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Sample records for anaerobic membrane bioreactors

  1. Applicability of dynamic membrane technology in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ersahin, Mustafa Evren; Ozgun, Hale; Tao, Yu; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the applicability of dynamic membrane technology in anaerobic membrane bioreactors for the treatment of high strength wastewaters. A monofilament woven fabric was used as support material for dynamic membrane formation. An anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) was operated under a variety of operational conditions, including different sludge retention times (SRTs) of 20 and 40 days in order to determine the effect of SRT on both biological performance and dynamic membrane filtration characteristics. High COD removal efficiencies exceeding 99% were achieved during the operation at both SRTs. Higher filtration resistances were measured during the operation at SRT of 40 days in comparison to SRT of 20 days, applying a stable flux of 2.6 L/m(2) h. The higher filtration resistances coincided with lower extracellular polymeric substances concentration in the bulk sludge at SRT of 40 days, likely resulting in a decreased particle flocculation. Results showed that dynamic membrane technology achieved a stable and high quality permeate and AnDMBRs can be used as a reliable and satisfactory technology for treatment of high strength wastewaters. PMID:24156951

  2. Pulse shear stress for anaerobic membrane bioreactor fouling control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jixiang; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-01-01

    Increase of shear stress at membrane surfaces is a generally applied strategy to minimize membrane fouling. It has been reported that a two-phase flow, better known as slug flow, is an effective way to increase shear stress. Hence, slug flow was introduced into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor for membrane fouling control. Anaerobic suspended sludge was cultured in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AMBR) operated with a side stream inside-out tubular membrane unit applying sustainable flux flow regimes. The averaged particle diameter decreased from 20 to 5 microm during operation of the AMBR. However, the COD removal efficiency did not show any significant deterioration, whereas the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) increased from 0.16 to 0.41 gCOD/g VSS/day. Nevertheless, the imposed gas slug appeared to be insufficient for adequate fouling control, resulting in rapidly increasing trans membrane pressures (TMP) operating at a flux exceeding 16 L/m2/h. Addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) enhanced the effect of slug flow on membrane fouling. However, the combined effect was still considered as not being significant. The tubular membrane was subsequently equipped with inert inserts for creating a locally increased shear stress for enhanced fouling control. Results show an increase in the membrane flux from 16 L/m2/h to 34 L/m2/h after the inserts were mounted in the membrane tube. PMID:22097007

  3. Characterization of organic membrane foulants in a forward osmosis membrane bioreactor treating anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Tian, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Feng; You, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this study, two aerobic forward osmosis (FO) membrane bioreactors (MBR) were utilized to treat the effluent of mesophilic (35°C) and atmospheric (25°C) anaerobic MBRs, respectively. The results showed that the FO membrane process could significantly improve the removal efficiencies of N and P. Meanwhile, the flux decline of the FOMBR treating effluent of mesophilic AnMBR (M-FOMBR) was higher than that treating effluent of atmospheric AnMBR (P-FOMBR). The organic membrane foulants in the two FOMBRs were analyzed to understand the membrane fouling behavior in FO processes. It was found that the slightly increased accumulation of protein-like substances into external foulants did not cause faster flux decline in P-FOMBR than that in M-FOMBR. However, the quantity of organic matter tended to deposit or adsorb into FO membrane pores in P-FOMBR was less than that in M-FOMBR, which was accordance with the tendency of membrane fouling indicated by flux decline. PMID:24976492

  4. Performance of anaerobic membrane bioreactor during digestion and thickening of aerobic membrane bioreactor excess sludge.

    PubMed

    Hafuka, Akira; Mimura, Kazuhisa; Ding, Qing; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor in terms of digestion and thickening of excess sludge from an aerobic membrane bioreactor. A digestion reactor equipped with an external polytetrafluoroethylene tubular microfiltration membrane module was operated in semi-batch mode. Solids were concentrated by repeated membrane filtration and sludge feeding, and their concentration reached 25,400mg/L after 92d. A high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, i.e., 98%, was achieved during operation. A hydraulic retention time of 34d and a pulse organic loading rate of 2200mg-COD/(L-reactor) gave a biogas production rate and biogas yield of 1.33L/(reactor d) and 0.08L/g-CODinput, respectively. The external membrane unit worked well without membrane cleaning for 90d. The transmembrane pressure reached 25kPa and the filtration flux decreased by 80% because of membrane fouling after operation for 90d. PMID:27394993

  5. Submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment and energy generation.

    PubMed

    Bornare, J B; Adhyapak, U S; Minde, G P; Kalyan Raman, V; Sapkal, V S; Sapkal, R S

    2015-01-01

    Compared with conventional wastewater treatment processes, membrane bioreactors (MBRs) offer several advantages including high biodegradation efficiency, excellent effluent quality and smaller footprint. However, it has some limitations on account of its energy intensive operation. In recent years, there has been growing interest in use of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) due to their potential advantages over aerobic systems, which include low sludge production and energy generation in terms of biogas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a submerged AnMBR for the treatment of synthetic wastewater having 4,759 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD). The COD removal efficiency was over 95% during the performance evaluation study. Treated effluent with COD concentration of 231 mg/l was obtained for 25.5 hours hydraulic retention time. The obtained total organic carbon concentrations in feed and permeate were 1,812 mg/l and 89 mg/l, respectively. An average biogas generation and yield were 25.77 l/d and 0.36 m3/kg COD, respectively. Evolution of trans-membrane pressure (TMP) as a function of time was studied and an average TMP of 15 kPa was found suitable to achieve membrane flux of 12.17 l/(m2h). Almost weekly back-flow chemical cleaning of the membrane was found necessary to control TMP within the permissible limit of 20 kPa. PMID:26038930

  6. Instrumentation, control, and automation for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Robles, Ángel; Durán, Freddy; Ruano, María Victoria; Ribes, Josep; Rosado, Alfredo; Seco, Aurora; Ferrer, José

    2015-01-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was designed and operated for urban wastewater treatment. An instrumentation, control, and automation (ICA) system was designed and implemented for proper process performance. Several single-input-single-output (SISO) feedback control loops based on conventional on-off and PID algorithms were implemented to control the following operating variables: flow-rates (influent, permeate, sludge recycling and wasting, and recycled biogas through both reactor and membrane tanks), sludge wasting volume, temperature, transmembrane pressure, and gas sparging. The proposed ICA for AnMBRs for urban wastewater treatment enables the optimization of this new technology to be achieved with a high level of process robustness towards disturbances. PMID:25635702

  7. Analysis of fouling mechanisms in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Amine; Ben Amar, Nihel; Harmand, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate the fouling mechanisms responsible for MF and UF membrane flux decline in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBR). We have used the fouling mechanism models proposed by Hermia (1982), namely pore constriction, cake formation, complete blocking and intermediate blocking. Based on an optimization approach and using experimental data extracted from the literature, we propose a systematic procedure for identifying the most likely fouling mechanism in play. Short-term as well as long-term experiments are considered and discussed. It was found that short-term experiments are usually characterized by two fouling phases during which the same fouling mechanism or two different mechanisms affect the process. In contrast, in long-term experiments involving cleaning cycles, membrane fouling appears to be better ascribed to one phase only. The impact of abiotic parameters on membrane fouling mechanisms is reviewed and discussed in the light of these results. Finally, it is shown that the mechanism most responsible for membrane fouling in an AnMBR is cake formation. This main result will be useful for the future development of simple integrated models for optimization and control. PMID:22397816

  8. Removal of trace organics by anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Monsalvo, Victor M; McDonald, James A; Khan, Stuart J; Le-Clech, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    The biological removal of 38 trace organics (pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors, personal care products and pesticides) was studied in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). This work presents complete information on the different removal mechanisms involved in the removal of trace organics in this process. In particular, it is focused on advanced characterization of the relative amount of TO accumulated within the fouling layers formed on the membranes. The results show that only 9 out of 38 compounds were removed by more than 90% while 23 compounds were removed by less than 50%. These compounds are therefore removed in an AnMBR biologically and partially adsorbed and retained by flocs and the deposition developed on the membranes, respectively. A total amount of 288 mg of trace organics was retained per m(2) of membrane, which were distributed along the different fouling layers. Among the trace organics analyzed, 17α-ethynylestradiol, estrone, octylphenol and bisphenol A were the most retained by the fouling layers. Among the fouling layers deposited on the membranes, the non-readily detachable layer has been identified as the main barrier for trace organics. PMID:24321247

  9. Autotrophic ammonia removal from landfill leachate in anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal, removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. In this paper, ANAMMOX process was adopted for removing NH4+-N from landfill leachate having low COD using anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The AnMBR was optimized for nitrogen loading rate (NLR) varying from 0.025 to 5 kg NH4+-N/m3/d with hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 1 to 3d. NH4+-N removal efficacy of 85.13 +/- 9.67% with the mean nitrogen removal rate of 5.54 +/- 0.63 kg NH4+-N/m3/d was achieved with NLR of 6.51 +/- 0.20kg NH4+-N/m3/d at 1.5 d HRT. The nitrogen transformation intermediates in the form of hydrazine (N2H4) and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were 0.008 +/- 0.005 and 0.006 +/- 0.001 mg/l, respectively, indicating co-existence of aerobic ammonia oxidizers and ANAMMOX. The free ammonia (NH3) and free nitrous acid (HNO2) concentrations were 26.61 +/- 16.54 mg/l and (1.66 +/- 0.95) x 10(-5) mg/l, preventing NO2(-)-N oxidation to NO3(-)-N enabling sustained NH4+-N removal. PMID:24617075

  10. Comparing the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y W; Zhou, J L; Zhang, J; Liang, S; Ni, B J; Zhang, X B; Wang, J

    2016-08-01

    The anaerobic digestion process in anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an effective way for waste management, energy sustainability and pollution control in the environment. This digestion process basically involves the production of volatile fatty acids and biohydrogen as intermediate products and methane as a final product. This paper compares the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors through a thorough assessment. The value was assessed in terms of technical feasibility, economic assessment, environmental impact and impact on society. Even though the current research objective is more inclined to optimize the production of methane, the intermediate products could also be considered as economically attractive and environment friendly options. Hence, this is the first review study to correlate the idea into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor which is expected to guide future research pathways regarding anaerobic process and its bioproducts. PMID:27233838

  11. Membrane fouling control using a rotary disk in a submerged anaerobic membrane sponge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungmin; Shin, Jaewon; Kim, Hyemin; Lee, Jung-Yeol; Yoon, Min-Hyuk; Won, Seyeon; Lee, Byung-Chan; Song, Kyung Guen

    2014-11-01

    Despite significant research efforts over the last few decades, membrane fouling in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) remains an unsolved problem that increases the overall operational costs and obstructs the industrial applications. Herein, we developed a method for effectively controlling the membrane fouling in a sponge-submerged AnMBRs using an anaerobic rotary disk MBR (ARMBR). The disk rotation led the effective collision between the sponge and membrane surface; thus successfully enhanced the membrane permeability in the ARMBR. The effect of the disk rotational speed and sponge volume fraction on the membrane permeability and the relationship between the water flow direction and membrane permeability were investigated. The long-term feasibility was tested over 100days of synthetic wastewater treatment. As a result, stable and economical performance was observed without membrane replacement and washing. The proposed integrated rotary disk-supporting media appears to be a feasible and even beneficial option in the AnMBR technology. PMID:25277260

  12. Psychrophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2013-03-15

    A bench-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) equipped with submerged flat-sheet microfiltration membranes was operated at psychrophilic temperature (15 °C) treating simulated and actual domestic wastewater (DWW). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal during simulated DWW operation averaged 92 ± 5% corresponding to an average permeate COD of 36 ± 21 mg/L. Dissolved methane in the permeate stream represented a substantial fraction (40-50%) of the total methane generated by the system due to methane solubility at psychrophilic temperatures and oversaturation relative to Henry's law. During actual DWW operation, COD removal averaged 69 ± 10%. The permeate COD and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) averaged 76 ± 10 mg/L and 24 ± 3 mg/L, respectively, indicating compliance with the U.S. EPA's standard for secondary effluent (30 mg/L BOD(5)). Membrane fouling was managed using biogas sparging and permeate backflushing and a flux greater than 7 LMH was maintained for 30 days. Comparative fouling experiments suggested that the combination of the two fouling control measures was more effective than either fouling prevention method alone. A UniFrac based comparison of bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in the AnMBR and three different inocula using pyrosequencing targeting 16S rRNA genes suggested that mesophilic inocula are suitable for seeding psychrophilic AnMBRs treating low strength wastewater. Overall, the research described relatively stable COD removal, acceptable flux, and the ability to seed a psychrophilic AnMBR with mesophilic inocula, indicating future potential for the technology in practice, particularly in cold and temperate climates where DWW temperatures are low during part of the year. PMID:23295067

  13. Osmotic pressure effect on membrane fouling in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor and its experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Meijia; Wang, Aijun; Lin, Hongjun; Hong, Huachang; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2012-12-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) treating sewage was used to investigate the membrane fouling mechanism. Characterization of cake layer formed on membrane surface showed that cake layer was hydrated, rich of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and negative charged with the charge density of 0.21-0.46 meq/kg MLSS. Detailed analysis revealed a new membrane fouling mechanism, osmotic pressure during cake layer filtration process due to the interception of ions. An osmotic pressure model was then developed to elaborate the existence of osmotic pressure and to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to membrane fouling. The calculated results showed that osmotic pressure accounted for the largest fraction of total operation pressure, indicating that osmotic pressure generated by the retained ions was one of the major mechanisms responsible for membrane fouling problem in MBRs. These findings provided a new insight into membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:23026319

  14. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes. PMID:26436551

  15. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic membrane (DM) formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes. PMID:26436551

  16. Use of flocculants for increasing permeate flux in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Díaz, H; Azócar, L; Torres, A; Lopes, S I C; Jeison, D

    2014-01-01

    Biomass retention, required for high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment, can be accomplished coupling an anaerobic bioreactor with membrane filtration. However, low flux seems to be a common factor when operating anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs). Modification of biomass properties may represent a strategy for improving membrane flux. The addition of flocculants was tested as a tool for flux increase. Six different products were tested in dead-end filtration experiments. Based on the results, two products were selected for cross-flow tests. The one presenting better performance (Nalco MPE50) was tested in a laboratory-scale continuous AnMBR. Results show that the flocculant was able to substantially increase flux. Indeed, the flux-increasing effect was observed for several weeks after flocculant addition. Therefore, the use of flocculants seems to be an interesting tool to cope with temporary increases in required flux. PMID:24901617

  17. Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    Membrane biofilm development was evaluated to improve psychrophilic (15°C) anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment of domestic wastewater. An AnMBR containing three replicate submerged membrane housings with separate permeate collection was operated at three levels of membrane fouling by independently controlling biogas sparging for each membrane unit. High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration two to three times the equilibrium concentration predicted by Henry’s law. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA targeting Bacteria and Archaea and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) gene in methanogens indicated that the membrane biofilm was enriched in highly active methanogens and syntrophic bacteria. Restoring fouled membranes to a transmembrane pressure (TMP) near zero by increasing biogas sparging did not disrupt the biofilm’s treatment performance, suggesting that microbes in the foulant layer were tightly adhered and did not significantly contribute to TMP. Dissolved methane oversaturation persisted without high TMP, implying that methanogenesis in the biofilm, rather than high TMP, was the primary driving force in methane oversaturation. The results describe an attractive operational strategy to improve treatment performance in low-temperature AnMBR by supporting syntrophy and methanogenesis in the membrane biofilm through controlled membrane fouling. PMID:26238293

  18. Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Membrane biofilm development was evaluated to improve psychrophilic (15°C) anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment of domestic wastewater. An AnMBR containing three replicate submerged membrane housings with separate permeate collection was operated at three levels of membrane fouling by independently controlling biogas sparging for each membrane unit. High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration two to three times the equilibrium concentration predicted by Henry's law. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA targeting Bacteria and Archaea and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) gene in methanogens indicated that the membrane biofilm was enriched in highly active methanogens and syntrophic bacteria. Restoring fouled membranes to a transmembrane pressure (TMP) near zero by increasing biogas sparging did not disrupt the biofilm's treatment performance, suggesting that microbes in the foulant layer were tightly adhered and did not significantly contribute to TMP. Dissolved methane oversaturation persisted without high TMP, implying that methanogenesis in the biofilm, rather than high TMP, was the primary driving force in methane oversaturation. The results describe an attractive operational strategy to improve treatment performance in low-temperature AnMBR by supporting syntrophy and methanogenesis in the membrane biofilm through controlled membrane fouling. PMID:26238293

  19. Anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater with a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) system.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Rihye; Kim, Jeonghwan; McCarty, Perry L; Bae, Jaeho

    2012-09-01

    A laboratory-scale staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) system was used to treat a municipal wastewater primary-clarifier effluent. It was operated continuously for 192 days at 6-11 L/m(2)/h flux and trans-membrane pressure generally of 0.1 bar or less with no fouling control except the scouring effect of the fluidized granular activated carbon on membrane surfaces. With a total hydraulic retention time of 2.3h at 25°C, the average effluent chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand concentrations of 25 and 7 mg/L yielded corresponding removals of 84% and 92%, respectively. Also, near complete removal of suspended solids was obtained. Biosolids production, representing 5% of the COD removed, equaled 0.049 g VSS/g BOD(5) removed, far less than the case with comparable aerobic processes. The electrical energy required for the operation of the SAF-MBR system, 0.047 kW h/m(3), could be more than satisfied by using the methane produced. PMID:22784964

  20. Analysis of submerged membrane for a sludge-bed anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating prehydrolysis liquor.

    PubMed

    Kale, Mayur Milan; Singh, Kripa Shankar

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of foulants and the performance of membranes in innovative sludge-bed anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SB-AnMBRs) were evaluated at mesophilic (35°C for approx. 400 days) followed by thermophilic (55°C for approx. 400 days) temperatures while treating the prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) waste stream from a dissolving pulp production plant. The membrane fouling of SB-AnMBR was analyzed for 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2 m(3)/m(2)/d flux conditions. Physico-chemical analyses of the membrane showed that the combination of 5% citric acid, 0.5% NaOCl and 2% NaOH solutions was effective in achieving more than 80% recovery of membrane flux. Chemical characterization of foulants showed that proteins were more predominant in membrane fouling than carbohydrates. Sugars and lignin contribution were negligible as compared to proteins in the total organic carbon content of the foulant. Membrane fouling occurred through a biofilm-dominated process and organic fouling. Combination of cleaning chemicals which included 0.5% NaClO and 2% NaOH solutions was most effective in the removal of the organic foulants. SEM analysis showed the pictorial evolution of the impact of fouling on the pore openings and the effect of cleaning on the membrane surface. PMID:26708166

  1. Characteristics and role of dynamic membrane layer in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ersahin, Mustafa Evren; Tao, Yu; Ozgun, Hale; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2016-04-01

    A submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) was operated for treatment of concentrated wastewater. The dynamic membrane (DM) or cake layer was characterized on its physicochemical and biological composition and the role of the DM layer in treatment and filtration performances was assessed. The results showed that the DM layer had an important role in organic matter removal. Both organic and inorganic materials, such as sludge particles, soluble microbial products (SMP), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and Ca, N, P, Mg precipitations contributed to the DM layer formation. Thus, effective retention of very small particles by the DM layer was achieved. The DM layer had higher microbial diversity and different microbial population composition in comparison to the bulk sludge. Overall, this study provided a better understanding about the DM layer structure in AnDMBRs, which might lead to increased applicability of this promising technology for the treatment of concentrated wastewaters. PMID:26418620

  2. [Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for treating agricultural and food processing wastewater at high strength].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan-Song; Yu, Da-Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-04-01

    As the second largest amounts of COD discharged in 41 kinds of industrial wastewater, it is of great urgency for the agricultural and food processing industry to control water pollution and reduce pollutants. Generally the agricultural and food processing industrial wastewater with high strength COD of 8 000-30 000 mg x L(-1), is mainly treated with anaerobic and aerobic processes in series, but which exists some issues of long process, difficult maintenance and high operational costs. Through coupling anaerobic digestion and membrane separation together, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) has typical advantages of high COD removal efficiency (92%-99%), high COD organic loading rate [2.3-19.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)], little sludge discharged (SRT > 40 d) and low cost (HRT of 8-12 h). According to COD composition of high strength industrial wastewater, rate-limiting step of methanation could be either hydrolysis and acidification or methanogenesis. Compared with aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR), membrane fouling of AnMBR is more complicated in characterization and more difficult in control. Measures for membrane fouling control of AnMBR are almost the same as those of MBR, including cross flow, air sparging and membrane relaxation. For meeting discharging standard of food processing wastewater with high strength, AnMBR is a promising technology with very short process, by enhancing COD removal efficiency, controlling membrane fouling and improving energy recovery. PMID:24946624

  3. Anaerobic digestibility of marine microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum in a lab-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zamalloa, Carlos; De Vrieze, Jo; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2012-01-01

    The biomass of industrially grown Phaeodactylum tricornutum was subjected in a novel way to bio-methanation at 33°C, i.e., in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) at a hydraulic retention time of 2.5 days, at solid retention times of 20 to 10 days and at loading rates in the range of 2.6-5.9 g biomass-COD L(-1) day(-1) with membrane fluxes ranging from 1 to 0.8 L m(-2) h(-1). The total COD recovered as biogas was in the order of 52%. The input suspension was converted to a clear effluent rich in total ammonium nitrogen (546 mg TAN L(-1)) and phosphate (141 mg PO(4)-P L(-1)) usable as liquid fertilizer. The microbial community richness, dynamics, and organization in the reactor were interpreted using the microbial resource management approach. The AnMBR communities were found to be moderate in species richness and low in dynamics and community organization relative to UASB and conventional CSTR sludges. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that Methanosaeta sp. was the dominant acetoclastic methanogen species followed by Methanosarcina sp. This work demonstrated that the use of AnMBR for the digestion of algal biomass is possible. The fact that some 50% of the organic matter is not liquefied means that the algal particulates in the digestate constitute a considerable fraction which should be valorized properly, for instance as slow release organic fertilizer. Overall, 1 kg of algae dry matter (DM) could be valorized in the form of biogas ( euro 2.07), N and P in the effluent (euro 0.02) and N and P in the digestate (euro 0.04), thus totaling about euro 2.13 per kilogram algae DM. PMID:22005739

  4. Membrane fouling behavior in anaerobic baffled membrane bioreactor under static operating condition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiadong; Jia, Xiaolan; Gao, Bo; Bo, Longli; Wang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    A novel AnMBR combined with ABR as the anaerobic baffled membrane bioreactor (ABMBR) was developed for membrane fouling mitigation without any turbulence intensifying strategy to reduce the energy consumption further. The filtration time of this system lasted 14-25days under stable condition only with back-flushing every 48h. The polysaccharide accounted for 6.85±3.1% amount of total filter cake and the protein accounted for 4.12±2.1%, which took 79.12% and 11.12% of total area in laser scanning confocal microscope (CLSM) image. After filtration, 83.72±10.97% of turbidity, 59.28±16.46% of polysaccharide, 16.51% of tryptophan and 37.61% of humic-like substrates were rejected, respectively. The total membrane resistance at the end of each cycle was (4.47±0.99)×10(13)m(-1). And the resistance from filter cake was (4.15±1.00)×10(13)m(-1), which accounted for of 92.6±3.4% of total membrane resistance. PMID:27179954

  5. ANAMMOX process start up and stabilization with an anaerobic seed in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR).

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2011-10-01

    ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal alternative to traditional nitrification--denitrification removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. The feasibility of enriching anammox bacteria from anaerobic seed culture to start up an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR) for N-removal is reported in this paper. The Anammox activity was established in the AnMBR with anaerobic digester seed culture from a Sewage Treatment Plant in batch mode with recirculation followed by semi continuous process and continuous modes of operation. The AnMBR performance under varying Nitrogen Loading Rates (NLR) and HRTs is reported for a year, in terms of nitrogen transformations to ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate along with hydrazine and hydroxylamine. Interestingly ANAMMOX process was evident from simultaneous Amm-N and nitrite reduction, consistent nitrate production, hydrazine and hydroxylamine presence, notable organic load reduction and bicarbonate consumption. PMID:21775136

  6. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor for the treatment of leachates from Jebel Chakir discharge in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Zayen, Amal; Mnif, Sami; Aloui, Fathi; Fki, Firas; Loukil, Slim; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-05-15

    Landfill leachate (LFL) collected from the controlled discharge of Jebel Chakir in Tunisia was treated without any physical or chemical pretreatment in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The organic loading rate (OLR) in the AnMBR was gradually increased from 1 g COD l(-1)d(-1) to an average of 6.27 g COD l(-1)d(-1). At the highest OLR, the biogas production was more than 3 volumes of biogas per volume of the bioreactor. The volatile suspended solids (VSSs) reached a value of approximately 3 g l(-1) in the bioreactor. At stable conditions, the treatment efficiency was high with an average COD reduction of 90% and biogas yield of 0.46 l biogas per g COD removed. PMID:20096996

  7. Navigating wastewater energy recovery strategies: a life cycle comparison of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and conventional treatment systems with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Cao, Ling; Love, Nancy G; Raskin, Lutgarde; Skerlos, Steven J

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate emerging anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology in comparison with conventional wastewater energy recovery technologies. Wastewater treatment process modeling and systems analyses were combined to evaluate the conditions under which AnMBR may produce more net energy and have lower life cycle environmental emissions than high rate activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (HRAS+AD), conventional activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (CAS+AD), and an aerobic membrane bioreactor with anaerobic digestion (AeMBR+AD). For medium strength domestic wastewater treatment under baseline assumptions at 15 °C, AnMBR recovered 49% more energy as biogas than HRAS+AD, the most energy positive conventional technology considered, but had significantly higher energy demands and environmental emissions. Global warming impacts associated with AnMBR were largely due to emissions of effluent dissolved methane. For high strength domestic wastewater treatment, AnMBR recovered 15% more net energy than HRAS+AD, and the environmental emissions gap between the two systems was reduced. Future developments of AnMBR technology in low energy fouling control, increased flux, and management of effluent methane emissions would make AnMBR competitive with HRAS+AD. Rapid advancements in AnMBR technology must continue to achieve its full economic and environmental potential as an energy recovery strategy for domestic wastewater. PMID:24742289

  8. A hybrid anaerobic membrane bioreactor coupled with online ultrasonic equipment for digestion of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meilan; Wen, Xianghua; Yu, Zhiyong; Li, Yushan; Huang, Xia

    2011-05-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactor and online ultrasonic equipment used to enhance membrane filtration were coupled to form a hybrid system (US-AnMBR) designed for long-term digestion of waste activated sludge. The US-AnMBR was operated under volatile solids loading rates of 1.1-3.7 gVS/L·d. After comprehensive studies on digestion performance and membrane fouling control in the US-AnMBR, the final loading rate was determined to be 2.7 gVS/L·d with 51.3% volatile solids destruction. In the US-AnMBR, the improved digestion was due to enhanced sludge disintegration, as indicated by soluble matter comparison in the supernatant and particle size distribution in the digested sludge. Maximum specific methanogenic activity revealed that ultrasound application had no negative effect on anaerobic microorganisms. Furthermore, implementing ultrasound effectively controlled membrane fouling and successfully facilitated membrane bioreactor operation. This lab-scale study demonstrates the potential feasibility and effectiveness of setting up a US-AnMBR system for sludge digestion. PMID:21421308

  9. Enzyme augmentation of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating sewage containing organic particulates.

    PubMed

    Teo, Chee Wee; Wong, Philip Chuen Yung

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes offer the potential for enhancing the hydrolysis of organic particulates, which tends to be rate limiting in the anaerobic treatment of particulate containing wastewaters. In this study, the effects of enzyme augmentation on the biological performance of a laboratory submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) were investigated. A hydrolytic enzyme blend containing proteases, amylases and lipases was added to the bioreactor daily at doses ranging from 0.9 to 18 mL/g of influent COD to enhance the hydrolysis of organic particulates and soluble macromolecules. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in the reduction of total and volatile suspended solids by approximately 19% and 22%, respectively, on the average. Overall COD removal efficiency was unaffected while the average biogas production increased from 0.27 to 0.34 L/g of influent COD. Additionally, the concentrations of bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) decreased and increased respectively, suggesting the enzymatic hydrolysis of EPS to SMP. Low enzymatic activities were detected throughout the entire study, probably due to the instability of free enzymes in the bioreactor environment. Nevertheless, membrane retention of exogenous enzymes within the AnMBR is an inherent feature, as evidenced by size exclusion chromatography. PMID:24139106

  10. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  11. Development of an energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactors for 2-chlorophenol-contained wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Pan, Xin-Rong; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Wen-Wei; Shi, Bing-Jing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    A novel energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactor (AnHMBR) with mesh filter, which takes advantage of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and fixed-bed biofilm reactor, is developed for low-strength 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)-contained wastewater treatment. In this system, the anaerobic membrane bioreactor is stuffed with granular activated carbon to construct an anaerobic hybrid fixed-bed biofilm membrane bioreactor. The effluent turbidity from the AnHMBR system was low during most of the operation period, and the chemical oxygen demand and 2-CP removal efficiencies averaged 82.3% and 92.6%, respectively. Furthermore, a low membrane fouling rate was achieved during the operation. During the AnHMBR operation, the only energy consumption was for feed pump. And a low energy demand of 0.0045-0.0063kWhm(-3) was estimated under the current operation conditions. All these results demonstrated that this novel AnHMBR is a sustainable technology for treating 2-CP-contained wastewater. PMID:24880609

  12. Perspectives on anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Love, Nancy G; Skerlos, Steven J; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-10-01

    Interest in increasing the sustainability of water management is leading to a reevaluation of domestic wastewater (DWW) treatment practices. A central goal is to reduce energy demands and environmental impacts while recovering resources. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have the ability to produce a similar quality effluent to aerobic treatment, while generating useful energy and producing substantially less residuals. This review focuses on operational considerations that require further research to allow implementation of AnMBR DWW treatment. Specific topics include membrane fouling, the lower limits of hydraulic retention time and temperature allowing for adequate treatment, complications with methane recovery, and nutrient removal options. Based on the current literature, future research efforts should focus on increasing the likelihood of net energy recovery through advancements in fouling control and development of efficient methods for dissolved methane recovery. Furthermore, assessing the sustainability of AnMBR treatment requires establishment of a quantitative environmental and economic evaluation framework. PMID:22608937

  13. Microalgae cultivation in wastewater: nutrient removal from anaerobic membrane bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Martinez, A; Martin Garcia, N; Romero, I; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the effluent of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) by means of a lab-scale photobioreactor in which algae biomass was cultured in a semi-continuous mode for a period of 42 days. Solids retention time was 2 days and a stable pH value in the system was maintained by adding CO(2). Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the SAnMBR effluent fluctuated according to the operating performance of the bioreactor and the properties of its actual wastewater load. Despite these variations, the anaerobic effluent proved to be a suitable growth medium for microalgae (mean biomass productivity was 234 mg l(-1)d(-1)), achieving a nutrient removal efficiency of 67.2% for ammonium (NH(4)(+)-N) and 97.8% for phosphate (PO(4)(-3)-P). When conditions were optimum, excellent water quality with very low ammonium and phosphate concentrations was obtained. PMID:23073115

  14. Development and testing of a fully gravitational submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Ruiz, Santiago; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    A gravity-operated submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) was set up in order to test its principle of operation as an alternative to conventional pumped permeation of the membrane. This operating mode allowed the membrane flux rate to be measured accurately whilst maintaining a constant transmembrane pressure (TMP), and allowed small transient variations in the flux rate to be observed. The reactor was operated at 36°C for a period of 115 days using a nutrient-balanced synthetic substrate with a high suspended solids concentration. Membrane cleaning was in situ by a gas scouring system using recirculation of headspace biogas. With an initial TMP of 7.0 kPa, the membrane flux slowly decreased due to membrane fouling and had not reached a constant value by day 71. The results indicated that the system was still acclimatizing up to 50 days after start-up; but from that point onwards, performance parameters became much more stable. A constant flux of 2.2 L m(-2) h(-1) was achieved over the last 45 days after the TMP was reduced to 2.3 kPa. The stable flux was maintained over this period and the loading raised to 1 g COD L(-1) d(-1) by increasing the influent strength. Under these conditions, the average chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was 96% and the specific methane potential was 0.31 L CH4 g(-1) COD removed. PMID:25751755

  15. Effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on membrane fouling in anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaodi; Koh, Yoong Keat Kelvin; Ng, How Yong

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have been regarded as a potential solution to achieve energy neutrality in the future wastewater treatment plants. Coupling ceramic membranes into AnMBRs offers great potential as ceramic membranes are resistant to corrosive chemicals such as cleaning reagents and harsh environmental conditions such as high temperature. In this study, ceramic membranes with pore sizes of 80, 200 and 300 nm were individually mounted in three anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating real domestic wastewater to examine the treatment efficiencies and to elucidate the effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on fouling behaviours. The average overall chemical oxygen demands (COD) removal efficiencies could reach around 86-88%. Although CH4 productions were around 0.3 L/g CODutilised, about 67% of CH4 generated was dissolved in the liquid phase and lost in the permeate. When filtering mixed liquor of similar properties, smaller pore-sized membranes fouled slower in long-term operations due to lower occurrence of pore blockages. However, total organic removal efficiencies could not explain the fouling behaviours. Liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectrophotometer and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence and ultra-violet detectors were used to analyse the DOMs in detail. The major foulants were identified to be biopolymers that were produced in microbial activities. One of the main components of biopolymers--proteins--led to different fouling behaviours. It is postulated that the proteins could pass through porous cake layers to create pore blockages in membranes. Hence, concentrations of the DOMs in the soluble fraction of mixed liquor (SML) could not predict membrane fouling because different components in the DOMs might have different interactions with membranes. PMID:26255104

  16. Removal of polycyclic musks by anaerobic membrane bioreactor: biodegradation, biosorption, and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Nghiem, Long D; Khan, Stuart J

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance of anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for removing five polycyclic musks (PCMs), which are common active ingredients of personal care and household cleaning products. A laboratory scale AnMBR system was used in this investigation. Concentrations of the PCMs in both the liquid and biosolids phase were measured to conduct a mass balance analysis and elucidate their fate during AnMBR treatment. The AnMBR was effective for removing PCMs from the aqueous phase by a combination of biotransformation and sorption onto the biosolids. However, biotransformation was observed to be the dominant removal mechanism for all five PCMs. Enantioselective analysis of the PCMs in influent, effluent and biomass samples indicated that there was negligible enantioselectivity in the removal of these PCMs. Accordingly, all enantiomers of these PCMs can be expected to be removed by AnMBR with similar efficiency. PMID:25461940

  17. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for bamboo industry wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Qi; Zheng, Shuangshuang; Wu, Donglei

    2013-12-01

    Bamboo industry wastewater (BIWW) poses severe environmental problems because of its high organic matter content. In this study, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was applied for BIWW treatment. During the start-up stage, the system presented an effective degradation with a final COD removal of 91%. Compared to the intermittent mode, a higher membrane rejection (45% COD, 60% NH3-N) was obtained when the system was operated continuously. N2 flushing was applied for membrane cleaning, and the cleaning efficiency was significantly influenced by the hydraulic retention time (HRT). While operated under HRT ≥ 5 d, membrane fouling could be effectively controlled. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis indicated the membrane top area suffered the most serious fouling. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed most organic matter in BIWW was eliminated by AnMBR. However, benzene and fluoro derivatives were detected in the permeate as the by-products. PMID:24121371

  18. Influent wastewater microbiota and temperature influence anaerobic membrane bioreactor microbial community.

    PubMed

    Seib, M D; Berg, K J; Zitomer, D H

    2016-09-01

    Sustainable municipal wastewater recovery scenarios highlight benefits of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs). However, influences of continuous seeding by influent wastewater and temperature on attached-growth AnMBRs are not well understood. In this study, four bench-scale AnMBR operated at 10 and 25°C were fed synthetic (SPE) and then real (PE) primary effluent municipal wastewater. Illumina sequencing revealed different bacterial communities in each AnMBR in response to temperature and bioreactor configuration, whereas differences were not observed in archaeal communities. Activity assays revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant methanogenic pathway at 10°C. The significant relative abundance of Methanosaeta at 10°C concomitant with low acetoclastic methanogenic activity may indicate possible Methanosaeta-Geobacter direct interspecies electron transfer. When AnMBR feed was changed to PE, continual seeding with wastewater microbiota caused AnMBR microbial communities to shift, becoming more similar to PE microbiota. Therefore, influent wastewater microbiota, temperature and reactor configuration influenced the AnMBR microbial community. PMID:27262719

  19. Two-stage anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactor treatment of settled domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bae, J; Yoo, R; Lee, E; McCarty, P L

    2013-01-01

    A two-stage anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) system was applied for the treatment of primary-settled domestic wastewater that was further pre-treated by either 10 μm filtration or 1 mm screening. While the different pre-treatment options resulted in different influent qualities, the effluent qualities were quite similar. In both cases at a total hydraulic retention time of 2.3 h and 25 °C, chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removals were 84-91% and 92-94%, with effluent concentrations lower than 25 and 7 mg/L, respectively. With a membrane flux of 6-12 L/m(2)/h, trans-membrane pressure remained below 0.2 bar during 310 d of continuous operation without need for membrane chemical cleaning or backwashing. Biosolids production was estimated to be 0.028-0.049 g volatile suspended solids/g BOD5, which is far less than that with comparable aerobic processes. Electrical energy production from combined heat and power utilization of the total methane produced (gaseous and dissolved) was estimated to be more than sufficient for total system operation. PMID:23863433

  20. Micropollutants removal in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor and in an aerobic conventional treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Abargues, M R; Robles, A; Bouzas, A; Seco, A

    2012-01-01

    The paper expresses an attempt to tackle the problem due to the presence of micropollutants in wastewater which may be able to disrupt the endocrine system of some organisms. These kinds of compounds are ubiquitously present in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. The aim of this paper is to compare the fate of the alkylphenols-APs (4-(tert-octyl)) phenol, t-nonylphenol and 4-p-nonylphenol and the hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol) in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) pilot plant and in a conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (CTP). The obtained results are also compared with the results obtained in a previous study carried out in an aerobic MBR pilot plant. The results showed that the APs soluble concentrations in the SAMBR effluent were always significantly higher than the CTP ones. Moreover, the analyses of the suspended fraction revealed that the AP concentrations in the SAMBR reactor were usually higher than in the CTP reactor, indicating that under anaerobic conditions the APs were accumulated in the digested sludge. The aerobic conditions maintained both in the CTP system and in the aerobic MBR favoured the APs and hormones degradation, and gave rise to lower concentrations in the effluent and in the reactor of these systems. Furthermore, the results also indicated that the degradation of APs under aerobic conditions was enhanced working at high solid retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) values. PMID:22643422

  1. Potentials of anaerobic membrane bioreactors to overcome treatment limitations induced by industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Dereli, Recep Kaan; Ersahin, Mustafa Evren; Ozgun, Hale; Ozturk, Izzet; Jeison, David; van der Zee, Frank; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    This review presents a comprehensive summary on applications of anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology for industrial wastewaters in view of different aspects including treatability and filterability. AnMBRs present an attractive option for the treatment of industrial wastewaters at extreme conditions, such as high salinity, high temperature, high suspended solids concentrations, and toxicity that hamper granulation and retention of biomass or reduce the biological activity. So far, most of the research has been conducted at laboratory scale; however, also a number of full-scale AnMBR systems is currently being operated worldwide. Membrane fouling, a multivariable process, is still a research quest that requires further investigation. In fact, membrane fouling and flux decline present the most important reasons that hamper the wide-spread application of full-scale reactors. This paper addresses a detailed assessment and discussion on treatability and filterability of industrial wastewaters in both lab- and full-scale AnMBR applications, the encountered problems and future opportunities. PMID:22749827

  2. Separation of competitive microorganisms using anaerobic membrane bioreactors as pretreatment to microbial electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Gao, Yaohuan; Yeo, Hyeongu; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) as pretreatment to microbial electrochemical cells (MECs) were first assessed for improving energy recovery. A dual-chamber MEC was operated at hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 1 to 8d, while operating conditions for an AnMBR were fixed. Current density was increased from 7.5 ± 0 to 14 ± 1A/m(2) membrane with increasing HRT. MEC tests with AnMBR permeate (mainly propionate and acetate) and propionate medium confirmed that propionate was fermented to acetate and hydrogen gas, and anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) utilized these fermentation products as substrate. Membrane separation in the AnMBR excluded fermenters and methanogens from the MEC, and thus no methane production was found in the MEC. The lack of fermenters, however, slowed down propionate fermentation rate, which limited current density in the MEC. To symphonize fermenters, H2-consumers, and ARB in biofilm anode is essential for improving current density, and COD removal. PMID:24047682

  3. Effect of temperature on the treatment of domestic wastewater with a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yoo, R H; Kim, J H; McCarty, P L; Bae, J H

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) system was applied to the treatment of primary clarifier effluent from a domestic wastewater treatment plant with temperature decreasing from 25 to 10 °C. At all temperatures and with a total hydraulic retention time of 2.3 h, overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removals were 89% and 94% or higher, with permeate COD and BOD5 of 30 and 7 mg/L or lower, respectively. No noticeable negative effects of low temperature on organic removal were found, although a slight increase to 3 mg/L in volatile fatty acids concentrations in the effluent was observed. Biosolids production was 0.01-0.03 kg volatile suspended solids/kg COD, which is far less than that with aerobic processes. Although the rate of trans-membrane pressure at the membrane flux of 9 L/m(2)/h increased as temperature decreased, the SAF-MBR was operated for longer than 200 d before chemical cleaning was needed. Electrical energy potential from combustion of the total methane production (gaseous and dissolved) was more than that required for system operation. PMID:24647177

  4. Energy-positive food wastewater treatment using an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR).

    PubMed

    Galib, Mohamed; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Reid, Robertson; Hussain, Abid; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2016-11-01

    An immersed-membrane anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) achieved 88-95% of COD removal for meat-processing wastewater at organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.4-3.2 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1). Membrane flux was stable for low OLR (0.4 and 1.3 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1)), but irrecoverable fouling occurred at high OLR of 3.2 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1). Methane gas yield of 0.13-0.18 LCH4 g(-1)CODremoved was obtained, which accounted for 33-38% of input COD, the most significant electron sink. Dissolved methane was only 3.4-11% of input COD and consistently over-saturated at all OLR conditions. The least accumulation of dissolved methane (25 mg L(-1) and saturation index 1.3) was found for the highest OLR of 3.2 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) where biogas production rate was the highest. Energy balances showed that AnMBR produced net energy benefit of 0.16-1.82 kWh m(-3), indicating the possibility of energy-positive food wastewater treatment using AnMBRs. PMID:27526085

  5. Performance of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor with forward osmosis membrane for low-strength wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Gu, Yangshuo; Cao, Chuqing; Zhang, Jun; Ng, Jing-Wen; Tang, Chuyang

    2014-03-01

    A submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor with forward osmosis membrane (FO-AnMBR) was operated at 25 °C for the treatment of synthetic wastewater. As the experiment progressed, the water flux reduced due to the membrane fouling and the increasing salinity in the reactor, and achieved at around 3.5 LMH in one cycle. It was worth noting that the level of salinity in the reactor was not a concern in terms of inhibition or toxic effects on the biological processes. The FO-AnMBR process exhibited greater than 96% removal of organic carbon, nearly 100% of total phosphorus and 62% of ammonia-nitrogen, respectively, suggesting a better removal efficiency than the conventional anaerobic membrane bioreactor. The methane and carbon dioxide compositions achieved concentrations of around 65%-78% and 22%-35%, respectively; and no obvious difference in the biogas composition was observed with the changes of conductivity. With respect to the methane yield, an average value of 0.21 L CH4 g(-1) COD was obtained, exhibiting the feasibility of energy recovery by this FO-AnMBR system. Additionally, an increase in the salinity enhanced the accumulation of soluble microbial products, especially for the proteins with 88.9% increment as the conductivity increased from 1.2 to 17.3 ms cm(-1). In contrast, a relatively stable concentration of extracellular polymer substances (EPS) was observed, indicating that the influence of conductivity on EPS cannot be directly correlated. PMID:24374126

  6. Performance of novel sludge-bed anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SB-AnMBR) treating prehydrolysis liquor.

    PubMed

    Kale, Mayur M; Singh, Kripa S

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of a novel sludge-bed anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SB-AnMBR) configuration for treating a waste stream from a dissolving pulp production industry was evaluated. The waste stream, called prehydrolysis liquor (PHL), is generated after the wood chips are subjected to high temperature steam to remove unwanted hemicelluloses. The PHL with total chemical oxygen demand (COD) of approximately 100 g/L contained mainly sugars, furfural, lignin, and acetic acid. The SB-AnMBR was fed with the PHL at organic loading rates in a range of 0.8 to10 kg-COD/(m(3)·d). The COD removal efficiency of more than 85% and an average rate of methane production of 0.35 m(3)/(kg-COD·d) were observed at each loading rate. No detectable sugars or furfural were present in the treated effluent from SB-AnMBR. Lignin removal varied from 60 to 90%. Flat-sheet membranes performed well with one fouling event during first 400 days of operation. PMID:24569279

  7. Post-treatment of the permeate of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) treating landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Ofoegbu, Nkechi; Stuckey, David C

    2011-01-01

    In this study, various methods were compared to reduce the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) content of stabilised leachate from a Submerged Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) resulted in greater COD removals (84 %) than Granular Activated Carbon (GAC-80 %), an ultrafiltration membrane of 1kDa (75 %), coagulation-flocculation with FeCl(3) and polyelectrolyte (45 %), FeCl(3) alone (32 %), and polymeric adsorbents such as XAD7HP (46 %) and XAD4 (32 %). Results obtained on the <1 kDa fraction showed that PAC and GAC had a similar adsorption efficiency of about 60 % COD removal, followed by XAD7HP (48 %), XAD4 (27 %) and then FeCl(3) (23 %). The post-treatment sequence UF+GAC would result in a final effluent with less than 100 mg COD/L. Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) revealed that the extent of adsorption of low MW compounds onto PAC was limited due to low MW hydrophilic compounds, whereas the kinetics of PAC adsorption depended mainly on the adsorption of high MW aromatics. PMID:21992219

  8. Inorganic fouling of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and a polishing aerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Stuckey, David C

    2016-03-01

    The treatment of leachate (Average TCOD=11.97 g/L, 14.4% soluble) from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was investigated using a Submerged Anaerobic Membrane BioReactor (SAMBR), followed by an aerobic membrane bioreactor (AMBR) to polish this effluent. This paper investigated the exact nature and composition of the inorganic precipitate in each of the reactors in the process. The flux decreased due to precipitation of calcium as monohydrocalcite (CaCO3·H2O) containing traces of metals onto the SAMBR membrane because of high CO2 partial pressures. Precipitation of calcium in the AMBR was also observed due to a higher pH. In this case, phosphorus also precipitated with calcium in two different phases: the background layer contained calcium, oxygen, carbon and small amounts of phosphorus (2-6.7%), while flakes containing calcium, oxygen and higher amounts of phosphorus (10-17%) were probably hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH). PMID:26771921

  9. Methanogenic activities in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) treating synthetic municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jaeho; Sung, Shihwu

    2010-04-01

    Two laboratory-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactors, AnMBR 1 and AnMBR 2, were run in parallel at 25 and 15 degrees C, respectively. Total chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was more than 95% and 85% for AnMBR 1 and 2, respectively. The COD removal of AnMBR 1 was mostly carried out biologically. However, the physical removal on the membrane surface compensated for the decreased biological removal rate in AnMBR 2. The membrane in AnMBR systems is likely not only to retain all biomass in the reactor, but also complement decreased biological removal efficiency at low temperature by rejecting soluble organics. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) test was used to investigate the methanogenic activity profiles of suspended and attached sludge in AnMBRs treating synthetic municipal wastewater at 25 and 15 degrees C. The methanogenic activity was 51.8 ml CH(4)/g VSSd on day 1 and eventually increased 27% and reached 65.7 ml CH(4)/g VSSd on day 75 for AnMBR 1. However, the methanogenic activity of AnMBR 2 sludge was lower than that of AnMBR 1. The microbial activity of suspended sludge continuously increased, while that of attached sludge gradually decreased in this study. The methanogenic activity of attached sludge was far lower than that of suspended sludge. The role of attached sludge on the membrane in AnMBRs as a biofilm for biological organic removal was minimal compared to suspended sludge. PMID:20022745

  10. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of synthetic municipal wastewater at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jaeho; Sung, Shihwu

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a crossflow anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) to treat synthetic municipal wastewater was investigated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The AnMBR was operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates of 1 to 2 kg COD/m3 x d for 280 days. The permeate COD concentration was always lower than 40 mg/L, and no noticeable volatile fatty acids were detected, regardless of HRT variations, while soluble COD (SCOD) was accumulated in the reactor with decreases in HRT. The particle size reduction was relatively lower than other studies reported, even after a long operation time resulting from the low operation crossflow velocity. Approximately 30% of COD was not available for methane recovery, irrespective of applied HRTs, as a result of the COD loss by dissolved methane, sulfate reduction, and untreated COD in the permeate. The fraction of methane recovered from the synthetic municipal wastewater decreased from 48 to 35%, with the decrease of HRT from 12 to 6 hours, as a result of the increase of mixed-liquor SCOD, which was rejected and accumulated in the AnMBR. Therefore, AnMBR operation with relatively long HRTs and SRTs may be favorable, to enhance methane recovery and reduce or eliminate sludge production. PMID:19860148

  11. Cultivation of Planktonic Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria Using Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Enrichment cultures of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria as planktonic cell suspensions are essential for studying their ecophysiology and biochemistry, while their cultivation is still laborious. The present study aimed to cultivate two phylogenetically distinct anammox bacteria, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica” and “Ca. Scalindua sp.” in the form of planktonic cells using membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The MBRs were continuously operated for more than 250 d with nitrogen loading rates of 0.48–1.02 and 0.004–0.09 kgN m−3 d−1 for “Ca. Brocadia sinica” and “Ca. Scalindua sp.”, respectively. Planktonic anammox bacterial cells were successfully enriched (>90%) in the MBRs, which was confirmed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The decay rate and half-saturation constant for NO2− of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” were determined to be 0.0029–0.0081 d−1 and 0.47 mgN L−1, respectively, using enriched planktonic cells. The present study demonstrated that MBR enables the culture of planktonic anammox bacterial cells, which are suitable for studying their ecophysiology and biochemistry. PMID:24200833

  12. The effect of solids retention time on dissolved methane concentration in anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hyeongu; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the effect of solids retention times (SRT) on dissolved methane concentration in a lab-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) operated at SRT 20d and 40d at ambient temperature (23 +/- 1 degrees C). Daily methane production was 196 +/- 17 mL/d and 285 +/- 18 mL/d for SRT 20d and 40d, respectively. In comparison, the average concentration of dissolved methane in AnMBR permeates was 9.9 +/- 2.3 mg/L for SRT 20d (close to thermodynamic equilibrium), which was decreased to 4.3 +/- 0.3 mg/L for SRT 40d. We often found oversaturation of dissolved methane at SRT 20d, which means that mass transfer of dissolved methane from liquid to gas phase is dynamic at this short SRT. However, we never detected oversaturation of dissolved methane at SRT 40d, due to slow endogenous decay kinetics. Higher daily methane production at SRT 40d than that at SRT 20d indicates that methane was supplementarily produced from biomass electrons by endogenous decay. This study shows that operation of AnMBRs under long SRT can keep low dissolved methane concentration in AnMBR permeate, along with high methane yield. PMID:24350464

  13. Effects of the acidogenic biomass on the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeison, David; Plugge, Caroline M; Pereira, Alcina; van Lier, Jules B

    2009-03-01

    Continuous flow experiments were performed to study the effects of acidogenic biomass development, induced by feeding with non-acidified substrate, on the operation and performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The AnMBR was operated at cross-flow velocities up to 1.5m/s and fed with a gelatine-starch-ethanol mixture. A significant fraction of acidogenic biomass developed during reactor operation, which fully determined the sludge rheology, and influenced the particle size distribution. As a result, flux levels of only 6.5l/m(2)h were achieved, at a liquid superficial velocity of 1.5m/s. Even though the soluble microbial products levels in the AMBR were as high as 14g COD/l, the observed hydraulic flux was not limited by irreversible pore fouling, but by reversible cake layer formation. Propionate oxidation was the limiting step for the applied organic loading rate. The assessed specific methanogenic activity (SMA) with propionate as substrate was, however, similar to the values found by others during thermophilic treatment of non or partially acidified substrates in granular sludge bed reactors, indicating an appropriate level of the propionate oxidation capacity. PMID:19036578

  14. Ammonium nitrogen removal from the permeates of anaerobic membrane bioreactors: economic regeneration of exhausted zeolite.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiaosi; Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2014-08-01

    This study revealed that ammonium exchange of natural zeolite could be an economical method of nitrogen removal from the permeates of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs). It was found that the mass ratio of Na+ to Zeolite - NH4+ - N significantly affected regeneration efficiency (RE), not simply NaCI concentration. Batch experiments showed that the mass ratio of 750g Na+/g Zeolite - NH4+ - N was required to achieve RE over 90% in 2h at pH 9. However, the alkaline regeneration at pH 12 significantly decreased the mass ratio down to 4.2 in batch tests. It was confirmed that the alkaline regeneration only needed NaCl 10 g/L (the mass of Na+ to Zeolite - NH4+ - N of 4.2) for RE of 85% in 2 h of reaction time in continuous column tests. Economic analysis showed that this alkaline regeneration decreased chemical costs over 10 times as compared with a conventional regeneration method. A significant bottleneck of zeolite processes would be the requirement of substituting exhausted zeolite with virgin one, due to the reductions of ammonium exchange capacity and RE. PMID:24956795

  15. A plant-wide energy model for wastewater treatment plants: application to anaerobic membrane bioreactor technology.

    PubMed

    Pretel, R; Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a detailed and comprehensive plant-wide model for assessing the energy demand of different wastewater treatment systems (beyond the traditional activated sludge) in both steady- and unsteady-state conditions. The proposed model makes it possible to calculate power and heat requirements (W and Q, respectively), and to recover both power and heat from methane and hydrogen capture. In order to account for the effect of biological processes on heat requirements, the model has been coupled to the extended version of the BNRM2 plant-wide mathematical model, which is implemented in DESSAS simulation software. Two case studies have been evaluated to assess the model's performance: (1) modelling the energy demand of two urban wastewater treatment plants based on conventional activated sludge and submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technologies in steady-state conditions and (2) modelling the dynamics of reactor temperature and heat requirements in an AnMBR plant in unsteady-state conditions. The results indicate that the proposed model can be used to assess the energy performance of different wastewater treatment processes and would thus be useful, for example, WWTP design or upgrading or the development of new control strategies for energy savings. PMID:26829316

  16. Performance of anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactors using effluents of microbial fuel cells treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Yang, Wulin; Ye, Yaoli; LaBarge, Nicole; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactors (AFMBRs) have been mainly developed as a post-treatment process to produce high quality effluent with very low energy consumption. The performance of an AFMBR was examined using the effluent from a microbial fuel cell (MFC) treating domestic wastewater, as a function of AFMBR hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and organic matter loading rates. The MFC-AFMBR achieved 89±3% removal of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), with an effluent of 36±6mg-COD/L over 112days operation. The AFMBR had very stable operation, with no significant changes in COD removal efficiencies, for HRTs ranging from 1.2 to 3.8h, although the effluent COD concentration increased with organic loading. Transmembrane pressure (TMP) was low, and could be maintained below 0.12bar through solids removal. This study proved that the AFMBR could be operated with a short HRT but a low COD loading rate was required to achieve low effluent COD. PMID:26921870

  17. Iron deficiency and bioavailability in anaerobic batch and submerged membrane bioreactors (SAMBR) during organic shock loads.

    PubMed

    Ketheesan, Balachandran; Thanh, Pham Minh; Stuckey, David C

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the effects of Fe(2+) and its bioavailability for controlling VFAs during organic shock loads in batch reactors and a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). When seed grown under Fe-sufficient conditions (7.95±0.05mgFe/g-TSS), an organic shock resulted in leaching of Fe from the residual to organically bound and soluble forms. Under Fe-deficient seed conditions (0.1±0.002mgFe/gTSS), Fe(2+) supplementation (3.34mgFe(2+)/g-TSS) with acetate resulted in a 2.1-3.9 fold increase in the rate of methane production, while with propionate it increased by 1.2-1.5 fold compared to non-Fe(2+) supplemented reactors. Precipitation of Fe(2+) as sulphides and organically bound Fe were bioavailable to methanogens for acetate assimilation. The results confirmed that the transitory/long term limitations of Fe play a significant role in controlling the degradation of VFAs during organic shock loads due to their varying physical/chemical states, and bioavailability. PMID:27015020

  18. Removal of viruses and indicators by anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating animal waste.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Xagoraraki, Irene; Wallace, James; Bickert, William; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Rose, Joan B

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate treatment of agricultural waste is necessary for the protection of public health in rural areas because land-applied animal manure may transmit zoonotic disease. In this study, we evaluated the potential of using a pilot anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) to treat agricultural waste. The AnMBR system, following a conventional complete mix anaerobic digester (CMAD), achieved high removals of biological and chemical agents. The mean log(10) removals of Escherichia coli, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and coliphage by the AnMBR were 5.2, 6.1, 6.4, and 3.7, respectively, and for the CMAD were 1.5, 1.2, 0.1, and 0.5, respectively. Compared with other indicators, coliphage was observed most frequently and had the highest concentration in effluent samples. Bovine adenoviruses and bovine polymaviruses (BPyV) were monitored in this study using nested PCR methods. All of the CMAD influent and CMAD effluent samples were positive for both viruses, and three AnMBR effluent samples were BPyV positive. The mean removals of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphate, chemical oxygen demand, total solids, and volatile solids by the entire system were 31, 96, 92, 82, and 91%, respectively, but there was no removal of ammonium. When the AnMBR was operated independent of the CMAD, AnMBR achieved similar E. coli and enterococci removals as the combined CMAD/AnMBR system. The high quality of effluent produced by the pilot AnMBR system in this study demonstrated that such systems can be considered as alternatives for managing animal manure. PMID:19549946

  19. A performance evaluation of three membrane bioreactor systems: aerobic, anaerobic, and attached-growth.

    PubMed

    Achilli, A; Marchand, E A; Childress, A E

    2011-01-01

    Water sustainability is essential for meeting human needs for drinking water and sanitation in both developing and developed countries. Reuse, decentralization, and low energy consumption are key objectives to achieve sustainability in wastewater treatment. Consideration of these objectives has led to the development of new and tailored technologies in order to balance societal needs with the protection of natural systems. Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are one such technology. In this investigation, a comparison of MBR performance is presented. Laboratory-scale submerged aerobic MBR (AMBR), anaerobic MBR (AnMBR), and attached-growth aerobic MBR (AtMBR) systems were evaluated for treating domestic wastewater under the same operating conditions. Long-term chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) monitoring showed greater than 80% removal in the three systems. The AnMBR system required three months of acclimation prior to steady operation, compared to one month for the aerobic systems. The AnMBR system exhibited a constant mixed liquor suspended solids concentration at an infinite solids retention time (i.e. no solids wasting), while the aerobic MBR systems produced approximately 0.25 g of biomass per gram of COD removed. This suggests a more economical solids management associated with the AnMBR system. Critical flux experiments were performed to evaluate fouling potential of the MBR systems. Results showed similar critical flux values between the AMBR and the AnMBR systems, while the AtMBR system showed relatively higher critical flux value. This result suggests a positive role of the attached-growth media in controlling membrane fouling in MBR systems. PMID:22049730

  20. Textile wastewater treatment in a bench-scale anaerobic-biofilm anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor combined with nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Selene; Piscitelli, Daniela; Mattioli, Davide; Casu, Stefania; Spagni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the treatability of textile wastewaters in a bench-scale experimental system, comprising an anaerobic biofilter, an anoxic reactor and an aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR). The MBR effluent was thereafter treated by a nanofiltration (NF) membrane. The proposed system was demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of the textile wastewater under the operating conditions applied in the study. The MBR system achieved a good COD (90-95%) removal; due to the presence of the anaerobic biofilter, also effective color removal was obtained (70%). The addition of the NF membrane allowed the further improvement in COD (50-80%), color (70-90%) and salt removal (60-70% as conductivity). In particular the NF treatment allowed the almost complete removal of the residual color and a reduction of the conductivity such as to achieve water quality suitable for reuse. PMID:21992723

  1. Domestic wastewater treatment with purple phototrophic bacteria using a novel continuous photo anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hülsen, Tim; Barry, Edward M; Lu, Yang; Puyol, Daniel; Keller, Jürg; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-09-01

    A key future challenge of domestic wastewater treatment is nutrient recovery while still achieving acceptable discharge limits. Nutrient partitioning using purple phototrophic bacteria (PPB) has the potential to biologically concentrate nutrients through growth. This study evaluates the use of PPB in a continuous photo-anaerobic membrane bioreactor (PAnMBR) for simultaneous organics and nutrient removal from domestic wastewater. This process could continuously treat domestic wastewater to discharge limits (<50 mgCOD L(-1), 5 mgN L(-1), 1.0 mgP L(-1)). Approximately 6.4 ± 1.3 gNH4-N and 1.1 ± 0.2 gPO4-P for every 100 gSCOD were removed at a hydraulic retention time of 8-24 h and volumetric loading rates of 0.8-2.5 COD kg m(3) d(-1). Thus, a minimum of 200 mg L(-1) of ethanol (to provide soluble COD) was required to achieve these discharge limits. Microbial community through sequencing indicated dominance of >60% of PPB, though the PPB community was highly variable. The outcomes from the current work demonstrate the potential of PPB for continuous domestic (and possibly industrial) wastewater treatment and nutrient recovery. Technical challenges include the in situ COD supply in a continuous reactor system, as well as efficient light delivery. Addition of external (agricultural or fossil) derived organics is not financially nor environmentally justified, and carbon needs to be sourced internally from the biomass itself to enable this technology. Reduced energy consumption for lighting is technically feasible, and needs to be addressed as a key objective in scaleup. PMID:27232993

  2. Characterization of the proton binding sites of extracellular polymeric substances in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chang, Sheng; Defersha, Fantahun M

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the chemical compositions and acidic constants of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating synthetic brewery wastewater by using chemical analysis, linear programming analysis (LPA) of titration data, and FT-IR analysis. The linear programming analysis of titration data revealed that the EPSs have proton binding sites with pKa values from pKa ≤ 6, between 6 and 7, and approximately 9.8. The strong acidic sites (pKa ≤ 6) and some weak acidic sites (7.5 < pKa < 9.0) were found to be readily removed by 0.45-μm membrane filtration. In addition, the FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids in the EPS samples. Based on the FT-IR analysis and the main chemical functional groups at the bacterial cell surfaces, the identified proton binding sites were related to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl/amine groups with pKa values of 4.6 ± 0.7, 6.6 ± 0.01, and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, with the corresponding respective intensities of 0.31 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.3, and 1.53 ± 0.3 mmole/g-EPS. The pKa values and intensities of the proton binding sites are the fundamental molecular properties of EPSs that affect the EPS charge, molecular interactions, and metal complexation characteristics. Determination of such properties can advance Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO)-based concentration polarization modeling, facilitate the estimation of the osmotic pressure of the EPS concentration polarization layers, and lead to a deeper understanding of the role of metal complexation in membrane fouling. PMID:25935368

  3. Selection of suitable fertilizer draw solute for a novel fertilizer-drawn forward osmosis-anaerobic membrane bioreactor hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjin; Chekli, Laura; Shim, Wang-Geun; Phuntsho, Sherub; Li, Sheng; Ghaffour, Noreddine; Leiknes, TorOve; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a protocol for selecting suitable fertilizer draw solute for anaerobic fertilizer-drawn forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (AnFDFOMBR) was proposed. Among eleven commercial fertilizer candidates, six fertilizers were screened further for their FO performance tests and evaluated in terms of water flux and reverse salt flux. Using selected fertilizers, bio-methane potential experiments were conducted to examine the effect of fertilizers on anaerobic activity due to reverse diffusion. Mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) showed the highest biogas production while other fertilizers exhibited an inhibition effect on anaerobic activity with solute accumulation. Salt accumulation in the bioreactor was also simulated using mass balance simulation models. Results showed that ammonium sulfate and MAP were the most appropriate for AnFDFOMBR since they demonstrated less salt accumulation, relatively higher water flux, and higher dilution capacity of draw solution. Given toxicity of sulfate to anaerobic microorganisms, MAP appears to be the most suitable draw solution for AnFDFOMBR. PMID:26898159

  4. Study on submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) treating high suspended solids raw tannery wastewater for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Umaiyakunjaram, R; Shanmugam, P

    2016-09-01

    This study deals with the treatment of high suspended solids raw tannery wastewater using flat sheet Submerged Anaerobic Membrane (0.4μm) Bioreactor (SAMBR) acclimatized with hypersaline anaerobic seed sludge for recovering biogas. The treatability of SAMBR achieved higher CODremoval efficiency (90%) and biogas yield (0.160L.g(-1) CODremoved) coincided with high r(2) values between permeate flux and TSS (0.95), biogas and COD removed (0.96). The acidification of hypersaline influent wastewater by biogas mixing with high CO2, achieved quadruplet benefit of gas liquid and solid separation, in-situ pH and NH3 control, in-situ CH4 enrichment, and prevention of membrane fouling. The initial high VFA became stable as time elapsed reveals the hydrolysing ability of particulate COD into soluble COD and into biogas, confirms the suitability of SAMBR for high suspended solids tannery wastewater. PMID:27309773

  5. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system. PMID:23489563

  6. Characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances and bacterial communities in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor coupled with online ultrasound equipment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyong; Wen, Xianghua; Xu, Meilan; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    Two parallel anaerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), integrated with or without ultrasound equipment for online membrane fouling control (US-AnMBR, or AnMBR) were established to digest waste activated sludge (WAS). The characteristics of bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and bacterial communities in the systems were investigated for further understanding of the membrane fouling mechanisms. Ultrasound was an effective method for reducing cake layer resistance. A relatively high amount of bound EPS were found in the cake layer, especially for the US-AnMBR, by responding to the external forces (i.e. cross flow and ultrasound). High-throughput pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were applied to analyze the bacterial diversity. Some bacterial populations contributing to membrane fouling were identified to accumulate in the cake layer, such as Peptococcaceae, Bacteroides and Syntrophobacterales. Since the ultrasounded retentate was recirculated back to the reactor, the bacterial community in the digested sludge was affected. PMID:22621809

  7. Development and application of a procedure for evaluating the long-term integrity of membranes for the anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR).

    PubMed

    Shin, Chungheon; Kim, Kihyun; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale short-term test, developed to predict the long-term integrity of membranes with potential for use in anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors, was used to evaluate several commercial hollow-fiber membranes. It was found that membrane performance varied widely, some membranes failing much more rapidly than others. Also found was that larger sizes of the fluidized media, in this case granular activated carbon (GAC), severely affected membrane structural integrity more than did smaller sizes, as did the method used for membrane attachment. Within the limits studied, the GAC packing ratio had only a minor impact. A decrease in membrane permeability that sometimes resulted during the testing and was caused by the deposition of fine GAC particles could be eliminated without membrane damage through simultaneous chemical cleaning and sonication. This new testing procedure should be useful for selecting membranes and reactor operating conditions to better ensure long-term operating performance of anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors. PMID:27438251

  8. Methanogenic population dynamics and performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating swine manure under high shear conditions.

    PubMed

    Padmasiri, Sudini I; Zhang, Jiangzhao; Fitch, Mark; Norddahl, Birgir; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2007-01-01

    A 6-L, completely mixed anaerobic bioreactor with an external ultrafiltration membrane module was operated for 300 days to evaluate the startup and performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating swine manure. The reactor had a successful startup at the initial loading rate of 1g volatile solids (VS)/L/day. After a two-fold increase in loading rate followed by a sudden, two-fold increase in flow velocity through the membrane module on day 75, the performance of the AnMBR deteriorated as measured by volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation, decrease in pH, and decrease in biogas production. The methanogenic population dynamics in the reactor were monitored with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Changes in the relative levels of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae were consistent with changes in VFA concentrations, i.e., high and low levels of acetate corresponded to a high abundance of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae, respectively. The levels of hydrogenotrophic methanogens of the order of Methanomicrobiales increased during decreased reactor performance suggesting that syntrophic interactions involving hydrogenotrophic methanogens remained intact regardless of the degree of shear in the AnMBR. PMID:17109913

  9. Evaluation of system performance and microbial communities of a bioaugmented anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kok Kwang; Shi, Xueqing; Ng, How Yong

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a control anaerobic membrane bioreactor (C-AnMBR) and a bioaugmented anaerobic membrane bioreactor (B-AnMBR) were operated for 210 d to treat pharmaceutical wastewater. Both the bioreactors were fed with the pharmaceutical wastewater containing TCOD of 16,249 ± 714 mg/L and total dissolved solids (TDS) of 29,450 ± 2209 mg/L with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 13.0 ± 0.6 kgCOD/m(3)d. Under steady-state condition, an average total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency of 46.1 ± 2.9% and 60.3 ± 2.8% was achieved by the C-AnMBR and the B-AnMBR, respectively. The conventional anaerobes in the C-AnMBR cannot tolerate the hypersaline conditions well, resulting in lower TCOD removal efficiency, biogas production and methane yield than the B-AnMBR seeded from the coastal shore. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that marine bacterial species (Oliephilus sp.) and halophilic bacterial species (Thermohalobacter sp.) were only present in the B-AnMBR; these species could possibly degrade complex and recalcitrant organic matter and withstand hypersaline environments. Two different dominant archaeal communities, genus Methanosaeta (43.4%) and Methanolobus (61.7%), were identified as the dominant methanogens in the C-AnMBR and the B-AnMBR, respectively. The species of genus Methanolobus was reported resistant to penicillin and required sodium and magnesium for growth, which could enable it to thrive in the hypersaline environment. PMID:26086149

  10. Removal of steroid estrogens from municipal wastewater in a pilot scale expanded granular sludge blanket reactor and anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ayumi; Mensah, Lawson; Cartmell, Elise; Lester, John N

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater offers the prospect of a new paradigm by reducing aeration costs and minimizing sludge production. It has been successfully applied in warm climates, but does not always achieve the desired outcomes in temperate climates at the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) values of municipal crude wastewater. Recently the concept of 'fortification' has been proposed to increase organic strength and has been demonstrated at the laboratory and pilot scale treating municipal wastewater at temperatures of 10-17°C. The process treats a proportion of the flow anaerobically by combining it with primary sludge from the residual flow and then polishing it to a high effluent standard aerobically. Energy consumption is reduced as is sludge production. However, no new treatment process is viable if it only addresses the problems of traditional pollutants (suspended solids - SS, BOD, nitrogen - N and phosphorus - P); it must also treat hazardous substances. This study compared three potential municipal anaerobic treatment regimes, crude wastewater in an expanded granular sludge blanket (EGSB) reactor, fortified crude wastewater in an EGSB and crude wastewater in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor. The benefits of fortification were demonstrated for the removal of SS, BOD, N and P. These three systems were further challenged with the removal of steroid estrogens at environmental concentrations from natural indigenous sources. All three systems removed these compounds to a significant degree, confirming that estrogen removal is not restricted to highly aerobic autotrophs, or aerobic heterotrophs, but is also a faculty of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26212345

  11. Performance evaluation of a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating ethanol thin stillage.

    PubMed

    Dereli, R K; Urban, D R; Heffernan, B; Jordan, J A; Ewing, J; Rosenberger, G T; Dunaev, T I

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol industry has grown rapidly during the past ten years, mainly due to increasing oil prices. However, efficient and cost-effective solutions for treating thin stillage wastewater have still to be developed. The anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology combines classical anaerobic treatment in a completely-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with membrane separation. The combination of these two technologies can achieve a superior effluent quality and also increase biogas production compared to conventional anaerobic solutions. A pilot-scale AnMBR treating thin stillage achieved very high treatment efficiencies in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal (>98%). An average permeate flux of 4.3 L/m2 x h was achieved at relatively low transmembrane pressure (TMP) values (0.1-0.2 bars) with flat-sheet membranes. Experience gained during the pilot-scale studies provides valuable information for scaling up of AnMBRs treating complex and high-strength wastewaters. PMID:22988609

  12. Biofouling and pollutant removal during long-term operation of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Robledo, M; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2010-01-01

    Two different sludge retention times (SRTs) were tested in order to assess the impact on membrane fouling and effluent quality in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Two up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors (1 l volume) coupled to external tubular ultrafiltration membranes (filtration area = 81 cm(2)) were operated at a hydraulic retention time of 3 h and two different SRTs (100 and 60 days). The transmembrane pressure (TMP), flux (J) and relevant parameters to assess water quality were measured. Effluents from UASB reactors were filtered for 500 h without intermediate cleaning. The permeate met Mexican standards for wastewater reclamation in both tested conditions. Abrupt and periodical changes in the TMP and J were noticed during the experimental period. A fouling layer collapse and compression hypothesis was set forth in order to explain these changes. An autopsy performed on biofouled membranes indicated that deposited mass was mainly composed of volatile solids (85%) and the rest related to mineral matter, with the presence of inorganic salts containing Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Si. Biomass in the fouling layer was estimated at 0.27% based on the DNA/biomass ratio for the bacterial biofilm. No clear difference in membrane fouling was detected under the two SRTs applied to the systems. However, when operated over 500 h, repetitive sudden TMP and flux changes occurred later in system A (SRT of 100 days) than in system B (SRT of 60 days) suggesting a stronger fouling layer structure in the former. PMID:20390553

  13. Long term performance of membranes in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qirong; Parker, Wayne; Dagnew, Martha

    2016-02-01

    The long term impact of SRT (100-40 days) and recovery cleaning on membrane performance of an AnMBR treating authentic municipal wastewater in a large pilot plant was assessed. Successful operation of the pilot plant at a flux of 17 LMH was maintained for a period of 536 days during which the longest period of operation without recovery cleaning or membrane replacement was 178 days. Lower SRT (40 days) reduced the fouling propensity of the mixed liquor in terms of TSS concentration and the dewaterability indicators including colloidal COD (cCOD) concentration and capillary suction time (CST). Critical fluxes ranged from 21 to 23 LMH to 25-27 LMH for SRTs of 70 and 40 days respectively and this was consistent with the reduced concentrations of TSS and improved dewaterability under the latter conditions. Recovery cleaning was found to result in substantial reduction of resistance as indicated by both pilot plant operation and clean water flux tests. The long-term fouling rate was observed to be higher with cleaned membranes as compared to virgin membranes. The lower membrane fouling with virgin membranes suggested that accumulation of foulants, which were resistant to cleaning, caused the higher fouling rates for the cleaned membranes. PMID:26363327

  14. Development of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor for concurrent extraction of volatile fatty acids and biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Trad, Zaineb; Akimbomi, Julius; Vial, Christophe; Larroche, Christian; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study an externally-submerged membrane bioreactor for the cyclic extraction of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during anaerobic fermentation, combining the advantages of submerged and external technologies for enhancing biohydrogen (BioH2) production from agrowaste. Mixing and transmembrane pressure (TMP) across a hollow fiber membrane placed in a recirculation loop coupled to a stirred tank were investigated, so that the loop did not significantly modify the hydrodynamic properties in the tank. The fouling mechanism, due to cake layer formation, was reversible. A cleaning procedure based on gas scouring and backwashing with the substrate was defined. Low TMP, 10(4)Pa, was required to achieve a 3Lh(-1)m(-2) critical flux. During fermentation, BioH2 production was shown to restart after removing VFAs with the permeate, so as to enhance simultaneously BioH2 production and the recovery of VFAs as platform molecules. PMID:26253913

  15. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. PMID:23810998

  16. Evaluation and characterization during the anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaolan; Huang, Zhenxing; Ruan, Wenquan; Yan, Lintao; Miao, Hengfeng; Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Mingxing

    2015-10-01

    The anaerobic digestion of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was investigated at two different operational modes, including no sludge discharge and daily sludge discharge of 20 L. The AnMBR provided excellent and reliable permeate quality with high COD removal efficiencies over 99%. The obvious accumulations of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and Ca(2+) were found in the anaerobic digester by precipitation and agglomeration. Though the physicochemical process contributed to attenuating the free LCFAs toxicity on anaerobic digestion, the digestion efficiency was partly influenced for the low bioavailability of those precipitates. Moreover, higher organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.8 kg COD/(m(3) d) and digestion efficiency of 78% were achieved as the AnMBR was stably operated with sludge discharge, where the membrane fouling propensity was also alleviated, indicating the crucial significance of SRT control on the treatment of high-strength kitchen waste slurry via AnMBRs. PMID:26141283

  17. Effects of salinity build-up on the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor regarding basic water quality parameters and removal of trace organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoye; McDonald, James; Price, William E; Khan, Stuart J; Hai, Faisal I; Ngo, Hao H; Guo, Wenshan; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-09-01

    The effects of elevated inorganic salt concentration on anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treatment regarding basic biological performance and trace organic contaminant (TrOC) removal were investigated. A set of 33 TrOCs were selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroids, and pesticides in municipal wastewater. Results show potential adverse effects of increase in the bioreactor salinity to 15g/L (as NaCl) on the performance of AnMBR with respect to chemical oxygen demand removal, biogas production, and the removal of most hydrophilic TrOCs. Furthermore, a decrease in biomass production was observed as salinity in the bioreactor increased. The removal of most hydrophobic TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by salinity build-up in the bioreactor. The accumulation of a few persistent TrOCs in the sludge phase was observed, but such accumulation did not vary significantly as salinity in the bioreactor increased. PMID:27262094

  18. Enhanced waste activated sludge digestion using a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor: performance, sludge characteristics and microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) plays an important role in waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment; however, conventional AD (CAD) process needs substantial improvements, especially for the treatment of WAS with low solids content and poor anaerobic biodegradability. Herein, we propose a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) for simultaneous WAS thickening and digestion without any pretreatment. During the long-term operation, the AnDMBR exhibited an enhanced sludge reduction and improved methane production over CAD process. Moreover, the biogas generated in the AnDMBR contained higher methane content than CAD process. Stable carbon isotopic signatures elucidated the occurrence of combined methanogenic pathways in the AnDMBR process, in which hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathway made a larger contribution to the total methane production. It was also found that organic matter degradation was enhanced in the AnDMBR, thus providing more favorable substrates for microorganisms. Pyrosequencing revealed that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant in bacterial communities and Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in archaeal communities, which played an important role in the AnDMBR system. This study shed light on the enhanced digestion of WAS using AnDMBR technology.

  19. Enhanced waste activated sludge digestion using a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor: performance, sludge characteristics and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) plays an important role in waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment; however, conventional AD (CAD) process needs substantial improvements, especially for the treatment of WAS with low solids content and poor anaerobic biodegradability. Herein, we propose a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) for simultaneous WAS thickening and digestion without any pretreatment. During the long-term operation, the AnDMBR exhibited an enhanced sludge reduction and improved methane production over CAD process. Moreover, the biogas generated in the AnDMBR contained higher methane content than CAD process. Stable carbon isotopic signatures elucidated the occurrence of combined methanogenic pathways in the AnDMBR process, in which hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathway made a larger contribution to the total methane production. It was also found that organic matter degradation was enhanced in the AnDMBR, thus providing more favorable substrates for microorganisms. Pyrosequencing revealed that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant in bacterial communities and Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in archaeal communities, which played an important role in the AnDMBR system. This study shed light on the enhanced digestion of WAS using AnDMBR technology. PMID:26830464

  20. Enhanced waste activated sludge digestion using a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor: performance, sludge characteristics and microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Chaowei

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) plays an important role in waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment; however, conventional AD (CAD) process needs substantial improvements, especially for the treatment of WAS with low solids content and poor anaerobic biodegradability. Herein, we propose a submerged anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) for simultaneous WAS thickening and digestion without any pretreatment. During the long-term operation, the AnDMBR exhibited an enhanced sludge reduction and improved methane production over CAD process. Moreover, the biogas generated in the AnDMBR contained higher methane content than CAD process. Stable carbon isotopic signatures elucidated the occurrence of combined methanogenic pathways in the AnDMBR process, in which hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathway made a larger contribution to the total methane production. It was also found that organic matter degradation was enhanced in the AnDMBR, thus providing more favorable substrates for microorganisms. Pyrosequencing revealed that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were abundant in bacterial communities and Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta in archaeal communities, which played an important role in the AnDMBR system. This study shed light on the enhanced digestion of WAS using AnDMBR technology. PMID:26830464

  1. Growth of Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a High-Pressure Membrane Capsule Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H. C. Aura; Plugge, Caroline M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lens, Piet N. L.; Meulepas, Roel J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-μm-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure. PMID:25501484

  2. Growth of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in a high-pressure membrane capsule bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Peer H A; Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H C Aura; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L; Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-02-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-m-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure. PMID:25501484

  3. Removal of pharmaceuticals and organic matter from municipal wastewater using two-stage anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Kasturi; Lee, Ming-Yi; Lai, Webber Wei-Po; Lee, Chien Hsien; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2014-08-01

    The aim of present study was to treat municipal wastewater in two-stage anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) (anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFBR) followed by AFMBR) using granular activated carbon (GAC) as carrier medium in both stages. Approximately 95% COD removal efficiency could be obtained when the two-stage AFMBR was operated at total HRT of 5h (2h for AFBR and 3h for AFMBR) and influent COD concentration of 250mg/L. About 67% COD and 99% TSS removal efficiency could be achieved by the system treating the effluent from primary clarifier of municipal wastewater treatment plant, at HRT of 1.28h and OLR of 5.65kg COD/m(3)d. The system could also effectively remove twenty detected pharmaceuticals in raw wastewaters with removal efficiency in the range of 86-100% except for diclofenac (78%). No other membrane fouling control was required except scouring effect of GAC for flux of 16LMH. PMID:24745898

  4. Treatment of domestic wastewater by an integrated anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactor under moderate to low temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Hu, Qi; Yao, Chen; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a novel integrated anaerobic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactor (IAFMBR) for treating practical domestic wastewater was investigated at a step dropped temperature from 35, 25, to 15°C. The COD removal was 74.0 ± 3.7%, 67.1 ± 2.9% and 51.1 ± 2.6% at 35, 25 and 15°C, respectively. The COD removal depended both on influent strength and operational temperature. The accumulation of VFAs (Volatile Fatty Acids) was affected by temperature, and acetic acid was the most sensitive one to the decrease of temperature. The methanogenic activity of the sludge decreased eventually and the methane yield was dropped from 0.17 ± 0.03, 0.15 ± 0.02 to 0.10 ± 0.01 L/Ld. And as compared with a mesophilic temperature, a low temperature can accelerate membrane biofouling. Proteins were the dominant matters causing membrane fouling at low temperature and membrane fouling can be mitigated by granular active carbon (GAC) through protein absorption. PMID:24650533

  5. Effects of FeCl3 addition on the operation of a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunseok; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The effects on sulfur removal and membrane fouling resulting from FeCl(3) addition to an anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) in a staged AFMBR (SAF-MBR) was investigated. Total sulfur removal in the SAF-MBR was 42-59% without FeCl(3) addition, but increased to 87-95% with FeCl(3) addition. Sulfide removal in the AFMBR increased to 90% with addition of FeCl(3) at a molar Fe(3+)/S ratio of 0.54 and to 95% when the ratio was increased to 0.95. Effluent sulfide concentration then decreased to 0.3-0.6 mg/L. Phosphate removals were only 19 and 37% with the above added FeCl(3) ratios, indicating that iron removed sulfide more readily than phosphate. Neither chemical oxygen demand nor biochemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were affected by the addition of FeCl(3). When the AFMBR permeate became exposed to air, light brown particles were formed from effluent Fe(2+) oxidation to Fe(3+). FeCl(3) addition, while beneficial for sulfide removal, did increase the membrane fouling rate due to the deposition of inorganic precipitates in the membrane pores. PMID:27386990

  6. Global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR).

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2014-04-01

    The results of a global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic MBRs (AnMBRs) are assessed in this paper. This study aimed to (1) identify the less- (or non-) influential factors of the model in order to facilitate model calibration and (2) validate the modelling approach (i.e. to determine the need for each of the proposed factors to be included in the model). The sensitivity analysis was conducted using a revised version of the Morris screening method. The dynamic simulations were conducted using long-term data obtained from an AnMBR plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. Of the 14 factors in the model, six were identified as influential, i.e. those calibrated using off-line protocols. A dynamic calibration (based on optimisation algorithms) of these influential factors was conducted. The resulting estimated model factors accurately predicted membrane performance. PMID:24650614

  7. Parameters governing permeate flux in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating low-strength municipal wastewaters: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bérubé, P R; Hall, E R; Sutton, P M

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this review was to conduct a comprehensive literature survey to identify the parameters that govern the permeate flux in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating municipal wastewater. Based on the survey, research to date indicates that the optimal membrane system for an AnMBR consists of an organic, hydrophilic, and negatively charged membrane with a pore size of approximately 0.1 microm. The use of both external and submerged membrane configurations shows promise. The operating parameters that affect permeate flux in an external membrane system are transmembrane pressure (TMP) and cross-flow velocity. The operating parameters that affect permeate flux in a submerged membrane system are TMP, sparging intensity, and duration of the relaxation period. Both cross-flow velocity and sparging intensity impart a significant amount of shear force on the biomass in an AnMBR. High shear forces can reduce the microbial activity in an AnMBR. In addition, high shear forces can reduce the size of the biosolids in the mixed liquor and increase the release of soluble microbial products. In this respect, external and submerged membrane systems are expected to perform differently because the magnitude of the shear forces to which the biomass is exposed in an external membrane system is significantly greater than that in a submerged system. The size of the biosolid particles and concentration of soluble microbial products in the mixed liquor affect permeate flux. Higher concentrations of soluble microbial products may be present in the mixed liquor when an AnMBR is operated at relatively low operating temperatures. Aerobic polishing following anaerobic treatment can potentially significantly reduce the concentration of some components of the soluble microbial products in the mixed liquor. It is not possible to remove the foulant layer on an organic membrane with caustic cleaning alone. Acidic cleaning or acidic cleaning followed by caustic cleaning is

  8. Biogas-pH automation control strategy for optimizing organic loading rate of anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating high COD wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dawei; Liu, Jibao; Sui, Qianwen; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-03-01

    Control of organic loading rate (OLR) is essential for anaerobic digestion treating high COD wastewater, which would cause operation failure by overload or less efficiency by underload. A novel biogas-pH automation control strategy using the combined gas-liquor phase monitoring was developed for an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating high COD (27.53 g·L(-1)) starch wastewater. The biogas-pH strategy was proceeded with threshold between biogas production rate >98 Nml·h(-1) preventing overload and pH>7.4 preventing underload, which were determined by methane production kinetics and pH titration of methanogenesis slurry, respectively. The OLR and the effluent COD were doubled as 11.81 kgCOD·kgVSS(-1)·d(-1) and halved as 253.4 mg·L(-1), respectively, comparing with a constant OLR control strategy. Meanwhile COD removal rate, biogas yield and methane concentration were synchronously improved to 99.1%, 312 Nml·gCODin(-1) and 74%, respectively. Using the biogas-pH strategy, AnMBR formed a "pH self-regulation ternary buffer system" which seizes carbon dioxide and hence provides sufficient buffering capacity. PMID:26722804

  9. Treating wastewater with high oil and grease content using an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR). Filtration and cleaning assays.

    PubMed

    Diez, V; Ramos, C; Cabezas, J L

    2012-01-01

    An Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR) pilot plant was studied to improve certain operational conditions of AnMBRs that treat high oil and grease wastewaters discharged from a snacks factory. A comparison of its performance and behavior was made with an upflow anaerobic reactor throughout the first eight weeks of its operation. Raw snack food wastewater was characterized by oil and grease concentrations of up to 6,000 mg/l, with chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)) concentrations of up to 22,000 and 10,300 mg/l, respectively. The AnMBR achieved COD removal efficiencies of 97% at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.1 kg COD/m(3) d. The filtration flux, and the suction, backwash and relaxation times for each cycle were all varied: an 11 min filtration time involving 10 s pre-relaxation, 20 s backwash and 70 s post-relaxation was finally selected. The filtration flux for long-term operation was between 6.5 and 8.0 l/m(2) h. The study also tested physical cleaning strategies such as intensive backwashing cycles and extended relaxation mode, and different chemical cleaning methods, such as chemically enhanced backwash on air and chemical cleaning by immersion. PMID:22546801

  10. Use of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) containing powdered activated carbon (PAC) for the treatment of textile effluents.

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Ramos, R L; Lima, D R S; Aquino, S F

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated the use of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAMBRs) in the presence and absence of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for the treatment of genuine textile wastewater. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with an HRT of 24 h and the textile effluent was diluted (1:10) with nutrient solution containing yeast extract as the source of the redox mediation riboflavin. The results showed that although both SAMBRs exhibited an excellent performance, the presence of PAC inside SAMBR-1 enhanced reactor stability and removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFA), turbidity and color. The median removal efficiencies of COD and color in SAMBR-1 were, 90 and 94% respectively; whereas for SAMBR-2 (without PAC) these values were 79 and 86%, In addition, the median values of turbidity and VFA were 8 NTU and 8 mg/L for SAMBR-1 and 14 NTU and 26 mg/L for SAMBR-2, indicating that the presence of PAC inside SAMBR-1 led to the production of an anaerobic effluent of high quality regarding such parameters. PMID:22508114

  11. Graphene-Coated Hollow Fiber Membrane as the Cathode in Anaerobic Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactors - Effect of Configuration and Applied Voltage on Performance and Membrane Fouling.

    PubMed

    Werner, Craig M; Katuri, Krishna P; Hari, Ananda Rao; Chen, Wei; Lai, Zhiping; Logan, Bruce E; Amy, Gary L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-04-19

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated, hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 μm for rectangular reactors and 4 μm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than that in the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance. PMID:26691927

  12. Effect of solids retention time on membrane fouling intensity in two-stage submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors treating palm oil mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Annop, S; Sridang, P; Puetpaiboon, U; Grasmick, A

    2014-01-01

    Submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAnMBRs) treating palm oil mill effluent were analysed in terms of membrane fouling dynamics when working at three different sludge retention times (SRTs of 15, 30 and 60 d). The average permeate flux was fixed at 2.4 L x m(-2) x h(-1). During operation, the membrane was regenerated by using two steps: membrane wiping during each experiment as soon as trans-membrane pressure reached 125-130 mbars, and complete membrane cleaning including backwash and chemical cleaning at the end of each experiment when analysing the membrane surface and foulant material. Whatever the SRT, the cake formation was the dominant effect on membrane fouling dynamics. The concentration of suspended solids in the SAnMBRs, depending on the SRT, was then a determining criterion. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that fouled membrane surfaces were covered with a cake layer containing organic and inorganic elements whose concentrations were higher when working at a higher SRT; the higher concentrations of such elements gave to the cake layer a denser and more compact structure. In these experiments, the soluble fractions played a secondary role because of the dominant effect of cake layer structuring. PMID:25145221

  13. Performances of anaerobic and aerobic membrane bioreactors for the treatment of synthetic textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Adem; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Aktaş, Özgür; Uçar, Deniz; Çınar, Özer; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-09-01

    This study aims at comparatively evaluating anaerobic and aerobic MBRs for the treatment of azo-dye containing synthetic wastewater. Also, the filtration performances of AnMBR and AeMBR were compared under similar operating conditions. In both MBRs, high COD removal efficiencies were observed. Although almost complete color removal was observed in AnMBR, only partial (30-50%) color removal was achieved in AeMBR. AnMBR was successfully operated up to 9 L/(m(2)h) (LMH) and no chemical cleaning was required at 4.5 LMH for around 50 days. AeMBR was operated successfully up to 20 LMH. The filtration resistance of AnMBR was generally higher compared to AeMBR although reversible fouling rates were comparable. In both MBRs, offline chemical cleaning with NaOCl and sulfuric acid almost completely removed irreversible fouling and the resistances of chemically cleaned membranes were close to those of new membranes. PMID:26093251

  14. Two-stage anaerobic membrane bioreactor for the treatment of sugarcane vinasse: assessment on biological activity and filtration performance.

    PubMed

    Mota, Vera Tainá; Santos, Fábio S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    2013-10-01

    A two-stage submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (2-SAnMBR) was designed for the treatment of sugarcane vinasse. For start-up, the flow rate was reduced whenever VFA levels reached critical levels in the methanogenic reactor. After acclimation, the system was operated under a continuous flow. Separation of the stages was observed during the entire period of operation. VFA, COD and DOC levels of raw effluent, acidified effluent and permeate averaged 2141, 3525 and 61 mg VFA L(-1) (as acetic acid), 15727, 11512 and 488 mg COD L(-1), and, 3544, 3533 and 178 mg DOC L(-1), respectively. Overall COD and DOC removal efficiencies of 96.9±0.7% and 95.0±1.1%, respectively, were reached. Methane content of the biogas from the acidogenic and methanogenic reactors ranged 0.1-4.6% and 60.1-70.1%, respectively. Removable fouling strongly affected filtration performance and cake layer formation accounted for most of filtration resistance. Membrane resistance was related to presence of protein-like substances and carbohydrates. PMID:23958682

  15. Influence of step increases in hydraulic retention time on (RS)-MCPP degradation using an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yuzir, Ali; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Sallis, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    The effects of different hydraulic retention time (HRT) on (RS)-MCPP utilisation was investigated by decreasing the feed flow rate in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Results showed an average COD removal efficiency of 91.4%, 96.9% and 94.4% when the reactor was operated at HRT 3, 7 and 17 d, respectively. However, when the HRT was reduced to 1d, the COD removal efficiency declined to just only 60%, confirming the AnMBR is stable to a large transient hydraulic shock loads. The (RS)-MCPP removal efficiency fluctuated from 6% to 39% at HRT 3 d, however when it was increased to 7 and 17 d, the removal efficiency increased to an average of 60% and 74.5%. In addition, (RS)-MCPP specific utilisation rates (SUR) were dependent on the HRT and gradually improved from 18 to 43 μg mg VSS(-1) d(-1) as flow rate increased. PMID:21862323

  16. Impact of the herbicide (RS)-MCPP on an anaerobic membrane bioreactor performance under different COD/nitrate ratios.

    PubMed

    Yuzir, Ali; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Sallis, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of (RS)-MCPP was investigated in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) using nitrate as an available electron acceptor under different COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios. Results showed high soluble COD removal efficiency (80-93%) when the reactor was operated at high COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios. However, the COD removal started to decline (average 15%) at high nitrate concentrations coinciding with a drop in nitrate removal efficiency to 37%, suggesting that the denitrification activity dropped and affected the AnMBR performance when nitrate was the predominant electron acceptor. Additionally, the removal efficiency of (RS)-MCPP increased from 2% to 47% with reducing COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios, whilst the (RS)-MCPP specific utilisation rate (SUR) was inversely proportional to the COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratio, suggesting that a lower COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios had a positive influence on the (RS)-MCPP SUR. Although nitrate had a major impact on methane production rates, the methane composition was stable (approximately 80%) for COD/NO(3)(-)-N ratios of 23 or more. PMID:22318083

  17. Multiple effects of trace elements on methanogenesis in a two-phase anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating starch wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dawei; Li, Chao; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jing; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-08-01

    For enhancing anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating food processing wastewater due to speed-limited methanogenesis step, multiple effects of trace element (TE) supplementation on methanogenesis of a two-phase AnMBR were firstly investigated in batch tests. TE supplementation included individual element, combination and recovery of Fe, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn supplementation. Multiple effects of TE supplementation were highest stimulated by 22.4 ± 5.6 % (TE313) for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, 43.1 ± 12.5 % (TE303) for specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and 13.9 ± 3.7 % (TE405) for biomass growth, respectively, although only 7.5 ± 0.6 % (TE106) for methane production. Dosage of TEs played a critical role in methane production, COD removal and biomass growth of the AnMBR's methanogenesis. Low dosages of TE supplementation improved the COD removal and slightly stimulated the COD bioconverting to methane and biomass, but their specific methanation activities were inhibited in the initial rapid methanogenesis stage. Several methanation functional species were increased in abundance like Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus. PMID:26879957

  18. Effect of Mecoprop (RS)-MCPP on the biological treatment of synthetic wastewater in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yuzir, Ali; Abdullah, Norhayati; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Sallis, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The effects of Mecoprop (RS)-MCPP were investigated in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBr) fed with synthetic wastewater containing stepwise increases in Mecoprop concentration, 5-200 mg L(-1) over 240 days. Effects were observed in terms of soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, and methane yield. Soluble COD removal efficiency was stable at Mecoprop concentrations below 200 (±3) mg L(-1), with an average of 98 (±0.7)% removal. However, at 200 (±3) mg L(-1) Mecoprop, the COD removal efficiency decreased gradually to 94 (±1.5)%. At 5 mg L(-1) Mecoprop, acetic and propionic acid concentrations increased by 60% and 160%, respectively. In contrast, when Mecoprop was increased to 200 (±3) mg L(-1), the formation and degradation of acetate was unaffected by the higher Mecoprop concentration, acetate remaining below 35 mg L(-1). Increases in the Mecoprop specific utilization rate were observed as Mecoprop was increased stepwise between 5 and 200 mg L(-1). PMID:23422308

  19. Development of a predictive framework to assess the removal of trace organic chemicals by anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; McDonald, James A; Khan, Stuart J; Hai, Faisal I; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop a predictive framework to assess the removal and fate of trace organic chemicals (TrOCs) during wastewater treatment by anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). The fate of 27 TrOCs in both the liquid and sludge phases during AnMBR treatment was systematically investigated. The results demonstrate a relationship between hydrophobicity and specific molecular features of TrOCs and their removal efficiency. These molecular features include the presence of electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) or donating groups (EDGs), especially those containing nitrogen and sulphur. All seven hydrophobic contaminants were well removed (>70%) by AnMBR treatment. Most hydrophilic TrOCs containing EDGs were also well removed (>70%). In contrast, hydrophilic TrOCs containing EWGs were mostly poorly removed and could accumulate in the sludge phase. The removal of several nitrogen/sulphur bearing TrOCs (e.g., linuron and caffeine) by AnMBR was higher than that by aerobic treatment, possibly due to nitrogen or sulphur reducing bacteria. PMID:25918032

  20. Sustainable organic loading rate and energy recovery potential of mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chun-Hai; Harb, Moustapha; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying; Leiknes, TorOve

    2014-08-01

    The overall performance of a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for synthetic municipal wastewater treatment was investigated under a range of organic loading rate (OLR). A very steady and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (around 98%) was achieved over a broad range of volumetric OLR of 0.8-10 gCOD/L/d. The sustainable volumetric and sludge OLR satisfying a permeate COD below 50 mg/L for general reuse was 6 gCOD/L/d and 0.63 gCOD/gMLVSS (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids)/d, respectively. At a high sludge OLR of over 0.6 gCOD/gMLVSS/d, the AnMBR achieved high methane production of over 300 ml/gCOD (even approaching the theoretical value of 382 ml/gCOD). A low biomass production of 0.015-0.026 gMLVSS/gCOD and a sustainable flux of 6L/m(2)/h were observed. The integration of a heat pump and forward osmosis into the mesophilic AnMBR process would be a promising way for net energy recovery from typical municipal wastewater in a temperate area. PMID:24926606

  1. A comprehensive study into fouling properties of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from bulk sludge and cake sludge in a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Tian, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This study focused on the fouling behaviors of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) to obtain the relations of EPS specific constituents with membrane fouling. It was found that for the EPS extracted from bulk sludge, the LB-EPS induced the largest flux decline; however, for EPS extracted from cake sludge, the S-EPS caused the highest flux decline. The preferential rejection fraction by membrane further confirmed that the greater flux decline was exhibited with the higher percent rejection of EPS fractions. The adhesion and cohesion interactions of EPS fractions and membranes could explain the different rejection rates of the EPS components. The structural characteristics analysis indicated that the fouling layers of different EPS fractions with the greater loss of filterability had the smaller porosity. Further investigations demonstrated that these changes could be attributed to the different content of HPO-N in EPS fractions. PMID:26022972

  2. Long-term operation of a pilot scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for the treatment of municipal wastewater under psychrophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, J; Plaza, F; Garralon, G; Fdz-Polanco, F; Peña, M

    2015-06-01

    The performance of a pilot scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), comprising an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor coupled to an external ultrafiltration membrane treating municipal wastewater at 18±2°C, was evaluated over three years of stable operation. The reactor was inoculated with a mesophilic inoculum without acclimation. The AnMBR supported a tCOD removal efficiency of 87±1% at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 7h, operating at a volumetric loading rate (VLR) of between 2 and 2.5kgtCOD/m(3)d, reaching effluent tCOD concentrations of 100-120mg/L and BOD5 concentrations of 35-50mgO2/L. Specific methane yield varied from 0.18 to 0.23Nm(3)CH4/kgCODremoved depending on the recirculation between the membrane module and the UASB reactor. The permeate flow rate, using cycles of 15s backwash, 7.5min filtration, and continuous biogas sparging (40-60m/h), ranged from 10 to 14Lm(2)/h with trans-membrane pressure (TMP) values of 400-550mbar. PMID:25770470

  3. The energy-saving anaerobic baffled reactor membrane bioreactor (EABR-MBR) system for recycling wastewater from a high-rise building.

    PubMed

    Ratanatamskul, Chavalit; Charoenphol, Chakraphan

    2015-01-01

    A novel energy-saving anaerobic baffled reactor-membrane bioreactor (EABR-MBR) system has been developed as a compact biological treatment system for reuse of water from a high-rise building. The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) compartment had five baffles and served as the anaerobic degradation zone, followed by the aerobic MBR compartment. The total operating hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the EABR-MBR system was 3 hours (2 hours for ABR compartment and very short HRT of 1 hour for aerobic MBR compartment). The wastewater came from the Charoen Wisawakam building. The results showed that treated effluent quality was quite good and highly promising for water reuse purposes. The average flux of the membrane was kept at 30 l/(m2h). The EABR-MBR system could remove chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus from building wastewater by more than 90%. Moreover, it was found that phosphorus concentration was rising in the ABR compartment due to the phosphorus release phenomenon, and then the concentration decreased rapidly in the aerobic MBR compartment due to the phosphorus uptake phenomenon. This implies that phosphorus-accumulating organisms inside the EABR-MBR system are responsible for biological phosphorus removal. The research suggests that the EABR-MBR system can be a promising system for water reuse and reclamation for high-rise building application in the near future. PMID:26067504

  4. Effect of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as a biocarrier on volatile fatty acids production of a two-stage thermophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chaikasem, Supawat; Abeynayaka, Amila; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2014-09-01

    This work studied the effect of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-gel) beads, as an effective biocarrier for volatile fatty acid (VFA) production in hydrolytic reactor of a two-stage thermophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (TAnMBR). The two-stage TAnMBR, treating synthetic high strength particulate wastewater with influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) [16.4±0.8 g/L], was operated at 55 °C. Under steady state conditions, the reactor was operated at an organic loading rate of 8.2±0.4 kg COD/m(3) d. Operational performance of the system was monitored by assessing VFA composition and quantity, methane production and COD removal efficiency. Increment of VFA production was observed with PVA-gel addition. Hydrolytic effluent contained large amount of acetic acid and n-butyric acid. However, increase in VFA production adversely affected the methanogenic reactor performance due to lack of methanogenic archaea. PMID:24803272

  5. In-situ biogas sparging enhances the performance of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) with mesh filter in low-strength wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-07-01

    In the recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology is being considered as a very attractive alternative for wastewater treatment due to the striking advantages such as upgraded effluent quality. However, fouling control is still a problem for the application of AnMBR. This study investigated the performance of an AnMBR using mesh filter as support material to treat low-strength wastewater via in-situ biogas sparging. It was found that mesh AnMBR exhibited high and stable chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies with values of 95 ± 5 % and an average methane yield of 0.24 L CH4/g CODremoved. Variation of transmembrane pressure (TMP) during operation indicated that mesh fouling was mitigated by in-situ biogas sparging and the fouling rate was comparable to that of aerobic membrane bioreactor with mesh filter reported in previous researches. The fouling layer formed on the mesh exhibited non-uniform structure; the porosity became larger from bottom layer to top layer. Biogas sparging could not change the composition but make thinner thickness of cake layer, which might be benefit for reducing membrane fouling rate. It was also found that ultrasonic cleaning of fouled mesh was able to remove most foulants on the surface or pores. This study demonstrated that in-situ biogas sparging enhanced the performance of AnMBRs with mesh filter in low-strength wastewater treatment. Apparently, AnMBRs with mesh filter can be used as a promising and sustainable technology for wastewater treatment. PMID:27003270

  6. Membrane Bioreactor With Pressure Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efthymiou, George S.; Shuler, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Improved class of multilayer membrane bioreactors uses convention forced by differences in pressure to overcome some of diffusional limitations of prior bioreactors. In reactor of new class, flow of nutrient solution reduces adverse gradients of concentration, keeps cells supplied with fresh nutrient, and sweeps away products faster than diffusion alone. As result, overall yield and rate of reaction increased. Pressures in sweeping gas and nutrient alternated to force nutrient liquid into and out of biocatalyst layer through hyrophilic membrane.

  7. Implications of changes in solids retention time on long term evolution of sludge filterability in anaerobic membrane bioreactors treating high strength industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dereli, Recep Kaan; Grelot, Aurelie; Heffernan, Barry; van der Zee, Frank P; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-08-01

    Long-term experiments were conducted to assess the impact of changing the solids retention time (SRT) on sludge filterability in anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs), treating corn-based bioethanol thin stillage. Well established parameters, such as capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), developed for sludge dewatering, were used to evaluate the SRT effect on sludge filterability. Our results clearly demonstrated that SRT is one of the most important factors influencing sludge filterability in AnMBRs. SRT effects the accumulation of fine particles and solutes, which were found to affect attainable flux and fouling, in reactor broth. A better filterability was observed at a SRT of 20 days compared to elevated SRTs, i.e. 50 days. A clear correlation between sludge filtration characteristics and membrane filtration resistance could not be established especially at short SRTs, whereas many parameters such as total suspended solids (TSS), CST, soluble microbial products (SMP) and supernatant filterability were found to be mutually correlated. Net membrane fluxes between 9 and 13 L m(-2) h(-1) were obtained at 0.5 m s(-1) cross-flow velocity and the long term fouling was controlled by using frequent filtration and backwash cycles. PMID:24769102

  8. Effect of sludge retention time on the biological performance of anaerobic membrane bioreactors treating corn-to-ethanol thin stillage with high lipid content.

    PubMed

    Dereli, Recep Kaan; van der Zee, Frank P; Heffernan, Barry; Grelot, Aurelie; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-02-01

    The potential of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) for the treatment of lipid rich corn-to-ethanol thin stillage was investigated at three different sludge retention times (SRT), i.e. 20, 30 and 50 days. The membrane assisted biomass retention in AnMBRs provided an excellent solution to sludge washout problems reported for the treatment of lipid rich wastewaters by granular sludge bed reactors. The AnMBRs achieved high COD removal efficiencies up to 99% and excellent effluent quality. Although higher organic loading rates (OLRs) up to 8.0 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) could be applied to the reactors operated at shorter SRTs, better biological degradation efficiencies, i.e. up to 83%, was achieved at increased SRTs. Severe long chain fatty acid (LCFA) inhibition was observed at 50 days SRT, possibly caused by the extensive dissolution of LCFA in the reactor broth, inhibiting the methanogenic biomass. Physicochemical mechanisms such as precipitation with divalent cations and adsorption on the sludge played an important role in the occurrence of LCFA removal, conversion, and inhibition. PMID:24238260

  9. Navigating environmental, economic, and technological trade-offs in the design and operation of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs).

    PubMed

    Pretel, R; Shoener, B D; Ferrer, J; Guest, J S

    2015-12-15

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) enable energy recovery from wastewater while simultaneously achieving high levels of treatment. The objective of this study was to elucidate how detailed design and operational decisions of submerged AnMBRs influence the technological, environmental, and economic sustainability of the system across its life cycle. Specific design and operational decisions evaluated included: solids retention time (SRT), mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration, sludge recycling ratio (r), flux (J), and specific gas demand per membrane area (SGD). The possibility of methane recovery (both as biogas and as soluble methane in reactor effluent) and bioenergy production, nutrient recovery, and final destination of the sludge (land application, landfill, or incineration) were also evaluated. The implications of these design and operational decisions were characterized by leveraging a quantitative sustainable design (QSD) framework which integrated steady-state performance modeling across seasonal temperatures (using pilot-scale experimental data and the simulating software DESASS), life cycle cost (LCC) analysis, and life cycle assessment (LCA). Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were used to characterize the relative importance of individual design decisions, and to navigate trade-offs across environmental, economic, and technological criteria. Based on this analysis, there are design and operational conditions under which submerged AnMBRs could be net energy positive and contribute to the pursuit of carbon negative wastewater treatment. PMID:26206622

  10. Feasibility of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) for onsite sanitation and resource recovery (nutrients, energy and water) in urban slums.

    PubMed

    Bair, Robert A; Ozcan, Onur Y; Ozcan, Onur O; Calabria, Jorge L; Dick, George H; Yeh, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Slums are challenging locations for sanitation technologies. High population densities, a lack of water and electricity infrastructure, and space constraints combine to ensure that many traditional waste treatment technologies fail when implemented in this context. This paper proposes the use of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) for slum sanitation. AnMBRs allow for localized water reuse, high quality treatment, and energy production at the point of treatment. A water, energy, nutrient, and mass balance was conducted on a theoretical AnMBR directly coupled to a public toilet. The combined system would be capable of recycling its water for use in toilet flushing and would be capable of providing enough energy to power both the toilet and AnMBR operation. The addition of food waste to the feed would help to ensure process stability and energy production by the AnMBR. Ammonia accumulation within the system would have to be managed through struvite precipitation, ion exchange, oxidation, plant uptake or other means. Generated biogas can be converted into heat and/or electricity using small scale gas generators. AnMBR technology has high potential for success in slum settings, if considerations for maintenance and supplies are made as part of the design and system delivery. PMID:26524445

  11. Treatment of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) effluent by an activated sludge system: the role of sulphide and thiosulphate in the process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramírez, J E; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Bouzas, A; García-Usach, F

    2015-01-01

    This work studies the use of a well-known and spread activated sludge system (UCT configuration) to treat the effluent of a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) treating domestic wastewater. Ammonia, phosphate, dissolved methane and sulphide concentrations in the SAnMBR effluent were around 55 mg NH4-N L(-1), 7 mg PO4-P L(-1), 30 mg non-methane biodegradable COD L(-1), and 105 mg S(2-) L(-1) respectively. The results showed a nitrification inhibition caused by the presence of sulphur compounds at any of the solids retention time (SRT) studied (15, 20 and 25 days). This inhibition could be overcome increasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 13 to 26 h. Among the sulphur compounds, sulphide was identified as the substance which caused the nitrification inhibition. When the nitrification was well established, removal rates of nitrogen and phosphorus of 56% and 45% were reached respectively. The sulphide present in the influent was completely oxidised to sulphate, contributing this oxidation to the denitrification process. Moreover, the presence of methanotrophic bacteria, detected by FISH technique, could also contribute to the denitrification. PMID:25239686

  12. Efficient performance and the microbial community changes of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor in treatment of sewage containing cellulose suspended solid at 25°C.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryoya; Nie, Yulun; Takahashi, Shintaro; Wakahara, Shinichiro; Li, Yu-You

    2016-09-01

    Influence of cellulose as suspended solid (SS) on the performance of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAnMBR) was evaluated at 25°C using two types of synthetic sewage (SS contained or not). During the 110days operation, COD and BOD removal, CH4 gas recovery and cellulose accumulation were investigated in detail. The influence of cellulose as SS in sewage on the SAnMBR performance was not significant at HRT longer than12h and 65-72% of the influent COD was recovered as methane gas at HRT of 12h. At HRT of 6h, the quality of effluent got worse and the accumulation of cellulose was found in reactor. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the microbial diversity distribution including Archaea and Bacteria changed due to the addition of SS in sewage and specific microbe for cellulose degradation such as Proteobacteria was detected. Sludge in SAnMBR could acclimate to characteristics of sewage by self-adaptation. PMID:27235975

  13. Metagenomic characterization of 'Candidatus Defluviicoccus tetraformis strain TFO71', a tetrad-forming organism, predominant in an anaerobic-aerobic membrane bioreactor with deteriorated biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Nobu, Masaru K; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-09-01

    In an acetate-fed anaerobic-aerobic membrane bioreactor with deteriorated enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), Defluviicoccus-related tetrad-forming organisms (DTFO) were observed to predominate in the microbial community. Using metagenomics, a partial genome of the predominant DTFO, 'Candidatus Defluviicoccus tetraformis strain TFO71', was successfully constructed and characterized. Examining the genome confirmed the presence of genes related to the synthesis and degradation of glycogen and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), which function as energy and carbon storage compounds. TFO71 and 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' (CAP) UW-1 and CAP UW-2, representative polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), have PHA metabolism-related genes with high homology, but TFO71 has unique genes for PHA synthesis, gene regulation and granule management. We further discovered genes encoding DTFO polyphosphate (polyP) synthesis, suggesting that TFO71 may synthesize polyP under untested conditions. However, TFO71 may not activate these genes under EBPR conditions because the retrieved genome does not contain all inorganic phosphate transporters that are characteristic of PAOs (CAP UW-1, CAP UW-2, Microlunatus phosphovorus NM-1 and Tetrasphaera species). As a first step in characterizing EBPR-associated DTFO metabolism, this study identifies important differences between DTFO and PAO that may contribute to EBPR community competition and deterioration. PMID:24428681

  14. Elimination and fate of selected micro-organic pollutants in a full-scale anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic process combined with membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenchao; Wu, Chunying; Xiao, Kang; Huang, Xia; Zhou, Haidong; Tsuno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2010-12-01

    The occurrence and elimination of 19 micro-organic pollutants including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in a full-scale anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic-membrane bioreactor process was investigated. The investigated process achieved over 70% removal of the target EDCs and 50%-100% removal of most of the PPCPs, with influent concentration ranging from ng/L to μg/L. Three PPCPs, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulpiride were not well removed, with the removal efficiency below 20%. A rough mass balance suggests that the targets were eliminated through sludge-adsorption and/or biodegradation, the former of which was particularly significant for the removal of hydrophobic compounds. The two-phase fate model was employed to describe the kinetics of sludge-adsorption and biodegradation. It was found that the fast sludge adsorption (indicated by mass-transfer rates greater than 10 for most compounds) is responsible for the rapid decline of the aqueous concentration of the targets in the first compartment of the treatment process (i.e. in the anaerobic tank). In contrast, the slow biodegradation proved to be the rate-determining step for the entire degradation process, and the rates are generally positively related to the dissolved oxygen level. On the other hand, this study showed that the removal rates of most targets can reach a quasi-plateau in 5 h under aerobic conditions, indicating that hydraulic retention time of ca. 5 h in aerobic tanks should be sufficient for the elimination of most targets. PMID:20723962

  15. Examination of Bacterial Characteristics of Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors in Three Pilot-Scale Plants for Treating Low-Strength Wastewater by Application of the Colony-Forming-Curve Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Naoaki; Tokiwa, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yasuo; Fujiki, Kiichi; Taroda, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic sludge ecosystems arising in anaerobic membrane bioreactors of three pilot-scale plants treating low-strength (less than 1 g of biological oxygen demand per liter) sewage or soybean-processing wastewater were examined by analysis of the colony-forming-curves (CFC) obtained by counting colonies at suitable intervals. The wastewaters, containing high amounts of suspended solids (SS) (SS/chemical oxygen demand ratio, 0.51 to 0.80), were treated by using two types of bioreactors: (i) a hydrolyzation reactor for solubilization and acidification of SS in wastewater and (ii) a methane fermentation reactor for producing methane. The colony counts for the two sewage treatment plants continued to increase even after 3 weeks of incubation, whereas those for soybean-processing wastewater reached an approximately constant level within 3 weeks of incubation. The CFCs were analyzed by correlating the rate of colony appearance on roll tubes with the physiological types of bacteria present in the bioreactors. It was found that there were large numbers of slow-colony-forming anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactors and that the viable populations consisted of a few groups with different growth rates. It is considered that the slow-growing colonies appearing after 10 days of incubation were the dominant microflora in the sewage treated by hydrolyzation reactors. In particular, highly concentrated sludge (30.0 g of mixed-liquor volatile SS per liter) retained by the membrane separation module contained a large number of such bacteria. Slow-growing colonies of these bacteria could be counted by using a sludge extract medium prepared from only the supernatant of autoclaved sludge. In addition, the highest colony counts were almost always obtained with the sludge extract medium, meaning that most of the anaerobic bacteria in these sludges have complex nutrient requirements for growth. This report also indicates the usefulness of application of the CFC analysis method to

  16. A two-stage microbial fuel cell and anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) system for effective domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lijiao; Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m(2)/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m(3), which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m(3)). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m(3)). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements. PMID:24568605

  17. A Two-Stage Microbial Fuel Cell and Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Membrane Bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) System for Effective Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m2/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m3, which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m3). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m3). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements. PMID:24568605

  18. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  19. Membrane bioreactors for water reclamation.

    PubMed

    Tao, G; Kekre, K; Wei, Z; Lee, T C; Viswanath, B; Seah, H

    2005-01-01

    Singapore has been using dual membrane technology (MF/UF RO) to produce high-grade water (NEWater) from secondary treated sewage. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) has very high potential and will lead to the further improvement of the productivity and quality of high-grade water. This study was focused on the technical feasibility of MBR system for water reclamation in Singapore, making a comparison between various membrane systems available and to get operational experience in terms of membrane cleaning and other issues. Three MBR plants were built at Bedok Water Reclamation Plant with a design flow of 300 m3/day each. They were commissioned in March 2003. Three different types of submerged membranes were tested. They are Membrane A, plate sheet membrane with pore size of 0.4 microm; Membrane B, hollow fibre membrane with pore size of 0.4 microm; and Membrane C, hollow fibre membrane with pore size of 0.035 microm. The permeate quality of all the three MBR Systems were found equivalent to or better than that of the conventional tertiary treatment by ultrafiltration. MBR permeate TOC was about 2 mg/l lower than UF permeate TOC. GC-MS, GC-ECD and HPLC scan results show that trace organic contaminants in MBR permeate and UF permeate were in the same range. MBR power consumption can be less than 1 kwh/m3. Gel layer or dynamic membrane generated on the submerged membrane surface played an important role for the lower MBR permeate TOC than the supernatant TOC in the membrane tank. Intensive chemical cleaning can temporarily remove this layer. During normal operation conditions, the formation of dynamic membrane may need one day to obtain the steady low TOC levels in MBR permeate. PMID:16004005

  20. Energy efficiency in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Barillon, B; Martin Ruel, S; Langlais, C; Lazarova, V

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption remains the key factor for the optimisation of the performance of membrane bioreactors (MBRs). This paper presents the results of the detailed energy audits of six full-scale MBRs operated by Suez Environnement in France, Spain and the USA based on on-site energy measurement and analysis of plant operation parameters and treatment performance. Specific energy consumption is compared for two different MBR configurations (flat sheet and hollow fibre membranes) and for plants with different design, loads and operation parameters. The aim of this project was to understand how the energy is consumed in MBR facilities and under which operating conditions, in order to finally provide guidelines and recommended practices for optimisation of MBR operation and design to reduce energy consumption and environmental impacts. PMID:23787304

  1. Treatment of textile wastewater with membrane bioreactor: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Jegatheesan, Veeriah; Pramanik, Biplob Kumar; Chen, Jingyu; Navaratna, Dimuth; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Shu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology has been used widely for various industrial wastewater treatments due to its distinct advantages over conventional bioreactors. Treatment of textile wastewater using MBR has been investigated as a simple, reliable and cost-effective process with a significant removal of contaminants. However, a major drawback in the operation of MBR is membrane fouling, which leads to the decline in permeate flux and therefore requires membrane cleaning. This eventually decreases the lifespan of the membrane. In this paper, the application of aerobic and anaerobic MBR for textile wastewater treatment as well as fouling and control of fouling in MBR processes have been reviewed. It has been found that long sludge retention time increases the degradation of pollutants by allowing slow growing microorganisms to establish but also contributes to membrane fouling. Further research aspects of MBR for textile wastewater treatment are also considered for sustainable operations of the process. PMID:26776150

  2. On-line removal of volatile fatty acids from CELSS anaerobic bioreactor via nanofiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Guillermo

    1995-01-01

    The CELSS (controlled ecological life support system) resource recovery system, which is a waste processing system, uses aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plants nutrients and secondary foods from the inedible biomass. The anaerobic degradation of the inedible biomass by means of culture of rumen bacteria,generates organic compounds such as volatile fatty acids (acetic, propionic, butyric, VFA) and ammonia. The presence of VFA in the bioreactor medium at fairly low concentrations decreases the microbial population's metabolic reactions due to end-product inhibition. Technologies to remove VFA continuously from the bioreactor are of high interest. Several candidate technologies were analyzed, such as organic solvent liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption and/or ion exchange, dialysis, electrodialysis, and pressure driven membrane separation processes. The proposed technique for the on-line removal of VFA from the anaerobic bioreactor was a nanofiltration membrane recycle bioreactor. In order to establish the nanofiltration process performance variables before coupling it to the bioreactor, a series of experiments were carried out using a 10,000 MWCO tubular ceramic membrane module. The variables studied were the bioreactor slurry permeation characteristics, such as, the permeate flux, VFA and the nutrient removal rates as a function of applied transmembrane pressure, fluid recirculation velocity, suspended matter concentration, and process operating time. Results indicate that the permeate flux, VFA and nutrients removal rates are directly proportional to the fluid recirculation velocity in the range between 0.6 to 1.0 m/s, applied pressure when these are low than 1.5 bar, and inversely proportional to the total suspended solids concentration in the range between 23,466 to 34,880. At applied pressure higher than 1.5 bar the flux is not more linearly dependent due to concentration polarization and fouling effects over the membrange surface. It was also found

  3. Proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Taro; Nagai, Yuhei; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kimura, Katsuki; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the details of proteins causing membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating real municipal wastewater were investigated. Two separate pilot-scale MBRs were continuously operated under significantly different operating conditions; one MBR was a submerged type whereas the other was a side-stream type. The submerged and side-stream MBRs were operated for 20 and 10 days, respectively. At the end of continuous operation, the foulants were extracted from the fouled membranes. The proteins contained in the extracted foulants were enriched by using the combination of crude concentration with an ultrafiltration membrane and trichloroacetic acid precipitation, and then separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis of the proteins which formed intensive spots on the 2D-PAGE gels allowed us to partially identify one protein (OmpA family protein originated from genus Brevundimonas or Riemerella anatipestifer) from the foulant obtained from the submerged MBR, and two proteins (OprD and OprF originated from genus Pseudomonas) from that obtained from the side-stream MBR. Despite the significant difference in operating conditions of the two MBRs, all proteins identified in this study belong to β-barrel protein. These findings strongly suggest the importance of β-barrel proteins in developing membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:26360742

  4. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  5. Characteristics, process parameters, and inner components of anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  6. Comparison between mixed liquors of two side-stream membrane bioreactors treating wastewaters from waste management plants with high and low solids anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga-Agustí, E; Mendoza-Roca, J A; Bes-Piá, A; Alonso-Molina, J L; Fernández-Giménez, E; Álvarez-Requena, C; Muñagorri-Mañueco, F; Ortiz-Villalobos, G

    2016-09-01

    In the last years, biological treatment plants for the previously separated organic fraction from municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) have gained importance. In these processes a liquid effluent (liquid fraction from the digestate and leachate from composting piles), which has to be treated previously to its discharge, is produced. In this paper, the characteristics of the mixed liquor from two full-scale membrane bioreactors treating the effluents of two OFMSW treatment plants have been evaluated in view to study their influence on membrane fouling in terms of filterability. For that, the mixed liquor samples have been ultrafiltrated in an UF laboratory plant. Besides, the effect of the influent characteristics to MBRs and the values of the chemical and physical parameters of the mixed liquors on the filterability have been studied. Results showed that the filterability of the mixed liquor was strongly influenced by the soluble microbial products in the mixed liquors and the influent characteristics to MBR. Permeate flux of MBR mixed liquor treating the most polluted wastewater was considerable the lowest (around 20 L/m(2) h for some samples), what was explained by viscosity and soluble microbial products concentration higher than those measured in other MBR mixed liquor. PMID:27235772

  7. The influence of hydrolysis induced biopolymers from recycled aerobic sludge on specific methanogenic activity and sludge filterability in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Buntner, D; Spanjers, H; van Lier, J B

    2014-03-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of excess aerobic sludge on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA), in order to establish the maximum allowable aerobic sludge loading. In batch tests, different ratios of aerobic sludge to anaerobic inoculum were used, i.e. 0.03, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15, showing that low ratios led to an increased SMA. However, the ratio 0.15 caused more than 20% SMA decrease. In addition to the SMA tests, the potential influence of biopolymers and extracellular substances, that are generated as a result of excess aerobic sludge hydrolysis, on membrane performance was determined by assessing the fouling potential of the liquid broth, taking into account parameters such as specific resistance to filtration (SRF) and supernatant filterability (SF). Addition of aerobic sludge to the anaerobic biomass resulted in a high membrane fouling potential. The increase in biopolymers could be ascribed to aerobic sludge hydrolysis. A clear positive correlation between the concentration of the colloidal fraction of biopolymer clusters (cBPC) and the SRF was observed and a negative correlation between the cBPC and the SF measured at the end of the above described SMA tests. The latter implies that sludge filtration resistance increases when more aerobic sludge is hydrolyzed, and thus more cBPC is released. During AnMBR operation, proteins significantly contributed to sludge filterability decrease expressed as SRF and SF, whereas the carbohydrate fraction of SMP was of less importance due to low concentrations. On the contrary, carbohydrates seemed to improve filterability and diminish SRF of the sludge. Albeit, cBPC increase caused an increase in mean TMP during the AnMBR operation, confirming that cBPC is positively correlated to membrane fouling. PMID:24284260

  8. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  9. The status of membrane bioreactor technology.

    PubMed

    Judd, Simon

    2008-02-01

    In this article, the current status of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology for wastewater treatment is reviewed. Fundamental facets of the MBR process and membrane and process configurations are outlined and the advantages and disadvantages over conventional suspended growth-based biotreatment are briefly identified. Key process design and operating parameters are defined and their significance explained. The inter-relationships between these parameters are identified and their implications discussed, with particular reference to impacts on membrane surface fouling and channel clogging. In addition, current understanding of membrane surface fouling and identification of candidate foulants is appraised. Although much interest in this technology exists and its penetration of the market will probably increase significantly, there remains a lack of understanding of key process constraints such as membrane channel clogging, and of the science of membrane cleaning. PMID:18191260

  10. High retention membrane bioreactors: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-09-01

    Extensive research has focussed on the development of novel high retention membrane bioreactor (HR-MBR) systems for wastewater reclamation in recent years. HR-MBR integrates high rejection membrane separation with conventional biological treatment in a single step. High rejection membrane separation processes currently used in HR-MBR applications include nanofiltration, forward osmosis, and membrane distillation. In these HR-MBR systems, organic contaminants can be effectively retained, prolonging their retention time in the bioreactor and thus enhancing their biodegradation. Therefore, HR-MBR can offer a reliable and elegant solution to produce high quality effluent. However, there are several technological challenges associated with the development of HR-MBR, including salinity build-up, low permeate flux, and membrane degradation. This paper provides a critical review on these challenges and potential opportunities of HR-MBR for wastewater treatment and water reclamation, and aims to guide and inform future research on HR-MBR for fast commercialisation of this innovative technology. PMID:24996563

  11. Photosynthetic bacteria production from food processing wastewater in sequencing batch and membrane photo-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    Application of photosynthetic process could be highly efficient and surpass anaerobic treatment in releasing less greenhouse gas and odor while the biomass produced can be utilized. The combination of photosynthetic process with membrane separation is possibly effective for water reclamation and biomass production. In this study, cultivation of mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria from food processing wastewater was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) supplied with infrared light. Both photo-bioreactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days. Higher MLSS concentration achieved in the MBR through complete retention of biomass resulted in a slightly improved performance. When the system was operated with MLSS controlled by occasional sludge withdrawal, total biomass production of MBR and SBR photo-bioreactor was almost equal. However, 64.5% of total biomass production was washed out with the effluent in SBR system. Consequently, the higher biomass could be recovered for utilization in MBR. PMID:22258682

  12. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qiyong; Tian, Ying; Wang, Shen; Ko, Jae Hac

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Temporary aeration shortened the initial acid inhibition phase for methanogens. • COD decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactor than that in the anaerobic control. • Methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. • MSW settlement increased with increasing the frequency of intermittent aeration. - Abstract: Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10 months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic–anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia–nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75 d and 60 d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens.

  13. The cost of a small membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lo, C H; McAdam, E; Judd, S

    2015-01-01

    The individual cost contributions to the mechanical components of a small membrane bioreactor (MBR) (100-2,500 m3/d flow capacity) are itemised and collated to generate overall capital and operating costs (CAPEX and OPEX) as a function of size. The outcomes are compared to those from previously published detailed cost studies provided for both very small containerised plants (<40 m3/day capacity) and larger municipal plants (2,200-19,000 m3/d). Cost curves, as a function of flow capacity, determined for OPEX, CAPEX and net present value (NPV) based on the heuristic data used indicate a logarithmic function for OPEX and a power-based one for the CAPEX. OPEX correlations were in good quantitative agreement with those reported in the literature. Disparities in the calculated CAPEX trend compared with reported data were attributed to differences in assumptions concerning cost contributions. More reasonable agreement was obtained with the reported membrane separation component CAPEX data from published studies. The heuristic approach taken appears appropriate for small-scale MBRs with minimal costs associated with installation. An overall relationship of net present value=(a tb)Q(-c lnt+d) was determined for the net present value where a=1.265, b=0.44, c=0.00385 and d=0.868 according to the dataset employed for the analysis. PMID:26540534

  14. Comparison of Leachate Quality from Aerobic and Anaerobic Municipal Solid Waste Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills are becoming a drain on the resources of local municipalities as the requirements for stabilization and containment become increasingly stringent. Current regulations limit the moisture in the landfill to minimize leachate production and lower the potential for release of leachate to the environment. Recent research has shown that addition and recycling of moisture in the waste optimizes the biodegradation of stabilization and also provides a means for leachate treatment. This study compares the characteristics of leachate produced from aerobic and anaerobic laboratory bioreactors, and leachate collected from a full-scale anaerobic bioreactor. The laboratory reactors consisted of 200-liter tanks filled with fresh waste materials with the following conditions: (a) aerobic (air injection with leachate recirculation), (b) anaerobic (leachate recirculation). The leachate from the reactors was monitored for metals, nutrients, organic carbon, and microbiological activity for up to 500 days. Leachate from the aerobic tank had significantly lower concentrations of all potential contaminants, both organic and metal, after only a few weeks of operation. Metals leaching was low throughout the test period for the aerobic tanks, and decreased over time for the anaerobic tanks. Organic carbon as measured by BOD, COD, TOC, and COD were an order of magnitude higher in the leachate from the anaerobic system. Microbiological assessment by lipid analysis, enzyme activity assays, and cell counts showed high biomass and diversity in both the aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors, with higher activity in the anaerobic leachate. Results from the full-scale anaerobic bioreactor were not significantly different from those of the laboratory anaerobic bioreactor. The reduction in noxious odors was a significant advantage of the aerobic system. These results suggest that aerobic management of landfills could reduce or eliminate the need for leachate treatment

  15. Hydrodynamics of an electrochemical membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment. PMID:25997399

  16. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-05-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment.

  17. Hydrodynamics of an Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Yun-Kun; He, Chuan-Shu; Yang, Hou-Yun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) has recently been developed for energy recovery and wastewater treatment. The hydrodynamics of the EMBR would significantly affect the mass transfers and reaction kinetics, exerting a pronounced effect on reactor performance. However, only scarce information is available to date. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the EMBR were investigated through various approaches. Tracer tests were adopted to generate residence time distribution curves at various hydraulic residence times, and three hydraulic models were developed to simulate the results of tracer studies. In addition, the detailed flow patterns of the EMBR were acquired from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Compared to the tank-in-series and axial dispersion ones, the Martin model could describe hydraulic performance of the EBMR better. CFD simulation results clearly indicated the existence of a preferential or circuitous flow in the EMBR. Moreover, the possible locations of dead zones in the EMBR were visualized through the CFD simulation. Based on these results, the relationship between the reactor performance and the hydrodynamics of EMBR was further elucidated relative to the current generation. The results of this study would benefit the design, operation and optimization of the EMBR for simultaneous energy recovery and wastewater treatment. PMID:25997399

  18. Pilot-scale experiment on anaerobic bioreactor landfills in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianguo Yang, Guodong; Deng, Zhou; Huang, Yunfeng; Huang, Zhonglin; Feng, Xiangming; Zhou, Shengyong; Zhang, Chaoping

    2007-07-01

    Developing countries have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This paper describes the impacts of leachate recirculation and recirculation loadings on waste stabilization, landfill gas (LFG) generation and leachate characteristics. Four simulated anaerobic columns, R1-R4, were each filled with about 30 tons of waste and recirculated weekly with 1.6, 0.8 and 0.2 m{sup 3} leachate and 0.1 m{sup 3} tap water. The results indicated that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) half-time of leachate from R1 was about 180 days, which was 8-14 weeks shorter than that of R2-R4. A large amount of LFG was first produced in R1, and its generation rate was positively correlated to the COD or volatile fatty acid concentrations of influent leachates after the 30th week. By the 50th week of recirculation, the waste in R1 was more stabilized, with 931.2 kg COD or 175.6 kg total organic carbon released and with the highest landfill gas production. However, this contributed mainly to washout by leachate, which also resulted in the reduction of LFG generation potential and accumulation of ammonia and/or phosphorus in the early stage. Therefore, the regimes of leachate recirculation should be adjusted to the phases of waste stabilization to enhance efficiency of energy recovery. Integrated with the strategy of in situ leachate management, extra pre-treatment or post-treatment methods to remove the nutrients are recommended.

  19. Rheological behaviors of anaerobic granular sludge in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Ruobin; Xiang, Xinyi; Ma, Chengyu; Li, Gang; Hu, Tao; Xu, Zhengqi; Abdelgadir, Awad

    2015-01-01

    The rheological behaviors of the anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor (SSSAB) were investigated. Shear-thinning behavior, thixotropic behavior, concentration-viscosity behavior and temperature-viscosity behavior were evaluated based on the constitutive equation of the AGS. The results indicated that the Herschel-Bulkley model was able to adequately describe the constitutive relation of AGS in the SSSAB. The AGS also showed shear-thinning behavior as well as thixotropic behavior. The critical shear rate and network strength of the AGS were 61.8 s(-1) and 497.0 W m(-3), respectively. The relationship between the apparent viscosity and the sludge concentration was illustrated and explained by the Woodcock formula. The relationship between apparent viscosity of the AGS and temperature could be modeled using the Arrhenius equation. The AGS was significantly thermo-sensitive and its mean energy of activation was 14.640 kJ mol(-1). Notably, it was necessary to consider such behaviors in the hydrodynamic modeling of SSSAB in which shear condition, sludge concentration and temperature were in non-uniform distribution. PMID:26247766

  20. Sustainable operation of submerged Anammox membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyin; Xu, Xindi; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, FengLin; Zhang, ShuShen

    2015-12-01

    A submerged anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling has been successfully operated for 100d. Based on the batch tests, a recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2m(3)h(-1) was fixed as an ultimate value for the sustainable operation. The mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (VSS) of the inoculum for the long operation was around 3000mgL(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate increasing stepwise from 0 to 0.2m(3)h(-1), the reactor reached an influent total nitrogen (TN) up to 1.7gL(-1), a stable TN removal efficiency of 83% and a maximum specific Anammox activity (SAA) of 0.56kg TNkg(-1) VSSd(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2 m(3) h(-1) (corresponding to an aeration intensity of 118m(3)m(-2)h(-1)), the membrane operation circle could prolong by around 20 times compared to that without gas sparging. Furthermore, mechanism of membrane fouling was proposed. And with recycling biogas sparging, the VSS and EPS content increasing rate in cake layer were far less than the ones without biogas sparging. The TN removal performance and sustainable membrane operation of this system showed the appealing potential of the submerged Anammox MBR with recycling biogas sparging in treating high-strength nitrogen-containing wastewaters. PMID:25311769

  1. Mechanism of calcium mitigating membrane fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Xia, Jie; Yang, Yang; Wang, Zixing; Yang, Fenglin

    2009-01-01

    Two parallel membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated under different calcium dosages (168.5, 27 mg/L) to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of retarding membrane fouling by adding calcium. The results showed that the particle size of sludge flocs increased and the particle size distribution tended to be narrow at the optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L). Calcium was effective in decreasing loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) in microbial flocs and soluble microbial products (SMP) in the supernatant at the dosage of 168.5 mg/L by strengthening the neutralization and bridging of EPS with flocs. Furthermore, the amount of CODs and CODc decreased in both the mixed liquor and the fouling cake layer on the membrane surface. In order to compare the filtration characteristics of cake layers from the MBRs with the two calcium dosages, the specific cake resistance and the compressibility coefficient were measured. The specific cake resistance from the MBR with optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L) was distinctly lower than that with low dosage (27 mg/L). The compressibility coefficient of the cake layers under two dosages were respectively attained as 0.65, 0.91. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional confocal scanning laser microscope analysis (CLSM) images were utilized to observe the gel layer directly. PMID:19862919

  2. Bacteriorhodopsin as a Possible Element of Membrane Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimychev, A. V.; Chamorovskii, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    Certain approaches to the creation of membrane bioreactors, representing an example of integrated membrane systems, are examined. The characteristic features of the use of organised molecular assemblies in such systems as sensor and regulatory elements are discussed. The properties of the retinal-protein complex of bacteriorhodopsin as a promising component of integrated membrane systems, capable of carrying out regulatory functions, are examined. The bibliography includes 139 references.

  3. TREATMENT OF PCP CONTAINING WASTEWATER USING ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED GAC BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the use of two anaerobic fluidized-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) bioreactors for treating pentachlorophenol (PCP), one of the major toxic compounds found in wastewaters stemming primarily from wood preserving industries. he reactors are fed synthetic so...

  4. TREATMENT AND PCP CONTAINING WASTEWATER USING ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED-BED GAC BIOREACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates the use of two anaerobic fluidized-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) bioreactors for treating pentachlorophenol (PCP), one of the major toxic compounds found in wastewaters stemming primarily from wood preserving industries. he reactors are fed synthetic so...

  5. Recent developments in anaerobic membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, David C

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic membrane reactors (AnMBRs) have recently evolved from aerobic MBRs, with the membrane either external or submerged within the reactor, and can achieve high COD removals (~98%) at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) as low as 3 h. Since membranes stop biomass being washed out, they can enhance performance with inhibitory substrates, at psychrophilic/thermophilic temperatures, and enable nitrogen removal via Anammox. Fouling is important, but addition of activated carbon or resins/precipitants can remove soluble microbial products (SMPs)/colloids and enhance flux. Due to their low energy use and solids production, and solids free effluent, they can enhance nutrient and water recycling. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: compare fouling between aerobic and anaerobic systems; determine how reactor operation influences fouling; evaluate the effect of different additives on membrane fouling; determine whether nitrogen removal can be incorporated into AnMBRs; recover methane solubility from low temperatures effluents; and, establish sound mass and energy balances. PMID:22749372

  6. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor. PMID:25267355

  7. Comparison and Analysis of Membrane Fouling between Flocculent Sludge Membrane Bioreactor and Granular Sludge Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhi-Qiang, Chen; Jun-Wen, Li; Yi-Hong, Zhang; Xuan, Wang; Bin, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of inoculating granules on reducing membrane fouling. In order to evaluate the differences in performance between flocculent sludge and aerobic granular sludge in membrane reactors (MBRs), two reactors were run in parallel and various parameters related to membrane fouling were measured. The results indicated that specific resistance to the fouling layer was five times greater than that of mixed liquor sludge in the granular MBR. The floc sludge more easily formed a compact layer on the membrane surface, and increased membrane resistance. Specifically, the floc sludge had a higher moisture content, extracellular polymeric substances concentration, and negative surface charge. In contrast, aerobic granules could improve structural integrity and strength, which contributed to the preferable permeate performance. Therefore, inoculating aerobic granules in a MBR presents an effective method of reducing the membrane fouling associated with floc sludge the perspective of from the morphological characteristics of microbial aggregates. PMID:22859954

  8. Biogas Production from Citrus Waste by Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wikandari, Rachma; Millati, Ria; Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR), the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR) was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor. PMID:25167328

  9. Advances in biotreatment of acid mine drainage and biorecovery of metals: 2. Membrane bioreactor system for sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Henry H; Govind, Rakesh

    2003-12-01

    Several biotreatmemt techniques for sulfate conversion by the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been proposed in the past, however few of them have been practically applied to treat sulfate containing acid mine drainage (AMD). This research deals with development of an innovative polypropylene hollow fiber membrane bioreactor system for the treatment of acid mine water from the Berkeley Pit, Butte, MT, using hydrogen consuming SRB biofilms. The advantages of using the membrane bioreactor over the conventional tall liquid phase sparged gas bioreactor systems are: large microporous membrane surface to the liquid phase; formation of hydrogen sulfide outside the membrane, preventing the mixing with the pressurized hydrogen gas inside the membrane; no requirement of gas recycle compressor; membrane surface is suitable for immobilization of active SRB, resulting in the formation of biofilms, thus preventing washout problems associated with suspended culture reactors; and lower operating costs in membrane bioreactors, eliminating gas recompression and gas recycle costs. Information is provided on sulfate reduction rate studies and on biokinetic tests with suspended SRB in anaerobic digester sludge and sediment master culture reactors and with SRB biofilms in bench-scale SRB membrane bioreactors. Biokinetic parameters have been determined using biokinetic models for the master culture and membrane bioreactor systems. Data are presented on the effect of acid mine water sulfate loading at 25, 50, 75 and 100 ml/min in scale-up SRB membrane units, under varied temperatures (25, 35 and 40 degrees C) to determine and optimize sulfate conversions for an effective AMD biotreatment. Pilot-scale studies have generated data on the effect of flow rates of acid mine water (MGD) and varied inlet sulfate concentrations in the influents on the resultant outlet sulfate concentration in the effluents and on the number of SRB membrane modules needed for the desired sulfate conversion in

  10. Treatment of nitrate-rich water in a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) employing waste derived materials.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhankar; Singh, Saurabh K; Tewari, Prahlad K; Batra, Vidya S; Balakrishnan, Malini

    2014-12-15

    Nitrate removal in submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is limited as intensive aeration (for maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels and for membrane scouring) deters the formation of anoxic zones essential for biological denitrification. The present study employs baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) to overcome this constraint. Treatment of nitrate rich water (synthetic and real groundwater) was investigated. Sludge separation was achieved using ceramic membrane filters prepared from waste sugarcane bagasse ash. A complex external carbon source (leachate from anaerobic digestion of food waste) was used to maintain an appropriate C/N ratio. Over 90% COD and 95% NO3-N reduction was obtained. The bagasse ash filters produced a clear permeate, free of suspended solids. Sludge aggregates were observed in the reactor and were linked to the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. Lower sludge volume index (40 mL/g compared to 150 mL/g for seed sludge), higher settling velocity (47 m/h compared to 10 m/h for seed sludge) and sludge aggregates (0.7 mm aggregates compared to <0.2 mm for seed sludge) was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of waste-derived materials viz. food waste leachate and bagasse ash filters in water treatment. PMID:25151111

  11. Treatment of ammonium-rich swine waste in modified porphyritic andesite fixed-bed anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Dawei; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a modified porphyritic andesite (WRS) was developed as ammonium adsorbent and bed material for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste. The performance in bioreactors with modified WRS, natural WRS, calcium chloride and no additives was investigated. The bioreactor with modified WRS exhibited the best performance, with start-up time on the 7th day, methane yield of 359.71 ml/g-VS, and COD removal of 67.99% during all 44 days of the experiment at 35°C. The effective ammonium adsorption and essential ions dissociation for microorganisms by modified WRS, as well as the immobilization of microbial on the surface of the modified WRS play a great role on the high efficiency anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste. PMID:22366608

  12. Toxicity of the effluent from an anaerobic bioreactor treating cereal residues on Lactuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian Jonathan; Riera, Nicolás Iván; Beily, María Eugenia; Bres, Patricia Alina; Crespo, Diana Cristina; Ronco, Alicia Estela

    2012-02-01

    Effluents generated during the process of anaerobic digestion should be treated before their disposal into the environment. The aim of this study was evaluating the effectiveness of the effluent treatment system from an anaerobic bioreactor, assessing the toxicity reduction with the Lactuca sativa seed germination and root elongation inhibition test. Three sampling points were selected along the effluent treatment system: inflow into the first treatment pond, outflow from the third pond and recirculated flow to the bioreactor. Effluent dilutions tested for each sampling point were 25% and 50% (v/v), undiluted sample and controls. The pH, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, BOD₅ and COD were measured. The decrease in the organic and inorganic loads was correlated with a reduction in the phytotoxicity. The use of the seed toxicity test allows evaluating the quality and effectiveness of the studied effluent treatment system. PMID:21993347

  13. Energy conservation and production in a packed-bed anaerobic bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pit, W.W. Jr.; Genung, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing an energy-conserving/ producing wastewater treatment system based on a fixed-film anaerobic bioreactor. The treatment process is based on passing wastewaters upward through the bioreactor for continuous treatment by gravitational settling, biophysical filtration and biological decomposition. A two-year pilot-plant project using a bioreactor designed to treat 5000 gpd has been conducted using raw wastewater on a municipal site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Data obtained for the performance of the bioreactor during this project have been analyzed by ORNL and Associated Water and Air Resources Engineers (AWARE), Inc. of Nashville, Tennessee. From these analyses it was estimated that hydraulic loading rates of 0.25 gpm/ft/sup 2/ and hydraulic residence times of 10 hours could be used in designing such bioreactors for the secondary treatment of municipal wastewaters. Conceptual designs for total treatment systems processing up to one million gallons of wastewater per day were developed based on the performance of the pilot plant bioreactor. These systems were compared to activated sludge treatment systems also operating under secondary treatment requirements and were found to consume as little as 30% of the energy required by the activated sludge systems. Economic advantages of the process result from the elimination of operating energy requirements associated with the aeration of aerobic-based processes and with the significant decrease of sludge-handling costs required with conventional activated sludge treatment systems.Furthermore, methane produced by anaerobic fermentation processes occurring during the biological decomposition of carbonaceous wastes also represented a significant and recoverable energy production. For dilute municipal wastewaters this would completely offset the remaining energy required for treatment, while for concentrated industrial wastewater would result in a net production of energy.

  14. COMMERCIAL-SCALE AEROBIC-ANAEROBIC BIOREACTOR LANDFILL OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sequential aerobic-anaerobic treatment system has been applied at a commercial scale (3,000 ton per day) municipal solid waste landfill in Kentucky, USA since 2001. In this system, the uppermost layer of landfilled waste is aerated and liquid waste including leachate, surface w...

  15. Sewage treatment by a low energy membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoyuan; van Houten, Renze; Eikelboom, Dick H; Doddema, Hans; Jiang, Zhaochun; Fan, Yaobo; Wang, Jusi

    2003-11-01

    A new membrane bioreactor (MBR) was developed for treatment of municipal wastewater. The MBR was mainly made up of an activated sludge reactor and a transverse flow membrane module, with an innovative configuration being in application between them. As a result, the transverse flow membrane module and low recirculation flow rate created advantages, such as lower energy consumption and more resistance to membrane fouling. The total energy consumption in the whole system was tested as 1.97+/-0.74 kWh/m(3) (permeate) while using periodical backwash with treated water and backflush with mixed liquor daily, being in the same level as a submerged membrane bioreactor, reported to be 2.4 kWh/m(3) (permeate). Energy consumption analysis in the system shows that the membrane module was more energy consuming than the other four parts listed as pump, aeration, pipe system and return sludge velocity lose, which consumed 37.66-52.20% of the total energy. The effluent from this system could be considered as qualified for greywater reuse in China, showing its potential application in the future. PMID:12895562

  16. Shock resistance characteristic of a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bio-reactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Ruobin; Xiang, Xinyi; Li, Gang; Xu, Zhengqi; Hu, Tao; Abdelgadir, Awad

    2016-01-01

    The shock resistance characteristic (SRC) of an anaerobic bioreactor characterizes the ability of the anaerobic community in the reactor to withstand violent change in the living environment. In comparison with an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR), the SRC of a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bio-reactor (SSSAB) was systematically investigated in terms of removal efficiency, adsorption property, settling ability, flocculability and fluctuations in these parameters. A quantitative assessment method for SRC was also developed. The results indicated that the SSSAB showed better SRC than the UASBR. The average value (m value) of chemical oxygen demand removal rates of the SSSAB was 86.0%. The contact angle of granules in the SSSAB present gradient distribution, that is the m value of contact angle increasing from bottom (84.5°) to top (93.9°). The m value of the density at the upper and lower sections of the SSSAB were 1.0611 g·cm(-3) and 1.0423 g·cm(-3), respectively. The surface mean diameter of granules in the SSSAB increased from 1.164 to 1.292 mm during operation. The absolute m value of zeta potential of granular sludge at the upper and lower sections of the SSSAB were 40.4 mV and 44.9 mV, respectively. The weighted mean coefficient variance (C̅V̅) value indicated SSSAB was more stable than the UASBR. PMID:26901736

  17. Electrolysis within anaerobic bioreactors stimulates breakdown of toxic products from azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Sávia; Guzman, Juan J L; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes are the most widely used coloring agents in the textile industry, but are difficult to treat. When textile effluents are discharged into waterways, azo dyes and their degradation products are known to be environmentally toxic. An electrochemical system consisting of a graphite-plate anode and a stainless-steel mesh cathode was placed into a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor to evaluate the removal of an azo dye (Direct Black 22) from synthetic textile wastewater. At applied potentials of 2.5 and 3.0 V when water electrolysis occurs, no improvement in azo dye removal efficiency was observed compared to the control reactor (an integrated system with electrodes but without an applied potential). However, applying such electric potentials produces oxygen via electrolysis and promoted the aerobic degradation of aromatic amines, which are toxic, intermediate products of anaerobic azo dye degradation. The removal of these amines indicates a decrease in overall toxicity of the effluent from a single-stage anaerobic bioreactor, which warrants further optimization in anaerobic digestion. PMID:25750156

  18. Comparison of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Erses, A Suna; Onay, Turgut T; Yenigun, Orhan

    2008-09-01

    Two landfill bioreactors were operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a thermo-insulated room at a constant temperature of 32 degrees C. Reactors were filled with 19.5 kg of shredded synthetic solid waste prepared according to the average municipal solid waste compositions determined in Istanbul and operated under wet-tomb management strategy by using leachate recirculation. Aerobic conditions in the reactor were developed by using an air compressor. The results of experiments indicated that aerobic reactor had higher organic, nitrogen, phosphorus and alkali metal removal efficiencies than the anaerobic one. Furthermore, stabilization time considerably decreased when using aerobic processes with leachate recirculation compared to the anaerobic system with the same recirculation scheme. PMID:18082400

  19. Correlation between microbial community and granule conductivity in anaerobic bioreactors for brewery wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Werner, Jeffrey J; Franks, Ashley E; Elena-Rotaru, Amelia; Shrestha, Minita; Liu, Fanghua; Nevin, Kelly P; Angenent, Largus T; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-12-01

    Prior investigation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastes suggested that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) significantly contributed to interspecies electron transfer to methanogens. To investigate DIET in granules further, the electrical conductivity and bacterial community composition of granules in fourteen samples from four different UASB reactors treating brewery wastes were investigated. All of the UASB granules were electrically conductive whereas control granules from ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reactors and microbial granules from an aerobic bioreactor designed for phosphate removal were not. There was a moderate correlation (r=0.67) between the abundance of Geobacter species in the UASB granules and granule conductivity, suggesting that Geobacter contributed to granule conductivity. These results, coupled with previous studies, which have demonstrated that Geobacter species can donate electrons to methanogens that are typically predominant in anaerobic digesters, suggest that DIET may be a widespread phenomenon in UASB reactors treating brewery wastes. PMID:25443621

  20. Innovative anaerobic/upflow sludge blanket filtration bioreactor for phosphorus removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, H; Movahedyan, H; Bina, B; Farrokhzadeh, H

    2011-04-01

    Phosphorus is the key element to remove from aquatic environments to limit the growth of aquatic plants and algae and, thus, to control eutrophication. Because the upflow sludge blanket filtratio' (USBF) process, without addition of metal salts, entails low efficiency for phosphorus removal, we added an anaerobic reactor to the USBF bioreactor in order to promote the simultaneous removal of phosphorus and nitrogen from wastewater. The results revealed that the anaerobic/USBF bioreactor had a phosphorus removal efficiency up to 86%, with a sludge retention time (SRT) of 10 days, a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours and an optimum COD/N/P ratio of 100/5/1. This ratio also improved the compaction quality of the sludge blanket in the USBF clarifier. The average specific phosphate uptake rate in the aerobic zone and the average specific phosphate release rate in the anaerobic reactor were 0.014 mg PO4-P removed/(g VSS x min) and 0.0525 mg PO4-P released/(g VSS x min), respectively. Secondary phosphorus release in the USBF clarifier was heightened with increasing HRT. Hence, the optimum total HRT can be selected between 16 and 24 hours based on effluent quality. Effluent phosphorus of about 1 mg/L was provided for wastewater with the COD/N/P ratio of 100/5/1 at the sludge age of 10 days and total HRT of 16 hours. This study illustrated that the anaerobic/USBF bioreactor at the optimum operational conditions can be an effective process for phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater. PMID:21877530

  1. Biofouling control: Bacterial quorum quenching versus chlorination in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Nuwan A; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2016-10-15

    Biofilm formation (biofouling) induced via cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing) causes problems in membrane filtration processes. Chorine is one of the most common chemicals used to interfere with biofouling; however, biofouling control is challenging because it is a natural process. This study demonstrates biofouling control for submerged hollow fiber membranes in membrane bioreactors by means of bacterial quorum quenching (QQ) using Rhodococcus sp. BH4 with chemically enhanced backwashing. This is the first trial to bring QQ alongside chlorine injection into practice. A high chlorine dose (100 mg/L as Cl2) to the system is insufficient for preventing biofouling, but addition of the QQ bacterium is effective for disrupting biofouling that cannot be achieved by chlorination alone. QQ reduces the biologically induced metal precipitate and extracellular biopolymer levels in the biofilm, and biofouling is significantly delayed when QQ is applied in addition to chlorine dosing. QQ with chlorine injection gives synergistic effects on reducing physically and chemically reversible fouling resistances while saving substantial filtration energy. Manipulating microbial community functions with chemical treatment is an attractive tool for biofilm dispersal in membrane bioreactors. PMID:27474939

  2. Start-up of membrane bioreactor and hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor: kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Díaz, J C; Poyatos, J M

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBR) system was studied as an alternative solution to conventional activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors. This paper shows the results obtained from three laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants working in parallel in the start-up and steady states. The first wastewater treatment plant was a MBR, the second one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system containing carriers both in anoxic and aerobic zones of the bioreactor (hybrid MBBR-MBRa), and the last one was a hybrid MBBR-MBR system which contained carriers only in the aerobic zone (hybrid MBBR-MBRb). The reactors operated with a hydraulic retention time of 30.40 h. A kinetic study for characterizing heterotrophic biomass was carried out and organic matter and nutrients removals were evaluated. The heterotrophic biomass of the hybrid MBBR-MBRb showed the best kinetic performance in the steady state, with yield coefficient for heterotrophic biomass=0.30246 mg volatile suspended solids per mg chemical oxygen demand, maximum specific growth rate for heterotrophic biomass=0.00308 h(-1) and half-saturation coefficient for organic matter=3.54908 mg O2 L(-1). The removal of organic matter was supported by the kinetic study of heterotrophic biomass. PMID:26606088

  3. Trace organics removal using three membrane bioreactor configurations: MBR, IFAS-MBR and MBMBR.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, T; Alonso, E; Santos, J L; Rodríguez, C; Gómez, M A; Malfeito, J J

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen pharmaceutically active compounds and 22 other trace organic pollutants were analysed regularly in the influent and permeate from a semi-real plant treating municipal wastewater. The plant was operated during 29 months with different configurations which basically differed in the type of biomass present in the system. These processes were the integrated fixed-film activated sludge membrane bioreactor (IFAS-MBR), which combined suspended and attached biomass, the moving bed membrane bioreactor (MBMBR) (only attached biomass) and the MBR (only suspended biomass). Moreover, removal rates were compared to those of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) operating nearby with conventional activated sludge treatment. Reverse osmosis (RO) was used after the pilot plant to improve removal rates. The highest elimination was found for the IFAS-MBR, especially for hormones (100% removal); this was attributed to the presence of biofilm, which may lead to different conditions (aerobic-anoxic-anaerobic) along its profile, which increases the degradation possibilities, and also to a higher sludge age of the biofilm, which allows complete acclimation to the contaminants. Operating conditions played an important role, high mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and sludge retention time (SRT) being necessary to achieve these high removal rates. Although pharmaceuticals and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates showed high removal rates (65-100%), nonylphenols and phthalate could only be removed to 10-30%. RO significantly increased removal rates to 88% mean removal rate. PMID:25768224

  4. Characteristics of the bioreactor landfill system using an anaerobic-aerobic process for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Liu, Xin-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Jian; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2007-09-01

    A sequential upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and air-lift loop sludge blanket (ALSB) treatment was introduced into leachate recirculation to remove organic matter and ammonia from leachate in a lab-scale bioreactor landfill. The results showed that the sequential anaerobic-aerobic process might remove above 90% of COD and near to 100% of NH4+ -N from leachate under the optimum organic loading rate (OLR). The total COD removal efficiency was over 98% as the OLR increased to 6.8-7.7 g/l d, but the effluent COD concentration increased to 2.9-4.8 g/l in the UASB reactor, which inhibited the activity of nitrifying bacteria in the subsequent ALSB reactor. The NO3- -N concentration in recycled leachate reached 270 mg/l after treatment by the sequential anaerobic-aerobic process, but the landfill reactor could efficiently denitrify the nitrate. After 56 days operation, the leachate TN and NH4+ -N concentrations decreased to less than 200 mg/l in the bioreactor landfill system. The COD concentration was about 200 mg/l with less than 8 mg/l BOD in recycled leachate at the late stage. In addition, it was found that nitrate in recycled leachate had a negative effect on waste decomposition. PMID:17071082

  5. Tuning anti-adhesion ability of membrane for a membrane bioreactor by thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Qian; Li, Fengquan; Shen, Liguo; Yang, Lining; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    Developing strategies that allow tuning anti-adhesion ability of membranes in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is of primary interest in membrane fouling research. In this study, interaction energies between foulants and membrane in three different interaction scenarios were systematically assessed based on thermodynamic methods. It was found that, membrane surface electron donor tension (γ(-)) rather than surface hydrophilicity was a more reliable indicator to predict adsorptive fouling. The interaction energy would be continuously repulsive in the initial range of separation distance when membrane γ(-) is higher than a critical value, suggesting that designing membrane with γ(-) higher than a critical value would confer membrane with high anti-adhesion ability. It was also found that, zeta potential on the membrane surface exerted certain effects on adsorptive fouling. This study proposed a novel strategy regarding adjusting membrane γ(-) to tune anti-adhesion ability of membrane, and also offered a thermodynamic theoretical background to this strategy. PMID:27289061

  6. Hollow fibre membrane bioreactors for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Wung, Nelly; Acott, Samuel M; Tosh, David; Ellis, Marianne J

    2014-12-01

    Hollow fibre membrane bioreactors (HFB) provide a novel approach towards tissue engineering applications in the field of regenerative medicine. For adherent cell types, HFBs offer an in vivo-like microenvironment as each fibre replicates a blood capillary and the mass transfer rate across the wall is independent from the shear stresses experienced by the cell. HFB also possesses the highest surface area to volume ratio of all bioreactor configurations. In theory, these factors enable a high quantity of the desired cellular product with less population variation, and favourable operating costs. Experimental analyses of different cell types and bioreactor designs show encouraging steps towards producing a clinically relevant device. This review discusses the basic HFB design for cell expansion and in vitro models; compares data produced on commercially available systems and addresses the operational differences between theory and practice. HFBs are showing some potential for mammalian cell culture but further work is needed to fully understand the complexities of cell culture in HFBs and how best to achieve the high theoretical cell yields. PMID:25064452

  7. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for phenol biodegradation under continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-03-15

    Continuous phenol biodegradation was accomplished in a two-phase partitioning osmotic membrane bioreactor (TPPOMBR) system, using extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) as the partitioning phase. The EIMs alleviated substrate inhibition during prolonged operation at influent phenol concentrations of 600-2000mg/L, and also at spiked concentrations of 2500mg/L phenol restricted to 2 days. Filtration of the effluent through forward osmosis maintained high biomass concentration in the bioreactor and improved effluent quality. Steady state was reached in 5-6 days at removal rates varying between 2000 and 5500mg/L-day under various conditions. Due to biofouling and salt accumulation, the permeate flux varied from 1.2-7.2 LMH during 54 days of operation, while maintaining an average hydraulic retention time of 7.4h. A washing cycle, comprising 1h osmotic backwashing using 0.5M NaCl and 2h washing with water, facilitated biofilm removal from the membranes. Characterization of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) through FTIR showed peaks between 1700 and 1500cm(-1), 1450-1450cm(-1) and 1200-1000cm(-1), indicating the presence of proteins, phenols and polysaccharides, respectively. The carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS was estimated to be 0.3. These results indicate that TPPOMBR can be promising in continuous treatment of phenolic wastewater. PMID:26651068

  8. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria from Taihu sediments by a membrane biofilm bioreactor at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghui; Wu, Qing; Lei, Ting; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation is a recently discovered process performed by bacteria affiliated to the NC10 phylum. These microorganisms could play important roles in the energy-efficient way of anaerobic wastewater treatment where residual dissolved methane might be removed at the expense of nitrate or nitrite. The difficulty to enrich these microorganisms due to a slow growth rate, especially at low temperatures, limited its application in engineering field. In this study, an NC10 bacteria community was enriched from Taihu sediments by a membrane biofilm bioreactor at ambient temperature of 10-25 °C. After 13 months enrichment, the maximum denitrification rate of the enriched culture reached 0.54 mM day(-1) for nitrate and 1.06 mM day(-1) for nitrite. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled denitrification was estimated from the (13)C-labeled CO2 ((13)CO2) production during batch incubations with (13)CH4. Furthermore, analysis of 16S rRNA genes clone library confirmed the presence of NC10 phylum bacteria and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria dominated the reactor. All of the results indicated the NC10 bacteria community was competitive in terms of treating nitrate-contaminated water or wastewater under natural conditions. PMID:26578374

  9. Mitigated membrane fouling of anammox membrane bioreactor by microbiological immobilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuotao; Liu, Sitong; Miyoshi, Taro; Matsuyama, Hideto; Ni, Jinren

    2016-02-01

    In this study, membrane fouling behavior of anammox MBR with or without carriers made by magnetic porous carbon microspheres was investigated. The results show that Trans Membrane Pressure was an order of magnitude lower after 50days due to use of carriers, which did not directly contact with membrane surface. Scanning Electron Microscope analysis indicates that abundance of anammox bacteria formed biofilm on membrane surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with amino acids contents analysis for membrane surface deposition show that metabolite released by anammox bacteria contains more hydrophobic groups than hydrophilic, which was considered as important reason for its abundant existence on hydrophobic membrane surface. Microbiological immobilization not only reduces biological membrane fouling, but also mitigates organic fouling including organic matter containing COO, hydrophobic groups (CH3, CH2 and CH etc), as well as inorganic deposition. Our finding provides an effective method for mitigating MBR membrane fouling in anammox process. PMID:26687491

  10. Production of bacterial cellulose membranes in a modified airlift bioreactor by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Chi; Li, Meng-Hsun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a novel bioreactor for producing bacterial cellulose (BC) is proposed. Traditional BC production uses static culture conditions and produces a gelatinous membrane. The potential for using various types of bioreactor, including a stirred tank, conventional airlift, and modified airlift with a rectangular wire-mesh draft tube, in large-scale production has been investigated. The BC obtained from these bioreactors is fibrous or in pellet form. Our proposed airlift bioreactor produces a membrane-type BC from Gluconacetobacter xylinus, the water-holding capacity of which is greater than that of cellulose types produced using static cultivation methods. The Young's modulus of the product can be manipulated by varying the number of net plates in the modified airlift bioreactor. The BC membrane produced using the proposed bioreactor exhibits potential for practical application. PMID:25823854

  11. Kinetics of anaerobic digestion of soft drink wastewater in immobilized cell bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Borja, R; Banks, C J

    1994-07-01

    A kinetic study of the anaerobic digestion of soft drink wastewater was undertaken, using bioreactors containing various suspended supports (bentonite, zeolite, sepiolite, saponite and polyurethane foam), on to which the microorganisms effecting the purification were immobilized. Assuming the overall anaerobic digestion process conforms to first-order kinetics, the specific rate constants, K0, derived from the reactors with saponite and sepiolite (magnesium silicates) were approximately twice those from bentonite and zeolite (aluminium silicates) and almost five times higher than in the control reactor (without support); the polyurethane support showed an intermediate behaviour. The methanogenic activity increased linearly with COD load, with saponite and sepiolite supports showing the highest values. The average yield coefficient of methane was 325 cm3 CH4 STP g-1 COD and the percentage elimination of COD was 77.8%; these values were not significantly altered by the type of support used. PMID:7764995

  12. Enhanced Biogas Production from Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron-Amended Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; Laughton, Stephanie N.; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Addition of nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) to anaerobic batch reactors to enhance methanogenic activity is described. Two NZVI systems were tested: a commercially available NZVI (cNZVI) slurry and a freshly synthesized NZVI (sNZVI) suspension that was prepared immediately before addition to the reactors. In both systems, the addition of NZVI increased pH and decreased oxidation/reduction potential compared with unamended control reactors. Biodegradation of a model brewery wastewater was enhanced as indicated by an increase in chemical oxygen demand removal with both sNZVI and cNZVI amendments at all concentrations tested (1.25–5.0 g Fe/L). Methane production increased for all NZVI-amended bioreactors, with a maximum increase of 28% achieved on the addition of 2.5 and 5.0 g/L cNZVI. Addition of bulk zero-valent iron resulted in only a 5% increase in methane, indicating the advantage of using the nanoscale particles. NZVI amendments further improved produced biogas by decreasing the amount of CO2 released from the bioreactor by approximately 58%. Overall, addition of cNZVI proved more beneficial than the sNZVI at equal iron concentrations, due to decreased colloidal stability and larger effective particle size of sNZVI. Although some have reported cytotoxicity of NZVI to anaerobic microorganisms, work presented here suggests that NZVI of a certain particle size and reactivity can serve as an amendment to anaerobic digesters to enhance degradation and increase the value of the produced biogas, yielding a more energy-efficient anaerobic method for wastewater treatment. PMID:26339183

  13. The effect of enzymatic pre-hydrolysis of dairy wastewater on the granular and immobilized microbial community in anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Magali C; Rosa, Daniela R; Duarte, Iolanda C S; Saavedra, Nora K; Varesche, Maria B A; Zaiat, Marcelo; Freire, Denise M G

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a lipase-rich enzyme preparation produced by the fungus Penicillium sp. on solid-state fermentation was evaluated in two anaerobic bioreactors (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB)) treating dairy wastewater with 1200 mg oil and grease/L. The oil and grease hydrolysis step was carried out with 0.1% (w/v) of the solid enzymatic preparation at 30 degrees C for 24 h. This resulted in a final concentration of free acids eight times higher than the initial value. The bioreactors operated at 30 degrees C with hydraulic retention times of 12 h (HAIB) and 20 h (UASB) for a period of 430 days, and had high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies (around 90%) when fed with pre-hydrolyzed wastewater. There was, however, an increase in the effluent oil and grease concentration (from values as low as 17 mg/L to values above 150 mg/L in the UASB bioreactor, and from 38-242 mg/L in the HAIB bioreactor), and oil and grease accumulation in the biomass throughout the operational period (the oil and grease content reached 1.7 times that found in the inoculum of the UASB bioreactor). The HAIB bioreactor gave better results because the support for biomass immobilization acted as a filter, retaining oil and grease at the entry of the bioreactor. The molecular analysis of the Bacteria and Archaea domains revealed significant differences in the microbial profiles in experiments conducted with and without the pre-hydrolysis step. The differences observed in the overall parameters could be related to the microbial diversity of the anaerobic sludge. PMID:23530355

  14. Performance of an anaerobic, static bed, fixed film bioreactor for chlorinated solvent treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Walker, Charles; Graves, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic, fixed film, bioreactors bioaugmented with a dechlorinating microbial consortium were evaluated as a potential technology for cost effective, sustainable, and reliable treatment of mixed chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in groundwater from a large groundwater recovery system. Bench- and pilot-scale testing at about 3 and 13,500 L, respectively, demonstrated that total chlorinated solvent removal to less than the permitted discharge limit of 100 μg/L. Various planned and unexpected upsets, interruptions, and changes demonstrated the robustness and reliability of the bioreactor system, which handled the operational variations with no observable change in performance. Key operating parameters included an adequately long hydraulic retention time for the surface area, a constant supply of electron donor, pH control with a buffer to minimize pH variance, an oxidation reduction potential of approximately −200 millivolts or lower, and a well-adapted biomass capable of degrading the full suite of chlorinated solvents in the groundwater. Results indicated that the current discharge criteria can be met using a bioreactor technology that is less complex and has less downtime than the sorption based technology currently being used to treat the groundwater.

  15. Modeling biogas production from organic fraction of MSW co-digested with MSWI ashes in anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lo, H M; Kurniawan, T A; Sillanpää, M E T; Pai, T Y; Chiang, C F; Chao, K P; Liu, M H; Chuang, S H; Banks, C J; Wang, S C; Lin, K C; Lin, C Y; Liu, W F; Cheng, P H; Chen, C K; Chiu, H Y; Wu, H Y

    2010-08-01

    This study aims at investigating the effects of MSW incinerator fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) on the anaerobic co-digestion of OFMSW with FA or BA. It also simulates the biogas production from various dosed and control bioreactors. Results showed that suitable ashes addition (FA/MSW 10 and 20 g L(-1) and BA/MSW 100 g L(-1)) could improve the MSW anaerobic digestion and enhance the biogas production rates. FA/MSW 20 g L(-1) bioreactor had the higher biogas production and rate implying the potential option for MSW anaerobic co-digestion. Modeling studies showed that exponential plot simulated better for FA/MSW 10 g L(-1) and control bioreactors while Gaussian plot was applicable for FA/MSW 20 g L(-1) one. Linear and exponential plot of descending limb both simulated better for BA/MSW 100 g L(-1) bioreactor. Modified Gompertz plot showed higher correlation of biogas accumulation than exponential rise to maximum plot for all bioreactors. PMID:20400299

  16. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  17. Thiosulphate conversion in a methane and acetate fed membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; Timmers, Peer H A; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Buisman, Cees J N; Weijma, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The use of methane and acetate as electron donors for biological reduction of thiosulphate in a 5-L laboratory membrane bioreactor was studied and compared to disproportionation of thiosulphate as competing biological reaction. The reactor was operated for 454 days in semi-batch mode; 30 % of its liquid phase was removed and periodically replenished (days 77, 119, 166, 258, 312 and 385). Although the reactor was operated under conditions favourable to promote thiosulphate reduction coupled to methane oxidation, thiosulphate disproportionation was the dominant microbial process. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the most abundant microorganisms in the bioreactor were phototrophic green sulphur bacteria (GSB) belonging to the family Chlorobiaceae and thiosulphate-disproportionating bacteria belonging to the genus Desulfocapsa. Even though the reactor system was surrounded with opaque plastic capable of filtering most of the light, the GSB used it to oxidize the hydrogen sulphide produced from thiosulphate disproportionation to elemental sulphur. Interrupting methane and acetate supply did not have any effect on the microbial processes taking place. The ultimate goal of our research was to develop a process that could be applied for thiosulphate and sulphate removal and biogenic sulphide formation for metal precipitation. Even though the system achieved in this study did not accomplish the targeted conversion using methane as electron donor, it does perform microbial conversions which allow to directly obtain elemental sulphur from thiosulphate. PMID:26423279

  18. Extractive biofilm membrane bioreactor with energy recovery from excess aeration and new membrane fouling control.

    PubMed

    Phattaranawik, Jirachote; Leiknes, TorOve

    2011-02-01

    Hybrid biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) system featuring new mechanisms for recovering the excess energy from air bubbling flow in the biofilm reactor and for controlling membrane biofouling was preliminarily investigated in this study. Alternative design of the biofilm reactor was developed to utilize the bubbling flow from the lower aerobic chamber to generate a mechanical mixing in the upper anoxic chamber in the vertical biofilm reactor. Suspended solid (SS) concentration in the system was hydrodynamically controlled to be lower than 70 mg/L. The ultraviolet (UV) inactivation unit was integrated with the membrane filtration tank to limit biological activities for biofoulant productions and to decelerate the unwanted biofilm formation in the permeate tube. Membrane relaxations at various operating conditions were studied for optimum membrane fouling reductions under low SS environment. Combinations of membrane relaxation and the UV inactivation significantly prolonged sustainable operation periods of the membrane filtration in the BF-MBR process. PMID:21074416

  19. Biofouling behavior and performance of forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification in osmotic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Cheng, Qianxun; Tian, Qing; Yang, Bo; Chen, Qianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received considerable interest for water and energy related applications in recent years. Biofouling behavior and performance of cellulose triacetate (CTA) forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification via polydopamine (PD) coating and poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting (PD-g-PEG) in a submerged osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) were investigated in this work. The modified membranes exhibited lower flux decline than the pristine one in OMBR, confirming that the bioinspired surface modification improved the antifouling ability of the CTA FO membrane. The result showed that the decline of membrane flux related to the increase of the salinity and MLSS concentration of the mixed liquid. It was concluded that the antifouling ability of modified membranes ascribed to the change of surface morphology in addition to the improvement of membrane hydrophilicity. The bioinspired surface modifications might improve the anti-adhesion for the biopolymers and biocake. PMID:27089532

  20. Effect of filtration flux on the development and operation of a dynamic membrane for anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mubashir; Alibardi, Luca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Cossu, Raffaello; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic membrane represents a cost effective alternative to conventional membranes by employing fouling as a means of solid-liquid separation. This study evaluated the effects of initial flux on both development rate of dynamic membrane and bioreactor performance during two consecutive experiments. The dynamic membrane was developed over a 200 μm mesh and the reactor was operated under anaerobic conditions. It was found that the effect of an initial higher applied flux on dynamic membrane development was more pronounced than mixed liquor suspended solid concentration inside the bioreactor. The development of the dynamic membrane was therefore positively associated with the applied flux. The rapid development of the dynamic membrane during the second experimental run at high initial fluxes and lower MLSS concentrations also affected the performance of the bioreactor in terms of more efficient COD removal and biogas production. A major shortcoming of applying higher initial applied flux was the formation of a denser and robust dynamic membrane layer that was resistant to applied hydraulic shear to control desired permeability and thus represented an obstacle in maintaining a long term operation with sustainable flux at lower transmembrane pressure (TMP). PMID:27280854

  1. Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators

  2. Treatment of toilet wastewater for reuse in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Boehler, M; Joss, A; Buetzer, S; Holzapfel, M; Mooser, H; Siegrist, H

    2007-01-01

    Toilet wastewater is treated and reused on site at Europe's highest membrane bioreactor (MBR), located in a cable car mountain station in the ski resort of Zermatt. Negative impacts on the sensitive mountain environment are minimised by reusing close to 100% of the treated wastewater for toilet flushing. Besides 100% nitrogen removal, 80% of phosphorus was also eliminated. This paper presents operational results, optimisations of sludge management, decoloration and long-term maintenance of biomass in the very low-loaded summer season. From a global view the experiences and results of the project are of great importance, proposing a solution to a problem existing 100-fold in the Alps as well as in arid regions all over the world: reducing water consumption for sanitation by reuse. PMID:17881838

  3. A venturi device reduces membrane fouling in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kayaalp, Necati; Ozturkmen, Gokmen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, for the first time, a venturi device was integrated into a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) to improve membrane surface cleaning and bioreactor oxygenation. The performances of a blower and the venturi device were compared in terms of membrane fouling and bioreactor oxygenation. Upon comparing membrane fouling, the performances were similar for a low operation flux (18 L/m(2).h); however, at a medium flux (32 L/m(2).h), the venturi system operated 3.4 times longer than the blower system, and the final transmembrane pressure was one-third that of the blower system. At the highest flux studied (50 L/m(2).h), the venturi system operated 5.4 times longer than the blower system. The most notable advantage of using a venturi device was that the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the MBR was in the range of 7 to 8 mg/L at a 3 L/min aeration rate, while the DO concentration of the MBR was inadequate (a maximum of 0.29 mg/L) in the blower system. A clean water oxygenation test at a 3 L/min aeration rate indicated that the standard oxygen transfer rate for the venturi system was 9.5 times higher than that of the blower system. PMID:27386992

  4. Calicivirus Removal in a Membrane Bioreactor Wastewater Treatment Plant▿

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Laura C.; Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Elimelech, Menachem; Le Guyader, Françoise S.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment virus removal, a study was conducted in southwest France. Samples collected from plant influent, an aeration basin, membrane effluent, solid sludge, and effluent biweekly from October 2009 to June 2010 were analyzed for calicivirus (norovirus and sapovirus) by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using extraction controls to perform quantification. Adenovirus and Escherichia coli also were analyzed to compare removal efficiencies. In the influent, sapovirus was always present, while the norovirus concentration varied temporally, with the highest concentration being detected from February to May. All three human norovirus genogroups (GI, GII, and GIV) were detected in effluent, but GIV was never detected in effluent; GI and GII were detected in 50% of the samples but at low concentrations. In the effluent, sapovirus was identified only once. An adenovirus titer showing temporal variation in influent samples was identified only twice in effluent. E. coli was always below the limit of detection in the effluent. Overall, the removal of calicivirus varied from 3.3 to greater than 6.8 log units, with no difference between the two main genogroups. Our results also demonstrated that the viruses are blocked by the membrane in the treatment plant and are removed from the plant as solid sludge. PMID:21666029

  5. Pyrosequencing reveals microbial community profile in anaerobic bio-entrapped membrane reactor for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kok Kwang; Shi, Xueqing; Ong, Say Leong; Ng, How Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, pharmaceutical wastewater with high salinity and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) was treated by an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) and an anaerobic bio-entrapped membrane reactor (AnBEMR). The microbial populations and communities were analyzed using the 454 pyrosequencing method. The hydraulic retention time (HRT), membrane flux and mean cell residence time (MCRT) were controlled at 30.6h, 6L/m(2)h and 100d, respectively. The results showed that the AnBEMR achieved higher TCOD removal efficiency and greater biogas production compared to the AnMBR. Through DNA pyrosequencing analysis, both the anaerobic MBRs showed similar dominant groups of bacteria and archaea. However, phylum Elusimicrobia of bacteria was only detected in the AnBEMR; the higher abundance of dominant archaeal genus Methanimicrococcus found in the AnBEMR could play an important role in degradation of the major organic pollutant (i.e., trimethylamine) present in the pharmaceutical wastewater. PMID:26577579

  6. Arsenic remediation by formation of arsenic sulfide minerals in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Root, Robert A; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a highly toxic metalloid that has been identified at high concentrations in groundwater in certain locations around the world. Concurrent microbial reduction of arsenate (As(V) ) and sulfate (SO4 (2-) ) can result in the formation of poorly soluble arsenic sulfide minerals (ASM). The objective of this research was to study As biomineralization in a minimal iron environment for the bioremediation of As-contaminated groundwater using simultaneous As(V) and SO4 (2-) reduction. A continuous-flow anaerobic bioreactor was maintained at slightly acidic pH (6.25-6.50) and fed with As(V) and SO4 (2-) , utilizing ethanol as an electron donor for over 250 d. A second bioreactor running under the same conditions but lacking SO4 (2-) was operated as a control to study the fate of As (without S). The reactor fed with SO4 (2-) removed an average 91.2% of the total soluble As at volumetric rates up to 2.9 mg As/(L · h), while less than 5% removal was observed in the control bioreactor. Soluble S removal occurred with an S to As molar ratio of 1.2, suggesting the formation of a mixture of orpiment- (As2 S3 ) and realgar-like (AsS) solid phases. Solid phase characterization using K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a mixture of As2 S3 and AsS. These results indicate that a bioremediation process relying on the addition of a simple, low-cost electron donor offers potential to promote the removal of As from groundwater with naturally occurring or added SO4 (2-) by precipitation of ASM. PMID:26333155

  7. Arsenic remediation by formation of arsenic sulfide minerals in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E.; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Root, Robert A.; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a highly toxic metalloid that has been identified at high concentrations in groundwater in certain locations around the world. Concurrent microbial reduction of arsenate (AsV) and sulfate (SO42-) can result in the formation of poorly soluble arsenic sulfide minerals (ASM). The objective of this research was to study As biomineralization in a minimal iron environment for the bioremediation of As-contaminated groundwater using simultaneous AsV and SO42- reduction. A continuous-flow anaerobic bioreactor was maintained at slightly acidic pH (6.25-6.50) and fed with AsV and SO42-, utilizing ethanol as an electron donor for over 250 d. A second bioreactor running under the same conditions but lacking SO42- was operated as a control to study the fate of As (without S). The reactor fed with SO42- removed an average 91.2% of the total soluble As at volumetric rates up to 2.9 mg As/(L∙h), while less than 5% removal was observed in the control bioreactor. Soluble S removal occurred with an S to As molar ratio of 1.2, suggesting the formation of a mixture of orpiment- (As2S3) and realgar-like (AsS) solid phases. Solid phase characterization using K-edge X-Ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a mixture of As2S3 and AsS. These results indicate that a bioremediation process relying on the addition of a simple, low-cost electron donor offers potential to promote the removal of As from groundwater with naturally occurring or added sulfate by precipitation of ASM. PMID:26333155

  8. In-situ utilization of generated electricity in an electrochemical membrane bioreactor to mitigate membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Shi, Bing-Jing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-10-01

    How to mitigate membrane fouling remains a critical challenge for widespread application of membrane bioreactors. Herein, an antifouling electrochemical membrane bioreactor (EMBR) was developed based on in-situ utilization of the generated electricity for fouling control. In this system, a maximum power density of 1.43 W/m(3) and a current density of 18.49 A/m(3) were obtained. The results demonstrate that the formed electric field reduced the deposition of sludge on membrane surface by enhancing the electrostatic repulsive force between them. The produced H2O2 at the cathode also contributed to the fouling mitigation by in-situ removing the membrane foulants. In addition, 93.7% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and 96.5% NH4(+)-N removal in average as well as a low effluent turbidity of below 2 NTU were achieved, indicating a good wastewater treatment performance of the EMBR. This work provides a proof-of-concept study of an antifouling MBR with high wastewater treatment efficiency and electricity recovery, and implies that electrochemical control might provide another promising avenue to in-situ suppress the membrane fouling in MBRs. PMID:23886542

  9. Foaming in membrane bioreactors: identification of the causes.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Torregrossa, Michele

    2013-10-15

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) represent by now a well established alternative for wastewater treatment. Their increasing development is undoubtedly related to the several advantages that such technology is able to guarantee. Nevertheless, this technology is not exempt from operational problems; among them the foaming still represents an "open challenge" of the MBR field, due to the high complexity of phenomenon. Unfortunately, very little work has been done on the foaming in MBRs and further studies are required. Actually, there is not a distinct difference between conventional activated system and MBR: the main difference is that the MBR plants can retain most Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPSs) in the bioreactor. For these reason, unlike conventional activated sludge systems, MBRs have experienced foaming in the absence of foam-forming micro-organisms. Nevertheless, the actual mechanisms of EPS production and the role of bacteria in producing foam in activated sludge in MBRs are still unclear. In this paper, the authors investigated the roles of EPS and foam-forming filamentous bacteria by analyzing samples from different pilot plants using MBRs. In particular, in order to define the macroscopic features and the role of EPS and filamentous bacteria, a Modified Scum Index (MSI) test was applied and proposed. Based on the MSI and the foam power test, the causes of biological foaming were identified in terms of the potential for foaming, the quality and the quantity of the foam. The results indicated that the MBR foaming was influenced significantly by the concentration of bound EPSs in the sludge. In addition, the quantity and stability of MBR scum increased when both bound EPSs and foam-forming filamentous bacteria were present in the activated sludge. PMID:23792916

  10. Clofibric acid and gemfibrozil removal in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Macias, Tania; Nacheva, Petia Mijaylova

    2015-01-01

    The removal of two blood lipid regulators, clofibric acid (CLA) and gemfibrozil (GFZ), was evaluated using two identical aerobic membrane bioreactors with 6.5 L effective volume each. Polysulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes were submerged in the reactors. Different operating conditions were tested varying the organic load (F/M), hydraulic residence time (HRT), biomass concentration measured as total suspended solids in the mixed liquor (MLTSS) and the sludge retention time (SRT). Complete GFZ removal was obtained with F/M of 0.21-0.48 kg COD kgTSS⁻¹ d⁻¹, HRT of 4-10 hours, SRT of 10-32 d and MLTSS of 6-10 g L⁻¹. The GFZ removal can be attributed to biodegradation and there was no accumulation of the compound in the biomass. The CLA removals improved with the SRT and HRT increase and F/M decrease. Average removals of 78-79% were obtained with SRT 16-32 d, F/M of 0.21-0.34 kgCOD kgTSS⁻¹ d⁻¹, HRT of 7-10 hours and MLTSS of 6-10 g L⁻¹. Biodegradation was found to be the main removal pathway. PMID:25909723

  11. Removal of naphthalene and phenanthrene using aerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mijaylova Nacheva, Petia; Esquivel Sotelo, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by membrane bioreactor (MBR) under aerobic conditions had been studied using naphthalene (NAP) and phenanthrene (PHE) as model compounds. Three MBRs with submerged ultra-filtration hollow fiber membranes were operated applying different operational conditions during 6.5 months. Complete NAP and PHE removal was obtained applying loads of 7 gNAP kgTSS(-1) day(-1) and 0.5 gPHE kgTSS(-1) day(-1), while the organic loading rate was adjusted to 0.26 kgCOD kgTSS(-1) day(-1), with the biomass concentration being 6000 mgTSS L(-1), the hydraulic retention time (HRT) 8 h and the solids retention time (SRT) 30 days. Load increases, as well as HRT and SRT reductions, affected the NAP and PHE removals. Biodegradation was found to be the major NAP and PHE removal mechanism. There was no NAP accumulation in the biomass. Low PHE quantities remain sorbed in the biomass and the contribution of the sorption in the removal of this compound was estimated to be less than 0.01 %. The volatilization does not contribute to the PHE removal in MBRs, but the contribution of NAP volatilization can reach up to 0.6 % when HRT of 8 h is applied. PMID:26895256

  12. Potential use of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in anaerobic co-digestion with wastewater in submerged anaerobic membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Moñino, P; Jiménez, E; Barat, R; Aguado, D; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-10-01

    Food waste was characterized for its potential use as substrate for anaerobic co-digestion in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor pilot plant that treats urban wastewater (WW). 90% of the particles had sizes under 0.5mm after grinding the food waste in a commercial food waste disposer. COD, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were 100, 2 and 20 times higher in food waste than their average concentrations in WW, but the relative flow contribution of both streams made COD the only pollutant that increased significantly when both substrates were mixed. As sulphate concentration in food waste was in the same range as WW, co-digestion of both substrates would increase the COD/SO4-S ratio and favour methanogenic activity in anaerobic treatments. The average methane potential of the food waste was 421±15mLCH4g(-1)VS, achieving 73% anaerobic biodegradability. The anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with WW is expected to increase methane production 2.9-fold. The settleable solids tests and the particle size distribution analyses confirmed that both treatment lines of a conventional WWTP (water and sludge lines) would be clearly impacted by the incorporation of food waste into its influent. Anaerobic processes are therefore preferred over their aerobic counterparts due to their ability to valorise the high COD content to produce biogas (a renewable energy) instead of increasing the energetic costs associated with the aeration process for aerobic COD oxidation. PMID:27436236

  13. Full-scale assessment of the nutrient removal capabilities of membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T; Crawford, George V; Johnson, Bruce R

    2010-01-01

    Operating results from two full-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) practicing biological and chemical phosphorus and biological nitrogen removal to meet stringent effluent nutrient limits are analyzed. Full-scale results and special studies conducted at these facilities resulted in the development of guidelines for the design of MBRs to achieve stringent effluent nutrient concentrations--as low as 0.05 mg/L total phosphorus and 3 mg/L total nitrogen. These guidelines include the following: (1) direct the membrane recirculation flow to the aerobic zone, (2) provide intense mixing at the inlets of the anaerobic and anoxic zones, (3) maintain internal recirculation flowrates to maintain the desired mixed liquor suspended solids distribution, and (4) carefully control supplemental metal salt addition in proportion to the phosphorus remaining after biological removal is complete. Staging the various process zones and providing effective dissolved oxygen control also enhances nutrient removal performance. The results demonstrated that process performance can be characterized by the International Water Association (London, United Kingdom) (IWA) activated sludge model number 2d (ASM2d) and the Water Environment Federation (Alexandria, Virginia) chemical phosphorus removal model. These models subsequently were used to develop unique process configurations that are currently under design and/or construction for several full-scale nutrient removal MBRs. PMID:20942336

  14. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  15. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997) and has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and economic growth will continue to render landfilling as an important and necessary component of solid waste management. Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works, Division of Integrated Waste Management is demonstrating a new landfill technology called Bioreactor Landfill to better manage solid waste. In a Bioreactor Landfill, controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray-water, etc.) are added and recirculated to increase the moisture content of the waste and improve waste decomposition. As demonstrated in a small-scale demonstration project at the Yolo County Central Landfill in 1995, this process significantly increases the biodegradation rate of waste and thus decreases the waste stabilization and composting time (5 to 10 years) relative to what would occur within a conventional landfill (30 to 50 years or more). When waste decomposes anaerobically (in absence of oxygen), it produces landfill gas (biogas). Biogas is primarily a mixture of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which can be recovered for electricity or other uses. Other benefits of a bioreactor landfill composting operation include increased landfill waste settlement which increases in landfill capacity and life, improved leachate chemistry, possible reduction of landfill post-closure management time, opportunity to explore decomposed waste for landfill mining, and abatement of greenhouse gases through highly efficient methane capture over a much shorter period of time than is typical of waste management through conventional landfilling. This project also investigates the aerobic decomposition of waste of 13,000 tons of waste (2.5 acre) for

  16. pH, dissolved oxygen, and adsorption effects on metal removal in anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Willow, Mark A; Cohen, Ronald R H

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic bioreactors were used to test the effect of the pH of influent on the removal efficiency of heavy metals from acid-rock drainage. Two studies used a near-neutral-pH, metal-laden influent to examine the heavy metal removal efficiency and hydraulic residence time requirements of the reactors. Another study used the more typical low-pH mine drainage influent. Experiments also were done to (i) test the effects of oxygen content of feed water on metal removal and (ii) the adsorptive capacity of the reactor organic substrate. Analysis of the results indicates that bacterial sulfate reduction may be a zero-order kinetic reaction relative to sulfate concentrations used in the experiments, and may be the factor that controls the metal mass removal efficiency in the anaerobic treatment systems. The sorptive capacities of the organic substrate used in the experiments had not been exhausted during the experiments as indicated by the loading rates of removal of metals exceeding the mass production rates of sulfide. Microbial sulfate reduction was less in the reactors receiving low-pH influent during experiments with short residence times. Sulfate-reducing bacteria may have been inhibited by high flows of low-pH water. Dissolved oxygen content of the feed waters had little effect on sulfate reduction and metal removal capacity. PMID:12931874

  17. Kinetic study of anaerobic digestion of fruit-processing wastewater in immobilized-cell bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Borja, R; Banks, C J

    1994-08-01

    The kinetics of the anaerobic digestion of a fruit-processing wastewater [chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 5.1 g/l] were investigated. Laboratory experiments were carried out in bioreactors containing supports of different chemical composition and features, namely bentonite and zeolite (aluminum silicates), sepiolite and saponite (magnesium silicates) and polyurethane foam, to which the microorganisms responsible for the process adhered. The influence of the support medium on the kinetics was compared with a control digester with suspended biomass. Assuming the overall anaerobic digestion process conforms to first-order kinetics, the specific rate constant, K0, was determined for each of the experimental reactors. The average values obtained were: 0.080 h-1 (bentonite); 0.103 h-1 (zeolite); 0.180 h-1 (sepiolite); 0.198 h-1 (saponite); 0.131 h-1 (polyurethane); and 0.037 h-1 (control). The results indicate that the support used to immobilize the micro-organisms had a marked influence on the digestion process; the results were significant at the 95% confidence level. Methanogenic activity increased linearly with COD, with the saponite and sepiolite supports showing the highest values. The yield coefficient of methane was 270 ml of methane (under standard temperature and pressure conditions)/g of COD. The average elimination of COD was 89.5%. PMID:7917066

  18. Impact of solids residence time on biological nutrient removal performance of membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ersu, Cagatayhan Bekir; Ong, Say Kee; Arslankaya, Ertan; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Impact of long solids residence times (SRTs) on nutrient removal was investigated using a submerged plate-frame membrane bioreactor with anaerobic and anoxic tanks. The system was operated at 10, 25, 50 and 75 days SRTs with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 2 h each for the anaerobic and anoxic tanks and 8 h for the oxic tank. Recirculation of oxic tank mixed liquor into the anaerobic tank and permeate into the anoxic tank were fixed at 100% each of the influent flow. For all SRTs, percent removals of soluble chemical oxygen demand were more than 93% and nitrification was more than 98.5% but total nitrogen percent removal seemed to peak at 81% at 50 days SRT while total phosphorus (TP) percent removal showed a deterioration from approximately 80% at 50 days SRT to 60% at 75 days SRT. Before calibrating the Biowin((R)) model to the experimental data, a sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted which indicated that heterotrophic anoxic yield, anaerobic hydrolysis factors of heterotrophs, heterotrophic hydrolysis, oxic endogenous decay rate for heterotrophs and oxic endogenous decay rate of PAOs had the most impact on predicted effluent TP concentration. The final values of kinetic parameters obtained in the calibration seemed to imply that nitrogen and phosphorus removal increased with SRT due to an increase in anoxic and anaerobic hydrolysis factors up to 50 days SRT but beyond that removal of phosphorus deteriorated due to high oxic endogenous decay rates. This indirectly imply that the decrease in phosphorus removal at 75 days SRT may be due to an increase in lysis of microbial cells at high SRTs along with the low food/microorganisms ratio as a result of high suspended solids in the oxic tank. Several polynomial correlations relating the various calibrated kinetic parameters with SRTs were derived. The Biowin((R)) model and the kinetic parameters predicted by the polynomial correlations were verified and found to predict well the effluent water quality

  19. Pilot demonstration of energy-efficient membrane bioreactor (MBR) using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jaeho; Smith, Shaleena; Patamasank, Jaren; Tontcheva, Petia; Kim, Gyu Dong; Roh, Hyung Keun

    2015-03-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) is becoming popular for advanced wastewater treatment and water reuse. Air scouring to "shake" the membrane fibers is most suitable and applicable to maintain filtration without severe and rapidfouling. However, membrane fouling mitigating technologies are energy intensive. The goal of this research is to develop an alternative energy-saving MBR system to reduce energy consumption; a revolutionary system that will directly compete with air scouring technologies currently in the membrane water reuse market. The innovative MBR system, called reciprocation MBR (rMBR), prevents membrane fouling without the use of air scouring blowers. The mechanism featured is a mechanical reciprocating membrane frame that uses inertia to prevent fouling. Direct strong agitation of the fiber is also beneficial for the constant removal of solids built up on the membrane surface. The rMBR pilot consumes less energy than conventional coarse air scouring MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for membrane reciprocation for the pilot rMBR system was 0.072 kWh/m3 permeate produced at 40 LMH, which is 75% less than the conventional air scouring in an MBR system (0.29 kWh/m3). Reciprocation of the hollow-fiber membrane can overcome the hydrodynamic limitations of air scouring or cross-flow membrane systems with less energy consumption and/or higher energy efficiency. PMID:25842538

  20. Preliminary evaluation of biosolids characteristics for anaerobic membrane reactors treating municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qirong; Dagnew, Martha; Cumin, Jeff; Parker, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of biosolids of a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating municipal wastewater. The production of total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) was comparable to that reported for the extended aeration system at solids residence time (SRT) longer than 40 days. The yields of TS and VS were reduced as SRT increased from 40 to 100 days and increased with the addition of 26 mg/L of FeCl3. The AnMBR destroyed 60-82% of the VS loading in feed wastewater and hence it was concluded the biosolids met the requirements for vector attraction reduction for land application. The concentrations of volatile suspended solids and total suspended solids in the sludge were less than those reported after anaerobic digestion of conventional primary and secondary sludge mixtures, and hence dewatering of the waste stream may be required for some applications. The nutrient content in terms of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorus was similar to that of anaerobically digested municipal sludges. The dewaterability of the biosolids was poorer than that reported for sludges from aerobic treatment and anaerobically digested sludges. Dewaterability was improved by addition of FeCl3 and reduced SRT. The biosolids met standards for land application with regards to the concentration of heavy metals but would need further treatment to meet Class B pathogen indicator criteria. PMID:26465317

  1. Direct observations of membrane scale in membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment application.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Yoon, T I

    2010-01-01

    The formation of inorganic fouling on MF membrane was investigated in membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating industrial wastewater. Membrane autopsy works using microscopic techniques and surface analysis were carried out at the completion of pilot-scale operation to analyze foulant materials extensively. Scaling occurred on the membrane surface significantly in the MBR treating calcium-rich wastewater (LSI > 2.0). Our experiments showed that the coverage of the membrane surface by the inorganic fouling consisted mostly of calcium while the internal fouling within membrane pores due to the scale formation was almost negligible. Most of calcium was rejected on the MF membrane surface as scale formation of calcium carbonate (>90% as rejection). The sequence sodium hypochlorite-citric acid for the removal of membrane scale was more effective than the sequence citric acid-sodium hypochlorite cleaning. It appeared that the structure of organic compounds combined with calcium became loose by the addition of the sodium hypochlorite, thereby releasing calcium more easily from the membrane by applying the acid cleaning agent. PMID:20418623

  2. Influence of membrane surface roughness on interfacial interactions with sludge flocs in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the interfacial interactions between sludge flocs and a rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor were investigated. Models describing these interfacial interactions were firstly proposed based on the surface element integration (SEI) method. Surface properties of sludge flocs and membrane were experimentally determined to simulate the models through composite Simpson's rule. It was found that, roughness on membrane surface significantly decreased interaction strength, which enabled the sludge flocs to more easily attach on and detach from the rough membrane surface. Further analysis showed that the value of total interaction energy increased with asperity radius, while the strength of total interaction energy decreased with asperity height. Results also demonstrated that increase in floc size would significantly decrease the attractive specific total interaction with rough membrane surface. It was revealed that there existed a critical asperity radius above which the total interaction energy in certain separation distance coverage was continuously repulsive, facilitating membrane fouling control in MBRs. This study demonstrated the possibility to mitigate membrane fouling by "tailoring" membrane surface roughness. PMID:25660708

  3. Novel magnetically induced membrane vibration (MMV) for fouling control in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bilad, Muhammad R; Mezohegyi, Gergo; Declerck, Priscilla; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2012-01-01

    Conventional submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) rely on the coarse bubbles aeration to generate shear at the liquid-membrane interface to limit membrane fouling. Unfortunately, it is a very energy consuming method, still often resulting in a rapid decrease of membrane permeability and consequently in higher expenses. In this paper, the feasibility of a novel magnetically induced membrane vibration (MMV) system was studied in a lab-scale MBR treating synthetic wastewater. The effects on membrane fouling of applied electrical power of different operation strategies, of membrane flux and of the presence of multiple membranes on one vibrating engine on membrane fouling were investigated. The filtration performance was evaluated by determining the filtration resistance profiles and critical flux. The results showed clear advantages of the vibrating system over conventional MBR processes by ensuring higher fluxes at lower fouling rates. Intermittent vibration was found a promising strategy for both efficient fouling control and significant energy saving. The optimised MMV system is presumed to lead to significant energy and cost reduction in up-scaled MBR operations. PMID:22082526

  4. The influence of zeolite (clinoptilolite) on the performance of a hybrid membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, M; Mehrnia, M R

    2014-04-01

    This work aims to investigate the effect of clinoptilolite on the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR). The control membrane bioreactor without clinoptilolite (CMBR) and the hybrid membrane bioreactor with clinoptilolite (HMBR), in two parallel simultaneous MBRs within long and short term filtration experiments, were studied. Sludge properties, transmembrane pressure (TMP) rise as an index for membrane fouling and nutrient removal from synthetic wastewater in the CMBR and HMBR were compared. In HMBR, sludge properties improvement such as 22.5% rise in MLSS, 7% more accumulation of large particles, reduction of soluble microbial products (SMP) to half of this value in CMBR, no increase in sludge volume index (SVI) and 66% TMP reduced. The results of short term filtration showed that the trend of TMP increase in terms of flux will be slower in HMBR. Improvement of biological wastewater treatment quality and ease of membrane operation are concluded from this study. PMID:24583211

  5. A novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor system: biological stability and trace organic compound removal.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Cath, Tzahi Y; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-05-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) by a novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor (MDBR) system was examined. Salinity build-up and the thermophilic conditions to some extent adversely impacted the performance of the bioreactor, particularly the removal of total nitrogen and recalcitrant TrOCs. While most TrOCs were well removed by the thermophilic bioreactor, compounds containing electron withdrawing functional groups in their molecular structure were recalcitrant to biological treatment and their removal efficiency by the thermophilic bioreactor was low (0-53%). However, the overall performance of the novel MDBR system with respect to the removal of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by the conditions of the bioreactor. All TrOCs investigated here were highly removed (>95%) by the MDBR system. Biodegradation, sludge adsorption, and rejection by MD contribute to the removal of TrOCs by MDBR treatment. PMID:24658107

  6. Characterization of effluent water qualities from satellite membrane bioreactor facilities.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Zakir M; Bukhari, Zia; Oppenheimer, Joan; Jjemba, Patrick; LeChevallier, Mark W; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2013-09-15

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are often a preferred treatment technology for satellite water recycling facilities since they produce consistent effluent water quality with a small footprint and require little or no supervision. While the water quality produced from centralized MBRs has been widely reported, there is no study in the literature addressing the effluent quality from a broad range of satellite facilities. Thus, a study was conducted to characterize effluent water qualities produced by satellite MBRs with respect to organic, inorganic, physical and microbial parameters. Results from sampling 38 satellite MBR facilities across the U.S. demonstrated that 90% of these facilities produced nitrified (NH4-N <0.4 mg/L-N) effluents that have low organic carbon (TOC <8.1 mg/L), turbidities of <0.7 NTU, total coliform bacterial concentrations <100 CFU/100 mL and indigenous MS-2 bacteriophage concentrations <21 PFU/100 mL. Multiple sampling events from selected satellite facilities demonstrated process capability to consistently produce effluent with low concentrations of ammonia, TOC and turbidity. UV-254 transmittance values varied substantially during multiple sampling events indicating a need for attention in designing downstream UV disinfection systems. Although enteroviruses, rotaviruses and hepatitis A viruses (HAV) were absent in all samples, adenoviruses were detected in effluents of all nine MBR facilities sampled. The presence of Giardia cysts in filtrate samples of two of nine MBR facilities sampled demonstrated the need for an appropriate disinfection process at these facilities. PMID:23871258

  7. One-stage partial nitritation and anammox in membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowu; Sun, Kaihang; Wei, Qiaoyan; Urata, Kohei; Yamashita, Yuki; Hong, Nian; Hama, Takehide; Kawagoshi, Yasunori

    2016-06-01

    Partial nitritation and anammox (PN/A) was applied in a lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) to investigate its technical feasibility for treating ammonium-rich wastewater with low C/N ratio. The bacterial community was analyzed by molecular cloning and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Partial nitritation (PN) was first realized in MBR by seeding aerobic activated sludge. With dissolved oxygen control, a steady effluent mixture with NO2 (-)-N/NH4 (+)-N ratio of 1.13 ± 0.08 was generated from the PN process. Subsequently, the MBR was seeded with anammox biomass on day 59. After running 300 days, the one-stage PN/A achieved a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 1.45 kg N/m(3)/day at the nitrogen removal efficiency of 89.5 %. Microbial community analysis revealed that Nitrosomonas sp. HKU and Nitrosospira sp. YKU corresponded to nitritation; meanwhile, Candidatus Brocadia TKU sp. accounted for nitrogen removal of the PN/A system. Specifically, Nitrosomonas sp. were enriched in the reactor at the PN/A phase and then conquered Nitrosospira sp. to be the predominant ammonia oxidizers. Nitrite oxidizers and denitrifiers were detected in symbiosis with aforementioned microbes. Denitrification promised potential plus nitrogen depletion. The present one-stage PN/A process allows a significant decrease in operational costs compared with classical nitrification/denitrification. PMID:26916267

  8. Membrane installation for enhanced up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Zhang, Kaisong; Bakke, Rune; Li, Chunming; Liu, Haining

    2013-09-01

    It is postulated that up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor efficiency can be enhanced by a membrane immersed in the reactor to operate it as an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for low-strength wastewater treatment. This postulate was tested by comparing the performance with and without a hollow fiber microfiltration membrane module immersed in UASB reactors operated at two specific organic loading rates (SOLR). Results showed that membrane filtration enhanced process performance and stability, with over 90% total organic carbon (TOC) removal consistently achieved. More than 91% of the TOC removal was achieved by suspended biomass, while less than 6% was removed by membrane filtration and digestion in the membrane attached biofilm during stable AnMBRs operation. Although the membrane and its biofilm played an important role in initial stage of the high SOLR test, linear increased TOC removal by bulk sludge mainly accounted for the enhanced process performance, implying that membrane led to enhanced biological activity of the suspended sludge. The high retention of active fine sludge particles in suspension was the main reason for this significant improvement of performance and biological activity, which led to decreased SOLR with time to a theoretical optimal level around 2  g COD/g MLVSS·d and the establishment of a microbial community dominated by Methanothrix-like microbes. It was concluded that UASB process performance can be enhanced by transforming such to AnMBR operation when the loading rate is too high for sufficient sludge retention, and/or when the effluent water quality demands are especially stringent. PMID:23578587

  9. Perspectives on carbon materials as powerful catalysts in continuous anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Salvador, A F; Dias, P; Pereira, M F R; Alves, M M; Pereira, L

    2016-09-15

    The catalytic effect of commercial microporous activated carbon (AC) and macroporous carbon nanotubes (CNT) is investigated in reductive bioreactions in continuous high rate anaerobic reactors, using the azo dye Acid Orange 10 (AO10) as model compound as electron acceptor and a mixture of VFA as electron donor. Size and concentration of carbon materials (CM) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) are assessed. CM increased the biological reduction rate of AO10, resulting in significantly higher colour removal, as compared to the control reactors. The highest efficiency, 98%, was achieved with a CNT diameter (d) lower than 0.25 mm, at a CNT concentration of 0.12 g per g of volatile solids (VS), a HRT of 10 h and resulted in a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 85%. Reducing the HRT to 5 h, colour and COD removal in CM-mediated bioreactors were above 90% and 80%, respectively. In the control reactor, thought similar COD removal was achieved, AO10 decolourisation was just approximately 20%, demonstrating the ability of CM to significantly accelerate the reduction reactions in continuous bioreactors. AO10 reduction to the correspondent aromatic amines was proved by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Colour decrease in the reactor treating a real effluent with CNT was the double comparatively to the reactor operated without CNT. The presence of AC in the reactor did not affect the microbial diversity, as compared to the control reactor, evidencing that the efficient reduction of AO10 was mainly due to AC rather than attributed to changes in the composition of the microbial communities. PMID:27295618

  10. Fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactors by humic-like substances.

    PubMed

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; König, Katja; Fojan, Peter; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-12-01

    Fouling by free extracellular polymeric substances was studied in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. It was demonstrated that the free extracellular polymeric substances, primarily consisting of humic-like substances, were adsorbed to the membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant. Infrared analyses indicated the presence of the humic-like substances on the membrane's active surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of a gel layer on the membrane surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. The gel layer caused a significant decline in water flux. This layer was not entirely removed by a backwashing, and the membrane's water flux could not be re-established. The membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant showed infrared spectra similar to that fouled by the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension in the laboratory. Thus, the results of this study show the importance of humic-like substances in irreversible fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:25014564

  11. Discrepant membrane fouling of partial nitrification and anammox membrane bioreactor operated at the same nitrogen loading rate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhao; Zhang, Zuotao; Liu, Sitong; Miyoshi, Taro; Matsuyama, Hideo; Ni, Jinren

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two times more serious membrane fouling was found in anammox membrane bioreactor, compared to partial nitrification membrane bioreactor (PN-MBR) operated at the same nitrogen loading rate. By protein, polysaccharide, amino acids and functional groups analysis, it was found that the discrepancy in membrane fouling was virtually due to the difference in microbial products of nitrifiers and anammox bacteria. Protein and polysaccharide were main foulants on membrane surface; meanwhile theirs content and ratio in the EPS, supernatant and membrane surface were significantly different in PN-MBR and anammox-MBR. The anammox metabolism products contained much more hydrophobic organics, hydrophobic amino acids, and hydrophobic functional groups than nitrifiers. A mass of anammox bacteria as well as hydrophobic metabolism products deposited on the hydrophobic membrane surface and formed serious fouling. In further, hydrophilic modification is more urgently needed to mitigate membrane fouling when running anammox-MBR, than PN-MBR. PMID:27209455

  12. Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Technology for Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation: Membrane Fouling

    PubMed Central

    Iorhemen, Oliver Terna; Hamza, Rania Ahmed; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) has emerged as an efficient compact technology for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The major drawback impeding wider application of MBRs is membrane fouling, which significantly reduces membrane performance and lifespan, resulting in a significant increase in maintenance and operating costs. Finding sustainable membrane fouling mitigation strategies in MBRs has been one of the main concerns over the last two decades. This paper provides an overview of membrane fouling and studies conducted to identify mitigating strategies for fouling in MBRs. Classes of foulants, including biofoulants, organic foulants and inorganic foulants, as well as factors influencing membrane fouling are outlined. Recent research attempts on fouling control, including addition of coagulants and adsorbents, combination of aerobic granulation with MBRs, introduction of granular materials with air scouring in the MBR tank, and quorum quenching are presented. The addition of coagulants and adsorbents shows a significant membrane fouling reduction, but further research is needed to establish optimum dosages of the various coagulants/adsorbents. Similarly, the integration of aerobic granulation with MBRs, which targets biofoulants and organic foulants, shows outstanding filtration performance and a significant reduction in fouling rate, as well as excellent nutrients removal. However, further research is needed on the enhancement of long-term granule integrity. Quorum quenching also offers a strong potential for fouling control, but pilot-scale testing is required to explore the feasibility of full-scale application. PMID:27314394

  13. Positive impact of biofilm on reducing the permeation of ampicillin through membrane for membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Yuan, Xia; Shen, Weihuang; He, Ning; Wang, Yuanpeng; Lu, Haoliang; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-02-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) has recently been the focus of research for the treatment of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics in wastewater. Although the biofilm on membrane in an MBR has been considered a cause of "membrane biofouling", its positive impact on removing pollutants has not been well-studied. This study was designed to investigate the retention effect on the permeation of ampicillin (AMP) by the biofilm coated on cellulose acetate (CA) membrane (commonly used for MBRs) utilizing a novel method based on microbial sensitivity test. The bioflim layer (thickness of 12-16μm) increased the resistance of the membrane for AMP permeation by 3-28%. Diffusion appeared to be the main driving force for the mass transfer of AMP across the membrane. Besides, the biofilm increased the retention of AMP by 23% but exhibited similar adsorption capacity with comparison of the suspended activated sludge, which indicates that the compact structure of the biofilm was the major contributor for the added retention effect on AMP by the biofilm-coated CA membrane. This study suggests that biofilm (biofouling) in MBRs increases the retention of small-molecule constituents such as antibiotics. A delicate tradeoff between reduced wastewater throughput and increased retention of contaminants should be obtained when an MBR is designed and operated. PMID:24268345

  14. Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) Technology for Wastewater Treatment and Reclamation: Membrane Fouling.

    PubMed

    Iorhemen, Oliver Terna; Hamza, Rania Ahmed; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2016-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor (MBR) has emerged as an efficient compact technology for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The major drawback impeding wider application of MBRs is membrane fouling, which significantly reduces membrane performance and lifespan, resulting in a significant increase in maintenance and operating costs. Finding sustainable membrane fouling mitigation strategies in MBRs has been one of the main concerns over the last two decades. This paper provides an overview of membrane fouling and studies conducted to identify mitigating strategies for fouling in MBRs. Classes of foulants, including biofoulants, organic foulants and inorganic foulants, as well as factors influencing membrane fouling are outlined. Recent research attempts on fouling control, including addition of coagulants and adsorbents, combination of aerobic granulation with MBRs, introduction of granular materials with air scouring in the MBR tank, and quorum quenching are presented. The addition of coagulants and adsorbents shows a significant membrane fouling reduction, but further research is needed to establish optimum dosages of the various coagulants/adsorbents. Similarly, the integration of aerobic granulation with MBRs, which targets biofoulants and organic foulants, shows outstanding filtration performance and a significant reduction in fouling rate, as well as excellent nutrients removal. However, further research is needed on the enhancement of long-term granule integrity. Quorum quenching also offers a strong potential for fouling control, but pilot-scale testing is required to explore the feasibility of full-scale application. PMID:27314394

  15. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities in a membrane bioreactor for the treatment of metal-working fluid wastewater.

    PubMed

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Garbisu, Carlos; Martín, Iker; Etxebarria, Javier; Gutierrez-Mañero, F Javier; Lucas Garcia, Jose Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An extensive microbiological study has been carried out in a membrane bioreactor fed with activated sludge and metal-working fluids. Functional diversity and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied with different approaches. Functional diversity of culturable bacterial communities was studied with different Biolog™ plates. Structure and dynamics of bacterial communities were studied in culturable and in non-culturable fractions using a 16S rRNA analysis. Among the culturable bacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the predominant classes. However, changes in microbial community structure were detected over time. Culture-independent analysis showed that Betaproteobacteria was the most frequently detected class in the membrane bioreactor (MBR) community with Zoogloea and Acidovorax as dominant genera. Also, among non-culturable bacteria, a process of succession was observed. Longitudinal structural shifts observed were more marked for non-culturable than for culturable bacteria, pointing towards an important role in the MBR performance. Microbial community metabolic abilities assessed with Biolog™ Gram negative, Gram positive and anaerobic plates also showed differences over time for Shannon's diversity index, kinetics of average well colour development, and the intensely used substrates by bacterial community in each plate. PMID:26608762

  16. Fate of endocrine disrupting compounds in membrane bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Y; Chen, X; Tao, G; Kekred, K

    2007-06-01

    Yeast estrogen screen (YES) bioassay and liquid chromatography-mass spectrum-mass spectrum (LC-MS-MS) analysis were performed to investigate the fate of active and potential endocrine disrupting compounds in 3 pilot-scale and 2 lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems. Compared with the overall estrogenicities of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents from references, the MBR systems studied have relatively good performance in the removal of estrogenicity. Estrone (E1) was removed with relatively high efficiency (80.2-91.4%), but 17beta-estradiol (E2) was removed with moderate efficiency (49.3-66.5%) by the MBRs. However, the experimental results indicated that after the treatment by MBR, substantial amounts of E1, estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S), estrone-3-glucuronide (E1-3G), and 17beta-estradiol-glucuronides (E2-G) passed through treatment systems and entered into the aquatic environment. The reduction in the levels of overall equivalent E1 (68.4%) and that of overall equivalent E2 (80.8%) was demonstrated for the pilot-scale MBR-B. For alkylphenol compounds, bisphenol A (BPA) was removed well with a removal efficiency of 68.9 -90.1%, but 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) concentration was amplified (removal efficiency of -439.5 to -161.1%) after MBR treatment which could be caused by the transformation of its parent compounds, nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPnEOs). The amounts of adsorbed estrogens per kg dry mass was relatively low, due to short hydraulic retention time and high mixed liquor suspended solids in MBRs, compared to that in STPs. PMID:17612196

  17. Bed expansion behavior and sensitivity analysis for super-high-rate anaerobic bioreactor*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-guang; Zheng, Ping; Cai, Jing; Qaisar, Mahmood

    2010-01-01

    Bed expansion behavior and sensitivity analysis for super-high-rate anaerobic bioreactor (SAB) were performed based on bed expansion ratio (E), maximum bed sludge content (V pmax), and maximum bed contact time between sludge and liquid (τ max). Bed expansion behavior models were established under bed unfluidization, fluidization, and transportation states. Under unfluidization state, E was 0, V pmax was 4 867 ml, and τ max was 844–3 800 s. Under fluidization state, E, V pmax, and τ max were 5.28%–255.69%, 1 368–4 559 ml, and 104–732 s, respectively. Under transportation state, washout of granular sludge occurred and destabilized the SAB. During stable running of SAB under fluidization state, E correlated positively with superficial gas and liquid velocities (u g and u l), while V pmax and τ max correlated negatively. For E and V pmax, the sensitivities of u g and u l were close to each other, while for τ max, the sensitivity of u l was greater than that of u g. The prediction from these models was a close match to the experimental data. PMID:20104641

  18. Combined Industrial Wastewater Treatment in Anaerobic Bioreactor Posttreated in Constructed Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Bibi Saima; Mahmood, Qaisar; Jadoon, Saima; Pervez, Arshid; Irshad, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) with monoculture of Arundo donax L. was investigated for the posttreatment of anaerobic bioreactor (ABR) treating combined industrial wastewater. Different dilutions of combined industrial wastewater (20, 40, 60, and 80) and original wastewater were fed into the ABR and then posttreated by the laboratory scale CW. The respective removal efficiencies of COD, BOD, TSS, nitrates, and ammonia were 80%, 78–82%, 91.7%, 88–92%, and 100% for original industrial wastewater treated in ABR. ABR was efficient in the removal of Ni, Pb, and Cd with removal efficiencies in the order of Cd (2.7%) > Ni (79%) > Pb (85%). Posttreatment of the ABR treated effluent was carried out in lab scale CW containing A. donax L. CW was effective in the removal of COD and various heavy metals present in ABR effluents. The posttreatment in CW resulted in reducing the metal concentrations to 1.95 mg/L, 0 mg/L, and 0.004 mg/L for Ni, Pb, and Cd which were within the permissible water quality standards for industrial effluents. The treatment strategy was effective and sustainable for the treatment of combined industrial wastewater. PMID:24396832

  19. Effect of hydraulic retention time and sludge recirculation on greenhouse gas emission and related microbial communities in two-stage membrane bioreactor treating solid waste leachate.

    PubMed

    Nuansawan, Nararatchporn; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and responsible microorganisms during the treatment of municipal solid waste leachate in two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated. The MBR system, consisting of anaerobic and aerobic stages, were operated at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 and 2.5days in each reactor under the presence and absence of sludge recirculation. Organic and nitrogen removals were more than 80% under all operating conditions during which CH4 emission were found highest under no sludge recirculation condition at HRT of 5days. An increase in hydraulic loading resulted in a reduction in CH4 emission from anaerobic reactor but an increase from the aerobic reactor. N2O emission rates were found relatively constant from anaerobic and aerobic reactors under different operating conditions. Diversity of CH4 and N2O producing microorganisms were found decreasing when hydraulic loading rate to the reactors was increased. PMID:26860618

  20. Calcium ion on membrane fouling reduction and bioflocculation promotion in membrane bioreactor at high salt shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Fan, Xue; Wang, Bin; Song, Lianfa

    2016-01-01

    Fouling propensity of activated sludge in membrane bioreactor (MBR) is closely related to the disturbance of a salt shock. In this work, the characteristics of membrane fouling and bioflocculation were compared in two laboratory-scale MBRs (one with calcium addition, MBR-Ca, the other without, MBR-C) with a transient salt shock. Particle size distributions, zeta potential, relative hydrophobicity, modified fouling index, the content of polysaccharides, proteins and calcium ions in different layers of sludge were monitored prior to, during and after the salt shock. Comparison with MBR-C showed that the recovery time and fouling rate of MBR-Ca were reduced by 50% and 34%, respectively. Remarkable variations of sludge properties in terms of bioflocculation, such as larger particle sizes, higher relative hydrophobicity and zeta potential, lower polysaccharides in supernatant, higher proteins/polysaccharides ratio in slime and loose bound extracellular polymeric substances, were observed in MBR-Ca after the salt shock. PMID:26524252

  1. Membrane Distillation Bioreactor (MDBR) - A lower Green-House-Gas (GHG) option for industrial wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shuwen; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Yu; Fane, Anthony G

    2015-12-01

    A high-retention membrane bioreactor system, the Membrane Distillation Bioreactor (MDBR) is a wastewater reclamation process which has the potential to tap on waste heat generated in industries to produce high quality product water. There are a few key factors which could make MDBR an attractive advanced treatment option, namely tightening legal requirements due to increasing concerns on the micropollutants in industrial wastewater effluents as well as concerns over the electrical requirement of pressurized advanced treatment processes and greenhouse gas emissions associated with wastewater reclamation. This paper aims to provide a consolidated review on the current state of research for the MDBR system and to evaluate the system as a possible lower Green House Gas (GHG) emission option for wastewater reclamation using the membrane bioreactor-reverse osmosis (MBR-RO) system as a baseline for comparison. The areas for potential applications and possible configurations for MDBR applications are discussed. PMID:25262945

  2. Gluconic acid production in bioreactor with immobilized glucose oxidase plus catalase on polymer membrane adjacent to anion-exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Godjevargova, Tzonka; Dayal, Rajeshwar; Turmanova, Sevdalina

    2004-10-20

    Gluconic acid was obtained in the permeate side of the bioreactor with glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized onto anion-exchange membrane (AEM) of low-density polyethylene grafted with 4-vinylpiridine. The electric resistance of the anion-exchange membranes was increased after the enzyme immobilization on the membrane. The gluconic acid productions were relatively low with the GOD immobilized by any method on the AEM. To increase the enzyme reaction efficiency, GOD was immobilized on membrane of AN copolymer (PAN) adjacent to an anion-exchange membrane in bioreactor. Uses of anion-exchange membrane led to selective removal of the gluconic acid from the glucose solution and reduce the gluconic acid inhibition. The amount of gluconic acid obtained in the permeate side of the bioreactor with the GOD immobilized on the PAN membrane adjacent to the AEM under electrodialysis was about 30 times higher than that obtained with enzyme directly bound to the AEM. The optimal substrate concentration in the feed side was found to be about 1 g/l. Further experiments were carried out with the co-immobilized GOD plus Catalase (CAT) on the PAN membrane adjacent to the AEM to improve the efficiency of the immobilize system. The yield of this process was at least 95%. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD and CAT was studied (lost 20% of initial activity for 90 d). The results obtained clearly showed the higher potential of the dual membrane bioreactor with GOD plus CAT bound to ultrafiltration polymer membrane adjacent to the AEM. Storage stability of GOD activity in GOD plus CAT immobilized on PAN//AEM membranes and on AEM. PMID:15497133

  3. Artificial neural network based modeling to evaluate methane yield from biogas in a laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vijay V; Dhar, Hiya; Kumar, Sunil; Thalla, Arun Kumar; Mukherjee, Somnath; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactor was investigated in the present study to determine methane (CH4) content in biogas yield from digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). OFMSW consists of food waste, vegetable waste and yard trimming. An organic loading between 40 and 120kgVS/m(3) was applied in different runs of the bioreactor. The study was aimed to focus on the effects of various factors, such as pH, moisture content (MC), total volatile solids (TVS), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and CH4 fraction on biogas production. OFMSW witnessed high CH4 yield as 346.65LCH4/kgVS added. A target of 60-70% of CH4 fraction in biogas was set as an optimized condition. The experimental results were statistically optimized by application of ANN model using free forward back propagation in MATLAB environment. PMID:27005793

  4. Shifts in methanogenic subpopulations measured with antibody probes in a fixed-bed loop anaerobic bioreactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Macario, A.J.L.; de Macario, E.C. ); Ney, U.; Schoberth, S.M.; Sahm, H. )

    1989-08-01

    A fixed-bed loop, high-rate anaerobic bioreactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate was sampled when it reached steady state and afterwards following perturbations during a 14-month period. By using immunotechnology, it was observed that shifts in methanogenic subpopulations occurred in association with perturbations, such as restarting and relocating the biomass into a different tank. Methanogens related to Methanobacterium bryantii MoHG and Methanobrevibacter smithii ALI were numerous throughout the observation period, while Methanosarcina mazei S6 and Methanosarcina thermophila TM1 were found in the early and late samples, respectively. Also, Methanobacterium formicicum was more numerous at the top portion of the bioreactor, while Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ and DC were at the bottom. Sample formalinization required for prolonged storage proved suitable for antigen preservation.

  5. Performance and microbial community composition in a long-term sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor operation treating coking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dev Raj; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Zhe; Gao, Yingxin; Yang, Min

    2016-09-01

    The combined anaerobic-aerobic biosystem is assumed to consume less energy for the treatment of high strength industrial wastewater. In this study, pollutant removal performance and microbial diversity were assessed in a long-term (over 300 days) bench-scale sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor treating coking wastewater. Anaerobic treatment removed one third of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and more than half of the phenols with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 42 h, while the combined system with total HRT of 114 h removed 81.8, 85.6, 99.9, 98.2, and 85.4 % of COD, total organic carbon (TOC), total phenols, thiocyanate, and cyanide, respectively. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed complete removal of phenol derivatives and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) via the combined system, with the anaerobic process alone contributing 58.4 and 58.6 % removal on average, respectively. Microbial activity in the bioreactors was examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities. Proteobacteria (61.2-93.4 %), particularly Betaproteobacteria (34.4-70.1 %), was the dominant bacterial group. Ottowia (14.1-46.7 %), Soehngenia (3.0-8.2 %), and Corynebacterium (0.9-12.0 %), which are comprised of phenol-degrading and hydrolytic bacteria, were the most abundant genera in the anaerobic sludge, whereas Thiobacillus (6.6-43.6 %), Diaphorobacter (5.1-13.0 %), and Comamonas (0.2-11.1 %) were the major degraders of phenol, thiocyanate, and NHCs in the aerobic sludge. Despite the low density of fungi, phenol degrading oleaginous yeast Trichosporon was abundant in the aerobic sludge. This study demonstrated the feasibility and optimization of less energy intensive treatment and the potential association between abundant bacterial groups and biodegradation of key pollutants in coking wastewater. PMID:27221291

  6. Applicability of a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor using a specific draw solution in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Hao, Chan Wen; Lin, Po-Hsun

    2015-06-15

    This study aims to develop a new osmotic membrane bioreactor by combining a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR) to treat wastewater. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt coupled with polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether was used as an innovative draw solution in this membrane hybrid system (MBBR-OsMBR) for minimizing the reverse salt flux and maintaining a healthy environment for the microorganism community. The results showed that the hybrid system achieved a stable water flux of 6.94 L/m(2) h and low salt accumulation in the bioreactor for 68 days of operation. At a filling rate of 40% (by volume of the bioreactor) of the polyethylene balls used as carriers, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P were almost removed (>99%) while producing relatively low NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N in the effluent (e.g. <0.56 and 0.96 mg/L, respectively). Furthermore, from analysis based on scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence emission-excitation matrix spectrophotometry, there was a thin gel-like fouling layer on the FO membrane, which composed of bacteria as well as biopolymers and protein-like substances. Nonetheless, the formation of these fouling layers of the FO membrane in MBBR-OsMBR was reversible and removed by a physical cleaning technique. PMID:25790914

  7. Kinetic evaluation of nitrification performance in an immobilized cell membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Güven, D; Ubay Çokgör, E; Sözen, S; Orhon, D

    2016-01-01

    High rate membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems operated at extremely low sludge ages (superfast membrane bioreactors (SFMBRs)) are inefficient to achieve nitrogen removal, due to insufficient retention time for nitrifiers. Moreover, frequent chemical cleaning is required due to high biomass flux. This study aims to satisfy the nitrification in SFMBRs by using sponge as carriers, leading to the extension of the residence time of microorganisms. In order to test the limits of nitrification, bioreactor was run under 52, 5 and 2 days of carrier residence time (CRT), with a hydraulic retention time of 6 h. Different degrees of nitrification were obtained for different CRTs. Sponge immobilized SFMBR operation with short CRT resulted in partial nitrification indicating selective dominancy of ammonia oxidizers. At higher CRT, simultaneous nitrification-denitrification was achieved when accompanying with oxygen limitation. Process kinetics was determined through evaluation of the results by a modeling study. Nitrifier partition in the reactor was also identified by model calibration. PMID:27332835

  8. A submerged membrane bioreactor with pendulum type oscillation (PTO) for oily wastewater treatment: membrane permeability and fouling control.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Lusheng; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Dexin; Long, Xuwei; Meng, Qin

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a novel submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) with pendulum type oscillation (PTO) hollow fiber membrane modules was developed to treat oily wastewater and control the problem of membrane fouling. To assess the potential of PTO membrane modules, the effect of oscillation orientation and frequency on membrane permeability was investigated in detail. The forces exerted on sludge flocs in the oscillating SMBR were analyzed to evaluate the impact of membrane oscillating on the cake layer resistance reduction. Results showed that the optimized PTO SMBR system exhibited 11 times higher membrane permeability and better fouling controllability than the conventional MBR system. By hydrodynamic analysis, it was found that the cooperative effect of bubble-induced turbulence and membrane oscillation in PTO SMBR system generated strong shear stress at liquid-membrane interface in vertical and horizontal direction and effectively hindered the particles from depositing on membrane surface. PMID:25710681

  9. Comparative effectiveness of membrane bioreactors, conventional secondary treatment, and disinfection to remove microorganisms from municipal wastewaters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Log removals of bacterial indicators, coliphage, and enteric viruses were studied in three membrane bioreactor activated-sludge (MBR) and two conventional secondary activated-sludge municipal wastewater treatment plants during three disinfection seasons (May–Oct.). In total, 73 regular samples were ...

  10. NOVEL CERAMIC MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR LOW-FLOW SYSTEMS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved low-flow (50,000 gallons per day) sanitary wastewater treatment systems are needed. CeraMem Corporation's proposed approach includes a membrane bioreactor (MBR) using fully proven biological processes for biological oxygen demand oxidation and (optionally) fo...

  11. The role of forward osmosis and microfiltration in an integrated osmotic-microfiltration membrane bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhai; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the performance of an integrated osmotic and microfiltration membrane bioreactor (O/MF-MBR) system for wastewater treatment and reclamation. The O/MF-MBR system simultaneously used microfiltration (MF) and forward osmosis (FO) membranes to extract water from the mixed liquor of an aerobic bioreactor. The MF membrane facilitated the bleeding of dissolved inorganic salts and thus prevented the build-up of salinity in the bioreactor. As a result, sludge production and microbial activity were relatively stable over 60 days of operation. Compared to MF, the FO process produced a better permeate quality in terms of nutrients, total organic carbon, as well as hydrophilic and biologically persistent trace organic chemicals (TrOCs). The high rejection by the FO membrane also led to accumulation of hydrophilic and biologically persistent TrOCs in the bioreactor, consequently increasing their concentration in the MF permeate. On the other hand, hydrophobic and readily biodegradable TrOCs were minimally detected in both MF and FO permeates, with no clear difference in the removal efficiencies between two processes. PMID:25966331

  12. USE OF MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR FOR BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE IN CONTAMINATED WATER1

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor was evaluated for biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated water. The system was fed 5 mg/L MTBE in granular activated carbon (GAC) treated Cincinnati tap water containing ample buffer and nutrients. Within 120...

  13. A hybrid microbial fuel cell membrane bioreactor with a conductive ultrafiltration membrane biocathode for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Malaeb, Lilian; Katuri, Krishna P; Logan, Bruce E; Maab, Husnul; Nunes, S P; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2013-10-15

    A new hybrid, air-biocathode microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system was developed to achieve simultaneous wastewater treatment and ultrafiltration to produce water for direct reclamation. The combined advantages of this system were achieved by using an electrically conductive ultrafiltration membrane as both the cathode and the membrane for wastewater filtration. The MFC-MBR used an air-biocathode, and it was shown to have good performance relative to an otherwise identical cathode containing a platinum catalyst. With 0.1 mm prefiltered domestic wastewater as the feed, the maximum power density was 0.38 W/m(2) (6.8 W/m(3)) with the biocathode, compared to 0.82 W/m(2) (14.5 W/m(3)) using the platinum cathode. The permeate quality from the biocathode reactor was comparable to that of a conventional MBR, with removals of 97% of the soluble chemical oxygen demand, 97% NH3-N, and 91% of total bacteria (based on flow cytometry). The permeate turbidity was <0.1 nephelometric turbidity units. These results show that a biocathode MFC-MBR system can achieve high levels of wastewater treatment with a low energy input due to the lack of a need for wastewater aeration. PMID:24016059

  14. A novel osmosis membrane bioreactor-membrane distillation hybrid system for wastewater treatment and reuse.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Chan, Wen Hao; Ray, Saikat Sinha; Li, Chi-Wang; Hsu, Hung-Te

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach was designed to simultaneously enhance nutrient removal and reduce membrane fouling for wastewater treatment using an attached growth biofilm (AGB) integrated with an osmosis membrane bioreactor (OsMBR) system for the first time. In this study, a highly charged organic compound (HEDTA(3-)) was employed as a novel draw solution in the AGB-OsMBR system to obtain a low reverse salt flux, maintain a healthy environment for the microorganisms. The AGB-OsMBR system achieved a stable water flux of 3.62L/m(2)h, high nutrient removal of 99% and less fouling during a 60-day operation. Furthermore, the high salinity of diluted draw solution could be effectively recovered by membrane distillation (MD) process with salt rejection of 99.7%. The diluted draw solution was re-concentrated to its initial status (56.1mS/cm) at recovery of 9.8% after 6h. The work demonstrated that novel multi-barrier systems could produce high quality potable water from impaired streams. PMID:26946435

  15. Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME): Using a Multiplexed Miniature Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactor Solution for Rapid Process Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Koss, Lawrence L.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Spencer, Lachelle E.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Ellis, Ronald; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor research is mostly limited to continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) which are not an option for microgravity (g) applications due to the lack of a gravity gradient to drive aeration as described by the Archimedes principle. Bioreactors and filtration systems for treating wastewater in g could avoid the need for harsh pretreatment chemicals and improve overall water recovery. Solution: Membrane Aerated Bioreactors (MABRs) for g applications, including possible use for wastewater treatment systems for the International Space Station (ISS).

  16. Fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijia; Chen, Jianrong; Ma, Yuanjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface with a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function was conducted. The topography of rough membrane surface was measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the results showed that the membrane surface was isotropous. Accordingly, the fractal dimension and roughness of membrane surface were calculated by the power spectrum method. The rough membrane surface was reconstructed on the MATLAB platform with the parameter values acquired from raw AFM data. The reconstructed membrane was much similar to the real membrane morphology measured by AFM. The parameters (including average roughness and root mean square (RMS) roughness) associated with membrane morphology for the model and real membrane were calculated, and a good match of roughness parameters between the reconstructed surface and real membrane was found, indicating the feasibility of the new developed method. The reconstructed membrane surface can be potentially used for interaction energy evaluation. PMID:27318159

  17. Modeling and simulation of oxygen-limited partial nitritation in a membrane-assisted bioreactor (MBR).

    PubMed

    Wyffels, Stijn; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Boeckx, Pascal; Volcke, Eveline I P; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-06-01

    Combination of a partial nitritation process and an anaerobic ammonium oxidation process for the treatment of sludge reject water has some general cost-efficient advantages compared to nitrification-denitrification. The integrated process features two-stage autotrophic conversion of ammonium via nitrite to dinitrogen gas with lower demand for oxygen and no external carbon requirement. A nitrifying membrane-assisted bioreactor (MBR) for the treatment of sludge reject water was operated under continuous aeration at low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations with the purpose of generating nitrite accumulation. Microfiltration was applied to allow a high sludge retention time (SRT), resulting in a stable partial nitritation process. During start-up of the MBR, oxygen-limited conditions were induced by increasing the ammonium loading rate and decreasing the oxygen transfer. At a loading rate of 0.9 kg N m(-3) d(-1) and an oxygen concentration below 0.1 mg DO L(-1), conversion to nitrite was close to 50% of the incoming ammonium, thereby yielding an optimal effluent within the stoichiometric requirements for subsequent anaerobic ammonium oxidation. A mathematical model for ammonium oxidation to nitrite and nitrite oxidation to nitrate was developed to describe the oxygen-limited partial nitritation process within the MBR. The model was calibrated with in situ determinations of kinetic parameters for microbial growth, reflecting the intrinsic characteristics of the ammonium oxidizing growth system at limited oxygen availability and high sludge age. The oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) and the ammonium-loading rate were shown to be the appropriate operational variables to describe the experimental data accurately. The validated model was used for further steady state simulation under different operational conditions of hydraulic retention time (HRT), K(L)a, temperature and SRT, with the intention to support optimized process design. Simulation results indicated that

  18. Effect of COD/N ratio on nitrogen removal and microbial communities of CANON process in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hongzhong; Ye, Changming; Wei, Mingbao; Du, Jingjing

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effect of COD/N ratio on completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process was investigated in five identical membrane bioreactors. The five reactors were simultaneously seeded for 1L CANON sludge and be operated for more than two months under same conditions, with influent COD/N ratio of 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4, respectively. DGGE was used to analyze the microbial communities of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) in five reactors. Results revealed the harmonious work of CANON and denitrification with low COD concentration, whereas too high COD concentration suppressed both AOB and AAOB. AOB and AAOB biodiversity both decreased with COD increasing, which then led to worse nitrogen removal. The suppressing threshold of COD/N ratio for CANON was 1.7. CANON was feasible for treating low COD/N sewage, while the high sewage should be converted by anaerobic biogas producing process in advance. PMID:25898093

  19. Long-term study on the impact of temperature on enhanced biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sayi-Ucar, N; Sarioglu, M; Insel, G; Cokgor, E U; Orhon, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-11-01

    The study involved experimental observation and performance evaluation of a membrane bioreactor system treating municipal wastewater for nutrient removal for a period 500 days, emphasizing the impact of high temperature on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). The MBR system was operated at relatively high temperatures (24-41 °C). During the operational period, the total phosphorus (TP) removal gradually increased from 50% up to 95% while the temperature descended from 41 to 24 °C. At high temperatures, anaerobic volatile fatty acid (VFA) uptake occurred with low phosphorus release implying the competition of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) with polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Low dissolved oxygen conditions associated with high wastewater temperatures did not appreciable affected nitrification but enhanced nitrogen removal. Dissolved oxygen levels around 1.0 mgO2/L in membrane tank provided additional denitrification capacity of 6-7 mgN/L by activating simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. As a result, nearly complete removal of nitrogen could be achieved in the MBR system, generating a permeate with no appreciable nitrogen content. The gross membrane flux was 43 LMH corresponding to the specific permeability (K) of 413 LMH/bar at 39 °C in the MBR tank. The specific permeability increased by the factor of 43% at 39 °C compared to that of 25 °C during long-term operation. PMID:26204227

  20. Conversion of Cn-Unsaturated into Cn-2-Saturated LCFA Can Occur Uncoupled from Methanogenesis in Anaerobic Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Ana J; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Guedes, Ana P; Stams, Alfons J M; Alves, M Madalena; Sousa, Diana Z

    2016-03-15

    Fat, oils, and grease present in complex wastewater can be readily converted to methane, but the energy potential of these compounds is not always recyclable, due to incomplete degradation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) released during lipids hydrolysis. Oleate (C18:1) is generally the dominant LCFA in lipid-containing wastewater, and its conversion in anaerobic bioreactors results in palmitate (C16:0) accumulation. The reason why oleate is continuously converted to palmitate without further degradation via β-oxidation is still unknown. In this work, the influence of methanogenic activity in the initial conversion steps of unsaturated LCFA was studied in 10 bioreactors continuously operated with saturated or unsaturated C16- and C18-LCFA, in the presence or absence of the methanogenic inhibitor bromoethanesulfonate (BrES). Saturated Cn-2-LCFA accumulated both in the presence and absence of BrES during the degradation of unsaturated Cn-LCFA, and represented more than 50% of total LCFA. In the presence of BrES further conversion of saturated intermediates did not proceed, not even when prolonged batch incubation was applied. As the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA degradation proceed uncoupled from methanogenesis, accumulation of saturated LCFA can be expected. Analysis of the active microbial communities suggests a role for facultative anaerobic bacteria in the initial steps of unsaturated LCFA biodegradation. Understanding this role is now imperative to optimize methane production from LCFA. PMID:26810160

  1. Membrane Bioreactor Technology for the Development of Functional Materials from Sea-Food Processing Wastes and Their Potential Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Senevirathne, Mahinda

    2011-01-01

    Sea-food processing wastes and underutilized species of fish are a potential source of functional and bioactive compounds. A large number of bioactive substances can be produced through enzyme-mediated hydrolysis. Suitable enzymes and the appropriate bioreactor system are needed to incubate the waste materials. Membrane separation is a useful technique to extract, concentrate, separate or fractionate the compounds. The use of membrane bioreactors to integrate a reaction vessel with a membrane separation unit is emerging as a beneficial method for producing bioactive materials such as peptides, chitooligosaccharides and polyunsaturated fatty acids from diverse seafood-related wastes. These bioactive compounds from membrane bioreactor technology show diverse biological activities such as antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antitumor, anticoagulant, antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. This review discusses the application of membrane bioreactor technology for the production of value-added functional materials from sea-food processing wastes and their biological activities in relation to health benefits. PMID:24957872

  2. Nutrient removal from membrane bioreactor permeate using microalgae and in a microalgae membrane photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdev; Thomas, Pamela Baldwin

    2012-08-01

    This paper explores the use of a novel microalgae membrane photoreactor (mMR) to polish the effluent from an aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) fed with domestic wastewater. Four microalgae species Chlorella (Chlorella sp.), Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), Scenedesmus quadricauda (S. quadricauda) and Scenedesmus dimorphus (S. dimorphus) were isolated from the environment and tested in batch reactors fed with permeate from the aerobic MBR to evaluate the nutrient removal rates for each species. All four microalgae species were able to completely remove NH4 in the reactor within 3 days. The removal rates of NO3, NO2 and PO4 were between 43-54%, 83-95% and 70-92%, respectively after 3 days in the batch reactor. Subsequently, an MBR-mMR system was operated for 23 days. The mMR was able to remove on average 50% of NH4, 75% of NO2, 35% of NO3 and 60% of PO4 consistently from the MBR effluent under the conditions tested. PMID:22609717

  3. Performance assessment of a pilot-size vacuum rotation membrane bioreactor treating urban wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaizy, Raafat; Aidan, Ahmad; Luo, Haonan

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the suitability and performance of a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR). Huber vacuum rotation membrane (VRM 20/36) bioreactor was installed at the Sharjah sewage treatment plant (STP) in the United Arab Emirate for 12 months. The submerged membranes were flat sheets with a pore size of 0.038 μm. The VRM bioreactor provided a final effluent of very high quality. The average reduction on parameters such as COD was from 620 to 3 mg/l, BOD from 239 to 3 mg/l, Ammonia from 37 to 2 mg/l, turbidity from 225NTU to less than 3NTU, and total suspended solids from 304 mg/l to virtually no suspended solids. The rotating mechanism of the membrane panels permitted the entire membrane surface to receive the same intensive degree of air scouring, which lead to a longer duration. The MBR process holds a promising future because of its smaller footprints in contrast to conventional systems, superior effluent quality, and high loading rate capacity.

  4. A Long-Term Cultivation of an Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Microbial Community from Deep-Sea Methane-Seep Sediment Using a Continuous-Flow Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masataka; Ehara, Masayuki; Saito, Yumi; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Saito, Yayoi; Miyashita, Ai; Kawakami, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments is an important global methane sink, but the physiological characteristics of AOM-associated microorganisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the cultivation of an AOM microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called the down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) bioreactor. We anaerobically incubated deep-sea methane-seep sediment collected from the Nankai Trough, Japan, for 2,013 days in the bioreactor at 10°C. Following incubation, an active AOM activity was confirmed by a tracer experiment using 13C-labeled methane. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that phylogenetically diverse Archaea and Bacteria grew in the bioreactor. After 2,013 days of incubation, the predominant archaeal components were anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-2a, Deep-Sea Archaeal Group, and Marine Benthic Group-D, and Gammaproteobacteria was the dominant bacterial lineage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ANME-1 and -2a, and most ANME-2c cells occurred without close physical interaction with potential bacterial partners. Our data demonstrate that the DHS bioreactor system is a useful system for cultivating fastidious methane-seep-associated sedimentary microorganisms. PMID:25141130

  5. Evaluation of different configurations of hybrid membrane bioreactors for treatment of domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Rodríguez, G; Cervantes-Avilés, P; Torres-Chávez, I; Bernal-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Four membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with the same dimensions were studied for 180 days: three hybrid growth membrane bioreactors with biofilm attached in different packing media and a conventional MBR (C-MBR). The four MBRs had an identical membrane module of hollow fiber with a nominal porous diameter of 0.4 μm. The MBRs were: (1) a C-MBR; (2) a moving bed membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR), which was packed with 2 L of carrier Kaldnes-K1, presenting an exposed surface area of 678.90 m²/m³; (3) a non-submerged organic fixed bed (OFB-MBR) packed with 6.5 L of organic packing media composed of a mixture of cylindrical pieces of wood, providing an exposed surface area of 178.05 m²/m³; and (4) an inorganic fixed bed non-submerged membrane bioreactor (IFB-MBR) packed with 6 L of spherical volcanic pumice stone with an exposed surface area of 526.80 m²/m³. The four MBRs were fed at low organic loading (0.51 ± 0.19 kgCOD/m³ d). The results were recorded according to the behavior of the total resistance, transmembrane pressure (TMP), permeability, and removal percentages of the nutrients during the experimental time. The results showed that the MB-MBR presented the better performance on membrane filtration, while the higher nutrient removals were detected in the OFB-MBR and IFB-MBR. PMID:25714631

  6. Use of inhibitory solvents in multi-membrane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Toohyon (Inventor); Shuler, Michael L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An immobilized liquid membrane is employed to allow use of a product-extracting solvent which is normally toxic toward a cell layer which produces the product in a membrane-moderated biological reaction.

  7. Removal of pharmaceuticals from synthetic wastewater in an aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor and determination of the bioreactor microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Zhao, Xia; Xu, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Five types of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) substances were selected as pollutants in this study. The effects of the removal of these pollutants and the microbial succession process in a granular sludge membrane bioreactor (GMBR) were investigated. Results showed that wastewater containing PPCPs influenced the performance of granular sludge. The removal of the five PPCPs from the GMBR had different effects. The removal rates of prednisolone, norfloxacin and naproxen reached 98.5, 87.8 and 84 %, respectively. The degradation effect in the GMBR system was relatively lower for sulphamethoxazole and ibuprofen, with removal efficiency rates of 79.8 and 63.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, the microbial community structure and diversity variation of the GMBR were analysed via high-throughput sequencing technology. The results indicated the structural and functional succession of the microbial community based on the GMBR process. The results indicate the key features of bacteria with an important role in drug degradation. PMID:27234140

  8. Model system studies with a phase separated membrane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestial simulation.

  9. Phase separated membrane bioreactor - Results from model system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial simulation.

  10. Long-term effect on membrane fouling in a new membrane bioreactor as a pretreatment to seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Rice, Scott A; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2014-08-01

    Submerged membrane adsorption bio-reactors (SMABR) were investigated as a new pretreatment for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination. They were tested with different doses of powder activated carbon (PAC) on-site for a long-term. The biofouling on the membrane was assessed in terms of DNA (cells) and polysaccharide distribution. MBR without PAC addition resulted in severe fouling on membrane. When PAC is added in the MBR, PAC could reduce the organic fouling. Hence the biofilm formation on membrane was reduced without any membrane damage. PAC also helped to remove low molecular weight (LMW) organics responsible for biofouling of RO membrane. A linear correlation between assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and LMW organics was observed. A small amount of PAC (2.4-8.0g of PAC/m(3) of seawater) was sufficient to reduce biofouling. It indicated that SMABR is an environmentally-friendly biological pretreatment to reduce biofouling for SWRO. PMID:24745896