experiments. Anaerobic digestion of OMW or the supernatant of its centrifugation, the methane production was achieved at up to 5-15% (V/V) dilution corresponding to only 5-20 g/L COD. The washed suspended solids of OMW were toxic at up to 80 g/L COD; however, the kinetic of biodegradability of OMW or the supernatant was faster than for suspended solids, which are constituted mealy of cellulose and lignin. The darkly colored polyphenols induce the problem of biodegradation of OMW, whereas the long chain fatty acids (LCFA), tannins and simple phenolic compounds are responsible for its toxicity for methanogenic bacteria. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of paunch in a CSTR for renewable energy production and nutrient mineralization.

    PubMed

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Marchbank, Douglas H; Hao, Xiying

    2015-09-01

    A laboratory study investigated the anaerobic digestion of paunch in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the recovery of biogas and mineralization of nutrients. At an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.8gVSL(-1)day(-1) with a 30-day hydraulic retention time (HRT), a CH4 yield of 0.213Lg(-1)VS and CH4 production rate of 0.600LL(-1)day(-1) were obtained. Post-anaerobic digestion of the effluent from the CSTR for 30days at 40°C recovered 0.067Lg(-1)VS as CH4, which was 21% of the batch CH4 potential. Post-digestion of the effluent from the digestate obtained at this OLR is needed to meet the stable effluent criteria. Furthermore, low levels of soluble ions such as K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were found in the liquid fraction of the digestate and the remainder could have been retained in the solid digestate fraction. This study demonstrates the potential of biogas production from paunch in providing renewable energy. In addition, recovery of plant nutrients in the digestate is important for a sustainable agricultural system. PMID:26037058

  8. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure and corn stover with biological and chemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yufang; Li, Xiujin; Yu, Liang; Zou, Dexun; Yuan, Hairong

    2015-12-01

    Biological and chemical pretreatment methods using liquid fraction of digestate (LFD), ammonia solution (AS), and NaOH were compared in the process of mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cattle manure and corn stover. The results showed that LFD pretreatment could achieve the same effect as the chemical pretreatment (AS, NaOH) at the performance of anaerobic digestion (AD). Compared with the untreated corn stover, the cumulative biomethane production (CBP) and the volatile solid (VS) removal rate of three pretreatment methods were increased by 25.40-30.12% and 14.48-16.84%, respectively, in the co-digestion of cattle manure and corn stover. T80 was 20-37.14% shorter than that of the control test (35±1days). LFD pretreatment not only achieved the same effect as chemical pretreatment, but also reduced T80 and improved buffer capacity of anaerobic digestion system. Therefore, this study provides meaningful insight for exploring efficient pretreatment strategy to stabilize and enhance AD performance for practical application. PMID:26409855

  9. Application of protein misfolding cyclic amplification to detection of prions in anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Gilroyed, Brandon H; Braithwaite, Shannon L; Price, Luke M; Reuter, Tim; Czub, Stefanie; Graham, Catherine; Balachandran, Arumuga; McAllister, Tim A; Belosevic, Miodrag; Neumann, Norman F

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional physio-chemical resistance of prions to established decontamination procedures poses a challenge to assessing the suitability of applied inactivation methods. Prion detection is limited by the sensitivity level of Western blotting or by the cost and time factors of bioassays. In addition, prion detection assays can be limited by either the unique or complex nature of matrices associated with environmental samples. To investigate anaerobic digestion (AD) as a practical and economical approach for potential conversion of specified risk materials (SRM) into value added products (i.e., renewable energy), challenges associated with detection of prions in a complex matrix need to be overcome to determine potential inactivation. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay, with subsequent Western blot visualization, was used to detect prions within the AD matrix. Anaerobic digestate initially inhibited the PMCA reaction and/or Western blot detection. However, at concentrations of ?1% of anaerobic digestate, 263K scrapie prions could be amplified and semi-quantitatively detected. Infectious 263K prions were also proven to be bioavailable in the presence of high concentrations of digestate (10-90%). Development of the PMCA application to digestate provides extremely valuable insight into the potential degradation and/or fate of prions in complex biological matrices without requiring expensive and time-consuming bioassays. PMID:26272376

  10. Microbial Ecology in Anaerobic Digestion at Agitated and Non-Agitated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester. PMID:25313520

  11. CO{sub 2} level control by anthropogenic peat: The anaerobic digestion of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    Anthropogenic Peat (AP) has been described as an effective and economical way to control the level of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere without adverse effect on economic activity and development. All elements of the proposal are separately at work, but one, anaerobic digestion, is not widely known nor has it been applied to biomass as AP requires. Anaerobic digestion is described here, with some of its current large-scale applications. Results of lab studies of the digestion of other materials, including biomass especially grown for this purpose are presented, and the methods used to find them are explained. The preferred biomass source for AP is sugar cane, and extended studies have been run on a close relative, sorghum; preliminary work on cane itself and on various sugar sources is also reported.

  12. Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, B; Flotats, X

    2014-11-01

    Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24-192 mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively. PMID:25081855

  13. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  14. Integration of pyrolysis and anaerobic digestion--use of aqueous liquor from digestate pyrolysis for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Tobias; Mumme, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of aqueous pyrolysis liquor derived from pyrolysis of solid digestate was tested in batch mode using an un-adapted inoculum. Three pyrolysis liquors produced at 330°C, 430°C and 530°C in four COD-based concentrations of 3, 6, 12 and 30 g L(-1) were investigated. The three lower concentrations showed considerable biogas production, whereas the 30 g L(-1) dosage caused process inhibition. The highest methane yield of 199.1±18.5 mL g(COD)(-1) (COD removal: 56.9±5.3%) was observed for the 330°C pyrolysis liquor, followed by the 430°C sample with only slightly lower values. The 530°C sample dropped to a yield of 129.3±19.7 mL g(COD)(-1) (COD removal: 36.9±5.6%). Most VOCs contained in the pyrolysis liquor (i.e. furfural, phenol, catechol, guaiacol, and levoglucosan) were reduced below detection limit (cresol by 10-60%). Consequently, integrated pyrolysis and anaerobic digestion in addition to thermochemical conversion of digestate also promises bioconversion of pyrolysis liquors. PMID:25725406

  15. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3MWh, or 46kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively. PMID:22317795

  16. Characterization and single-stage denitrification anaerobic digestion of spent stream from the hydrolysis-fermentation-combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik

    The demand for ethanol as an oxygenate and octane booster in automobile fuel is growing. A number of processes are being investigated for conversion of biomass to ethanol. The Hydrolysis-Fermentation-Combustion (HFC) process for fuel ethanol production developed at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory, Richmond, California is at the stage of technology transfer following over two decades of research and development. This study addresses the technology to be used in treatment of spent streams to be discharged from this process. The treatment design combines a single stage denitrification and anaerobic digestion (SSDAD) for the biological treatment of a representative stream from this process. A typical spent stream contained a wide range of soluble organic materials including: unfermented sugars, components of the feedstocks solubilized in the hydrolysis, acid degradation products of carbohydrates, cleavage products of lignin, water-soluble extractives and phenolics, terpenes and other unfermented organic material, and nitrate ion from the nitric acid used as a catalyst in the hydrolysis reaction. Three sets of experiments were conducted in laboratory scale anaerobic digesters. Commonly available anaerobic sludge from local sewage treatment plants was used as a starter seed and was successfully acclimated to the high nitrate substrate leading to enrichment of denitrifiers. Necessary nutrients and trace elements were identified and supplied to satisfy the obligatory requirements of different groups of bacterial groups present. A major finding was the unique role of ammonium hydroxide in controlling pH leading to steady-state operation of the digester. At steady state operation the reduction in COD was 65%, the nitrate reduction was 88% and the nitrite reduction was 100%. Nitrate was reduced to safe nitrogen gas without buildup of any intermediate products. Organic material was converted to useful methane gas and carbon dioxide. The SSDAD system was shown to be effective in treating spent streams having high COD and nitrate concentrations.

  17. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  18. Anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater: A comparison of single and two-phase reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R.; Banks, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    The anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater, a complex substrate which includes milk proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, has received little attention. Work using an aerobic contact system showed that at a 7.5-d hydraulic retention time (HRT), with an organic loading rate of 1.7 g COD/Ld and influent TSS (total suspended solids) of 5870 mg/L, the effluent COD was 628 mg/L, BOD was 91 mg/L and TSS was 674. Anaerobic filters have also been used at organic loadings of 6 kg COD/m{sup 3}d applied at a HRT of 0.42 day, with COD removals of 80%. Goodwing showed that this waste was capable of being treated by the UASB process with granulation commencing after 60-70 days, and gas production ranging between 0.73 and 0.93 L CH{sub 4}/g COD removed with loading rates between 0.7 and 3.0 g TOC/Ld. Two-phase anaerobic digestion is an innovative fermentation mode that has recently received increased attention. The kinetically dissimilar fermentation phases, hydrolysis-acidification and acetogenesis-methanation are operated in two separate reactors; the first of which is maintained at a very short HRT. The effluent from the first, acid-forming, phase is used as the substrate for the methane-phase reactor which has a longer HRT or cell immobilization. The aim of this work was to compare the methane production capability and performance of a single-phase upflow fixed bed reactor with a two-phase digestion system. The two-phase digestion system consists of a completely mixed reactor for the acidogenic reaction and an upflow fixed bed reactor for the methanogenic reaction. Because of the high lipid content and COD of ice cream wastewater off site disposal has proved to be both expensive and poses problems to the receiving effluent treatment plant. For this reason the potential for a rapid anaerobic stabilization of the waste, with energy recovery in the form of methane gas, has been investigated in an attempt to minimize plant size and maximize gas production. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Triclocarban Influences Antibiotic Resistance and Alters Anaerobic Digester Microbial Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Carey, Daniel E; Zitomer, Daniel H; Hristova, Krassimira R; Kappell, Anthony D; McNamara, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is one of the most abundant organic micropollutants detected in biosolids. Lab-scale anaerobic digesters were amended with TCC at concentrations ranging from the background concentration of seed biosolids (30 mg/kg) to toxic concentrations of 850 mg/kg to determine the effect on methane production, relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes, and microbial community structure. Additionally, the TCC addition rate was varied to determine the impacts of acclimation time. At environmentally relevant TCC concentrations (max detect = 440 mg/kg), digesters maintained function. Digesters receiving 450 mg/kg of TCC maintained function under gradual TCC addition, but volatile fatty acid concentrations increased, pH decreased, and methane production ceased when immediately fed this concentration. The concentrations of the mexB gene (encoding for a multidrug efflux pump) were higher with all concentrations of TCC compared to a control, but higher TCC concentrations did not correlate with increased mexB abundance. The relative abundance of the gene tet(L) was greater in the digesters that no longer produced methane, and no effect on the relative abundance of the class 1 integron integrase encoding gene (intI1) was observed. Illumina sequencing revealed substantial community shifts in digesters that functionally failed from increased levels of TCC. More subtle, yet significant, community shifts were observed in digesters amended with TCC levels that did not inhibit function. This research demonstrates that TCC can select for a multidrug resistance encoding gene in mixed community anaerobic environments, and this selection occurs at concentrations (30 mg/kg) that can be found in full-scale anaerobic digesters (U.S. median concentration = 22 mg/kg, mean = 39 mg/kg). PMID:26588246

  20. Effect of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds pretreatments on foaming in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, N; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2014-10-01

    Foam appears regularly in anaerobic digesters producing operational and safety problems. In this research, based on the operational observation at semi-industrial pilot scale where sludge pretreatment mitigated foaming in anaerobic digesters, this study aimed at evaluating any potential relationship between foaming tools applied to activated sludge at lab-scale (foam potential, foam stability and Microthrix parvicella abundance) and the experimental behavior observed in pilot scale and full-scale anaerobic digesters. The potential of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds for reducing foaming capacity was also evaluated. Filamentous bacteria abundance was directly linked to foaming capacity in anaerobic processes. A maximum reduction of M.parvicella abundance (from 5 to 2) was reached using thermal hydrolysis with steam explosion at 170°C and ultrasounds at 66.7kWh/m(3), showing both good anti-foaming properties. On the other hand, foam potential and stability determinations showed a lack of consistency with the bacteria abundance results and experimental evidences. PMID:25168914

  1. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL WASTE: EFFECT OF MODE OF MIXING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale digesters were operated to study the effect of mixing (via biogas recirculation, impeller mixing, and slurry recirculation) on biogas production. Three sets of experiments were performed using cow manure slurry feed with either 50, 100, or 150 g/L total solids (TS) concentrations (r...

  2. Improving composting as a post-treatment of anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yang; De Guardia, Amaury; Dabert, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    This work investigated the influences of practical parameters upon composting of digestate. The yardsticks for evaluation were digestate stabilization, nitrogenous emissions mitigation and self-heating potential. The results suggest choosing an "active" bulking agent like dry wood chips (WC) which served as free-water and nitrogen sink through composting. At an optimal volumetric WC:digestate mixing ratio of 4:1, nearly 90% of the initial NH4(+)/NH3 were fixed, which reduced significantly nitrogenous emissions. This mixing ratio also improved the stabilization and self-heating potential. Using small particle size WC increased narrowly O2 consumption and reduced NH3 emission. Storing used WC prior to recycling reduced 40% N2O emission compared to directly recycled WC. Recycling compost helped to decrease NH3 emission, but quadrupled N2O emission. The optimal aeration rate (15Lh(-1)kg OM0) which was lower compared to composting of organic waste, was enough to ensure the O2 supply and ameliorate the self-heating potential through composting of digestate. PMID:26684176

  3. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions following anaerobic digestion of sludge in Japanese sewage treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Oshita, Kazuyuki; Okumura, Takuya; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Appels, Lise; Dewil, Raf

    2014-11-01

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are potent greenhouse gases with global warming potentials (expressed in terms of CO2-equivalents) of 28 and 265, respectively. When emitted to the atmosphere, they significantly contribute to climate change. It was previously suggested that in wastewater treatment facilities that apply anaerobic sludge digestion, CH4 continues to be emitted from digested sludge after leaving the anaerobic digester. This paper studies the CH4 and N2O emissions from anaerobically digested sludge in the subsequent sludge treatment steps. Two full-scale treatment plants were monitored over a 1-year period. Average emissions of CH4 and N2O were 509±72 mg/m(3)-influent (wastewater) and 7.1±2.6 mg/m(3)-influent, respectively. These values accounted for 22.4±3.8% of the indirect reduction in CO2-emissions when electricity was generated using biogas. They are considered to be significant. PMID:25194911

  4. Hyperspectral imaging techniques applied to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Fabbri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    An anaerobic digestion process, finalized to biogas production, is characterized by different steps involving the variation of some chemical and physical parameters related to the presence of specific biomasses as: pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile solids, nitrate (NO3-) and phosphate (PO3-). A correct process characterization requires a periodical sampling of the organic mixture in the reactor and a further analysis of the samples by traditional chemical-physical methods. Such an approach is discontinuous, time-consuming and expensive. A new analytical approach based on hyperspectral imaging in the NIR field (1000 to 1700 nm) is investigated and critically evaluated, with reference to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process. The application of the proposed technique was addressed to identify and demonstrate the correlation existing, in terms of quality and reliability of the results, between "classical" chemical-physical parameters and spectral features of the digestate samples. Good results were obtained, ranging from a R2=0.68 and a RMSECV=12.83 mg/l for nitrate to a R2=0.90 and a RMSECV=5495.16 mg O2/l for COD. The proposed approach seems very useful in setting up innovative control strategies allowing for full, continuous control of the anaerobic digestion process.

  5. Neutral fat hydrolysis and long-chain fatty acid oxidation during anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Masse, L; Massé, D I; Kennedy, K J; Chou, S P

    2002-07-01

    Neutral fat hydrolysis and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) oxidation rates were determined during the digestion of slaughterhouse wastewater in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors operated at 25 degrees C. The experimental substrate consisted of filtered slaughterhouse wastewater supplemented with pork fat particles at various average initial sizes (D(in)) ranging from 60 to 450 microm. At the D(in) tested, there was no significant particle size effect on the first-order hydrolysis rate. The neutral fat hydrolysis rate averaged 0.63 +/- 0.07 d(-1). LCFA oxidation rate was modelled using a Monod-type equation. The maximum substrate utilization rate (kmax) and the half-saturation concentration (Ks) averaged 164 +/- 37 mg LCFA/L/d and 35 +/- 31 mg LCFA/L, respectively. Pork fat particle degradation was mainly controlled by LCFA oxidation rate and, to a lesser extent, by neutral fat hydrolysis rate. Hydrolysis pretreatment of fat-containing wastewaters and sludges should not substantially accelerate their anaerobic treatment. At a D(in) of 450 microm, fat particles were found to inhibit methane production during the initial 20 h of digestion. Inhibition of methane production in the early phase of digestion was the only significant effect of fat particle size on anaerobic digestion of pork slaughterhouse wastewater. Soluble COD could not be used to determine the rate of lipid hydrolysis due to LCFA adsorption on the biomass. PMID:17590931

  6. Evaluation of Integrated Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrothermal Carbonization for Bioenergy Production

    PubMed Central

    Reza, M. Toufiq; Werner, Maja; Pohl, Marcel; Mumme, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most abundant yet underutilized renewable energy resources. Both anaerobic digestion (AD) and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) are promising technologies for bioenergy production from biomass in terms of biogas and HTC biochar, respectively. In this study, the combination of AD and HTC is proposed to increase overall bioenergy production. Wheat straw was anaerobically digested in a novel upflow anaerobic solid state reactor (UASS) in both mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. Wet digested from thermophilic AD was hydrothermally carbonized at 230 °C for 6 hr for HTC biochar production. At thermophilic temperature, the UASS system yields an average of 165 LCH4/kgVS (VS: volatile solids) and 121 L CH4/kgVS at mesophilic AD over the continuous operation of 200 days. Meanwhile, 43.4 g of HTC biochar with 29.6 MJ/kgdry_biochar was obtained from HTC of 1 kg digestate (dry basis) from mesophilic AD. The combination of AD and HTC, in this particular set of experiment yield 13.2 MJ of energy per 1 kg of dry wheat straw, which is at least 20% higher than HTC alone and 60.2% higher than AD only. PMID:24962786

  7. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel. PMID:26489344

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of forage radish and dairy manure in complete mix digesters.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashley J; Lansing, Stephanie; Mulbry, Walter; Weil, Ray R

    2015-02-01

    Pilot-scale digesters (850 L) were used to quantify CH4 and H2S production when using forage radish cover crops as a co-digestion feedstock in dairy manure-based digesters. During two trials, triplicate mixed digesters were operated in batch mode with manure-only or radish+manure (27% and 13% radish by wet weight in Trial 1 and 2, respectively). Co-digestion increased CH4 production by 11% and 39% in Trial 1 and 2, respectively. As H2S production rapidly declined in the radish+manure digesters, CH4 production increased reaching high levels of CH4 (?67%) in the biogas. Over time, radish co-digestion lowered the H2S concentration in the biogas (0.20%) beyond that of manure-only digestion (0.34-0.40%), although cumulative H2S production in the radish+manure digesters was higher than manure-only. Extrapolated to a farm-scale (200 cows) continuous mixed digester, co-digesting with radish could generate 3150 m(3) CH4/month, providing a farmer additional revenue up to $3125/month in electricity sales. PMID:25278111

  9. Foam formation in biogas plants caused by anaerobic digestion of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Lucie; Lehnig, Marcus; Schenk, Joachim; Zehnsdorf, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The use of sugar beet in anaerobic digestion (AD) during biogas production can lead to process upsets such as excessive foaming in fermenters. In the present study, foam formation in sugar beet-fed digestates was studied in foaming tests. The increasing disintegration grade of sugar beet was observed to have a promoting effect on foaming in the digestate but did not affect the biogas yield. Chemical analysis of foam and digestate from sugar beet silage AD showed high concentrations of pectin, other carbohydrates and N-containing substances in the foam. Both pectin and sucrose showed little foaming in AD. Nevertheless, sucrose and calcium chloride had a promoting effect on foaming for pectin AD. Salts of divalent ions also enhanced the foam intensity in the case of sugar beet silage AD, whereas ammonium chloride and urea had a lessening effect on sugar beet-based foaming. PMID:25446785

  10. Combined thermophilic aerobic process and conventional anaerobic digestion: effect on sludge biodegradation and methane production.

    PubMed

    Dumas, C; Perez, S; Paul, E; Lefebvre, X

    2010-04-01

    The efficiency of hyper-thermophilic (65 degrees Celsius) aerobic process coupled with a mesophilic (35 degrees Celsius) digester was evaluated for the activated sludge degradation and was compared to a conventional mesophilic digester. For two Sludge Retention Time (SRT), 21 and 42 days, the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) solubilisation and biodegradation processes, the methanisation yield and the aerobic oxidation were investigated during 180 days. The best results were obtained at SRT of 44 days; the COD removal yield was 30% higher with the Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion/Thermophilic Aerobic Reactor (MAD-TAR) co-treatment. An increase of the sludge intrinsic biodegradability is also observed (20-40%), showing that the unbiodegradable COD in mesophilic conditions becomes bioavailable. However, the methanisation yield was quite similar for both processes at a same SRT. Finally, such a process enables to divide by two the volume of digester with an equivalent efficiency. PMID:19959355

  11. Anaerobic co-digestion of livestock wastes with vegetable processing wastes: a statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; García-González, María Cruz; González-Fernández, Cristina; Cuetos, María José; Morán, Antonio; Gómez, Xiomar

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion of livestock wastes with carbon rich residues was studied. Swine manure and poultry litter were selected as livestock waste, and vegetable processing waste was selected as the rich carbon source. A Central Composite Design (CCD) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) were employed in designing experiments and determine individual and interactive effects over methane production and removal of volatile solids. In the case of swine manure co-digestion, an increase in vegetable processing waste resulted in higher volatile solids removal. However, without a proper substrate/biomass ratio, buffer capacity of swine manure was not able to avoid inhibitory effects associated with TVFA accumulation. Regarding co-digestion with poultry litter, substrate concentration determined VS removal achieved, above 80 g VSL(-1), NH(3) inhibition was detected. Statistical analysis allowed us to set initial conditions and parameters to achieve best outputs for real-scale plant operation and/or co-digestion mixtures design. PMID:20709535

  12. Anaerobic digestion of catering wastes: effect of micronutrients and retention time.

    PubMed

    Climenhaga, M A; Banks, C J

    2008-01-01

    Source-separated foodwastes collected from a campus catering facility were processed in bench-scale single-stage anaerobic digesters. The feedstock contained a varied mix of fruits, vegetables, meats and fried foods. A constant organic loading rate (OLR) was maintained with differing hydraulic retention times (HRT). Regular addition of trace elements or prolonged retention time allowed stable digestion at high total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) levels. Reactors on HRT of 25, 50, and 100 days with no micronutrient supplementation exhibited methanogenic failure after approximately 40, 100 and 90 days respectively, while duplicate reactors with micronutrient supplementation maintained stable digestion. An extended HRT of 180 days has so far allowed continued digestion (for reactors with and without micronutrient supplementation) at levels of ammonia nitrogen exceeding 5.7 g l(-1) and volatile fatty acid levels exceeding 15 g l(-1), usually considered inhibitory or toxic. PMID:18401139

  13. Electrochemical oxidation of the effluent from anaerobic digestion of dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Ikko; Umetsu, Kazutaka; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Tsuneo

    2006-08-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of the digested effluent from anaerobic digestion of dairy manure was investigated in this study. The digested effluent sample containing with suspended solids was pretreated by filtration for the electrochemical experiment. The influence of direct anodic oxidation and indirect oxidation was evaluated through the use of dimensionally stable anode (DSA) and Ti/PbO2 as anode. The decreasing rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was higher at lead dioxide coated titanium (Ti/PbO2) electrode than at DSA, however the DSA was preferred anode for the decrease of ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) due to the control of ammonium nitrate (NO3-N) accumulation. The results showed that the filtration of suspended solids as a pretreatment and addition of NaCl could improve the whole removing efficiency of NH4-N in the digested effluent on electrochemical oxidation. PMID:16125931

  14. Implementation of the IWA anaerobic digestion model No.1 (ADM1) for simulating digestion of blackwater from vacuum toilets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Behrendt, J; Wendland, C; Otterpohl, R

    2006-01-01

    The IWA anaerobic digestion model No.1 (ADM1) is applied to the blackwater anaerobic digestion (BWAD) plant in this work. In order to verify the biochemical kinetics, batch experiments were executed. According to the Monod type kinetics, the maximum uptake rates (km) of butyric acid (HBu), propionic acid (HPr) and acetic acid (HAc) are testified as 18, 14, 13 d(-1), and their half saturation concentrations (Ks) are 110, 120, 160 g COD/m3, respectively. Afterwards, the model was calibrated based on the performance of a laboratory scale BWAD plant (under mesophilic conditions) by three scenario studies, i.e. the reference conditions, different feeding frequencies and high NH4+ concentration. The model successfully simulated three scenarios. The further two virtual scenario studies were achieved based on the calibrated model. First, the performance of BWAD plant was predicted with different hydraulic retention times (HRT); second, the kitchen refuse (KR) was added into the BWAD plant as additional organic loading. The model predicted the perspective of BW plus KR digestion and generated valuable suggestions for the operation of the real BWAD plant. PMID:16841750

  15. TIME-SETTLEMENT BEHAVIOR OF PROCESSED REFUSE. PART III: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF MILLED REFUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this laboratory investigation were to gain an understanding of the decomposition of milled refuse under anaerobic conditions, the rates of decomposition, and the gas production and composition. The rates of decomposition of cellulose and cellulosic materials, ga...

  16. Reduction of volatile fatty acids and odor offensiveness by anaerobic digestion and solid separation of dairy manure during manure storage.

    PubMed

    Page, Laura H; Ni, Ji-Qin; Zhang, Hao; Heber, Albert J; Mosier, Nathan S; Liu, Xingya; Joo, Hung-Soo; Ndegwa, Pius M; Harrison, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) play an important role in the biodegradation of organic wastes and production of bioenergy under anaerobic digestion, and are related to malodors. However, little is known about the dynamics of VFA during dairy manure storage. This study evaluated the characteristics of VFA in dairy manure before and after anaerobic co-digestion in a laboratory experiment using eight lab-scale reactors. The reactors were loaded with four different types of dairy manure: (1) liquid dairy manure from a freestall barn, (2) mixture of dairy manure and co-digestion food processing wastes at the inlet of an anaerobic digester, (3) effluent from the digester outlet, and (4) the liquid fraction of effluent from a solid separator. Four VFA (acetic, propionic, butyric, and 2-methylbutyric acids) were identified and quantified in weekly manure samples from all reactors. Results showed that the dominant VFA was acetic acid in all four manure sources. The off-farm co-digestion wastes significantly increased the total VFA concentrations and the proportions of individual VFA in the influent. The dairy manure under storage demonstrated high temporal and spatial variations in pH and VFA concentrations. Anaerobic digestion reduced the total VFA by 86%-96%; but solid-liquid separation did not demonstrate a significant reduction in total VFA in this study. Using VFA as an indicator, anaerobic digestion exhibited an effective reduction of dairy manure odor offensiveness. PMID:25617873

  17. Preliminary experimental results of Sewage Sludge (SS) Co-digestion with Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) for Enhanced Biogas Production in Laboratory Scale Anaerobic Digester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasankari, R.; Kumaran, P.; Normanbhay, Saifuddin; Halim Shamsuddin, Abd

    2013-06-01

    An investigation on the feasibility of co-digesting Sewage Sludge with Palm Oil Mill Effluent for enhancing the biogas production and the corresponding effect of the co-digestion substrate ratio on the biogas production has been evaluated. Anaerobic co-digestion of POME with SS was performed at ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 0:100 to find the optimum blend required for enhanced waste digestion and biogas production. Single stage batch digestion was carried out for 12 days in a laboratory scale anaerobic digester. Co-digestion of sludge's at the 70:30 proportion resulted in optimal COD and C: N ratio which subsequently recorded the highest performance with regards to biogas production at 28.1 L's compared to the 1.98 L's of biogas produced from digestion of SS alone. From the results obtained, it is evident that co-digestion of POME and SS is an attractive option to be explored for enhancement of biogas production in anaerobic digesters.

  18. REACTIVATION AND REGROWTH OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED AND DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS: EPA’S PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) recently published a report titled Examination of Reactivation and Regrowth of Fecal Coliforms in Anaerobically Digested Sludges. Seven full-scale publicly owned treatment facilities were sampled several times to determine if bacte...

  19. Characterization of residuals from novel anaerobic digestion of organic municipal solid waste for application as liquid fertilizer

    E-print Network

    Karceski, Julie (Julie Katherine)

    2015-01-01

    Management of organic municipal solid waste presents numerous challenges in India. Anaerobic digestion is one technology that can be used to address this problem, by transforming organic waste into methane via microbial ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of anaerobic digestion for sewage sludge and various organic wastes with simple modeling.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Taira; Wang, Feng; Tsumori, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and other organic wastes, such as kitchen garbage, food waste, and agricultural waste, at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a promising method for both energy and material recovery. Substrate characteristics and the anaerobic digestion performance of sewage sludge and various organic wastes were compared using experiments and modeling. Co-digestion improved the value of digested sewage sludge as a fertilizer. The relationship between total and soluble elemental concentrations was correlated with the periodic table: most Na and K (alkali metals) were soluble, and around 20-40% of Mg and around 10-20% of Ca (alkaline earth metals) were soluble. The ratio of biodegradable chemical oxygen demand of organic wastes was 65-90%. The methane conversion ratio and methane production rate under mesophilic conditions were evaluated using a simplified mathematical model. There was reasonably close agreement between the model simulations and the experimental results in terms of methane production and nitrogen concentration. These results provide valuable information and indicate that the model can be used as a pre-evaluation tool to facilitate the introduction of co-digestion at WWTPs. PMID:26031329

  1. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. PMID:26630583

  2. Anaerobic digestion of antibiotic residue in combination with hydrothermal pretreatment for biogas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangyi; Li, Chunxing; Ma, Dachao; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic residues are difficult to be treated or utilized because of their high water content and residual antibiotics. This article is devoted to investigating the possibility of biogas production from cephalosporin C residue (CPCAR), one typical type of antibiotic residues, via anaerobic digestion in combination with hydrothermal pretreatment (HTPT). The results from the bench-scale experiments showed that the combination of HTPT and anaerobic digestion can provide a viable way to convert CPCAR into biogas, and the biogas and methane yields reached 290 and 200 ml(g TS)(-1), respectively. This article further evaluated the proposed technology in terms of energy balance and technical feasibility based on theoretical calculation using the data from a pilot HTPT test. It was shown that the process is totally self-sufficient in energy and its main challenging problem of ammonia inhibition can be solved via ammonia stripping. PMID:26038331

  3. Characterization and environmental studies of Pompano Beach anaerobic digestion facility. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S; Gerrish, H P; Wong, K F; Nemerow, N; Daly, Jr, E L; Farooq, S; Chriswell, C

    1980-08-01

    Municipal solid wastes contain numerous substances of potential environmental concern. While some understanding of the composition of raw municipal waste and its leachate products is available, no information regarding characteristics of solid, liquid and gaseous outputs from anaerobic digestion exists. If centralized anaerobic digestion plants are to be environmentally viable, the characteristics and environmental effects of effluents from these plants must be acceptable. The environmental concerns are particularly acute where ground water supplies are precariously low and the water table is high, South Florida is such a location. A characterization and environmental study was initiated by the Resource Recovery Group on August 1978. The specific objectives are: (1) systematic characterization of solid, liquid and gaseous inputs and outputs; (2) investigations of leaching characteristic of output solid and liquid effluents, and the transport of pollutants to and through ground water systems; and (3) analysis of environmental and process parameters to obtain causal relationships.

  4. NIR Monitoring of Ammonia in Anaerobic Digesters Using a Diffuse Reflectance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Chitra S.; Løkke, Mette Marie; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Ward, Alastair J.; Møller, Henrik B.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of using a diffuse reflectance probe attached to a near infrared spectrometer to monitor the total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) content in an anaerobic digester run on cattle manure was investigated; as a previous study has indicated that this probe can be easily attached to an anaerobic digester. Multivariate modelling techniques such as partial least squares regression and interval partial least squares methods were used to build models. Various data pre-treatments were applied to improve the models. The TAN concentrations measured were in the range of 1.5 to 5.5 g/L. An R2 of 0.91 with an RMSEP of 0.32 was obtained implying that the probe could be used for monitoring and screening purposes. PMID:22438767

  5. Anaerobic digestion of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymer packaging: biodegradability and environmental impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Trzcinski, A P; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2011-12-01

    The digestibility of a starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymer insulated cardboard coolbox was investigated under a defined anaerobic digestion (AD) system with key parameters characterized. Laboratory results were combined with industrial operational data to develop a site-specific life cycle assessment (LCA) model. Inoculated with active bacterial trophic groups, the anaerobic biodegradability of three starch-PVOH biopolymers achieved 58-62%. The LCA modeling showed that the environmental burdens of the starch-PVOH biopolymer packaging under AD conditions on acidification, eutrophication, global warming and photochemical oxidation potential were dominated by atmospheric emissions released from substrate degradation and fuel combustion, whereas energy consumption and infrastructure requirements were the causes of abiotic depletion, ozone depletion and toxic impacts. Nevertheless, for this bio-packaging, AD of the starch-PVOH biopolymer combined with recycling of the cardboard emerged as the environmentally superior option and optimization of the energy utilization system could bring further environmental benefits to the AD process. PMID:22001054

  6. Two-stage anaerobic digestion process for complete inactivation of enteric bacterial pathogens in human night soil.

    PubMed

    Kunte, D P; Yeole, T Y; Ranade, D R

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion offers a good alternative for human waste treatment. However, the fate of enteric bacterial pathogens present in human night soil (HNS) remains a major concern for hygienic safety of the process. A two-stage anaerobic digestion process, consisting of separate acidogenic and methanogenic digesters, was designed and its efficacy in the inactivation of Salmonella typhi was compared to a single-stage digestion process. In a single-stage digestion, complete pathogen inactivation was achieved only in the digesters with high levels of volatile fatty acids (VFA approximately equal to 18,000 mg/l) and acidic pH (approximately equal to 6.0). These digesters, however, showed drastic reduction in methane yield. In the two-stage digestion process, S. typhi was completely inactivated in the acidogenic digester and the methanogenic digester was free from the pathogen even after receiving a daily dose of the pathogen. The process also achieved complete inactivation of other enteric pathogens, viz., Shigella dysenteriae and Vibrio cholerae. The two-stage process was efficient in biogas generation from HNS. Thus, the two-stage process ensures complete hygienic safety in anaerobic digestion of human night soil. PMID:15536996

  7. Inactivation of Clostridium difficile in sewage sludge by anaerobic thermophilic digestion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changyun; Salsali, Hamidreza; Weese, Scott; Warriner, Keith

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in community-associated Clostridium difficile infections with biosolids derived from wastewater treatment being identified as one potential source. The current study evaluated the efficacy of thermophilic digestion in decreasing levels of C. difficile ribotype 078 associated with sewage sludge. Five isolates of C. difficile 078 were introduced (final density of 5 log CFU/g) into digested sludge and subjected to anaerobic digestion at mesophilic (36 or 42 °C) or thermophilic (55 °C) temperatures for up to 60 days. It was found that mesophilic digestion at 36 °C did not result in a significant reduction in C. difficile spore levels. In contrast, thermophilic sludge digestion reduced endospore levels at a rate of 0.19-2.68 log CFU/day, depending on the strain tested. The mechanism of lethality was indirect - by stimulating germination then inactivating the resultant vegetative cells. Acidification of sludge by adding acetic acid (6 g/L) inhibited the germination of spores regardless of the sludge digestion temperature. In conclusion, thermophilic digestion can be applied to reduce C. difficile in biosolids, thereby reducing the environmental burden of the enteric pathogen. PMID:26564276

  8. Environmental assessment of farm-scaled anaerobic co-digestion for bioenergy production.

    PubMed

    Lijó, Lucía; González-García, Sara; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Negri, Marco; Fiala, Marco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, María Teresa

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the environmental profile of a bioenergy system based on a co-digestion plant using maize silage and pig slurry as substrates. All the processes involved in the production of bioenergy as well as the avoided processes accrued from the biogas production system were evaluated. The results evidenced the environmental importance of the cultivation step and the environmental credits associated to the avoided processes. In addition, this plant was compared with two different plants that digest both substrates separately. The results revealed the environmental benefits of the utilisation of pig slurry due to the absence of environmental burdens associated with its production as well as credits provided when avoiding its conventional management. The results also presented the environmental drawbacks of the utilisation of maize silage due to the environmental burdens related with its production. Accordingly, the anaerobic mono-digestion of maize silage achieved the worst results. The co-digestion of both substrates was ranked in an intermediate position. Additionally, three possible digestate management options were assessed. The results showed the beneficial effect of digestate application as an organic fertiliser, principally on account of environmental credits due to avoided mineral fertilisation. However, digestate application involves important acidifying and eutrophicating emissions. PMID:25892438

  9. Behavior of cellulose-degrading bacteria in thermophilic anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Syutsubo, K; Nagaya, Y; Sakai, S; Miya, A

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we found that the newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain JC3 became the dominant cellulose-degrading bacterium in thermophilic methanogenic sludge. In the present study, the behavior of strain JC3 in the thermophilic anaerobic digestion process was investigated quantitatively by molecular biological techniques. A cellulose-degrading experiment was conducted at 55 degrees C with a 9.5 L of anaerobic baffled reactor having three compartments (Nos. 1, 2, 3). Over 80% of the COD input was converted into methane when 2.5 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) was loaded for an HRT of 27 days. A FISH probe specific for strain JC3 was applied to sludge samples harvested from the baffled reactor. Consequently, the ratio of JC3 cells to DAPI-stained cells increased from below 0.5% (undetectable) to 9.4% (compartment 1), 13.1% (compartment 2) and 21.6% (compartment 3) at day 84 (2.5 kgCOD m(-3)d(-1)). The strain JC3 cell numbers determined by FISH correlated closely with the cellulose-degrading methanogenic activities of retained sludge. A specific primer set targeting the cellulase gene (cellobiohydrolaseA: cbhA) of strain JC3 was designed and applied to digested sludge for treating solid waste such as coffee grounds, wastepaper, garbage, cellulose and so on. The strain JC3 cell numbers determined by quantitative PCR correlated closely with the cellulose-sludge loading of the thermophilic digester. Strain JC3 is thus important in the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose in thermophilic anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:16180412

  10. Effects of ionic strength and ion pairing on (plant-wide) modelling of anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Volcke, Eveline I P; Tait, Stephan; Batstone, Damien; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Plant-wide models of wastewater treatment (such as the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 or BSM2) are gaining popularity for use in holistic virtual studies of treatment plant control and operations. The objective of this study is to show the influence of ionic strength (as activity corrections) and ion pairing on modelling of anaerobic digestion processes in such plant-wide models of wastewater treatment. Using the BSM2 as a case study with a number of model variants and cationic load scenarios, this paper presents the effects of an improved physico-chemical description on model predictions and overall plant performance indicators, namely effluent quality index (EQI) and operational cost index (OCI). The acid-base equilibria implemented in the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) are modified to account for non-ideal aqueous-phase chemistry. The model corrects for ionic strength via the Davies approach to consider chemical activities instead of molar concentrations. A speciation sub-routine based on a multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson (NR) iteration method is developed to address algebraic interdependencies. The model also includes ion pairs that play an important role in wastewater treatment. The paper describes: 1) how the anaerobic digester performance is affected by physico-chemical corrections; 2) the effect on pH and the anaerobic digestion products (CO2, CH4 and H2); and, 3) how these variations are propagated from the sludge treatment to the water line. Results at high ionic strength demonstrate that corrections to account for non-ideal conditions lead to significant differences in predicted process performance (up to 18% for effluent quality and 7% for operational cost) but that for pH prediction, activity corrections are more important than ion pairing effects. Both are likely to be required when precipitation is to be modelled. PMID:25540837

  11. Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation using anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater in an airlift circulation photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaobo; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Libin; Zhao, Fangchao; Zhou, Xuefei

    2014-10-01

    To explore the integration of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment, we utilized an airlift circulation photobioreactor and a dynamic membrane reactor for microalgae cultivation in combination with an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor for starch processing wastewater (SPW) treatment. Chlorella pyrenoidosa completely adapted to the digested SPW without any chemical additives, and it grew normally under a wide temperature range in different seasons. C. pyrenoidosa was always the dominant microorganism in the photobioreactors although bacteria and some wild type microalgae were observed. Optimal biomass growth and pollutants removal was achieved at temperatures between 35 and 38°C in summer, removing 65.99% of COD, 83.06% of TN, 96.97% of TP and a biomass productivity of 0.37gL(-1)d(-1). Temperature fluctuation significantly influenced lipid contents and FAMEs compositions in biomass. The results demonstrate the successful integration of microalgae biomass production and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment. PMID:25164347

  12. Start-Up of an Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Digester for Waste Activated Sludge Digestion: Temporal Variations in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Qiaoying; Wang, Zhiwei; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Li, Yongli; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    An anaerobic dynamic membrane digester (ADMD) was developed to digest waste sludge, and pyrosequencing was used to analyze the variations of the bacterial and archaeal communities during the start-up. Results showed that bacterial community richness decreased and then increased over time, while bacterial diversity remained almost the same during the start-up. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the major phyla. At the class level, Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant at the end of start-up, followed by Sphingobacteria. In the archaeal community, richness and diversity peaked at the end of the start-up stage. Principle component and cluster analyses demonstrated that archaeal consortia experienced a distinct shift and became stable after day 38. Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were the two predominant orders. Further investigations indicated that Methanolinea and Methanosaeta were responsible for methane production in the ADMD system. Hydrogenotrophic pathways might prevail over acetoclastic means for methanogenesis during the start-up, supported by specific methanogenic activity tests. PMID:24695488

  13. Do anaerobic digestates promote dispersion, acidification and water repellency in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkner, Amrei; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Digestates are used as organic fertilizer on agricultural land due to their high amounts of nutrients (e.g. potassium, sodium). It is commonly expected that the application of sludge derived from anaerobic digestion can influence the soil structure and soil stability. Due to the fact that digestates contain large quantities of monovalent salts and long-chained fatty acids, the consequence of sludge amendment can be soil degradation caused by acidification, dispersion and increased water-repellency. Thus, water infiltration can be impeded which results in a preservation of stable soil aggregates. However, a diminished water infiltration can support water erosion and preferential flow of easy soluble nutrients into the groundwater. Our research was conducted with different digestates derived from maize, wheat and sugar beet to examine occurring processes in soils of two different textures after the application of anaerobic sludges. Particularly, we focused on the wetting properties of the soil. For this purpose, the wetting behavior was investigated by determining the sorptivity-based Repellency Index with moist samples and the contact angle with homogenized, air-dried soil material. Further surveys were carried out to assess the flow behavior of digestates application and the deformation of the particle-to-particle association by microscaled shearing. Additionally, the acidification process in the soil as a result of sludge application was investigated. To account for the dispersive impact of digestates, the turbidity of soil suspensions was ascertained. We summarize from the results that the digestates have a clear impact on the water repellency of the soil. We recognized a shift to more hydrophobic conditions. Partially, the pH remains on a high level due to the alkaline digestate, but several samples show a decline of pH, depending on the soil texture, respectively. However, soil structure was weakened as was shown by an increase of turbidity. As a conclusion, we point out the necessity to take into account the impact which anaerobic digestates might have on soil structure and stability in addition to their fertilizing effect to sustain the soil in a good state.

  14. Anaerobic co-digestion of aquatic flora and quinoa with manures from Bolivian Altiplano

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Rene Liden, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Quinoa stalk (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from agricultural crop residue, totora (Schoenoplectus tatora) and o-macrophytes (aquatic flora) from Lake Titicaca (on the Bolivian Altiplano) were studied in a wet anaerobic co-digestion process together with manure from llama, cow and sheep. Anaerobic semi-continuous experiments were performed in (10) 2-l reactors at a temperature of 25 deg. C with 30 days of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.8 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. Totora was found to be the best co-substrate. In mixture ratios of 1:1 (VS basis), it increased the biogas productivity by 130% for llama manure, 60% for cow manure, and 40% for sheep manure. It was possible to use up to 58% (VS basis) of totora in the substrate. Higher concentrations (including pure totora) could not be digested, as that caused acidification problems similar to those caused by other lignocellulosic materials. When quinoa and o-macrophytes were used as co-substrates, the increase in biogas productivity was slightly less. However, these co-substrates did not cause any operational problems. An additional advantage of quinoa and o-macrophytes was that they could be used in any proportion (even in pure form) without causing any destabilization problems in the anaerobic digestion process.

  15. Making lignin accessible for anaerobic digestion by wet-explosion pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Birgitte K; Biswas, Rajib; Ahamed, Aftab; Teller, Philip J; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2014-10-23

    Lignin is a major part of the recalcitrant fraction of lignocellulose and in nature its degradation occurs through oxidative enzymes along with microbes mediated oxidative chemical actions. Oxygen assisted wet-explosion pretreatment promotes lignin solubility and leads to an increase biodegradation of lignin during anaerobic digestion processes. The pretreatment of feedlot manure was performed in a 10L reactor at 170°C for 25min using 4bars oxygen and the material was fed to a continuous stirred tank reactor operated at 55°C for anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of untreated and pretreated material was 70±27 and 320±36L/kg-VS/Day, respectively, or 4.5 times higher yield as a result of the pretreatment. Aliphatic acids formed during the pretreatment were utilized by microbes. 44.4% lignin in pretreated material was actually converted in the anaerobic digestion process compared to 12.6% for untreated material indicating the oxygen assisted explosion promoted lignin degradation. PMID:25459820

  16. Life cycle assessment of energy from waste via anaerobic digestion: a UK case study.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Sara; Lettieri, Paola; Borello, Domenico; Clift, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Particularly in the UK, there is potential for use of large-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) plants to treat food waste, possibly along with other organic wastes, to produce biogas. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment to compare the environmental impacts of AD with energy and organic fertiliser production against two alternative approaches: incineration with energy production by CHP and landfill with electricity production. In particular the paper investigates the dependency of the results on some specific assumptions and key process parameters. The input Life Cycle Inventory data are specific to the Greater London area, UK. Anaerobic digestion emerges as the best treatment option in terms of total CO2 and total SO2 saved, when energy and organic fertiliser substitute non-renewable electricity, heat and inorganic fertiliser. For photochemical ozone and nutrient enrichment potentials, AD is the second option while incineration is shown to be the most environmentally friendly solution. The robustness of the model is investigated with a sensitivity analysis. The most critical assumption concerns the quantity and quality of the energy substituted by the biogas production. Two key issues affect the development and deployment of future anaerobic digestion plants: maximising the electricity produced by the CHP unit fuelled by biogas and to defining the future energy scenario in which the plant will be embedded. PMID:24112851

  17. Evaluation of a Ca-modified porphyritic andesite for ammonium removal in the anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Ca-modified porphyritic andesite (wheat-rice-stone (WRS)) was developed for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich wastes. The Ca-modified WRS was obtained with integrated Ca-salt treatment and calcination. Scanning electron microscope and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analyses were performed to characterize the Ca-modified WRS, and adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated to clarify the adsorption mechanism. The ammonium adsorption process was explained well with a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The specific surface area of the Ca-modified WRS was determined to be 4.56 sq. m/g, and the maximum NH4(+)-N adsorption capacity was determined to be 45.45 mg/g. These values are improvements over those of natural WRS. The ammonium adsorption capacity remained constant at a pH range from 5.0 to 9.0, which indicates that Ca-modified WRS is a promising material for various applications. The methane-production and chemical oxygen demand-removal aspects of anaerobic digestion were much improved with the addition of Ca-modified WRS. Therefore, Ca-modified WRS could be developed into a viable ammonium adsorbent for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich wastes. PMID:23837319

  18. Effect of temperature on removal of antibiotic resistance genes by anaerobic digestion of activated sludge revealed by metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy

    2015-09-01

    As antibiotic resistance continues to spread globally, there is growing interest in the potential to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from wastewater sources. In particular, operational conditions during sludge digestion may serve to discourage selection of resistant bacteria, reduce horizontal transfer of ARGs, and aid in hydrolysis of DNA. This study applied metagenomic analysis to examine the removal efficiency of ARGs through thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion using bench-scale reactors. Although the relative abundance of various ARGs shifted from influent to effluent sludge, there was no measureable change in the abundance of total ARGs or their diversity in either the thermophilic or mesophilic treatment. Among the 35 major ARG subtypes detected in feed sludge, substantial reductions (removal efficiency >90%) of 8 and 13 ARGs were achieved by thermophilic and mesophilic digestion, respectively. However, resistance genes of aadA, macB, and sul1 were enriched during the thermophilic anaerobic digestion, while resistance genes of erythromycin esterase type I, sul1, and tetM were enriched during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Efflux pump remained to be the major antibiotic resistance mechanism in sludge samples, but the portion of ARGs encoding resistance via target modification increased in the anaerobically digested sludge relative to the feed. Metagenomic analysis provided insight into the potential for anaerobic digestion to mitigate a broad array of ARGs. PMID:25994259

  19. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, IckTae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ? MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ? Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ? In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ? Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  20. Anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and algae: impact of intracellular algal products recovery on co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    Astals, S; Musenze, R S; Bai, X; Tannock, S; Tait, S; Pratt, S; Jensen, P D

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and algae (Scenedesmus sp.) with and without extraction of intracellular algal co-products, with views towards the development of a biorefinery concept for lipid, protein and/or biogas production. Protein and/or lipids were extracted from Scenedesmus sp. using free nitrous acid pre-treatments and solvent-based Soxhlet extraction, respectively. Processing increased algae methane yield between 29% and 37% compared to raw algae (VS basis), but reduced the amount of algae available for digestion. Co-digestion experiments showed a synergy between pig manure and raw algae that increased raw algae methane yield from 0.163 to 0.245 m(3) CH4 kg(-1)VS. No such synergy was observed when algal residues were co-digested with pig manure. Finally, experimental results were used to develop a high-level concept for an integrated biorefinery processing pig manure and onsite cultivated algae, evaluating methane production and co-product recovery per mass of pig manure entering the refinery. PMID:25643955

  1. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of pulp and paper industry biosludge-long-term reactor performance and effects of thermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, V; Ylä-Outinen, A; Rintala, J

    2015-12-15

    The pulp and paper industry wastewater treatment processes produce large volumes of biosludge. Limited anaerobic degradation of lignocellulose has hindered the utilization of biosludge, but the processing of biosludge using anaerobic digestion has recently regained interest. In this study, biosludge was used as a sole substrate in long-term (400 d) mesophilic laboratory reactor trials. Nine biosludge batches collected evenly over a period of one year from a pulp and paper industry wastewater treatment plant had different solid and nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, trace elements) characteristics. Nutrient characteristics may vary by a factor of 2-11, while biomethane potentials (BMPs) ranged from 89 to 102 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS between batches. The BMPs were enhanced by 39-88% with thermal pretreatments at 105-134 °C. Despite varying biosludge properties, stable operation was achieved in reactor trials with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 14 d. Hydrolysis was the process limiting step, ceasing gas production when the HRT was shortened to 10 days. However, digestion with an HRT of 10 days was feasible after thermal pretreatment of the biosludge (20 min at 121 °C) due to enhanced hydrolysis. The methane yield was 78 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS for untreated biosludge and was increased by 77% (138 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS) after pretreatment. PMID:26397452

  2. Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A.; Augenstein, Don; Kayhanian, Masoud; Tchobanoglous, George

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal bacterial flocs from a raceway pond treating aquaculture wastewater: need for a biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Van Den Hende, Sofie; Laurent, Cedric; Bégué, Marine

    2015-11-01

    An outdoor raceway pond with microalgal bacterial flocs (MaB-flocs) is a novel sunlight-based system to treat pikeperch aquaculture wastewater while producing biomass. The harvested MaB-floc biomass (33tonTSha(-1)y(-1)) needs further valorization. Therefore, the biochemical methane yield (BMY) of MaB-floc biomass was determined in batch experiments. The results show significant differences between the BMY of MaB-flocs amongst their harvest dates (128-226NLCH4kg(-1)VS), a low anaerobic digestion conversion efficiency (25.0-36.2%), a moderate chlorophyll a removal (51.5-86.9%) and a low biogas profit (<0.01€m(-3)wastewater). None of the pretreatment methods screened (freezing, thermal, microwave, ultrasonic and chlorination, flue gas sparging, and acid) can be recommended due to a low BMY improvement and/or unfavorable energy balance. Therefore, anaerobic digestion of this MaB-floc biomass should only be granted a supporting role within a biorefinery concept. PMID:26241837

  4. Effect of Calcium Ions on Dewaterability of Enzymatic-Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion Sludge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Ying; Pang, Ya; Li, Xue; Liao, Xing-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Waste-activated sludge (WAS) solubilized remarkably after enzymatic-enhanced anaerobic digestion, but its dewaterability was deteriorated. In this study, a novel method was performed to improve the dewaterability of enzymatic-enhanced anaerobic digestion sludge by adding CaCl2 (0.01~1.00 g/g total sludge). The capillary suction time (CST), moisture content, and filtrate turbidity were employed to characterize the dewaterability of WAS, and the possible mechanisms involved were clarified. The results showed the dewaterability did not worsen when CaCl2 was added before sludge digestion, and the CST, moisture content, and filtrate turbidity were notably reduced with the increase of CaCl2 dosage. It also shown that calcium ions played an important role in the bioflocculation of digested sludge by neutralizing negative charges on the surface of sludge. In addition, soluble protein initially lowered a little and then observably improved with the addition of CaCl2, while soluble carbohydrate was reduced sharply first and then bounced back afterwards. The interactions between calcium ions and the biopolymer further enhanced the dewatering of sludge through bridging of colloidal particles together. PMID:26129703

  5. Influence of hydrothermal pretreatment on microalgal biomass anaerobic digestion and bioenergy production.

    PubMed

    Passos, Fabiana; Ferrer, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal biomass grown in wastewater treatment raceway ponds may be valorised producing bioenergy through anaerobic digestion. However, pretreatment techniques seem to be necessary for enhancing microalgae methane yield. In this study, hydrothermal pretreatment was studied prior to batch and continuous reactors. The pretreatment increased organic matter solubilisation (8-13%), anaerobic digestion rate (30-90%) and final methane yield (17-39%) in batch tests. The highest increase was attained with the pretreatment at 130 °C for 15 min, which was attested in a laboratory-scale continuous reactor operated at a hydraulic retention time of 20 days with an average organic loading rate of 0.7 g VS/L·day. The methane yield increased from 0.12 to 0.17 L CH?/g VS (41%) in the pretreated digester as compared to the control. Microscopic images of microalgal biomass showed that pretreated cells had unstructured organelles and disrupted cell wall external layer, which may enhance the hydrolysis. Indeed, images of the pretreated reactor digestate showed how cells were more degraded than in the control reactor. PMID:25462743

  6. Initial examination of microwave pretreatment on primary, secondary and mixed sludges before and after anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Eskicioglu, C; Kennedy, K J; Droste, R L

    2008-01-01

    The effects of microwave pretreatment on disintegration and mesophilic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS), primary sludge (PS), combined (PS + WAS) sequencing batch reactor (SBR) sludge and anaerobically digested biocake were investigated by both household and bench scale industrial types microwaves at temperatures below and above boiling point. Pretreatment variables, temperature, intensity (cooking rate) and sludge concentration had statistically significant effects on solubilization. The microwave pretreatment also increased the bioavailability of sludge components under batch anaerobic digestion and enhanced the dewaterability of pretreated sludges after digestion. However, the level of improvements in solubilization and biodegradation from different waste sludges were different. While the largest improvement in ultimate biodegradation was observed in WAS, microwave irradiation only affected the rate of biodegradation of pretreated PS samples. Similarly, relatively lower solubilization ratios achieved for combined - SBR sludge was attributed to high sludge age of extended aeration SBR unit. It is possible that initial sludge characteristics may influence final pretreatment outcomes so that general statements of performance cannot always be made. PMID:18309206

  7. Properties of cellulose micro/nanofibers obtained from eucalyptus pulp fiber treated with anaerobic digestate and high shear mixing.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High production costs remain the single greatest factor limiting wider use of cellulose micro/nanofibers in the industry. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of using a low-cost bacteria-rich digestate (liquid anaerobic digestate – AD supernatant) on milled eucalyptus...

  8. EVALUATION OF THE FULL-SCALE APPLICATION OF ANAEROBIC SLUDGE DIGESTION AT THE BLUE PLAINS WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY, WASHINGTON, DC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mesophilic-thermophilic digestion process is a new two-step concept for treating municipal wasterwater sludges. The first step operates under mesophilic process conditions (digestion with anaerobic microorganisms that thrive at 90 to 100F). The second step operates under ther...

  9. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant of OFMSW is an interesting research topic that has not yet been explored. At the moment, standardization in the design of facilities that treat anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of OFMSW is still under development. To move toward this direction, it is first necessary to assess the performance of alternative treatment options. It study concentrates existing data regarding the characteristics of the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of OFMSW and from their co-digestion with other BOW. This provides data documenting the effect of the anaerobic digestion operating conditions on the supernatant quality and critically evaluates alternative options for the post-treatment of the liquid fraction produced from the anaerobic digestion process. PMID:23808751

  10. Impact of pretreatment on solid state anaerobic digestion of yard waste for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhikai; Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-02-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion, as a safe and environment-friendly technology to dispose municipal solid wastes, can produce methane and reduce the volume of wastes. In order to raise the digestion efficiency, this study investigated the pretreatment of yard waste by thermal or chemical method to break down the complex lignocellulosic structure. The composition and structure of pretreated yard waste were analyzed and characterized. The results showed that the pretreatment decreased the content of cellulose and hemicelluloses in yard waste and in turn improved the hydrolysis and methanogenic processes. The thermal pretreatment sample (P1) had the highest methane yield, by increasing 88% in comparison with digesting the raw material. The maximum biogas production reached 253 mL/g volatile solids (VS). The largest substrate mass reduction was obtained by the alkaline pretreatment (P5). The VS of the alkaline-treated sample decreased about 60% in comparison with the raw material. PMID:23996635

  11. Anaerobic digestion of pre-fermented potato peel wastes for methane production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of anaerobic digestion (AD) of potato peel waste (PPW) and its lactic acid fermentation residue (PPW-FR) for methane (CH4) production. The experimental results showed that about 60-70% CH4 content was obtained. The digester using PPW-FR as feedstock exhibited better performance and produced a highest cumulative CH4 production of 273L/kg VSfed, followed by 239L/kg VSfed using PPW under the same conditions. However, with increasing solid loadings of PPW-FR feedstock from 6.4% to 9.1%, the CH4 production was inhibited. The generation, accumulation, and degradation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in digesters were also investigated in this research. PMID:26421481

  12. Gas in the Digestive Tract

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also contain small amounts of gasses that contain sulfur. Flatus that contains more sulfur gasses has more odor. Everyone has gas. However, ... methane gas or hydrogen sulfide, the most common sulfur gas in flatus. Studies have detected methane in ...

  13. Effect of fillers on key characteristics of sludge thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Liming; Xu, Yuanshun; Wang, Tianfeng; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic digestion (AD) of sludge, AD efficiency and digested sludge (DS) dewaterability are critical factors. In this study, polyester non-woven fabric fillers were integrated into a sludge digester. The effect of such fillers on digestion was investigated in thermophilic temperature range in semi-continuous mode. Methane production of filler system and control reactor were significantly different (P < 0.05, paired t-test). At hydraulic retention times of 18 days and 12 days, the corresponding methane yields from filler system were 140% and 161%, respectively, of the yields from control digester without filler. Improvement of DS dewaterability was uncertain during 110 days of operation. While after a longer period of digestion, filler system resulted in a lower normalized capillary suction time of DS (76.5 ± 21.6 s L/g total suspended solids) than control reactor (118.7 ± 32.9 s L/g total suspended solids). The results showed that the filler could improve thermophilic AD performance, except at too short hydraulic retention times. PMID:26151853

  14. Green job bio-aerosol exposure during anaerobic digestion for biomass energetic valorisation.

    PubMed

    Traversi, Deborah; Gorrasi, Ilaria; Bonetta, Sara; Leinardi, Riccardo; Pietrangeli, Biancamaria; Carraro, Elisabetta; Gilli, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The continued expansion of the green economy increases the risk profile for green occupational jobs. One of the broadest green sectors in terms of growth is the anaerobic digestion of biomasses. In recent years, this development has also interested Italian regions. The management of biomass includes biological risk and the risk of particulate and endotoxin exposure. In the present study, we evaluated airborne exposure for anaerobic digestion workers at two real-scale plants. Digested biomass has different origins, ranging from cattle sludge and manure to poultry manure to agricultural harvesting or processing residues, particularly from maize and fruits. Two sampling points were chosen: at the first, the input biomasses were stored, and the hopper was loaded; at the second, the digested sludge exited the digester. The microbiological parameters, assessed using an active sampler and cultural method, were the total bacteria counts (at 22, 37, and 55°C), yeasts, fungi, Pseudomonaceae, Clostridia spp., Enterobacteriaceae and Actinomycetes. Moreover, at the same sampling points, we evaluated six PM10 fraction levels (10.0-7.2, 7.2-3.0, 3.0-1.5, 1.5-0.95, 0.95-0.49, and <0.49µm) and the endotoxin content of each fraction. In this investigation, the microbe contamination of the air varied from low to high levels, while the PM10 and endotoxin levels were limited, reaching rural environmental levels (61.40µg/m(3) and 18.88EU/m(3), respectively). However, contamination and occupational risk must be evaluated individually for each plant because numerous variables influence the risk magnitude, particularly digested sludge treatments, such as input biomass nature, storage, movement conditions, building configuration and technological processes. PMID:25791865

  15. Is phytoremediation without biomass valorization sustainable? - comparative LCA of landfilling vs. anaerobic co-digestion.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Miguel; Marey-Pérez, Manuel F; Martinez Huerta, Gemma; Álvarez Cabal, Valeriano

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the sustainability of phytoremediation for soils contaminated with heavy metals, especially the influence of management of the produced metal-enriched biomass on the environmental performance of the complete system. We examine a case study in Asturias (north of Spain), where the land was polluted with Pb by diffuse emissions from an adjacent steelmaking factory. A Phytoremediation scenario based on this case was assessed by performing a comparative life cycle assessment and by applying the multi-impact assessment method ReCiPe. Our Baseline scenario used the produced biomass as feedstock for an anaerobic digester that produces biogas, which is later upgraded cryogenically. The Baseline scenario was compared with two alternative scenarios: one considers depositing the produced biomass into landfill, and the other considers excavating the contaminated soil, disposing it in a landfill, and refilling the site with pristine soil. A sensitivity analysis was performed using different yields of biomass and biogas, and using different distances between site and biomass valorization/disposal center. Our results show that the impacts caused during agricultural activities and biomass valorization were compensated by the production of synthetic natural gas and the avoided impact of natural gas production. In addition, it was found that if the produced biomass was not valorized, the sustainability of phytoremediation is questionable. The distance between the site and the biomass processing center is not a major factor for determining the technology's sustainability, providing distances are less than 200-300 km. However, distance to landfill or to the source of pristine soil is a key factor when deciding to use phytoremediation or other ex-situ conventional remediation techniques. PMID:25461087

  16. Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure: The effect of ammonia inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanguang; Zhou Xuefei; Zhang Yalei; Zhu Hongguang

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced anaerobic treatment of CSTR-digested effluent from chicken manure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was key controlling factor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold of the SCOD/TAN ratio was 2.4 at an influent pH of 8.5-9. - Abstract: The effect of ammonia inhibition was evaluated during the enhanced anaerobic treatment of digested effluent from a 700 m{sup 3} chicken-manure continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). A 12.3 L internal circulation (IC) reactor inoculated with an anaerobic granular sludge and operated at 35 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign C was employed for the investigation. With a corresponding organic loading rate of 1.5-3.5 kg-COD/m{sup 3} d over a hydraulic retention time of 1.5 d, a maximum volumetric biogas production rate of 1.2 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3} d and TCOD (total COD) removal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80% was achieved. However, the continual increase in the influent TAN content led to ammonia inhibition in the methanogenesis system. The SCOD/TAN (soluble COD/total ammonia nitrogen) ratio was presented to be the key controlling factor for the anaerobic treatment of semi-digested chicken manure, and further validation through shock loading and ammonia inhibition experiments was conducted. The threshold value of the SCOD/TAN ratio was determined to be 2.4 (corresponding to a TAN of 1250 mg/L) at an influent pH of 8.5-9.

  17. Digestion of frozen/thawed food waste in the hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid system

    SciTech Connect

    Stabnikova, O. Liu, X.Y.; Wang, J.Y.

    2008-07-01

    The hybrid anaerobic solid-liquid (HASL) system, which is a modified two-phase anaerobic digester, is to be used in an industrial scale operation to minimize disposal of food waste at incineration plants in Singapore. The aim of the present research was to evaluate freezing/thawing of food waste as a pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system. The hydrolytic and fermentation processes in the acidogenic reactor were enhanced when food waste was frozen for 24 h at -20 deg. C and then thawed for 12 h at 25 deg. C (experiment) in comparison with fresh food waste (control). The highest dissolved COD concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 16.9 g/l on day 3 in the control and 18.9 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The highest VFA concentrations in the leachate from the acidogenic reactors were 11.7 g/l on day 3 in the control and 17.0 g/l on day 1 in the experiment. The same volume of methane was produced during 12 days in the control and 7 days in the experiment. It gave the opportunity to diminish operational time of batch process by 42%. The effect of freezing/thawing of food waste as pre-treatment for its anaerobic digestion in the HASL system was comparable with that of thermal pre-treatment of food waste at 150 deg. C for 1 h. However, estimation of energy required either to heat the suspended food waste to 150 deg. C or to freeze the same quantity of food waste to -20 deg. C showed that freezing pre-treatment consumes about 3 times less energy than thermal pre-treatment.

  18. High-solids anaerobic digestion: comparison of three pilot scales.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, J; Buffière, P; Cacho, J; Carrère, M; Delgenes, J-P

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were undertaken in three different experimental set-ups in order to compare them: an industrial 21-m3 pilot reactor, a new 40-l laboratory pilot reactor and bmp type plasma bottles. Three consecutive batch dry digestion tests of municipal solid waste were performed under mesophilic conditions with the same feedstock in all vessels. Biogas and methane production at the end of the tests were similar (around 200 m3 CH4STP/tVS) for both pilot reactors and were different from the bottle tests. The dynamics of methane production and VFA accumulation concurred. However, the maximal levels of VFA transitory accumulation varied between reactors and between runs in a same reactor. Ammonia levels were similar in both reactors. These results show that the new reactor accurately imitates the conditions found in the larger one. Adaptation of microorganisms to the waste and operating conditions was also pointed out along the consecutive batches. Thermophilic semi-continuous tests were performed in both reactors with similar conditions. The methane production efficiencies were similar. PMID:19029716

  19. Sulfate reduction, nutrient limitation, and reactor design considerations in anaerobic digesters

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Three areas of improvement in anaerobic digestion were investigated: inhibition of sulfate reduction, nutrient limitation, and reactor design. In the anaerobic treatment of wastewaters containing high concentrations of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide, an undesirable end product, is produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Research was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of adding SRB-specific biochemical inhibitors to a waste stream as a method of preventing sulfate reduction in continuous anaerobic digesters. Two classes of inhibitory compounds were identified: (1) sulfate analogs and (2) transition metal divalent cations. Molybdate was found to have an immediate inhibitory effect on sulfate reduction, and a delayed effect on other trophic groups. Non-specific inhibition was not caused by a dynamic imbalance due to cessation of fatty acid degradation via sulfate reduction. Transition metals had no effect on sulfate reduction or overall digester performance in high sulfate digesters. The hypothesis that nutrient limitation could be synergistically coupled with the addition of SRB-specific inhibitors was investigated. Recovery of sulfate reduction was slower after molybdate removal from the feed when phosphate was limited as compared with when it was continually added, although this effect may have been an indirect result of non-specific inhibition. Periodic pulse nutrient addition was investigated as a method of (1) reducing cell growth, sludge production and related disposal costs and (2) reducing nutrient addition costs. Sustained waste treatment performance was demonstrated for iron, phosphorus, and nitrogen-free feeds. When withheld nutrients were added in pulses, effective operation could be maintained over long periods. Increasing pulse strength delayed the onset of adverse effects related to nutrient starvation.

  20. Peracetic acid oxidation as an alternative pre-treatment for the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Appels, Lise; Van Assche, Ado; Willems, Kris; Degrève, Jan; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2011-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion is generally considered to be an economic and environmentally friendly technology for treating waste activated sludge, but has some limitations, such as the time it takes for the sludge to be digested and also the ineffectiveness of degrading the solids. Various pre-treatment technologies have been suggested to overcome these limitations and to improve the biogas production rate by enhancing the hydrolysis of organic matter. This paper studies the use of peracetic acid for disintegrating sludge as a pre-treatment of anaerobic digestion. It has been proved that this treatment effectively leads to a solubilisation of organic material. A maximum increase in biogas production by 21% is achieved. High dosages of PAA lead to a decrease in biogas production. This is due to the inhibition of the anaerobic micro-organisms by the high VFA-concentrations. The evolution of the various VFAs during digestion is studied and the observed trends support this hypothesis. PMID:21227687

  1. Impact of different ratios of feedstock to liquid anaerobic digestion effluent on the performance and microbiome of solid-state anaerobic digesters digesting corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Shi, Jian; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Li, Yebo; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand how the non-microbial factors of L-AD effluent affected the microbiome composition and successions in the SS-AD digesters using both Illumina sequencing and qPCR quantification of major genera of methanogens. The SS-AD digesters started with a feedstock/total effluent (F/Et) ratio 2.2 (half of the effluent was autoclaved) performed stably, while the SS-AD digesters started with a 4.4 F/Et ratio (no autoclaved effluent) suffered from digester acidification, accumulation of volatile fatty acids, and ceased biogas production two weeks after startup. Some bacteria and methanogens were affected by non-microbial factors of the L-AD fluent. Alkalinity, the main difference between the two F/Et ratios, may be the crucial factor when SS-AD digesters were started using L-AD effluent. PMID:26575616

  2. Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nopharatana, Annop; Pullammanappallil, Pratap C.; Clarke, William P.

    2007-07-01

    A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

  3. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    PubMed

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 ?m with an average of 51 ?m and a median of 26 ?m. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production. PMID:24342346

  4. Potential use of duckweed based anaerobic digester effluent as a feed source for heterotrophic growth of micro-algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, L.; Dupont, R.

    2013-12-01

    Finding an alternative source of energy for the growing world's demand is a challenging task being considered by many scientists. Various types of renewable energy alternatives are being investigated by researchers around the world. The abundance of duckweed (i.e., Lemna and Wolfia sp.) in wetlands and wastewater lagoons, their rapid growth, and their capacity for nutrient, metal and other contaminant removal from wastewater suggests their potential as an inexpensive source of biomass for biofuel production. Another source of biomass for biofuel and energy production is micro-algae. The large-scale growth of micro-algae can potentially be achieved in a smaller footprint and at a higher rate and lower cost via heterotrophic growth compared to autotrophic growth for specific species that can grow under both conditions. Here we describe two types of research. First, two lab-scale, 5 L anaerobic digesters containing municipal raw wastewater that were set up, maintained and monitored over the course of 6 months using duckweed as the feed source. The pH, salinity, amount of gas production and gas composition were measured on a daily basis. The results from these measurements show that duckweed can be used as a good source of biofuel production in the form of methane gas. The second set of reactors consisted of two 1 L batch fed reactors containing algae (Chlorella vulgaris) grown in the lab environment heterotrophically. The pH and DO were monitored on a daily basis in order to investigate their effect on algae growth. Lipid analysis of the harvested algal biomass was done to investigate the efficiency of harvestable biofuel products. A nutrient solution containing glucose as an energy source was used as the initial feed solution, and the potential substitution of the glucose solution with the organic carbon residue from the duckweed digester effluent was investigated. Methane production, carbon stabilization, and gas composition results from the duckweed fed anaerobic digesters, and the growth and biolipid production of heterotrophic micro-algae fed pure substrate versus residual digester effluent carbon are discussed in detail in this study.

  5. Valorisation of biodiesel production wastes: Anaerobic digestion of residual Tetraselmis suecica biomass and co-digestion with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ballardo, David U; Font-Segura, Xavier; Ferrer, Antoni Sánchez; Barrena, Raquel; Rossi, Sergio; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel

    2015-03-01

    One of the principal opportunity areas in the development of the microalgal biodiesel industry is the energy recovery from the solid microalgal biomass residues to optimise the fuel production. This work reports the cumulative methane yields reached from the anaerobic digestion of the solid microalgal biomass residues using different types of inocula, reporting also the improvement of biogas production using the co-digestion of microalgal biomass with glycerol. Results demonstrate that the solid microalgal biomass residues showed better biogas production using a mesophilic inoculum, reaching almost two-fold higher methane production than under thermophilic conditions. Furthermore, the solid microalgal biomass residues methane production rate showed an increase from 173.78 ± 9.57 to 438.46 ± 40.50?mL of methane per gram of volatile solids, when the co-digestion with glycerol was performed. These results are crucial to improve the energy balance of the biodiesel production from Tetraselmis suecica, as well as proposing an alternative way to treat the wastes derived from the microalgae biodiesel production. PMID:25737140

  6. The efficiency of concentration methods used to detect enteric viruses in anaerobically digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Prado, Tatiana; Guilayn, Wilma de Carvalho Pereira Bonet; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2013-02-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in biosolids can be underestimated due to the inefficient methods (mainly molecular methods) used to recover the viruses from these matrices. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the different methods used to recover adenoviruses (AdV), rotavirus species A (RVA), norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII) and the hepatitis A virus (HAV) from biosolid samples at a large urban wastewater treatment plant in Brazil after they had been treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for spiking experiments to compare the detection limits of feasible methods, such as beef extract elution and ultracentrifugation. Tests were performed to detect the inhibition levels and the bacteriophage PP7 was used as an internal control. The results showed that the inhibitors affected the efficiency of the PCR reaction and that beef extract elution is a suitable method for detecting enteric viruses, mainly AdV from biosolid samples. All of the viral groups were detected in the biosolid samples: AdV (90%), RVA, NoV GII (45%) and HAV (18%), indicating the viruses' resistance to the anaerobic treatment process. This is the first study in Brazil to detect the presence of RVA, AdV, NoV GII and HAV in anaerobically digested sludge, highlighting the importance of adequate waste management. PMID:23440119

  7. The efficiency of concentration methods used to detect enteric viruses in anaerobically digested sludge

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Tatiana; Guilayn, Wilma de Carvalho Pereira Bonet; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2013-01-01

    The presence of enteric viruses in biosolids can be underestimated due to the inefficient methods (mainly molecular methods) used to recover the viruses from these matrices. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the different methods used to recover adenoviruses (AdV), rotavirus species A (RVA), norovirus genogroup II (NoV GII) and the hepatitis A virus (HAV) from biosolid samples at a large urban wastewater treatment plant in Brazil after they had been treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for spiking experiments to compare the detection limits of feasible methods, such as beef extract elution and ultracentrifugation. Tests were performed to detect the inhibition levels and the bacteriophage PP7 was used as an internal control. The results showed that the inhibitors affected the efficiency of the PCR reaction and that beef extract elution is a suitable method for detecting enteric viruses, mainly AdV from biosolid samples. All of the viral groups were detected in the biosolid samples: AdV (90%), RVA, NoV GII (45%) and HAV (18%), indicating the viruses' resistance to the anaerobic treatment process. This is the first study in Brazil to detect the presence of RVA, AdV, NoV GII and HAV in anaerobically digested sludge, highlighting the importance of adequate waste management. PMID:23440119

  8. Application of urea dosing for alkalinity supply during anaerobic digestion of vinasse.

    PubMed

    Boncz, M A; Formagini, E L; Santos, L da S; Marques, R D; Paulo, P L

    2012-01-01

    Pushed by demand for renewable energy, the ethanol industry in Brazil is expanding. However, production of 1 m(3) of ethanol generates around 13 m(3) of liquid residues (vinasse), so this expansion results in an increasing need for a more adequate destination of these residues. Nowadays the vinasse is dispersed on the sugar cane fields in the practice of fertirrigation, but anaerobic digestion of this residue may be a better solution, additionally offering an alternative source of energy, able to complement hydroelectric power supply in the dry season. However, when trying to digest vinasse at reduced hydraulic retention times, complications arise from its strong tendency toward acidification, upsetting the fragile balance of transformations normally occurring under anaerobic conditions. For successful operation of an anaerobic treatment process with acceptable hydraulic residence times, increasing alkalinity levels inside the reactor is neces-sary. In the present work we show that pH regulation by means of urea dosing, in spite of the risk posed by ammonia toxicity towards methanogenic biomass, can be a viable alternative to avoid vinasse acidification. The ammonia formed in urea conversion remains in solution, rather than escaping to the biogas, and so its use as fertiliser can offset its cost of application in the process. PMID:23032778

  9. Characterization of a Methanogenic Community within an Algal Fed Anaerobic Digester

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Joshua T.; Tramp, Cody; Sims, Ronald C.; Miller, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial diversity and metabolic potential of a methanogenic consortium residing in a 3785-liter anaerobic digester, fed with wastewater algae, was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing technology. DNA was extracted from anaerobic sludge material and used in metagenomic analysis through PCR amplification of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase ? subunit (mcrA) gene using primer sets ML, MCR, and ME. The majority of annotated mcrA sequences were assigned taxonomically to the genera Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales. Methanogens from the genus Methanosaeta are obligate acetotrophs, suggesting this genus plays a dominant role in methane production from the analyzed fermentation sample. Numerous analyzed sequences within the algae fed anaerobic digester were unclassified and could not be assigned taxonomically. Relative amplicon frequencies were determined for each primer set to determine the utility of each in pyrosequencing. Primer sets ML and MCR performed better quantitatively (representing the large majority of analyzed sequences) than primer set ME. However, each of these primer sets was shown to provide a quantitatively unique community structure, and thus they are of equal importance in mcrA metagenomic analysis. PMID:23724331

  10. Modeling a solar-heated anaerobic digester for the developing world using system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Johanna Lynn

    Much of the developing world lacks access to a dependable source of energy. Agricultural societies such as Mozambique and Papua New Guinea could sustain a reliable energy source through the microbacterial decomposition of animal and crop waste. Anaerobic digestion produces methane, which can be used directly for heating, cooking, and lighting. Adding a solar component to the digester provides a catalyst for bacteria activity, accelerating digestion and increasing biogas production. Using methane decreases the amount of energy expended by collecting and preparing firewood, eliminates hazardous health effects linked to inhalation of particles, and provides energy close to where it is needed. The purpose of this work is two fold: initial efforts focus on the development and validation of a computer-based system dynamics model that combines elements of the anaerobic digestion process in order to predict methane output; second, the model is flexed to explore how the addition of a solar component increases robustness of the design, examines predicted biogas generation as a function of varying input conditions, and determines how best to configure such systems for use in varying developing world environments. Therefore, the central components of the system: solar insolation, waste feedstock, bacteria population and consumption rates, and biogas production are related both conceptually and mathematically through a serious of equations, conversions, and a causal loop and feedback diagram. Given contextual constraints and initial assumptions for both locations, it was determined that solar insolation and subsequent digester temperature control, amount of waste, and extreme weather patterns had the most significant impact on the system as a whole. Model behavior was both reproducible and comparable to that demonstrated in existing experimental systems. This tool can thus be flexed to fit specific contexts within the developing world to improve the standard of living of many people, without significantly altering everyday activities.

  11. Effect of anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 and 60 °C on pharmaceuticals and organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, A; Kjerstadius, H; Haghighatafshar, S; Fick, J; Olsson, M; Wachtmeister, H; Eriksson, E; la Cour Jansen, J

    2014-01-01

    The application of treated sewage sludge on farmland is a suggested method for recycling nutrients and reducing demand for commercial fertilizer. However, sludge needs to be safe from possible contaminants which can cause acute and long-term health and environmental problems. Residual pharmaceuticals and organic contaminants are mentioned as emerging threats since wastewater treatment plants are not designed to degrade these substances. The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the presence, and reduction, of pharmaceuticals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during anaerobic digestion of mixed primary and waste-activated sludge at 35, 55 and 60 °C and during pasteurization at 70 °C. The study showed the difficulty of analysing pharmaceutical compounds in low concentrations in the sludge matrix. No general reduction of these compounds was seen during treatment, but for individual substances some reduction occurred. The PAHs were generally not reduced during digestion or pasteurization, but for three substances (indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (analysed together) and benzo[g,h,i]perylene) reduction (up to 60%) during digestion was seen. Digestion at 35 and 55 °C resulted in about the same order of reduction of the three individual PAHs, which was higher than for digestion at 60 °C. PMID:24647195

  12. Winery waste recycling through anaerobic co-digestion with waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Da Ros, C; Cavinato, C; Pavan, P; Bolzonella, D

    2014-11-01

    In this study biogas and high quality digestate were recovered from winery waste (wine lees) through anaerobic co-digestion with waste activated sludge both in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The two conditions studied showed similar yields (0.40 m(3)/kgCODfed) but different biological process stability: in fact the mesophilic process was clearly more stable than the thermophilic one in terms of bioprocess parameters. The resulting digestates showed good characteristics for both the tested conditions: heavy metals, dioxins (PCDD/F), and dioxin like bi-phenyls (PCBs) were concentred in the effluent if compared with the influent because of the important reduction of the solid dry matter, but remained at levels acceptable for agricultural reuse. Pathogens in digestate decreased. Best reductions were observed in thermophilic condition, while at 37°C the concentration of Escherichia coli was at concentrations level as high as 1000 UFC/g. Dewatering properties of digestates were evaluated by means of the capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) tests and it was found that a good dewatering level was achievable only when high doses of polymer (more than 25 g per kg dry solids) were added to sludge. PMID:25151445

  13. Ammonia removal in food waste anaerobic digestion using a side-stream stripping process.

    PubMed

    Serna-Maza, A; Heaven, S; Banks, C J

    2014-01-01

    Three 35-L anaerobic digesters fed on source segregated food waste were coupled to side-stream ammonia stripping columns and operated semi-continuously over 300 days, with results in terms of performance and stability compared to those of a control digester without stripping. Biogas was used as the stripping medium, and the columns were operated under different conditions of temperature (55, 70, 85 °C), pH (unadjusted and pH 10), and RT (2-5 days). To reduce digester TAN concentrations to a useful level a high temperature (?70 °C) and a pH of 10 were needed; under these conditions 48% of the TAN was removed over a 138-day period without any detrimental effects on digester performance. Other effects of the stripping process were an overall reduction in digestate organic nitrogen-containing fraction compared to the control and a recovery in the acetoclastic pathway when TAN concentration was 1770±20 mg kg(-1). PMID:24300847

  14. Influence of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; Sánchez, E; Weiland, P; Borja, R; Martín, A; Ilangovan, K

    2001-10-01

    The effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste was studied. Natural zeolite doses in the range 0.2-10 g/l of wastewater were used in batch experiments, which were carried out at temperatures between 27 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Total chemical oxygen demand (COD), total and volatile solids, ammonia and organic nitrogen, pH, total volatile fatty acids (TVFA), alkalinity (Alk) and accumulative methane production were determined during 30 days of digestion. The anaerobic digestion process was favored by the addition of natural zeolite at doses between 2 and 4 g/l and increasingly inhibited at doses beyond 6 g/l. A first-order kinetic model of COD removal was used to determine the apparent kinetic constants of the process. The kinetic constant values increased with the zeolite amount up to a concentration of 4 g/l. The values of the maximum accumulative methane production (Gm) increased until zeolite concentrations of 2-4 g/l. The addition of zeolite reduced the values of the TVFA/ Alk ratio while increasing the pH values, and these facts could contribute to the process failure at zeolite doses of 10 g/l. PMID:11554599

  15. Comparison of seven chemical pretreatments of corn straw for improving methane yield by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS(-1) in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost. PMID:24695485

  16. Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus in Dairy Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Jason D.; Collins, Harold P.; Tarara, Julie M.; Cochran, Rebecca L.

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus (P) from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to <8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential of biochar to reduce P in the anaerobic digester effluent (ADE) was assessed in small-scale filter systems through which the effluent was circulated. Biochar sequestered an average of 381 mg L?1 P from the ADE, and 4 g L?1 ADF was captured as a coating on the biochar. There was an increase of total (1.9 g kg?1), Olsen (763 mg kg?1), and water-extractable P (914 mg kg?1) bound to the biochar after 15 d of filtration. This accounted for a recovery of 32% of the P in the ADE. The recovered P on the biochar was analyzed using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance for P speciation, which confirmed the recovery of inorganic orthophosphate after liquid extraction of the biochar and the presence of inextractable Ca-P in the solid state. The inorganic phosphate was sequestered on the biochar through physical and weak chemical bonding. Results indicate that biochar could be a beneficial component to P reduction in the dairy system.

  17. Effects of lactone, ketone, and phenolic compounds on methane production and metabolic intermediates during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Wikandari, Rachma; Sari, Noor Kartika; A'yun, Qurrotul; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-02-01

    Fruit waste is a potential feedstock for biogas production. However, the presence of fruit flavors that have antimicrobial activity is a challenge for biogas production. Lactones, ketones, and phenolic compounds are among the several groups of fruit flavors that are present in many fruits. This work aimed to investigate the effects of two lactones, i.e., ?-hexalactone and ?-decalactone; two ketones, i.e., furaneol and mesifurane; and two phenolic compounds, i.e., quercetin and epicatechin on anaerobic digestion with a focus on methane production, biogas composition, and metabolic intermediates. Anaerobic digestion was performed in a batch glass digester incubated at 55 °C for 30 days. The flavor compounds were added at concentrations of 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/L. The results show that the addition of ?-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin in the range of 0.5-5 g/L reduced the methane production by 50 % (MIC50). Methane content was reduced by 90 % with the addition of 5 g/L of ?-decalactone, quercetin, and epicathechin. Accumulation of acetic acid, together with an increase in carbon dioxide production, was observed. On the contrary, ?-hexalactone, furaneol, and mesifurane increased the methane production by 83-132 % at a concentration of 5 g/L. PMID:25416476

  18. Semi-continuous anaerobic co-digestion of agro-wastes.

    PubMed

    Misi, S N; Forster, C F

    2002-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well established process for treating many types of organic waste, both solid and liquid. As such, the digestion of cattle slurries and of a range of agricultural wastes has been evaluated and has been successful. Previous batch studies have shown that multi-component mixtures of agro-wastes can be digested successfully, although with some mixtures a degree of both synergism and antagonism occurred. A continuously stirred tank reactor (15 l) was used as a mesophilic (35 degrees C) anaerobic reactor to examine the effect of treating mixtures of fruit and vegetable wastes, cattle slurry, poultry waste and waste activated sludge in which the proportions of the latter two components only were varied. The retention time was kept at 20 days and the loading rate maintained in the range 1.51-1.89 kg VS m(-3) d(-1). Increasing the proportion of poultry waste from 0% to 100% improved the methane yield from 0.164 to 0.244 m CH4 kg(-1) VS added, and caused the VS reduction to decrease slightly. There did not appear to be any synergism or antagonism in the mixtures examined. PMID:12088372

  19. Pathogen removal in farm-scale psychrophilic anaerobic digesters processing swine manure.

    PubMed

    Massé, Daniel; Gilbert, Yan; Topp, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of commercial-scale psychrophilic anaerobic digestion in sequencing batch reactors (PADSBRs) for pathogen removal from pig manure. The impact of treatment cycle length and of hydraulic flow regimes on pathogen removal efficiency was investigated. Two conventionally operated SBRs (BR1 and BR2) and two SBRs simultaneously fed during the draw step (BR3 and BR4) were monitored over a two-year period. PADSBRs significantly decreased the concentration of coliforms, Salmonella, Campylobacter spp., and Y. enterocolitica, respectively from about 10(6), 10(3) CFU g(-1), 10(3), and 10(4) CFU g(-1) to undetectable levels in most samples. Densities of the gram-positive Clostridium perfringens and Enterococcus spp. remained high (10(5) CFU g(-1)) in the digesters throughout treatment. The PADSBRs maintained the same level of pathogen removal when the treatment cycle length was reduced from 2 to 1 week. Mass balances on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) revealed short-circuits of inlet flow respectively averaging 6.3% and 6.4% for BR3 and BR4, significantly reducing the overall performance of these reactors regarding pathogens removal. The results obtained in this study show the ability of low temperature anaerobic digestion to remove or significantly reduce indicator and pathogen concentration from raw pig manure. PMID:20801022

  20. Comparison of Seven Chemical Pretreatments of Corn Straw for Improving Methane Yield by Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS ?1 in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost. PMID:24695485

  1. An integrated approach to energy recovery from biomass and waste: Anaerobic digestion-gasification-water treatment.

    PubMed

    Milani, M; Montorsi, L; Stefani, M

    2014-06-19

    The article investigates the performance of an integrated system for the energy recovery from biomass and waste based on anaerobic digestion, gasification and water treatment. In the proposed system, the organic fraction of waste of the digestible biomass is fed into an anaerobic digester, while a part of the combustible fraction of the municipal solid waste is gasified. Thus, the obtained biogas and syngas are used as a fuel for running a cogeneration system based on an internal combustion engine to produce electric and thermal power. The waste water produced by the integrated plant is recovered by means of both forward and inverse osmosis. The different processes, as well as the main components of the system, are modelled by means of a lumped and distributed parameter approach and the main outputs of the integrated plant such as the electric and thermal power and the amount of purified water are calculated. Finally, the implementation of the proposed system is evaluated for urban areas with a different number of inhabitants and the relating performance is estimated in terms of the main outputs of the system. PMID:24946772

  2. Biomass retention on electrodes rather than electrical current enhances stability in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Gildemyn, Sylvia; Arends, Jan B A; Vanwonterghem, Inka; Verbeken, Kim; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy; Tyson, Gene W; Hennebel, Tom; Rabaey, Korneel

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a well-established technology for energy recovery from organic waste streams. Several studies noted that inserting a bioelectrochemical system (BES) inside an anaerobic digester can increase biogas output, however the mechanism behind this was not explored and primary controls were not executed. Here, we evaluated whether a BES could stabilize AD of molasses. Lab-scale digesters were operated in the presence or absence of electrodes, in open (no applied potential) and closed circuit conditions. In the control reactors without electrodes methane production decreased to 50% of the initial rate, while it remained stable in the reactors with electrodes, indicating a stabilizing effect. After 91 days of operation, the now colonized electrodes were introduced in the failing AD reactors to evaluate their remediating capacity. This resulted in an immediate increase in CH4 production and VFA removal. Although a current was generated in the BES operated in closed circuit, no direct effect of applied potential nor current was observed. A high abundance of Methanosaeta was detected on the electrodes, however irrespective of the applied cell potential. This study demonstrated that, in addition to other studies reporting only an increase in methane production, a BES can also remediate AD systems that exhibited process failure. However, the lack of difference between current driven and open circuit systems indicates that the key impact is through biomass retention, rather than electrochemical interaction with the electrodes. PMID:24576697

  3. Digestion and dewatering characteristics of waste activated sludge treated by an anaerobic biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfeng; Shao, Liming; Li, Tianshui; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2014-02-01

    Immobilization of microorganisms for sludge anaerobic digestion was investigated in this study. The effects of filler properties on anaerobic digestion and dewaterability of waste activated sludge were assessed at mesophilic temperature in batch mode. The results showed that the duration of the methanogenic stage of reactors without filler, with only filler, and with pre-incubated filler was 39days, 19days and 13days, respectively, during which time the protein was degraded by 45.0%, 29.4% and 30.0%, and the corresponding methane yield was 193.9, 107.2 and 108.2mL/g volatile suspended solids added, respectively. On day 39, the final protein degradation efficiency of the three reactors was 45.0%, 40.9% and 42.0%, respectively. The results of normalized capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration suggested that the reactor incorporating pre-incubated filler could improve the dewaterability of digested sludge, while the effect of the reactor incorporating only filler on sludge dewaterability was uncertain. PMID:24355503

  4. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of high-pressure extruded food waste by inoculum optimization.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xin; Xu, Shuang; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Huan; Zhao, Ke; He, Liang

    2016-01-15

    The inoculation for extruded food waste anaerobic digestion (AD) was optimized to improve methane (CH4) yield. The inoculum of acclimated anaerobic sludge resulted in high biodegradability, producing CH4 yields from 580 mLCH4 g(-1)·VSadded to 605 mLCH4 g(-1)·VSadded, with corresponding BDCH4 ranging from 90% to 94%. We also investigated inoculum to substrate ratios (ISRs). With regards to digested slurry as inoculum, we found that a decrease in ISR improved CH4 yield, while a lower ISR prolonged the lag time of the initial AD stage due to lipid inhibition caused by excessive food waste. These results demonstrate that minimal inocula are required to start the AD system for high-pressure extruded food waste because it is easily biodegraded. High ammonia concentration had a negative effect on CH4 production (i.e., when free ammonia nitrogen [FAN] increased from 20 to 30 mg L(-1) to 120-140 mg L(-1), the CH4 yield decreased by 25%), suggesting that FAN was a significant inhibitor in CH4 yield reduction. In terms of CH4 yield and lag time of the AD process, the optimal inoculation of digested slurry for the extruded food waste had an ISR of 0.33 with CH4 yield of 505 mLCH4 g(-1)VSadded, which was 20% higher than what was found for higher ISR controls of 2, 1 and 0.5. PMID:26468605

  5. Improvement of mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of agri-food waste by addition of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Antonio; Siles, Jose A; Chica, Arturo F; Martin, M Angeles

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion is a promising alternative to manage agri-food waste rather than landfilling, composting or incineration. But improvement of methane yield and biodegradability is often required to optimize its economic viability. Biomethanization of agri-food solid waste presents the disadvantage of a slow hydrolytic phase, which might be enhanced by adding a readily digestible substrate such as glycerol. In this study, strawberry extrudate, fish waste and crude glycerol derived from biodiesel manufacturing are mixed at a proportion of 54:5:41, in VS (VS, total volatile solids), respectively. The mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion at lab-scale of the mixture was stable at loads lower than 1.85 g VS/L, reaching a methane yield coefficient of 308 L CH4/kg VS (0 °C, 1 atm) and a biodegradability of 96.7%, in VS. Moreover, the treatment capacity of strawberry and fish waste was increased 16% at adding the crude glycerol. An economic assessment was also carried out in order to evaluate the applicability of the proposed process. Even in a pessimistic scenario, the net balance was found to be positive. The glycerol adding implied a net saving in a range from 25.5 to 42.1 €/t if compared to landfill disposal. PMID:24726968

  6. Volume ratios between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion system affect their performance and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wen; Zhang, Wenfei; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-25

    An experimental temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system, with the thermophilic digester operated at neutral pH and with a balanced acidogenesis and methanogenesis (referred to as NT-TPAD), was evaluated with respect to the microbial communities and population dynamics of methanogens when digesting dairy cattle manure at 15-day overall system hydraulic retention time (HRT). When fed a manure slurry of 10% total solid (TS), similar system performance, 36-38% volatile solid (VS) removal and 0.21-0.22L methaneg(-1) VS fed, was achieved between a 5-day and 7.5-day HRT for the thermophilic digester. However, the thermophilic digester achieved a greater volumetric biogas yield when operated at a 5-day RT than at a 7.5-day HRT (6.3 vs. 4.7L/L/d), while the mesophilic digester had a stable volumetric biogas yield (about 1.0L/L/d). Each of the digesters harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, and some of the methanogens were significantly correlated with methane productions. Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta were the most important methanogenic genera in the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters, respectively. The microbiological findings may help understand the metabolism that underpins the anaerobic processes within each of the two digesters of TPAD systems when fed dairy manure. PMID:26232524

  7. Archaeal community composition affects the function of anaerobic co-digesters in response to organic overload

    SciTech Connect

    Lerm, S.; Kleyboecker, A.; Miethling-Graff, R.; Alawi, M.; Kasina, M.; Liebrich, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of methanogens are necessary to respond successfully to perturbation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diversity of methanogens correlates with the VFA concentration and methane yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aggregates indicate tight spatial relationship between minerals and microorganisms. - Abstract: Microbial community diversity in two thermophilic laboratory-scale and three full-scale anaerobic co-digesters was analysed by genetic profiling based on PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes. In parallel operated laboratory reactors a stepwise increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) resulted in a decrease of methane production and an accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). However, almost threefold different OLRs were necessary to inhibit the gas production in the reactors. During stable reactor performance, no significant differences in the bacterial community structures were detected, except for in the archaeal communities. Sequencing of archaeal PCR products revealed a dominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens were of minor importance and differed additionally in their abundance between reactors. As a consequence of the perturbation, changes in bacterial and archaeal populations were observed. After organic overload, hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanospirillum hungatei and Methanoculleus receptaculi) became more dominant, especially in the reactor attributed by a higher OLR capacity. In addition, aggregates composed of mineral and organic layers formed during organic overload and indicated tight spatial relationships between minerals and microbial processes that may support de-acidification processes in over-acidified sludge. Comparative analyses of mesophilic stationary phase full-scale reactors additionally indicated a correlation between the diversity of methanogens and the VFA concentration combined with the methane yield. This study demonstrates that the coexistence of two types of methanogens, i.e. hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens is necessary to respond successfully to perturbation and leads to stable process performance.

  8. Key microbial communities steering the functioning of anaerobic digesters during hydraulic and organic overloading shocks.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Leticia; Lema, Juan M; Carballa, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Overloading is one of the most typical process disturbance in anaerobic digesters, resulting in volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation. This work aimed to study the microbial community dynamics during hydraulic (decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and organic (increasing the organic loading rate maintaining the HRT constant) overload shocks in anaerobic reactors treating agro-industrial wastes, as well as during the recovery period. In both cases, the organic loading rate increased from 2 to 10gCODL(-1)d(-1), resulting in VFAs accumulation up to 9gL(-1). Both overloads were correlated to an increase in Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria phyla and with a drop in Syntrophomonadaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families. In contrast, Tissierellaceae family only increased during the organic shock. Active Archaea decreased in both overloads, going from Methanosaeta dominance to Methanosarcina prevalence. During the recovery period, Porphyromonadaceae family increased its presence and Clostridium genus recovered values prior to perturbation. PMID:26340029

  9. Enhancement options for the utilisation of nitrogen rich animal by-products in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Resch, Christoph; Wörl, Alexander; Waltenberger, Reinhold; Braun, Rudolf; Kirchmayr, Roland

    2011-02-01

    This study focuses on the enhancement of an Austrian anaerobic digestion plant at a slaughterhouse site which exclusively uses animal by-products as substrate. High ammonia concentrations from protein degradation cause severe inhibitions of anaerobic microorganisms. For improving the current situation the COD:TKN ratio is widened by (a) ammonia stripping directly out of the process and (b) addition of a C source to the substrate. Different OLR and HRT were tested in continuous experiments to simulate new operating conditions. The results show that the addition of carbon cannot improve fermentation capacity. The reduction of ammonia boosts the degradation: After reduction of TKN from 7.5 to 4.0 g kg(-1) the initially high VFA concentration decreased and the COD degradation was improved by 55.5%. Hence, the implementation of the new N reduction process facilitates either the increase of the OLR by 61% or the reduction of the HRT by 25%. PMID:21134743

  10. Toxicity and biogas production potential of refinery waste sludge for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Haak, Laura; Roy, Ratul; Pagilla, Krishna

    2016-02-01

    Two waste streams from an oil refinery wastewater treatment system, float from a dissolved air flotation unit (DAF sludge) and waste activated sludge (WAS), were investigated to determine toxicity and biogas production potential for anaerobic digestion through batch testing methods. Ozonation as a pretreatment was investigated to observe the impacts of waste solubilization on both toxicity and biodegradability. Anaerobic toxicity assays resulted in no detectible inhibition from WAS, neither with nor without ozonation. Untreated DAF sludge exhibited inhibition that amplified with the increases in DAF sludge inclusion. Ozone treatment effectively reduces this inhibition. The biodegradability of WAS, measured by biochemical methane potential tests, doubled with low dose ozonation. DAF sludge biodegradability was negligible prior to treatment and was successfully enhanced through ozonation. PMID:26461442

  11. Characterization of products from hydrothermal carbonization of orange pomace including anaerobic digestibility of process liquor.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Ezgi; Atila, Buse; Mumme, Jan; Reza, M Toufiq; Toptas, Asli; Elibol, Murat; Yanik, Jale

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effect of the temperature and reaction time on hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of orange pomace was investigated. In addition, a set of anaerobic batch tests were performed to determine the resulting biogas and methane potential of the spent liquor. Hydrochar yields followed a decreasing trend with the increasing temperature, whereas reaction time had no considerably effect on the yield. The evolution of the H/C and O/C atomic ratios from the raw material to the hydrochars suggested that dehydration reactions prevail during HTC. The hydrochars tended to become enriched in Ca, Mg and P minerals by increasing HTC temperature. The heavy metal contents in hydrochars were found below limits and no PAH compound was detected. Anaerobic digestion tests showed that the aqueous phase from HTC can be used as feedstocks for biogas production. PMID:26226579

  12. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome

    PubMed Central

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na+). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L?1 day?1 organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the “ML635J-40 aquatic group” while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  13. Structures of microbial communities found in anaerobic batch runs that produce methane from propionic acid-Seeded from full-scale anaerobic digesters above a certain threshold.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong; Shin, Seung Gu; Han, Gyuseong; Cho, Kyungjin; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2015-11-20

    The volatile fatty acid propionate inhibits anaerobic digestion during organic waste treatments. To examine potential microbial interactions that accelerate propionate oxidation, anaerobic digestion systems seeded with various types of anaerobic sludge were analyzed. Seed samples were collected from 10 different full-scale anaerobic reactors in South Korea. Propionate oxidation was estimated as the methane production rate per gram of propionate used per day. Two domestic sewage sludge showed the highest methane production rate values, 109.1±4.2 and 74.5±8.6mL CH4/(g propionate?d). A food waste recycling wastewater source exhibited the lowest methane production rate, 33.2±2.6mL CH4/(g propionate?d). To investigate how the microbial community structure affected propionate oxidation, qualitative molecular analyses were carried out using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Methanosaeta concilii, an aceticlastic methanogen, was detected in most batch runs. Smithella propionica, a unique propionate oxidizer and simultaneous producer of acetate, was found in domestic sewage sludge sources showing the highest methane production rate; in contrast, Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis, a sulfate reducer coupled with the consumption of acetate to be used as a precursor of methane, was observed in food waste recycling wastewater sludge source showing the lowest methane production rate. Thus, we propose that S. propionica, a syntrophic acetate producer using propionate, might cooperate with aceticlastic methanogens for high methane production during anaerobic digestion that included propionate. PMID:26450560

  14. Comparison of various microbial inocula for the efficient anaerobic digestion of Laminaria hyperborea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The hydrolysis of seaweed polysaccharides is the rate limiting step in anaerobic digestion (AD) of seaweeds. Seven different microbial inocula and a mixture of these (inoculum 8) were therefore compared in triplicate, each grown over four weeks in static culture for the ability to degrade Laminaria hyperborea seaweed and produce methane through AD. Results All the inocula could degrade L. hyperborea and produce methane to some extent. However, an inoculum of slurry from a human sewage anaerobic digester, one of rumen contents from seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep and inoculum 8 used most seaweed volatile solids (VS) (means ranged between 59 and 68% used), suggesting that these each had efficient seaweed polysaccharide digesting bacteria. The human sewage inoculum, an inoculum of anaerobic marine mud mixed with rotting seaweed and inoculum 8 all developed to give higher volumes of methane (means between 41 and 62.5 ml g-1 of seaweed VS by week four) ,compared to other inocula (means between 3.5 and 27.5 ml g-1 VS). Inoculum 8 also gave the highest acetate production (6.5 mmol g-1 VS) in a single-stage fermenter AD system and produced most methane (8.4 mL mmol acetate-1) in phase II of a two-stage AD system. Conclusions Overall inoculum 8 was found to be the most efficient inoculum for AD of seaweed. The study therefore showed that selection and inclusion of efficient polysaccharide hydrolysing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in an inoculum offer increased methane productivity in AD of L. hyperborea. This inoculum will now being tested in larger scale (10L) continuously stirred reactors optimised for feed rate and retention time to determine maximum methane production under single-stage and two-stage AD systems. PMID:24456825

  15. Effects of lipid concentration on anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yifei; Wang, Dian; Yan, Jiao; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Tianle

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Lipid in municipal biomass would not inhibited the anaerobic digestion process. • A lipid concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. • The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with the increasing of the lipid contents. • Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process. - Abstract: The influence of the lipid concentration on the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste-activated sludge was assessed by biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests and by bench-scale tests in a mesophilic semi-continuous stirred tank reactor. The effect of increasing the volatile solid (VS) concentration of lipid from 0% to 75% was investigated. BMP tests showed that lipids in municipal biomass waste could enhance the methane production. The results of bench-scale tests showed that a lipids concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. Methane yields increased with increasing lipid concentration when lipid concentrations were below 60%, but when lipid concentration was set as 65% or higher, methane yields decreased sharply. When lipid concentrations were below 60%, the pH values were in the optimum range for the growth of methanogenic bacteria and the ratios of volatile fatty acid (VFA)/alkalinity were in the range of 0.2–0.6. When lipid concentrations exceeded 65%, the pH values were below 5.2, the reactor was acidized and the values of VFA/alkalinity rose to 2.0. The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with increasing lipid content. Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process, thereby inhibiting anaerobic digestion.

  16. Treatment of anaerobic digestion effluent of sewage sludge using soilless cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchimura, Koki; Sago, Yuki; Kamahara, Hirotsugu; Atsuta, Yoichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2014-02-01

    Soilless cultivation was carried out using anaerobic digestion effluent of sewage sludge as liquid fertilizer, with a preparation which cultures microorganisms in nutrient solution. As a result, ammonium ions contained in the effluent were nitrified into nitrate ions by the microorganisms. And then, Japanese mustard spinach (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) was cultivated by soilless cultivation system. The plants were grown well using microbial nutrient solution, which similar to the plants using conventional inorganic nutrient solution. In contrast, the plants were grown poorly using the effluent as liquid fertilizer without microorganisms.

  17. Effects of mechanical treatment of digestate after anaerobic digestion on the degree of degradation.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the biogas production from different substrates by applying a mechanical treatment only to the non-degraded digestate after the fermentation process in order to feed it back into the process. To evaluate this approach, digestates were grounded with a ball mill for four different treatment time periods (0, 2, 5, 10 min) and then the effects on the particle size, volatile organic substances, methane yield and degradation kinetic were measured. A decrease of volatile fatty acids based on this treatment was not detected. The mechanical treatment caused in maximum to a triplication of the methane yield and to a quadruplicating of the daily methane production. PMID:25451773

  18. Effects of thermobarical pretreatment of cattle waste as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Budde, Jörn; Heiermann, Monika; Quiñones, Teresa Suárez; Plöchl, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    Lab-scale experiments were conducted to assess the impact of thermobarical treatment of cattle waste on anaerobic digestion. Treatment was at temperatures of 140-220°C in 20K steps for a 5-min duration. Methane yields could be increased by up to 58% at a treatment temperature of 180°C. At 220°C the abundance of inhibitors and other non-digestible substances led to lower methane yields than those obtained from untreated material. In an extended analysis it could be demonstrated that there is a functional correlation between the methane yields after 30 days and the formation rate and methane yield in the acceleration phase. It could be proved in a regression of these correlation values that the optimum treatment temperature is 164°C and that the minimum treatment temperature should be above 115°C. PMID:24238801

  19. Dairy manure resource recovery utilizing two-stage anaerobic digestion - Implications of solids fractionation.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Edmond J; Coats, Erik R; Brinkman, Cynthia K

    2015-12-01

    Dairy manure management is increasingly becoming an environmental challenge. In this regard, manure anaerobic digestion (AD) can be applied to address environmental concerns; however, dairy manure AD remains economically uncompetitive. Ongoing research is focused on enhanced resource recovery from manure, including maximizing AD methane yield through a novel multi-stage AD configuration. Research presented herein centered on the hypothesis that separately digesting fine and coarse solids from fermented dairy manure would improve methane production; the hypothesis was disproven. While maximum methane concentration was realized on fine solids, combined solids AD yielded enhanced VS destruction. The diverse combined-solids substrate enriched for a more heterogeneous bacterial/archaeal consortium that balanced fermentation and methanogenesis to yield maximum product (methane). However, results suggest that targeted AD of the fat-rich fine solids could be a more optimal approach for processing manure; alternate (non-AD) methods could then be applied to extract value from the fibrous fraction. PMID:26398667

  20. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage. PMID:26094194

  1. Microwave Thermal Hydrolysis Of Sewage Sludge As A Pretreatment Stage For Anaerobic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, W.; Wang, W.; Xun, R.

    2008-02-01

    This article focuses on the effects of microwave thermal hydrolysis on sewage sludge anaerobic digestion. Volatile suspended solid (VSS) and COD solubilization of treated sludge were investigated. It was found that the microwave hydrolysis provided a rapid and efficient process to release organics from sludge. The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min. The effect of the VSS solubilization was mainly dependent on temperature. The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio, 36.4%, was obtained at 170 °C for 30 min. COD dissolving ratio was about 25% at 170 °C. BMP test of excess sludge and mixture of primary and excess sludge proved the increase of methane production. Total biogas production of microwave treated mixture sludge increased by 12.9% to 20.2% over control after 30 days digestion. For excess sludge, biogas production was 11.1% to 25.9% higher than untreated sludge.

  2. Anaerobic model for high-solids or high-temperature digestion - additional pathway of acetate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wett, B; Takács, I; Batstone, D; Wilson, C; Murthy, S

    2014-01-01

    Current anaerobic digestion models cannot properly simulate processes that are operated under high solids concentrations or high temperatures. A modification to existing models has been implemented by adding important missing degradation pathways, to accommodate these systems without artificially recalibrating the model parameters. Specifically, we implemented the alternate acetate oxidizing mechanism that is more tolerant to ammonia than the standard aceticlastic pathway. Inhibition values were estimated and an empirical function has been used to apply ammonia inhibition. The model also relates metabolic activity to un-ionised species such as undissociated acetic acid as substrate (although not obligatory for all organisms) and unionised ammonia as inhibitor. The model relies on an equilibrium chemistry module (e.g. including the phosphate buffer), resulting in more accurate pH predictions, which is crucial for proper modeling of CO2 and NH3 stripping. Calibration results from three case-studies modeling thermal hydrolysis and subsequent digestion of sludge are presented. PMID:24759522

  3. Importance of heat transfer in an anaerobic digestion plant in a continental climate context.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Gérard; Kohler, François; Bouvier, Maele; Lissolo, Thierry; Boileau, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    Investigation on the sensivity to temperature variations has been achieved on a full-scale experimental dairy wastewater treatment plant including an unheated but insulated upflow anaerobic sludge blanket. A simple steady-state heat transfer model based on energy balance has been designed to forecast the biogas production depending on ambient air and dairy wastewater temperatures variations. Energy balance has been described for any part of the digestion plant. Calculated heat losses were in the same range than observed losses with an uncertainty of about 10%. From the equalization tank to the digester the average heat loss under cold period was close to 10°C due to convection and conduction. Mesophilic conditions are not respected for couples of ambient air and wastewater temperatures ranging respectively from 8-35 to 35-29°C. Technical solutions are suggested to increase the biogas production. PMID:22989635

  4. Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

  5. Multiple approaches to characterize the microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digester running on swine manure: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Chang, Yi-Chia; Yu, Chang-Ping; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the first survey of microbial community in thermophilic anaerobic digester using swine manure as sole feedstock was performed by multiple approaches including denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library and pyrosequencing techniques. The integrated analysis of 21 DGGE bands, 126 clones and 8506 pyrosequencing read sequences revealed that Clostridia from the phylum Firmicutes account for the most dominant Bacteria. In addition, our analysis also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous researches, including members of the bacterial phyla Synergistetes, Planctomycetes, Armatimonadetes, Chloroflexi and Nitrospira which might also play a role in thermophilic anaerobic digester. Most archaeal 16S rRNA sequences could be assigned to the order Methanobacteriales instead of Methanomicrobiales comparing to previous studies. In addition, this study reported that the member of Methanothermobacter genus was firstly found in thermophilic anaerobic digester. PMID:24629524

  6. A new multiple-stage electrocoagulation process on anaerobic digestion effluent to simultaneously reclaim water and clean up biogas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Stromberg, David; Liu, Xuming; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-21

    A new multiple-stage treatment process was developed via integrating electrocoagulation with biogas pumping to simultaneously reclaim anaerobic digestion effluent and clean up biogas. The 1st stage of electrocoagulation treatment under the preferred reaction condition led to removal efficiencies of 30%, 81%, 37% and >99.9% for total solids, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively. Raw biogas was then used as a reactant and pumped into the effluent to simultaneously neutralize pH of the effluent and remove H2S in the biogas. The 2nd stage of electrocoagulation treatment on the neutralized effluent showed that under the selected reaction condition, additional 60% and 10% of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand were further removed. The study concluded a dual-purpose approach for the first time to synergistically combine biogas purification and water reclamation for anaerobic digestion system, which well addresses the downstream challenges of anaerobic digestion technology. PMID:25540943

  7. Mass and Energy Balances of Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion Treating Swine Manure Mixed with Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Jining; Zou, Guoyan; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of swine manure treatment by a proposed Dry Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (DT-AD) system, we evaluated the methane yield of swine manure treated using a DT-AD method with rice straw under different C/N ratios and solid retention time (SRT) and calculated the mass and energy balances when the DT-AD system is used for swine manure treatment from a model farm with 1000 pigs and the digested residue is used for forage rice production. A traditional swine manure treatment Oxidation Ditch system was used as the study control. The results suggest that methane yield using the proposed DT-AD system increased with a higher C/N ratio and shorter SRT. Correspondently, for the DT-AD system running with SRT of 80 days, the net energy yields for all treatments were negative, due to low biogas production and high heat loss of digestion tank. However, the biogas yield increased when the SRT was shortened to 40 days, and the generated energy was greater than consumed energy when C/N ratio was 20 : 1 and 30 : 1. The results suggest that with the correct optimization of C/N ratio and SRT, the proposed DT-AD system, followed by using digestate for forage rice production, can attain energy self-sufficiency. PMID:26609436

  8. Potential for methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of swine manure with winery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Riaño, B; Molinuevo, B; García-González, M C

    2011-03-01

    This work examines the methane production potential for the anaerobic co-digestion of swine manure (SM) with winery wastewater (WW). Batch and semi-continuous experiments were carried out under mesophilic conditions. Batch experiments revealed that the highest specific methane yield was 348 mL CH(4)g(-1) COD added, obtained at 85.4% of WW and 0.7 g COD g(-1)VS. Specific methane yield from SM alone was 27 mL CH(4)g(-1) COD added d(-1). Furthermore, specific methane yields were 49, 87 and 107 mL CH(4)g(-1) COD added d(-1) for the reactors co-digesting mixtures with 10% WW, 25% WW and 40% WW, respectively. Co-digestion with 40% WW improved the removal efficiencies up to 52% (TCOD), 132% (SCOD) and 61% (VSS) compared to SM alone. These results suggest that methane can be produced very efficiently by the co-digestion of swine manure with winery wastewater. PMID:21232936

  9. Characterization of microbial community structure during continuous anaerobic digestion of straw and cow manure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Schnürer, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Responses of bacterial and archaeal communities to the addition of straw during anaerobic digestion of manure at different temperatures (37°C, 44°C and 52°C) were investigated using five laboratory-scale semi-continuous stirred tank reactors. The results revealed that including straw as co-substrate decreased the species richness for bacteria, whereas increasing the operating temperature decreased the species richness for both archaea and bacteria, and also the evenness of the bacteria. Taxonomic classifications of the archaeal community showed that Methanobrevibacter dominated in the manure samples, while Methanosarcina dominated in all digesters regardless of substrate. Increase of the operating temperature to 52°C led to increased relative abundance of Methanoculleus and Methanobacterium. Among the bacteria, the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated within all samples. Compared with manure itself, digestion of manure resulted in a higher abundance of an uncultured class WWE1 and lower abundance of Bacilli. Adding straw to the digesters increased the level of Bacteroidia, while increasing the operating temperature decreased the level of this class and instead increased the relative abundance of an uncultured genus affiliated to order MBA08 (Clostridia). A considerable fraction of bacterial sequences could not be allocated to genus level, indicating that novel phylotypes are resident in these communities. PMID:26152665

  10. Dry anaerobic digestion of cow dung for methane production: effect of mixing.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ajay Kumar; Li, Jianzheng; Ban, Qiaoying; Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Bowei

    2012-12-01

    The performance characteristics of a dry batch reactor with a blender treating cow dung has been evaluated for 35 days in a single-stage batch reactor of 3 L effective volume at 35 +/- 1 degree C to investigate the effect of continuous-mixing on biogas production and organic materials removal. The results showed that the performance of unmixed and mixed digesters was quite different and the dry digester with mixing system produced methane of 0.358 LCH4/gVS(r) which was 7.50% higher than that for unmixed digester. Moreover, the organic material removal efficiency was increased by 9.73% in term of VS. The wide diversity of prominent bacteria and methanogenic archaea affiliated with all steps along the anaerobic degradation pathway made the process stable. But the dry digester with mixing system during start up was not beneficial, as it resulted in relatively higher volatile fatty acids, higher volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio, lower pH and consequently prolonged start up time. PMID:24261113

  11. Conversion of phenols during anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste--a review of important microorganisms and impact of temperature.

    PubMed

    Levén, Lotta; Nyberg, Karin; Schnürer, Anna

    2012-03-01

    During anaerobic digestion of organic waste, both energy-rich biogas and a nutrient-rich digestate are produced. The digestate can be used as a fertiliser in agricultural soils if the levels of hazardous compounds and pathogens are low. This article reviews the main findings about phenols in anaerobic digestion processes degrading organic solid wastes, and examines the effect of process temperature on the anaerobic degradation of phenols, the microbial community and the quality of the digestate. The degradation efficiency of a number of different phenols has been shown to be correlated to the process temperature. Higher degradation efficiency is observed at mesophilic process temperature than at thermophilic temperature. Possible explanations for this variation in the degradation of phenols include differences in diversity, particularly of the phenol-degrading bacteria, and/or the presence of temperature-sensitive enzymes. Chemical analysis of digestate from bioreactors operating at thermophilic temperature detected a higher content of phenols compared to mesophilic bioreactors, verifying the degradation results. Digestate with the highest phenol content has the greatest negative impact on soil microbial activity. PMID:21050654

  12. Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A, GRAETZ, AND K. R. REDDY2

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Decomposition of Fresh and Anaerobically Digested Plant Biomass in Soil1 K. K. MOORHEAD, D. A for soil are often determined by nutrient-release potential dur- ing decomposition. The N decomposition of anaerobically digested sewage sludge (Miller, 1974; Tester et al., 1977). Much of the available

  13. Optimisation of sewage sludge anaerobic digestion through co-digestion with OFMSW: Effect of collection system and particle size.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Gracia; Bonmatí, August; Fernández, Belén

    2015-09-01

    The effect of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) loading rate and particulate size on the sewage sludge (SS) mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion was assessed in continuous stirred tank reactor at hydraulic retention time of 20days. The SS-OFMSW mixture composed by 54% of the volatile solids fed (inlet-VS), at OLR of 3.1kgCODm(-3)d(-1) (1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1)), showed the highest increment on the volumetric methane production and yield of +200% and +59% respectively, under stable conditions. The effect of particulate size was assessed with the same mixture and same operational conditions but reducing the OFMSW particulate size from 20mm to 8mm with the aim to improve the hydrolysis step, but the results showed any influence in the OFMSW particulate size range analysed. In addition, specific biomass activity was assessed at the end of each co-digestion period. Results showed that OFMSW promoted ?-oxidation syntrophic acetogens and the acetoclastic methanogens activity; although the last increase of the OFMSW percentage (from 47% to 54% inlet-VS) affected negatively the specific substrate activity, but not inhibitory effect was observed. Therefore, the results obtained in the continuous experiment could be related with some inhibitory or toxic effect and not due to hydrolysis limitation. The specific biomass activity test was demonstrated to be an interesting tool to evaluate and control the co-digestion process, especially when conventional parameters did not explain the behaviour of the biological system. PMID:26139136

  14. Deterministic processes guide long-term synchronised population dynamics in replicate anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D; Dennis, Paul G; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    A replicate long-term experiment was conducted using anaerobic digestion (AD) as a model process to determine the relative role of niche and neutral theory on microbial community assembly, and to link community dynamics to system performance. AD is performed by a complex network of microorganisms and process stability relies entirely on the synergistic interactions between populations belonging to different functional guilds. In this study, three independent replicate anaerobic digesters were seeded with the same diverse inoculum, supplied with a model substrate, ?-cellulose, and operated for 362 days at a 10-day hydraulic residence time under mesophilic conditions. Selective pressure imposed by the operational conditions and model substrate caused large reproducible changes in community composition including an overall decrease in richness in the first month of operation, followed by synchronised population dynamics that correlated with changes in reactor performance. This included the synchronised emergence and decline of distinct Ruminococcus phylotypes at day 148, and emergence of a Clostridium and Methanosaeta phylotype at day 178, when performance became stable in all reactors. These data suggest that many dynamic functional niches are predictably filled by phylogenetically coherent populations over long time scales. Neutral theory would predict that a complex community with a high degree of recognised functional redundancy would lead to stochastic changes in populations and community divergence over time. We conclude that deterministic processes may play a larger role in microbial community dynamics than currently appreciated, and under controlled conditions it may be possible to reliably predict community structural and functional changes over time. PMID:24739627

  15. Impact of ozone assisted ultrasonication pre-treatment on anaerobic digestibility of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinbo; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Lin, Li Leonard; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-07-01

    Impact of ultrasonication (ULS) and ultrasonication-ozonation (ULS-Ozone) pre-treatment on the anaerobic digestibility of sewage sludge was investigated with semi-continuous anaerobic reactors at solid retention time (SRT) of 10 and 20 days. The control, ULS and ULS-Ozone reactors produced 256, 309 and 348 mL biogas/g CODfed and the volatile solid (VS) removals were 35.6%, 38.3% and 42.1%, respectively at SRT of 10 days. At SRT of 20 days, the biogas yields reached 313, 337 and 393 mL biogas/g CODfed and the VS removal rates were 37.3%, 40.9% and 45.3% in the control, ULS and ULS-Ozone reactors, respectively. ULS-Ozone pre-treatment increased the residual organic amount in the digested sludge. These soluble residual organics were found to contain macromolecules with molecular weights (MW) larger than 500 kDa and smaller polymeric products with MW around 19.4 and 7.7 kDa. These compounds were further characterized to be humic acid-like substances with fluorescent spectroscopy analysis. PMID:26141875

  16. Mesophilic versus thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure: methane productivity and microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Moset, Veronica; Poulsen, Morten; Wahid, Radziah; Højberg, Ole; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    In this study, productivity and physicochemical and microbiological (454 sequencing) parameters, as well as environmental criteria, were investigated in anaerobic reactors to contribute to the ongoing debate about the optimal temperature range for treating animal manure, and expand the general knowledge on the relation between microbiological and physicochemical process indicators. For this purpose, two reactor sizes were used (10?m(3) and 16?l), in which two temperature conditions (35°C and 50°C) were tested. In addition, the effect of the hydraulic retention time was evaluated (16 versus 20 days). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion showed higher organic matter degradation (especially fiber), higher pH and higher methane (CH?) yield, as well as better percentage of ultimate CH? yield retrieved and lower residual CH? emission, when compared with mesophilic conditions. In addition, lower microbial diversity was found in the thermophilic reactors, especially for Bacteria, where a clear intensification towards Clostridia class members was evident. Independent of temperature, some similarities were found in digestates when comparing with animal manure, including low volatile fatty acids concentrations and a high fraction of Euryarchaeota in the total microbial community, in which members of Methanosarcinales dominated for both temperature conditions; these indicators could be considered a sign of process stability. PMID:25737010

  17. A review: factors affecting excess sludge anaerobic digestion for volatile fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Li, Xiaoshuai; Jia, Shuting; Dai, Lingling; Zhao, Jianfu; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of methods that improve the production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) from excess sludge during the anaerobic digestion process. These methods are mainly divided into two approaches. The first approach is located in the pre-treatment methods, which change the properties of the substrates, such as thermal pre-treatment, alkaline pre-treatment, microwave pre-treatment and ultrasonic pre-treatment. The other approach is found in the fermentation process control methods, which influence the environment of anaerobic digestion for the production of VFA, such as pH, temperature, mixing, additives and solids retention time control. In the text recent research studies of each method are listed and analyzed in detail. Comparably, microwave and ultrasonic pre-treatment methods are considered emerging and promising technologies due to their efficiency and environmentally friendly characteristics. However, the microwave pre-treatment has high electricity demand, which might make the process economically unfeasible. In order to calculate optimal operation, further studies still need to be done. PMID:26287825

  18. Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) anaerobic digestion and related processes, odour and health effects study.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, J R; Adams, G; Cain, W; Cometto-Muniz, E; Forbes, B; Hentz, L; Novack, J T; Higgins, M; Murthy, S; McEwen, D; Ong, H T; Daigger, G T

    2004-01-01

    Biosolids odour emissions can affect the ability of wastewater utilities to implement beneficial biosolids processing and reuse programs. Communities often become more sensitised and vocal about biosolids issues, once they experience odours emanating from a nearby site. Odour impacts from biosolids, including potential human health effects, have been targeted recently by many national and local newspapers, citizens' groups, and regulatory agencies, who have raised significant concerns, ranging from viable disposal methods/sites to outright bans. Many national and local regulatory agencies in the United States are considering biosolids disposal bans in their communities because of misinformation, poor science, and citizen pressure, but primarily because of odour impact concerns. The wastewater industry has a relatively poor understanding of the operations and treatment parameters that influence biosolids odour emissions. Thus, wastewater treatment plants are often unable to control the odour quality of the biosolids that are delivered into communities. A research study to demonstrate the influence of anaerobic digestion, mechanical dewatering, and storage design and operating parameters on the odour quality of the final product was performed and is the subject of this paper. Established and new sampling and analytical methods were used to measure biosolids odour emissions from 11 test sites in North America. By determining the impacts of these control variables on biosolids odour quality, design and operations of anaerobic digestion systems might be enhanced. This paper also summarises a corollary study performed as part of the WERF research study that addresses the health effects of biosolids odours. PMID:15484737

  19. Environmental assessment of anaerobically digested sludge reuse in agriculture: potential impacts of emerging micropollutants.

    PubMed

    Hospido, Almudena; Carballa, Marta; Moreira, Maite; Omil, Francisco; Lema, Juan M; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    2010-05-01

    Agricultural application of sewage sludge has been emotionally discussed in the last decades, because the latter contains organic micropollutants with unknown fate and risk potential. In this work, the reuse of anaerobically digested sludge in agriculture is evaluated from an environmental point of view by using Life Cycle Assessment methodology. More specifically, the potential impacts of emerging micropollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, present in the sludge have been quantified. Four scenarios were considered according to the temperature of the anaerobic digestion (mesophilic or thermophilic) and the sludge retention time (20 or 10d), and they have been compared with the non-treated sludge. From an environmental point of view, the disposal of undigested sludge is not the most suitable alternative, except for global warming due to the dominance (65-85%) of the indirect emissions associated to the electricity use. Nutrient-related direct emissions dominate the eutrophication category impact in all the scenarios (>71.4%), although a beneficial impact related to the avoidance of industrial fertilisers production is also quantified (up to 6.7%). In terms of human and terrestrial toxicity, the direct emissions of heavy metals to soil dominate these two impact categories (>70%), and the contribution of other micropollutants is minimal. Moreover, only six (Galaxolide, Tonalide, Diazepam, Ibuprofen, Sulfamethoxazole and 17alpha-ethinyloestradiol) out of the 13 substances considered are really significant since they account for more than 95% of the overall micropollutants impact. PMID:20347114

  20. Comparison of anaerobic digestion characteristics and kinetics of four livestock manures with different substrate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Liu, Ronghou; Sun, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic digestions of pig manure (PM), dairy manure (DM), chicken manure (CM) and rabbit manure (RM) at initial volatile solid loading (VSL) of 8gVS/L, 16gVS/L, 32g VS/L, 64g VS/L were investigated under mesophilic conditions. The maximum methane yields of 410, 270, 377 and 323mL CH4/gVSadded for PM, DM, CM and RM were all obtained at initial VSL of 8gVS/L, respectively. The improvement of substrate concentration to 64gVS/L not only decreased the methane yield and biodegradability both by 22.4%, 37.3%, 49.1% and 34.6% for PM, DM, CM and RM respectively, but also reduced the methane content in final biogas production. The Cone model (R(2): 0.9910-0.9974) showed a better fit to the experiment data and the calculated parameters indicated that anaerobic digestion of manures at higher loading has longer lag phase and lower hydrolysis rate. PMID:26386415

  1. Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1.

    PubMed

    Motelica-Wagenaar, Anne Marieke; Nauta, Arjen; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2014-08-01

    The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from in vitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production in vitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different in vitro model: an in vitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for in vitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon. PMID:24880006

  2. Utilisation of wastewater nutrients for microalgae growth for anaerobic co-digestion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ashish K; Siljudalen, Jon; Trydal, Tina; Rusten, Bjørn

    2013-06-15

    The feasibility of growing microalgae in natural light using wastewater high in nutrients (N & P) for the production of more bioenergy was examined. The main retrofitting unit would be a photobioreactor for wastewater treatment plants (wwtp) having anaerobic digesters in close proximity. Theoretical microalgae production rates from different wastewater sources (municipal wwtp, source separation of human and animal wastewaters) were estimated using mass balance. Mass and energy balances for a conventional wwtp using chemically enhanced primary treatment was investigated for microalgae growth for a situation limited by availability of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated onsite and where additional CO2 was imported from outside source. Reject water from dewatering of anaerobically digested sludge from four wwtp around Oslo region were pretreated for improved light penetration and examined for microalgae growth. Several pre-treatment methods were investigated. Pretreatment using flocculation + settling + anthracite filtration yielded high light transmittance. A maximum microalgae growth rate of 13 g TSS/m(2)-d was achieved using this pretreated reject water. The challenges of integrating photobioreactors with existing units have been highlighted. PMID:23570973

  3. Mesophilic versus thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure: methane productivity and microbial ecology

    PubMed Central

    Moset, Veronica; Poulsen, Morten; Wahid, Radziah; Højberg, Ole; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    In this study, productivity and physicochemical and microbiological (454 sequencing) parameters, as well as environmental criteria, were investigated in anaerobic reactors to contribute to the ongoing debate about the optimal temperature range for treating animal manure, and expand the general knowledge on the relation between microbiological and physicochemical process indicators. For this purpose, two reactor sizes were used (10?m3 and 16?l), in which two temperature conditions (35°C and 50°C) were tested. In addition, the effect of the hydraulic retention time was evaluated (16 versus 20 days). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion showed higher organic matter degradation (especially fiber), higher pH and higher methane (CH4) yield, as well as better percentage of ultimate CH4 yield retrieved and lower residual CH4 emission, when compared with mesophilic conditions. In addition, lower microbial diversity was found in the thermophilic reactors, especially for Bacteria, where a clear intensification towards Clostridia class members was evident. Independent of temperature, some similarities were found in digestates when comparing with animal manure, including low volatile fatty acids concentrations and a high fraction of Euryarchaeota in the total microbial community, in which members of Methanosarcinales dominated for both temperature conditions; these indicators could be considered a sign of process stability. PMID:25737010

  4. Effect of different pH-values on process parameters in two-phase anaerobic digestion of high-solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In many publications, primary fermentation is described as a limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of fibre-rich biomass [Eastman JA, Ferguson JF. Solubilization of particulacte carbon during the anaerobic digeston. J WPCF. 1981;53:352-366; Noike T, Endo G, Chang J, Yaguchi J, Matsumoto J. Characteristics of carbohydrate degradation and the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. Biotechnol Bioeng. 1985;27:1482-1489; Arntz HJ, Stoppok E, Buchholz K. Anaerobic hydroysis of beet pulp-discontiniuous experiments. Biotechnol Lett. 1985;7:113-118]. The microorganisms of the primary fermentation process differ widely from the methanogenic microorganisms [Pohland FG, Ghosh S. Developments in anaerobic stabilization of organic wastes-the two-phase concept. Environ Lett. 1971;1:255-266]. To optimize the biogas process, a separation in two phases is suggested by many authors [Fox P, Pohland GK. Anaerobic treatment applications and fundamentals: substrate specificity during phase separation. Water Environ Res. 1994;66:716-724; Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580]. To carry out the examination, a two-phase laboratory-scale biogas plant was established, with a physical phase separation. In previous studies, the regulation of the pH-value during the acid formation was usually carried out by the addition of sodium hydroxide [Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580; Ueno Y, Tatara M, Fukui H, Makiuchi T, Goto M, Sode K. Production of hydrogen and methane from organic solid wastes by phase separation of anaerobic process. Bioresour Technol. 2007;98:1861-1865; Zoetemeyer RJ, van den Heuvel JC, Cohen A. pH influence on acidogenic dissimilation of glucose in an anaerobic digestor. Water Res. 1982;16:303-311]. A new technology without the use of additives was developed in which the pH-regulation is executed by the pH-dependent recycling of effluent from the anaerobic filter into the acidification reactor. During this investigation, the influence of the different target pH-values (5.5, 6.0, 7.0 and 7.5) on the degradation rate, the gas composition and the methane yield of the substrate maize silage was determined. With an increase in the target pH-value from 5.5 to 7.5, the acetic acid equivalent decreased by 88.1% and the chemical oxygen demand-concentration by 18.3% in the hydrolysate. In response, there was a 58% increase in the specific methane yield of the overall system. Contrary to earlier studies, a marked increase in biogas production and in substrate degradation was determined with increasing pH-values. However, these led to a successive approximation of a single-phase process. Based on these results, pH-values above 7.0 seem to be favourable for the digestion of fibre-rich substrates. PMID:25413114

  5. Bioenergy from stillage anaerobic digestion to enhance the energy balance ratio of ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Garcia, Marcelo Loureiro

    2015-10-01

    The challenges associated with the availability of fossil fuels in the past decades intensified the search for alternative energy sources, based on an ever-increasing demand for energy. In this context, the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) as a core treatment technology in industrial plants should be highlighted, since this process combines the pollution control of wastewaters and the generation of bioenergy, based on the conversion of the organic fraction to biogas, a methane-rich gaseous mixture that may supply the energetic demands in industrial plants. In this context, this work aimed at assessing the energetic potential of AD applied to the treatment of stillage, the main wastewater from ethanol production, in an attempt to highlight the improvements in the energy balance ratio of ethanol by inserting the heating value of methane as a bioenergy source. At least 5-15% of the global energy consumption in the ethanol industry could be supplied by the energetic potential of stillage, regardless the feedstock (i.e. sugarcane, corn or cassava). The association between bagasse combustion and stillage anaerobic digestion in sugarcane-based distilleries could provide a bioenergy surplus of at least 130% of the total fossil fuel input into the ethanol plant, considering only the energy from methane. In terms of financial aspects, the economic gains could reach US$ 0.1901 and US$ 0.0512 per liter of produced ethanol, respectively for molasses- (Brazil) and corn-based (EUA) production chains. For large-scale (?1000 m(3)EtOH per day) Brazilian molasses-based plants, an annual economic gain of up to US$ 70 million could be observed. Considering the association between anaerobic and aerobic digestion, for the scenarios analyzed, at least 25% of the energetic potential of stillage would be required to supply the energy consumption with aeration, however, more suitable effluents for agricultural application could be produced. The main conclusion from this work indicates that anaerobic processes should be considered the core technology to treat stillage, based mainly on the attractive relation energy generation-financial return and on the possibility to keep the advantages inherent to the common fertigation when using the treated effluent in agriculture. PMID:26233583

  6. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in an electric-anaerobic system to increase methane production from sludge digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Wang, Liying; Quan, Xie

    2015-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species is an alternative to interspecies hydrogen transfer (IHT) in anaerobic digester, which however has not been established in anaerobic sludge digestion as well as in bioelectrochemical systems yet. In this study, it was found that over 50% of methane production of an electric-anaerobic sludge digester was resulted from unknown pathway. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Geobacter species were significantly enriched with electrodes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) further confirmed that the dominant Geobacter species enriched belonged to Geobacter metallireducens. Together with Methanosaeta species prevailing in the microbial communities, the direct electron exchange between Geobacter species and Methanosaeta species might be an important reason for the “unknown” increase of methane production. Conductivity of the sludge in this electric-anaerobic digester was about 30% higher than that of the sludge in a control digester without electrodes. This study not only revealed for the first time that DIET might be the important mechanism on the methanogenesis of bioelectrochemical system, but also provided a new method to enhance DIET by means of bioelectric enrichment of Geobacter species. PMID:26057581

  7. Effects of sulfide on the integration of denitrification with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhixuan; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The effects of sulfide on the integration of denitrification with anaerobic digestion using anaerobic effluents of cassava stillage as carbon source were investigated. Batch tests indicated that nitrate reduction efficiencies decreased from 96.5% to 15.8% as sulfide/nitrate (S/NO3(-)-N) ratios increased from 0.27 to 1.60. At low S/NO3(-)-N ratios (0.27-1.08) anaerobic acidogenesis was accelerated. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite via sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification, after which the formed nitrite and residual nitrate were converted to N2 via heterotrophic denitrification. Increases in the S/NO3(-)-N ratio (1.60) caused a shift (76.3%) in the nitrate reduction pathway from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). Sulfide concentrations (S/NO3(-)-N ratio of 1.60) suppressed not only heterotrophic denitrification but also acidogenesis. The potentially toxic effect of sulfide on acid production was mitigated by its rapid oxidation to sulfur, allowing the recovery of acidogenesis. PMID:25801462

  8. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  9. Impact of metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles on wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Chiqian; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials have been increasingly used in consumer products (e.g. sunscreen, socks), the medical and electronic industries, and environmental remediation. Many of them ultimately enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) or landfills. This review paper discusses the fate and potential effects of four types of nanoparticles, namely, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), nano ZnO, nano TiO2, and nano zero valent iron (NZVI), on waste/wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion. The stabilities and chemical properties of these nanoparticles (NPs) result in significant differences in antimicrobial activities. Analysis of published data of metallic and metal oxide NPs suggests that oxygen is often a prerequisite for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for AgNPs and NZVI, while illumination is necessary for ROS generation for nano TiO2 and nano ZnO. Furthermore, such nanoparticles are capable of being oxidized or dissolved in water and can release metal ions, leading to metal toxicity. Therefore, AgNPs and nano TiO2 are chemically stable NPs that have no adverse effects on microbes under anaerobic conditions. Although the toxicity of nanomaterials has been studied intensively under aerobic conditions, more research is needed to address their fate in anaerobic waste/wastewater treatment systems and their long-term effects on the environment. PMID:24592426

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION Gas-Phase Separations of Protease Digests

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Gas-Phase Separations of Protease Digests Stephen J. Valentine, Anne E University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA A mixture of peptides from a complete tryptic digest of ubiquitin has and identify peptides from a tryptic digest of ubiquitin. The mixture was electrosprayed into the gas phase

  11. Cogeneration system using digester gas for Macon-Bibb county water and sewerage authority

    SciTech Connect

    Priester, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    With rise in energy cost, there is renewed focus on alternate energy sources, and especially sources that previously were not feasible to utilize, but were readily available. One of these is methane gas generated in biomass conversion in wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digestion process. The gas generated has been historically wasted and only used where it has been convenient. Now it is economically feasible to engineer systems to make the best use of the gas. The combination of cogeneration and digester gas utilization is particularly attractive for medium to large wastewater treatment plants. This paper describes the system designed for the Poplar Street Water Pollution Control Plant of the Macon-Bibb County Water and Sewerage Authority. The system consists of gas collection, cleaning and drying systems, storage vessel, and a utilization system of gas turbine generators.

  12. An 'omics' approach towards the characterisation of laboratory scale anaerobic digesters treating municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Beale, D J; Karpe, A V; McLeod, J D; Gondalia, S V; Muster, T H; Othman, M Z; Palombo, E A; Joshi, D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, laboratory scale digesters were operated to simulate potential shocks to the Anaerobic Digestion (AD) process at a 350 ML/day wastewater treatment plant. The shocks included high (42 °C) and low (32 °C) temperature (either side of mesophilic 37 °C) and a 20% loading of fats, oil and grease (FOG; 20% w:v). These variables were explored at two sludge retention times (12 and 20 days) and two organic loading rates (2.0 and 2.5 kgTS/m(3)day OLR). Metagenomic and metabolomic approaches were then used to characterise the impact of operational shocks in regard to temperature and FOG addition, as determined through monitoring of biogas production, the microbial profile and their metabolism. Results showed that AD performance was not greatly affected by temperature shocks, with the biggest impact being a reduction in biogas production at 42 °C that persisted for 32 ± 1 days. The average biogas production across all digesters at the completion of the experiment was 264.1 ± 76.5 mL/day, with FOG addition observed to significantly promote biogas production (+87.8 mL/day). Metagenomic and metabolomic analyses of the digesters indicated that methanogens and methane oxidising bacteria (MOB) were low in relative abundance, and that the ratio of oxidising bacteria (methane, sulphide and sulphate) with respect to sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) had a noticeable influence on biogas production. Furthermore, increased biogas production correlated with an increase in short chain fatty acids, a product of the addition of 20% FOG. This work demonstrates the application of metagenomics and metabolomics to characterise the microbiota and their metabolism in AD digesters, providing insight to the resilience of crucial microbial populations when exposed to operational shocks. PMID:26512813

  13. Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nayono, Satoto E.; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

  14. Identification and quantification of microbial populations in activated sludge and anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Reyes, M; Borrás, L; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2015-01-01

    Eight different phenotypes were studied in an activated sludge process (AeR) and anaerobic digester (AnD) in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant by means of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated FISH quantification software. The phenotypes were ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methanotrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Some findings were unexpected: (a) Presence of PAO, GAO and denitrifiers in the AeR possibly due to unexpected environmental conditions caused by oxygen deficiencies or its ability to survive aerobically; (b) presence of SRB in the AeR due to high sulphate content of wastewater intake and possibly also due to digested sludge being recycled back into the primary clarifier; (c) presence of methanogenic archaea in the AeR, which can be explained by the recirculation of digested sludge and its ability to survive periods of high oxygen levels; (d) presence of denitrifying bacteria in the AnD which cannot be fully explained because the nitrate level in the AnD was not measured. However, other authors reported the existence of denitrifiers in environments where nitrate or oxygen was not present suggesting that denitrifiers can survive in nitrate-free anaerobic environments by carrying out low-level fermentation; (e) the results of this paper are relevant because of the focus on the identification of nearly all the significant bacterial and archaeal groups of microorganisms with a known phenotype involved in the biological wastewater treatment. PMID:25409582

  15. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. PMID:24837280

  16. Evaluation of biodegradability of phenol and bisphenol A during mesophilic and thermophilic municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion using 13C-labeled contaminants.

    PubMed

    Limam, Intissar; Mezni, Mohamed; Guenne, Angéline; Madigou, Céline; Driss, Mohamed Ridha; Bouchez, Théodore; Mazéas, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the isotopic tracing using (13)C-labeled phenol and bisphenol A was used to study their biodegradation during anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. Microcosms were incubated anaerobically at 35 °C (mesophilic conditions) and 55 °C (thermophilic conditions) without steering. A continuous follow-up of the production of biogas (CH(4) and CO(2)), was carried out during 130 d until the establishment of stable methanogenesis. Then (13)C(12)-BPA, and (13)C(6)-phenol were injected in microcosms and the follow-up of their degradation was performed simultaneously by gas chromatography isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C-NMR) Spectroscopy is used in the identification of metabolites. This study proves that the mineralization of phenol to CO(2) and CH(4) occurs during anaerobic digestion both in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions with similar kinetics. In mesophilic condition phenol degradation occurs through the benzoic acid pathway. In thermophilic condition it was not possible to identify the complete metabolic pathway as only acetate was identified as metabolite. Our results suggest that mineralization of phenol under thermophilic condition is instantaneous explaining why metabolites are not observed as they do not accumulate. No biodegradation of BPA was observed. PMID:22985591

  17. Struvite Crystallization of Anaerobic Digestive Fluid of Swine Manure Containing Highly Concentrated Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Oh, Min Hwan; Yang, Seung-Hak; Yoon, Tae Han

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the optimal operation factors for struvite crystallization for removing and recovering nitrogen and phosphorus from anaerobic digestive fluid of swine manure containing highly concentrated nitrogen was determined. Every experiment for the struvite crystallization reaction was conducted by placing 1,000 mL of digestion fluid in a 2,000 mL Erlenmeyer flask at various temperatures, pH, and mixing speed. Except for special circumstances, the digestion fluid was centrifuged (10,000 rpm, 10 min) and then the supernatant was used for the experiment at room temperature and 100 rpm. The optimal mole ratio of PO43?:Mg2+ was 1:1.5, and the pH effect ranging from 9 to 11 was similar, when mixed for 1 hour. Under this condition, the removal efficiency of NH4+-N and PO43?-P was 40% and 88.6%, respectively. X-shaped crystal was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, struvite crystal structure was confirmed through X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:26104412

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and strawberry extrudate under mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Antonio; Siles, José A; Chica, Arturo F; Martín, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    The biomethanization of sewage sludge has several disadvantages such as low methane yield, poor biodegradability and nutrient imbalance. In this paper, a sewage sludge and strawberry extrudate mixture in a proportion of 40:60 (wet weight) is proposed to improve the viability of the process. The addition of an easily biodegradable co-substrate enhanced the nutrient balance and diluted the heavy metals and inhibitors from sewage sludge. Two different experimental set-ups at lab and semi-pilot scale were employed in order to ensure the reproducibility and significance of the obtained values. Co-digestion improved the stability of the process by decreasing the alkalinity to a mean value of 3215 ± 190 mg CaCO?/L, while maintaining the pH within the optimal range for anaerobic digestion. The methane yield coefficient and biodegradability were 176 L/kg VS (total volatile solids) (0°C, 1 atm) and 81% (VS), respectively. Kinetic parameters decreased at the highest loads, suggesting the occurrence of a slowing down phenomenon. A quality organic amendment with a heavy metal content lower than the limits established under European legislation for agricultural applications was obtained from the digestate of the proposed treatment. PMID:25189839

  19. Electrochemical nutrient recovery enables ammonia toxicity control and biogas desulfurization in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Desloover, Joachim; De Vrieze, Jo; Van de Vijver, Maarten; Mortelmans, Jacky; Rozendal, René; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-20

    Organic waste streams can be valorized and reduced in volume with anaerobic digestion (AD). An often-encountered key issue however is the high ammonium (NH4(+)) content of certain waste streams. Ammonia (NH3), in equilibrium with NH4(+), is a toxic compound to the methanogenic community, which limits the organic loading rate and endangers process stability. An electrochemical system (ES) linked to a digester could, besides recovering this nutrient, decrease NH3 toxicity through electrochemical extraction. Therefore, two digesters with and without ES attached in the recirculation loop were operated to test whether the ES could control NH3 toxicity. During periods of high ammonium loading rates, the methane (CH4) production of the ES-coupled reactor was up to 4.5 times higher compared to the control, which could be explained through simultaneous NH4(+) extraction and electrochemical pH control. A nitrogen flux of 47 g N m(–2) membrane d(–1) could be obtained in the ES-coupled reactor, resulting in a current and removal efficiency of 38 ± 5% and 28 ± 2%, respectively, at an electrochemical power input of 17 ± 2 kWh kg(–1) N. The anode also oxidized sulfide, resulting in a significantly lower H2S emission via the biogas. Lastly, limited methanogenic community dynamics pointed to a nonselective influence of the different operational conditions. PMID:25517198

  20. Uncoupling of liquid and solid retention times in anaerobic digestion of catering wastes.

    PubMed

    Climenhaga, M A; Banks, C J

    2008-01-01

    Source-separated food wastes collected from a university campus catering facility were processed in bench-scale anaerobic digesters. The feedstock contained a varied mix of fruits, vegetables, meats and fried foods. Two modes of digestion were compared. The first was hydraulic flush (HF) mode, in which liquids were flushed through the reactor on a retention time of 25 days while solids were maintained on an extended retention time of over 150 days. The converse was a solids wastage (SW) mode, in which liquid retention time was over 150 days, and solids were wasted to maintain a retention time of 25 days. SW reactors exhibited methanogenic failure after approximately 45 days. HF reactors, in contrast, maintained stable digestion for a period of 100 days, and were robust enough to recover from a thermal shock applied over a three-day period in which the temperature was increased from 35 degrees C to 50 degrees C between days 105-108 of the experiment. Stable operation was regained by day 139 and continued until the end of the run on day 150. PMID:19001711

  1. Mixture optimization of anaerobic co-digestion of tomato and cucumber waste.

    PubMed

    Gil, Aida; Siles, José Ángel; Serrano, Antonio; Martín, M Ángeles

    2015-10-01

    Greenhouse cultivation has significantly increased the production of vegetables and reduced dependence on environmental conditions. In Mediterranean areas, vegetable crops are nowadays one of the most important sources of organic waste generation. Anaerobic digestion is among the methods used to treat this type of biodegradable waste. However, the selection of the organic wastes to be subjected to this microbial treatment is a crucial aspect due to seasonality and simultaneity of the original crops. In this sense, as waste does not have frequently the proper nutrient balance, co-digestion with other substrates generated in the same geographical area is recommended to ensure the correct development of the process. This work studies the mesophilic co-digestion of tomato waste (TW) and cucumber waste (CW), which are common greenhouse wastes that do not contain an adequate ratio among nutrients (C/N/P) and are generated simultaneously. The influence of the percentage of both wastes in the mixture on the overall performance of the process was evaluated. The combination of TW and CW was found to be feasible in terms of stability, biodegradability and methane yield, which reached a value of 292?mLSTP?CH4/g?VS (STP: standard temperature and pressure, 0°C and 760?mmHg) for the percentage of tomato in the mixture, which is considered optimal at 55-75%. The most suitable organic load rate was determined for a percentage of 65% of TW, reaching a value of 1562?kgwaste?m(-3)?month(-1). PMID:25896715

  2. CFD investigation of turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluates six turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in a lab-scale anaerobic digestion tank with a pitched blade turbine (PBT) impeller. The models studied are: (1) the standard k-? model, (2) the RNG k-? model, (3) the realizable k-? model, (4) the standard k-? model, (5) the SST k-? model, and (6) the Reynolds stress model. Through comparing power and flow numbers for the PBT impeller obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from the lab specifications, the realizable k-? and the standard k-? models are found to be more appropriate than the other turbulence models. An alternative method to calculate the Reynolds number for the moving zone that characterizes the impeller rotation is proposed to judge the flow regime. To check the effect of the model setup on the predictive accuracy, both discretization scheme and numerical approach are investigated. The model validation is conducted by comparing the simulated velocities with experimental data in a lab-scale digester from literature. Moreover, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale digester with two side-entry impellers is performed to optimize the installation. PMID:21216428

  3. Guidance Document on Anaerobic Digester Foaming Prevention and Control Methods (WERF Report INFR1SG10a)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of this anaerobic digester (AD) foaming guidance document is based on the need for a specific detailed methodology that water resource recovery facilities (WRRF) personnel can follow and implement to manage or mitigate AD foam incidents. This guidance manual is th...

  4. Comparison of raw dairy manure slurry and anaerobically digested slurry as N sources for grass forage production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study was conducted to determine how raw dairy slurry and anaerobically digested slurry (dairy slurry and food waste) applied via broadcast and subsurface deposition to reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) affected forage biomass, N uptake, apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR), and soil nitrate...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of brewery spent grain in a semi-continuous bioreactor: inhibition by phenolic degradation products.

    PubMed

    Sežun, Mija; Grilc, Viktor; Zupan?i?, Gregor D; Marinšek-Logar, Romana

    2011-03-01

    In this study anaerobic digestion of selected lignocellulosic substrate, namely brewery spent grain (BSG), was studied. In order to facilitate anaerobic digestion several types of pretreatment methods were tested such as: mechanical, chemical (alkali and acid) and thermo-chemical. The anaerobic digestion experiments were carried out in a semi-continuous stirred bioreactors with the organic loading rates between 2.9 and 3.9 kgCOD m-3 d-1 (1.9 and 2.5 kgVSS m-3 d-1 respectively) and corresponding hydraulic retention times of 33-39 days. Biogas production and composition, pH, COD, TSS and VSS, short chain fatty acids and phenolic compounds were measured. A significant inhibition of biogas production occurred, depending on the type of substrate pretreatment. There are indications that p-cresol is responsible for process inhibition when its concentration in the reaction mixture exceeds critical value between 115 and 240 mg L-1. Anaerobic digestion of chemically pretreated BSG (acid and alkali) and untreated-raw BSG was inhibited between the days 56 and 63 of the experiment, followed by thermo-chemically pretreated BSG on day 112 and mechanically pretreated BSG on day 126. Analyses of the substrates showed no phenolic compounds either in raw-untreated BSG or pretreated substrates, therefore the recorded p-cresol is an intermediate degradation product, responsible for process inhibition. PMID:24061957

  6. A new approach to simultaneous ammonium and dissolved methane removal from anaerobic digestion liquor: A model-based investigation of feasibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Xie, Guo-Jun; Liu, Yiwen; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-11-15

    The presence of a high level of dissolved methane (e.g., 20-26 g m(-3)) in the anaerobic sludge digestion liquor represents a major challenge to the treatment of this stream, as its emission to the atmosphere contributes significantly to the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment. Here we propose a new approach to simultaneous ammonium and dissolved methane removal from the anaerobic digestion liquor through integrating partial nitritation-Anammox and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) processes in a single-stage membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). In such an MBfR, the anaerobic digestion liquor is provided in the bulk liquid, while oxygen is supplied through gas-permeable membranes to avoid dissolved methane stripping. A previously developed model with appropriate extensions was applied to assess the system performance under different operational conditions and the corresponding microbial interactions. Both influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time) and oxygen surface loading are found to significantly influence the total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved methane removal, which jointly determine the overall system performance. The counter diffusion and concentration gradients of substrates cause microbial stratification in the biofilm, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) attach close to the membrane surface (biofilm base) where oxygen and ammonium are available, while Anammox and DAMO microorganisms jointly grow in the biofilm layer close to the bulk liquid where methane, ammonium, and nitrite are available with the latter produced by AOB. These results provide first insights and useful information for the design and operation of this new technology for simultaneous ammonium and dissolved methane removal in its potential future applications. PMID:26342913

  7. Semi-continuous anaerobic co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge and fat, oil and grease

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Caixia; Zhou Quancheng; Fu Guiming

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) with fat, oil and grease (FOG). > Co-digestion of TWAS and FOG at 64% VS increased biogas production by 137%. > FOG addition ratio at 74% of total VS caused inhibition of the anaerobic digestion process. > Micronutrients addition did not significantly improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. - Abstract: Co-digestion of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and fat, oil and grease (FOG) was conducted semi-continuously under mesophilic conditions. The results showed that daily methane yield at the steady state was 598 L/kg VS{sub added} when TWAS and FOG (64% of total VS) were co-digested, which was 137% higher than that obtained from digestion of TWAS alone. The biogas composition was stabilized at a CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} content of 66.8% and 29.5%, respectively. Micronutrients added to co-digestion did not improve the biogas production and digestion stabilization. With a higher addition of FOG (74% of total VS), the digester initially failed but was slowly self-recovered; however, the methane yield was only about 50% of a healthy reactor with the same organic loading rate.

  8. Effect of organic loading on the microbiota in a temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Abraham, Christopher; Nelson, Michael C; Chen, Po-Hsu; Graf, Joerg; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-10-01

    Temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD) has gained increasing attention because it provides the flexibility to operate digesters under conditions that enhance overall digester performance. However, research on impact of organic overloading rate (OLR) to microbiota of TPAD systems was limited. In this study, we investigated the composition and successions of the microbiota in both the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of a laboratory-scale TPAD system co-digesting dairy manure and waste whey before and during organic overloading. The thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters were operated at 50 and 35 °C, respectively, with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days for each digester. High OLR (dairy manure with 5 % total solid and waste whey of ?60.4 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/l/day) resulted in decrease in pH and in biogas production and accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the thermophilic digester, while the mesophilic digester remained unchanged except a transient increase in biogas production. Both denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons showed dramatic change in microbiota composition and profound successions of both bacterial and methanogenic communities. During the overloading, Thermotogae was replaced by Proteobacteria, while Methanobrevibacter and archaeon classified as WCHD3-02 grew in predominance at the expense of Methanoculleus in the thermophilic digester, whereas Methanosarcina dominated the methanogenic community, while Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter became less predominant in the mesophilic digester. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that digester temperature and pH were the most influential environmental factors that explained much of the variations of the microbiota in this TPAD system when it was overloaded. PMID:26084892

  9. Performance and kinetic evaluation of semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters treating food waste: role of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanqin; Wu, Shubiao; Guo, Jianbin; Zhou, Jie; Dong, Renjie

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of trace elements (TEs) on the anaerobic digestion (AD) of food waste (FW) in laboratory-scale semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters. The duration of digesters operation was approximately 400 days. Organic loading rates (OLRs) ranged from 1.0 to 5.5 g VS L(-1) d(-1) at 37 °C. Results showed that methane production of the digester was severely inhibited at a volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration of 30,000 mg L(-1) at OLR of 4.0 g VS L(-1) d(-1) in the absence of TEs. Contrary to the failed digesters, a stable performance was achieved in the TEs added digesters. High methane yield (approximately 465.4 mL CH4 g(-1)VSadded) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of VFA was observed in the TEs added digesters at OLR of 1.0-5.0 g VS L(-1) d(-1) and HRT of 40 days. These findings strongly indicated that the addition of TEs has an important impact on the operation stability of AD of FW. PMID:25160748

  10. Microbial Anaerobic Digestion (Bio-Digesters) as an Approach to the Decontamination of Animal Wastes in Pollution Control and the Generation of Renewable Energy

    PubMed Central

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Mamphweli, Sampson N.; Meyer, Edson L.; Okoh, Anthony I.; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester) via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas) and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications. PMID:24048207

  11. Performance and kinetic study of semi-dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Sajeena Beevi, B; Madhu, G; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and waste disposal. In this study semi dry anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes was conducted for 45 days in a lab-scale batch experiment for total solid concentration of 100g/L for investigating the start-up performances under thermophilic condition (50 °C). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by measuring the daily biogas production and calculating the degradation of total solids and the total volatile solids. The biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9L/kg VS (volatile solid) for the total solid (TS) concentration of 100g/L. About 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained during the digestion. A first order model based on the availability of substrate as the limiting factor was used to perform the kinetic studies of batch anaerobic digestion system. The value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day(-1). PMID:25449607

  12. Stable thermophilic anaerobic digestion of dissolved air flotation (DAF) sludge by co-digestion with swine manure.

    PubMed

    Creamer, K S; Chen, Y; Williams, C M; Cheng, J J

    2010-05-01

    Environmentally sound treatment of by-products in a value-adding process is an ongoing challenge in animal agriculture. The sludge produced as a result of the dissolved air flotation (DAF) wastewater treatment process in swine processing facilities is one such low-value residue. The objective of this study was to determine the fundamental performance parameters for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of DAF sludge. Testing in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor and in batch reactors was conducted to determine the kinetics of degradation and biogas yield. Stable operation could not be achieved using pure DAF sludge as a substrate, possibly due to inhibition by long-chain fatty acids or to nutrient deficiencies. However, in a 1:1 ratio (w/w, dry basis) with swine manure, operation was both stable and productive. In the semi-continuous stirred reactor at 54.5 degrees Celsius, a hydraulic residence time of 10 days, and an organic loading rate of 4.68 gVS/day/L, the methane production rate was 2.19 L/L/day and the specific methane production rate was 0.47 L/gVS (fed). Maximum specific methanogenic activity (SMA) in batch testing was 0.15 mmoles CH(4) h(-1) gVS(-1) at a substrate concentration of 6.9 gVS L(-1). Higher substrate concentrations cause an initial lag in methane production, possibly due to long-chain fatty acid or nitrogen inhibition. PMID:20060713

  13. Utilization of biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of agro-industrial waste: Energy, economic and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Andrea; Schneider, Daniel Rolph; Džodan, Janko

    2014-06-24

    Anaerobic digestion of agro-industrial waste is of significant interest in order to facilitate a sustainable development of energy supply. Using of material and energy potentials of agro-industrial waste, in the framework of technical, economic, and ecological possibilities, contributes in increasing the share of energy generated from renewable energy sources. The paper deals with the benefits arising from the utilization of biogas produced by co-digestion of whey and cow manure. The advantages of this process are the profitability of the plant and the convenience in realizing an anaerobic digestion plant to produce biogas that is enabled by the benefits from the sale of electric energy at favorable prices. Economic aspects are related to the capital cost (€ 2,250,000) of anaerobic digestion treatment in a biogas plant with a 300 kW power and 510 kW heating unit in a medium size farm (450 livestock units). Considering the optimum biogas yield of 20.7 dm(3) kg(-1) of wet substrate and methane content in the biogas obtained of 79%, the anaerobic process results in a daily methane production of 2,500 kg, with the maximum power generation of 2,160,000 kWh y(-1) and heat generation of 2,400,000 kWh y(-1). The net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period for implementation of profitable anaerobic digestion process is evaluated. Ecological aspects related to carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emission reduction are assessed. PMID:24963093

  14. Improved Design of Anaerobic Digesters for Household Biogas Production in Indonesia: One Cow, One Digester, and One Hour of Cooking per Day

    PubMed Central

    Usack, Joseph G.; Wiratni, Wiratni; Angenent, Largus T.

    2014-01-01

    A government-sponsored initiative in Indonesia to design and implement low-cost anaerobic digestion systems resulted in 21 full-scale systems with the aim to satisfy the cooking fuel demands of rural households owning at least one cow. The full-scale design consisted of a 0.3?m diameter PVC pipe, which was operated as a conventional plug-flow system. The system generated enough methane to power a cooking stove for ?1?h. However, eventual clogging from solids accumulation inside the bioreactor proved to be a major drawback. Here, we improved the digester configuration to remedy clogging while maintaining system performance. Controlled experiments were performed using four 9-L laboratory-scale digesters operated at a temperature of 27 ± 1°C, a volatile solids loading rate of 2.0?g VS·L?1·day?1, and a 21-day hydraulic retention time. Two of the digesters were replicates of the original design (control digesters), while the other two digesters included internal mixing or effluent recycle (experimental digesters). The performance of each digester was compared based on methane yields, VS removal efficiencies, and steady-state solids concentrations during an operating period of 311 days. Statistical analyses revealed that internal mixing and effluent recycling resulted in reduced solids accumulation compared to the controls without diminishing methane yields or solids removal efficiencies. PMID:24715809

  15. Enhancement of anaerobic digestion efficiency of wastewater sludge and olive waste: Synergistic effect of co-digestion and ultrasonic/microwave sludge pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Aylin Alagöz, B; Yenigün, Orhan; Erdinçler, Ay?en

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of ultrasonic and microwave pre-treatment on biogas production from the anaerobic co-digestion of olive pomace and wastewater sludges. It was found that co-digestion of wastewater sludge with olive pomace yielded around 0.21L CH4/g VSadded, whereas the maximum methane yields from the mono-digestion of olive pomace and un-pretreated wastewater sludges were 0.18 and 0.16L CH4/g VSadded. In the same way, compared to mono-digestion of these substrates, co-digestion increased methane production by 17-31%. The microwave and ultrasonic pre-treatments applied to sludge samples prior to co-digestion process led to further increase in the methane production by 52% and 24%, respectively, compared to co-digestion with un-pretreated wastewater sludge. The highest biogas and methane yields were obtained from the co-digestion of 30min microwave pre-treated wastewater sludges and olive pomace to be 0.46L/g VSadded and 0.32L CH4/g VSadded, respectively. PMID:26320815

  16. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of organic matter during the anaerobic digestion and successive composting of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Maria Rosaria; Malerba, Anna D; Pezzolla, Daniela; Gigliotti, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    In this work, anaerobic digestion of pig slurry and successive composting of the digestate after centrifugation were studied by means of chemical analysis, FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy as excitation-emission matrix (EEM). Chemical analysis highlighted the organic matter transformation occurring during the processes. A decrease of volatile solids and total organic carbon were observed in the digestate with respect to the fresh pig slurry as a consequence of the consumption of sugars, proteins, amino acids and fatty acids used by microorganisms as a C source. Water Extractable Organic Matter (WEOM) was obtained for all samples and fractionated into a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic fraction. The highest WEOM value was found in the pig slurry indicating a high content of labile organic C. The digestate centrifuged and the digestate composted showed lower hydrophilic and higher hydrophobic contents because of the decrease of labile C. Total phenolic content was lower in the digestate with respect to fresh pig slurry sample (36.7%) as a consequence of phenolic compounds degradation. The strong decrease of total reducing sugars in the digestate (76.6%) as compared to pig slurry confirmed that anaerobic process proceed mainly through consumption of sugars which represent a readily available energy source for microbial activity. FTIR spectra of pig slurry showed bands indicative of proteins and carbohydrates. A drop of aliphatic structures and a decrease of polysaccharides was observed after the anaerobic process along with the increase of the peak in the aromatic region. The composted substrate showed an increase of aromatic and a relative decrease of polysaccharides. EEM spectra provided tryptophan:fulvic-like fluorescence ratios which increased from fresh substrate to digestate because of the OM decompostion. Composted substrate presented the lowest ratio due to the humification process. PMID:24411986

  17. Microalgal system for treatment of effluent from poultry litter anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjinder; Reynolds, David L; Das, Keshav C

    2011-12-01

    The potential of mixotrophic microalgae to utilize poultry litter anaerobic digester (AD) effluent (PLDE) as nutritional growth medium was evaluated. Three algal strains viz. Chlorella minutissima, Chlorella sorokiniana and Scenedesmus bijuga and their consortium showed significant biomass productivity in 6% (v/v) concentration of PLDE in deionized water. Multiple booster dosage of PLDE supported better growth relative to a single dose PLDE. The maximum biomass productivity of 76 mg L(-1) d(-1) was recorded. The biomass was rich in protein (39% w/w) and carbohydrates (22%) while lipids (<10%) were low, making it most suitable as an animal feed supplement. The mixotrophic algae showed sustainable growth against variations in PLDE composition in different AD batches, thus proving to be a suitable candidate for large scale wastewater treatment with concomitant production of renewable biomass feedstock for animal feed and bioenergy applications. PMID:21967714

  18. Mathematical model of anaerobic digestion in a chemostat: effects of syntrophy and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Weedermann, Marion; Seo, Gunog; Wolkowicz, Gail S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Three of the four main stages of anaerobic digestion: acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and methanogenesis are described by a system of differential equations modelling the interaction of microbial populations in a chemostat. The microbes consume and/or produce simple substrates, alcohols and fatty acids, acetic acid, and hydrogen. Acetogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens interact through syntrophy. The model also includes the inhibition of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens due to sensitivity to varying pH-levels. To examine the effects of these interactions and inhibitions, we first study an inhibition-free model and obtain results for global stability using differential inequalities together with conservation laws. For the model with inhibition, we derive conditions for existence, local stability, and bistability of equilibria and present a global stability result. A case study illustrates the effects of inhibition on the regions of stability. Inhibition introduces regions of bistability and stabilizes some equilibria. PMID:23336708

  19. Effect of leachate recirculation on mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-03-01

    The effects of using untreated leachate for supplemental water addition and liquid recirculation on anaerobic digestion of food waste was evaluated by combining cyclic water recycle operations with batch mesophilic biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays. Cyclic BMP assays indicated that using an appropriate fraction of recycled leachate and fresh make up water can stimulate methanogenic activity and enhance biogas production. Conversely increasing the percentage of recycled leachate in the make up water eventually causes methanogenic inhibition and decrease in the rate of food waste stabilization. The decrease in activity is exacerbated as the number cycles increases. Inhibition is possibly attributed to accumulation and elevated concentrations of ammonia as well as other waste by products in the recycled leachate that inhibit methanogenesis. PMID:22088957

  20. A model of anaerobic digestion for biogas production using Abel equations

    E-print Network

    Primitivo B. Acosta-Humánez; Maximiliano Machado-Higuera; Alexander V. Sinitsyn

    2014-11-27

    We consider a nonlinear mathematical model for the study of anaerobic digestion processes. We decompose the original system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations into subsystems. For these subsystems we prove existence of lower and upper solutions in reverse order for one of the va\\-ria\\-bles. The upper and lower solutions are constructed in analytical form. Furthermore, the upper solutions of subsystem for feeding bacteria are related with solutions of Abel equations of the first kind. Using numerical and theoretical arguments we examine how to obtain upper and lower solutions approximated to the numerical solution of the system. In this work we establish special techniques of lower-upper solution, which includes reverse order for non monotone systems, in contrast to the techniques used by H.L. Smith and P. Waltman on their monograph.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of lipid-extracted Auxenochlorella protothecoides biomass for methane generation and nutrient recovery.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Ketter, Ben; Chow, Steven; Adams, Kameron J; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Allnutt, F C Thomas; Bouwer, Edward J

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated methane production and nutrient recovery from industrially produced, lipid extracted algal biomass (LEA) of Auxenochlorella protothecoides using semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (AD) at different organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). It was shown, that AD can improve biofuel production efficiency and sustainability, especially for scaled processes, through up to 30% increase in energy generation (up to 0.25 L of methane per g of LEA volatile solids) and partial nutrient recovery and recycling. The nutrient recycling with the AD effluent may reduce the cost of the supplied fertilizers by up to 45%. However, methane production was limited to nearly 50% of theoretical maxima potentially due to biomass recalcitrance and inhibition effects from the residual solvent in the LEA. Therefore, further AD optimization is required to maximize methane yield and nutrient recovery as well as investigation and elimination of inhibition from solvent residues. PMID:25746299

  2. Enhancement of volatile fatty acids production from rice straw via anaerobic digestion with chemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwon Woo; Kim, Ilgook; Jung, Kwonsu; Seo, Charles; Han, Jong-In; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-08-01

    Rice straw is one of the most abundant renewable biomass sources and was selected as the feedstock for the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from which microbial biodiesel can be produced. Two kinds of chemical pretreatments involving nitric acid and sodium hydroxide were investigated at 150 °C with 20 min of reaction time. The nitric acid pretreatment generated the most hemicellulose hydrolyzate, while significant reduction of the lignin occurred with sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Anaerobic digestion of 20 g/L rice straw yielded 6.00 and 7.09 g VFAs/L with 0.5% HNO3 and 2% NaOH, respectively. The VFAs yield with 2% NaOH was 0.35 g/g. PMID:25764527

  3. Anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable wastes and primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, B; Arathy, E C; Hemalatha, R; Philip, Jerry Elsa; Alwar Ramanujam, R

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW) and primary sewage sludge was carried out in a fed-batch reactor having a volume of 21 under ambient temperature conditions. Three different proportions (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 in terms ofVS) of fruit and vegetable wastes and primary sewage sludge were studied for an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.0 g VS/ l.d and with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 25 days. The reactor with 75% FVW and 25% sewage sludge (in terms of VS) showed better performance in terms of VS reduction and biogas yield when compared to other two proportions. PMID:21114101

  4. Biodiesel production from Scenedesmus bijuga grown in anaerobically digested food wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Yun; Cho, Hyun Uk; Utomo, Joseph Christian; Choi, Yun-Nam; Xu, Xu; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae, Scenedesmus bijuga, was cultivated in anaerobically digested food wastewater effluent (FWE) to treat the wastewater and produce biodiesel simultaneously. Three different mixing ratios with municipal wastewater were compared for finding out proper dilution ratio in biodiesel production. Of these, 1/20 diluted FWE showed the highest biomass production (1.49 g/L). Lipid content was highest in 1/10 diluted FWE (35.06%), and the lipid productivity showed maximum value in 1/20 diluted FWE (15.59 mg/L/d). Nutrient removal was also measured in the cultivation. FAME compositions were mainly composed of C16-C18 (Over 98.94%) in S. bijuga. In addition, quality of FAMEs was evaluated by Cetane Number (CN) and Bis-allylic Position Equivalent (BAPE). PMID:25466996

  5. Controlling a toxic shock of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to anaerobic digestion using activated carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yeyuan; De Araujo, Cecilia; Sze, Chun Chau; Stuckey, David C

    2015-04-01

    Several powdered and granular activated carbons (PACs and GACs) were tested for adsorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in bench-scale anaerobic digestion reactors to control the toxicity of PCP to acetoclastic methanogenesis. Results showed that the adsorption capacities of PAC were reduced by 21-54%, depending on the PAC addition time, in the presence of the methanogenic sludge compared to the controls without sludge. As a preventive measure, PAC at a low dose of 20% (mass ratio to the VSS) added 24 h prior to, or simultaneously with, the addition of PCP could completely eliminate the toxic effects of PCP. At the same dose, PAC also enabled methanogenesis to recover immediately after the sludge had been exposed to PCP for 24h. GAC was not effective in enabling the recovery of methanogenesis due to its slow adsorption kinetics; however, at a dose of 80% it could partially ameliorate the toxic shock of PCP. PMID:25665874

  6. The possibility of using encapsulated nitrifiers for treatment of reject water coming from anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Vacková, L; Stloukal, R; Wanner, J

    2012-01-01

    Large wastewater treatment plants have to deal not only with the influent wastewater, but also with the highly concentrated reject water coming from anaerobic digestion. The aim of this work was to verify the suitability of using encapsulated nitrifiers in polyvinyl alcohol carrier (so called Lentikats Biocatalyst) at temperatures between 5 and 30 °C. For laboratory nitrification batch tests synthetic wastewater with ammonia nitrogen (Namon) concentration 10-800 mg L(-1) was used. The system has been proved to operate at the temperature of 10 °C, but not at 5 °C. It was found that the highest specific nitrification rates were observed at 30 °C and with ammonia nitrogen concentrations above 250 mg L(-1), which means that separate treatment of reject water by using encapsulated biomass seems to be an effective tool for wastewater treatment plant optimization. PMID:22466589

  7. A self-sustaining advanced lignocellulosic biofuel production by integration of anaerobic digestion and aerobic fungal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan; Ruan, Zhenhua; Zhong, Yingkui; Archer, Steven; Liu, Yan; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    High energy demand hinders the development and application of aerobic microbial biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials. In order to address this issue, this study focused on developing an integrated system including anaerobic digestion and aerobic fungal fermentation to convert corn stover, animal manure and food wastes into microbial lipids for biodiesel production. Dairy manure and food waste were first anaerobically digested to produce energy and solid digestate (AD fiber). AD fiber and corn stover were then processed by a combined alkali and acid hydrolysis, followed by fungal lipid accumulation. The integrated process can generate 1L biodiesel and 1.9 kg methane from 12.8 kg dry dairy manure, 3.1 kg dry food wastes and 12.2 kg dry corn stover with a positive net energy of 57 MJ, which concludes a self-sustaining lignocellulosic biodiesel process and provides a new route to co-utilize corn stover and organic wastes for advanced biofuel production. PMID:25543542

  8. The fate of crop nutrients during digestion of swine manure in psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Massé, D I; Croteau, F; Masse, L

    2007-11-01

    The objectives of the study were to measure the levels of manure nutrients retained in psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (PASBRs) digesting swine manure, and to determine the distribution of nutrients in the sludge and supernatant zones of settled bioreactor effluent. Anaerobic digestion reduced the total solids (TS) concentration and the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of manure by 71.4% and 79.9%, respectively. The nitrogen, potassium, and sodium fed with the manure to the PASBRs were recovered in the effluent. The bioreactors retained on average 25.5% of the P, 8.7% of the Ca, 41.5% of the Cu, 18.4% of the Zn, and 67.7% of the S fed to the PASBRs. The natural settling of bioreactor effluent allowed further nutrient separation. The supernatant fraction, which represented 71.4% of effluent volume, contained 61.8% of the total N, 67.1% of the NH4-N, and 73.3% of the Na. The settled sludge fraction, which represented 28.6% of the volume, contained 57.6% of the solids, 62.3% of the P, 71.6% of the Ca, 89.6% of the Mg, 76.1% of the Al, 90.0% of the Cu, 74.2% of the Zn, and 52.2% of the S. The N/P ratio was increased from 3.9 in the raw manure to 5.2 in the bioreactor effluent and 9.2 in the supernatant fraction of the settled effluent. The PASBR technology will then substantially decrease the manure management costs of swine operations producing excess phosphorus, by reducing the volume of manure to export outside the farm. The separation of nutrients will also allow land spreading strategies that increase the agronomic value of manure by matching more closely the crop nutrient requirements. PMID:17400445

  9. Bacterial community structure in treated sewage sludge with mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Stiborova, Hana; Wolfram, Jan; Demnerova, Katerina; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2015-11-01

    Stabilized sewage sludge is applied to agricultural fields and farmland due to its high organic matter content. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of sludge stabilization, mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD), on bacterial communities in sludge, including the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Bacterial community structure and phylogenetic diversity were analyzed in four sewage sludge samples from the Czech Republic. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes showed that investigated sludge samples harbor diverse bacterial populations with only a few taxa present across all samples. Bacterial diversity was higher in sludge samples after MAD versus TAD treatment, and communities in MAD-treated sludge shared the highest genetic similarities. In all samples, the bacterial community was dominated by reads affiliated with Proteobacteria. The sludge after TAD treatment had considerably higher number of reads of thermotolerant/thermophilic taxa, such as the phyla Deinococcus-Thermus and Thermotogae or the genus Coprothermobacter. Only one operational taxonomic unit (OTU), which clustered with Rhodanobacter, was detected in all communities at a relative abundance >1 %. All of the communities were screened for the presence of 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic bacteria using a database of 122 pathogenic species and ?98 % identity threshold. The abundance of such sequences ranged between 0.23 and 1.57 % of the total community, with lower numbers present after the TAD treatment, indicating its higher hygienization efficiency. Sequences clustering with nontuberculous mycobacteria were present in all samples. Other detected sequences of pathogenic bacteria included Streptomyces somaliensis, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Gordonia spp., Legionella anisa, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Enterobacter aerogenes, Brucella melitensis, and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25921720

  10. Wastewater polishing by a channelized macrophyte-dominated wetland and anaerobic digestion of the harvested phytomass.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael F; Hare, Caden; Kozlowski, John; McCormick, Rachel S; Chen, Lily; Schneider, Linden; Parish, Meghan; Knight, Zane; Nelson, Timothy A; Grewell, Brenda J

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetlands (CW) offer a mechanism to meet increasingly stringent regulatory standards for wastewater treatment while minimizing energy inputs. Additionally, harvested wetland phytomass subjected to anaerobic digestion can serve as a source of biogas methane. To investigate CW wastewater polishing activities and potential energy yield we constructed a pair of secondary wastewater-fed channelized CW modules designed to retain easily harvestable floating aquatic vegetation and maximize exposure of water to roots and sediment. Modules that were regularly harvested averaged a nitrate removal rate of 1.1 g N m(-2) d(-1); harvesting, sedimentation and gasification were responsible for 30.5%, 8.0% and 61.5% of the N losses, respectively. Selective harvesting of a module to maintain dominance of filamentous algae had no effect on nitrate removal rate but lowered productivity by one-half. The average monthly productivity for unselectively harvested modules was 9.3 ± 1.7 g dry wt. m(-2) d(-1) (±SE). Cessation of harvesting in one module resulted in a significant increase in nitrate removal rate and decrease in phosphate removal rate. Compared to the influent, the effluent of the harvested module had significantly lower levels of estrogenic activity, as determined by a quantitative PCR-based juvenile trout bioassay, and significantly lower densities of E. coli. In mixed vertical-flow reactors anaerobic co-digestion of equal dry weight proportions of harvested aquatic vegetation, wine yeast lees and dairy manure was greatly improved when the manure was replaced with the crude glycerol by-product of biodiesel production. Remaining solids were vermicomposted for use as a soil amendment. Our results indicate that incorporation of constructed wetlands into an integrated treatment system can simultaneously enhance the economic and energetic feasibility of wastewater and organic waste treatment processes. PMID:23245307

  11. Sequential anaerobic/aerobic digestion for enhanced sludge stabilization: comparison of the process performance for mixed and waste sludge [corrected].

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Carozza, Nicola Antonello

    2015-05-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated as a promising alternative for enhanced sludge stabilization. In this paper, a feasibility study of the sequential digestion applied to real waste activated sludge (WAS) and mixed sludge is presented. Process performance is evaluated in terms of total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) removal, biogas production, and dewaterability trend in the anaerobic and double-stage digested sludge. In the proposed digestion lay out, the aerobic stage was operated with intermittent aeration to reduce the nitrogen load recycled to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Experimental results showed a very good performance of the sequential digestion process for both waste and mixed sludge, even if, given its better digestibility, higher efficiencies are observed for mixed sludge. VS removal efficiencies in the anaerobic stage were 48 and 50% for waste and mixed sludge, respectively, while a significant additional improvement of the VS removal of 25% for WAS and 45% for mixed sludge has been obtained in the aerobic stage. The post-aerobic stage, operated with intermittent aeration, was also efficient in nitrogen removal, providing a significant decrease of the nitrogen content in the supernatant: nitrification efficiencies of 90 and 97% and denitrification efficiencies of 62 and 70% have been obtained for secondary and mixed sludges, respectively. A positive effect due to the aerobic stage was also observed on the sludge dewaterability in both cases. Biogas production, expressed as Nm(3)/(kgVSdestroyed), was 0.54 for waste and 0.82 for mixed sludge and is in the range of values reported in the literature in spite of the low anaerobic sludge retention time of 15 days. PMID:25028317

  12. Members of the uncultured bacterial candidate division WWE1 are implicated in anaerobic digestion of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Limam, Rim Driss; Chouari, Rakia; Mazéas, Laurent; Wu, Ting-Di; Li, Tianlun; Grossin-Debattista, Julien; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Saidi, Mouldi; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Sghir, Abdelghani; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-01-01

    Clones of the WWE1 (Waste Water of Evry 1) candidate division were retrieved during the exploration of the bacterial diversity of an anaerobic mesophilic (35 ± 0.5°C) digester. In order to investigate the metabolic function of WWE1 members, a 16S rRNA gene-based stable isotope probing (SIP) method was used. Eighty-seven percent of 16S r rRNA gene sequences affiliated to WWE1 candidate division were retrieved in a clone library obtained after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of enriched DNA fraction from anaerobic municipal solid waste samples incubated with 13C-cellulose, at the end of the incubation (day 63) using a Pla46F-1390R primer pair. The design of a specific WWE1 probe associated with the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique corroborated the abundant representation of WWE1 members in our 13C-cellulose incubations. Secondary ion mass spectrometry–in situ hybridization (SIMSISH) using an iodine-labeled oligonucleotide probe combined with high-resolution nanometer-scale SIMS (NanoSIMS) observation confirmed the isotopic enrichment of members of WWE1 candidate division. The 13C apparent isotopic composition of hybridized WWE1 cells reached the value of about 40% early during the cellulose degradation process, suggesting that these bacteria play a role either in an extracellular cellulose hydrolysis process and/or in the uptake fermentation products. PMID:24497501

  13. Members of the uncultured bacterial candidate division WWE1 are implicated in anaerobic digestion of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Limam, Rim Driss; Chouari, Rakia; Mazéas, Laurent; Wu, Ting-Di; Li, Tianlun; Grossin-Debattista, Julien; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Saidi, Mouldi; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Sghir, Abdelghani; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-04-01

    Clones of the WWE1 (Waste Water of Evry 1) candidate division were retrieved during the exploration of the bacterial diversity of an anaerobic mesophilic (35 ± 0.5°C) digester. In order to investigate the metabolic function of WWE1 members, a 16S rRNA gene -based stable isotope probing (SIP) method was used. Eighty-seven percent of 16S r rRNA gene sequences affiliated to WWE1 candidate division were retrieved in a clone library obtained after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of enriched DNA fraction from anaerobic municipal solid waste samples incubated with (13) C-cellulose, at the end of the incubation (day 63) using a Pla46F-1390R primer pair. The design of a specific WWE1 probe associated with the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique corroborated the abundant representation of WWE1 members in our (13) C-cellulose incubations. Secondary ion mass spectrometry-in situ hybridization (SIMSISH) using an iodine-labeled oligonucleotide probe combined with high-resolution nanometer-scale SIMS (NanoSIMS) observation confirmed the isotopic enrichment of members of WWE1 candidate division. The (13) C apparent isotopic composition of hybridized WWE1 cells reached the value of about 40% early during the cellulose degradation process, suggesting that these bacteria play a role either in an extracellular cellulose hydrolysis process and/or in the uptake fermentation products. PMID:24497501

  14. An integrated anaerobic digestion and UV photocatalytic treatment of distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Apollo, Seth; Onyango, Maurice S; Ochieng, Aoyi

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic up-flow fixed bed reactor and annular photocatalytic reactor were used to study the efficiency of integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ultraviolet (UV) photodegradation of real distillery effluent and raw molasses wastewater (MWW). It was found that UV photodegradation as a stand-alone technique achieved colour removal of 54% and 69% for the distillery and MWW, respectively, with a COD reduction of <20% and a negligible BOD reduction. On the other hand, AD as a single treatment technique was found to be effective in COD and BOD reduction with efficiencies of above 75% and 85%, respectively, for both wastewater samples. However, the AD achieved low colour removal efficiency, with an increase in colour intensity of 13% recorded when treating MWW while a colour removal of 51% was achieved for the distillery effluent. The application of UV photodegradation as a pre-treatment method to the AD process reduced the COD removal and biogas production efficiency. However, an integration in which UV photodegradation was employed as a post-treatment to the AD process achieved high COD removal of above 85% for both wastewater samples, and colour removal of 88% for the distillery effluent. Thus, photodegradation can be employed as a post-treatment technique to an AD system treating distillery effluent for complete removal of the biorecalcitrant and colour imparting compounds. PMID:23974530

  15. Dark fermentation of complex waste biomass for biohydrogen production by pretreated thermophilic anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Frunzo, Luigi; Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The Biohydrogen Potential (BHP) of six different types of waste biomass typical for the Campania Region (Italy) was investigated. Anaerobic sludge pre-treated with the specific methanogenic inhibitor sodium 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BESA) was used as seed inoculum. The BESA pre-treatment yielded the highest BHP in BHP tests carried out with pre-treated anaerobic sludge using potato and pumpkin waste as the substrates, in comparison with aeration or heat shock pre-treatment. The BHP tests carried out with different complex waste biomass showed average BHP values in a decreasing order from potato and pumpkin wastes (171.1 ± 7.3 ml H2/g VS) to buffalo manure (135.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), dried blood (slaughter house waste, 87.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), fennel waste (58.1 ± 29.8 ml H2/g VS), olive pomace (54.9 ± 5.4 ml H2/g VS) and olive mill wastewater (46.0 ± 15.6 ml H2/g VS). The digestate was analyzed for major soluble metabolites to elucidate the different biochemical pathways in the BHP tests. These showed the H2 was produced via mixed type fermentation pathways. PMID:25617867

  16. Potential of low-temperature anaerobic digestion to address current environmental concerns on swine production.

    PubMed

    Massé, D I; Masse, L; Xia, Y; Gilbert, Y

    2010-04-01

    Environmental issues associated with swine production are becoming a major concern among the general public and are thus an important challenge for the swine industry. There is now a renewed interest in environmental biotechnologies that can minimize the impact of swine production and add value to livestock by-products. An anaerobic biotechnology called psychrophilic anaerobic digestion (PAD) in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) has been developed at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. This very stable biotechnology recovers usable energy, stabilizes and deodorizes manure, and increases the availability of plant nutrients. Experimental results indicated that PAD of swine manure slurry at 15 to 25 degrees C in intermittently fed SBR reduces the pollution potential of manure by removing up to 90% of the soluble chemical oxygen demand. The process performs well under intermittent feeding, once to 3 times a week, and without external mixing. Bioreactor feeding activities can thus be easily integrated into the routine manure removal procedures in the barn, with minimal interference with other farm operations and use of existing manure-handling equipment. Process stability was not affected by the presence of antibiotics in manure. The PAD process was efficient in eliminating populations of zoonotic pathogens and parasites present in raw livestock manure slurries. Psychrophilic anaerobic digestion in SBR could also be used for swine mortality disposal. The addition of swine carcasses, at loading rates representing up to 8 times the normal mortality rates on commercial farms, did not affect the stability of SBR. No operational problems were related to the formation of foam and scum. The biotechnology was successfully operated at semi-industrial and full commercial scales. Biogas production rate exceeded 0.20 L of methane per gram of total chemical oxygen demand fed to the SBR. The biogas was of excellent quality, with a methane concentration ranging from 70 to 80%. The recovery of green energy, the production of a value-added odorless fertilizer, the elimination of manure pathogens, and the proper disposal of swine mortalities will substantially reduce the carbon and environmental footprints on products of swine origin. PMID:19855002

  17. Coupling of anaerobic digester and microbial fuel cell for COD removal and ammonia recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated for use in removing total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and residual COD from effluent digested in an anaerobic digester (AD) fed with actual swine wastewater for 32 days in batch mode. Cumulative COD removal in the AD was as high as 59,647±2096 mg/L (80.5% removed), whereas TAN removal in the AD was negligible at 296±116 mg-N/L (5.8% removed), causing a decrease in the COD/TAN ratio from 14.5 to 3.0. In a subsequent MFC system, 77.5% of TAN was removed at 36 days, leading to an increase in COD/TAN ratio from 4.6 to 8.1. As a result, the COD in the anode was further reduced from 19,319±417 mg/L to 7519±554 mg/L (61.1% removed). From these results, removing the TAN in MFCs was found to increase the COD/TAN ratio, with the COD being further degraded. PMID:26142819

  18. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from the fruit juice industry: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zerrouki, Souhaib; Rihani, Rachida; Bentahar, Fatiha; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from the fruit juice industry was carried out in a batch digester. To study the effect of the pH values as well as the nutrient medium on the fermentation process, different parameters were monitored under mesophilic temperature, such as cumulative biogas volume, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total sugar, and biomass growth. It was found that for all cases, the COD concentration decreased with time. The lowest value reached was obtained when the nutrient medium was added; it was about 110 g/L after 480 h. In such cases, the COD removal reached about 80%; the highest cumulative biogas volume of about 5,515.8 NmL was reached after 480 h testing; and the lowest value reached was about 2,862.3 NmL in the case of peach-substrate containing sodium sulfite. The addition of nutrient medium improved the cumulative biogas production as well as the COD abatement. Measurement of the biogas composition highlighted three gaseous components, namely, methane (56.52%), carbon dioxide (20.14%), and hydrogen sulfide (23.34%). The modified Gompertz equation and the first-order kinetic model were used to describe the cumulative biogas production and the organic matter removal, respectively. A good agreement was found between simulated and experimental data. PMID:26114280

  19. Hybrid alkali-hydrodynamic disintegration of waste-activated sludge before two-stage anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Grübel, Klaudiusz; Suschka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The first step of anaerobic digestion, the hydrolysis, is regarded as the rate-limiting step in the degradation of complex organic compounds, such as waste-activated sludge (WAS). The aim of lab-scale experiments was to pre-hydrolyze the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline sludge conditioning before applying hydrodynamic disintegration, as the pre-treatment procedure. Application of both processes as a hybrid disintegration sludge technology resulted in a higher organic matter release (soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD)) to the liquid sludge phase compared with the effects of processes conducted separately. The total SCOD after alkalization at 9 pH (pH in the range of 8.96-9.10, SCOD?=?600 mg O2/L) and after hydrodynamic (SCOD?=?1450 mg O2/L) disintegration equaled to 2050 mg/L. However, due to the synergistic effect, the obtained SCOD value amounted to 2800 mg/L, which constitutes an additional chemical oxygen demand (COD) dissolution of about 35 %. Similarly, the synergistic effect after alkalization at 10 pH was also obtained. The applied hybrid pre-hydrolysis technology resulted in a disintegration degree of 28-35%. The experiments aimed at selection of the most appropriate procedures in terms of optimal sludge digestion results, including high organic matter degradation (removal) and high biogas production. The analyzed soft hybrid technology influenced the effectiveness of mesophilic/thermophilic anaerobic digestion in a positive way and ensured the sludge minimization. The adopted pre-treatment technology (alkalization?+?hydrodynamic cavitation) resulted in 22-27% higher biogas production and 13-28% higher biogas yield. After two stages of anaerobic digestion (mesophilic conditions (MAD)?+?thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD)), the highest total solids (TS) reduction amounted to 45.6% and was received for the following sample at 7 days MAD?+?17 days TAD. About 7% higher TS reduction was noticed compared with the sample after 9 days MAD?+?15 days TAD. Similar results were obtained for volatile solids (VS) reduction after two-stage anaerobic digestion. The highest decrease of VS was obtained when the first stage, the mesophilic digestion which lasted 7 days, was followed by thermophilic digestion for 17 days. PMID:25318422

  20. Modelling the rheological properties of sludge during anaerobic digestion in a batch reactor by using electrical measurements.

    PubMed

    Dieudé-Fauvel, E; Héritier, P; Chanet, M; Girault, R; Pastorelli, D; Guibelin, E; Baudez, J C

    2014-03-15

    Anaerobic digestion is a significant process leading to biogas production and waste management. Despite this double interest, professionals still face a lack of efficient tools to monitor and manage the whole procedure. This is especially true for rheological properties of the material inside the reactor, which are of major importance for anaerobic digestion management. However, rheological properties can hardly be determined in-situ and it would be very helpful to determine indicators of their evolution. To solve this problem, this paper investigates the evolution of sewage sludge rheological and electrical properties during the anaerobic digestion in a batch reactor. We especially focus on apparent viscosity and complex impedance, measured by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Both of them can be modelled by a linear combination of raw sludge and inoculum properties, weighted by time-dependent coefficients. Thus, by determining digested sludge electrical signature, it is possible to obtain those coefficients and model sludge apparent viscosity. This work offers many theoretical and practical prospects. PMID:24419207

  1. From mesophilic to thermophilic digestion: the transitions of anaerobic bacterial, archaeal, and fungal community structures in sludge and manure samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weimin; Yu, Guangwei; Louie, Tiffany; Liu, Tong; Zhu, Chengsheng; Xue, Gang; Gao, Pin

    2015-12-01

    The shift of microbial communities during a transition from mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) to thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) was characterized in two treatments. One treatment was inoculated with sludge and the other was inoculated with manure. In this study, methane was produced both in MAD and TAD, but TAD has slightly more methane produced than MAD. A broad phylogenetic spectrum of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal taxa at thermophilic conditions was detected. Coprothermobacter, Bacillus, Haloplasma, Clostridiisalibacter, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, Saccharomycetales, Candida, Alternaria, Cladosporium, and Penicillium were found almost exclusively in TAD, suggesting their adaptation to thermophilic conditions and ecological roles in digesting the organic compounds. The characterization of the lesser-known fungal community revealed that fungi probably constituted an important portion of the overall community within TAD and contributed to this process by degrading complex organic compounds. The shift of the microbial communities between MAD and TAD implied that temperature drastically affected the microbial diversity in anaerobic digestion. In addition, the difference in microbial communities between sludge and manure indicated that different source of inoculum also affected the microbial diversity and community. PMID:26245681

  2. Effect of ultrasound pretreatment in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion with emphasis on naphthalene and pyrene removal.

    PubMed

    Benabdallah El-Hadj, T; Dosta, J; Márquez-Serrano, R; Mata-Alvarez, J

    2007-01-01

    In many anaerobic digestion processes for the treatment of the sludge produced in wastewater treatment plants, the hydrolysis of the organic matter has been identified as the rate limiting step. This study is focused on the effect of ultrasonic pretreatment of raw sewage sludge before being fed to the mesophilic and the thermophilic anaerobic digestion. From particle size reduction, COD disintegration degree and biodegradability test, 11,000kJ/kg TS was estimated as the optimal specific energy in ultrasonic pretreatment. Moreover, the use of pretreated sludge improved significantly the COD removal efficiency and biogas production in lab-scale anaerobic digesters when compared with the performance without pretreatment, specially under mesophilic conditions. During ultrasonic pretreatment, the diffusion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) compounds to the aqueous phase was stated by a reduction in the pretreated sludge micropollutants content. With sonication, naphthalene was better removed than without this pretreatment, particularly in the mesophilic digester. However, pyrene removal remained at same efficiency level with and without ultrasonic pretreatment. PMID:17113620

  3. The effects of temperature, organic matter and time-dependency on rheological properties of dry anaerobic digested swine manure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang-Jin; Liu, Yi; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Lei, Yun-Hui; Chen, Zi-Ai; Deng, Liang-Wei

    2015-04-01

    An efficient way to avoid the pollution of swine wastewater is the application of dry anaerobic digestion, which needs rheological parameter for stirring and pipe designing. The rheological properties of this kind of sludge have been studied for many decades, yet their effects only solid concentration has been investigated widely. In this paper, the influences of temperature, organic and time-dependency on the efficiency of anaerobic digested swine manure were studied. The viscosity decreased with temperature arranged from 10 to 60 °C which caused increase in protein from 7.18 to 8.49 g/kg. 60 °C can make the digested swine manure with TS from 16.6% to 21.5% reach to the same rheology state. The added peptone decreased the viscosity because of its function of water-reducing admixture and air entraining mixture. Time-dependent experiment showed the decrease of shear stress over time. The first and the second yield stress of dry anaerobic digested swine manure were evaluated through time-dependent model. PMID:25616554

  4. Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of an Anaerobic Codigestion Facility Processing Dairy Manure and Industrial Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Jacqueline H; Labatut, Rodrigo A; Rankin, Matthew J; Pronto, Jennifer L; Gooch, Curt A; Williamson, Anahita A; Trabold, Thomas A

    2015-09-15

    Anaerobic codigestion (AcoD) can address food waste disposal and manure management issues while delivering clean, renewable energy. Quantifying greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to implementation of AcoD is important to achieve this goal. A lifecycle analysis was performed on the basis of data from an on-farm AcoD in New York, resulting in a 71% reduction in GHG, or net reduction of 37.5 kg CO2e/t influent relative to conventional treatment of manure and food waste. Displacement of grid electricity provided the largest reduction, followed by avoidance of alternative food waste disposal options and reduced impacts associated with storage of digestate vs undigested manure. These reductions offset digester emissions and the net increase in emissions associated with land application in the AcoD case relative to the reference case. Sensitivity analysis showed that using feedstock diverted from high impact disposal pathways, control of digester emissions, and managing digestate storage emissions were opportunities to improve the AcoD GHG benefits. Regional and parametrized emissions factors for the storage emissions and land application phases would reduce uncertainty. PMID:26241377

  5. Semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of different silage crops: VFAs formation, methane yield from fiber and non-fiber components and digestate composition.

    PubMed

    Pokój, T; Bu?kowska, K; Gusiatin, Z M; Klimiuk, E; Jankowski, K J

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the results of long-term semi-continuous experiments on anaerobic digestion at an HRT of 45d with ten silages: 2 annual and 4 perennial crops, and 4 mixtures of annual with perennial crops. The composition of substrates and digestates was determined with Van Soest's fractionation method. Removal of non-fiber materials ranged from 49.4% (Miscanthus sacchariflorus) to 89.3% (Zea mays alone and mixed with M. sacchariflorus), that of fiber materials like lignin ranged from 0.005% (Z. mays alone and mixed with grasses at VS ratio of 90:10%) to 46.5% (Sida hermaphrodita). The lowest stability of anaerobic digestion, as confirmed by normalized data concentrations of volatile fatty acids, was reported for both miscanthuses and sugar sorghum. The methane yield coefficients for non-fiber and fiber materials were 0.3666 and 0.2556L/g, respectively. All digestate residues had high fertilizing value, especially those from mixtures of crops. PMID:25958143

  6. Sanitation ability of anaerobic digestion performed at different temperature on sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Garuti, Gilberto; Negri, Marco; Adani, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A small amount of ammonia is used in full-scale plants to partially sanitize sewage sludge, thereby allowing successive biological processes to enable the high biological stability of the organic matter. Nevertheless, ammonia and methane are both produced during the anaerobic digestion (AD) of sludge. This paper describes the evaluation of a lab-scale study on the ability of anaerobic process to sanitize sewage sludge and produce biogas, thus avoiding the addition of ammonia to sanitize sludge. According to both previous work and a state of the art full-scale plant, ammonia was added to a mixture of sewage sludge at a rate so that the pH values after stirring were 8.5, 9 and 9.5. This procedure determined an ammonia addition lower than that generally indicated in the literature. The same sludge was also subjected to an AD process for 60 days under psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The levels of fecal coliform, Salmonella spp. helmints ova, pH, total N, ammonia fractions and biogas production were measured at different times during each process. The results obtained suggested that sludge sanitation can be achieved using an AD process; however, the addition of a small amount of ammonia was not effective in sludge sanitation because the buffer ability of the sludge reduced the pH and thus caused ammonia toxicity. Mesophilic and thermophilic AD sanitized better than psychrophilic AD did, but the total free ammonia concentration under the thermophilic condition inhibited biogas production. The mesophilic condition, however, allowed for both sludge sanitation and significant biogas production. PMID:23973551

  7. Upgrading of a mechanical biological treatment plant with a solid anaerobic digestion batch: a real case study.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    The energetic and treatment efficiency analysis of an existing mechanical biological treatment (MBT) plant shows that more than 60% of the 25 kWh consumed per each tonne of non-differentiated waste (NDW) treated is due to the electric fans. About 7.5 kWh per tonne of NDW is used for supplying the process air for stabilizing the waste organic fraction (WOF). Exploitation of the solid anaerobic digestion batch (SADB) for processing the WOF before it enters the aerobic section of the MBT leads to the production of biogas and, when subsequently fed to a gas engine, electric power at a magnitude of about 150 kWh per tonne of WOF, resulting in an energy surplus of about 48 kWh per tonne of NDW treated by the MBT facility. The SADB can also reduce the organic load rate at which the aerobic section operates up to 40%, leading to further positive effects on the whole MBT process. PMID:22751849

  8. Influence of initial pH on thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of swine manure and maize stalk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Mao, Chunlan; Zhai, Ningning; Wang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Gaihe

    2015-01-01

    The contradictions between the increasing energy demand and decreasing fossil fuels are making the use of renewable energy the key to the sustainable development of energy in the future. Biogas, a renewable clean energy, can be obtained by the anaerobic fermentation of manure waste and agricultural straw. This study examined the initial pH value had obvious effect on methane production and the process in the thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion. Five different initial pH levels with three different manure ratios were tested. All digesters in different initial pH showed a diverse methane production after 35 days. The VFA/alkalinity ratio of the optimum reaction condition for methanogens activity was in the range of 0.1-0.3 and the optimal condition that at the 70% dung ratio and initial pH 6.81, was expected to achieve maximum total biogas production (146.32 mL/g VS). PMID:25442104

  9. Electrical resistivity tomography to quantify in situ liquid content in a full-scale dry anaerobic digestion reactor.

    PubMed

    André, L; Lamy, E; Lutz, P; Pernier, M; Lespinard, O; Pauss, A; Ribeiro, T

    2016-02-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is a non-intrusive method widely used in landfills to detect and locate liquid content. An experimental set-up was performed on a dry batch anaerobic digestion reactor to investigate liquid repartition in process and to map spatial distribution of inoculum. Two array electrodes were used: pole-dipole and gradient arrays. A technical adaptation of ERT method was necessary. Measured resistivity data were inverted and modeled by RES2DINV software to get resistivity sections. Continuous calibration along resistivity section was necessary to understand data involving sampling and physicochemical analysis. Samples were analyzed performing both biochemical methane potential and fiber quantification. Correlations were established between the protocol of reactor preparation, resistivity values, liquid content, methane potential and fiber content representing liquid repartition, high methane potential zones and degradations zones. ERT method showed a strong relevance to monitor and to optimize the dry batch anaerobic digestion process. PMID:26638138

  10. Effect of Solids Retention Time on the Denitrification Potential of Anaerobically Digested Swine Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinyua, Maureen Njoki

    Three continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated in semi continuous mode treating swine waste using anaerobic digestion. The reactors were used to test the effect of solid retention time (SRT) on CH4 yield, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations, % volatile solids (VS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) removal, readily biodegradable COD concentration and the denitrification potential for the effluent in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system. During Phase I of the study, the three reactors were operated at the same 28 day SRT for 16 weeks. SRTs were then changed during the 12 week Phase II period. The SRTs studied were 14, 21 and 28 days, with the same organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.88 ± 0.2 kg VS/ m3-day. The reactor with the lowest SRT (14 days) had the highest VS and VFA removal at 73.6 and 67.6% and lowest TAN concentration at 0.78 g NH4+-N/L, followed by the 21 day and 28 day reactors. This was likely due to the fast microbial growth rates and substrate utilization rates in this reactor compared with the other two. The 14 day reactor had the highest CH4 yield at 0.33 m3CH 4/kg VS added and readily biodegradable COD concentration at 0.93 COD/L. The variations in CH4 yield and readily biodegradable COD concentrations between the three reactors were not statistically significant. Denitrification potential for the reactors was 1.20, 0.73 and 0.56 g COD/g N for 14, 21 and 28 day reactors, respectively, and the differences were statistically significant. None of the reactors achieved a denitrification potential of 5 g COD/g N, the amount required to use effluent of anaerobically digested swine waste as an internal carbon source in a BNR. This was attributed to operating conditions such as freezing and thawing of the raw swine waste that maximized CH4 yield and lowered the readily biodegradable COD concentration. In addition the 14 day reactor had low TAN concentrations thus increasing the denitrification potential of the centrate from that reactor.

  11. [Studies on Effect of Alkali Pretreatment on Anaerobic Digestion of Rice Straw with Confocal Raman Microscopy].

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi-hua; Luo, Liu-bin; Li, Xiao-li; He, Yong; Sheng, Kui-chuan

    2015-03-01

    NaOH pretreatment is a convenient and effective method which is widely used in rice straw anaerobic digestion. But the mechanism of the alkaline (NaOH) hydrolysis of biopolymers compositions and polymeric cross-linked network structures of rice straw cell wall need further study. This paper firstly studied the effect and mechanism of alkali pretreatment on anaerobic digestion and biogas production of rice straw by using a combination of confocal Raman microscopy and transmission electron microscope. First, the original rice straw and the rice straw pretreated by NaOH were taken for mapping scanning by confocal Raman microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution. Then principal component analysis was adopted to extract main information of Raman spectra, it could be found that the two types of samples were respectively presented with ray-like distribution in the first two principal component space, which were with cumulative contribution of 99%. And there was a clear boundary between the two types of samples without any overlapping, indicating that there was a significant difference of Raman spectral characteristic between original rice leaf and rice leaf pretreated by NaOH. Further analysis of the loading weights of the first two principal components showed that the Raman peaks at 1 739, 1 508 and 1 094 cm(-1) were the important bands, and these three Raman peaks were attributed to the scattering of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin respectively. Following, chemical imaging analysis of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin were achieved by combining these Raman peaks and microscopic image information. It could be found that the NaOH pretreatment resulted in a loss of dense spatial uniformity structure of tissue and great decreases of the contents of these three ingredients, particularly lignin. It can be concluded that it is feasible to non-destructively measure hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose in rice straw tissue by confocal Raman microscopy, and to achieve chemical imaging analysis of the three ingredients in tissue, and this research will be much help for revealing the promotion mechanism of NaOH pretreatment for the rice straw fermentation and biogas production. PMID:26117874

  12. Control of interspecies electron flow during anaerobic digestion: role of floc formation in syntrophic methanogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, J.H.; Chartrain, M.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The flora of an anaerobic whey-processing chemostat was separated by anaerobic sedimentation techniques into a free-living bacterial fraction and a bacterial floc fraction. The floc fraction constituted a major part (i.e., 57% total protein) of the total microbial population in the digestor, and it accounted for 87% of the total CO/sub 2/-dependent methanogenic activity and 76% of the total ethanol-consuming acetogenic activity. Lactose was degraded by both cellular fractions, but in the free flora fraction it was associated with higher intermediary levels of H/sub 2/, ethanol, butyrate, and propionate production. Electron microscopic analysis of flocs showed bacterial diversity and juxtapositioning of tentative Desulfovibrio and Methanobacterium species without significant microcolony formation. Ethanol, an intermediary product of lactose-hydrolyzing bacteria, was converted to acetate and methane within the flocs by interspecies electron transfer. Ethanol-dependent methane formation was compartmentalized and closely coupled kinetically within the flocs but without significant formation of H/sub 2/ gas. Physical disruption of flocs into fragments of 10- to 20-..mu..m diameter initially increased the H/sub 2/ partial pressure but did not change the carbon transformation kinetic patterns of ethanol metabolism or demonstrate a significant role for H/sub 2/ in CO/sub 2/ reduction to methane. The data demonstrate that floc formation in a whey-processing anaerobic digestor functions in juxtapositioning cells for interspecies electron transfer during syntrophic ethanol conversion into acetate and methane but by a mechanism which was independent of the available dissolved H/sub 2/ gas pool in the ecosystem.

  13. Effect of inoculum/substrate ratio on methane yield and orthophosphate release from anaerobic digestion of Microcystis spp.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shujuan; Yuan, Xianzheng; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Qiu, Yanling

    2010-06-15

    A batch anaerobic test was conducted to evaluate the effects of inoculum/substrate ratios (ISRs) on the methane yield and orthophosphate release from the anaerobic digestion of Microcystis spp. The results demonstrated an obvious influence on methane yield and orthophosphate release by ISR. The maximum methane yield decreased from 140.48 to 94.42 mL/gVS when the ISR decreased from 2.0 to 0.5. The highest maximum methane yield calculated from Ørskov equation was 153.66 mL/gVS at ISR value of 1.0. The values of pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) corroborated the appropriate stability of this anaerobic process. PMID:20138427

  14. Short term effects of copper, sulfadiazine and difloxacin on the anaerobic digestion of pig manure at low organic loading rates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Ostermann, Anne; Siemens, Jan; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics of inorganic and organic origin in pig manure can inhibit the anaerobic process in biogas plants. The influence of three frequently used antibiotics, copper dosed as CuSO(4), sulfadiazine (SDZ), and difloxacin (DIF), on the anaerobic digestion process of pig manure was studied in semi-continuous experiments. Biogas production recovered after every Cu dosage up to a sum of 12.94g Cukg(-1) organic dry matter (ODM), probably due to Cu precipitation following the formation of sulphide from sulphate. Complete inhibition was found at the very high Cu concentration of 19.40g Cukg(-1) ODM. Inhibitory effect of SDZ and DIF was observed at concentrations as high as 2.70gkg(-1) ODM and 0.54gkg(-1) ODM, respectively. It seems very unlikely that the antibiotics tested would inhibit the anaerobic process in a full-scale biogas plant. PMID:21868210

  15. Algaculture integration in conventional wastewater treatment plants: anaerobic digestion comparison of primary and secondary sludge with microalgae biomass.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Mendez, Lara; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using microalgae biomass as feedstock for anaerobic digestion together with other biomasses (primary and secondary sludge) normally generated in WWTP. Raw microalgae biomass anaerobic biodegradability (33%) was higher than that of secondary sludge (23%). Thermal pretreatment enhanced 62% and 16% methane yield for Chlorellavulgaris and secondary sludge, respectively. When both substrates were codigested, methane yields remained low. On the other hand, primary sludge supported the highest anaerobic biodegradability (97%) and when combined with thermally pretreated C. vulgaris, methane yields were higher (13-17%) than the ones expected theoretically. Despite the high protein content of those substrates and the high nitrogen mineralization, no ammonia inhibition was detected. Thereby, this study showed that algae biomass is a potential cosubstrate for biogas production together with municipal wastewater sludge. PMID:25451781

  16. Anaerobic digestion of different feedstocks: impact on energetic and environmental balances of biogas process.

    PubMed

    Bacenetti, Jacopo; Negri, Marco; Fiala, Marco; González-García, Sara

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of limiting the global warming is strictly linked to the reduction of GHG emissions. Renewable energy both allows reducing emissions and permits to delay fossil fuel depletion. The anaerobic digestion of animal manure and energy crops is a promising way of reducing GHG emissions. In Italy agricultural biogas production was considerably increased; nowadays there are about 520 agricultural biogas plants. The increasing number of biogas plants, especially of those larger than 500 kW(e) (electrical power), involves a high consumption of energy crops, large transport distances of biomass and digestate and difficulties on thermal energy valorization. In this study the energetic (CED) and environmental (GHG emissions) profiles associated with the production of electricity derived from biogas have been identified. Three biogas plants located in Northern Italy have been analyzed. The study has been carried out considering a cradle-to-grave perspective and thus, special attention has been paid on the feedstock production and biogas production process. The influences on the results taking into account different plant sizes and feeding rate has been assessed in detail. Energy analysis was performed using the Cumulative Energy Demand method (CED). The climate change was calculated for a 100-year time frame based on GHG emissions indicated as CO2 equivalents (eq) and defined by the IPCC (2006). In comparison to the fossil reference system, the electricity production using biogas saves GHG emissions from 0.188 to 1.193 kg CO2eq per kWh(e). Electricity supply from biogas can also contribute to a considerable reduction of the use of fossil energy carriers (from -3.97 to 10.08 MJ(fossil) per kWh(e)). The electricity production from biogas has a big potential for energy savings and reduction of GHG emissions. Efficient utilization of the cogenerated heat can substantially improve the GHG balance of electricity production from biogas. PMID:23831800

  17. Enhancement of waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion by a novel chemical free acid/alkaline pretreatment using electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Charles, W; Ng, B; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Cheng, L; Ho, G; Kayaalp, A

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is relatively poor due to hydrolysis limitations. Acid and alkaline pretreatments are effective in enhancing hydrolysis leading to higher methane yields. However, chemical costs often prohibit full-scale application. In this study, 12 V two-chamber electrolysis using an anion exchange membrane alters sludge pH without chemical dosing. pH dropped from 6.9 to 2.5 in the anode chamber and increased to 10.1 in the cathode chamber within 15 h. The volatile suspended solids solubilisation of WAS was 31.1% in the anode chamber and 34.0% in the cathode chamber. As a result, dissolved chemical oxygen demand increased from 164 to 1,787 mg/L and 1,256 mg/L in the anode and cathode chambers, respectively. Remixing of sludge from the two chambers brought the pH back to 6.5, hence no chemical neutralisation was required prior to anaerobic digestion. Methane yield during anaerobic digestion at 20 d retention time was 31% higher than that of untreated sludge. An energy balance assessment indicated that the non-optimised process could approximately recover the energy (electricity) expended in the electrolysis process. With suitable optimisation of treatment time and voltages, significant energy savings would be expected in addition to the benefit of decreased sludge volume. PMID:23787324

  18. Influence of feeding mixture composition in batch anaerobic co-digestion of stabilized municipal sludge and waste from dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Trulli, Ettore; Torretta, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Waste anaerobic co-digestion applications are particularly useful in Southern Mediterranean areas where large quantities of agricultural waste materials and waste from agro-industries are produced. This waste can be added to urban waste together with the sludge produced by wastewater treatment processes, which, when combined, guarantee the supply of organic matrixes for treatment throughout the year. The implementation of facilities to service vast areas of the agricultural economy and which are heterogeneous in terms of production can provide a good solution. We present an experimental investigation into the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal sludge and bio-waste produced in the Mediterranean area. We conducted anaerobic treatability tests, with measures of biogas production and pH of the mixture in digestion. Our main aims were to identify an optimal mix of substrates for the production of biogas, and to analyse the influence on the composition of biogas and the variation in pH values of the substrates. This analysis was conducted considering the variation of the input, in particular due to the addition of waste acids, such as biological sewage sludge. PMID:25442095

  19. Anaerobic digestate from biogas production as a resource for improving soil fertility: effects on crop yield and soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Vignozzi, Nadia; Valboa, Giuseppe; Papini, Rossella; Fabiani, Arturo; Simoncini, Stefania; Mocali, Stefano; Piccolo, Raimondo

    2013-04-01

    Soil fertility is fundamental in determining crops productivity in all farming systems. Production of biogas through anaerobic digestion of energy crops generates residues that can represent a valuable resource to sustain and improve soil fertility and to increase soil organic matter content. Residues from anaerobic digestion contain organic fractions and available nutrients, that can thus be returned to the cultivation soil as fertilizer and soil conditioner. However, some unknown aspects of digested residues utilization remain to explore: i) the nutrient supply and the real potential for mineral fertilization substitution, ii) the impact on the structure and functioning of soil microbial communities, iii) the direct and indirect effects on soil structure, organic matter and C mineralization. The aim of the present research was to gain a better understanding of these aspects, evaluating the effects of anaerobic digestate application on soil properties and maize yield. With the main focus of comparing mineral fertilization (250 Kg N ha-1) with digested residues addition (at the dose of 25 % and 50 % of mineral fertilizer), a triplicate sets of plots were designed in a field experiment on a silty-clay loam soil in the southern Po Valley (Italy). The amount of applied residues was calculated according to its N content in order to fertilizer each plots with the same amount of total nitrogen. Residues from digestion showed a N content of 0.4 % (60 % as N-NH4) and a C/N ratio of 3. Changes in soil quality after residues application were studied with a holistic approach, involving microbiological, physical and chemical aspects of soil fertility. In particular, we determined: the abundance and diversity of bacterial and fungal soil communities; the soil organic matter content, its distribution within soil aggregates and the C mineralization potential; cation exchange capacity; the main macro and micro nutrients; bulk density; aggregate stability. No significant differences among treatments were registered in the above ground maize biomass. Molecular analysis conducted on microbial soil communities suggested that the application of digested residues to soil contributes to substantial modifications of both bacterial and fungal community structure. Soil organic C and total N increased in soils treated with digested residues addition, with no significant differences between the two doses of digestate. Cation exchange capacity did not show significant differences among treatments, remaining stable during the maize vegetative cycle. Differently, some variations occurred in the exchangeable cation pool. In particular, K content increased under digestate treatments, while Na and Mg contents increased with time irrespective of the fertilization treatment. No significant variations were observed in soil microelement levels, except for an increase in Zn content at the highest digestate dose. Moreover, digested residue addition had a positive impact on aggregates stability. From the first results, the absence of negative effects in plant productivity and soil fertility after residues application, at both doses, is a promising indication for the potential use of anaerobic digestate as substitute of mineral fertilizers.

  20. Total solids content: a key parameter of metabolic pathways in dry anaerobic digestion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In solid-state anaerobic digestion (AD) bioprocesses, hydrolytic and acidogenic microbial metabolisms have not yet been clarified. Since these stages are particularly important for the establishment of the biological reaction, better knowledge could optimize the process performances by process parameters adjustment. Results This study demonstrated the effect of total solids (TS) content on microbial fermentation of wheat straw with six different TS contents ranging from wet to dry conditions (10 to 33% TS). Three groups of metabolic behaviors were distinguished based on wheat straw conversion rates with 2,200, 1,600, and 1,400 mmol.kgVS-1 of fermentative products under wet (10 and 14% TS), dry (19 to 28% TS), and highly dry (28 to 33% TS) conditions, respectively. Furthermore, both wet and dry fermentations showed acetic and butyric acid metabolisms, whereas a mainly butyric acid metabolism occurred in highly dry fermentation. Conclusion Substrate conversion was reduced with no changes of the metabolic pathways until a clear limit at 28% TS content, which corresponded to the threshold value of free water content of wheat straw. This study suggested that metabolic pathways present a limit of TS content for high-solid AD. PMID:24261971

  1. Physicothermochemical pretreatments of food processing waste for enchancing anaerobic digestion and biogas generation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. Menoufia Univ., Sadat City ); Nasr, M.I. )

    1993-10-01

    This paper was conducted to evaluate the effect of milling and alkali lime cooking pretreatments on the rate and extent of methane generation from sugar Cane bagasse. The effect of pretreatment process variables (Particle size 8.0.003 mm, temperature between 100 and 250[degree]C and alkaline dosage between 0 and 8g CaO/kg VS) on the biogas generation from Sugar Cane bagasse has been investigated. Methane generation from the pretreated cane bagasse was studied using serum bottle technique and an upflow anaerobic filter bioreactor. The optimum condition involves alkali-cooking of cane bagasse (0.5 mm) with 4% CaO at 200[degree]C, dissolving most of the cellulose and converting it in a mixture of organic acids, including formic, acetic, lactic, and succinic acids. About 80% of the COD content of the cellulose was retained in the cooked liquor. A very rapid biogas were observed in the first three days of 70% methane content from the pretreated cane bagasse and the digestion was completed within 8 days. It has been concluded, that the lime-cooking of CB could produce methane as much as 70% of that from glucose. Inhibition did not seems to be serious problem in the biogas generation from the alkali-cooking cane bagasse. 29 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Quick-start of full-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) using aeration.

    PubMed

    Lagerkvist, Anders; Pelkonen, Markku; Wikström, Tommy

    2015-04-01

    A conventional 1300 m(3) continuously stirred anaerobic tank reactor at the city of Boden, north Sweden, which was receiving a feed of both sewage sludge and food waste, was put out of operation due to the build-up of a float phase. The reactor was emptied and cleaned. At start-up there was no methanogenic sludge available, so an unconventional start-up procedure was applied: The reactor was rapidly (8 days with 1200 kg of total solids (TS) added daily) filled with thickened, and slightly acidic sewage sludge, showing only slight methane generation, which was subsequently heated to 55 °C. Then compressed air was blown into the digester and within a month a fully functional methanogenic culture was established. The transfer from acidogenic to methanogenic conditions happened in about one week. As a start-up technique this is fast and cost efficient, it only requires the access of a compressor, electricity and a source of air. In total, about 16 tonnes of oxygen were used. It is proposed that this method may also be used as an operational amendment technique, should a reactor tend to acidify. PMID:25636861

  3. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m(2) /day and current density of 4.33 A/m(2) were achieved at steady-state condition. As a result, 112% extra biogas was produced due to ammonia recovery by the SMDC. High-throughput sequencing showed that ammonia recovery had an impact on the microbial community structures in the SMDC and CSTR. Considering the additional economic benefits of biogas enhancement and possible wastewater treatment, the SMDC may represent a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method for waste resources recovery and biomethanation of ammonia-rich residues. PMID:25620722

  4. Effects of Psychrophilic Storage on Manures as Substrate for Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Wenche; Dinamarca, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The idea that storage can enhance manure quality as substrate for anaerobic digestion (AD) to recover more methane is evaluated by studying storage time and temperature effects on manure composition. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) and total dissolved organics (CODs) were measured in full scale pig manure storage for a year and in multiple flasks at fixed temperatures, mainly relevant for colder climates. The CODs generation, influenced by the source of the pig manure, was highest initially (0.3?g?COD?L?1d?1) gradually dropping for 3 months towards a level of COD loss by methane production at 15°C. Methane emission was low (<0.01?g?COD?L?1d?1) after a brief initial peak. Significant CODs generation was obtained during the warmer season (T > 10°C) in the full scale storage and almost no generation at lower temperatures (4–6°C). CODs consisted mainly of VFA, especially acetate. All VFAs were present at almost constant ratios. The naturally separated manure middle layer without sediment and coarser particles is suitable for sludge bed AD and improved further during an optimal storage time of 1–3 month(s). This implies that high rate AD can be integrated with regular manure slurry handling systems to obtain efficient biogas generation. PMID:25165712

  5. Cellulose digestion and metabolism induced biocatalytic transitions in anaerobic microbial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Morioka, Yusuke; Shino, Amiu; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of highly polymerized biomass by microbial communities present in diverse microbial ecosystems is an indispensable metabolic process for biogeochemical cycling in nature and for industrial activities required to maintain a sustainable society. Therefore, the evaluation of the complicated microbial metabolomics presents a significant challenge. We here describe a comprehensive strategy for characterizing the degradation of highly crystallized bacterial cellulose (BC) that is accompanied by metabolite production for identifying the responsible biocatalysts, including microorganisms and their metabolic functions. To this end, we employed two-dimensional solid- and one-dimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profiling combined with a metagenomic approach using stable isotope labeling. The key components of biocatalytic reactions determined using a metagenomic approach were correlated with cellulose degradation and metabolic products. The results indicate that BC degradation was mediated by cellulases that contain carbohydrate-binding modules and that belong to structural type A. The degradation reactions induced the metabolic dynamics of the microbial community and produced organic compounds, such as acetic acid and propionic acid, mainly metabolized by clostridial species. This combinatorial, functional and structural metagenomic approach is useful for the comprehensive characterization of biomass degradation, metabolic dynamics and their key components in diverse ecosystems. PMID:24958386

  6. The effects of alternative pretreatment strategies on anaerobic digestion and methane production from different algal strains.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The effect of various pretreatment strategies on methane yields following anaerobic digestion (AD) of five different microalgal strains was investigated. Pavlova_cf sp., Tetraselmis sp. and Thalassiosira weissflogii exhibited substantial methane yields of 0.4-0.5L/g volatile solids (VS) without pretreatment, providing up to 75-80% of theoretical values. In contrast, methane yields from Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were around 0.35L/g VS, or 55-60% of the theoretical values, respectively. Alkali treatment was not effective and thermal pretreatment only enhanced Nannochloropsis methane yields. Thermochemical pretreatment had the strongest impact on biomass solubilization with methane yields increasing by 30% and 40% for Chlorella and Nannochloropsis, respectively. The lipid content had a strong beneficial impact on the theoretical and observed methane yields as compared to protein and carbohydrate content. Other features such as cell-wall composition are also likely to be important factors dictating algal biodegradability and methane yields addressed in part by thermochemical pretreatment. PMID:24468544

  7. Functional responses and adaptation of mesophilic microbial communities to psychrophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Gunnigle, Eoin; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Fuszard, Matthew; Botting, Catherine H; Sheahan, Jerome; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Abram, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Psychrophilic (<20°C) anaerobic digestion (AD) represents an attractive alternative to mesophilic wastewater treatment. In order to investigate the AD microbiome response to temperature change, with particular emphasis on methanogenic archaea, duplicate laboratory-scale AD bioreactors were operated at 37°C followed by a temperature drop to 15°C. A volatile fatty acid-based wastewater (composed of propionic acid, butyric acid, acetic acid and ethanol) was used to provide substrates representing the later stages of AD. Community structure was monitored using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, as well as DNA and cDNA-based DGGE analysis, while the abundance of relevant methanogens was followed using qPCR. In addition, metaproteomics, microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and methanogenic activity measurements were employed to investigate microbial activities and functions. Methanomicrobiales abundance increased at low temperature, which correlated with an increased contribution of CH4 production from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 15°C. Methanosarcinales utilized acetate and H2/CO2 as CH4 precursors at both temperatures and a partial shift from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was observed for this archaeal population at 15°C. An upregulation of protein expression was reported at low temperature as well as the detection of chaperones indicating that mesophilic communities experienced stress during long-term exposure to 15°C. Overall, changes in microbial community structure and function were found to underpin the adaptation of mesophilic sludge to psychrophilic AD. PMID:26507125

  8. Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation in outdoors using the diluted anaerobically digested activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Li-Bin; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Zhao, Fang-Chao; Chu, Hua-Qiang; Guo, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A freshwater green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) was cultured in outdoors using the diluted anaerobically digested activated sludge (ADAS). The outdoors batch culture in every season showed that C. pyrenoidosa can grow normally under natural conditions in the diluted ADAS (STE/ADAS=1.5/1, 3/1 and 5/1, v/v). Seasonal changes of environmental conditions significantly affected biomass growth and nutrient removal. Optimal biomass growth and nutrient removal was achieved at STE/ADAS=1.5/1 during summer culture, harvesting a maximum biomass concentration of 1.97±0.21g/L, average biomass productivity of 291.52±33.74g/m(3)/day (maximum value of 573.10±41.82) and average lipids productivity of 37.49±5.26g/m(3)/day (maximum value of 73.70±9.75); simultaneously, the microalgae growth effectively removed nutrients from the wastewater, including 105.6±17.1mgCODCr/L/day, 36.8±6.1mgN/L/day and 6.1±1.1mgP/L/day. PMID:26407348

  9. Boosting D-lactate production in engineered cyanobacteria using sterilized anaerobic digestion effluents.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Whitney D; Varman, Arul M; You, Le; Hembree, Zachary; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an environmentally friendly approach to waste treatment, which can generate N and P-rich effluents that can be used as nutrient sources for microalgal cultivations. Modifications of AD processes to inhibit methanogenesis leads to the accumulation of acetic acid, a carbon source that can promote microalgal biosynthesis. This study tested different AD effluents from municipal wastes on their effect on D-lactate production by an engineered Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (carrying a novel lactate dehydrogenase). The results indicate that: (1) AD effluents can be supplemented into the modified BG-11 culture medium (up to 1:4 volume ratio) to reduce N and P cost; (2) acetate-rich AD effluents enhance D-lactate synthesis by ? 40% (1.2g/L of D-lactate in 20 days); and (3) neutral or acidic medium had a deleterious effect on lactate secretion and biomass growth by the engineered strain. This study demonstrates the advantages and guidelines in employing wastewater for photomixotrophic biosynthesis using engineered microalgae. PMID:25084044

  10. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of simulated organic fraction of municipal solid waste: process modeling.

    PubMed

    Fdez-Güelfo, L A; Álvarez-Gallego, C; Sales Márquez, D; Romero García, L I

    2011-01-01

    Solid retention time (SRT) is a very important operational variable in continuous and semicontinuous waste treatment processes since the organic matter removal efficiency--expressed in terms of percentage of Dissolved Organic Carbon (% DOC) or Volatile Solids (% VS) removed--and the biogas or methane production are closely related with the SRT imposed. Optimum SRT is depending on the waste characteristics and the microorganisms involved in the process and, hence, it should be determined specifically in each case. In this work a series of experiments were carried out to determine the effect of SRT, from 40 to 8 days, on the performance of the dry (30% Total Solids) thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes (OFMSW) operating at semicontinuous regime of feeding. The experimental results show than 15days is the optimum SRT (the best between all proved) for this process. Besides, data of organic matter concentration and methane production versus SRT have been used to obtain the kinetic parameters of the kinetic model of Romero García (1991): the maximum specific growth rate of the microorganisms (?max=0.580 days(-1)) and the fraction of substrate non-biodegradable (?=0.268). PMID:20729078

  11. High rate psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of high solids (35%) dairy manure in sequence batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-06-01

    Zero liquid discharge is increasingly adopted as an objective for waste treatment process. The objective of this study was to increase the feed total solids (TS) and the organic loading rate (OLR) fed to a novel psychrophilic (20°C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD). Duplicate laboratory-scale bioreactors were fed cow feces and wheat straw (35% TS in feed) at OLR of 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1) during long-term operation (147 days consisting of 7 successive cycles). An overall average specific methane yield (SMY) of 151.8±7.9 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed with an averaged volatile solids removal of 42.4±4.3% were obtained at a volatile solids-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio (ISR) of 2.13±0.2. The operation was stable as indicated by biogas and VFAs profiles and the results were reproducible in successive cycles; a maximum SMY of 163.3±5.7 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed was obtained. Hydrolysis was the reaction limiting step. High rate PDAD of 35% TS dairy manure is possible in sequential batch reactor within 21 days treatment cycle length. PMID:25804501

  12. Low pH anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge for enhanced phosphorous release.

    PubMed

    Latif, Muhammad A; Mehta, Chirag M; Batstone, Damien J

    2015-09-15

    This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) at low pH to enhance phosphorous solubility. Batch biochemical methane potential tests were conducted at a pH range of 5 to 7.2 in two separate sets (two different WAS samples collected from municipal WWTP). Low pH (<5.7) caused a significant (p = 0.004) decrease in methane potential (B0) up to 33% and 3.6 times increase in phosphorus release compared to neutral pH (7-7.7), but with no major change in methane production rate coefficient (khyd). The loss in methane yield was mainly due to decrease in hydrolytic capability rather than inhibition of methanogenesis with volatile fatty acids being <300 mgCOD L(-1) and soluble COD <1300 mgCOD L(-1) even at low pH. While pH did not influence the acetoclastic community (Methanosaeta dominated), it was the primary driver for the remaining community (p = 0.004), and caused a loss of diversity and shift to Clostridia. PMID:26081435

  13. Continuous cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa using anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater in the outdoors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hua-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Yang, Li-Bin; Zhao, Fang-Chao; Guo, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Microalgae cultivation using wastewater might be a suitable approach to support sustainable large-scale biomass production. Its compelling characteristics included the recycling of nutrients and water resources, reducing carbon emissions and harvesting available biomass. In outdoor batch and continuous cultures, Chlorella pyrenoidosa completely adapted to anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater and was the dominant microorganism in the photobioreactor. However, seasonal changes of environmental conditions significantly influenced biomass growth and lipid production. The long-term outdoor operation demonstrated that the biomass concentration and productivity in continuous operations at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) can be successfully predicted using the kinetic growth parameters obtained from the batch culture. A moderate HRT (4days) in the summer provided the best microalgae and lipid production and achieved relatively high biomass concentrations of 1.29-1.62g/L, biomass productivities of 342.6±12.8mg/L/d and lipids productivities of 43.37±7.43mg/L/d. PMID:25746477

  14. Biomethane production and physicochemical characterization of anaerobically digested teff (Eragrostis tef) straw pretreated by sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chufo, Akiber; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Pang, Yunzhi; Li, Xiujin

    2015-04-01

    The biogas production potential and biomethane content of teff straw through pretreatment by NaOH was investigated. Different NaOH concentrations (1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) were used for each four solid loadings (50, 65, 80 and 95 g/L). The effects of NaOH as pretreatment factor on the biodegradability of teff straw, changes in main compositions and enhancement of anaerobic digestion were analyzed. The result showed that, using 4% NaOH for pretreatment in 80 g/L solid loading produced 40.0% higher total biogas production and 48.1% higher biomethane content than the untreated sample of teff straw. Investigation of changes in chemical compositions and physical microstructure indicated that there was 4.3-22.1% total lignocellulosic compositions removal after three days pretreatment with NaOH. The results further revealed that NaOH pretreatment changed the structural compositions and lignin network, and improved biogas production from teff straw. PMID:25656865

  15. Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system

    SciTech Connect

    De Gioannis, G.; Diaz, L.F.; Muntoni, A. Pisanu, A.

    2008-07-01

    A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

  16. Enhanced dewaterability of anaerobically digested sewage sludge using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture as sludge conditioner.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Ravindran, Balasubramani; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Kurade, Mayur B; Yu, Shuk-Man; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2014-10-01

    Role of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture in bioacidification and dewaterability of anaerobically digested sewage sludge (ADS) was investigated. A. ferrooxidans culture grown in 9K medium along with Fe(2+) produced iron flocculant containing, secondary iron minerals and biopolymeric substances as confirmed by FT-IR, XRD, and SEM-EDX. Bioacidification of ADS was performed using 10% (v/v) A. ferrooxidans culture, isolated cells and cell-free culture filtrate; and dewaterability was assessed using the capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF). Isolated bacterial cells significantly (P<0.05) reduced the sludge dewaterability when supplemented with Fe(2+) while the whole culture and cell-free filtrate rapidly acidified the sludge without Fe(2+) and showed significant reduction of CST (71.3-73.5%) and SRF (84-88%). Results clearly indicated that the culture and filtrate of the A. ferrooxidans facilitated rapid sludge dewaterability while the cells supplemented with Fe(2+) also enhanced dewaterability but required 2-4 days. PMID:25064335

  17. Bioremediation of reject water from anaerobically digested waste water sludge with macroalgae (Ulva lactuca, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Sode, Sidsel; Bruhn, Annette; Balsby, Thorsten J S; Larsen, Martin Mørk; Gotfredsen, Annemarie; Rasmussen, Michael Bo

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorus and biologically active nitrogen are valuable nutrient resources. Bioremediation with macroalgae is a potential means for recovering nutrients from waste streams. In this study, reject water from anaerobically digested sewage sludge was successfully tested as nutrient source for cultivation of the green macroalgae Ulva lactuca. Maximal growth rates of 54.57±2.16% FW d(-1) were achieved at reject water concentrations equivalent to 50 ?M NH4(+). Based on the results, the growth and nutrient removal was parameterised as function of NH4(+) concentration a tool for optimisation of any similar phycoremediation system. Maximal nutrient removal rates of 22.7 mg N g DW(-1) d(-1) and 2.7 mg P g DW(-1) d(-1) were achieved at reject water concentrations equivalent to 80 and 89 ?M NH4(+), respectively. A combined and integrated use of the produced biomass in a biorefinery is thought to improve the feasibility of using Ulva for bioremediation of reject water. PMID:23954716

  18. Cold season ammonia emissions from land spreading with anaerobic digestates from biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Jan Reent; Dittert, Klaus; Mühling, Karl-Hermann; Kage, Henning; Pacholski, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestates (AD) from biogas production are applied to agricultural land as organic fertilizers, but pose an ammonia (NH3) emission source. However, data about NH3 emissions of cold season AD land spreading is still lacking. Therefore, in the present study NH3 emissions of AD application under winter conditions were determined. AD was applied via trail hoses to a field plot of 27 ha in Northern Germany during the winter with temperatures around the freezing point and partly frozen soil. NH4+ N application rate was, including a preceding urea application, 123 kg NH4+ and urea N ha-1. The NH3 volatilization was monitored using Open Path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in combination with a micrometeorological transport model. Cumulative NH3 volatilization during the six day measurements was 17.5 kg NH3 N ha-1 which corresponds to 33.1% of the NH4+ N in applied AD. This NH3 loss is relatively high for low temperature conditions and was most likely caused by the frozen soil restricting AD infiltration.

  19. Cellulose Digestion and Metabolism Induced Biocatalytic Transitions in Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Yamazawa, Akira; Iikura, Tomohiro; Morioka, Yusuke; Shino, Amiu; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of highly polymerized biomass by microbial communities present in diverse microbial ecosystems is an indispensable metabolic process for biogeochemical cycling in nature and for industrial activities required to maintain a sustainable society. Therefore, the evaluation of the complicated microbial metabolomics presents a significant challenge. We here describe a comprehensive strategy for characterizing the degradation of highly crystallized bacterial cellulose (BC) that is accompanied by metabolite production for identifying the responsible biocatalysts, including microorganisms and their metabolic functions. To this end, we employed two-dimensional solid- and one-dimensional solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profiling combined with a metagenomic approach using stable isotope labeling. The key components of biocatalytic reactions determined using a metagenomic approach were correlated with cellulose degradation and metabolic products. The results indicate that BC degradation was mediated by cellulases that contain carbohydrate-binding modules and that belong to structural type A. The degradation reactions induced the metabolic dynamics of the microbial community and produced organic compounds, such as acetic acid and propionic acid, mainly metabolized by clostridial species. This combinatorial, functional and structural metagenomic approach is useful for the comprehensive characterization of biomass degradation, metabolic dynamics and their key components in diverse ecosystems. PMID:24958386

  20. Bioelectrochemical reduction of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion effluent for the production of biofuels.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Sanath; Min, Booki

    2015-12-15

    This study proves for the first time the feasibility of biofuel production from anaerobic digestion effluent via bioelectrochemical cell operation at various applied cell voltages (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V). An increase in cell voltage from 1 to 2 V resulted in more reduction current generation (-0.48 to -0.78 mA) at a lowered cathode potential (-0.45 to -0.84 mV vs Ag/AgCl). Various alcohols were produced depending on applied cell voltages, and the main products were butanol, ethanol, and propanol. Hydrogen and methane production were also observed in the headspace of the cell. A large amount of lactic acid was unexpectedly formed at all conditions, which might be the primary cause of the limited biofuel production. The addition of neutral red (NR) to the system could increase the cathodic reduction current, and thus more biofuels were produced with an enhanced alcohol formation compared to without a mediator. PMID:26402877