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Sample records for anaerobic odontogenic infections

  1. Odontogenic infection mimicking antral polyps.

    PubMed

    Kaplowitz, G J

    1997-01-01

    Odontogenic infections can extend into the maxillary sinus and produce sinusitis that mimics other pathoses. Infection of odontogenic origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis. Sinusitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of maxillary posterior teeth with acute or chronic symptoms. PMID:9171482

  2. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Turn ... is only a limited amount of oxygen. By definition, the term anaerobic means “life without air.” Here ...

  3. A Case of Thrombocytopenia due to Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Verma, Dinesh; Rajan, Ritesh

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia in surgical patients is a potentially serious condition,faced by surgeons. A close relationship between sepsis and thrombocytopenia has been suggested. Thrombocytopenia has even been suggested to be indicative of an acute infection. Platelet count in a septicemic patient may also serve as a prognostic tool. There are many reports of thrombocy-topenia due to septicemia in the literature but the occurrence of thrombocytopenia in maxillofacial infections is rare. Thrombocytopenia in a patient with odontogenic infection presents unique diagnostic and management challenges. A case report of an adult male patient with odontogenic infection, who developed life-threatening thrombocytopenia, is presented. PMID:22991625

  4. Antimicrobial Therapy in Management of Odontogenic Infections in General Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Curtis J; Pellecchia, Robert

    2016-04-01

    This article focuses on the diagnosis and management of odontogenic infections. Current antibiotic regimens are reviewed and discussed including use of alternative antibiotics with patients known to have a penicillin allergy. Emphasis is made on proper examination of the patient with use of diagnostic aids to provide the correct treatment of choice. PMID:27040298

  5. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved. PMID:26904312

  6. Oral streptococcal strains isolated from odontogenic infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bancescu, Gabriela; Dumitriu, Silvia; Bancescu, Adrian; Pana, Marina; Andrei, Manuela

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify at species level and to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility of oral streptococcal strains isolated from 100 pus samples collected from Romanian patients with different odontogenic infections. The isolates were identified at species level using the Rapid ID 32 STREP system and their susceptibility was testing by the Etest, against: penicillin G, ampicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline. For the investigation of erythromycin resistance phenotype the disk diffusion test was used. The isolates belonged to several species, with Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus oralis predominating. Reduced susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics was found only among the isolates belonging to S. mitis and S. sanguinis groups. Resistance to erythromycin was detected among all species, except for: S. constellatus, S. intermedius and S. gordonii, and the M phenotype was established, while resistance to tetracycline was detected within all species but S. gordonii. In contrast, clindamycin was fully active. As most odontogenic infections are mixed infections, often involving strictly anaerobic bacteria, which are frequently beta-lactamase producers, the association of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, like Amoxiclav, is recommended when the antimicrobial treatment is necessary. PMID:17438917

  7. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly encountered anaerobic organisms associated with PJI. Since anaerobic PJI has also been linked to dental procedures, we also reviewed information on the use of dental procedures and prophylaxis, when available. PMID:26341272

  8. Maxillary sinus disease of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Pushkar; Murad, Haitham

    2004-04-01

    Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition and accounts for approximately 10% to 12% of cases of maxillary sinusitis. An odontogenic source should be considered in patients with symptoms of maxillary sinusitis who give a history positive for odontogenic infection or dentoalveolar surgery or who are resistant to standard sinusitis therapy. Diagnosis usually requires a thorough dental and clinical evaluation with appropriate radiographs. Common causes of odontogenic sinusitis include dental abscesses and periodontal disease perforating the Schneidarian membrane, sinus perforations during tooth extraction, or irritation and secondary infection caused by intra-antral foreign bodies. The typical odontogenic infection is now considered to be a mixed aerobic-anaerobic infection, with the latter outnumbering the aerobic species involved. Most common organisms include anaerobic streptococci, Bacteroides, Proteus, and Coliform bacilli. Typical treatment of atraumatic odontogenic sinusitis is a 3- to 4- week trial of antibiotic therapy with adequate oral and sinus flora coverage. When indicated, surgical removal of the offending odontogenic foreign body (primary or delayed) or treatment of the odontogenic pathologic conditions combined with medical therapy is usually sufficient to cause resolution of symptoms. If an oroantral communication is suspected, prompt surgical management is recommended to reduce the likelihood of causing chronic sinus disease. PMID:15064067

  9. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  10. Use of metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after incision and drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    The combination of amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole is a widely-accepted empirical regimen for infections of the odontogenic spaces. Once adequate drainage has been established micro-organisms are less likely to grow and multiply, particularly anaerobes. This may obviate the need for anaerobic coverage after drainage in healthy hosts. We studied 60 patients in this randomised prospective study, the objective of which was to evaluate metronidazole as part of an empirical antibiotic regimen after drainage of infections of the odontogenic spaces. Samples of pus were sent for culture and testing for sensitivity. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole were given to all patients. After incision and drainage the patients were randomly allocated to two groups. In the first group both antibiotics were continued, and in the second metronidazole was withdrawn. The groups were compared both clinically and microbiologically. There were no significant differences between the groups in the resolution of infection. Thirteen patients (n=6 in the 2-antimicrobial group, and n=7 in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group) showed no improvement during the 48 h postoperatively. Overall there was need to substitute another antibiotic for amoxicillin/clavulanate in only 6 cases. Six patients in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group required the addition of metronidazole after drainage. We conclude that in healthy subjects metronidazole is not necessary in the period after drainage, but its prescription should be based on assessment of clinical and laboratory markers of infection. PMID:25277645

  11. A Case of Odontogenic Infection by Streptococcus constellatus Leading to Systemic Infection in a Cogan's Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshiyuki; Ohata, Yae; Saijo, Hideto; Ohkubo, Kazumi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic infection in immunocompromised patients tends to extend systemically beyond the oral cavity. Our case report presents a patient with sepsis due to a Streptococcus constellatus (S. constellatus) odontogenic infection in a 64-year-old-immunocompromised woman with Cogan's syndrome. She had been suffering from chronic mandibular osteomyelitis which was thought to have been caused by dental caries and/or chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement of the left mandibular first molar. We suspect that the acute symptoms of the chronic osteomyelitis due to S. constellatus led to the systemic infection. This infection could be accelerated by the use of a corticosteroid and an alendronate. This is the first report which represents the potential association between odontogenic infection and Cogan's syndrome. PMID:25506439

  12. Anaerobic infections of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Louria, D B; Sen, P

    1980-05-01

    In normal nonpregnant women anaerobes predominate in the cervicovaginal flora. The frequency of Bacteroides fragilis isolation ranges up to 16%. In pregnancy anaerobic prevalence falls progressively from the first to the third trimester and increases precipitously immediately after delivery. Anaerobes are often responsible for infections from vulva to ovaries, but the microbial etiology of post-cesarean section endometritis remains unclear. Risk factors for pelvic infection include cesarean delivery as contrasted with vaginal delivery; among those undergoing cesarean section, risk factors for infection are prolonged labor, prolonged membrane rupture, excessive numbers of vaginal examinations, and perhaps age of less than 17 years. Gonorrhea is also a risk factor for subsequent pelvic infection. The use of an intrauterine contraceptive device is associated with increased risk of pelvic actinomycosis. Anaerobic disease often is associated with a putrid odor and may present as 1 or more pulmonary emboli. Optimal treatment of pelvic anaerobic infections is not yet agreed upon. Clindamycin and chloramphenicol are the 2 documented first-line agents. Penicillin is often effective but a substantial percentage of B fragilis strains resist it; this is also true of carbenicillin. The data on cefoxitin look encouraging, but more data are needed on both the efficacy and the frequency of superinfection. PMID:6990327

  13. Deep Neck Infection and Descending Mediastinitis as a Complication of Propionibacterium acnes Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Koyfman, Leonid; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Borer, Abraham; Refaely, Yael; Klein, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium which causes numerous types of infections. Isolated Propionibacterium acnes deep neck infections are very rare. We present an interesting case of deep neck infection complicated by descending mediastinitis of isolated Propionibacterium acnes infection. PMID:26693363

  14. Lemierre's syndrome from odontogenic infection: Review of the literature and case description

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Dani; Rachmiel, Adi; Levy-Faber, Dan; Emodi, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS) is a rare potentially fatal sequel of head and neck infection, classically described as thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with cervical space infection extending into the thorax. Our objective was to answer the clinical question: “Does Lemierre syndrome (LS) from odontogenic infection differ from nonodontogenic LS in regard to clinical sequence, treatment, and survival.” We reviewed the literature on the management of LS over the last two decades, with a focus on LS from odontogenic infection. Such a case is presented in order to portray the clinical sequence. Only 10 cases met the inclusion criteria (including the case presented). The recorded data were analyzed in comparison to large case series reviewing LS. Our data reflect the moderate differences in regard to IJV thrombosis and bacteriogram. There is an overall rise in published LS cases in the last 20 years. Odontogenic infection leading to LS is scarce, yet with survival rates similar to nonodontogenic LS. Repeated surgical interventions and aggressive wide spectrum antibiotic therapy remain the treatment of choice. PMID:26981474

  15. Lemierre's syndrome from odontogenic infection: Review of the literature and case description.

    PubMed

    Noy, Dani; Rachmiel, Adi; Levy-Faber, Dan; Emodi, Omri

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome (LS) is a rare potentially fatal sequel of head and neck infection, classically described as thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with cervical space infection extending into the thorax. Our objective was to answer the clinical question: "Does Lemierre syndrome (LS) from odontogenic infection differ from nonodontogenic LS in regard to clinical sequence, treatment, and survival." We reviewed the literature on the management of LS over the last two decades, with a focus on LS from odontogenic infection. Such a case is presented in order to portray the clinical sequence. Only 10 cases met the inclusion criteria (including the case presented). The recorded data were analyzed in comparison to large case series reviewing LS. Our data reflect the moderate differences in regard to IJV thrombosis and bacteriogram. There is an overall rise in published LS cases in the last 20 years. Odontogenic infection leading to LS is scarce, yet with survival rates similar to nonodontogenic LS. Repeated surgical interventions and aggressive wide spectrum antibiotic therapy remain the treatment of choice. PMID:26981474

  16. A comparative analysis of odontogenic maxillofacial infections in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: an institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Shetye, Omkar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance is an outcome of evolution. Most patients presenting with odontogenic space infections also have associated systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus resulting in impaired host defense. The present study aims to compare the odontogenic spaces involved, antibiotic susceptibility of microorganisms, length of hospital stay, and the infl uence of systemic comorbidities on treatment outcome in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods A 2-year prospective study from January 2012 to January 2014 was conducted on patients with odontogenic maxillofacial space infections. The patients were divided into two groups based on their glycemic levels. The data were compiled and statistically analyzed. Results A total of 188 patients were included in the study that underwent surgical incision and drainage, removal of infection source, specimen collection for culture-sensitivity, and evaluation of diabetic status. Sixty-one out of 188 patients were found to be diabetic. The submandibular space was the most commonly involved space, and the most prevalent microorganism was Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetics and group D Streptococcus in the nondiabetic group. Conclusion The submandibular space was found to be the most commonly involved space, irrespective of glycemic control. Empiric antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid combined with metronidazole with optimal glycemic control and surgical drainage of infection led to resolution of infection in diabetic as well as nondiabetic patients. The average length of hospital stay was found to be relatively longer in diabetic individuals. PMID:26339575

  17. The clinical relevance of microbiology specimens in head and neck space infections of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Farmahan, Samir; Tuopar, Dery; Ameerally, Phillip J

    2014-09-01

    It is common surgical practice to take a specimen for microbial culture and sensitivity when incising and draining infections of odontogenic origin in the head and neck. We aimed to find out if routine testing has any therapeutic value. We retrospectively studied 90 patients (57 male and 33 female) admitted to Northampton General Hospital for treatment of odontogenic infections, and reviewed admission details, antimicrobial treatment, microbiological findings and their sensitivity or resistance, and complications. Specimens were sent from 72 (80%) patients of which 61 (85%) were infected. The most commonly isolated organism was Streptococcus viridans. Interim reports were published after a mean of 3 days (range 1-4), and 94% of patients were discharged within a mean of 2 days (range 0-9) postoperatively. Almost 95% of patients were discharged before results were available, and there were no reported complications. We therefore suggest that microbial culture has little therapeutic value in the management of these patients. With culture and sensitivity tests costing £25 - £30, omission of this practice in the case of uncomplicated (single tissue space) odontogenic infections could save resources in the National Health Service without affecting the care of patients. PMID:24906248

  18. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of

  19. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  20. Facial paralysis and mediastinitis due to odontogenic infection and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bucak, Abdulkadir; Ulu, Sahin; Kokulu, Serdar; Oz, Gürhan; Solak, Okan; Kahveci, Orhan Kemal; Ayçiçek, Abdullah

    2013-11-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is a rare, rapidly advancing infection that involves the skin, the subcutaneous fibrofatty tissue, as well as the superficial and deep fascia and can cause life-threatening complications. The most frequent initiating factors in the head and neck region are a primary odontogenic infection, a peritonsillar infection, as well as posttraumatic or iatrogenic skin and mucosal injuries. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) can expand within hours, and the reported mortality rate is up to 75% with delay interference. If the patients have any risk factors, poor prognosis can be seen. In this study, 1 patient with CNF with a history of peritonsillar infection and 2 patients with CNF who had a history of odontogenic infection with spreading to the temporal region and the mediastinum were described, with information of the literature and a clinical experience that was gained from 5 patients with NF who were seen at our clinic in the recent year, despite the fact that CNF was not seen up to last year. None of the patients had any risk factors. One of them had a worse clinical state with ascending infection to the temporal region, cranial nerve paralysis, and descending necrotizing mediastinitis, but he recovered from NF. After the oral intake began, dyspnea due to aspiration was seen and he died because of sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction. We aimed to attract attention to the importance of dental pathologies and increased mortality in a healthy patient. PMID:24220381

  1. Spectrum and treatment of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery. Because anaerobes generally are isolated mixed with aerobes, the antimicrobial chosen should provide for adequate coverage of both. The most effective antimicrobials against anaerobes are: metronidazole, the carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem), chloramphenicol, the combinations of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitors (ampicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate, amoxicillin plus sulbactam, piperacillin plus tazobactam), tigecycline, cefoxitin and clindamycin. PMID:26620376

  2. Use of FDG-PET to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as a possible source of the brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Sato, Jun; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Wada, Mayumi; Satoh, Akira; Watanabe, Shiro; Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as the possible origin of a brain abscess (BA). A 74-year-old man with esophageal carcinoma was referred to our department to determine the origin of a BA in his oral cavity. He had no acute odontogenic infections. The BA was drained, and bacteria of the Staphylococcus milleri group were detected. Whole body FDG-PET revealed that the only sites of definite uptake of FDG were the esophageal carcinoma and the left upper maxillary region (SUVmax: 4.5). These findings suggested that the BA may have originated from a chronic periodontal infection. Six teeth with progressive chronic periodontal disease were extracted to remove the possible source of BA. These findings excluded the possibility of direct spread of bacteria from the odontogenic infectious lesion to the intracranial cavity. After extraction, there was no relapse of BA. PMID:26497357

  3. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid for the Treatment of Odontogenic Infections: A Randomised Study Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability versus Clindamycin

    PubMed Central

    Tancawan, Archiel Launch; Pato, Maria Noemi; Abidin, Khamiza Zainol; Asari, A. S. Mohd; Thong, Tran Xuan; Kochhar, Puja; Muganurmath, Chandra; Twynholm, Monique; Barker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment of odontogenic infections includes surgical drainage and adjunctive antibiotics. This study was designed to generate efficacy and safety data to support twice daily dosing of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid compared to clindamycin in odontogenic infections. Methods. This was a phase IV, randomised, observer blind study; 472 subjects were randomised to receive amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (875 mg/125 mg BID, n = 235) or clindamycin (150 mg QID, n = 237) for 5 or 7 days based on clinical response. The primary endpoint was percentage of subjects achieving clinical success (composite measure of pain, swelling, fever, and additional antimicrobial therapy required) at the end of treatment. Results. The upper limit of two-sided 95% confidence interval for the treatment difference between the study arms (7.7%) was within protocol specified noninferiority margin of 10%, thus demonstrating noninferiority of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to clindamycin. Secondary efficacy results showed a higher clinical success rate at Day 5 in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid arm. Most adverse events (raised liver enzymes, diarrhoea, and headache) were similar across both arms and were of mild to moderate intensity. Conclusion. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was comparable to clindamycin in achieving clinical success (88.2% versus 89.7%) in acute odontogenic infections and the safety profile was consistent with the known side effects of both drugs. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02141217. PMID:26300919

  4. [The clinico-laboratory characteristics of the forms of suppurative infection in dental patients].

    PubMed

    Gubin, M A; Kharitonov, Iu M; Lazutikov, O V

    1998-01-01

    Odontogenic anaerobic sepsis was diagnosed using vapor-phase gas chromatographic analysis (VPGCA) for detecting volatile fatty acids--metabolites of anaerobic bacteria. The method is rapid and therefore diagnostically valuable. Rapid diagnosis of anaerobic odontogenic sepsis is to include detection of the clinical signs of anaerobic inflammation of the primary purulent focus and the clinical laboratory symptom complex of generalized infection and VPGCA of volatile fatty acids in the blood. PMID:9511419

  5. Bilateral septic cavernous sinus thrombosis following the masticator and parapharyngeal space infection from the odontogenic origin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiddee, Weerawat; Preechawai, Passorn; Hirunpat, Siriporn

    2010-09-01

    Neglect of odontogenic infections can have serious consequences. If they spread through fascial planes and intracranially they can cause an abscess, orbital cellulitis, and eventually cavernous sinus thrombosis. The authors report a case of rapid progressive bilateral orbital cellulitis and cavernous sinus thrombosis that originated from dental caries. Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a medical emergency. Early recognition and prompt treatments direct to the underlying sources of infection are crucial. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality from this lethal condition. Management should be based on early diagnosis and prompt management with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgical intervention. PMID:20873087

  6. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26657399

  7. Joint and bone infections due to anaerobic bacteria in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    The current review describes the microbiology, diagnosis and management of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to anaerobic bacteria in children. Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae type-b, and Group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Kingela kingae, Neisseria meningiditis and Salmonella spp are the predominant aerobic bacteria that cause arthritis in children. Gonococcal arthritis can occur in sexually active adolescents. The predominant aerobes causing osteomyelitis in children are S. aureus, H. influenzae type-b, Gram-negative enteric bacteria, beta-hemolytic streptococci, S. pneumoniae, K. kingae, Bartonella henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi. Anaerobes have rarely been reported as a cause of these infections in children. The main anaerobes in arthritis include anaerobic Gram negative bacilli including Bacteroides fragilis group, Fusobacterium spp., Clostridium spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp. Most of the cases of anaerobic arthritis, in contrast to anaerobic osteomyelitis, involved a single isolate. Most of the cases of anaerobic arthritis are secondary to hematogenous spread. Many patients with osteomyelitis due to anaerobic bacteria have evidence of anaerobic infection elsewhere in the body, which is the source of the organisms involved in osteomyelitis. Treatment of arthritis and osteomyelitis involving anaerobic bacteria includes symptomatic therapy, immobilization in some cases, adequate drainage of purulent material and antibiotic therapy effective to these organisms. PMID:12396847

  8. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  9. Odontogenic infection involving the secondary fascial space in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: a clinical comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Je-Shin; Yoo, Kil-Hwa; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Ha, Jiwon; Jung, Seunggon; Kook, Min-Suk; Park, Hong-Ju; Ryu, Sun-Youl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical impact of diabetes mellitus on the prognosis in secondary space infection. Materials and Methods Medical records, radiographic images, computed tomography, and microbial studies of 51 patients (25 diabetic patients and 26 non-diabetic patients) were reviewed. Patients were diagnosed as secondary fascial space infections with odontogenic origin and underwent treatment at Chonnam National University Hospital, in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, from January 2007 to February 2009. Results Compared to patients without diabetes, patients with diabetes were presented with the following characteristics: older age (diabetic patients: 62.9 years, non-diabetic patients, 47.8 years), more spaces involved (diabetic patients, 60%; non-diabetic patients, 27.3%), more intense treatment, longer hospitalization (diabetic patients, 28.9 days; non-diabetic patients, 15.4 days), higher white blood cell and C-reactive protein values, higher incidence of complication (diabetic patients, 40%; non-diabetic patients, 7.7%), and distinctive main causative microorganisms. Conclusion These results suggest that the prognosis of diabetic patients is poorer than that of non-diabetic patients in secondary space infections since they had greater incidence rates of involved spaces, abnormal hematologic findings, more complications, and additional procedures, such as tracheostomy. PMID:24471039

  10. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of infections after trauma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from infections after trauma in children over a 20 year period. METHODS: Only specimens that were studied for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were included in the analysis. They were collected from seven separate centres in which the microbiology laboratories only accepted specimens that were properly collected without contamination and were submitted in appropriate transport media. Anaerobes and aerobic bacteria were cultured and identified using standard techniques. Clinical records were reviewed to identify post-trauma patients. RESULTS: From 1974 to 1994, 175 specimens obtained from 166 children with trauma showed bacterial growth. The trauma included blunt trauma (71), lacerations (48), bites (42), and open fractures (5). Anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 38 specimens (22%), aerobic bacteria only in 51 (29%), and mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora in 86 (49%); 363 anaerobic (2.1/specimen) and 158 aerobic or facultative isolates (0.9/specimen) were recovered. The predominant anaerobic bacteria included Peptostreptococcus spp (115 isolates), Prevotella spp (68), Fusobacterium spp (52), B fragilis group (42), and Clostridium spp (21). The predominant aerobic bacteria included Staph aureus (51), E coli (13), Ps aeruginosa (12), Str pyogenes (11) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9). Principal infections were: abscesses (52), bacteraemia (3), pulmonary infections (30, including aspiration pneumonia, tracheostomy associated pneumonia, empyema, and ventilator associated pneumonia), wounds (36, including cellulitis, post-traumatic wounds, decubitus ulcers, myositis, gastrostomy and tracheostomy site wounds, and fasciitis), bites (42, including 23 animal and 19 human), peritonitis (4), osteomyelitis (5), and sinusitis (3). Staph aureus and Str pyogenes were isolated at all sites. However, organisms of the oropharyngeal flora predominated in infections that originated from head and neck wounds and abscesses, and bites, and those from the gastrointestinal tract predominated in infections that originated from peritonitis, abdominal abscesses, and decubitus ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: Many infections that follow trauma in children involve multiple organisms. PMID:9639177

  12. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  13. Primary Paranasal Tuberculosis in a Diabetic Mimicking Odontogenic Infection: A Rare Case; A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mehendirratta, Monica; Sareen, Chanchal; Aggarwal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Tuberculosis (TB) is high especially in developing countries but primary para-nasal TB is still a rarity. The latter often remains quiescent until it reaches an advanced stage and offers a diagnostic challenge. In the present case report maxillary sinus TB mimicked a destructive periodontitis induced space infection, thus causing a delay in treatment. The present case report describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of a 50-year-old diabetic/HIV seronegative patient with histopathologically confirmed case of maxillary sinus TB. PMID:27135017

  14. Primary Paranasal Tuberculosis in a Diabetic Mimicking Odontogenic Infection: A Rare Case; A Unique Presentation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Mehendirratta, Monica; Sareen, Chanchal; Aggarwal, Anju

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of Tuberculosis (TB) is high especially in developing countries but primary para-nasal TB is still a rarity. The latter often remains quiescent until it reaches an advanced stage and offers a diagnostic challenge. In the present case report maxillary sinus TB mimicked a destructive periodontitis induced space infection, thus causing a delay in treatment. The present case report describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of a 50-year-old diabetic/HIV seronegative patient with histopathologically confirmed case of maxillary sinus TB. PMID:27135017

  15. Moxifloxacin versus Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone in the management of odontogenic maxillofacial infectious processes: A preliminary, intrahospital, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Arámbula, Hansel; Hidalgo-Hurtado, Antonio; Rodríguez-Flores, Rosaura; González-Amaro, Ana-María; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the days of hospitalization length between patients treated with Moxifloxacin with that of patients treated with a Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination and additionally, to isolate and identify the oral pathogens involved in orofacial odontogenic infections. Material and Methods A pilot-controlled-clinical-trial was carried out on hospitalized patients with cervicofacial odontogenic abscesses or cellulitis, who were randomly asigned to two study groups: 1) patients who received Moxifloxacin, and 2) patients receiving Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone combination. Infiltrate samples were collected through transdermic or transmucosal punction and later cultured on a media specific for aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Mean hospitalization duration in days until hospital discharge and susceptibility assessment in rates were established. Results Mean hospitalization time in days of patients treated with Moxifloxacin was 7.0 ± 1.6 days, while in the Clindamycin/Ceftriaxone group, this was 8.4 ± 1.8 days, although significant difference could not be demonstrated (p=0.074). A total of 43 strains were isolated, all of these Gram-positive. These strains appeared to be highly sensitive to Moxifloxacin (97.5%) and Ceftriaxone (92.5%). Conclusions Moxifloxacin and Ceftriaxone appear to be potential convenient and rational alternatives to traditional antibiotics, for treating severe odontogenic infections, in conjunction with surgical extraoral incision, debridement, and drainage. Key words:Orofacial odontogenic infections, antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26644841

  16. Microbiological analysis of a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial comparing moxifloxacin and clindamycin in the treatment of odontogenic infiltrates and abscesses.

    PubMed

    Sobottka, Ingo; Wegscheider, Karl; Balzer, Ludwig; Böger, Rainer H; Hallier, Olaf; Giersdorf, Ina; Streichert, Thomas; Haddad, Munif; Platzer, Ursula; Cachovan, Georg

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the oral pathogens found in odontogenic infections, to determine their susceptibilities to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC), clindamycin (CLI), doxycycline (DOX), levofloxacin (LVX), moxifloxacin (MXF), and penicillin (PEN), and to search for associations between specific pathogens and types of infection. Swabs from patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind phase II trial comparing MXF with CLI for the treatment of odontogenic abscesses or inflammatory infiltrates were cultured on media for aerobes and anaerobes. All bacterial isolates were identified at the species level. Overall, 205 isolates were cultured from 71 patients: 77 viridans group streptococci, 56 Prevotella spp., 19 Neisseria spp., 17 Streptococcus anginosus group isolates and hemolytic streptococci, 15 other anaerobes, and 21 other bacteria. Ninety-eight percent of pathogens were susceptible to MXF, 96% to AMC, 85% to LVX, 67% to PEN, 60% to CLI, and 50% to DOX. S. anginosus group and hemolytic streptococci were found significantly more frequently (P = 0.04) in patients with abscesses (12/95) than in patients with infiltrates (5/110). In four patients with infiltrates who failed to respond to CLI therapy, three isolates of the Streptococcus mitis group and four Neisseria spp. resistant to CLI were found. In this study, S. anginosus group and hemolytic streptococci were clearly associated with odontogenic abscesses. Our analysis suggests that viridans group streptococci and Neisseria spp. play a decisive role in the etiology of odontogenic infiltrates. The high in vitro activity of MXF against odontogenic bacteria corresponds well to its clinical results in the treatment of odontogenic abscesses and infiltrates. PMID:22354306

  17. Anaerobic

    MedlinePlus

    ... In exercise, our bodies need to perform both anaerobic and aerobic reactions to supply us with energy. We need aerobic reactions for slower and more prolonged exercise like walking or jogging. Anaerobic reactions are faster. We need them during shorter, ...

  18. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  19. Enhancement of Experimental Anaerobic Infections by Blood, Hemoglobin, and Hemostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Gale B.

    1978-01-01

    Certain foreign materials have been demonstrated to enhance the infectivity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Whole blood and other protein compounds encountered in surgical settings or trauma were tested for their effect on infectivity of nonsporeforming anaerobic bacteria. Infectious synergistic mixtures of Bacteroides fragilis plus Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Bacteroides melaninogenicus plus Fusobacterium necrophorum were each diluted to a barely noninfectious or minimally infectious concentration (subinfective inoculum) that was injected intraperitoneally into mice alone and in combination with test proteins. Infectivity was measured by deaths from sepsis or abscess(es) within the abdominal cavity at autopsy at 1 week. Two hemostatic agents, Gelfoam powder and Avitene (final concentrations, 10 mg/ml), and crystalline hemoglobin (4 g/100 ml) each produced a marked increase (P < 0.001) in the rate of infection when mixed with a normally subinfective inoculum of either bacterial mixture. Fresh homologous mouse blood (0.25 ml) injected intraperitoneally without anticoagulant also significantly enhanced infectivity (P < 0.01) of a subinfective inoculum of B. fragilis plus P. anaerobius. These studies demonstrated the capacity of whole blood, hemoglobin, and hemostatic agents to enhance the infectivity of certain nonsporeforming anaerobic bacteria. The high concentrations of anaerobic bacteria in the gastrointestinal, female genital, and respiratory tracts produce an increased risk of human infection after surgery or trauma in these sites; the protein agents studied here may further enhance infection. PMID:631883

  20. Hydrolytic enzymes of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, E K; Hentges, D J

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-three strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human clinical specimens were examined for the presence of heparinase, hyaluronidase, chondroitin sulfatase, gelatinase, collagenase, fibrinolysin, lecithinase, and lipase activities. Pronounced heparinase activity was limited to species of the genus Bacteroides. A number of species of the genera Bacteroides and Clostridium produced hyaluronidase and chondroitin sulfatase. Gelatinase, collagenase, and fibrinolysin activities were encountered in isolates of the genera Bacteroides, Clostridium, and Peptostreptococcus. All strains capable of degrading collagen also hydrolyzed other protein substrates. Lipolytic activity was minimal among these anaerobic bacteria. No specific hydrolytic activity was consistently associated with the isolates. PMID:6268657

  1. Cystic Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sonal; Rahim, Ahmed Mujib Bangalore; Parakkat, Nithin Kavassery; Kapoor, Shekhar; Mittal, Kumud; Sharma, Bhushan; Shivappa, Anil Bangalore

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called “the master of disguise,” this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT. PMID:26579317

  2. Unusual Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Reis; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real; Andrade, Cleverton Roberto de; Silva, Breno Nogueira; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is a rare benign neoplasm. It can, however, have locally aggressive behavior. This is a case of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of unusual location and behavior in a 15-year-old female patient. A panoramic radiograph revealed a large radiolucent lesion involving the retained tooth 33. Teeth involved in this lesion were displaced and with apparent root resorption. A prototype of the mandible showed a marked expansion of cortical bone, fenestration points in the lingual cortex, and fragility of the base of the mandible. Therefore, because of the risk of postoperative pathologic fracture the placement of a 2.4-mm reconstruction plate was indicated. Total enucleation of the lesion, as well as placement of a reconstruction plate were performed. Despite the large bone destruction, with the correct surgical procedure and the use of the reconstruction plate the patient recovered without incidents and a 24-month postoperative radiography showed satisfactory bone formation. PMID:26963303

  3. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF STRICT AND FACULTATIVE ANAEROBES ISOLATED FROM ENDODONTIC INFECTIONS TO METRONIDAZOLE AND β-LACTAMS

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Lins, Samira Âmbar; Vieira, Evanice Menezes Marçal; de Oliveira, Sérgio Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Endodontic infections are mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections and several microbial groups associated to these pathologies are also involved in orofacial infections. The goal of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of microorganisms isolated from endodontic infections to β-lactams and metronidazole and verify the production of β-lactamases. Clinical specimens were collected from 58 endodontic infections of 52 patients. The microorganisms were isolated in selective and non-selective culture media, under anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, and identified using biochemical methods. In the susceptibility tests, it was used an agar dilution method, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar enriched with blood, hemin and menadione for the anaerobes, while Mueller- Hinton agar was employed for the facultative anaerobes. The production of β-lactamases was evaluated through the biological and chromogenic cephalosporin methods. All tested isolates were sensitive to imipenem and 99.3% to amoxicillin/clavulanate association, while 16.1% showed resistance to amoxicillin and penicillin G, and 4.89% to cefoxitin. Resistance to metronidazole was just found in facultative anaerobes. Production of β-lactamases was detected in 18.2% of the isolates and presented a correlation with resistance to β-lactams. PMID:19089195

  4. Express diagnostic of anaerobic infection and disbacteriosis by optical PNC method in clinical dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Michail T.; Koz'ma, Sergey U.; Taubinsky, Ilia M.; Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research a new way of express (real time) diagnostics of anaerobic infection and disbacteriosis is suggested. The express diagnostics of anaerobic infection allows to perform quick assessment of the injury microbiocenosis, the state of gastroenteric tract, the disbacteriosis presence and the degree of its development, to follow up dynamics of microflora variations in the process of medication treatment. The research were performed with optical PNC-method. The basic of the method is in registration of stimulated (secondary) radiations and registration of their space fields, which occur in the process of probing radiation interaction with biological tissues and their active elements. The process is called Photon- undulatory Nonlinear Conversion or in short PNC-process (PNC- method, PNC-diagnostic). The optimal diagnostic PNC-method developed here allows detecting the presence of anaerobic microflora directly at the bed of a patient. It makes possible to control the dynamic of patient rehabilitation process, providing strictly individual assessments.

  5. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria. PMID:25552434

  6. [Intestinal disorder of anaerobic bacteria aggravates pulmonary immune pathological injury of mice infected with influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Wu, Sha; Yan, Yuqi; Zhang, Mengyuan; Shi, Shanshan; Jiang, Zhenyou

    2016-04-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the intestinal disorder of anaerobic bacteria and influenza virus infection, and the effect on pulmonary inflammatory cytokines in mice. Methods Totally 36 mice were randomly divided into normal control group, virus-infected group and metronidazole treatment group (12 mice in each group). Mice in the metronidazole group were administrated orally with metronidazole sulfate for 8 days causing anaerobic bacteria flora imbalance; then all groups except the normal control group were treated transnasally with influenza virus (50 μL/d FM1) for 4 days to establish the influenza virus-infected models. Their mental state and lung index were observed, and the pathological morphological changes of lung tissues, caecum and intestinal mucosa were examined by HE staining. The levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interferon γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and IL-17 in the lung homogenates were determined by ELISA. Results Compared with the virus control group, the metronidazole group showed obviously increased lung index and more serious pathological changes of the lung tissue and appendix inflammation performance. After infected by the FM1 influenza virus, IFN-γ and IL-17 of the metronidazole group decreased significantly and IL-4 and IL-10 levels were raised, but there was no statistically difference between the metronidazole and virus control groups. Conclusion Intestinal anaerobic bacteria may inhibit the adaptive immune response in the lungs of mice infected with FM1 influenza virus through adjusting the lung inflammatory factors, affect the replication and clean-up time of the FM1 influenza virus, thus further aggravating pulmonary immune pathological injury caused by the influenza virus infection. PMID:27053604

  7. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature. PMID:25209225

  8. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Virupakshappa, Deepti; Rajashekhara, Bhari Sharanesha; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Das, Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumour that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. It comprises 3% of all odontogenic tumours. This report describes the surgical therapy, clinical course and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour that developed in the left maxilla of a 20-year-old patient. PMID:24810436

  9. Bone and joint infections due to anaerobic bacteria: an analysis of 61 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Walter, G; Vernier, M; Pinelli, P O; Million, M; Coulange, M; Seng, P; Stein, A

    2014-08-01

    The diagnosis of anaerobic bone and joint infections (BJI) were underestimated before the advent of molecular identification and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We report 61 cases of anaerobic infections based on our 4-year experience with the management of BJI. A total of 75% of cases were post-surgical infections, associated with osteosynthesis devices (65%). Early infections occurred in 27% of cases, delayed infections in 17.5% of cases, and late infections in 55% of cases. We recorded 36 species of 93 anaerobic strains using MALDI-TOF MS (91) and molecular methods (2). We identified 20 strains of Propionibacterium acnes, 13 of Finegoldia magna, six of Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus, and six of P. harei. Polymicrobial infections occurred in 50 cases. Surgical treatment was performed in 93.5% of cases. The antibiotic treatments included amoxicillin (30%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (16%), metronidazole (30%), and clindamycin (26%). Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was used in 17 cases (28%). The relapse rate (27%) was associated with lower limbs localization (p = 0.001). P. acnes BJI was associated with shoulder (p = 0.019), vertebra (p = 0.021), and head flap localization (p = 0.011), and none of these cases relapsed (p = 0.007). F. magna BJI was associated with ankle localization (p = 0.014). Anaerobic BJI is typically considered as a post-surgical polymicrobial infection, and the management of this infection combines surgical and medical treatments. MALDI-TOF MS and molecular identification have improved diagnosis. Thus, physicians should be aware of the polymicrobial nature of anaerobic BJI to establish immediate broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment during the post-surgical period until accurate microbiological results have been obtained. PMID:24577953

  10. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    PubMed

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm activity revealed significant results--MICB50 lay between 7.8 and 62.5 μg/mL, and dehydroabietic acid prevented all the evaluated bacteria from forming a biofilm. Hence, the chemical constituents of P. elliottii are promising biomolecules to develop novel therapeutic strategies to fight against endodontic infections. PMID:25270831

  11. Dominant Obligate Anaerobes Revealed in Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Horses by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    KINOSHITA, Yuta; NIWA, Hidekazu; KATAYAMA, Yoshinari; HARIU, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obligate anaerobes are important etiological agents in pneumonia or pleuropneumonia in horses, because they are isolated more commonly from ill horses that have died or been euthanized than from those that survive. We performed bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for obligate anaerobes to establish effective antimicrobial therapy. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify 58 obligate anaerobes and compared the results with those from a phenotypic identification kit. The identification results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were more reliable than those of the commercial kit. We concluded that genera Bacteroides and Prevotellaespecially B. fragilis and P. heparinolyticaare dominant anaerobes in lower respiratory tract infection in horses; these organisms were susceptible to metronidazole, imipenem and clindamycin. PMID:24366152

  12. Dominant obligate anaerobes revealed in lower respiratory tract infection in horses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuta; Niwa, Hidekazu; Katayama, Yoshinari; Hariu, Kazuhisa

    2014-04-01

    Obligate anaerobes are important etiological agents in pneumonia or pleuropneumonia in horses, because they are isolated more commonly from ill horses that have died or been euthanized than from those that survive. We performed bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for obligate anaerobes to establish effective antimicrobial therapy. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to identify 58 obligate anaerobes and compared the results with those from a phenotypic identification kit. The identification results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were more reliable than those of the commercial kit. We concluded that genera Bacteroides and Prevotella-especially B. fragilis and P. heparinolytica-are dominant anaerobes in lower respiratory tract infection in horses; these organisms were susceptible to metronidazole, imipenem and clindamycin. PMID:24366152

  13. Are we missing anaerobic infective endocarditis in some acute coronary syndromes?

    PubMed

    Abuzaid, Ahmed; Smer, Aiman; Akturk, Halis Kaan; Bittner, Marvin

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a 3-week history of intermittent fevers and dyspnoea on exertion after a dental bridge placement 2 months ago. The patient's medical history was significant for mild to moderate mitral valve prolapse. Initial evaluation was notable for a 3/6 systolic apical murmur. Laboratory investigations revealed leucocytosis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein and cardiac biomarkers. Patient was treated initially for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. A 2-dimensional echocardiography was concerning for a new mitral regurgitation and a questionable vegetation adjacent to the mitral valve annulus. Transoesophageal echocardiography study confirmed the diagnosis. Subsequent microbial identification was notable for Peptostreptococci and he was started on intravenous penicillin therapy. The unexplained illness with underlying valve disease prompted consideration of infective endocarditis. This case describes a rare occurrence of anaerobic endocarditis imitating an acute coronary event. PMID:24943143

  14. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: II. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ghost Cell Odontogenic Tumors Derived from Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2014-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs) and ghost cell odontogenic tumors (GCOTs) are characteristic odontogenic origin epithelial tumors which produce calcifying materials from transformed epithelial tumor cells. CEOT is a benign odontogenic tumor composed of polygonal epithelial tumor cells that show retrogressive calcific changes, amyloid-like deposition, and clear cytoplasm. Differentially, GCOTs are a group of transient tumors characterized by ghost cell presence, which comprise calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT), dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT), and ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC), all derived from calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs). There is considerable confusion about COCs and GCOTs terminology, but these lesions can be classified as COCs or GCOTs, based on their cystic or tumorous natures, respectively. GCOTs include ameloblastomatous tumors derived from dominant odontogenic cysts classified as CCOTs, ghost cell-rich tumors producing dentinoid materials as DGCTs, and the GCOT malignant counterpart, GCOCs. Many authors have reported CEOTs and GCOTs variably express keratins, β-catenin, BCL-2, BSP, RANKL, OPG, Notch1, Jagged1, TGF-β, SMADs, and other proteins. However, these heterogeneous lesions should be differentially diagnosed to allow for accurate tumor progression and prognosis prediction. PMID:25013415

  15. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor radiographically mimicking a sinus mucocele.

    PubMed

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Frota, Riedel; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2013-03-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or Gorlin cyst is an uncommon lesion with a variable clinical behavior and considerable histopathologic diversity. The authors report a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor that was being treated as a maxillary sinus mucocele. The possibility of mimicking numerous odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions makes the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor difficult for a clinical diagnosis. The present case demonstrates that a specific knowledge in oral pathology is required to differentiate odontogenic lesions. PMID:23524811

  16. In Vitro Activity of Moxifloxacin against 923 Anaerobes Isolated from Human Intra-Abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Fernandez, Helen

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 recent anaerobic isolates obtained from pretreatment cultures in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections was studied using the CLSI M11-A-6 agar dilution method. Moxifloxacin was active against 87% (96 of 110) Bacteroides fragilis strains at ≤1 μg/ml and 87% (79 of 90) B. thetaiotaomicron strains at ≤2 μg/ml. Species variation was seen, with B. uniformis, B. vulgatus, Clostridium clostridioforme, and C. symbiosum being least susceptible and accounting for most of the resistant isolates; excluding the aforementioned four resistant species, 86% (303 of 363) of Bacteroides species isolates and 94% (417 of 450) of all other genera and species were susceptible to ≤2 μg/ml of moxifloxacin. Overall, moxifloxacin was active against 763 of 923 (83%) of strains at ≤2 μg/ml, supporting its use as a monotherapy for some community-acquired intra-abdominal infections. PMID:16377680

  17. The Role of PIN1 on Odontogenic and Adipogenic Differentiation in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Man; Shin, Seung-Yun; Jue, Seong-Suk; Kwon, Il-Keun; Cho, Eun-Hee; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the involvement of PIN1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, has been reported in age-related bone homeostasis and adipogenesis. However, the role of PIN1 during odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation remains to be fully understood, particularly regarding human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs). Thus, in the present study, we have investigated the role of PIN1 in odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation of HDPSCs and signaling pathways possibly involved. PIN1 mRNA and protein level were upregulated in a time-dependent manner during adipogenic differentiation, increasing until 1 day of odontogenic induction and then steadily declined during odontogenic differentiation. Treatment of a known PIN1 inhibitor, juglone, significantly increased odontogenic differentiation as confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and mRNAs induction of odontogenic markers [ALP, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1)]. On the contrary, adipogenic differentiation was dramatically reduced upon juglone treatment, with concomitant downregulation of lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenic marker genes [peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AP2)]. In contrast to PIN1 inhibition, the overexpression of PIN1 via adenoviral infection (Ad-PIN1) in HDPSCs inhibited odontogenic differentiation but increased adipogenic differentiation, in which stem cell property markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) and STRO-1 were upregulated during odontogenic differentiation but downregulated in adiopogenic differentiation. Consistently, juglone-mediated inhibition of PIN1 augmented the osteogenic medium (OM)-induced activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt/β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, which response was reversed by Ad-PIN1. Moreover, juglone blocked the adipogenic induction medium-induced activation of PPARγ, C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, ERK, and NF-κB pathways, which was rescued by Ad-PIN1 infection. In summary, the present study shows for the first time that PIN1 acts as an important modulator of odontogenic and adipogenic differentiation of HDPSCs and may have clinical implications for regenerative dentistry. PMID:24219242

  18. [The diagnosis and treatment of odontogenic mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Gubin, M A; Girko, E I; Kharitonov, Iu M

    1996-01-01

    A program of early diagnostics of odontogenic mediastinitis was developed on the basis of an analysis of clinico-laboratory manifestations and the evaluation of its clinical efficiency is given. The criteria were established for determining the phases of odontogenic mediastinitis-reactive, toxic and terminal ones. A program of complex treatment was worked out and introduced into practice which included the methods of efferent therapy-hemosorption and perfusion through xenospleen. Substantially decreased lethality (from 39.5% to 15.3%) from odontogenic mediastinitis was obtained. PMID:8966928

  19. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  20. Odontogenic tumors that mimic a dentigerous cyst.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, E M; Sewall, S R; Dohse, A; Novak, T S

    1995-05-01

    Hyperplastic follicular tissue and a dentigerous cyst are the two most common entities associated with the crown of an impacted tooth. However, other diagnostic possibilities, including odontogenic tumors should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pericoronal radiolucency. This article presents three cases of radiolucent lesions that were histologically diagnosed as an odontogenic tumor, and stresses the importance of histological evaluation of all pericoronal radiolucencies. PMID:8624989

  1. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  2. Odontogenic keratocyst mimicking paradental cyst.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola; Rizza, Federica; Re, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  3. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  4. First Report of Septicemia Caused by an Obligately Anaerobic Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Human

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Sandra L.; Peter, John Victor; Chan, Louisa; Wise, Rolf P.; Butcher, Andrew R.; Grove, David I.

    2006-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the first instance of septicemia caused by an obligately anaerobic Staphylococcus aureus in a human. A 45-year-old man presented with septicemia, septic arthritis, and multiple pulmonary abscesses, which were caused by an obligately anaerobic S. aureus. The clinical and microbiological features that led to the diagnosis are discussed. Genotyping cannot at present reliably separate S. aureus subsp. aureus from S. aureus subsp. anaerobius, but phenotypic characteristics suggest that the present isolate is a previously undescribed strain of anaerobic Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:16757649

  5. [Mixed odontogenic tumors in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Gyulai-Gaál, Szabolcs; Takács, Daniel; Barabás, József; Tarján, Ildikó; Martonffy, Katalin; Szabó, György; Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2007-04-01

    Mixed odontogenic tumors in the jaws of children and adolescents usually cause dentition anomalies. The typical forms of these are ameloblastic fibroma, ameloblastic fibroodontoma, complex odontoma and compound odontoma. In the present study mixed odontogenic tumor cases are presented in patients under 20 years of age. All of them were associated with tooth eruption disturbances. Further aim of this study was to discuss the nature and interrelationships of this group of lesions. Ameloblastic fibromas (AFs) are true, mixed, soft tissue neoplasms, deriving from the proliferation of both odontogenic epithelium and mesenchyma. They have a potential to both recurrence and malignant transformation. Ameloblastic fibroodontomas (AFOs) may be regarded as hamartomas, which exhibit epithelial, mesenchymal and abundant hard tissue components of the developing teeth. Odontomas are calcifying benign hamartomas, and represent the most common type of odontogenic jaw tumors among patients less than 20y, having complex and compound variants. Complex odontomas (CXOs) are built up from amorphous hard tissue elements, and generally occur in the premolar or molar regions of the maxilla. Compound odontomas (CDOs) usually appear in the maxilla, in the region of the incisors and canines, and contain small, radio-opaque structures reminiscent of rudimentary teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of mixed odontogenic jaw tumors in children may prevent the serious orthodontic complications and jaw deformations. PMID:17546897

  6. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha A; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  7. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha A.; Sangle, Amit; Bussari, Smita; Koshy, Ajit V.

    2016-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated. PMID:27134453

  8. Central odontogenic fibroma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, V; Madhavan, R Nirmal; Nassar, M Mohamed; Amsaveni, R

    2013-01-01

    The central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic mesenchymal tumor of jaw bones. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes two variants of COF namely: 1) Epithelial-rich type (WHO) and 2) epithelial-poor type (simple type). Rare variants like ossifying COF, COF associated with giant cell lesions, and amyloid have been documented. This article presents a case of an epithelial-rich variant of COF in a 24-year-old female. It presented as a bony swelling of the maxilla and appeared as a mixed lesion in radiographs. Histopathology showed a highly cellular fibrous connective tissue stroma with plump fibroblasts and long strands of odontogenic epithelium exhibiting mild eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm. Numerous cementum-like hematoxyphilic calcifications of various sizes akin to dentin or acellular cementum were observed. We believe that clinical and radiographic features of this case may add valuable knowledge to the already existing literature. PMID:24250106

  9. Odontogenic epithelial stem cells: hidden sources.

    PubMed

    Padma Priya, Sivan; Higuchi, Akon; Abu Fanas, Salem; Pooi Ling, Mok; Kumari Neela, Vasantha; Sunil, P M; Saraswathi, T R; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Kumar, Suresh

    2015-12-01

    The ultimate goal of dental stem cell research is to construct a bioengineered tooth. Tooth formation occurs based on the well-organized reciprocal interaction of epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The dental mesenchymal stem cells are the best explored, but because the human odontogenic epithelium is lost after the completion of enamel formation, studies on these cells are scarce. The successful creation of a bioengineered tooth is achievable only when the odontogenic epithelium is reconstructed to produce a replica of natural enamel. This article discusses the untapped sources of odontogenic epithelial stem cells in humans, such as those present in the active dental lamina in postnatal life, in remnants of dental lamina (the gubernaculum cord), in the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, and in reduced enamel epithelium. The possible uses of these stem cells in regenerative medicine, not just for enamel formation, are discussed. PMID:26367485

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P < 0.001). The intensity of MFs was significantly higher in odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  11. Glandular odontogenic cyst: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the principal features of “glandular odontogenic cyst” (GOC), by systematic review (SR), and to compare their frequencies among four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of GOCs that occurred in a series in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. All cases were confirmed histopathologically. Results 18 reports on 17 series of consecutive cases were included in the SR. GOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost three times as frequently. The mean age at first presentation was 44 years, coincident with that of the Western global group, in which the largest proportion of reports and cases first presented in the second half of the fifth decade. However, age at presentation of GOCs in the East Asian and sub-Saharan African global groups was nearly a decade younger, this was significant. Six reports included details of at least one clinical presentation. Eight reports included at least one conventional radiological feature. There were some significant differences between global groups. The Western global group had a particular predilection for the anterior sextants of both jaws. The sub-Saharan African group displayed buccolingual expansion (as did the Latin American group) and tooth displacement in every case. 18% of GOCs recurred overall, except in the sub-Saharan African global group. Conclusions GOCs have a marked propensity to recur in most global groups. GOCs presented in older patients and with swellings, affected the anterior sextants of both jaws, and radiologically were more likely to present as a well-defined unilocular radiolucency with buccolingual expansion. Tooth displacement, root resorption and an association with unerupted teeth occurred in 50%, 30% and 11% of cases, respectively. PMID:20203274

  12. Biochemical and Cytological Comparison of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours to Nonkeratinising Odontogenic Cysts Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pushparaj; Patidar, Nitesh; Mittal, Sugandh; Singh, Hanspal; Chethna

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes in the cystic fluid for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning of keratocystic odontogenic tumours and other non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods Fifteen keratocystic odontogenic tumour and 15 controls were studied. The cystic fluid was aspirated and analysed to determine the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and the presence of keratinocytes. The data collected was statistically evaluated using Mann Whitney U-Test and Students t-test. Results A highly significant difference (p<0.0001) was seen when a comparison of Prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes was made between keratocystic odontogenic tumour and non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. The presence of albumin also showed a significant difference (p<0.01). Conclusion A combined analysis of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, inorganic phosphorous and detection of epithelial squames may be used as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumour in a minimally invasive and highly accurate fashion. PMID:26393202

  13. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions. PMID:25587387

  14. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions. PMID:25587387

  15. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with ameloblastic fibro-odontoma of the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Song, Young-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Bong Chul; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, which was formerly named calcifying odontogenic cyst, is a benign odontogenic tumor containing clusters of ghost cells within ameloblastic epithelium. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors have been associated with other odontogenic tumors, a finding that is a rare event in other types of odontogenic cysts or tumors. This report describes a case of hybrid odontogenic tumor composed of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastic fibroma-odontoma of the anterior mandible that occurred in a 4-year-old Korean girl. PMID:24785751

  16. Surgical and prosthetic management of maxillary odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Bashir, Atif

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are uncommon tumors of comprising of 3% of all the tumors of odontogenic origin. They usually occur during the second and third decades of life and are more commonly seen in females. The current case report sheds light upon the surgical treatment of a myxoma of odontogenic origin in posterior maxilla of a young female patient. Prosthodontic rehabilitation stages are also briefly described following complete healing of the lesion after surgery. PMID:26038664

  17. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: As an unusual mandibular manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Passi, Sidhi; Kumar, Vinay V.

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare odontogenic tumor which is often misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst and accounts for about 1% until 9% of all odontogenic tumors. It is predominantly found in young and female patients, located more often in the maxilla in most cases associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. It is a benign (hamartomatous), noninvasive lesion with slow but progressive growth. There are three variants of AOT: follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. We report a rare case of follicular-type AOT in the mandible of a 14-year-old male patient who presented with right -sided jaw swelling. PMID:22629062

  18. Amelogenin in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Anigol, Praveen; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Anand, Nagaraja; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major enamel proteins that play a major role in the biomineralization and structural organization of enamel. Aberrations of enamel-related proteins are thought to be involved in oncogenesis of odontogenic epithelium. The expression of amelogenin is possibly an indicator of differentiation of epithelial cells in the odontogenic lesions. Aims and Objectives: The present study aimed to observe the expression of amelogenin immunohistochemically in various odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of 40 odontogenic lesions were stained immunohistochemically with amelogenin antibodies. The positivity, pattern and intensity of expression of the amelogenin antibody were assessed, graded and statistically compared between groups of odontogenic cysts and tumors. Results: Almost all the odontogenic lesions expressed amelogenin in the epithelial component with the exception of an ameloblastic carcinoma. Differing grades of intensity and pattern were seen between the cysts and tumors. Intensity of expression was uniformly prominent in all odontogenic lesions with hard tissue formation. Statistical analysis however did not indicate significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The expression of amelogenin antibody is ubiquitous in odontogenic tissues and can be used as a definitive marker for identification of odontogenic epithelium. PMID:25937729

  19. Multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Liang, Hui; Wright, John; Teenier, Tom

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the clinical, radiographic, pathological and molecular findings of the first case of multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs). Multiple odontogenic keratocysts are one of the major features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and loss of heterozygosity in the PTCH gene, the culprit gene for NBCCS, has recently been found in sporadic OOC cases. Therefore, in this presenting case, we also investigated the possibility that this patient might also have NBCCS, by comparing the available clinical information and the molecular findings of this case to the diagnostic criteria for NBCCS (as proposed by the First International Colloquium on NBCCS in 2011). However, this patient with multiple OOCs showed no evidence of having NBCCS. This conclusion supports the findings from previous case series based on sporadic cases that OOC does not appear to be associated with NBCCS. PMID:24737103

  20. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, K.; Kumar, Senthil; Vijayasamundeeswari; Vigneswari, Srivel

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed. PMID:22919236

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, an uncommon tumor.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, K; Kumar, Senthil; Vijayasamundeeswari; Vigneswari, Srivel

    2012-04-01

    Here we report a case of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) in the maxilla in a young girl aged 14 years and its surgical management. We also review the literature and variations in the nomenclature and classifications of this interesting tumor. The review of literature gives an interesting picture regarding terminologies in the past and dilemma in classifying this tumor. The introduction of the name adenomatoid odontogenic tumour has resulted in the simpler and fruitful surgical management like enucleation and curettage with no reports of recurrences. In the past, similar lesion with the terminology like adeno ameloblastoma has resulted in unnecessary mutilating surgery. The conflicting views whether the lesion is being neoplasm or an anomalous hamartomatous growth is also being discussed. PMID:22919236

  2. Central odontogenic fibroma of the maxilla

    PubMed Central

    El Harti, Karima; Oujilal, Abdelilah; El Wady, Wafaa

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is an uncommon tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors; it has been defined as a benign neoplasm of the jaw. Clinically, the lesion grows slowly and leads to cortical expansion. Radiologically, the most common finding is multilocular radiolucency. The lesions are associated with the crown of an unerupted molar, premolar, or incisor tooth and in some cases, with root resorption or displacement. Histologically, the lesion is characterized by mature collagen fibers and numerous fibroblasts. COF responds well to surgical enucleation with no tendency for malignancy or recurrence. We report a case of a 15-year-old female patient presented with painless swelling of the left side of the maxilla since her childhood. Radiographs revealed an expanding ill-defined radiolucency with a displacement of the adjacent tooth. The impacted tooth was pushed posteriorly. The lesion was removed surgically. There were no postoperative complications. PMID:26752885

  3. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of the Anterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Srinivasa Pathapati; Reddy, Sridhar Padala; Ananthnag, Jakkula

    2015-01-01

    Context: Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare cyst occurring in the middle-age people with mandibular anterior as the common site of occurrence. Case Report: We report a case of massive GOC in a 65-year-old female with an emphasis on its clinical course, histological features, and treatment modalities. Conclusion: The aggressiveness and recurrences of GOC warrants clinicians for the careful examination, treatment, and long-term follow-up. PMID:25789251

  4. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  5. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor.

    PubMed

    Martins, Jorge N R; Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-07-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  6. Glandular Odontogenic Cyst of Mandible: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ankur; Kaur, Gursheen; Sood, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst. It is a slow growing and asymptomatic swelling, usually affecting middle aged men and has tendency to reoccur. Here, we report a case of GOC in the anterior portion of mandible diagnosed by histopathology. PMID:26813085

  7. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  8. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors. PMID:26221475

  9. [Inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws].

    PubMed

    Gallini, G; Merlini, C; Martelossi, L; Benetti, C

    1991-04-15

    The apical granuloma, the periapical abcess and the radicular cyst are the most frequent between the inflammatory odontogenic lesions of the jaws. These three lesions are caused by the necrosis of the pulp but are very different between each other from an histological point of view and they can correspond to different stages of the same pathological process considering the fact that from a granuloma can arise a periapical abcess or a radicular cyst and from a radicular cyst and abcess can originate. About these three pathological processes we discuss in this article the clinical, radiographical, ethiological, microscopical features, we suggest the treatment and the differential diagnosis. PMID:2070926

  10. A Huge Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shreedhar, Balasundari; Ali, Iqbal; Agarwal, Anshita; Alam, Sarwar

    2012-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign, nonneoplastic (hamartomatous) lesion with a slow progressing growth. It occurs in both intraosseous and peripheral forms. This paper reports the case of a female aged 16 years who presented with a swelling in anterior maxilla; canine was missing, and a supernumerary tooth was present in the mid line. Radiology revealed a well-defined radiolucent area associated with impacted canine and root resorption of adjacent teeth, which was diagnosed histopathologically as AOT. The patient was treated surgically and later rehabilitated with fixed prosthesis. PMID:22481948

  11. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery. PMID:26183855

  12. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C), and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications. PMID:21396085

  13. Capacity of anaerobic bacteria from necrotic dental pulps to induce purulent infections.

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, G K; Eckerbom, M I; Larsson, A P; Sjögren, U T

    1979-01-01

    Combinations of bacteria isolated from the root canals of teeth with necrotic pulps and periapical bone destruction were tested for their capacity to induce abscess formation and transmissible infections when inoculated subcutaneously into guinea pigs. Transmissible infections could be induced with combinations obtained from teeth with purulent apical inflammation, but not with combinations from symptomless teeth with chronic apical inflammation. All combinations which gave transmissible infections contained strains of Bacteroides melaninogenicus or B. asaccharolyticus (formerly B. melaninogenicus subsp. asaccharolyticus). The results suggest that purulent inflammation in the apical region in certain cases may be induced by specific combinations of bacteria in the root canal and that the presence of B. melaninogenicus or B. asaccharolyticus in such combinations is essential. However, with one exception, the strains needed the support of additional microorganisms to achieve pathogenicity. The results indicate that Peptostreptococcus micros was also essential. Histological sections of the lesions in the guinea pigs showed that all bacterial combinations induced acute inflammation with an accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the formation of an abscess. However, the presence of B. melaninogenicus or B. asaccharolyticus in the combinations resulted in a failure of abscess resolution, with a gradually increaseing accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Images PMID:489126

  14. Cytological findings of odontogenic myxofibroma: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Khare, Akriti; Joshi, Deepti; Majumdar, Kaushik; Gupta, Vikas; Goel, Garima; Kapoor, Neelkamal

    2016-04-01

    Odontogenic myxofibroma represents a rare slow-growing benign neoplasm, which usually occurs in the second and third decades of life and rarely in children or adults over 50 years of age. Myxomas in general represent from 2.3% to 17.7% of all odontogenic tumors, and myxofibromas represent a small number of all myxomas. Limited evidence is present in literature regarding the cytological diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma/myxofibroma. We hereby report the cytomorphological features of a histologically confirmed case of odontogenic myxofibroma and the pitfalls of the cytological diagnosis. A painless jaw swelling in a young boy was aspirated. Scanty mucoid material was obtained. Cytology Smears were moderately cellular and showed a population comprising predominantly of singly scattered plump to fusiform cells with bipolar cytoplasmic processes showing mild to moderate atypia embedded within dense myxoid matrix and another population of cells arranged in clusters. Case was interpreted as low grade mesenchymal tumor. Subsequent biopsy confirmed it as odontogenic myxofibroma arising in a odontogenic keratocyst. Precise interpretation of intraosseous jaw lesions FNAC may not always be possible, but an attempt should be made to broadly classify the lesion as an inflammatory lesion, cystic lesion, giant cell lesion, fibro-osseous lesion or as an odontogenic tumor. If dual population of odontogenic epithelium and mesenchymal cells embedded in myxoid matrix are identified in such aspirates, a possibility of myxoid odontogenic tumor may be suggested. Triple correlation of cytological, clinical and radiological findings can guide the surgeon for taking appropriate therapeutic decisions. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:329-333. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26801006

  15. Ameloblastomatous Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour: A Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, Rama Raju; Duggi, Lakshmi Srujana; Sanjeevareddygari, Shylaja; Potturi, Abhinand

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor (CCOT) was previously described by Gorlin et al., in 1962 as Calcifying odontogenic cyst. CCOT is a rare lesion which accounts for 2% of all odontogenic pathological changes in the jaws. One of the variants, Ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT is even more rare and very few cases have been reported in the light of literature review. This case report is an effort to bring forth a case of ameloblastomatous proliferating type of CCOT in a 65 year male, who presented with a painful swelling in the right jaw crossing midline causing facial asymmetry and confirmed by histopathological evaluation. PMID:25954714

  16. Odontogenic Myxoma in Children: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dalbo Contrera Toro, Mariana; Siqueira Barreto, Icléia; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid; Takahiro Chone, Carlos; Nizam Pfeilsticker, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Benign odontogenic lesions are rare entities but are very important due to their locally aggressive nature. Odontogenic myxoma is even rarer in children than in adults. There is no evidence in the literature in regard to the best treatment approach, in terms of conservative or aggressive surgery, for this type of tumor. This paper reports a case of odontogenic myxoma in a child treated with a compromised approach through bone osteotomies and a review of the literature about this disease, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27064694

  17. Peripheral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour - A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Vrinda Sunil; Shenoi, Ramakrishna; Gadve, Vandana; Rajderkar, Anand; Dive, Alka

    2015-07-01

    Odontogenic lesions are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial cells and ghost cells. Most peripheral CCOTs are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. This is a rare case report of CCOT. The rare feature in our case was its peripheral nature of existence and its location in the left buccal vestibule and retromolar region. Based on the radiological, cytological and histopathological findings the lesion was surgically excised. PMID:26393218

  18. Peripheral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shenoi, Ramakrishna; Gadve, Vandana; Rajderkar, Anand; Dive, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic lesions are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial cells and ghost cells. Most peripheral CCOTs are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. This is a rare case report of CCOT. The rare feature in our case was its peripheral nature of existence and its location in the left buccal vestibule and retromolar region. Based on the radiological, cytological and histopathological findings the lesion was surgically excised. PMID:26393218

  19. Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma with pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Renu; Somanathan, Thara; Kattoor, Jayasree

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) is an exceptionally rare malignant odontogenic epithelial tumor. It is characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinization in the form of ghost cells with varying amounts of dysplastic dentin. Malignant histological characteristics include infiltration, cellular pleomorphism, numerous mitosis and necrosis. Its biological behavior varies from slow-growing locally invasive lesions to rapidly growing highly aggressive tumors. OGCC metastasizing to distant sites is extremely rare. Only three cases of metastasis have been reported in literature. We are reporting the case of a 54-year-old male patient who presented with tender swelling in the malar region. Histopathological examination revealed OGCC and he received postoperative radiotherapy. Two years later, he presented with a lung mass. Biopsy from the lung lesion showed the same morphology as that of maxillary tumor with scattered ghost cells. This case points to the aggressive behavior of OGCC and its metastatic potential. It also highlights the need for long-term follow-up of these patients. PMID:26980967

  20. Acute thyroiditis of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Acocella, A; Nardi, P; Sacco, R; Agostini, T

    2007-09-01

    If an abscess is not able to establish drainage through the skin surface or into the oral cavity, it may spread diffusely through fascial planes of the neck's soft tissue. Once the infection descends into the submandibular space, it may extend to the lateral pharyngeal space, and then to the retro-pharyngeal space. From here, it may reach the thyroid gland. The authors here describe a case of submandibular phlegmon derived from a periapical abscess of inferior premolar, which has reached the thyroid gland. The damage caused to the gland resulted in the release of a conspicuous quantity of thyroid hormones, thus causing a thyrotoxic pattern: temperature, cutaneous pallor, excessive perspiration, tremor, tiredness, weight loss, increased appetite, and tachycardia. Additionally, the gland's edema caused dysphagia and dysphonia commonly seen with thyroid gland enlargement. After dental drainage and appropriate anti-inflammatory and antibiotic therapy, administration of oral beta-blockers and corticosteroid therapy were performed to counteract thyrotoxicosis in order to prevent recurrences. Finally, a root canal was performed once the thyrotoxicosis had been resolved. PMID:17938625

  1. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  2. Odontogenic carcinosarcoma of the mandible: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Pae, Sang-Pill; Cho, Hyun-Young; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Park, In-Shu

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant odontogenic tumor with only a few reported cases. It is characterized by a true mixed tumor showing malignant cytology of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. It has been assumed to arise from pre-existing lesions such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma, and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. To date, the reported cases have exhibited considerably aggressive clinical behavior. The case of an odontogenic carcinosarcoma in the mandible of a 61-year-old male is described herein. The tumor destroyed the cortex of the mandible and invaded the adjacent tissues. Treatment was performed by surgical resection and reconstruction. The purposes of this article are to introduce odontogenic carcinosarcoma through this case study, to distinguish it from related diseases and to discuss features of the tumor in the existing literature. PMID:26131431

  3. Odontogenic carcinosarcoma of the mandible: a case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Sang-Pill; Cho, Hyun-Young; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Park, In-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant odontogenic tumor with only a few reported cases. It is characterized by a true mixed tumor showing malignant cytology of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. It has been assumed to arise from pre-existing lesions such as ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma, and ameloblastic fibrosarcoma. To date, the reported cases have exhibited considerably aggressive clinical behavior. The case of an odontogenic carcinosarcoma in the mandible of a 61-year-old male is described herein. The tumor destroyed the cortex of the mandible and invaded the adjacent tissues. Treatment was performed by surgical resection and reconstruction. The purposes of this article are to introduce odontogenic carcinosarcoma through this case study, to distinguish it from related diseases and to discuss features of the tumor in the existing literature. PMID:26131431

  4. Keratin metaplasia in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Ramesh, Venkatapathy; Oza, Nirima; Panda, Abikshyeet; Balamurali, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find the prevalence of keratin metaplasia and its relation with clinico-pathological profile of the odontogenic cyst. Materials and Methods: Odontogenic cysts were studied histologically with special stains to identify the presence of keratin and compared with various parameters such as underlying connective tissue inflammation, average epithelial thickness, and site of the cyst, type of the cyst, age and the sex of the patient. Results: Of 71 cases of various odontogenic cysts, 26 (36.6%) cases exhibited keratinization in the epithelial lining. In cysts with severe inflammation there is absence of keratinization. Conclusions: This study reveals higher prevalence of keratin metaplasia in the odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, inflammation is found to be one of factor influencing keratin metaplasia. PMID:25210349

  5. Transnasal endoscopic resection of a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniel; Cure, Joel; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2014-08-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare histologic subtype of odontogenic tumor. Treatment requires complete enucleation. We report what we believe is the first case of CCOT to be removed via a transnasal endoscopic approach. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our department by his dentist for evaluation of an expansile mass of the left maxillary sinus. The dentist had noted an area of hyperlucency of the left palate during a routine examination. Computed tomography confirmed the presence of a large tumor. Complete resection of the tumor was achieved via a transnasal endoscopic surgical approach. Resection of odontogenic tumors is necessary because of their tendency to expand and produce a mass effect on surrounding structures. We believe resection via an entirely transnasal endoscopic approach is a valuable and important technique in the treatment of odontogenic tumors that leaves the patient with a more cosmetically acceptable postoperative appearance. PMID:25181672

  6. Follicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor in Mandible: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belgaumi, UI; Parkar, MI; Malik, NA; Suresh, KV; Havewala, AM; Bhalinge, PM

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a relatively rare, benign, hamartomatous, and cystic odontogenic neoplasm that was first described more than a century ago. The lesion still continues to intrigue experts with its varied histomorphology and controversies regarding its development. The present article describes a case of cystic AOT with an unusual histomorphology associated with an impacted 44 in a 21-year-old male. PMID:27057389

  7. [The diagnosis and treatment of contact odontogenic mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Robustova, T G; Gubin, M A; Kharitonov, Iu M; Girko, E I

    1996-01-01

    Contact odontogenic mediastinitis is a complication of advanced phlegmons of the face and neck. 22-year experience in the treatment of 107 patients with odontogenic mediastinitis, clinical and laboratory criteria of its diagnosis and differential diagnosis with advanced phlegmons are presented. The programs of intensive therapy adjusted for the disease phase and surgical treatment contributed to lowering of lethality from 50 to 15.3%. PMID:9214032

  8. Odontogenic Myxoma of the Maxilla- A Rare case Report

    PubMed Central

    Subramaiam, Ramkumar; Narasimhan, Malathi; Giri, Veda; Kumar, Santhosh

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon, benign, locally invasive, non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the odontogenic ectomesenchyme that usually occurs in the tooth bearing areas of the jaws. These lesions arouse special interest as they pose high diagnostic challenge. Here, we present a rare case of OM of the maxilla in an 18-year-old male. The clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of the lesion are discussed in this paper. PMID:26155585

  9. Primordial Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Slater, Lee J; Eftimie, Liviu F; Herford, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Primordial odontogenic tumor (POT) was first described in 2014. It typically presents in the posterior mandible of a child or adolescent as a "dentigerous cyst-like" well-circumscribed radiolucency associated with an unerupted molar. POT consists of an ellipsoidal mass of dental papilla-like myxoid connective tissue entirely enveloped in a delicate membrane of ameloblastic epithelium. It shows features of a developing tooth with a huge dental papilla, and because it is devoid of dental hard tissue, it could be regarded a soft tissue odontoma. The lesion histologically mimics early (primordial) stages of tooth development. This report describes a case of POT and POT-like proliferations in an unrelated complex odontoma. PMID:26408843

  10. Botryoid Odontogenic Cyst: A Diagnostic Chaos

    PubMed Central

    U, Urmila; Srinivas G, Vijay; Deviramisetty, Sabitha; HK, Puneeth

    2014-01-01

    Botryoid Odontogenic cyst (BOC) originally described by Weathers and Waldron (1973) is a variant of a lateral periodontal cyst characterized by macroscopic and microscopic multilocular growth pattern. We report a case of BOC in a 21-year-old male patient. Orthopantamogram revealed a multilocular radiolucency extending from 43 to 47. The histological examination of incisional biopsy revealed a thin 2-4 layered non keratinised epithelium without rete ridges resembling a reduced enamel epithelium with few localised plaque like thickenings and occasional mural bulges. These features were suggestive of BOC. The excisional biopsy revealed histological features similar to those of incisional biopsy except for the presence of 5-6 epithelial follicles with outer columnar cells and inner stellate reticulum like cells. CD56 and calretinin immunohistochemical staining (IHC) was done. This paper highlights the unusual appearance of follicles in BOC with differential diagnosis and IHC staining characteristics. PMID:25654045

  11. Odontogenic myxofibroma synchronous with primary angiosarcoma of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hadidy, A; Alsharif, A; Sheikh-Ali, R; Abukhalaf, M; Awidi, A; Abukaraki, A; Nimri, C; Omari, A

    2010-01-01

    Odontogenic myxofibroma of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare tumour; moreover, primary splenic angiosarcoma (PAS) in paediatric patients is extremely rare. We report on a 15-year-old boy who presented with right TMJ swelling and subsequently developed epigastric and right upper quadrant pain. The TMJ swelling proved to be odontogenic myxofibroma and the abdominal pain was a result of primary splenic angiosarcoma with hepatic metastasis. We report for the first time the synchronous presentation of PAS and odontogenic myxofibroma in a paediatric patient, and we describe the radiological features along with the histological diagnosis and clinical outcome. Uptake in 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography is also described for the first time for both these tumours. PMID:20139242

  12. Intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic (Pindborg) tumor: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B; Vijayvargiya, Ritika

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a locally aggressive, rare benign odontogenic neoplasm that accounts for <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It was first described by a Dutch pathologist Jens Jorgen Pindborg in 1955. It is most often located in the posterior mandible. The tumor usually appears between the second and sixth decade of life and has no gender predilection. It is slow-growing neoplasm with a recurrence rate of 10–15% and with rare malignant transformation. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid oro-maxillofacial deformation and destruction. CEOT is rarely reported in India. We, herewith present a rare case of CEOT with unusual features associated with an impacted right third molar in the posterior mandible of 35 years male, with an emphasis on clinical, radiographic, histopathology and immunohistochemical features. PMID:26604515

  13. Etiologies and Treatments of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Fahimeh; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Safai, Pooria

    2015-01-01

    Context: Maxillary sinusitis is an important issue in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. This study aims to present a systematic review of etiologies and treatments of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic database search was performed based on related MeSH keywords. Articles published between January 2001 and December 2014 was selected according to the inclusion criteria. The information extracted from various studies was categorized in various tables. Results: The study selected 19 studies. In most studies, oroantral fistula (OAF) was the most common etiology of odontogenic sinusitis. Alpha-hemolytic streptococcus was the most common flora in sinusitis with dental origin. The literature shows that the Caldwell-Luc approach may be the best method for treating sinusitis in cases of displaced teeth. Conclusions: OAF is a common cause of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and may easily be treated by endoscopy and fistula closure. Maxillofacial surgeons and dentists should consider this problem to avoid misdiagnosis and prevent complications. PMID:26756016

  14. Odontogenic calcificant cystic tumor: a report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Daniel; Villanueva, Julio; Espinosa, Sebastián; Cornejo, Marco

    2007-03-01

    Odontogenic Calcificant Cystic Tumor (OCCT) is an infrequent injury. It arises from odontogenic epithelial rests present in the maxilla, jaw or gum. Gorlin and col. described the OCCT for first time as an own pathological entity in 1962. Clinically, the OCCT represents 1% of the odontogenic injuries. It is possible to be found from the first decade to the eighth decade. It affects in same proportion the maxilla and the jaw, being the most common in the dented zones, with greater incidence in the first molar area. Two case reports of OCCT in two different ages, both in female individuals, one at 5 years old and the other at 35 years old are presented. Enucleation of the tumor was the treatment chosen. The purpose of this article is to present a review of the literature related to these two cases of OCCT and its treatment, putting an emphasis on its aetiology, biological behaviour and treatment. PMID:17322800

  15. The diagnostic usefulness of immunohistochemistry for odontogenic lesions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Keith D; Speight, Paul M

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of odontogenic tumors can be challenging, largely due to their rarity and consequent difficulties in gaining experience in their assessment. In most cases, careful attention to morphology, in conjunction with clinical and radiological features will allow a diagnosis to be made. However, in some cases, immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor may be useful. In this review we will outline the immunohistochemical expression profile of normal developing odontogenic tissues and a range of odontogenic tumors. In many cases the immunohistochemical markers are neither specific nor sensitive enough to be of help in diagnosis, but in some cases such analysis may prove very useful. Thus we have outlined a limited number of circumstances where immunohistochemistry may be of use to the practicing diagnostic pathologist. PMID:25409846

  16. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  17. Aerobic to anaerobic transition in Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818) infected with different miracidial doses of Echinostoma paraensei (Lie and Basch, 1967) by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Lustrino, Danilo; Castro, Rosane N; Sant'Ana, Luiza D'Oliveira; Garcia, Juberlan Silva; Maldonado, Arnaldo; dos Santos, Marcos Antônio José; de Lurdes de Azevedo Rodrigues, Maria; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2013-04-01

    The glucose content in the hemolymph and glycogen content in the digestive gland-gonad complex (DGG) and cephalopedal mass of Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to different parasite doses (5 and 50 miracidia) of Echinostoma paraensei as well as the activity of lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) analyses were also performed to determine the concentrations of four organic acids (oxalic, succinic, pyruvic and lactic) present in the hemolymph of infected and uninfected snails, to better understand the effect of infection on the host's energetic/oxidative metabolism. The snails were dissected 1-4 weeks after infection to collect the hemolymph and separate the tissues. There was alteration in the glycemia of the snails at both parasite doses, with a significant increase of glycemia from of the third week after infection in comparison to the control group. Changes were also observed in the lactate dehydrogenase activity, with increased activity as the infection progressed. In parallel, there was a decrease in the glycogen content in the storage tissues, with a markedly greater reduction in the digestive gland-gonad complex (larval development site) in comparison with the cephalopedal mass. Additionally, the infection by both miracidial doses resulted in an increase of oxalic and lactic acid levels, as well as in a decline of piruvic and succinic acid levels in B. glabrata, thus explaining the reduction of the oxidative decarboxylation rate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and acceleration of the anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates in the snails, through lactic fermentation, which is essential to ensure energy supply and success of the infection. PMID:23376444

  18. Infratemporal Space Infection Following Maxillary Third Molar Extraction in an Uncontrolled Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Gok, Gulşen; Zarghami, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Infratemporal space infection is a rare but serious sequel of odontogenic infection. The diagnosis is difficult due to non spe-cific signs and symptoms. Diabetes mellitus as a definitive risk factor for odontogenic infections needs more consideration during clinical procedures. We report a case of an undiagnosed diabetic patient with isolated infratemporal space infection after tooth extraction with presentation of similar signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint and muscle problem. PMID:22991649

  19. CT imaging findings of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, M; Geetha, P; Lakshmi Kavitha, N

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), also known as a Pindborg tumour, with local aggressive behaviour. CT imaging showed a large expansile bone-forming lesion in the mandible, which showed the exact extent and nature of the lesion. We briefly discuss the imaging features of CEOT and the relevant literature. PMID:22190756

  20. HSP70 expression in dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, and ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Andisheh-Tadbir, Azadeh; Fakharian, Mehrnaz

    2015-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) work as molecular chaperones that can assist cells to deal with stressful situations. Members of the HSP70 family can regulate cell growth and transformation and are involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In view of the distinct clinical behavior of odontogenic lesions, the objective of the present study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of HSP70 in these lesions. In this study, 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of odontogenic lesion-16 unicystic ameloblastomas (UAs), 17 solid ameloblastomas (SAs), 18 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), and 19 dentigerous cysts (DCs)-were reviewed by immunohistochemistry for HSP70 staining. In this study, HSP70 immunostaining was evident in all groups of the specimen. Mean percentage of HSP70 staining in SAs (84.2 ± 11.3) and OKCs (83.4 ± 6.8) were significantly higher than UAs (64.4 ± 9.8) and DCs (12.6 ± 10.2) (p = 0.00). But, there was no statistically significant difference between HSP70 expression in SAs and OKCs. The result of this study proposes that high expression rate of HSP70 has a role in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and OKC and is one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of ameloblastoma and high recurrence role of OKC, reinforcing the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor. PMID:25854321

  1. Central odontogenic fibroma of the mandible: A case report with diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Angela; Pannone, Giuseppe; Ramaglia, Luca; Bufo, Pantaleo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Saviano, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic fibroma (OF), a rare odontogenic tumor of mesodermal origin, has been thought to originate from either dental follicle, periodontal ligament, or dental papilla [1]. Different studies reported high variability in the incidence rate as being between 3 and 23% of all odontogenic tumors [2,3]. OF manifests a dual character at the histopathological examination showing odontogenic epithelial structures mimicking those observed in biopsy of ameloblastoma and, in addition, peculiar fragments of cellular stroma. The clinical and radiological features of OF are similar to other odontogenic and/or non-odontogenic tumours and the differential diagnosis may first occur at fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Presentation of case In the case reported, a young patient showed a localized gingival enlargement involving radiologically the superior margin of the right angle of the mandible and associated with an un-erupted tooth. The morphological characteristics together with clinical and radiologic findings confirmed the tumor to be a central odontogenic fibroma (COF) with secondary gingival involvement. Discussion and conclusion Benign odontogenic tumors may be distinguished from other odontogenic/non-odontogenic neoplasias and from malignant tumours through a cytologic differential diagnosis as treatment differs accordingly. PMID:26793312

  2. Comparative in vitro activities of ABT-773 against aerobic and anaerobic pathogens isolated from skin and soft-tissue animal and human bite wound infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Merriam, C V; Warren, Y; Tyrrell, K

    2000-09-01

    We studied the comparative in vitro activities of ABT-773, a new ketolide, against 268 aerobic and 148 anaerobic recent isolates from clinical bites using an agar dilution method and inocula of 10(4) CFU/spot for aerobes and 10(5) CFU for anaerobes. The following are the MIC ranges and MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited (MIC(90)s) of ABT-773 for various isolates, respectively: Pasteurella multocida and Pasteurella septica, 0.125 to 2 and 1 microg/ml; other Pasteurella species, 0.125 to 1 and 0.5 microg/ml; Corynebacterium spp., 0.015 to 0.06 and 0.015 microg/ml; Staphylococcus aureus, 0.03 to 0.06 and 0.06 microg/ml; coagulase-negative staphylococci, 0.015 to >32 and 32 microg/ml; streptococci, 0.015 to 0.03 and 0.03 microg/ml; Eikenella corrodens, 0.25 to 1 and 1 microg/ml; and Bergeyella zoohelcum, 0.03 to 0.25 and 0.06 microg/ml. For anaerobes the MIC ranges and MIC(90)s of ABT-773 were as follows, respectively: Prevotella heparinolytica, 0. 06 to 0.125 and 0.125 microg/ml; Prevotella spp., 0.015 to 0.125 and 0.06 microg/ml; Porphyromonas spp., 0.015 to 0.03 and 0.015 microg/ml; Fusobacterium nucleatum, 0.5 to 8 and 8 microg/ml; other Fusobacterium spp., 0.015 to 8 and 0.5 microg/ml; Bacteroides tectum, 0.015 to 0.5 and 0.06 microg/ml; and Peptostreptococcus spp., 0.015 to 0.25 and 0.03 microg/ml. ABT-773 was more active than all macrolides tested against S. aureus, E. corrodens, and anaerobes, but all compounds were poorly active against F. nucleatum. The activity of ABT-773 was within 1 dilution of that of azithromycin against Pasteurella spp., and ABT-773 was four- to eightfold more active than clarithromycin against Pasteurella spp. ABT-773 may offer a therapeutic alternative for bite wound infections. PMID:10952607

  3. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT. PMID:24102949

  4. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  5. A brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin in a child with cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Moti; Birenboim, Ravit; Katz-Sagi, Hadas; Perles, Zeev; Averbuch, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present report was to present a rare case of a brain abscess in a child with heterotaxy syndrome, severe cardiac anomalies, and extensive dental caries. The pathogen was Streptococcus intermedius isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. The source of the pathogen was probably an infection of a primary molar with a dentoalveolar abscess involving the bud of the permanent successor. After a long course of antibiotic regimens followed by a craniotomy with abscess drainage, a shunt, and comprehensive dental treatment, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any neurological sequel. At home, she completed an additional 3 months of oral antibiotics. This is the only known documented case of a toddler with a brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin without previous dental intervention. It emphasizes the importance of collaboration between cardiologists and pediatric dentists, especially in referring children with congenital heart defects for early dental checkups. PMID:23211917

  6. Role of inflammation in developmental odontogenic pathosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep S; Shetty, Devi C; Urs, Aadithya B; Nainani, P

    2016-01-01

    Periapical infection in the primary tooth may lead to periapical abscess, granuloma, radicular cyst and even osteomyelitis. The infection in primary teeth can also affect the developing successor teeth leading to hypomineralization, hypoplasia, arrest of tooth development, regional odontodysplasia, delayed eruption etc. The purpose of this article is to report a case of malformed permanent tooth in relation to overlying infected deciduous teeth. The probable role of inflammation in pathogenesis of the present condition is also being discussed. PMID:27194886

  7. Squamous Odontogenic Tumor: Literature Review Focusing on the Radiographic Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Nilson do Rosário; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira; Flores, Isadora Luana; de Almeida, Solange Maria; Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira de Castro

    2015-01-01

    Since its first publication in 1975, the squamous odontogenic tumor remains the rarest odontogenic lesion, with around 50 cases in the English-language literature in which the microscopic characteristics are frequently very well demonstrated. However, articles which discuss the radiographic aspects are scarce, especially with emphasis on the differential diagnosis. The present treatise proposes an assessment of jaw lesions with the same radiographic characteristics of the squamous odontogenic tumor to clarify the main findings for dental clinicians during routine diagnosis. PMID:26140060

  8. Surgical management of peripheral variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: A rare case report with review

    PubMed Central

    Jindwani, Karuna; Paharia, Y. K.; Kushwah, Atul Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a relatively uncommon lesion constituting around 3% of all odontogenic tumours and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst. It manifests as a beningn growth which affects young individuals, with a female predeliction usually in the second decade of life, exhibiting more often in the anterior region of maxilla. The current article enumerates the clinical, radiographic and histopathological features of a rare case of extraosseous AOT with its therapeutic consideration PMID:25684929

  9. [A case of the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg's tumor). Reported and literature review].

    PubMed

    Peña-Torres, Leandro Miguel; Monterrubio-Guerrero, Alejandro; Díaz de León-Sandoval, Laura Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor known as Pindborg's tumor, is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the jaws. One of their characteristics is the cortical expansion and the relationship with a non erupted tooth. Since the original description in 1955, only 200 cases approximately have been described in the world literature. This article reviews the literature and describes a case of patient who presented calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor in the jaw undergoing surgical excision treatment with an evolution without complications. PMID:20929626

  10. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    PubMed

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. PMID:26608158

  11. Clinical enigma: A rare case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Cheshta; Chatterjee, Rudra Prasad; Kundu, Sanchita; Roy, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neoplasm of the jaw with only 74 reported cases. It occurs predominantly in the mandibular anterior region during fifth to seventh decades of life. Clinically it manifests as intra-bony swelling with a variable degree of pain. Microscopically, it reveals nests of cells with clear cytoplasm in connective tissue stroma arranged in different patterns. It is often misdiagnosed due to the rarity of lesion and confusing histopathology. Immunohistochemical staining plays an intricate role to uncertain the native of the clear cell to reach a confirmative diagnosis. The article aims to highlight the clinicopathologic features of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma in a middle-aged man with special emphasis on its differential diagnosis. PMID:26681866

  12. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changchun; Amm, Hope M.; DeVilliers, Patricia; Wu, Yixin; Deatherage, Joseph R.; Liu, Zhongyu; MacDougall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) may occur sporadically or associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is a benign aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial origin with a high rate of recurrence. A primary human keratocystic odontogenic tumor cell population, KCOT-1, has been established from a tumor explant culture. The KCOT-1 cells were characterized by growth rate, gene expression profiles of major tooth enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), ameloblastin (AMBN), amelotin (AMTN), tumor-related proteins enamelysin (MMP-20), kallikrein-4 (KLK-4), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cytokeratin 14 (CK14) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, expression of the members of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, SHH, patched (PTCH-1), smoothened (SMO), GLI-1, and GLI-2 and of the NOTCH signaling pathway, NOTCH-1, NOTCH-2, NOTCH-3, JAG-2 (Jagged-2), and Delta-like-1 (DLL-1) were evaluated. KCOT-1 cells were treated with SMO antagonist cyclopamine. We found that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and that the effects of cyclopamine were abolished by adding SHH protein. The protein expression of the SHH pathway was down-regulated by cyclopamine, further confirming that cyclopamine inhibits the SHH signaling pathway; SHH down-regulation correlated with the down-regulation of the NOTCH signaling pathway as well. In conclusion, using an established KCOT-1 cell population, we characterized the gene expression profiles related to the EMPs, SHH, and NOTCH signaling pathway and confirmed that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells and may be a viable agent as a novel therapeutic. PMID:22679015

  13. Mixed odontogenic tumour with dentinoid and ghost cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Patil, Shruthi; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastomas do not generally show evidence of induction, however, rare cases associated with odontome have been reported and are referred to as odontoameloblastomas. We report an unusual case of an ameloblastoma with features of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, showing evidence of induction of dentinoid by tumour cells--but without concomitant formation of enamel--and with features of ghost cells. The lesion occurred on the left side of the maxilla in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:26698201

  14. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The HER3 expression had positive results in 52.4% of OKC, 50% of DC and only 20% of RC samples. There was a significant difference between HER3 expression in OKCs and RCs. Conclusions: The HER3 expression in developmental odontogenic cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor. PMID:26734469

  15. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues ("dentome"). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the "dentome" and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  16. Mandibular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor: Radiographic and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    More, Chandramani B.; Das, Sunanda; Gupta, Swati; Bhavsar, Khushbu

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor of epithelial origin comprising 3% of all the odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, painless, noninvasive, and slow-growing lesion, with a relative frequency of 2.2-13% and often misdiagnosed as an odontogenic cyst on clinical examination. AOT affects young individuals with a female predominance, occurs mainly in the second decade, and usually surrounds the crown of unerupted teeth. This lesion is most commonly located in the anterior maxilla and rarely in the mandible. It is usually associated with an impacted canine. AOT frequently resembles lesions like dentigerous cyst or ameloblastoma. AOT has three variants, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. The intraoral periapical radiograph is the best radiograph to show radiopacities in AOT as discrete foci having a flocculent pattern within radiolucency even with minimal calcified deposits. These calcified deposits are seen in approximately 78% of the lesions. Herewith, we present the report of four unusual cases of AOT located in the mandible, with an emphasis on radiographic findings and on pathologic correlation, and on reviewing the existing literature on this tumor. PMID:24082751

  17. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  18. Oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli as a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes facilitating infections with multiresistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Clarisse; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Ehrmann, Elodie; Dupont, Anais; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Many β-lactamases have been described in various Gram-negative bacilli (Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, etc.) of the oral cavity, belonging to class A of the Ambler classification (CepA, CblA, CfxA, CSP-1 and TEM), class B (CfiA) or class D in Fusobacterium nucleatum (FUS-1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of β-lactams are variable and this variation is often related to the presence of plasmids or other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that modulate the expression of resistance genes. DNA persistence and bacterial promiscuity in oral biofilms also contribute to genetic transformation and conjugation in this particular microcosm. Overexpression of efflux pumps is facilitated because the encoding genes are located on MGEs, in some multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, similar to conjugative transposons harbouring genes encoding β-lactamases. All these facts lead us to consider the oral cavity as an important reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes and a privileged place for genetic exchange, especially in commensal strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli. PMID:25465519

  19. Microbiological examination and antibiotic sensitivity of infections in the head and neck. Has anything changed?

    PubMed

    Farmahan, Samir; Tuopar, Dery; Ameerally, Phillip J; Kotecha, Rushina; Sisodia, Bijal

    2014-09-01

    Because of the growing concern about antibiotic resistance, we aimed to investigate whether the microbiological picture and antibiotic sensitivity of infections in the head and neck have changed in the last 30-40 years. We retrospectively studied 150 patients admitted for inpatient treatment of infections in the head and neck, and searched published reports from the last 30 - 40 years for comparison. There were 85 male and 65 female patients (mean age 39 years, range 1-95). Most infections originated from the teeth (n = 111) and skin (n = 16), and the submandibular (69%) and buccal (67%) spaces were involved most often. Multiple spaces were involved in 94 patients. Swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity in 102 cases, and microorganisms were isolated in 91 (89%), of which 67 (74%) were aerobic infections and 24 (26%) were anaerobic. Bacteria were isolated in 87 (96%) cultures of which 60 (69%) were Gram-positive. Gram-positive cocci were isolated in 62% of cultures. The most common bacteria isolated were streptococci. Seventy percent of the bacteria were sensitive to amoxicillin and 84% to amoxicillin and metronidazole; 14% (Staphylococcus aureus from infections of the skin) were resistant to penicillin. A comparison of our results with those found in previous reports shows no significant change in the microbiological picture and antibiotic sensitivity of odontogenic infections in the head and neck over the last 30 - 40 years. Amoxicillin still treats these infections effectively. PMID:24906249

  20. The so-called calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour in dogs and cats (amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour).

    PubMed

    Gardner, D G; Dubielzig, R R; McGee, E V

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the microscopical features of a rare odontogenic tumour that occurs in dogs and cats and which has been referred to as the calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), although it is not the counterpart of the human tumour of that name. We have proposed amyloid-producing odontogenic tumour (APOT) as an appropriate alternative term. The tumour is composed of irregularly shaped strands of squamous epithelium, which in some areas exhibit palisading of the basal cells, similar to that seen in ameloblastomas. Stellate reticulum occurs focally in some examples. The second prominent feature is the presence of amyloid which tends to calcify. Finally, in some examples, a collagenous matrix, which is apparently a form of dentine, is present focally, adjacent to the epithelium. These histological features are compared with those of the canine keratinizing ameloblastoma and the human CEOT. To date, to few examples have been reported to determine accurately the biological behaviour of APOTs, but some have recurred after excision; none has metastasized. PMID:7836565

  1. Peripheral Tumor with Osteodentin and Cementum-like Material in an Infant: Odontogenic Hamartoma or Odontoma?

    PubMed

    Sfakianou, Aikaterini; Emmanouil, Dimitris E; Tosios, Konstantinos I; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a peripheral tumor on the mandibular alveolar ridge of a seven-month-old Caucasian boy, consisting of ectomesencymal odontogenic tissues, in particular osteodentin and cementum-like material, in a cellular or loose vascular connective tissue stroma. This case may be considered either a peripheral odontogenic hamartoma or a peripheral odontoma. PMID:27098720

  2. Assessment of CD-105 as an Angiogenic Modulator in Odontogenic Myxomas and Dental Follicles.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen González-Galván, María; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Farfán-Morales, J Eduardo; Gainza-Cirauqui, Maria Luisa; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-06-01

    Aim Odontogenic myxoma is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaws, with a locally aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. CD-105 is a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and is a component of the TGF-β1 growth factor receptor complex that modulates angiogenesis by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and cellular migration. The aim of this study is to quantify the microvascular density of the odontogenic myxoma based on the expression of CD-105. Materials and Methods The analysis included 18 odontogenic myxoma and 18 dental follicles as controls. A standard immunohistochemical procedure was performed with the CD-105 antibody. Five representative fields (40×) of the odontogenic myxoma and the dental follicles were selected to determine the microvascular density, which was then followed by a descriptive and comparative statistical analysis. Results Dental follicles presented a significantly higher microvascular density compared with odontogenic myxoma (P = .001). The odontogenic myxoma smaller than 3 cm showed a greater microvascular density than those larger than 3 cm in size (P > .05), and the microvascular density was lower in large odontogenic myxomas as compared with the dental follicles (P = .003). Conclusion A weaker expression of CD-105 in odontogenic myxoma might indicate a lower angiogenic activity, suggesting that vascular proliferation has a limited role in the growth mechanisms and in the aggressive behavior of this neoplasm. PMID:26888956

  3. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  4. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    PubMed Central

    Radheshyam, Chourasia; Alokenath, Bandyopadhyay; Kumar, Harish; Abikshyeet, Panda

    2015-01-01

    The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. PMID:26345145

  5. Defects of the Carney complex gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia F C; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-06-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as to facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene displays a loss of protein expression as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis, and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included in the study: six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial components of the tumors were separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around the PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations along with two 5'-UTR and four intronic mutations in mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, which indicates that additional genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of such tumors, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a(+) (/) (-) mice do not show abnormalities, which indicates that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  6. Frequency of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinus and response to surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Crovetto-Martínez, Rafael; Martin-Arregui, Francisco J.; Zabala-López-de-Maturana, Aitor; Tudela-Cabello, Kiara

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Odontogenic sinusitis usually affects the maxillary sinus but may extend to the anterior ethmoid sinuses. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid sinuses and determine also the surgical resolution differences between odontogenic maxillary sinusitis and odontogenic maxillary associated to anterior ethmoidal sinusitis. Study Design: This is a retrospective cohort study performed on 55 patients diagnosed of odontogenic sinusitis and treated surgically by functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: This study showed that 52.7% of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis spreads to anterior ethmoid, causing added anterior ethmoid sinusitis. We found that 92.3% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis (who underwent middle meatal antrostomy) and 96.5% of the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis extended to the anterior ethmoid (treated with middle meatal antrostomy and anterior ethmoidectomy) were cured. Conclusions: Ethmoid involvement is frequent in maxillary odontogenic sinusitis. The ethmoid involvement does not worsen the results of “functional endoscopic sinus surgery” applied to the odontogenic sinusitis. Key words:Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, ethmoiditis, functional endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:24608208

  7. In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Washington, J A

    1979-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria should be limited to isolates from persistent or recurrent infections that have been treated adequately and appropriately with antimicrobial agents and, in reference centers, to collections of isolates in order to monitor alterations in susceptibility of species to various antimicrobial agents. An agar dilution reference method is being evaluated currently; however, practicality limits sporadic testing of single isolates to disk elution or broth dilution techniques. No single disk diffusion method has yet been found to be acceptable for testing anaerobic bacteria, and the results obtained with standardized procedures for aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria are not applicable to anaerobic bacteria. PMID:288163

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Odontogenic Cutaneous Sinus Tracts in an 11-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Liang, Yun; Xiong, Huacui

    2016-05-01

    Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts (OCSTs) are generally primarily misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated by virtue of their rarity and the absence of dental symptoms. Accurate diagnosis and treatment and the elimination of the source of infection can reduce the incidence of complications and relieve the pain of the patient.In this case report, we present the case of an 11-year-old patient with an apparent abscess but an unobvious draining sinus tract in his left cheek. Intraorally, a glass-ionomer-cement filling on the occlusal surface of the left mandibular first molar (tooth 36) was noted. Radiographic examination revealed a radiopaque mass inside the crown and pulp chamber and an irregular, radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. He was diagnosed with an OCTS secondary to a periapical abscess of tooth 36. Precise root canal therapy (RCT) and chronic granuloma debridement was performed; 6 months later, the abscess and sinus had healed completely, and the periapical lesion had resolved.Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are uncommon in the clinic. This case report reminds us of the significance of OCSTs and provides some implications for their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27196471

  9. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa. PMID:25776548

  10. Odontogenic myxoma in a 52-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Hari; Mehta, Gagan; Kumar, Manoj; Lone, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare benign but locally aggressive tumour of the jaws. It is usually seen in the second to third decade of life. Women are more frequently affected than men and it has more predilections for the mandible rather than the maxilla. OM presents as an asymptomatic swelling in most of the cases. Owing to the non-capsulated and aggressive nature of OM, a high rate of recurrence has been reported. Here we present a case of OM in a 52-year-old woman managed by segmental mandibulectomy. Sign of recurrence was seen after 18 months of follow-up. PMID:24859552

  11. [Lymphotropic therapy for acute purulent odontogenic jaw periostitis].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Lĭubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R; Sheplev, B V

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the gingival mucosa was studied by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent odontogenic maxillary periostitis treated traditionally and receiving lymphotropic therapy. Lymphotropic administration of the antibiotic during 2 days resulted in less pronounced dilatation of the interstitial spaces and lymph vessels adjacent to the molars and higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. This indicated high efficiency of lymphotropic therapy of acute purulent maxillary periostitis for molars. Microcirculation parameters and tissue leukocyte cytogram in gingival mucosal tissue adjacent to the canines and premolars differed negligibly in patients treated by different methods. PMID:14671590

  12. Diagnostic Factors of Odontogenic Cysts in Iranian Population: A Retrospective Study Over the Past Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Hassan; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Sabour, Siamak; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of odontogenic cysts due to their silent progression is always a challenging problem for clinicians. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the frequency of odontogenic cysts and related factors in a selected Iranian population. Patients and Methods: The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 312 patients recorded data in Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April 1993 to December 2013. All related data were extracted from the records and categorized in tables. The correlation between the variables was analyzed by either chi-square or multinominal logistic regression tests. The P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Evaluation of 312 patients records (185 males and 127 females) with the mean age of 27.6 showed that Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC) was the most common odontogenic cyst of all followed by the dentigerous cyst as the second most common lesion. Most of the patients were in the second or third decades of their lives, although there was no statistically significant age distribution. The finding of the current study showed that calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurrence was significantly related to the history of trauma. Enucleation and curettage of the odontogenic cysts were the most common treatment plans of all. Conclusions: The current study showed that clinicians should consider the many factors associated with the occurrence of odontogenic cysts. PMID:26357548

  13. Defects of the Carney complex's gene (PRKAR1A) in odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Sílvia F; Gomez, Ricardo S; Diniz, Marina G; Bernardes, Vanessa F; Soares, Flávia FC; Brito, João Artur R; Liu, Sophie; Pontes, Hélder Antônio R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Gomes, Carolina C

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of some odontogenic tumors often leads to tooth and maxillary bone loss as well as facial deformity. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in their pathogenesis may result in alternative molecular therapies. The PRKAR1A gene shows loss of protein expression, as well as somatic mutations in odontogenic myxomas, an odontogenic ectomesenchymal neoplasm. We used a combination of qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, LOH analysis and direct sequencing of all PRKAR1A exons to assess if this gene is altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. Thirteen tumors were included, being six ameloblastic fibromas, four ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, one ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and two ameloblastic fibrosarcomas. The epithelial component of the tumors was separated from the mesenchymal by laser microdissection in most of the cases. We also searched for odontogenic pathology in Prkar1a+/− mice. PRKAR1A mRNA/protein expression was decreased in the benign mixed odontogenic tumors in association with LOH at markers around PRKAR1A gene. We also detected a missense and two synonymous mutations, besides two 5’-UTR and four intronic mutations in the mixed odontogenic tumors. Prkar1a+/− mice did not show evidence of odontogenic tumor formation, suggesting that additional genes may be involved in their pathogenesis, at least in rodents. We conclude that the PRKAR1A gene and its locus are altered in mixed odontogenic tumors. PRKAR1A's expression is decreased in a subset of tumors but not in all, and Prkar1a+/− mice do not show abnormalities, suggesting that additional genes play a role in this tumor's pathogenesis. PMID:25870248

  14. Remission for Loss of Odontogenic Potential in a New Micromilieu In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yunfei; Cai, Jinglei; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Shubin; Ge, Lihong; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic organogenesis, the odontogenic potential resides in dental mesenchyme from the bud stage until birth. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) isolated from the inductive dental mesenchyme of developing molars are frequently used in the context of tooth development and regeneration. We wondered if and how the odontogenic potential could be retained when mDMCs were cultured in vitro. In the present study, we undertook to test the odontogenic potential of cultured mDMCs and attempted to maintain the potential during culturing. We found that cultured mDMCs could retain the odontogenic potential for 24 h with a ratio of 60% for tooth formation, but mDMCs were incapable of supporting tooth formation after more than 24 h in culture. This loss of odontogenic potential was accompanied by widespread transcriptomic alteration and, specifically, the downregulation of some dental mesenchyme-specific genes, such as Pax9, Msx1, and Pdgfrα. To prolong the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in vitro, we then cultured mDMCs in a serum-free medium with Knockout Serum Replacement (KSR) and growth factors (fibroblastic growth factor 2 and epidermal growth factor). In this new micromilieu, mDMCs could maintain the odontogenic potential for 48 h with tooth formation ratio of 50%. Moreover, mDMCs cultured in KSR-supplemented medium gave rise to tooth-like structures when recombined with non-dental second-arch epithelium. Among the supplements, KSR is essential for the survival and adhesion of mDMCs, and both Egf and Fgf2 induced the expression of certain dental mesenchyme-related genes. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the transcriptomic changes responded to the alteration of odontogenic potential in cultured mDMCs and a new micromilieu partly retained this potential in vitro, providing insight into the long-term maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:27050091

  15. Treatment of Maxillary Glandular Odontogenic Cyst Involving the Same Place of Previously Treated Traumatic Bone Cyst.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emel; Baş, Burcu; Dinçer, Duygu; Günhan, Ömer

    2016-03-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst is a rare developmental odontogenic cysts of the jaws having an aggressive behavior. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior mandible, and it is widely seen in middle-aged people. It is suggested that trauma could be a precipitating factor for its occurrence. This article presents the diagnosis and treatment of a case of glandular odontogenic cyst at anterior maxilla that occurred at the same localization of a traumatic bone cyst, 5 years after its management. PMID:26967100

  16. Valuable Radiographic Tool for Odontogenic Jaw Keratocyst Diagnosis and Surgical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Lai, R-F; Li, Z-J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical use of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of patients with odontogenic jaw keratocyst and to guide computer-aided surgical treatment planning. Methods: Imaging, image processing, and visualization technologies were used to produce clear diagnosis, provide proper treatment, and formulate favourable prognosis. Cone beam computed tomography was used to collect medical information including site, extent, shape, and other characteristic features of a patient with large odontogenic jaw keratocyst. Results: The imaging technique produced excellent results in imaging, image processing and threedimensional (3D) visualization. Conclusion: The 3D digital reconstruction model of the odontogenic jaw keratocyst was shown intuitively. PMID:25429483

  17. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with dentigerous cyst: Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikramjeet; Goyal, Sunder; Sheikh, Soheyl; Shambulingappa, P.; Singh, Balwinder; Singh, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a benign lesion derived from the complex system of dental lamina or its remnant. It is categorized into three variants (follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral). We present a rare case of AOT arising from a dentigerous cyst around the unerupted canine in a 28-year-old female. We believe that this case z an odontogenic cyst with neoplastic development, containing both epithelial and mesenchymal components. As more cases accumulate, we will be able to study these rare lesions further whether the AOTs derived from an odontogenic cyst could represent a distinct “hybrid” variant separate to the three variants described thus far. PMID:23230373

  18. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis with oro-nasal fistula: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Longoni, Salvatore; Amosso, Ernesto; Carini, Stefania; Garavello, Werner; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study The odontogenic sinusitis has an incidence between 38 and 40.6%. Increased risk of maxillary sinusitis has been reported with the presence of periapical abscesses, periodontal disease, dental trauma, tooth extraction and implant placement when the sinusal membrane is perforated. Materials and methods A patient with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis associated with oro-nasal fistula was treated. Results The follow-up at six months showed the complete resolution of maxillary sinusitis, palatal fistula got closed and pain symptoms disappeared. Conclusion This case report describes a rare complication of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: the oro-nasal fistula. PMID:25678949

  19. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A rare presentation in an elderly female

    PubMed Central

    Vijayabanu, B.; Sreeja, C.; Bharath, N.; Aesha, I.; Kannan, V. Sadesh; Devi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxomas are rare benign neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, comprising 3–6% of all odontogenic tumors. They are slow growing, non-metastasizing, often asymptomatic with local aggressiveness due to its infiltrative nature and hence high recurrence rate, with a high incidence of occurrence in the mandible. Most frequently occurs in second to third decade of life, seldom occurs beyond these age groups. Hereby, we present a case of odontogenic myxoma occurring in the maxilla in a 65-year-old female managed by partial maxillectomy. PMID:26538962

  20. Retrospective study of 289 odontogenic tumors in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    Serpa, Marianna-Sampaio; Tenório, Jefferson-da-Rocha; do Nascimento, George-João-Ferreira; de Souza-Andrade, Emanuel-Sávio; Veras-Sobral, Ana-Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors (OTs) are considered important among oral lesions because of their clinicopathological heterogeneity, and variable biological behavior. This paper aims to determine the frequency and distribution of OTs, over a period of 10 years, at a public university in Northeastern Brazil and compare this data with previous reports. Material and Methods We reviewed all cases of OTs from oral pathology laboratory of University of Pernambuco (UPE), from 2004 to 2014. Diagnoses were re-evaluated and the tumors were classified according to the latest (2005) World Health Organization Classification of Tumors. In addition, we searched in the English-language literature retrospective studies on OTs that used the same classification. Results Data was obtained allowing the analysis of the tissue hemodynamics. We were able to map the vascularization of the face and it was possible to access three arteries of small diameter (0,60mm angular artery; 0,55mm greater palatine artery; 0,45mm infraorbital artery). Conclusions OTs are uncommon neoplasms with geographic variation. Our clinicopathological features are according to literature. In the present study, KCOT was the most frequent one, showing that the new classification of OTs altered the distribution of these lesions and possibly made KCOT the most common OT observed in diagnostic services worldwide. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, jaw neoplasms, epidemiology, oral pathology. PMID:26827068

  1. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    PubMed Central

    Goteti, Saravana HL

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005) classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2%) was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2%) and odontoma (19.9%). The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population. PMID:27013857

  2. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: a histopathologic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Ana Terezinha Marques; Santos, Cássio Roberto Rocha; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Jorge, Jacks; León, Jorge Esquiche; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2009-12-01

    The central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT) is a rare lesion that usually affects the posterior region of the mandible of young adults. We present a case of CGCOT involving the mandible of a 20-year-old white woman, emphasizing the immunohistochemical characteristics using a large panel of antibodies. The lesion was removed surgically, and after 4 years of follow-up, there are no evidences of recurrences. The odontogenic epithelium (OE) showed positivity for cytokeratins (CKs) AE1/AE3, 34betaE12, CK5, CK7, CK8, CK14, CK19, E-cadherin, beta-catenin, CD138, and p63. The granular cells were positive for vimentin, CD68, lysozyme, muscle-specific actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), CD138, and bcl-2. Dendritic-like cells surrounding the OE displayed positivity for vimentin, CD1a, S100, CD68, and bcl-2, but it was negative for factor XIIIa, supporting a Langerhans cell phenotype. Ki-67 labeling index was 1.8%, whereas p53 was negative. These data confirm the benign nature of CGCOT, the association of OE with Langerhans cells, and a variable phenotype of the granular cells. PMID:19917479

  3. [THE ROLE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN ODONTOGENIC CYSTS].

    PubMed

    Lytvynets-Holutyak, Y E

    2015-01-01

    The study involved 67 patients with odontogenic cysts (OC) aged 18 to 45 years, who were divided into groups: Group 1 (n = 67) patients with OC aged 18 to 45 years, group 2--control group, consisted of 20 healthy persons of similar age. We studied the characteristics of immune status and immunoreactivity in patients with odontogenic cysts. Condition of cellular and humoral immunity was assessed by using the methods of direct rosette developing with erythrocytes coated with monoclonal antibodies to CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD22+, CD4/CD8 indicators of immunoregulatory index and phagocytic immunity. State of nonspecific resistance was studied by determining the phagocytic activity of neutrophils and their oxygen dependent metabolism in NBT test. The concentration of cytokines (IL-6 and IL-4) in serum was determined by ELISA. During the study we found that in patients with (OC) developed significant changes in the structure of the immune response at the cellular as well as at the humoral level that makes it necessary to develop new individualized preventive measures along with existing therapies OC. PMID:26827437

  4. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed an odontogenic fibroma. No clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence were found five years after surgical excision. Despite the various differential diagnoses of homogeneous unilocular and well delimited radiolucencies of the jaws, enucleation with peripheral curettage, without any other pre-operative imaging exams or biopsies, can be considered as the treatment of choice. Key words:Differential diagnosis, impacted third molar, radiographic imaging, microscopic diagnosis, odontogenic fibroma. PMID:27034766

  5. Calcifying odontogenic cysts associated with odontomas: confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Petruzzi, Massimo; Scivetti, Michele; Pilolli, Giovanni Pietro; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Crincoli, Vito; Lajolo, Carlo; Giuliani, Michele; Calabro, Michele; Guida, Agostino; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario; Favia, Gianfranco

    2011-05-01

    The so-called calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) represents a heterogeneous group of lesions that exhibit a variety of clinico-pathologic features. It is an uncommon lesion and represents less than 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors. Recently, these lesions have been reclassified as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT), according to the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification. CCOT are frequently found in association with, or containing areas histologically identical to, various types of odontogenic tumors, such as complex/compound odontomas. This work analyzed clinical and histological data deriving from 13 patients affected by CCOT associated with odontomas. Moreover, a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) analysis was undertaken to further a better understanding of the nature of this peculiar lesion. PMID:21323419

  6. Maxillary Glandular Odontogenic Cyst: An Uncommon Entity at an Unusual Site.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sunira; Reddy, Enja Siva Prasad; Sah, Kunal; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2016-03-01

    The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare developmental cyst that was described in 1988 by Gardner, et al. This lesion demonstrates non-specific clinical course and radiological findings. Hence, often confused with other lesions, but specific histopathlogical features help in establishing its correct diagnosis. This article presents a rare case of a maxillary glandular odontogenic cyst in a 70-year-old female patient. PMID:26923896

  7. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely made this area of investigation more exciting. Particularly fascinating are their structural and physiological features allowing them to withstand extremely selective environmental conditions. These properties are often due to specific biomolecules (DNA, lipids, enzymes, osmolites, etc.) that have been studied for years as novel sources for biotechnological applications. In some cases (DNA-polymerase, thermostable enzymes), the search and applications successful exceeded preliminary expectations, but certainly further exploitations are still needed. PMID:25370030

  8. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely made this area of investigation more exciting. Particularly fascinating are their structural and physiological features allowing them to withstand extremely selective environmental conditions. These properties are often due to specific biomolecules (DNA, lipids, enzymes, osmolites, etc.) that have been studied for years as novel sources for biotechnological applications. In some cases (DNA-polymerase, thermostable enzymes), the search and applications successful exceeded preliminary expectations, but certainly further exploitations are still needed. PMID:25370030

  9. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  10. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  11. Conservative treatment of an aggressive odontogenic tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Catunda, Ivson Souza; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti Egito; Macedo Neres, Bruno Jose Carvalho; de Araujo, Raquell Alves; Ponzi, Elizabeth Arruda Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    An ameloblastoma is a polymorphic, benign, locally invasive tumor made up of odontogenic epithelium, clinically characterized by slow, progressive, painless growth. There are reports in the literature on the treatment of ameloblastomas with aggressive mural invasion through resections, in order to minimize recurrence. However, different approaches may be used at the bone level, such as curettage combined with a chemical fixative (Carnoy's solution), cryotherapy, or thermal cauterization. The findings of this case report demonstrate that the use of Carnoy's solution following the enucleation of a unicysticameloblastoma with mural invasion may be a treatment alternative with a low rate of recurrence, as well as a reduced rate of postoperative complications, a reduction in costs, and preservation of both esthetics and function. PMID:24064176

  12. Ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Mudhar, Hardeep Singh; Nurrudin, Murtuza

    2014-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a left infraorbital lesion, causing upward globe displacement. Imaging confirmed a mass between the globe and the orbital floor. The lesion was removed via a sub-ciliary approach and histology revealed a a mature tooth along with a periodontal ligament, oral-type mucinous glands and bone. Six years later a mass recurred at exactly the same site and on this occasion, revealed cysts containing mucin and lined by Schneiderian type epithelium. A rather complex combination of a tooth, lamellar bone, mucinous oral type glands and Schneiderian cystic epithelium is highly unusual and we have called the lesion "ossifying cystic odontogenic and Schneiderian choristoma of the orbit." PMID:24171664

  13. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Gingiva: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Soolari, Ahmad; Khan, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a case of an uncommon and slow-growing tumor known as a central odontogenic fibroma (COF). The patient in question is a 53-year-old African-American man who was referred for periodontal evaluation of asymptomatic space formation between the mandibular central incisors. Clinical and radiological evaluations disclosed tumor-like tissue expanding the alveolar ridge in the buccolingual dimension, along with thinning of the cortical plates. Surgical excision was performed, and the specimen was sent for histopathology, which later confirmed that the lesion was a COF. Periodontal regenerative therapy was performed to rebuild the hard and soft tissue that had been compromised as a result of tumor expansion. The site was grafted, with excellent results. PMID:25646136

  14. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash; Sapdhare, Swati; Pujar, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is of particular interest because its recurrence rate is high and its behavior is aggressive. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), which is also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and with a predisposition to neoplasms. These multiple KCOTs have warranted an aggressive treatment at the earliest because of the damage and possible complications. Recurrence of these lesions is a characteristic feature that has to be considered while explaining the prognosis to the patient. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old boy with clinical features of basal cell nevus syndrome and multiple KCOTs. In addition to the other common features, congenitally missing third molars in all the four quadrants is a feature which has not been previously reported in association with NBCCS in Indian patients. PMID:26981489

  15. Anaerobic endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus saccharolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Westblom, T U; Gorse, G J; Milligan, T W; Schindzielorz, A H

    1990-01-01

    The first case of infective endocarditis caused by the anaerobe Staphylococcus saccharolyticus is reported. The infection occurred in a previously healthy 61-year-old male with no known predisposing valvular heart disease. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of 2 g of nafcillin every 4 h and 90 mg of gentamicin every 8 h for 6 weeks. PMID:2280017

  16. Assessment of BRAFV600E and SMOF412E mutations in epithelial odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Marina Gonalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Guimares, Bruna Viana Antonini; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Lacerda, Jlio Csar Tanos; Cardoso, Sergio Vitorino; de Faria, Paulo Rogrio; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Eisenberg, Ana Lcia Amaral; Loyola, Adriano Mota; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2015-07-01

    The classification of ameloblastoma in multicystic or unicystic variants is associated with its clinical behaviour. Recently, BRAF and SMO mutations have been reported in ameloblastomas. However, it is not clear if such mutations are shared by the multi- and unicystic variants of ameloblastoma or by odontogenic carcinomas. We assessed BRAFV600E and SMOF412E in multicystic, unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastomas. In addition, we investigated whether the BRAFV600E mutation occurs in odontogenic carcinomas. A total of 28 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, comprising 17 ameloblastomas and 11 odontogenic carcinomas, were included. The BRAFV600E mutation was assessed by real-time PCR with a specific TaqMan probe and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The SMOF412E mutation was assessed by Sanger sequencing. Fourteen out of 17 (82 %) ameloblastomas showed the BRAFV600E mutation, specifically, 5/6 (83 %) unicystic, 7/9 (78 %) multicystic and 2/2 desmoplastic ameloblastomas. BRAFV600E mutation was detected in 4/11 (36 %) malignant tumours, specifically, 3/8 (38 %) ameloblastic carcinomas and 1/1 clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, while the two ghost cell odontogenic carcinomas did not harbour this mutation. The SMOF412E mutation was not detected in ameloblastoma. The BRAFV600E-activating mutation is a common event in ameloblastomas, occurring regardless of site or histological type. This mutation is also detected in odontogenic carcinomas. SMO somatic mutation is a secondary genetic event in the ameloblastoma pathogenesis. Our findings support the possibility for personalised, molecular-targeted therapy for ameloblastomas and odontogenic carcinomas harbouring the BRAFV600E mutation. PMID:25854168

  17. Linezolid activity compared to those of selected macrolides and other agents against aerobic and anaerobic pathogens isolated from soft tissue bite infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Merriam, C V

    1999-06-01

    Linezolid was tested against 420 aerobes and anaerobes, including 148 Pasteurella isolates, by an agar dilution method. Linezolid was active against all Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and P. multocida subsp. septica isolates and most Pasteurella canis, Pasteurella dagmatis, and Pasteurella stomatis isolates. The MIC was

  18. Giant Pindborg Tumor (Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor): An Unusual Case Report with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Lenka, Sthitaprajna; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Mishra, Sobhan

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called “Pindborg tumor”, as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of this locally invasive tumor remains unknown. It is thought to arise from stratum intermedium. It commonly affects the posterior mandible manifesting as a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling often associated with an impacted tooth. We report a case of CEOT, for which, owing to its huge size we have proposed the term “giant” Pindborg tumor (CEOT). This is probably the largest case of this tumor reported so far in the English literature. The present case also has the classic yet rare “driven snow” appearance of the tumor on radiographs. PMID:24516774

  19. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor in Anterior Maxilla Associated with a Supernumerary Tooth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Urvashi; Gulati, Anubha; Batra, Hemant; Singh, Devinderpreet

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are derived from epithelial, ectomesenchymal and/or mesenchymal elements that are or have been a part of the tooth-forming apparatus. Of all the odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor accounts for 1% of the cases. Approximately 200 cases have been reported to date. There is no sex predilection, with a 2:1 predilection for the mandible, mostly in the premolar/molar region. It is often locally invasive. Most often, it is associated with an impacted tooth, is asymptomatic and requires biopsy for diagnosis. Presented here is a rare case of an intraosseous calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor surrounding a supernumerary tooth. Furthermore, the occurrence of this tumor in the anterior maxilla (an uncommon site) in a pediatric patient makes it rarer. Although the present case was asymptomatic, root resorption and displacement of adjacent teeth necessitated its surgical removal. The lesion was surgically enucleated and histopathological examination confirmed calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, showing abundant calcifications in the form of Liesegang rings. PMID:23487408

  20. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Ferranti, Margarita; Hueto-Madrid, Juan Antonio; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare condition characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinitation in the form of Ghost cell with varying amounts of dysplastic dentina. Material and Methods: We report a case of a 70 year-old woman with a rapid onset of painful swelling right maxillary tumor. Magnetic resonance showed a huge tumor dependent on the right half of the right hard palate with invasion of the pterygoid process and focally to the second branch of the trigeminal. Radiological stage was T4N0. The patient underwent a right subtotal maxillectomy with clear margins. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given. The patient was free of residual or recurrent disease 12 months after surgery. Results: The tumor was 3,9cm in diameter. It was spongy and whitish gray. Microscopically the tumor was arranged in nets and trabeculae, occasionally forming palisade. Tumoral cells had clear cytoplasm with vesicular nuclei. There was atipia and mitosi with vascular and perineural invasion. The excised tumor was diagnosed as a GCOC. Conclusions: Ghost cell carcinoma is a rare odontogenic carcinoma. Its course is unpredictable, ranging from locally invasive tumors of slow growth to highly aggressive and infiltrative ones. Wide surgical excision with clean margins is the treatment of choice although its combination with postoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, remains controversial. Key words:Ameloblastic carcinoma, calcifying odontogenic cyst, Ghost cell carcinoma, keratinizing epithelial odontogenic cyst, maxillary tumor, odontogenic carcinoma. PMID:25674335

  1. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus. PMID:25411856

  2. Evaluation of sporadic cases of odontogenic keratocysts in multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Valter, K; Pavelić, B; Katanec, D; Sokler, K; Galić, N; Segović, S; Donath, K; Herman, R

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to report frequency of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts (sOKC) according to the age and gender, as well as location (mandible, maxilla, soft tissues, and maxillary sinus). Four hundred and twenty nine sOKC confirmed pathohistologically in a period from 1965-1998 were included in this study. The average age of patients with sOKC was 43.11 (age range 10-91), in males 42.06 and in females 44.72 years. More frequently sOKC were found in males (60.61%) in comparison to the females (39.39%). Therefore, ratio between males and females was 1.5:1. Diagnosis of sOKC is usually established in patients aged 21-30 (18.88%), in males usually aged between 21-30 (23.46%), and in females aged between 11-20 (18.93%). sOKC are more frequent in males according to the age groups, except between age 61-70 where sOKC were more frequent in females. Most frequently, sOKC occurred in the mandible 70.16%, 12.35% of sOKC were found in the maxilla, 12.82% in soft tissues and 4.66% in the maxillary sinuses. PMID:12674852

  3. Malignant transformation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour - a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Tarakji, Bassel; Ashok, Nipun; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) has been classified as an odontogenic tumour. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is the malignant counterpart of CCOT. This paper aims to review the literature regarding malignant transformation of CCOT. A literature search was done via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface, searching for articles relating to malignant transformation of CCOT. From these articles, references were obtained, and from their references lists, pertinent secondary references were also identified and acquired. After reviewing the literature, we found 26 cases of GCOC which developed from CCOT. Malignant transformation of CCOT was seen more commonly in the maxilla. Histologically, changes such as increased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, atypical mitotic figures have been reported after malignant transformation. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown an increased expression of ki-67 and p53 in tumour cells. Malignant transformation of CCOT, although rare, mostly takes place in recurrent and long standing cases. PMID:26557757

  4. Malignant transformation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour – a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) has been classified as an odontogenic tumour. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is the malignant counterpart of CCOT. This paper aims to review the literature regarding malignant transformation of CCOT. A literature search was done via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface, searching for articles relating to malignant transformation of CCOT. From these articles, references were obtained, and from their references lists, pertinent secondary references were also identified and acquired. After reviewing the literature, we found 26 cases of GCOC which developed from CCOT. Malignant transformation of CCOT was seen more commonly in the maxilla. Histologically, changes such as increased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, atypical mitotic figures have been reported after malignant transformation. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown an increased expression of ki-67 and p53 in tumour cells. Malignant transformation of CCOT, although rare, mostly takes place in recurrent and long standing cases. PMID:26557757

  5. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Kyul; Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Kim, Uk-Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction. PMID:25922819

  6. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Aditya, Amita; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  7. Bilateral Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour of Mandible: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Pragun; Mhapuskar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a relatively rare lesion of oral and maxillofacial region and forms only 2% of all odontogenic tumours. It was previously known as Calcifying odontogenic cyst and only recently has been classified as a tumour by WHO. The controversy regarding its origin can be owed to its diverse clinical and histopathological presentation and variation in reported malignant potential. It was first reported by Gorlin in 1962 and since then conundrum regarding its true nature has persisted. It is seen in association with other lesions like odontoma, ameloblastoma and ameloblastic fibroma. Both intra-osseous and extra-osseous forms of CCOT have been reported. It commnoly occurs in anterior region with equal preponderance in maxilla and mandible. Here we present a rare case of bilateral CCOT in the posterior mandible of a 16-year-old male patient which was discovered incidentally during a radiographic examination. PMID:26673837

  8. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography.

  9. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias. PMID:26464605

  10. A case of glandular odontogenic cyst in the mandible treated with the dredging method.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Naomi; Ohba, Seigo; Uehara, Masataka; Fujita, Syuichi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare odontogenic cyst derived from the odontogenic epithelium. GOC shows unpredictable and potentially aggressive behavior. Although enucleation and curettage are applied in most cases, the recurrence rate remains relatively high. Because a standard care procedure for GOC has not been established, we propose a new treatment procedure for GOC. In this case report, we describe a 62-year-old Japanese woman who suffered from GOC arising at the anterior region of her mandible and who was treated using the dredging method. She underwent enucleation and curettage twice using the dredging method with preservation of the teeth, which were involved with the lesion, but the lesion recurred 2 years later. In addition to enucleation and curettage, apicoectomy of the teeth was performed with a third dredging method procedure, and prognosis has been good with no recurrence for 18 months since the last treatment. PMID:24374982

  11. Mandibular intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma lesion associated with odontogenic keratocyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Seop; Geum, Dong-Ho; Yoon, Sang-Yong; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Cho, Yeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor in the oral cavity, and it accounts for about 90% of all oral cancers. Several risk factors for oral SCC have been identified; however, SCC associated with odontogenic keratocysts have rarely been reported. The present study describes the case of a 36-year-old man with SCC of the right ramus of the mandible, which was initially diagnosed as a benign odontogenic cyst. He underwent enucleation at another hospital followed by segmental mandibulectomy and fibular free flap reconstruction at our institution. In this case, we introduce a patient with oral cancer associated with odontogenic cyst on the mandible and report a satisfactory outcome with wide resection and immediate free flap reconstruction. PMID:25922819

  12. Clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor: Case report with immunohistochemical findings

    PubMed Central

    Turatti, Eveline; Brasil, Juviano; Romañach, Mário-José; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm, locally aggressive, characterized by sheets and nests of polyhedral epithelial cells exhibiting eosinophilic cytoplasm or less often clear cytoplasm. Additional features include nuclear pleomorphism without mitotic activity, concentric calcifications, and deposits of amyloid. Herein, we present an additional example of clear cell variant of CEOT occurring in a 25-year-old female. Microscopically, the tumor consisted on proliferation of epithelial cells with eosinophilic, clear vacuolated cytoplasm interspersed with focal areas of amyloid deposition. Tumor cells were immunopositive for AE1/AE3, CK14, CK19, β-catenin, CD138, and p63. Key words:Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, clear cell, histopathology, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25810830

  13. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  14. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Seo, Won-Gyo; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Park, Hae-Seo; Jang, Jong-Won; Chung, Woo-Yeol

    2015-12-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  15. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Piyush; Bishen, Kundendu A.; Gupta, Nishant; Jamdade, Anshuman; Kumar, Gopa R.

    2012-01-01

    Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC) is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC) as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size. PMID:23293492

  16. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najmeh; Saghafi, Shadi; Mohammadzadeh Rezaei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Central granular cell odontogenic tumor) CGCOT) of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images PMID:25628673

  17. Odontogenic tumors: A collaborative study of 218 cases diagnosed over 12 years and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nazl?m, Sinan; Etoz, Meryem; Den?z, Kemal; Yasa, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency and distribution of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in the Cappadocia region of Turkey, and to compare the findings with those reported in the literature. Study Design: The records of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology Departments at Erciyes University, with histologic diagnosis of odontogenic tumors (based on the World Health Organization classification, 2005), over a 12-year period, were analyzed. The relative frequency of different types of tumors was also analyzed and compared with the literature. Results: OTs in the present study constituted 2.74% of all the 7,942 registered biopsies. A total of 218 cases of OTs were collected and reviewed. Of these, (94.04%) were benign and (5.96%) were malignant. The mandible was the most commonly affected anatomic location, with 170 cases (77.9%). Ameloblastoma with a predilection for the posterior mandible was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (30.28%), followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (19.5%), odontoma (13.4%), and odontogenic myxoma (8.5%). Conclusions: OTs are rare neoplasms and appear to show geographic variations in the world. In Cappadocia, Turkey, they are more common in the mandible, with ameloblastoma followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumors with the incidences observed in the present study being similar to those of previous studies from Asia and Africa, and in contrast to those reported from American countries. Key words:Odontogenic tumors, WHO classification, prevalence, jaws. PMID:25481228

  18. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  19. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  20. Diagnostically Challenging Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: A Selective Review of 7 Jawbone Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Considerable variation in the clinicopathologic presentation of epithelial odontogenic tumors can sometimes be confusing and increase the chance of misdiagnosis. Seven diagnostically challenging jawbone lesions are described. There were 2 cases of mistaken identity in our ameloblastoma file. One unicystic type, initially diagnosed and treated as a lateral periodontal cyst, showed destructive recurrence 6 years postoperatively. The other globulomaxillary lesion was managed under the erroneous diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and recurred 4 times over an 11-year period. This tumor was found in retrospect to be consistent with an adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid. The diagnosis of cystic squamous odontogenic tumor (SOT) occurring as a radicular lesion of an impacted lower third molar was one of exclusion. Of two unsuspected keratocystic odontogenic tumors, one depicted deceptive features of pericoronitis, while the other case has long been in our files with the diagnosis of globulomaxillary SOT. Two cases of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma appeared benign clinically and exhibited unexpected findings; an impacted third molar began to erupt in association with the growth of carcinoma and another periradicular carcinoma showed dentinoid formation. Cases selectively reviewed in this article present challenging problems which require clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:20596984

  1. Collagen and Elastic Fibers in Odontogenic Entities: Analysis Using Light and Confocal Laser Microscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Moure, Sabrina P; Carrard, Vinicius C; Lauxen, Isabel S; Manso, Pedro Paulo A; Oliveira, Marcia G; Martins, Manoela D; Sant´Ana Filho, Manoel

    2011-01-01

    Dentigerous cyst (DC) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) are odontogenic lesions arising from epithelial elements, such as those observed in dental follicles (DF), that have been part of the tooth forming apparatus. These lesions show different clinical and histological characteristics, as well as distinct biological behavior. This study aimed to qualify and quantify collagen and elastic fibers by means of histochemical techniques with light and confocal laser microscopic methods in three odontogenic entities. Eleven DF, 13 DC (n=10 with inflammation, n=3 without inflammation) and 13 KOT were processed to the following techniques: Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Picrosirius, Direct Blue, and Orcein. DF and DC without inflammation exhibited collagen with similar characteristics: no parallel pattern of fiber orientation, thick fibers with dense arrangement, and absence of distinct layers. A comparison between DC with inflammation and KOT revealed similar collagen organization, showing distinct layers: thin collagen fibers with loose arrangement near the epithelium and thick fibers with dense arrangement in distant areas. The only difference found was that KOT exhibited a parallel collagen orientation in relation to the odontogenic epithelia. It may be suggested that the connective tissue of DC is a reactive tissue, inducing an expansive growth associated with fluid accumulation and inflammatory process, which in turn may be present as part of the lesion itself. In KOT, loosely arranged collagen may be associated with the behavior of the neoplastic epithelium. PMID:21760864

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of laminin-1 and Ki-67 in radicular cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cysts are those which arise from the epithelium associated with the development of teeth. Some odontogenic cysts were found to have special biological features that make them distinct from other lesions. This study was conducted to detect the immunoepxression of laminin-1 and Ki-67 in both radicular cysts (RCs) and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) and to examine the possible predictive value of these markers. Methods Thirteen cases of RCs and twelve cases of KCOTs were included in this study. Antibodies against laminin-1 and Ki-67 were used as primary antibodies. Results ten cases out of thirteen cases of RCs were immunopositive to laminin-1. The immunonegative cases of RCs showed high degree of inflammation inside the connective tissue wall. One case out of twelve cases of KCOTs was immunopositive to laminin-1 and the rest were immunonegative. Seven cases out of thirteen cases of RCs showed immunopositivity for Ki-67 with increased numbers of immunopositive cells when the inflammation was severe in the connective tissue wall. All KCOTS were immunopositive to Ki-67. Conclusions The benign nature of radicular cysts and the aggressive behavior of keratocystic odontogenic tumors could be explained by the expression of laminin and Ki-67. Laminin-1 and Ki-67 could be valuable markers for the prediction of the biologic behavior of cystic lesions. PMID:21366912

  3. [Clinical laboratory characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment of acute odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Gubin, M A; Popkova, N A; Shevchenko, L V; Sviridova, L L; Krugovoĭ, A E

    2003-01-01

    Clinical laboratory characteristics of acute odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are presented. All the patients (n = 132) were examined in accordance with a special diagnostic protocol. Two variants of acute inflammatory process were distinguished: serous and destructive. Conservative and surgical methods of treatment are suggested, depending on the disease pattern and complications. The treatment efficiency is compared to the results of traditional treatment. PMID:12772554

  4. The orosomucoid 1 protein (α1 acid glycoprotein) is overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign, but locally invasive, neoplasm occurring in the jaws. However, the molecules implicated in its development are unknown. OM as well as Dental Follicle (DF), an odontogenic tissue surrounding the enamel organ, is derived from ectomesenchymal/mesencyhmal elements. To identify some protein that could participate in the development of this neoplasm, total proteins from OM were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the profiles were compared with those obtained from DF, used as a control. Results We identified eight proteins with differential expression; two of them were downregulated and six upregulated in OM. A spot consistently overexpressed in odontogenic myxoma, with a molecular weight of 44-kDa and a pI of 3.5 was identified as the orosomucoid 1 protein. Western blot experiments confirmed the overexpression of this protein in odontogenic myxoma and immunohistochemical assays showed that this protein was mainly located in the cytoplasm of stellate and spindle-shaped cells of this neoplasm. Conclusion Orosomucoid 1, which belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins, may play a role in the modulation of the immune system and possibly it influences the development of OM. PMID:22888844

  5. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

  6. Clinical review: Bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the microbiology, diagnosis and management of bacteremia caused by anaerobic bacteria in children. Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Fusobacterium sp. were the most common clinically significant anaerobic isolates. The strains of anaerobic organisms found depended, to a large extent, on the portal of entry and the underlying disease. Predisposing conditions include: malignant neoplasms, immunodeficiencies, chronic renal insufficiency, decubitus ulcers, perforation of viscus and appendicitis, and neonatal age. Organisms identical to those causing anaerobic bacteremia can often be recovered from other infected sites that may have served as a source of persistent bacteremia. When anaerobes resistant to penicillin are suspected or isolated, antimicrobial drugs such as clindamycin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, cefoxitin, a carbapenem, or the combination of a beta-lactamase inhibitor and a penicillin should be administered. The early recognition of anaerobic bacteremia and administration of appropriate antimicrobial and surgical therapy play a significant role in preventing mortality and morbidity in pediatric patients. PMID:12133179

  7. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  8. Insight into the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells based on transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei; Liu, Pengfei; Yang, Dandan; Hu, Waner; Chen, Shubin; Zhao, Yuming; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing; Ge, Lihong; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mouse dental mesenchymal cells (mDMCs) from tooth germs of cap or later stages are frequently used in the context of developmental biology or whole-tooth regeneration due to their odontogenic potential. In vitro-expanded mDMCs serve as an alternative cell source considering the difficulty in obtaining primary mDMCs; however, cultured mDMCs fail to support tooth development as a result of functional failures of specific genes or pathways. The goal of this study was to identify the genes that maintain the odontogenic potential of mDMCs in culture. Methods. We examined the odontogenic potential of freshly isolated versus cultured mDMCs from the lower first molars of embryonic day 14.5 mice. The transcriptome of mDMCs was detected using RNA sequencing and the data were validated by qRT-PCR. Differential expression analysis and pathway analysis were conducted to identify the genes that contribute to the loss of odontogenic potential. Results. Cultured mDMCs failed to develop into well-structured tooth when they were recombined with dental epithelium. Compared with freshly isolated mDMCs, we found that 1,004 genes were upregulated and 948 were downregulated in cultured mDMCs. The differentially expressed genes were clustered in the biological processes and signaling pathways associated with tooth development. Following in vitro culture, genes encoding a wide array of components of MAPK, TGF-β/BMP, and Wnt pathways were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the activities of Bdnf, Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 were significantly inhibited in cultured mDMCs. Supplementation of VEGFα, BMP2, and BMP7 restored the expression of a subset of downregulated genes and induced mDMCs to form dentin-like structures in vivo. Conclusions. Vegfα, Bmp2, and Bmp7 play a role in the maintenance of odontogenic potential in mDMCs. PMID:26925321

  9. The Role of ORAI1 in the Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, S; Park, Y; Srikanth, S; Arai, A; Song, M; Yu, B; Shin, K-H; Kang, M K; Wang, C; Gwack, Y; Park, N-H; Kim, R H

    2015-11-01

    Pulp capping, or placing dental materials directly onto the vital pulp tissues of affected teeth, is a dental procedure that aims to regenerate reparative dentin. Several pulp capping materials are clinically being used, and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) released from these materials is known to mediate reparative dentin formation. ORAI1 is an essential pore subunit of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), which is a major Ca(2+) influx pathway in most nonexcitable cells. Here, we evaluated the role of ORAI1 in mediating the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). During the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs, the expression of ORAI1 increased in a time-dependent manner. DPSCs knocked down with ORAI1 shRNA (DPSC/ORAI1sh) or overexpressed with dominant negative mutant ORAI1(E106Q) (DPSC/E106Q) exhibited the inhibition of Ca(2+) influx and suppression of odontogenic differentiation and mineralization as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/staining as well as alizarin red S staining when compared with DPSCs of their respective control groups (DPSC/CTLsh and DPSC/CTL). The gene expression for odontogenic differentiation markers such as osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was also suppressed. When DPSC/CTL or DPSC/E106Q cells were subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice, DPSC/CTL cells induced mineralized tissue formation with significant increases in ALP and DMP1 staining in vivo, whereas DPSC/E106Q cells did not. Collectively, our data showed that ORAI1 plays critical roles in the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization of DPSCs by regulating Ca(2+) influx and that ORAI1 may be a therapeutic target to enhance reparative dentin formation. PMID:26403672

  10. Medium modification with bone morphogenetic protein 2 addition for odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Atalayin, Cigdem; Tezel, Huseyin; Dagci, Taner; Yavasoglu, Nefise Ulku Karabay; Oktem, Gulperi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether medium modification improves the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro and in vivo. DPSC isolated from human impacted third molar teeth were analysed for clusters of differentiation with flow cytometry. Odontogenic differentiation was stimulated by medium modification with the addition of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). The expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, enamelysin/matrix metalloproteinase 20 and the phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome of the cells were analysed with RT-PCR at 7, 14 and 21 days. Then, DPSC were transplanted on the back of immunocompromised mice via a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold, and the structure of the formed tissue was investigated. The cells were identified as mesenchymal stem cells with a 98.3% CD73 and CD90 double-positive cell rate. The increase in mineralization capacity and expression of human enamel-dentin specific transcripts proportional to the culture period were determined after differentiation. Six weeks after transplantation, an osteo-dentin matrix was formed in the group in which odontogenic differentiation was stimulated, and the odontogenic characteristics of the matrix were confirmed by histological examination and RT-PCR analysis. Odontogenic differentiation of the isolated and characterized human DPSC was improved with medium modification by the addition of BMP2 in vitro and in vivo. The defined medium and applied technique have a potential use for forming reparative dentin in the future, but the effects of the method should be investigated in long-term studies. PMID:26981753

  11. Odontogenic myxoma containing osteocement-like spheroid bodies: report of a case with an unusual histopathological feature.

    PubMed

    Oygür, T; Dolanmaz, D; Tokman, B; Bayraktar, S

    2001-09-01

    The odontogenic myxoma is a rare, benign, but locally invasive tumour of the jaws. Radiographically, it is a bone destroying lesion and has ill-defined borders. Histological characteristics are spindle and stellate-shaped tumour cells and a distinct myxomatous stroma. Bony islands that represent residual trabeculae are found scattered throughout the lesion. This report describes a case of odontogenic myxoma that shows diffusely dispersed osteocement-like spherular calcified bodies, unlike residual bone trabeculae, and discusses its differential diagnosis. PMID:11545243

  12. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  13. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. Methods: 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. Results: RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (p<0.05). The subepithelial zones of all cysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Conclusion: Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear. PMID:26793609

  14. Analysis of 153 cases of odontogenic cysts in a South Indian sample population: a retrospective study over a decade.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, Manickam; Donoghue, Mandana; Basandi, Praveen Shivappa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and to identify their clinico-pathological features among patients by studying biopsy specimens obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India, during the past 10 years. Data for the study were retrieved from the case records of patients fitting the histological classification of the World Health Organization (1992). Analyzed clinical variables included age, gender, anatomical location, and histological diagnosis. Of the 2275 biopsy reports analyzed, 194 cases (8.5%) were jaw cysts, including odontogenic (6.7%) and nonodontogenic cysts (0.25%). Odontogenic cysts included 69.3% radicular, 20.3% dentigerous, 5.2% keratinizing odontogenic, 3.3% residual, and 1.9% other cysts, such as lateral periodontal, botryoid odontogenic, and gingival cysts. The most frequent clinical manifestation was swelling, followed by a combination of pain and swelling. Age, gender, and location were related to the etiopathologic characteristics of the cyst type. A definitive diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological findings, which makes a good interdepartmental relationship between the clinicians and pathologists essential. Knowledge of the biological and histological behavior of the odontogenic cysts is required for their early detection and treatment. PMID:22714930

  15. Diversity of thermophilic anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Isaac D; Wiegel, Juergen

    2008-03-01

    Thermophilic anaerobes are Archaea and Bacteria that grow optimally at temperatures of 50 degrees C or higher and do not require the use of O(2) as a terminal electron acceptor for growth. The prokaryotes with this type of physiology are studied for a variety of reasons, including (a) to understand how life can thrive under extreme conditions, (b) for their biotechnological potential, and (c) because anaerobic thermophiles are thought to share characteristics with the early evolutionary life forms on Earth. Over 300 species of thermophilic anaerobes have been described; most have been isolated from thermal environments, but some are from mesobiotic environments, and others are from environments with temperatures below 0 degrees C. In this overview, the authors outline the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of thermophilic anaerobes as currently known. The purpose of this overview is to convey the incredible diversity and breadth of metabolism within this subset of anaerobic microorganisms. PMID:18378585

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Phulambrikar, Tushar; Vilas Kant, Sanchita; Kode, Manasi; Magar, Shaliputra

    2015-01-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla. PMID:26636128

  17. Two unique cases of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in the maxillary posterior region.

    PubMed

    Chindasombatjaroen, Jira; Poomsawat, Sopee; Boonsiriseth, Kiatanant

    2014-10-01

    A calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) is an uncommon odontogenic tumor with a predilection for the anterior part of the jaws. We report on 2 cases of CCOT in the posterior maxilla involving the maxillary sinus. In the first case, conventional radiography found a well-defined unilocular lesion. Internal calcification was identified on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Radiographically, the second case showed 2 large locules with a large complex odontoma and an embedded third molar. By revealing the internal calcification of the lesion, CBCT was helpful in the differential diagnosis of the first case. In both cases, CBCT illustrated the tumor extension and the relationship of the tumor to the maxillary sinus. Therefore, CBCT was an important tool for developing effective treatment plans for lesions in the posterior maxillary region. PMID:25201118

  18. Malignant Transformation of an Odontogenic Cyst in a Period of 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Juliane Pirágine; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rodrigues, Mônica Lúcia; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Lopes Pinto, Clovis Antonio; Alves, Fabio Abreu

    2014-01-01

    Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the jaws (PIOSCC) might arise from odontogenic epithelium, more commonly from a previous odontogenic cyst. The aim of this case is to illustrate that the clinician should consider that an apparent benign dentigerous cyst can suffer malignant transformation and that all material removed from a patient must be evaluated histologically. A 44-year-old man presented in a routine periapical X-ray an impacted lower left third molar with radiolucency over its crown. Ten years later, the patient complained of pain in the same region and the tooth was extracted. After one month, the patient still complained of pain and suffered a fracture of the mandible. A biopsy was performed and carcinoma was diagnosed. The patient was treated surgically with adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy and after 8 years, he is well without signs of recurrences. This report describes a central mandibular carcinoma probably developed from a previous dentigerous cyst. PMID:24804126

  19. A case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst suspected to be a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Hosokawa, Sohei; Ohnuki, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Hiroki; Seta, Shuichi; Muramatsu, Takashi; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a case of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst arising in the mandibular molar region of a 39-year-old man. Under the initial clinical diagnosis of radicular cyst, root canal treatment was performed on the mandibular right second molar. The treatment that continued for six months did not achieve healing. Subsequently surgical intervention was selected since the tooth fracture was found, and the prognosis was judged to be poor. After atraumatic tooth extraction, the apical cystic lesion was enucleated, and the tooth was replanted. A definite diagnosis of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. The radiograph taken seven months after the operation showed an improvement in the radiolucent lesion. No clinical signs of tooth mobility, pain, and swelling were present. The tooth was then successfully retained with the final restoration. Careful follow-up is needed in order to detect any signs of recurrence. PMID:19622877

  20. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising from an odontogenic keratocyst: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tamgadge, Sandhya; Tamgadge, Avinash; Modak, Neha; Bhalerao, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) derived from an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the jaws, which is locally aggressive with quite poor prognosis. The incidence of carcinomas arising in odontogenic cysts was reported to be approximately 1–2/1000. The number of well-documented cases of PIOSCC ex OKC is extremely small; hence, no sufficient incidence data are available in the literature. Overall, the survival rate of an individual, which is a period of two years, is very poor, and this can be attributed to the delayed diagnosis. But knowledge of the histopathological and immunohistological features of PIOSCC allows accurate and early diagnosis of the lesion so that an early and appropriate treatment can be instituted for better prognosis. The following report describes an extremely rare case of PIOSCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 20-year-old female patient. PMID:23717337

  1. Rare presentation of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a pediatric patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, João Paulo; da Costa, Fernanda Herrera; Matheus, Ricardo Alves; Ito, Fabio Augusto; Pereira-Stabile, Cecilia Luiz

    2016-06-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a painless benign tumor with slow growth, usually asymptomatic. It has three variants: follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral. In the follicular type, the tumor is associated with an impacted tooth, and maxillary canines are the most frequently affected. Association with primary teeth is very rare. Treatment consists essentially in a total lesion enucleation. The objective of this paper is to present the clinical case of a 7-year-old female patient with an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with the crown of the left lower deciduous canine (73), dislodging it to the mandibular base and consequently shifting and also impacting the permanent lower canine (33). The lesion was treated with careful enucleation, preserving the permanent canine, which then had its eruption path released favoring its migration to an ideal position. PMID:26584947

  2. Odontogenic myxoma of maxilla: A review discussion with two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Limdiwala, Piyush; Shah, Jigna

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare entity of slowly growing benign neoplasm of ectomesenchymal origin, comprising of 3–6% of all odontogenic tumors that histologically presenting spindle-shaped, stellate and round cells within loosely arranged myxomatous tissue stroma. OM originates from the dental papilla, follicle or periodontal ligament with an exclusive location in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws, association with missing or unerupted teeth. Clinically and radiographically the reported incidence and demographic information of this tumor has wide variability. Most common clinical variant is associated with the impacted tooth and shows local invasion with destruction of adjacent structures and displacement of teeth. Radiographically, common manifestations are multilocular radiolucent areas with well-defined borders and typical soap bubble or tennis racket appearances. This paper presents two rare case reports of OM of maxilla along with review discussion. PMID:25684930

  3. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  4. Dentinogenic Ghost Cell Tumor — A Neoplastic Variety of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst: Case Presentation and Review

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Prabhat, Mukul; Goel, Sumit; Bhalla, Kanika; Panjwani, Sapna; Misra, Deepankar; Agarwal, Ankur; Bhatnagar, Gunjan

    2015-01-01

    Context: The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC), also referred to as calcifying ghost cell odontogenic cyst (CGCOC) is a heterogeneous lesion existing either as cystic or solid variant. Due to the fact that all CGCOC lesions are not cystic, and the biological behavior is often not consistent with a cyst, there has always been a controversy as to whether COC is a cyst or a tumor. The dentinogenic ghost-cell tumor (DGCT), a solid variant of the COC, is an uncommon odontogenic neoplasm occurring predominantly in later life. Case report is followed by a concise review and disambiguation of controversial terminologies regarding nomenclature of COC. Case Report: We report a case of 33-year-old female patient who presented with an insidious, steadily increasing swelling on the left side of her face since 8 months. Patient reported slight difficulty in eating because of reduced intraoral space and an obvious concern with facial disfigurement. There was no contributory dental or medical history. Intraorally, a hard, well defined, bicortical swelling was noted in left maxillary region with slight mobility of the associated teeth and normal appearing overlying mucosa. A provisional diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor was made, and orthopantomogram, paranasal sinus radiograph and computed tomograpy scan of the face were acquired. A radiographic diagnosis of COC was made, which was subsequently confirmed on histopathology postenucleation of the tumor mass. COC has been seen to be of extensive diversity in its clinical and histopathological features as well as in its biological behavior. Conclusion: The present case of 33-year-old female was diagnosed as DGCT, a tumorous form of COC, due to its characteristic histological features; numerous ghost cells and dentinoid material. PMID:25709974

  5. Central odontogenic fibroma: a case report with long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An osteolytic tumour of the mandible with prominent expansive growth on the alveolar ridge and displacement of the involved teeth is described in a 28-year-old man. The lesion was diagnosed as a central odontogenic fibroma, an uncommon benign neoplasm derived from dental apparatus, and was removed by curettage. The patient remains asymptomatic after thirteen years of follow-up, which supports the claimed indolent behavior of this poorly documented disease and the adequacy of a conservative surgical treatment. PMID:20707924

  6. Camphorquinone Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Cells and Triggers Release of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Williams, Drake W.; Bae, Susan; Lee, Rachel S; Oh, Ju-Eun; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Kim, Tony; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Camphorquinone (CQ) is a photoinitiator that triggers polymerization of light-curing materials such as dental adhesives and composites. CQ does not become a part of the polymer network, suggesting that CQ can be leached out into surrounding environment including dental pulp and exert adversary effects on tissues. In order to understand the mechanisms of CQ-induced side effects, we investigated the effect of CQ on cell viability, cytokine secretion, and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro. Methods Cell viability was assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay after CQ exposure. Western blotting was performed for p16INK4A, p21WAF1, and p53. Secretory cytokines were evaluated using the membrane–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as conventional and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The effects of CQ on odontogenic differentiation were evaluated using alkaline phosphatase and alizarin red S staining methods. Results CQ treatment suppressed the proliferation of DPSCs and induced the expression of p16INK4A, p21WAF1, and p53. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines (eg, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 [MMP3]) were increased by CQ treatment. CQ also inhibited odontogenic differentiation and mineralization capacities of DPSC and MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Our study showed that CQ may trigger pulpal inflammation by inducing proinflammatory cytokine production from the pulpal cells and may impair odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp cells, resulting in pulpal irritation and inflammation. PMID:23228258

  7. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  8. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago. PMID:24972654

  9. A 44-year analysis of ghost cell odontogenic tumour subtypes in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Baghaee, Fereshteh; Dadafarid, Zahra; Alaeddini, Mojgan

    2014-10-01

    The objectives of our study were to evaluate the relative frequency of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumours (CCOTs), dentinogenic ghost cell tumours (DGCTs) and ghost cell odontogenic carcinomas (GCOCs), collectively known as ghost cell odontogenic tumours (GCOTs), in an Iranian population and to classify these lesions according to the 2005 WHO guidelines. Clinical/demographic data were recorded for all COCs referred to our Department from 1966 to 2010. H&E-stained slides were re-evaluated by two observers and all cases were reclassified according to the 2005 WHO guidelines. The male to female ratio of 37 retrieved COCs was 1.6 with most cases occurring intraosseously and in the second decade of life. Involvement of the mandible was significantly higher than the maxilla (P = 0.033). Histopathologically, most lesions demonstrated a cystic morphology and there were no GCOCs among our cases. Eight cases were followed for 4-20 years and 3 of them showed a total of 5 recurrences. Considering the variations among clinicopathologic reports of COC from different countries, presentation of epidemiologic data based on a universally accepted classification system would be extremely helpful in providing a better understanding of this lesion and comparing results between studies. PMID:24556524

  10. Primordial Odontogenic Cyst with Induction Phenomenon (Zonal Fibroblastic Hypercellularity) and Dentinoid Material Versus Archegonous Cystic Odontoma: You Choose!

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; Wetzel, Stephanie L; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2016-06-01

    The most recent A.F.I.P. fascicle defines primordial odontogenic cyst (POC) as a distinct, nonkeratinized, odontogenic cyst of "undetermined origin" forming in the place of a developing normal or supernumerary tooth. However, the majority of examples reported in the literature under this term represent odontogenic keratocysts (keratocystic odontogenic tumors). In addition, there are rare reported cases of cystic odontomas. An 18-year-old Caucasian male presented with a unilocular mandibular radiolucent lesion in the place of a congenitally missing molar. Histologically, it featured nonkeratinizing, thin stratified squamous epithelial lining with areas of spongiosis and foci of vacuolization of individual basal cells without significant nuclear palisading. Focally, budding of the basal cell layer was identified. A zone of increased cellularity featuring induction-type fibroblasts was present subepithelially as well as dentinoid deposits with odontogenic epithelial nests. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial lining was negative for calretinin and the induction-like zone negative for S100 protein, smooth muscle actin, and CD34. The case was externally reviewed by five oral pathologists who provided various diagnostic interpretations including primordial cyst, odontogenic cyst not otherwise specified (NOS), cyst with ameloblastic changes, and unicystic ameloblastoma. At that time, a final diagnosis of odontogenic cyst NOS was rendered with a comment that it may represent a true example of POC or a cystic odontoma. The lesion has not recurred within a 13 year follow-up period after initial excision. An unusual cystic lesion is presented that may represent a true example of POC with dentinoid formation or an archegonous cystic odontoma. PMID:26156422

  11. Are incidence and epidemiology of anaerobic bacteremia really changing?

    PubMed

    Vena, A; Muñoz, P; Alcalá, L; Fernandez-Cruz, A; Sanchez, C; Valerio, M; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    Incidence, prognosis and need of performing blood cultures for anaerobic bacteria are under debate, mainly due to the belief that the presence of anaerobes in blood can be easily suspected on clinical basis. We aimed to assess these three points in a retrospective analysis of a 10-year experience in our tertiary hospital. All episodes of significant anaerobic bacteremia diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 were included. Risk factors for mortality and clinical predictability of anaerobic bacteremia were evaluated in 113 randomly selected episodes. Overall incidence of anaerobic bacteremia was 1.2 episodes/1000 admissions, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. B. fragilis group (38.1 %) and Clostridium spp. (13.7 %) were the most frequent isolated microorganisms. As for the clinical study, 43.4 % of the patients had a comorbidity classified as ultimately fatal or rapidly fatal according to the McCabe and Jackson scale. Clinical manifestations suggestive of anaerobic involvement were present in only 55 % of the patients. Twenty-eight patients (24.8 %) died during the hospitalization. Independent predictive factors of mortality were a high Charlson's comorbidity index and presentation with septic shock, whereas, an adequate source control of the infection was associated with a better outcome. In our centre, incidence of anaerobic bacteremia remained stable during the last decade. The routine use of anaerobic BCs seems to be adequate, since in about half of the cases anaerobes could not be suspected on clinical bases. Moreover, prompt source control of infection is essential in order to reduce mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26017663

  12. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  13. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Does Sunlight Cause Problems With Chickenpox? Fever and Taking Your ... Infections Croup Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Dengue Fever Diphtheria Does Sunlight Cause Problems With Chickenpox? E. Coli Ebola Encephalitis ...

  14. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  15. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in pre-existing keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    BAI, MING-RU; SHEN, TING; CHEN, YU; GENG, NING

    2016-01-01

    Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) is a rare type of odontogenic carcinoma that arises within the jaws. PIOSCC has no initial connection with oral mucosa and possibly develops from the residues of the odontogenic epithelium or from an odontogenic cyst or tumor. The diagnosis of PIOSCC can be difficult as it must be differentiated from other odontogenic carcinomas, such as malignant ameloblastoma, from SCCs arising from the overlying oral mucosa, from the primary tumors of the maxillary sinus or nasal mucosa, and from the tumors that have metastasized to the jaws from other primary sites. The present study reported a rare case of a 59-year-old male patient with a course of keratocystic odontogenic tumor for 25 years, between 1988 and 2013, which eventually transformed into PIOSCC after at least five recurrences and corresponding treatments. The mandible excision and titanium plate reconstruction was performed. Follow-up examinations have revealed no sign of recurrence thus far. The present study discussed this case from three aspects of clinical history, radiological examination and pathological features. PMID:26893858

  16. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    PubMed Central

    Maud, P J; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gross work completed and relative to body weight. However, these differences are reduced when data is adjusted for body weight and further reduced when corrected for FFM. The study found no significant differences between men and women in either anaerobic power or anaerobic capacity when values were given relative to FFM. PMID:3730753

  17. Search for uro-genital tract infections in patients with symptoms of prostatitis. Studies on aerobic and strictly anaerobic bacteria, mycoplasmas, fungi, trichomonads and viruses.

    PubMed

    Mårdh, P A; Colleen, S

    1975-01-01

    Seventy-nine patients with symptoms of nonacute prostatitis and 20 healthy volunteers were examined for uro-genital tract infection with bacteria, mycoplasmas, fungi, trichomonads and viruses. No differences in the results of the bacterial cultures were found between the patients and the controls. In only a few cases were established urinary tract pathogens found, but in no instance were these findings reproducible in later specimens. The cultures of the expressed prostatic fluids and the samples of semen gave no information of the occurrence of bacteria over and above that obtainable from examination of the urethral specimens. Significant bacteriuria was not found in any of the patients. Though Neisseria gonorrhoeae could not be isolated from any of the subjects, immunofluorescent studies revealed such organisms in seminal fluid in 8% of the patients. Nine of the patients had 1 to 3 years been considered successfully treated for gonorrhoea. Five of these nine patients were still found to harbour gonococci, as judged from the immunofluorescent studies. Corynebacterium vaginale was recovered in an equally low frequency (5%) from the patients and the volunteers. There was no significant difference in the incidence of T-mycoplasmas between the patients (46%) and the controls (35%), while Mycoplasma hominis was only found in the patients (10%). Trichomonas vaginalis could not be detected in wet smears of expressed prostatic fluid in any of the subjects, but could be cultured from one such specimen. Metacycline treatment (performed according the double blind cross-over technique) was studied for effects on the bacterial flora. In about 10% of the patients, an earlier not observed relative dominance of gram-negative rods was found on the cultures made after the therapy. Candida albicans was only isolated from the patients. It was found more often after (24%) than before the (15%) treatment. Complement-fixing antibodies to N. gonorrhoeae, cytomegalovirus and Chlamydia were found in 10, 19, and 33% of the patients, respectively. The corresponding figures for the healthy males were 0, 20 and 5%. PMID:175434

  18. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-03-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  19. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  20. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour of the Mandible: a case report of decompression with a customised removable tube and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Smit, R B; Moore, B K; Lou, S M Y

    2015-09-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KOT or KCOT) is defined by the WHO to be 'a benign uni- or multicystic, intraosseous tumour of odontogenic origin'. In 2005, the World Health Organization renamed the lesion; previously known as an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) as the KCOT. WHO recommends the term KCOT as it reflects its neoplastic nature. In this case report, a 21-year-old female with a histologically proven large parakeratinised KCOT of the right mandible underwent treatment that involved a 14-month period of decompression, followed by enucleation (with Carnoys application) of the residual cyst. During the period of decompression, a custom made removable mandibular chrome-cobalt appliance was used to hold the decompression tube in the oral cavity. PMID:26502597

  1. Clindamycin and gentamicin for aerobic and anaerobic sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fass, R J; Ruiz, D E; Gardner, W G; Rotilie, C A

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-eight adult patients with serious pleuropulmonary, soft-tissue, bone, and intra-abdominal infections caused by combinations of aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria were treated with parenterally given clindamycin phosphate and gentamicin sulfate and surgery when appropriate. Nine had associated bacteremia. In 29, infections failed to respond to other therapeutic regimens, which included penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and chloramphenicol. Results with clindamycin and gentamicin were excellent and were attributed primarily to the activity of clindamycin against anaerobes, particularly Bacteroides fragilis. Serum concentrations of clindamycin surpassed by manyfold the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for anaerobes. Serum concentrations of gentamicin did not consistently surpass the MICs for Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although those organisms were consistently gentamicinsusceptible by disk diffusion susceptibility tests. Persistent colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, P aeruginosa, enterococci, or Candida were common, and occasionally they were significant in prolonging the clinical courses of patients with extensive infections. PMID:318824

  2. Developments of anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Two modifications of anaerobic fermentation of biomass were studied: separation of acid and CH4 phases of the anaerobic process used in CH4 production from the biomass and the use of attached growth methanogenesis. A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used for the acid phase. Effluent from the acid reactor was fed simultaneously to a conventional CSTR and an anaerobic rotating biological contactor (ARBC) operating in parallel for the CH4 phase. The temperature of all the reactors was 35 plus or minus 1 degree, the pH of the acid phase was 4.3, and the CH4 phase was studied at pH 7.5. The retention time for the acid phase CSTR was 4.5 h, and that for the ARBC and CSTR in the CH4 phase was 36 h.

  3. The histone acetyltransferase p300 regulates the expression of pluripotency factors and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Liu, Huijuan; Ning, Yanyang; Xu, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    p300 is a well-known histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and coactivator that plays vital roles in many physiological processes. Despite extensive research on the involvement of p300 in the regulation of transcription in numerous cell lines, the roles of this protein in regulating pluripotency genes and odontogenic differentiation in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) are poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigated the expression of OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 and the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation capacity of HDPCs following p300 overexpression. We found that p300 overexpression did not overtly affect the ability of HDPCs to proliferate. The overexpression of p300 upregulated the promoter activity and the mRNA and protein expression of NANOG and SOX2. The HAT activity of p300 appeared to partially mediate the regulation of these factors; indeed, when a mutant form of p300 lacking the HAT domain was overexpressed, the promoter activity and expression of NANOG and SOX2 decreased relative to p300 overexpression but was greater than in the control. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA levels of the odontogenic marker genes dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN) were significantly decreased in HDPCs overexpressing p300 cultured under normal culture conditions and increased in HDPCs inducted to undergo odontogenic differentiation. This finding was further confirmed by measuring levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and assessing the formation of mineralized nodules. The HAT activity of p300 had no significant effect on odontogenic differentiation. p300 was recruited to the promoter regions of OCN and DSPP and might be acting as a coactivator to increase the acetylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 of OCN and DSPP. Collectively, our results show that p300 plays an important role in regulating the expression of key pluripotency genes in HDPCs and modifying odontogenic differentiation. PMID:25007265

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Chaperones, Bip/GRP78 and Calnexin are Overexpressed in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Pavli, Maria; Farmaki, Elena; Merkourea, Stavroula; Vastardis, Helen; Sklavounou, Alexandra; Tzerbos, Fotios

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts that have been reclassified according World Health Organization (WHO), to keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs), a term that better reflects their neoplastic nature. The aim of present study is to evaluate the induction of stress of the endoplasmic reticulum and execution of the resulting unfolded protein response in keratinocystic odontogenic tumours. Material and Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry the expression of the chaperones BiP/GRP78 and calnexin in 24 cases of KCOTs. As controls, we have used 9 cases of periapical or radicular cysts (PACs) and 5 cases of Fibromas (FBs). The PACs and the FBs were included in the analysis, as PACs are the most common type of inflammatory odontogenic cysts of and FBs, as lesions of the connective tissue with unaffected epithelium. Results Analysis revealed a strong association between both BiP/GRP78 and calnexin expression and KCOTs: 18 out of 24 (75%) KCOTs expressed BiP/GRP78 as opposed to 1 out of 9 (13%) PACs, and none of 5 FBs evaluated (P < 0.001, x2-test). Calnexin was expressed in 11 out of 24 KCOTs (46%) but only one out of 9 (13%) PACs, and none of the 5 FBs analyzed (P < 0.001, x2-test). Conclusions Study results imply that induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress maybe of diagnostic value in keratocystic odontogenic tumours characterization. In addition to recent findings suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress plays a causative role in keratinization of epithelia, pharmacological interference with the execution of the unfolded protein response should be considered for the management of keratocystic odontogenic tumours. PMID:24800053

  5. Novel PTCH1 Mutations in Patients with Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Screened for Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma (NBCC) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Lorenza; Pollio, Annamaria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Guarneri, Carmelo; Ghiorzo, Paola; Longo, Caterina; Bruno, William; Giusti, Francesca; Bassoli, Sara; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Ruini, Cristel; Seidenari, Stefania; Tomasi, Aldo; Ponti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic tumors that arise sporadically or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, KCOTs of the jaws and a variety of other tumors. PTCH1 mutation can be found both in sporadic or NBCCS associated KCOTs. The aim of the current study was to assess whether a combined clinical and bio-molecular approach could be suitable for the detection of NBCCS among patients with a diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs). The authors collected keratocystic odontogenic tumors recorded in the database of the Pathology Department of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia during the period 1991–2011. Through interviews and examinations, family pedigrees were drawn for all patients affected by these odontogenic lesions. We found out that 18 of the 70 patients with KCOTs and/or multiple basal cell carcinomas actually met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of NBCCS. A wide inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability was evident in the families. Ameloblastomas (AMLs) were reported in two probands that are also carriers of the PCTH1 germline mutations. Nine germline mutations in the PTCH1 gene, 5 of them novel, were evident in 14 tested probands. The clinical evaluation of the keratocystic odontogenic tumors can be used as screening for the detection of families at risk of NBCCS. Keratocystic odontogenic lesions are uncommon, and their discovery deserves the search for associated cutaneous basal cell carcinomas and other benign and malignant tumors related to NBCCS. PMID:22952776

  6. Comparison of immunohistochemical expression of CD10 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hormozi, Elham; Fard, Vahid Nourollahi; Naseri, Mohammad Ali; Jahromi, Nima Haghighat; Keshani, Forooz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), also called keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), is a developmental lesion which should be carefully monitored and it exhibits development mechanisms and biologic behaviors different from those of other more common lesions such as dentigerous and radicular cysts. CD10 antigen is a cell surface metalloendopeptidase, which inactivates various peptides that are physiologically active. Studies have shown that increase in the expression of CD10 in the stromal cells helps the progression of the tumor. Ameloblastoma (AB) is a local invasive tumor and given the role of supporting connective tissue stroma in the aggression and progression. The aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the expression of CD10 in the connective tissue stroma of AB and OKC as a KCOT. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, 14 paraffin blocks of KCOT and 9 of AB (7 multicystic and 2 unicystic) were evaluated with CD10 immunohistochemical expression in the connective tissue stroma of AB and the connective tissue wall of KCOT. The data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Results: In 8 samples of 9 AB and in 13 samples of 14 KOT lesions, expression of CD10 was shown. Fisher's exact test did not reveal any significant differences between these two lesions in the expression of CD10 (P = 0.64). Conclusion: The results of this study propose that high expression rate of CD10 might be one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of AB and high recurrence rate of OKC and reinforce the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor. PMID:27076824

  7. Metronidazole in prevention and treatment of bacteroides infections after appendicectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, A T; Ferguson, I R; Jones, P H; Phillips, K D; Tearle, P V; Berry, R B; Fiddian, R V; Graham, D F; Harland, D H; Innes, D B; Mee, W M; Rothwell-Jackson, R L; Sutch, I; Kilbey, C; Edwards, D

    1976-01-01

    The frequency of non-clostridial anaerobic infection was studied in 95 patients who had undergone acute appendicectomy: 49 received prophylactic metronidazole and 46 received placebo. Anaerobic infection did not develop in any of the metronidazole-treated patients, but infections did develop in nine (19%) of the 46 controls. Metronidazole is conveniently administered by suppository to patients who cannot take oral drugs. Five patients with intra-abdominal infections caused by non-clostridial anaerobes were successfully treated with metronidazole. PMID:764935

  8. Treatment of Odontogenic Myxoma: A Multidisciplinary Approach6-Year Follow-Up Case

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Joo Gustavo Oliveira; Claus, Jonathas Daniel Paggi; Gil, Luiz Fernando; Gil, Jos Nazareno; Cardoso, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The most aggressive diseases that affect the oral environment are considered tumors of the jaw. The surgical treatment is preferably done by surgical resection of the lesion, resulting in a great loss of tissue and esthetics. Multidisciplinary planning is required for the rehabilitation of these cases. Autogenous grafting techniques or vascularized flaps allow ridge reconstruction for implant placement, restoring function, and esthetics. This paper reports a 6-year follow-up case of an odontogenic myxoma treated with wide resection and mandibular bone reconstruction for posterior rehabilitation with dental implants. PMID:25580309

  9. Maxillary odontogenic carcinoma with distant metastasis to axillary skin, brain, and lung: case report.

    PubMed

    Kao, S Y; Pong, B Y; Li, W Y; Gallagher, G T; Chang, R C

    1995-06-01

    We present a case of odontogenic carcinoma with ghost-cell keratinization of the right maxilla, with a history of 23 years after initial treatment. Within this period, multiple local recurrence, as well as metastasis to axilla, brain, and lung, was noted. Several attempts at resection of the primary lesion were unsuccessful at achieving local control, even when supplemented with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metastatic tumors were studied histologically, and their morphology coincided with that of the primary tumor. The medical history of the patient and pathologic findings of the tumor are reviewed. PMID:7594758

  10. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma of the maxilla: a case report with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Elneel Ahmed Mohamed; karrar, Musadak Ali; El-Siddig, Abeer Abdalla; Gafer, Nahla; satir, Ali Abdel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report is to present a rare case of a Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) of a 21-year-old man with review of the literature. The patient was treated surgically, and one of the surgical margins was involved, the patient received adjuvant radiotherapy for local control. Five months later, patient presented with infraorbital lesion which was proven histological to be GCOC. Radiological images, histological sections and clinical photographs are also presented. One year after the second surgery, the patient was tumor free. The only effective treatment modality was surgical removal. PMID:26523195

  11. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  12. Anaerobic bacteraemia: a 10-year retrospective epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Steven; Wybo, Ingrid; Naessens, Anne; Echahidi, Fedoua; Van der Beken, Mieke; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Vermeulen, Stefan; Piérard, Denis

    2016-06-01

    In order to identify current trends in anaerobic bacteraemia, a 10-year retrospective study was performed in the University Hospital Brussel, Belgium. All clinically relevant bacteraemia detected from 2004 until 2013 were included. Medical records were reviewed in an attempt to define clinical parameters that might be associated with the occurrence of anaerobic bacteraemia. 437 of the isolated organisms causing anaerobic bacteraemia were thawed, subcultured and reanalyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). There were an average of 33 cases of anaerobic bacteraemia per year during 2004-2008 compared to an average of 27 cases per year during 2009-2013 (P = 0.017), corresponding to a decrease by 19% between the first and the latter period. Also, the total number of cases of anaerobic bacteraemia per 100,000 patient days decreased from 17.3 in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 13.7 in the period 2009 to 2013 (P = 0.023). Additionally, the mean incidence of anaerobic bacteraemia decreased during the study period (1.27/1000 patients in 2004 vs. 0.94/1000 patients in 2013; P = 0.008). In contrast, the proportion of isolated anaerobic bacteraemia compared to the number of all bacteraemia remained stable at 5%. Bacteroides spp. and Parabacteroides spp. accounted for 47.1% of the anaerobes, followed by 14.4% Clostridium spp., 12.6% non-spore-forming Gram-positive rods, 10.5% anaerobic cocci, 8.2% Prevotella spp. and other Gram-negative rods and 7.1% Fusobacterium spp. The lower gastrointestinal tract (47%) and wound infections (10%) were the two most frequent sources for bacteraemia, with the origin remaining unknown in 62 cases (21%). The overall mortality rate was 14%. Further studies focusing on the antimicrobial susceptibility and demographic background of patients are needed to further objectify the currently observed trends. PMID:26923749

  13. Odontogenic effects of a fast-setting calcium-silicate cement containing zirconium oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-A; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Min, Kyung-San

    2015-01-01

    A fast-setting calcium-silicate cement (Endocem) was introduced in the field of dentistry for use in vital pulp therapy. Similar to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), it contains bismuth oxide to provide radiopacity. Recently, another product, EndocemZr, which contains zirconium oxide (ZrO2) as a radiopacifier, was developed by the same company. In this study, the biological/odontogenic effects of EndocemZr were investigated in human primary dental pulp cells (hpDPCs) in vitro and on capped rat teeth in vivo. The biocompatibility of EndocemZr was similar to that of ProRoot and Endocem on the basis of cell viability tests and cell morphological analysis. The mineralization nodule formation, expression of odontogenic-related markers, and reparative dentin formation of EndocemZr group was similar to those of other material groups. Our results suggest that EndocemZr has the potential to be used as an effective material for vital pulp therapy, similar to ProRoot and Endocem. PMID:25948141

  14. Vismodegib hedgehog-signaling inhibition and treatment of basal cell carcinomas as well as keratocystic odontogenic tumors in Gorlin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Booms, Patrick; Harth, Marc; Sader, Robert; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Vismodegib hedgehog signaling inhibition treatment has potential for reducing the burden of multiple skin basal cell carcinomas and jaw keratocystic odontogenic tumors. They are major criteria for the diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, also called nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Clinical features of Gorlin syndrome are reported, and the relevance of hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition by oral vismodegib for maxillofacial surgeons is highlighted. In summary, progressed basal cell carcinoma lesions are virtually inoperable. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors have an aggressive behavior including rapid growth and extension into adjacent tissues. Interestingly, nearly complete regression of multiple Gorlin syndrome-associated keratocystic odontogenic tumors following treatment with vismodegib. Due to radio-hypersensitivity in Gorlin syndrome, avoidance of treatment by radiotherapy is strongly recommended for all affected individuals. Vismodegib can help in those instances where radiation is contra-indicated, or the lesions are inoperable. The effect of vismodegib on basal cell carcinomas was associated with a significant decrease in hedgehog-signaling and tumor proliferation. Vismodegib, a new and approved drug for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma, is a specific oncogene inhibitor. It also seems to be effective for treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors and basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome, rendering the surgical resections less challenging. PMID:26389028

  15. A prospective epidemiological study on odontogenic tumours in a black African population, with emphasis on the relative frequency of ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Oginni, F O; Stoelinga, P J W; Ajike, S A; Obuekwe, O N; Olokun, B Aluko; Adebola, R A; Adeyemo, W L; Fasola, O; Adesina, O A; Akinbami, B O; Iwegbu, I O; Ogunmuyiwa, S A; Obimakinde, O S; Uguru, C C

    2015-09-01

    The persistent view in the literature is that the relative frequency of ameloblastomas is higher in the black population than in Caucasians. The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of all odontogenic tumours (OT) in a 100% black population and to compare our findings with those of previous studies. A prospective study was undertaken of all patients presenting with OT to all 16 Nigerian departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over a 4-year period. The following data were obtained: patient demographics, delay to presentation, extent of the lesion, and histological diagnosis. Six hundred and twenty-two cases were studied. A slight male preponderance was observed (male to female ratio 1.17:1). Patients ranged in age from 5 to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the third decade. The relative frequency of OT was 0.99 per million and that of ameloblastoma was 0.76 per million. Ameloblastoma was the most prevalent OT (76.5%), followed by adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (5.6%), odontogenic myxoma (4.5%), and keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOT) (3.1%). The relative frequency of ameloblastoma among Nigerians was not different from frequencies reported previously among Caucasian and Tanzanian black populations. KCOTs were, however, rarely diagnosed in Nigerians as compared to the white population in the Western world. PMID:25937364

  16. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  17. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  18. Anaerobic Metabolism in Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Robert A.; Rumpho, Mary E.; Fox, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen deficits is more widespread in biological systems than is commonly believed. Until recently, the general perception of anaerobic metabolism was often limited to the induction of alcoholic or lactic acid fermentation as the sole biochemical response to hypoxia/anoxia. Developments in the physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of anaerobic responses in invertebrates, lower plants, and higher plants have demonstrated that, depending upon the species, anaerobic metabolism may encompass much more than simple glycolytic metabolism. Here, recent progress in elucidating the mechanism(s) determining tolerance versus intolerance to anaerobic environments in higher plants is discussed, drawing most heavily on experimental systems using seeds or seedlings. PMID:16652929

  19. The Possible Role of Mast Cells in the Odontogenic Cyst's Pathogenesis: A Comparative Study between Dentigerous Cyst and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Sareh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Davardan, MirMahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recently, mast cells were recognized in the pathogenesis of more aggressive pathologic lesions. This study was aimed to evaluate and compare the density of mast cells in Dentigerous cyst (DC) and Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) regarding their different clinical behavior. Method. This study was conducted on 23 and 26 cases of DC and KCOT, respectively. Four-micron sections were prepared for Toluidine blue staining and mast cell densities in two desired cysts were studied. Final data was analyzed via t-test and Mann-Whitney U test method regarding the significant level lower than 0.05. Results. Mast cell densities were significantly higher in KCOTs for deep and superficial layers and both layers (P < 0.05). The density of degranulated mast cells in the deeper layers and both layers was significantly higher in KCOTs (P < 0.05). However, the density of degranulated mast cells in the superficial layer had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Conclusion. It seems that mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of KCOT, but, regarding wide range of mast cell's biologic activities, further investigations are recommended to confirm the issue and prepare the details.

  20. Anaerobic CO2 Cabinet for the Cultivation of Strict Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Leach, P. Ann; Bullen, J. J.; Grant, I. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design and construction of an anaerobic CO2 cabinet are described. Air is displaced by a stream of oxygen-free CO2, and anerobic conditions are produced in 3 hr. The equipment is simple and cheap to operate and has been found to be satisfactory for the isolation of strict anaerobes from the mouse intestine. Images PMID:4943587

  1. Pigmented intraosseous odontogenic carcinoma of the maxilla: a pediatric case report and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, R; Onuma, K; Ikeda, M; Kato, K; Toyoda, Y; Nagashima, Y; Ito, Y; Abiko, Y; Tanaka, Y

    2001-08-01

    We report a pigmented intraosseous odontogenic carcinoma of the maxilla occurring in a 6-year-old Japanese boy. Grossly, the tumor showed solid, gray-yellow, and markedly pigmented appearance. Histology showed neoplastic growths of atypical epithelial cells that occasionally contained melanin pigments. Melanocytes with dendritic processes were often found in the tumor cell clusters, and solitary or aggregated melanophages were scattered within the dense fibrovascular stroma. The tumor cells were diffusely positive for cytokeratins and epithelial membrane antigen, and focally positive for vimentin, neuron specific enolase, neurofilament protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, and amelogenin. Ultrastructural studies showed well-developed intercellular junctions, mainly desmosomes, and glycogen particles. In addition, some tumor cells contained melanosomes and/or a few neurosecretory granules. We consider that the present tumor suggests a close association of ectoderm, mesenchyma, and neuroectoderm in embryogenesis of the tooth, and can raise a diagnostic confusion with melanotic neuroectodermal tumor. PMID:11521234

  2. Characteristic features of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumour on cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, M; Wang, H; Xu, L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To illustrate characteristic features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) on CBCT. Methods: The archived CBCT and panoramic radiographs of eight patients histopathologically diagnosed as AOT were analysed. The radiographic features displayed on both radiographic images were carefully described and compared. Results: All eight AOT cases presented as unilocular and well-demarcated lesions on both CBCT and panoramic images. CBCT images displayed three-dimensional interpretation of AOT lesions, especially the detailed intralesional radiopacities. Numerous discrete radiopaque foci scattered in the lesion with evident contrast to the radiolucent background could be considered as one of the characteristic features of AOT on CBCT. Conclusions: Compared with panoramic radiography, CBCT seems to possess better potential in diagnosing AOT. PMID:24940808

  3. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  4. Odontogenic stimulation of human dental pulp cells with bioactive nanocomposite fiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Park, Yong-Duk; Lee, So-Youn; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a composite nanofibrous matrix made of biopolymer blend polycaprolactone-gelatin (BP) and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGNs) on the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). BGN-BP nanomatrices, with BGN content of up to 20 wt%, were produced via electrospinning. The differentiation of the HDPCs was evaluated by using an ALP activity assay, calcified nodule formation, and mRNA expression for markers. Integrin and its underlying signal pathways were assessed via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Although cell growth and attachment on the BGN-BP nanomatrix was similar to that on BP, ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and mRNA, expressions involving ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein-1 were greater on BGN-BP. BGN-BP upregulated the key adhesion receptors (integrin components α1, α2, α5, and β1) and activated integrin downstream pathways, such as phosphorylated-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-paxillin. In addition, BGN-BP activated BMP receptors, BMP-2 mRNA, and p-Smad 1/5/8, and such activation was blocked by the BMP antagonist, noggin. Furthermore, BGN-BP induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase 38, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases and activated expression of the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix in HDPCs. Collectively, the results indicated for the first time that a BGN-BP composite nanomatrix promoted odontogenic differentiation of HDPCs through the integrin, BMP, and mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway. Moreover, the nanomatrix is considered to be promising scaffolds for the culture of HDPCs and dental tissue engineering. PMID:25098335

  5. Techniques for anaerobic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Thornsberry, C

    1977-03-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antimicrobial agents for anaerobic bacteria can be determined by agar dilution and broth dilution (including microdilution) techniques. If MICs are not determined routinely, the disk broth or category methods are recommended for routine use. The Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion method and its interpretative standards should not be used for anaerobes. PMID:850089

  6. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect to the variety of substrates used, the types of dissimilatory metabolism, and the diversity of potential electron acceptors has important implications for the potential for life in hostile environments lacking oxygen and high in salt, implications that may also be relevant to astrobiology.

  7. In vitro osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Durante, Sandra; Mazzotti, Antonio; Dicarlo, Manuela; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Orsini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering. PMID:26578970

  8. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et al. 2007. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 57: 514 - 512. Hoeft, S.E, et al. 2004. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70: 2741 - 2747. Oremland, R.S., et al. 2005. Science 308: 1305 - 1308. Kulp, T.R. et al. 2008. Science 321: 967 - 970.

  9. Activities of HMR 3004 (RU 64004) and HMR 3647 (RU 66647) compared to those of erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, and eight other antimicrobial agents against unusual aerobic and anaerobic human and animal bite pathogens isolated from skin and soft tissue infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Hunt Gerardo, S; Hudspeth, M; Merriam, C V

    1998-05-01

    The activities of HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 and comparator agents, especially macrolides, were determined by the agar dilution method against 262 aerobic and 120 anaerobic strains isolated from skin and soft tissue infections associated with human and animal bite wounds. HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 were active against almost all aerobic and fastidious facultative isolates (MIC at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited [MIC90], < or = 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively) and against all anaerobes [Bacteroides tectum, Porphyromonas macacae (salivosa), Prevotella heparinolytica, Porphyromonas sp., Prevotella sp., and peptostreptococci] at < or = 0.25 and < or = 0.5 microg/ml, respectively, except Fusobacterium nucleatum (HMR 3004, MIC90 = 16 microg/ml; HMR 3647, MIC90 = 8 microg/ml) and other Fusobacterium species (MIC90, 1 and 2 microg/ml, respectively). In general, HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 were more active than any of the macrolides tested. Azithromycin was more active than clarithromycin against all Pasteurella species, including Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium species, while clarithromycin was more active than azithromycin against Corynebacterium species, Weeksella zoohelcum, B. tectum, and P. heparinolytica. PMID:9593139

  10. Anaerobic waste stabilization.

    PubMed

    Winter, J

    1984-01-01

    The present knowledge of the microbiology, physiology and regulation of anaerobic digestion in conventional or advanced processes is reviewed. In all systems the carbon flow from biopolymers to biogas is determined by syntrophic interactions of fermentative or acetogenic bacteria with methanogens at the level of interspecies hydrogen transfer. Inhibitors or heavy metal ions may interfere at different levels. The stabilization of waste at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures is compared and the process stability as well as the inactivation of pathogens is discussed. Characteristics of conventional digestion systems and of recently developed advanced processes with solids and liquids uncoupling are compared and selection criteria with respect to the type of sludge are outlined. Areas of future research for a better understanding of the biochemistry, the physiology and the regulation of the degradation of pollutants are suggested. PMID:14543721

  11. Paradoxical anaerobism in desert pupfish.

    PubMed

    Heuton, Matt; Ayala, Luis; Burg, Chris; Dayton, Kyle; McKenna, Ken; Morante, Aldo; Puentedura, Georgina; Urbina, Natasha; Hillyard, Stanley; Steinberg, Spencer; van Breukelen, Frank

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate metabolic demands of desert pupfish for conservation purposes, we measured oxygen consumption in fish acclimated to the ecologically relevant temperatures of 28 or 33°C. For these experiments, we used fish derived from a refuge population of Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis). Measurement of routine oxygen consumption (V̇O2,routine) revealed some 33°C-acclimated fish (10% of 295 assayed fish) periodically exhibited periods of no measurable oxygen consumption despite available ambient oxygen tensions that were above the critical PO2. We call this phenomenon paradoxical anaerobism. The longest observed continuous bout with no oxygen consumption was 149 min, although typical bouts were much shorter. Fish maintained normal posture and ventilation rate (>230 ventilations per minute) during paradoxical anaerobism. Fish rarely demonstrated a compensatory increase in oxygen use following a period of paradoxical anaerobism. In contrast, only one out of 262 sampled fish acclimated at 28°C spontaneously demonstrated paradoxical anaerobism. Muscle lactate concentration was not elevated during periods of paradoxical anaerobism. However, the amount of ethanol released by the 33°C-acclimated fish was 7.3 times greater than that released by the 28°C acclimation group, suggesting ethanol may be used as an alternative end product of anaerobic metabolism. Exposure to exogenous ethanol, in concentrations as low as 0.1%, produced periods of paradoxical anaerobism even in 28°C-acclimated fish. PMID:26632453

  12. In vitro evaluation of faropenem activity against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Behra-Miellet, J; Dubreuil, L; Bryskier, A

    2005-02-01

    Faropenem, a new oral penem with broad spectrum activity, could be used as empirical treatment in infections due to unidentified anaerobes, but only a few investigations have been carried out on these bacteria. The aim of this study was to compare faropenem in vitro activity with that of positive antimicrobial controls (metronidazole, imipenem, meropenem, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, cefotetan, cefoxitin and clindamycin) against 462 anaerobic bacterial strains. The reference agar dilution method was used according to the NCCLS standard. Faropenem demonstrated high antimicrobial activity, similar to that of both imipenem and meropenem (faropenem Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations 50% and 90% were 0.12 and 1 mg/L for all Gram-negative anaerobes, 0.25 and 1 mg/L for all Gram-positive anaerobes). Only 5 strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group (1.1% of all anaerobes) were resistant to faropenem, which compared favorably with that of other reference antianaerobic drugs. The results obtained confirm those previously reported. PMID:15828442

  13. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  14. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaolei; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Jian, Yutao

    2016-05-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo‑/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector‑mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector‑transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene‑transfected SCAP (SCAP‑VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP‑VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP‑BMP2‑VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP‑positive mineralized nodules than the other groups following 16 days culture in vitro. In conclusion, lentiviral vector-mediated BMP2 and VEGF gene co-transfection significantly activated the osteo‑/odontogenic differentiation of human SCAP. PMID:26986020

  15. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected human stem cells from apical papilla

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEN; ZHANG, XIAOLEI; LING, JUNQI; WEI, XI; JIAN, YUTAO

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) possess clear osteo-/odontogenic differentiation capabilities, and are regarded as the major cellular source for root dentin development. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serve pivotal roles in the modulation of tooth development and dentin formation. However, the synergistic effects of BMP2 and VEGF on osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of SCAP remain unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the proliferative and osteo-/odontogenic differentiating capabilities of BMP2 and VEGF gene-co-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2-VEGF) in vitro. The basic characteristics of the isolated SCAP were identified by the induction of multipotent differentiation and by flow cytometry. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfection was conducted with SCAP in order to construct blank vector-transfected SCAP (SCAP-green fluorescent protein), BMP2 gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-BMP2), VEGF gene-transfected SCAP (SCAP-VEGF) and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF. The Cell Counting Kit 8 assay was used to analyze the proliferative capacities of the four groups of cells. The expression of osteo-/odontogenic genes and proteins in the cells were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The mineralized nodules formed by the four group cells were visualized by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. Among the four groups of cells, SCAP-VEGF was demonstrated to exhibit increased proliferation, and SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited reduced proliferation during eight days observation. SCAP-BMP2-VEGF exhibited significantly increased expression levels of ALP, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene 1 and dentin sialoprotein than the other three groups at the majority of the time points. Furthermore, the SCAP-BMP2-VEGF group exhibited a significantly greater number of ALP-positive mineralized nodules than the other groups following 16 days culture in vitro. In conclusion, lentiviral vector-mediated BMP2 and VEGF gene co-transfection significantly activated the osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of human SCAP. PMID:26986020

  16. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  17. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    PubMed

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. PMID:26542569

  18. [Current methods of determining the sensitivity to antibacterial preparations of anaerobic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Dronova, O M; Ponomareva, T R

    1985-11-01

    Antibacterial therapy of infections caused by anaerobic bacteria requires consideration of the data on periodical estimation of sensitivity of the main groups of pathogens to antibacterial drugs. The method of serial dilutions in solid nutrient media is the most accurate and handy for estimation of sensitivity of a large number of strains of anaerobic bacteria. The method of elution of a drug from a paper disk into the liquid thioglycol medium is the most applicable for determination of sensitivity of anaerobic pathogens in specific cases in customary laboratories. PMID:4091519

  19. M2-polarized macrophages in keratocystic odontogenic tumor: relation to tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wen-Qun; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Xue-Peng; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of M2-polarized macrophages and their relationships to angiogenesis in keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). M2-polarized macrophages were detected in KCOT samples by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Meanwhile, microvessel density measured with antibody against CD31 was closely correlated with the presence of M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) significantly contributed to the activation of M2-polarized macrophages. Moreover, the results of in vitro wound healing, cell migration and tube formation assays further revealed the pro-angiogenic function of M2-polarized macrophage-like cells. This function might be associated with secretion of angiogenic cytokines, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and matrix metalloprotein-9 (MMP-9). This study demonstrates for the first time that M2-polarized macrophages are prevalent in KCOT, and their presence is dependent on M-CSF expression. More importantly, these tumor-supportive cells can also promote tumor angiogenesis by secreting angiogenic cytokines. PMID:26508096

  20. Conservative surgical approach to aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasm: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay

    2015-02-01

    Aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasms have substantial potential to grow to an enormous size with resulting bone deformities, and they often invade adjacent tissues and spread beyond their normal clinical and radiographic margins; as such, they have a high rate of recurrence. Historically, management (conservative versus aggressive) on the basis of clinical, radiographic and/or histopathologic characteristics has been controversial. However, recent advances in the understanding of the biological features of these lesions may provide greater evidence of the benefits of conservative management. Three patients with different complaints and final histopathologic diagnoses were enrolled in the study. All three cases were treated by a single operator with similar conservative surgical procedures. During follow-up, the patients had uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration, less packing time than previously reported, no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence and no apparent deformity. The aggressive behavior of these lesions requires long clinical and radiographic follow-up. Conservative surgical management may be an option to reduce recurrence and morbidity and increase the probability of uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration. PMID:25741467

  1. A keratocyst in the buccal mucosa with the features of keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Matsusue, Yumiko; Kurihara, Miyako; Takahashi, Yuka; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2013-01-01

    A 74-year-old male patient consulted us for an elastic firm mass in the right buccal mucosa. CT examination revealed a well-circumscribed oval cystic lesion in the anterior region of the masseter muscle. On MRI, the lesion showed a low signal on T1-weighted image and a high signal on T2-weighted image. Aspiration biopsy demonstrated the presence of squamous cells in whitish liquid. Under the diagnosis of epidermoid cyst, the lesion was intraorally extirpated under general anesthesia. The lesion was cystic at the size of 30 25mm. Histologically, the cyst wall was lined with parakeratinized squamous epithelium corrugated on its surface, the basal layer of which consisted of cuboidal cells showing palisading of the nuclei. Immunohistochemically, the lining epithelium was positive for CK17 and negative for CK10. The basal and suprabasal cells were labeled for Ki-67 at a relatively high rate. These features are compatible with those of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:24285986

  2. Parietal subdural empyema as complication of acute odontogenic sinusitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To date intracranial complication caused by tooth extractions are extremely rare. In particular parietal subdural empyema of odontogenic origin has not been described. A literature review is presented here to emphasize the extreme rarity of this clinical entity. Case presentation An 18-year-old Caucasian man with a history of dental extraction developed dysarthria, lethargy, purulent rhinorrhea, and fever. A computed tomography scan demonstrated extensive sinusitis involving maxillary sinus, anterior ethmoid and frontal sinus on the left side and a subdural fluid collection in the temporal-parietal site on the same side. He underwent vancomycin, metronidazole and meropenem therapy, and subsequently left maxillary antrostomy, and frontal and maxillary sinuses toilette by an open approach. The last clinical control done after 3 months showed a regression of all symptoms. Conclusions The occurrence of subdural empyema is an uncommon but possible sequela of a complicated tooth extraction. A multidisciplinary approach involving otolaryngologist, neurosurgeons, clinical microbiologist, and neuroradiologist is essential. Antibiotic therapy with surgical approach is the gold standard treatment. PMID:25146384

  3. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  4. Vitamin D Promotes Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells via ERK Activation.

    PubMed

    Woo, Su-Mi; Lim, Hae-Soon; Jeong, Kyung-Yi; Kim, Seon-Mi; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D such as 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) is a well-known key regulatory factor in bone metabolism. However, little is known about the potential of vitamin D as an odontogenic inducer in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25(OH)2D3, on odontoblastic differentiation in HDPCs. HDPCs extracted from maxillary supernumerary incisors and third molars were directly cultured with 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the absence of differentiation-inducing factors. Treatment of HDPCs with 1α,25(OH)2D3 at a concentration of 10 nM or 100 nM significantly upregulated the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1), the odontogenesis-related genes. Also, 1α,25(OH)2D3 enhanced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization in HDPCs. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), whereas the ERK inhibitor U0126 ameliorated the upregulation of DSPP and DMP1 and reduced the mineralization enhanced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. These results demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 promoted odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs via modulating ERK activation. PMID:26062551

  5. Conservative surgical approach to aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasm: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasms have substantial potential to grow to an enormous size with resulting bone deformities, and they often invade adjacent tissues and spread beyond their normal clinical and radiographic margins; as such, they have a high rate of recurrence. Historically, management (conservative versus aggressive) on the basis of clinical, radiographic and/or histopathologic characteristics has been controversial. However, recent advances in the understanding of the biological features of these lesions may provide greater evidence of the benefits of conservative management. Three patients with different complaints and final histopathologic diagnoses were enrolled in the study. All three cases were treated by a single operator with similar conservative surgical procedures. During follow-up, the patients had uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration, less packing time than previously reported, no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence and no apparent deformity. The aggressive behavior of these lesions requires long clinical and radiographic follow-up. Conservative surgical management may be an option to reduce recurrence and morbidity and increase the probability of uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration. PMID:25741467

  6. Differential expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in keratocystic odontogenic tumors prior and subsequent to decompression

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; SONG, XIAOMENG; ZHANG, XIAOMIN; WANG, ZHAO; DING, XU; YUAN, YE; WU, YUNONG; WU, HEMING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) prior and subsequent to decompression and to explore the association between iNOS expression and changes in clinical features. Sixteen pairs of specimens obtained at the time of decompression and subsequent curettages were collected and immunohistochemically examined using an antibody against iNOS. The intensity of iNOS staining was evaluated semi-quantitatively for statistical analysis. Prior to decompression, 87.5% of KCOT samples showed no immunohistochemical reactivity for iNOS. Only 12.5% of samples exhibited slight staining for iNOS in the cytoplasm of cells in the epithelial layer. Subsequent to decompression, all the samples exhibited moderate to intense staining for iNOS in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells in the epithelial and fibrous layers. This increased expression of iNOS following decompression was statistically significant (P<0.01). The results demonstrated distinct expression of iNOS in KCOT samples prior and subsequent to decompression, indicating that iNOS may have a role in mediating changes in clinical features.

  7. The use of vismodegib to shrink keratocystic odontogenic tumors in basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Tang, Jean Y.; Joseph, Timmy; Thompson, Bobbye; Lindgren, Joselyn; Raphael, Maria Acosta; Ulerio, Grace; Chanana, Anita M.; Mackay-Wiggan, Julian M.; Bickers, David R.; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-01-01

    Importance Keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaw (KCOTs) affect more than 65% of patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Surgery frequently causes facial disfigurement and is not always curative. Most BCNS-related and some sporadic KCOTs have malignant activation of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway. Observations We examined the effect of vismodegib (an oral HH-pathway inhibitor) on KCOT size in BCNS patients enrolled in a clinical trial testing vismodegib for BCC prevention (NCT00957229), using pre and post-treatment MRIs. Four men and 2 women had pretreatment KCOTs, mean longest diameter 2.0cm (range: 0.7–3.3cm), occurring primarily in the mandible. Subjects were treated with vismodegib (150mg/day) for a mean 18 months (SD: 4.8, range: 11–24). Four subjects experienced a size reduction and 2 had no change. Vismodegib reduced the mean longest diameter of KCOTs in all subjects by 1.0cm (95% CI: 0.03, 1.94, p= 0.02) or 50% from baseline. We observed no enlargement of existing KCOTs or new KCOT development. Conclusions and relevance Vismodegib shrinks some KCOTs in BCNS patients and may offer an alternative to surgical therapy. These effects were maintained for at least 9 months after drug cessation in 1 patient. Further studies assessing long-term efficacy and optimal maintenance regimens should be performed. PMID:24623282

  8. Recurrent squamous odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MOHR, BARBARA; WINTER, JOCHEN; WAHL, GERHARD; JANSKA, EMILIA

    2015-01-01

    Squamous odontogenic tumors (SOTs) are benign, locally infiltrative neoplasms that localize to the periodontium. In total, <50 cases have been reported since the first description of SOTs in 1975. Although the exact etiology of SOTs is unknown, the tumors are considered to derive from the epithelial cell rests of Malassez. SOTs are characterized by radiological and clinical signs and symptoms, including pain with increased sensitivity in the affected area, bone expansion and increased tooth mobility. The present study describes the case of a patient that experienced numerous SOT recurrences and also discusses recommendations for treatment. A locally invasive mandibular SOT was identified in a Caucasian 41-year-old female patient. The treatment involved recommended conservative surgery, including local curettage. In addition, 49 cases published in the literature were reviewed to assess the treatment strategies. The present patient experienced two recurrences of the tumor during the 6-year follow-up period. Ultimately, the vitality of the adjacent teeth was compromised. An apicoectomy with a small amount of resection of the marginal bone was necessary. In >50% of the reported cases of SOT in the literature the adjacent teeth were extracted. The present case of SOT and the associated literature were also discussed. It was concluded that the treatment of choice appears to be a conservative surgical removal, but the successful management of SOTs often requires the removal of the adjacent teeth. PMID:26722231

  9. Anaerobic dechlorination and degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers by anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jagnow, G; Haider, K; Ellwardt, P C

    1977-12-15

    Screening studies with strict and facultative anaerobic bacteria showed that Clostridium app. and several other representatives of Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae actively degraded gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH) under anaerobic conditions. Representatives of Lactobacillaceae and Propronibacterium were inactive. With 36Cl-labelled gamma-HCH a nearly complete dechlorination was shown to occur in 4--6 days by Clostridium butyricum, C. pasteurianum and Citrobacter freundii, while other facultative anaerobic species were less active. Aerobically grown facultative anaerobes also dechlorinated actively gamma-HCH during subsequent anaerobic incubation with glucose, pyruvate or formate as substrates. The alpha-, beta- and delta-HCH isomers were also, but more slowly, dechlorinated (gamma larger than alpha larger than beta larger than or equal to delta-HCH). All species active in anaerobic degradation of gamma-HCH formed gamma-tetrachlorocyclohexene (TCH) as the main intermediate metabolite and no gamma-pentachlorocyclohexene (PCH) or other isomers of TCH or PCH have been found. Small amounts of tri- and tetrachlorinated benzenes have been found too. The mechanism of dechlorination is discussed. PMID:74989

  10. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:25813393

  11. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I

    PubMed Central

    White, Lisa J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. Methods DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. Results When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. Significance These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:26882351

  12. Drug Targets and Mechanisms of Resistance in the Anaerobic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently been investigated using laboratory-induced resistant isolates. Instead of downregulation of the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin pathway as seen in G. duodenalis and T. vaginalis, E. histolytica induces oxidative stress mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin. The review examines the value of investigating both clinical and laboratory-induced syngeneic drug-resistant isolates and dissection of the complementary data obtained. Comparison of resistance mechanisms in anaerobic bacteria and the parasitic protozoa is discussed as well as the value of studies of the epidemiology of resistance. PMID:11148007

  13. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species. PMID:23648369

  14. Anaerobic digestion of woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Jerger, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    Woody biomass without pretreatment is generally considered to be refractive to anaerobic decomposition. This refractory property is attributed to its low moisture content, crystalline nature of the cellulose, and complex association of the component carbohydrates with lignin. This study investigated the methane fermentation (anaerobic digestion) of various wood species using conventional anaerobic digestion and batch anaerobic biogasification potential assays. Most experiments were conducted at 35/sup 0/C with a particle size in the range of 1 to 2 mm, and with a full complement of inorganic nutrient supplements. Conventional CSTR semicontinuous feed anaerobic digestion resulted in low methane yields and low conversion (less than 5% organic reduction). Significantly higher conversion (as high as 54%) and higher methane yields (as high as 5.4 SCF/lb VS added) were observed for several hardwood species in ABP assays employing low loading and long residence times (60 days). One softwood (loblolly pine) and eucalyptus were refractory under these conditions. Pretreatments, including particle size reduction and NaOH, increased rates but not total conversion. These results demonstrate that woody biomass can be decomposed by the methane fermentation and support the potential for development of this process for commercial wood conversion applications. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Intracranial bacterial infections of oral origin.

    PubMed

    Moazzam, Alan A; Rajagopal, Sowmya M; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Zada, Gabriel; Habibian, Mina

    2015-05-01

    Brain abscesses are rare but potentially deadly complications of odontogenic infections. This phenomenon has been described mainly in the form of case reports, as large-scale studies are difficult to perform. We compiled a total of 60 previously published cases of such a complication to investigate the predisposing factors, microbiology, and clinical outcomes of intracranial abscesses of odontogenic origin. A systematic review of the literature using the PubMed database was performed. Men accounted for 82.1% of cases, and the mean age was 42.1 years. Caries with periapical involvement and periodontitis were the two most common intra-oral sources, and wisdom tooth extraction was the most common preceding dental procedure. In 56.4% of cases, there were obvious signs of dental disease prior to development of intracranial infection. Commonly implicated microorganisms included Streptococcus viridans (especially the anginosus group), Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens. There was an 8.3% mortality rate. Intracranial abscesses can form anywhere within the brain, and appear unrelated to the side of dental involvement. This suggests that hematogenous spread is the most likely route of dissemination. PMID:25800939

  16. Clinical and microbiological efficacy of moxifloxacin versus amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in severe odontogenic abscesses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawas, B; Walter, C; Morbach, T; Seitner, N; Siegel, E; Maeurer, M; Krummenauer, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study targeted the evaluation of the in vivo effect of moxifloxacin in the treatment of patients with severe odontogenic abscesses. This was a prospective, two-armed, randomised, unblinded, monocentric pilot study, which enrolled 21 hospitalized patients with severe odontogenic abscesses. After extraoral incision, patients were either treated with moxifloxacin 400 mg i.v. once daily or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 2.2 g i.v. three times daily. Primary clinical endpoint was the time until clinical remission, represented by simultaneous assertion of the following criteria: body temperature <38.5 degrees C, no pain at palpation, and mouth opening similar or better than preoperatively. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein, pain, health related quality of life (HR-QoL) and length of hospital stay were recorded as secondary outcome criteria. The mean duration until reaching the primary end point was 6.6 (range, 4.3-8.8) days in the moxifloxacin group and 6.0 (range, 3.8-8.2) days in the amoxicillin/clavulanic acid group. Median days of in-house treatment ranged between five and six days for both groups. HR-QoL was highly impaired in both groups preoperatively and reached near normal on days three and four in both samples. In this pilot investigation, moxifloxacin showed promising results as compared to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Therefore, a larger prospective clinical trial using moxifloxacin in severe odontogenic abscesses appears encouraging. We suggest a combination of body temperature, palpatory pain, and subjective pain as a parameter for successful intervention; however, both findings need prospective validation by means of a phase III evaluation. PMID:18663500

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal-spatial visualization of bacteria. Methods used in this study can be applied to any cultivable anaerobe and any eukaryotic cell type. PMID:26709454

  18. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  19. PILOT ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PULP MILL EVAPORATOR FOUL CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of three new anaerobic biological treatment technologies were compared and evaluated. Data were obtained from the operation of pilot plants representative of the anaerobic filter, anaerobic upflow sludge bed, and anaerobic fluidized bed. A review of recent literat...

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. Results: VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. Conclusion: The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that the higher positivity for VEGF of KCOT could help to explain in part the aggressive biological behavior of the lesion. The stroma of KCOT could be regarded not only as a structural support of the cyst wall but also as playing a part in the neoplastic behavior of cyst. PMID:27134450

  1. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa, Ganymede, Titan or Enceladus (formed by cryo-concentration), arsenotrophy could serve as a credible means of microbial energy conservation. Regrettably, the direct search for arsenic biomarkers is restricted because only one stable isotope exists (75As), which rules out the use of stable isotopic ratios in this regard. However, antimony oxyanions often co-occur with arsenic in the environment. Its two stable isotopes (123Sb and 121Sb) hold the potential to be exploited as a proxy isotopic biomarker for the fingerprint of microbial arsenotrophy. Whether such an approach is feasible needs to be investigated.

  2. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  3. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes.

    PubMed

    Lainoff, Alexis J; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2015-05-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  4. Critical evaluation of the radiological and clinical features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Becker, T; Buchner, A; Kaffe, I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiological and clinical features of adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOTs). Methods A total of 272 cases (267 from the English-language literature and 5 new cases) were analysed with special emphasis on their radiological features. Results The patients' ages at time of diagnosis ranged from 3 years to 82 years (mean 18.4 years). The maxilla-to-mandible ratio was 1.7:1. Mandibular lesions were significantly more frequent among patients older than 16 years (p = 0.032). Expansion of the cortex was significantly more prominent among patients older than 16 years (p = 0.045). There was a positive correlation between the size of the lesion and the age of the patient at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.016). The size was also associated with increased root resorption (p < 0.001), ill-defined borders (p < 0.001), expansion (p < 0.001) and perforation of the cortex (p < 0.001). Small opacities were present in 77% of lesions and were associated with expansion of the cortex (p = 0.043). The significant radiological features in patients aged 30 years and above were root resorption (p = 0.013) and lesions crossing the midline (p = 0.019). Conclusions The size of an AOT is influenced by the patient's age. It is also associated with root resorption, ill-defined borders, expansion and perforation of the cortex, but it cannot be ruled out that those changes reflect a longer duration of the lesion. PMID:22752319

  5. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in Pediatric Nigerian Patients: A Review of 8 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Omeje, KU; Amole, IO; Osunde, OD; Efunkoya, AA

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxoma (OFM) is a benign, locally invasive and aggressive nonmetastasizing neoplasm of jaw bones. They are considered relatively rare and known to be derived from embryonic mesenchymal elements of dental origin. Treatment of OFM depends on the size of the lesion and on its nature and behavior. Varying treatment modalities ranging from curettage to radical excision have been documented. Aim; This paper is a review of management of 8 pediatric patients with histologically diagnosed OFM at a Nigerian tertiary health care facility. This was a retrospective study of all patients aged 15 years and below who presented to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, over a 5-year period (January 2008 to December 2012), with a histologic diagnosis of OFM. The information obtained included patients' demographics, as well as their clinical characteristics such as the anatomical site and side of lesions. Other information collated included presenting features, the onset of symptoms, type of treatment carried out, as well as treatment outcome. The data were analyzed and the results presented as frequencies and percentages. Among the 8 patients with OFM, more males (n = 5/8; 62.5%) were affected than females (n = 3/8; 37.5%). The mandible (n = 5/8; 62.5%) was the most frequent site of occurrence, and the anterior mandible was the most favored location (n = 4/8; 50%). Seven patients had excision of the lesion with peripheral ostectomy of the underlying bone while only one patient had a bone resection. These patients have been followed up for at least 1 year, and no recurrence was observed throughout the follow-up period. OFM causes gross facial disfigurement and may result in the destruction of the entire jaw bone; the impact of which may be grave for a growing child. Prompt surgical intervention and follow-up have proven to be adequate management protocol.

  6. The effectiveness of decompression for patients with dentigerous cysts, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and unicystic ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Soo; Song, In-Seok; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to verify the clinical effectiveness of decompression in decreasing the size of a cyst. In addition to the different types of cysts, we tried to reveal what effect host factors, such as the initial size of the lesion and the age of the patient, have on the velocity of cyst shrinkage. Materials and Methods With the aid of a panoramic view, we measured the size of the cysts before and after decompression in 13 dentigerous cysts (DCs), 14 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KTOCs), and 5 unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) cases. The velocity of shrinkage in the three cystic groups was calculated. Relationships between the age of the patient, the initial size of the cyst, and the shrinkage velocity were investigated. Results The three types of cysts showed no inter-type differences in their velocity of shrinkage. However, there was a statistically meaningful relationship between the initial size of the lesion and the absolute velocity of shrinkage in the DC group (P=0.02, R=0.65) and the KTOC group (P=0.02, R=0.56). There was also a significant relationship between the age of the patient and the absolute velocity of shrinkage in the KTOC group (P=0.04, R=0.45) and the UA group (P=0.04, R=0.46). Conclusion There was no difference in the decrease in size due to decompression among the different types of cysts. However, the age of the patient and the initial size of the lesion showed a significant relationship with the velocity of shrinkage. PMID:25551089

  7. Odontogenic ameloblast-associated and amelotin are novel basal lamina components.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Neves, Juliana; Wazen, Rima M; Kuroda, Shingo; Francis Zalzal, Sylvia; Moffatt, Pierre; Nanci, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) and amelotin (AMTN) are secreted by maturation stage ameloblasts and accumulate at the interface with enamel where an atypical basal lamina (BL) is present. This study aimed at determining and quantifying the ultrastructural distribution of ODAM and AMTN at the cell-tooth interface. Ultrathin sections of enamel organs from the early to mid- and late maturation stage of amelogenesis were processed for immunogold labeling with antibodies against ODAM, AMTN or with the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and Ricinus communis I agglutinin. Immunolabeling showed that both ODAM and AMTN localized to the BL. Quantitative analyses indicated that at the beginning of maturation there is a concentration of ODAM on the cell side of the BL while AMTN appears more concentrated on the enamel side. In the late maturation stage, such differential distribution is no longer apparent. All three lectins are bound to the BL. Competitive incubation with native lectins did not affect the binding efficiency of ODAM; however, AMTN binding was significantly reduced after incubation with HPA. In conclusion, ODAM and AMTN are bona fide components of the BL associated with maturation stage ameloblasts and they organize into different subdomains during the early maturation stage. The data also suggest that the BL is a dynamic structure that rearranges its organization as enamel maturation advances. Finally, the abrogation of AMTN antibody labeling by HPA supports the presence of O-linked sugars in the molecule and/or its close association with other O-glycosylated molecules. PMID:22231912

  8. A comparative examination of odontogenic gene expression in both toothed and toothless amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Lainoff, Alexis J.; Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E.; Hu, Diane; Kallonen, Aki; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hlusko, Leslea J.

    2015-01-01

    A well-known tenet of murine tooth development is that BMP4 and FGF8 antagonistically initiate odontogenesis, but whether this tenet is conserved across amniotes is largely unexplored. Moreover, changes in BMP4-signaling have previously been implicated in evolutionary tooth loss in Aves. Here we demonstrate that Bmp4, Msx1, and Msx2 expression is limited proximally in the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta) mandible at stages equivalent to those at which odontogenesis is initiated in mice, a similar finding to previously reported results in chicks. To address whether the limited domains in the turtle and the chicken indicate an evolutionary molecular parallelism, or whether the domains simply constitute an ancestral phenotype, we assessed gene expression in a toothed reptile (the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis) and a toothed non-placental mammal (the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica). We demonstrate that the Bmp4 domain is limited proximally in M. domestica and that the Fgf8 domain is limited distally in A. mississippiensis just preceding odontogenesis. Additionally, we show that Msx1 and Msx2 expression patterns in these species differ from those found in mice. Our data suggest that a limited Bmp4 domain does not necessarily correlate with edentulism, and reveal that the initiation of odontogenesis in non-murine amniotes is more complex than previously imagined. Our data also suggest a partially conserved odontogenic program in T. scripta, as indicated by conserved Pitx2, Pax9, and Barx1 expression patterns and by the presence of a Shh-expressing palatal epithelium, which we hypothesize may represent potential dental rudiments based on the Testudinata fossil record. PMID:25678399

  9. The Role of Thymosin Beta 4 on Odontogenic Differentiation in Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that overexpression of thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) in transgenic mice promotes abnormal hair growth and tooth development, but the role of Tβ4 in dental pulp regeneration was not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Tβ4 on odontoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism regulating pulp regeneration in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Our results demonstrate that mRNA and protein expression of Tβ4 is upregulated during odontogenic differentiation in HDPCs. Transfection with Tβ4 siRNA decreases OM-induced odontoblastic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of differentiation markers, and calcium nodule formation. In contrast, Tβ4 activation with a Tβ4 peptide promotes these processes by enhancing the phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2, BMP4, phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Smad2/3, and expression of transcriptional factors such as Runx2 and Osterix, which were blocked by the BMP inhibitor noggin. The expression of integrin receptors α1, α2, α3, and β1 and downstream signaling molecules including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), p-paxillin, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were increased by Tβ4 peptide in HDPCs. ILK siRNA blocked Tβ4-induced odontoblastic differentiation and activation of the BMP and MAPK transcription factor pathways in HDPCs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that Tβ4 plays a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of HDPCs and activation of Tβ4 could provide a novel mechanism for regenerative endodontics. PMID:23613983

  10. Glandular odontogenic cyst – Literature review and report of a paediatric case

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Mohammad; Ahmad, Syed Ansar; Ansari, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is an extremely rare lesion occurring in the jawbones. The present paper is a review of 181 cases of GOCs reported in English literature, since it was first reported by Padayache and Van Wyk in 1987. Mandible was involved in 130 cases and maxilla in 51 cases. Anterior mandible was the most common area of involvement. Radiographic appearance was that of a unilocular radiolucency in 98 of 176 reported cases. Rest presented as multilocular radiolucency. Cortical expansion was observed in 136 of the 180 reported cases while cortex breach or perforation was seen in 81 cases. The treatment of choice was that of minor procedures that included enucleation with or without curettage, peripheral ostectomy, cryotherapy, etc. in 157 of the total 177 reported cases. Marginal jaw resection, segmental mandibulectomy etc. was reported in 20 cases. Although minor surgical procedures were the treatment of choice in most studies, two major studies of Kaplan et al. and Fowler et al. involving 111 and 46 cases, recorded a recurrence rate of 35.9 and 19.6%, respectively. The age range was between 11 and 82 years. The respective mean age of patients in the above mentioned studies was 45.7 for Kaplan's and 51 years for Fowler's whereas in our study, the mean age was 45.9 years. Very rarely does GOC presents itself in a paediatric patient. The paper also reports a case of an 11-year-old child whose histopathogy came out to be a case of a GOC. PMID:26587384

  11. Tumor of the maxilla-odontogenic or glandular? A diagnostic challenge and the role of immunohistochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Jaya; Manjunatha, B S; Kumar, Harish; Kumar, Pratiksha

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice in medicine has reached remarkable change mainly due to the advances in the field. Odontogenic tumors represent a spectrum of lesions ranging from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms. Rarely, odontogenic tumors pose a challenge due to varied histological features. But appropriate and accurate diagnosis is crucial for further treatment and follow-up as these have an influence on the prognosis. In such situations, immunohistochemical. (IHC) markers play a significant role in the differentiating various lesions. Within its palette of histology, there are multiple histopathological presentations, many a times these features come in an intermixed pattern simulating different origin. We here, report such a case presented in a 70-year-old female came with a complaint of swelling in the posterior maxilla. The microscopic findings were indicative of a benign neoplasm. To know the nature of the lesion and arrive at a diagnosis, many IHC markers were used. Based on all these findings, a final diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma was arrived. PMID:26881616

  12. Identification of the involvement of LOXL4 in generation of keratocystic odontogenic tumors by RNA-Seq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Peng; Sima, Zi-Han; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Yun; Sun, Li-Sha; Chen, Feng; Li, Tie-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) are benign, locally aggressive intraosseous tumors of odontogenic origin. KCOT have a higher stromal microvessel density (MVD) than dentigerous cysts (DC) and normal oral mucosa. To identify genes in the stroma of KCOT involved in tumor development and progression, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed using samples from KCOT and primary stromal fibroblasts isolated from gingival tissues. Seven candidate genes that possess a function potentially related to KCOT progression were selected and their expression levels were confirmed by quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Expression of lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4), the only candidate gene that encodes a secreted protein, was enhanced at both the mRNA and protein levels in KCOT stromal tissues and primary KCOT stromal fibroblasts compared to control tissues and primary fibroblasts (P<0.05). In vitro, high expression of LOXL4 could enhance proliferation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). There was a significant, positive correlation between LOXL4 protein expression and MVD in stroma of KCOT and control tissues (r=0.882). These data suggest that abnormal expression of LOXL4 of KCOT may enhance angiogenesis in KCOT, which may help to promote the locally aggressive biological behavior of KCOT. PMID:24357854

  13. Mastoiditis and Gradenigo’s Syndrome with anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gradenigo’s syndrome is a rare disease, which is characterized by the triad of the following conditions: suppurative otitis media, pain in the distribution of the first and the second division of trigeminal nerve, and abducens nerve palsy. The full triad may often not be present, but can develop if the condition is not treated correctly. Case presentation We report a case of a 3-year-old girl, who presented with fever and left-sided acute otitis media. She developed acute mastoiditis, which was initially treated by intravenous antibiotics, ventilation tube insertion and cortical mastoidectomy. After 6 days the clinical picture was complicated by development of left-sided abducens palsy. MRI-scanning showed osteomyelitis within the petro-mastoid complex, and a hyper intense signal of the adjacent meninges. Microbiological investigations showed Staphylococcus aureus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. She was treated successfully with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy with anaerobic coverage. After 8 weeks of follow-up there was no sign of recurrent infection or abducens palsy. Conclusion Gradenigo’s syndrome is a rare, but life-threatening complication to middle ear infection. It is most commonly caused by aerobic microorganisms, but anaerobic microorganisms may also be found why anaerobic coverage should be considered when determining the antibiotic treatment. PMID:22978305

  14. Aerobic versus anaerobic wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.; White, J.E.; Callier, A.J.

    1997-04-01

    Biological wastewater treatment facilities are designed to emulate the purification process that occurs naturally in rivers, lakes and streams. In the simulated environment, conditions are carefully manipulated to spur the degradation of organic contaminants and stabilize the residual sludge. Whether the treatment process is aerobic or anaerobic is determined by a number of factors, including the composition of the wastewater, the degree of stabilization required for environmental compliance and economic viability. Because anaerobic digestion is accomplished without oxygen in a closed system, it is economical for pretreatment of high-strength organic sludge. Before the effluent can be discharged, however, followup treatment using an aerobic process is required. Though it has the drawback of being energy intensive, aerobic processing, the aeration of organic sludges in an open tank, is the primary method for treatment of industrial and municipal wastewater. Aerobic processes are more stable than anaerobic approaches and can be done rather simply, particularly with trickling filters. Gradually, the commercialization of modular systems that are capable of aerobic and anaerobic digestion will blur the distinctions between the two processes. Systems that boast those capabilities are available now.

  15. Anaerobic pretreatment of pharmaceutical wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. The pharmaceutical industry generates considerable amounts of wastewater that require extensive treatment before they are released. A common method of disposal is aerobic biological treatment, but this method is energy intensive and expensive. An alternative process--anaerobic digestion--costs less, saves energy, generates less sludge requiring disposal, and produces a usable fuel--methane. OIT and HydroQual, Inc., with Merck Co. recently completed a joint project that demonstrated the anaerobic biological treatment of wastewaters generated by the pharmaceutical industry. The objectives of the project were to demonstrate how the anaerobic biological process and the resulting energy savings can apply to the pharmaceutical industry and how effective and beneficial the process is to sludge management operations at pharmaceutical plants. This technical case study provides an overview of the DOE-HydroQual-Merck R D project and highlights the field tests done on pilot-scale anaerobic wastewater treatment units at a pharmaceutical plant. This document makes field test and data analysis results available to other researchers and private industry. It discusses project status; summarizes field-test efforts; and reviews potential technology impacts in terms of commercial applications, benefits, and full-scale system economics. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF TRIFLURALIN [ABSTRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dinitroaniline herbicides, such as trifluralin (2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzenamine) persist in oxic terrestrial environments, yet are rapidly degraded under certain anaerobic conditions. We examined the roles of Fe(II) minerals and trifluralin bioavailability in fate of the her...

  17. Anaerobic culture to detect periodontal and caries pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Anne C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaerobic culture has been critical in our understanding of the oral microbiotas. Highlight Studies in advanced periodontitis in the 1970s revealed microbial complexes that associated with different clinical presentations. Taxonomy studies identified species newly-observed in periodontitis as Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter (Wolinella) rectus and other Campylobacter species, and Tannerella (Bacteroides) forsythia. Anaerobic culture of initial periodontitis showed overlap in the microbiota with gingivitis, and added Selenomonas noxia and Filifactor alocis as putative periodontal pathogens. Porphyromonas gingivalis and T. forsythia were found to be associated with initial periodontitis in adults. The dominant microbiota of dental caries differs from that of periodontitis. The major cariogenic species are acidogenic and acid tolerant species particularly Streptococcus mutans, and Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. Anaerobic culture of severe early childhood caries revealed a widely diverse microbiota, comparable to that observed using cloning and sequencing. The PCR-based cloning approach, however, underestimated Actinobacteria compared with culture. Only a subset of the caries-associated microbiota was acid tolerant, with different segments of the microbiota cultured on blood agar compared to a low pH acid agar. While the major caries-associated species was S. mutans, a new species, Scardovia wiggsiae, was significantly associated with early childhood caries. Higher counts of S. wiggsiae were also observed in initial white spot carious lesions in adolescents. Conclusion In periodontitis and dental caries, anaerobic culture studies of advanced disease provided a comprehensive analysis of the microbiota of these infections. Anaerobic culture highlighted the limitation of PCR with standard primers that underestimate detection of Actinobacteria. PMID:25678835

  18. Effect of anaerobic digestion on oocysts of the protozoan Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M R; Shih, J C

    1988-01-01

    The effect of anaerobic digestion of poultry waste on oocysts of the protozoan Eimeria tenella, a common enteric pathogen that causes coccidiosis in poultry, was investigated in this study. Thermophilic (50 degrees C) and mesophilic (35 degrees C) anaerobic digestors, with poultry manure as the substrate, were inoculated with the oocysts. The oocysts were damaged during anaerobic digestion, as determined by morphological change and loss of their ability to sporulate. The recovered oocysts were tested for their infectivity in young chicks, as measured by body weight gain, mortality, and cecal lesions. Oocysts lost all their infectivity during thermophilic digestion, while oocysts subjected to mesophilic digestion remained moderately infective in comparison with untreated oocysts, which produced severe coccidiosis, high mortality, and low body weight gain in chicks. Oocysts were inactivated at 50 degrees C when they were suspended in digestor fluid or saline. Inactivation at 35 degrees C was significantly stronger in the digestor fluid than in the saline, which implied that factors other than temperature were involved in the lethal effect of anaerobic digestion on protozoan oocysts. In this study we demonstrated that the treatment of animal waste by anaerobic digestion, especially at a thermophilic temperature, has the benefits of pathogen control and protection of human and animal health in a farm environment. Images PMID:3202626

  19. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. PMID:24907580

  20. Decontamination by anaerobic stabilisation of the environment contaminated with enteronematode eggs Toxocara canis and Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Papajová, I; Juris, P; Szabová, E; Venglovský, J; Sasáková, N; Sefcíková, H; Martinez, J; Gábon, T

    2008-07-01

    Investigations were carried out under operating conditions of Field Composting Factory in Brezno (Slovak Republic) to determine the effect of anaerobic stabilization of organic wastes from public areas on the survival of model helminth Toxocara canis and Ascaris suum eggs. Due to anaerobic conditions, low temperature, low C:N ratio and changes in physical and chemical properties of organic waste, less than 64% of A. suum eggs remained viable after 150 days of stabilisation. The anaerobic stabilisation had a greater effect on the viability of T. canis eggs than on A. suum eggs. The infectivity of T. canis eggs was confirmed by a follow-up experiment in laboratory mice. A small number of T. canis larvae were found in their brain and muscles on day 28 after infection. The results refer to the risks of dissemination, survival and potential spread of endoparasitic developmental stages in the environment through organic wastes subjected to low temperature stabilisation. PMID:17976979

  1. Preparation of prereduced anaerobically sterilized media and their use in cultivation of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chan, E C; deVries, J; Harvey, R F

    1978-08-01

    Several modifications of the roll-tube method have made it simpler for routine use in the isolation and growth of anaerobic bacteria. These include use of a check valve for the production of prereduced anaerobically sterilized media; a Salvarsan tube under oxygen-free gas pressure for the dispensing of molten prereduced anaerobically sterilized agar medium; a Kelly infusion bottle with a graduated pipette side arm (also under gas pressure) for quantitative delivery of fluid prereduced anaerobically sterilized media; and screw-capped prescription bottles for the cultivation of anaerobes. Colonies of Bacteroides melaninogenicus were easily identified and counted by this method. Other anaerobic bacteria have also been cultivated successfully. PMID:29909

  2. Application of radiographic images in diagnosis and treatment of deep neck infections with necrotizing fasciitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Ju-Dong; Ryu, Hye-In; Cho, Yeon-Hee; Kong, Jun-Ha; Ohe, Joo-Young; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choi, Byung-Joon; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2011-12-01

    The advent and wide use of antibiotics have decreased the incidence of deep neck infection. When a deep neck infection does occur, however, it can be the cause of significant morbidity and death, resulting in airway obstruction, mediastinitis, pericarditis, epidural abscesses, and major vessel erosion. In our clinic, a patient with diffuse chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and fascial space abscess and necrotic fasciitis due to odontogenic infection at the time of first visit came. We successfully treated the patient by early diagnosis using contrast-enhanced CT and follow up dressing through the appropriate use of radiographic images. PMID:22232730

  3. Anaerobic wastewater treatment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suidan, M.T.; Pfeffer, J.T.; Nakhla, G.F.; Fraser, J.; Klepp, B.E.; Mueller, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    This project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of wastewater dilution, GAC (granular activated carbon) replacement rate, GAC particle size, operating temperature, and reactor configuration on the treatment of coal gasification wastewater with the expanded-bed GAC anaerobic bioreactor. Coal gasification wastewater used was generated in a low BTU, elevated pressure, stirred fixed-bed, gasifier operated by Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The treatability of another wastewater generated in a full-scale, slagging fixed-bed modification of a conventional dry-ash, pressurized gasifier located at the Great Plains gasification Association (GPGA) facility in North Dakota was also evaluated. Full-strength METC wastewater was found to be effectively treated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates as high as 19.4 g/kg GAC-day. At this rate, an excess of 50% of the applied COD was converted to methane, and a carbon utilization rate of 10 g GAC per liter of wastewater treated was employed. At these operating conditions, COD removal efficiencies across the treatment system exceeded 95%. Good COD removal and efficient COD conversion to methane were attainable at loading rates exceeding 70 g COD/kg GAC-day. Wastewater generated at the GPGA facility was found to be treatable at full-strength in the expanded-bed GAC anaerobic reactor at COD loading rates as high as 48 g COD/kg GAC-day. COD removal efficiencies at this loading rate exceeded 90%. Coal gasification wastewater was found to resist treatment under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. The thermophilic expanded-bed GAC anaerobic reactor affected very poor conversion efficiencies of phenol, even when fed a synthetically prepared phenol bearing wastewater. 29 refs., 77 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    PubMed

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown. PMID:21491069

  5. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-NXL104 against 396 Strains of β-Lactamase-Producing Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Merriam, Vreni; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2011-01-01

    NXL104, a novel β-lactamase inhibitor, was tested at a constant concentration of 4 μg/ml in combination with ceftazidime (CAZ), with and without added metronidazole, against 396 β-lactamase-producing strains of anaerobic bacteria. MIC50/MIC90 values for Bacteroides fragilis and the B. fragilis group were 8/16 and 64/>128 μg/ml, respectively. Although CAZ-NXL104 had limited activity against most anaerobic strains, in combination with metronidazole it shows potential for treating mixed infections involving resistant Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes. PMID:21537015

  6. Notes from the Field: Mycobacterium abscessus Infections Among Patients of a Pediatric Dentistry Practice - Georgia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Gianna; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Parham, Angie; Edison, Laura; Lorentzson, Lauren; Smith, Carol; Drenzek, Cherie

    2016-01-01

    On September 13, 2015, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified by hospital A of a cluster of pediatric Mycobacterium abscessus odontogenic infections. Hospital A had provided care for nine children who developed presumptive or confirmed M. abscessus infection after having a pulpotomy at pediatric dentistry practice A (dates of onset: July 23, 2014-September 4, 2015). During a pulpotomy procedure, decay and the diseased pulp are removed to preserve a deciduous tooth. DPH initiated an investigation to identify the outbreak source and recommend prevention and control measures. PMID:27054966

  7. Disruption of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelial cells influences the phenotype of multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weipeng; Yang, Guan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Tiejun

    2015-07-31

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are cystic epithelial neoplasms with a high recurrence rate. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of KCOTs are still largely unknown. Previous research showed that specific ablation of Smad4 in odontoblasts and dental epithelia resulted in spontaneous KCOTs in mice, and that constitutively activated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling was detected in the cyst epithelia of both Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre and Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice. Here, we ablated Smad4 in mouse odontoblasts and dental epithelia and compared the sizes and numbers of KCOTs. Both the number and size of KCOTs in Smad4(Co/Co) OC-Cre mice were larger than those in Smad4(Co/Co) K5-Cre mice, suggesting that paracrine signals from root odontoblasts play a more important role than those from Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) cells. PMID:26002469

  8. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst previously treated with marsupialization: case report and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Delgado-Azañero, Wilson; Rumayor-Piña, Alicia; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2016-04-01

    A rare case of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is presented here, with the clinical and histologic features of the first biopsy showing characteristics of OKC and the second biopsy disclosing a squamous cell carcinoma. Immunoprofile of this case was compared with five cases of classical OKC by using cytokeratins CK5, CK14, and CK19, CD138, p63, Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2. Classic OKCs showed expected positivity, mainly in the basal and/or suprabasal layers with most antibodies, except for p53, which was negative, whereas the present case showed irregular positivity in all layers, indicating that this can be useful for differential diagnosis and suggesting a possible role in malignant transformation into primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, immunohistochemical differences between the first biopsy of the present case and classic OKC suggest that immunohistochemistry can be helpful in cases with areas of subtle initial malignant transformation. PMID:26638715

  9. Enucleation of large keratocystic odontogenic tumor at mandible via unilateral sagittal split osteotomy: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Geun; Rhee, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Chung-Ah; Shin, Sang-Hun

    2015-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a common benign tumor of osseous lesions in dental and maxillofacial practice. We describe three cases of large KCOT located in the posterior part of the mandible extending to the angle and ramus region, which were enucleated via sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) of the mandible. There are cases in which a conventional enucleation procedure does not ensure complete excision of the entire lesion without damage to vital structures like the inferior alveolar nerve. In such cases, a SSO approach could be a better choice than conventional methods. The purpose of this article is to describe our experience using unilateral mandibular SSO for removal of a KCOT from the mandible. PMID:26339581

  10. Enucleation of large keratocystic odontogenic tumor at mandible via unilateral sagittal split osteotomy: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Geun; Rhee, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Chung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a common benign tumor of osseous lesions in dental and maxillofacial practice. We describe three cases of large KCOT located in the posterior part of the mandible extending to the angle and ramus region, which were enucleated via sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) of the mandible. There are cases in which a conventional enucleation procedure does not ensure complete excision of the entire lesion without damage to vital structures like the inferior alveolar nerve. In such cases, a SSO approach could be a better choice than conventional methods. The purpose of this article is to describe our experience using unilateral mandibular SSO for removal of a KCOT from the mandible. PMID:26339581

  11. Expression of CD105 in tumor angiogenesis a comparative study (ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and dentigerous cyst)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dandena Vinay; Hemavathy, Satheavanthan; Kulkarni, Dinraj; Rudraiah, Pradeep Mattighatta; Sidramayya Mathpati, Santosh Kumar; Priya, Sharan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Demonstrate the expression of CD105 (angiogenetic marker) in ameloblastoma (AM), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and dentigerous cyst (DC). Material and Methods: Assessment of microvessel density (MVD) in 70 cases, including 20 KCOT, 20 DC and 20 solid AMs. Assessment of MVD should be done as the mean number of microvessels per high-power-field. Results: AM and KCOT demonstrated a higher mean value of 7.98 (±2.70) and 6.25 (±2.88) respectively while DC demonstrated a lower mean of 3.75 (±1.42). There was no statistically significant difference between AM and KCOT (P > 0.05). The difference between AM and DC; and between KCOT and DC were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study suggested that angiogenesis may be one of the mechanisms possibly contributing to the different biological behaviors of KCOT, DCs and solid AMs. PMID:26124595

  12. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF ANAEROBIC SYSTEMS FOR MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT: 1. ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED. 2. ANFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses two developing technologies for the treatment of municipal wastewaters. These technologies are anaerobic fluidized bed systems and an anaerobic fixed-film bioreactor (ANFLOW). The report discusses: available laboratory data on system performance; fluidized b...

  13. STAT3 is a key pathway in primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising from an odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Shu-Li; Ye, Wei-Min; Zheng, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC) arising within an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is rare malignancy, entailing a poor prognosis for delayed diagnosis. The number of reports concerning this entity is extremely small. The aim of this study is to present the clinical and pathologic characteristics of PIOSCC and investigate its pathogenesis. Materials and methods: This study describes three patients with mandibular PIOSCC derived from an OKC over a seven-year period, each of which suffering from decompression in mandible. Important diagnostic criteria included the absence of overlying oral mucosal ulceration, the absence of a distant potential primary tumor, and the presence of a completely intraosseus lesion. The malignant transformation of OKC to PIOSCC was confirmed by pathologic evaluation of surgical resection specimens. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluating expression of Ki-67, p65, EGFR, phospho-AKT, and STAT3 in each of the three tumors and adjacent cyst walls. Results: Analysis by IHC indicated that Ki67, P65, EGFR and STAT3 were substantially elevated in PIOSCC. There was an obvious positive correlation between Ki67, P65, EGFR and STAT3 expression in adjacent benign epithelium. Each tumor exhibited long-standing chronic inflammation in the benign odontogenic cyst, suggesting that a sustained immune response may be partially responsible for malignant transformation of the benign cystic lining cells. Conclusions: These findings indicate that inflammation may be the principal mediator in PIOSCC ex-OKC, and the STAT3 signaling pathway is an important contributor to this process. Combined detection of Ki67, P65, and EGFR in the lesional epithelium can support the diagnosis of PIOSCC. PMID:26692930

  14. Application of a Chairside Anaerobic Culture Test for Endodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Masahiro; Kita, Seidai; Suzuki, Nao; Macedo, Sonia M.; Iha, Kosaku; Hirofuji, Takao

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions are caused by bacterial infections. The fundamental objective of endodontic treatment is to eliminate bacteria present in the root canal system because they play an important role in the development and maintenance of periapical lesions. Therefore, confirming the absence of bacteria before filling root canals is important. Anaerobic culture tests have been used in many endodontic cases, and they have brought about good treatment outcomes. These tests, however, require specific apparatuses and bacteriological techniques. Here, we report a chairside anaerobic culture test that does not require any specialized apparatuses or techniques. We also report two endodontic cases in which this simple test was used. Both patients were diagnosed with chronic purulent periapical lesions. After confirming the absence of bacteria in the root canals, they were filled with gutta-percha points. At followup, the radiolucencies showed recovery, although longterm observation is under way. From these results, the authors conclude that this simple chairside anaerobic culture test is effective for evaluating periapical lesion treatment procedures. PMID:21253539

  15. Late diagnosis of odontogenic sinusitis with near-fatal outcome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Elizabeth M; Frendø, Martin; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Subdural empyema is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication to sinusitis. Awareness of infection and early diagnosis is of the essence when dealing with a putatively immunosuppressed patient. Furthermore, patients at increased risk of infections due to immunosuppression need to be fully informed of risks associated with their treatment. PMID:27014448

  16. Basic Laboratory Culture Methods for Anaerobic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Herbert J.

    Oxygen is either limiting or absent in many ecosystems. Anaerobic bacteria are often key players in such environments and these organisms have important roles in geo-elemental cycling, agriculture, and medicine. The metabolic versatility of anaerobes is exploited in a variety of industrial processes including fermented food production, biochemical synthesis, and bioremediation. There has been recent considerable interest in developing and enhancing technologies that employ anaerobes as biocatalysts. The study of anaerobic bacteria requires specialized techniques, and specific methods are described for the culture and manipulation of these microbes.

  17. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  18. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobic bacteria from clinical samples of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Melissa; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; López-Ureña, Diana; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of veterinary infectious diseases has been the focus of considerable research, yet relatively little is known about the causative agents of anaerobic infections. Susceptibility studies have documented the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and indicate distinct differences in resistance patterns related to veterinary hospitals, geographic regions, and antibiotic-prescribing regimens. The aim of the present study was to identify the obligate anaerobic bacteria from veterinary clinical samples and to determinate the in vitro susceptibility to eight antimicrobials and their resistance-associated genes. 81 clinical specimens obtained from food-producing animals, pets and wild animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria, and the species represented. Bacteroides spp, Prevotella spp and Clostridium spp represented approximately 80% of all anaerobic isolates. Resistance to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and fluoroquinolones was found in strains isolated from food-producing animals. Ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and cephalotin showed the highest resistance in all isolates. In 17%, 4% and 14% of tetracycline-resistant isolates, the resistance genes tetL, tetM and tetW were respectively amplified by PCR whereas in 4% of clindamycin-resistant strains the ermG gene was detected. 26% of the isolates were positive for cepA, while only 6% harbored the cfxA (resistance-conferring genes to beta-lactams). In this study, the obligate anaerobic bacteria from Costa Rica showed a high degree of resistance to most antimicrobials tested. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases this resistance was not related to the resistance acquired genes usually described in anaerobes. It is important to address and regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agricultural industry and the empirical therapy in anaerobic bacterial infections in veterinary medicine, especially since antibiotics and resistant bacteria can persist in the environment. PMID:26385434

  19. [Infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D; Piper, C

    2015-04-01

    Colonization of native cardiac valves or polymer implants, e.g. valves, conduits, rings, electrode leads and polymer-associated endocarditis (PIE), by microorganisms, primarily gram-positive bacteria (infective endocarditis), constitutes a severe, prognostically unfavorable disease. Fever and in the majority of cases development of a valve regurgitant murmur are clinical landmark findings. The white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are regularly elevated. With a normal CRP level, infective endocarditis is extremely unlikely. Irrespective of body temperature, at least three blood cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) should be taken and if initiation of antimicrobial therapy is urgent, 1 h apart before therapy is initiated. Identification of the pathogen to the species level and testing antimicrobial susceptibility to antibiotics by a quantitative hemodilution test, not with agar diffusion tests, are obligatory. A minimum inhibitory concentration should be administered for antibiotics and usual combinations of antibiotics with an expected synergistic potential. Streptococci, staphylococci and enterococci are the most frequent causative organisms. Immediate initiation of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is mandatory followed by transesophageal echocardiography if imaging quality is poor, involvement of intracardiac implants is possible or TTE is insufficient to establish the diagnosis. An insufficiently long antimicrobial therapy promotes recurrent infections, thus a 4-week treatment is standard, while in special cases (e.g. PIE) treatment for 6 weeks should be the rule. If typical complications of infective endocarditis, such as uncontrolled local infection, systemic thromboembolism, central nervous involvement, development of a severe valve incompetence or mitral kissing vegetation in primary aortic valve endocarditis occur, urgent surgical intervention should be considered. If cardiac implants are involved, early surgical removal followed by a 6-week antimicrobial treatment is the rule. Adequate and timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to improve the overall prognosis. PMID:25822422

  20. In vitro activity of HMR 3647 against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Edlund, C; Sillerström, E; Wahlund, E; Nord, C E

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to determine the in vitro activity of HMR 3647 compared with other antimicrobial agents against anaerobic bacteria. The activity of HMR 3647 was determined against 342 clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria by the agar dilution method and was compared with azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin, erythromycin, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin and metronidazole. Among the macrolides HMR 3647 and among the beta-lactams imipenem were the most active agents tested. Anaerobic cocci (50 strains) had the following minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs): HMR 3647, range 0.016-0.125 mg/l; imipenem, range 0.016-0.064 mg/l. Propionibacterium acnes (30 strains): HMR 3647, 0.016-1.0 mg/l; imipenem, 0.032-0.064 mg/l. Clostridium perfringens (30 strains): HMR 3647, 0.125 mg/l; imipenem, 0.016-0.5 mg/l. Clostridium difficile (50 strains): HMR 3647, 0.125-256 mg/l; imipenem, 4.0-8.0 mg/l. Bacteroides fragilis (102 strains): HMR 3647, 0.032-16 mg/l; imipenem, 0.064-0.25 mg/l. Bacteroides and Prevotella species (50 strains): HMR 3647, 0.016-4.0 mg/l; imipenem, 0.016-0.25 mg/l. Fusobacterium nucleatum (30 strains): HMR 3647, 0.016-8.0 mg/l; imipenem, 0.008-0.064 mg/l. HMR 3647 may be useful as treatment and prophylaxis for infections due to anaerobic bacteria. PMID:9720465

  1. Fourth Belgian multicentre survey of antibiotic susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wybo, Ingrid; Van den Bossche, Dorien; Soetens, Oriane; Vekens, Evilien; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Claeys, Geert; Glupczynski, Youri; Ieven, Margareta; Melin, Pierrette; Nonhoff, Claire; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Verhaegen, Jan; Piérard, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To collect recent data on the susceptibility of anaerobes to antimicrobial agents with known activity against anaerobes, and to compare them with results from previous Belgian multicentre studies. Methods Four hundred and three strict anaerobic clinical isolates were prospectively collected from February 2011 to April 2012 in eight Belgian university hospitals. MICs were determined by one central laboratory for 11 antimicrobial agents using Etest methodology. Results According to EUCAST breakpoints, >90% of isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate (94%), piperacillin/tazobactam (91%), meropenem (96%), metronidazole (92%) and chloramphenicol (98%), but only 70% and 40% to clindamycin and penicillin, respectively. At CLSI recommended breakpoints, only 71% were susceptible to moxifloxacin and 79% to cefoxitin. MIC50/MIC90 values for linezolid and for tigecycline were 1/4 and 0.5/4 mg/L, respectively. When compared with survey data from 2004, no major differences in susceptibility profiles were noticed. However, the susceptibility of Prevotella spp. and other Gram-negative bacilli to clindamycin decreased from 91% in 1993–94 and 82% in 2004 to 69% in this survey. Furthermore, the susceptibility of clostridia to moxifloxacin decreased from 88% in 2004 to 66% in 2011–12 and that of fusobacteria from 90% to 71%. Conclusions Compared with previous surveys, little evolution was seen in susceptibility, except a decline in activity of clindamycin against Prevotella spp. and other Gram-negative bacteria, and of moxifloxacin against clostridia. Since resistance was detected to all antibiotics, susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates is indicated in severe infections to confirm appropriateness of antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24008826

  2. Anaerobic and aerobic/anaerobic treatment for tetrachloroethylene (PCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Guiot, S.R.; Kuang, X.; Beaulieu, C.; Corriveau, A.; Hawari, J.

    1995-12-31

    The reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor using sucrose, lactic acid, propionic acid, and methanol as cosubstrates. Parallel experiments were performed to compare the novel coupled anaerobic/aerobic reactor with the conventional UASB. More than 95% of PCE was transformed in both reactors. Complete dechlorination in the UASB reactor decreased with increased PCE loading, declining from 45 to 19%. Minor concentrations of trichloroethylene and of undegraded PCE were detected in the liquid effluent throughout the experiment. Dichloroethylene was the dominant metabolite of all PCE loads, while vinyl chloride was not detected in the liquid effluent. For both reactor types, increased PCE loading led to lower chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates caused by a decrease in the specific acetate utilization rate. This, combined with a decline of the specific total PCE dechlorination activity, may cause long-term stability problems in the UASB reactor. The coupled reactor demonstrated higher specific PCE degradation rates at all PCE loading levels and a higher specific total dechlorination rate at the highest PCE loading. These characteristics may promote long-term stability of the coupled reactor system.

  3. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four-year-old boy: atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Anbiaee, Najme; Sanaei, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. PMID:26125006

  4. In Vitro Activity of Ceftaroline against 623 Diverse Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria ▿

    PubMed Central

    Citron, D. M.; Tyrrell, K. L.; Merriam, C. V.; Goldstein, E. J. C.

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ceftaroline, a novel, parenteral, broad-spectrum cephalosporin, and four comparator antimicrobials were determined against anaerobic bacteria. Against Gram-positive strains, the activity of ceftaroline was similar to that of amoxicillin-clavulanate and four to eight times greater than that of ceftriaxone. Against Gram-negative organisms, ceftaroline showed good activity against β-lactamase-negative strains but not against the members of the Bacteroides fragilis group. Ceftaroline showed potent activity against a broad spectrum of anaerobes encountered in respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections. PMID:20100877

  5. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  6. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  7. Factor Analysis of Various Anaerobic Power Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, James M.; And Others

    A study investigated the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and of numerous anaerobic power tests with measures obtained on an isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty-one male college students performed several anaerobic power tests, including: the vertical jump using the Lewis formula; the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test; the Wingate…

  8. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  9. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  10. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  11. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  12. Anaerobic acidogenesis of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Krones, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if high rate acidogenic fermentation of dairy manure was possible, Whole dairy manure was ground and diluted to 4% total solids and fed to a 10 L anaerobic chemostat operating at 35C and with hydraulic retention times varying between 6 and 50 hours. Several physical and organic parameters of the influent and effluent were measured and compared. The results indicated that the manure was too refractory for high rate liquefaction and hydrolysis. A second experiment was conducted using the same techniques and substrate but varying the substrate pH between 5 and 7. The objectives were to further investigate the pH sensitivity of the acidogenic process and to determine if, by introducing a substrate with a low pH, acidogenesis might proceed more efficiently. The primary result of decreasing the pH was a smaller proportion of methane and an increased proportion of hydrogen in the gas. Liquefaction and hydrolysis continued to be rate limiting and appeared to be a major impediment to two phase anaerobic treatment of dairy manure.

  13. [Empyema due to an anaerobic Streptococcus in childhood].

    PubMed

    Sanna, C M; Corrias, A; Congiu, G; Dessì, S; Versace, R; Corda, R

    1991-01-01

    Anaerobic infections are quite rare in pediatric age, being that, they affect only neonates and immunodepressed patients. We think to be somewhat interesting to describe the case of our patient, a 9 year old boy, unaffected by any predisposing factor, came under our observation because of a severe respiratory distress. He showed evident clinical and radiological signs of pleural effusion in the right lung, together with a gas coil in the upper field and a left mediastinal shifting. A thoracentesis was then performed, giving rise to 600 ml of foul smelling purulent material; this procedure promptly improved his respiratory function. A permanent drainage trough the chest wall was set and an antibiotic therapy, based on the clinical picture and the character of the exudate, begun. In effect, the typical smell of the purulent material led us to suspect an anaerobic infection, and for this reason we employed the teicoplanin iv, a rarely used in the pediatric age drug. While blood cultures were negative for any organism, exudate cultures yielded Peptostreptococcus anaerobius; the last one resulted highly sensible following antibiogram to the previously chosen drug. The x-ray pattern and the rapid disappearing of the gas coil induced us to exclude further either congenital or acquired lung diseases. We conclude that, in absence of other proved sources of entry, the air presence in the pleural space was secondary to gas formation by the anaerobic micro-organism. The clinical course was very satisfactory allowing the patient to be dismissed on the 28th hospital day, with no need of further surgical therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1806927

  14. Problems encountered in clinical anaerobic bacteriology.

    PubMed

    Jousimies-Somer, H R; Finegold, S M

    1984-01-01

    Despite the rapid progress made in the technology of anaerobic bacteriology during the last 15 years, substantial variation in the practices and resources of different laboratories still exists. All steps, from the collection of the specimen to final identification, may involve pitfalls. Aspirated pus and tissue samples that are anaerobically transported are always preferable to swabs. Failure to examine gram-stained preparations and wet mounts and to inoculate the specimen promptly onto fresh supplemented media, including selective media, is still common. Generating and maintaining anaerobiosis requires careful monitoring. Plates often are discarded prematurely. The results of final identification with PRAS (prereduced, anaerobically sterilized) biochemicals and gas-liquid chromatography usually arrive too late to guide the clinician to proper therapy. Preliminary tests, along with growth on selective and differential media, are essential for prompt identification of clinically significant anaerobes. Future efforts should be directed toward diminishing the heavy work load of anaerobe laboratories by developing simpler and more rapid procedures. PMID:6201991

  15. Effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Pijuan, Maite; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-08-01

    The effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on the structure and activity of aerobic granules was studied. Aerobic granular sludge treating abattoir wastewater and achieving high levels of nutrient removal was subjected to 4-5 week starvation under anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Microscopic pictures of granules at the beginning of the starvation period presented a round and compact surface morphology with a much defined external perimeter. Under both starvation conditions, the morphology changed at the end of starvation with the external border of the granules surrounded by floppy materials. The loss of granular compactness was faster and more pronounced under anaerobic/aerobic starvation conditions. The release of Ca(2+) at the onset of anaerobic/aerobic starvation suggests a degradation of extracellular polymeric substances. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was reduced by 20 and 36% during anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation, respectively. When fresh wastewater was reintroduced, the granules recovered their initial morphology within 1 week of normal operation and the nutrient removal activity recovered fully in 3 weeks. The results show that both anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions are suitable for maintaining granule structure and activity during starvation. PMID:19524279

  16. Anaerobic filter for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavadej, S.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the performance of an anaerobic filter in producing biogas from pig waste with 30,000 mg/l of COD. The filter packing was bamboo rings of 1 and 1/2 in. diameter, 1 in. long; the bamboo-bed filter operated satisfactorily in a wide COD loading range of 3.74-15.65 kg/cu m/d which corresponds to the hydraulic retention of 8.47 to 1.68 days. At the optimum loading of 7.299 kg COD/cu m/d, the largest gas rate of 0.212 cu m/kg of COD was produced. The required volume of the digester for 1.2 cu m/d of gas production would be only 1.5 cu m; in practical applications, consideration should be given to the gas collecting system and clogging problems.

  17. Systemic Diseases Caused by Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Kolltveit, Kristin M.; Tronstad, Leif; Olsen, Ingar

    2000-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that oral infection, especially periodontitis, may affect the course and pathogenesis of a number of systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, diabetes mellitus, and low birth weight. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status of oral infections, especially periodontitis, as a causal factor for systemic diseases. Three mechanisms or pathways linking oral infections to secondary systemic effects have been proposed: (i) metastatic spread of infection from the oral cavity as a result of transient bacteremia, (ii) metastatic injury from the effects of circulating oral microbial toxins, and (iii) metastatic inflammation caused by immunological injury induced by oral microorganisms. Periodontitis as a major oral infection may affect the host's susceptibility to systemic disease in three ways: by shared risk factors; subgingival biofilms acting as reservoirs of gram-negative bacteria; and the periodontium acting as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators. Proposed evidence and mechanisms of the above odontogenic systemic diseases are given. PMID:11023956

  18. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  19. [Fluoroquinolones in respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Mouton, Y; Leroy, O

    1994-11-12

    Given orally, currently marketed fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin are absorbed rapidly, have an excellent diffusion coefficient. They are wide-spectrum first intention antibiotics effective against Gram negative bacilli, staphylococci and intracellular germs such as Legionella, Chlamydiae and mycoplasms. The spectrum does however not include streptococci, and in particular pneumococci, and anaerobic germs. The development of resistant strains, particularly in hospital settings, have been observed and despite their fundamental properties, the use of fluoroquinolones has been restrained for infections of the respiratory tract. Actually, the insensitivity of pneumococci or anaerobic germs means that fluoroquinolones cannot be used empirically for isolated cases of pneumonia or sinusitis. They can however be used successfully, either empirically, in a combination regimen or after identification of the bacteria, for treating infections due to Gram negative bacilli (superinfection of chronic bronchitis or cystic fibrosis, otitis) or intracellular germs (pneumonia). In the near future, when new fluoroquinolones active against pneumococci or anaerobic germs are introduced, therapeutic options will be modified. PMID:7831243

  20. Misdiagnosis of Extensive Maxillofacial Infection and Its Relationship with Periodontal Problems and Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Statkievicz, Cristian; Faverani, Leonardo P.; Gomes-Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Silva; Ramalho-Ferreira, Gabriel; Garcia-Junior, Idelmo Rangel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Complex dental infections can reach distant areas of the alveolar process, invading the secondary fascial spaces. Objectives. This case report aims to show a misdiagnosis of odontogenic infection and a great need for dentist in the hospital environment. Case Report. A male patient presented facial asymmetry and trismus, while the facial CT examination showed a hyperdense mass involving the left masseteric, pterygomandibular, and superficial temporal regions. The patient was then referred to oral oncology center by emergency physician with cancer suspicion. After 15 days, the patient returned to the same emergency room and was attended by the surgical and maxillofacial trauma team, presenting tachycardia, tachypnea, dysphagia, and trismus. During anamnesis, the patient reported being an uncontrolled diabetic. In intraoral exam, a poor oral condition and generalized periodontitis were observed. Results. Correct diagnosis of odontogenic infection was established and adequately treated. Conclusions. Symptomatology bland may mask the severity of an infection; every increase in volume associated with trismus, poor oral hygiene with or without hyperglycemia should be heavily investigated for the presence of an infectious process. It emphasizes the importance of a dentist working with the physician in emergency room. PMID:26885412

  1. Misdiagnosis of Extensive Maxillofacial Infection and Its Relationship with Periodontal Problems and Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Statkievicz, Cristian; Faverani, Leonardo P; Gomes-Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Silva; Ramalho-Ferreira, Gabriel; Garcia-Junior, Idelmo Rangel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Complex dental infections can reach distant areas of the alveolar process, invading the secondary fascial spaces. Objectives. This case report aims to show a misdiagnosis of odontogenic infection and a great need for dentist in the hospital environment. Case Report. A male patient presented facial asymmetry and trismus, while the facial CT examination showed a hyperdense mass involving the left masseteric, pterygomandibular, and superficial temporal regions. The patient was then referred to oral oncology center by emergency physician with cancer suspicion. After 15 days, the patient returned to the same emergency room and was attended by the surgical and maxillofacial trauma team, presenting tachycardia, tachypnea, dysphagia, and trismus. During anamnesis, the patient reported being an uncontrolled diabetic. In intraoral exam, a poor oral condition and generalized periodontitis were observed. Results. Correct diagnosis of odontogenic infection was established and adequately treated. Conclusions. Symptomatology bland may mask the severity of an infection; every increase in volume associated with trismus, poor oral hygiene with or without hyperglycemia should be heavily investigated for the presence of an infectious process. It emphasizes the importance of a dentist working with the physician in emergency room. PMID:26885412

  2. In vitro activity of meropenem compared with imipenem, metronidazole, ampicillin, and ampicillin/sulbactam against anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, U; Manncke, B; Gerbracht, K; Werner, H

    1994-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro activity of meropenem (ICI 194660, CAS 96036-03-2) with imipenem, metronidazole, clindamycin, ampicillin and ampicillin/sulbactam against a variety of anaerobic bacteria using an agar dilution method. 423 clinical isolates were tested belonging to 70 species of 15 anaerobic genera. They included Bacteroides fragilis (n = 62), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (n = 45), Prevotella bivia (n = 11), Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 12), Clostridium perfringens (n = 15) and several rarely isolated species and genera, e.g. Selenomonas sputigena and Clostridium symbiosum. Bacteroides species were inhibited by meropenem at < or = 2.0 micrograms/ml, Clostridium species, including C. difficile, at < or = 4.0 micrograms/ml and all the other anaerobes at < or = 0.5 microgram/ml. Meropenem and imipenem were the most active substances, but often equal to, or only slightly better than, metronidazole, clindamycin or ampicillin/sulbactam, dependent on species. Meropenem was especially active against Bacteroides gracilis (MIC90 0.015 microgram/ml), Prevotella disiens (MIC90 0.03 microgram/ml), Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC90 0.015 microgram/ml), Clostridium perfringens (MIC90 0.015 microgram/ml) and Veillonella parvula (MIC90 0.03 microgram/ml). The results obtained indicate that meropenem might be a useful adjunct to chemotherapy of anaerobic and mixed aerobic and anaerobic infections. PMID:7945523

  3. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-28

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  4. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  5. Preparation of prereduced anaerobically sterilized media and their use in cultivation of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, E C; deVries, J; Harvey, R F

    1978-01-01

    Several modifications of the roll-tube method have made it simpler for routine use in the isolation and growth of anaerobic bacteria. These include use of a check valve for the production of prereduced anaerobically sterilized media; a Salvarsan tube under oxygen-free gas pressure for the dispensing of molten prereduced anaerobically sterilized agar medium; a Kelly infusion bottle with a graduated pipette side arm (also under gas pressure) for quantitative delivery of fluid prereduced anaerobically sterilized media; and screw-capped prescription bottles for the cultivation of anaerobes. Colonies of Bacteroides melaninogenicus were easily identified and counted by this method. Other anaerobic bacteria have also been cultivated successfully. Images PMID:29909

  6. Calcifying ghost cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT) with predominance of clear cells: a case report with important diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Urs, Aadithya B; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Singh, Hanspal; Kureel, Kirti; Mohanty, Sujata; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-02-01

    An 18-year-old female reported painful swelling in the left maxillary region 4 months after the extraction of tooth #15. Because incisional biopsy suggested ameloblastoma with clear-cell changes, segmental resection was performed. The microscopic examination of the excised tissue revealed histomorphologic diversity, with features of typical calcifying ghost cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT) and a significant clear-cell component constituting more than 50% of the tumor mass without any features of malignancy. Clear cells were periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive and mucicarmine negative. CK19 was strongly positive in the solid tumor islands and variably positive in clear cells. A definitive diagnosis of CGCOT with predominance of clear cells was confirmed. Because both squamous metaplasia and clear-cell components were present in the ameloblastic follicles independent of each other, the presence of abundant calcifications favored the diagnosis of CGCOT with a clear-cell component over that of an ameloblastoma with clear-cell changes. The importance of identifying the histomorphologic features of the 2 entities, ameloblastoma and CGCOT, is highlighted. This appears to be the second case reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26260764

  7. Novel Association of Odontogenic Myxoma with Constitutional Chromosomal 1q21 Microduplication: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Best-Rocha, Alejandro; Patel, Kalyani; Hicks, John; Edmonds, Joseph L; Paldino, Michael J; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a rare, benign, and locally aggressive tumor. It tends to occur in the posterior maxilla and mandible and is often associated with root resorption and perforation of cortex. Histopathologically, there is a proliferation of spindle, bipolar, and stellate cells, with bland nuclei within a myxoid to infrequently fibromyxoid extracellular matrix. Long, thin residual bony trabeculae are often seen floating within the spindle cell proliferation because of the infiltrating nature of this tumor, and these trabeculae impart a "soap bubble" or "tennis-racket" radiologic appearance. No syndromic association of OM has been reported. Although similar histopathologic features are shared with cardiac myxoma and soft tissue myxoma, mutations in the GNAS gene have not been identified in OM to date, and only 2 of 17 OMs showed mutations in the PRKAR1A gene. In this report, we describe a case of OM in a patient with constitutional 1q21 microduplication, a locus that harbors genes encoding certain proteins in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, including G-protein-coupled receptors and 1 phosphodiesterase interacting protein. Review of the literature describes the key clinical features and molecular pathogenesis of 1q21 microduplication, as well as highlighting the role of PKA signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of myxomas in general. PMID:26230961

  8. PTCH1 Gene Mutations in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors: A Study of 43 Chinese Patients and a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Yun; Li, Xue-Fen; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Feng; Li, Tie-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive cystic jaw lesion that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). PTCH1, the gene responsible for NBCCS, may play an important role in sporadic KCOTs. In this study, we analyzed and compared the distribution pattern of PTCH1 mutations in patients with sporadic and NBCCS-associated KCOTs. Methods We detected PTCH1 mutations in 14 patients with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 29 patients with sporadic KCOTs by direct sequencing. In addition, five electronic databases were searched for studies detecting PTCH1 mutations in individuals with NBCCS-associated or sporadic KCOTs, published between January 1996 and June 2013 in English language. Results We identified 15 mutations in 11 cases with NBCCS-associated KCOTs and 19 mutations in 13 cases with sporadic KCOTs. In addition, a total of 204 PTCH1 mutations (187 mutations from 210 cases with NBCCS-associated and 17 mutations from 57 cases with sporadic KCOTs) were compiled from 78 published papers. Conclusions Our study indicates that mutations in transmembrane 2 (TM2) are closely related to the development of sporadic KCOTs. Moreover, for the early diagnosis of NBCCS, a genetic analysis of the PTCH1 gene should be included in the new diagnostic criteria. PMID:24204797

  9. A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of AgNORs in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor, Unicystic Ameloblastoma and Multicystic Ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayashankar, Urmila; Guduru, Vijay Srinivasvas; Ramprasad, V V S; Ramisetty, Sabitha Devi; Namala, Srilekha; Badavath, Kiran Kumar Naik

    2014-01-01

    Aims: A comparative evaluation of proliferation activity in unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), multicystic ameloblastoma (MA) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) using silver staining technique. Settings and Design: In the present study 21 histopathologically confirmed paraffin blocks,7 each of UA, MA and KCOT were selected and stained with silver nitrate. Materials and Methods: For quantitative analysis, 100 cells were counted at 1000x magnification for AgNORs and the mean value was calculated. Qualitative analysis of AgNORs included normal (oval shaped) and abnormal groups (bean shaped) in the lesion. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis of data was done by a specialist statistician using two way ANOVA and multiple comparisons with Tukey’s test in advanced excel. Results: The AgNOR count was more in KCOT when compared to MA and UA with the pattern of distribution of AgNORs more in basal than in the parabasal layer in KCOT. The qualitative analysis showed small to large oval AgNOR’s in KCOT and few clusters in MA whereas in UA irregular clusters were seen. Conclusion: This concludes the expediency of AgNOR staining in reflecting the high proliferation rate and a more aggressive behavior of KCOT in comparison to MA and UA which signifies requirement of a more hostile surgical approach in KCOT to avoid recurrences following different treatment modalities. PMID:25386440

  10. Characterization of anaerobic sulfite reduction by Salmonella typhimurium and purification of the anaerobically induced sulfite reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenbeck, P.C. ); Clark, M.A.; Barrett, E.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium that lack the biosynthetic sulfite reductase (cysI and cysJ mutants) retain the ability to reduce sulfite for growth under anaerobic conditions. Here we report studies of sulfite reduction by a cysI mutant of S. typhimurium and purification of the associated anaerobic sulfite reductase. Sulfite reduction for anaerobic growth did not require a reducing atmosphere but was prevented by an argon atmosphere contaminated with air (<0.33%). It was also prevented by the presence of 0.1 mM nitrate. Anaerobic growth in liquid minimal medium, but not on agar, was found to require additions of trace amounts (10{sup {minus}7} M) of cysteine. Spontaneous mutants that grew under the argon contaminated with air also lost the requirement for 10{sup {minus}7}M cysteine for anaerobic growth in liquid. A role for sulfite reduction in anaerobic energy generation was contraindicated by the findings that sulfite reduction did not improve cell yields, and anaerobic sulfite reductase activity was greatest during the stationary phase of growth. Sulfite reductase was purified from the cytoplasmic fraction of the anaerobically grown cysI mutant and was purified 190-fold. The most effective donor in crude extracts was NADH. NADHP and methyl viologen were, respectively, 40 and 30% as effective as NADH. Oxygen reversibly inhibited the enzyme. The anaerobic sulfite reductase showed some resemblance to the biosynthetic sulfite reductase, but apparently it has a unique, as yet unidentified function.

  11. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  12. DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: ANAEROBIC DIGESTER MIXING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design information report discusses the current problems and potential solutions associated with the selection, design, and operation of anaerobic digester mixing systems. The report describes the four major types of mixing systems and presents their advantages and disadvanta...

  13. ANAEROBIC DEHALOGENATION AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an international conference, microbiologists from five countries presented results of research into the anaerobic dehalogenation of compounds of environmental interest being performed at selected universities, government agencies, and private companies. he conference, held fro...

  14. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H; Moser, D P; Saffarini, D A

    1995-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions. PMID:11536689

  15. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  16. Nutritional requirements of anaerobic coryneforms.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D A; Cummins, C S

    1978-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of three species of anaerobic coryneforms and their serotypes (Propionibacterium acnes types I and II, P. avidum types I and II, and P. granulosum) were determined. Strains of P. avidum would consistently grow to a transmittance of 1 to 3% at 560 nm in a basal salts medium supplemented with glucose, pantothenate, biotin, thiamine, and 12 amino acids (alanine, arginine, cysteine, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, serine, tyrosine, and tryptophan). Strains of P. acnes and P. granulosum, however, failed to grow in this medium unless six additional amino acids were present (asparagine, leucine, lysine, proline, threonine, and valine). All three species grew equally well whether the 18 amino acids were supplied in the form of a casein hydrolysate supplemented with tryptophan or were added separately. Nicotinamide enhanced growth of P. acnes but had no effect on growth of P. avidum and P. granulosum. Other nutrients which were not absolute requirements, but which significantly improved growth of these species, included the purines guanine and/or adenine, Tween 80, which served as a source of oleic acid, sodium L-lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and pyruvate. Strains (86) comprising all five groups grew well in the defined medium, except four strains of P. acnes type II (29 tested), which failed to grow unless heme and vitamin K were added to the medium. One strain of P. granulosum (22 tested) failed to grow in any defined medium, suggesting an additional growth factor requirement. PMID:151095

  17. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  18. Hemicellulose conversion by anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Christopher, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The digestibility of an aquatic biomass (water hyacinth), a land-based biomass (Coastal Bermuda grass), and a biomass-waste blend (a mixture of hyacinth, grass, MSW, and sludge) under various digestion conditions was studied. Anaerobic digestion of hemicellulose consists of the steps of enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose to glucans, mannans, galactans, xylans, and arabans, and then to simple hexose and pentose sugars; production of C/sub 2/ and higher fatty acids from the simple sugars; conversion of higher fatty acids to acetate; and finally, production of methane and CO/sub 2/ from acetate, and CO/sub 2/ and hydrogen. The conversion of hemicellulose was higher under mesophilic conditions than those of cellulose or protein for all biomass test feeds, probably because the hemicellulose structure was more vulnerable to enzymatic attack than that of the lignocellulosic component. Cellulose conversion efficiencies at the mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures were about the same. However, hemicellulose was converted at a much lower efficiency than cellulose during thermophilic digestion - a situation that was the reverse of that observed at the mesophilic temperature. Cellulose was utilized in preference to hemicellulose during mesophilic digestion of nitrogen-supplemented Bermuda grass. It was speculated that Bermuda grass cellulose was converted at a higher efficiency than hemicellulose in the presence of external nitrogen because the metabolism of the breakdown product (glucose) of cellulose requires the least investment of enzymes and energy.

  19. Co-occurrence of anaerobic bacteria in colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous cancers have been linked to microorganisms. Given that colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths and the colon is continuously exposed to a high diversity of microbes, the relationship between gut mucosal microbiome and colorectal cancer needs to be explored. Metagenomic studies have shown an association between Fusobacterium species and colorectal carcinoma. Here, we have extended these studies with deeper sequencing of a much larger number (n = 130) of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal control tissues. We analyzed these data using co-occurrence networks in order to identify microbe-microbe and host-microbe associations specific to tumors. Results We confirmed tumor over-representation of Fusobacterium species and observed significant co-occurrence within individual tumors of Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia and Campylobacter species. This polymicrobial signature was associated with over-expression of numerous host genes, including the gene encoding the pro-inflammatory chemokine Interleukin-8. The tumor-associated bacteria we have identified are all Gram-negative anaerobes, recognized previously as constituents of the oral microbiome, which are capable of causing infection. We isolated a novel strain of Campylobacter showae from a colorectal tumor specimen. This strain is substantially diverged from a previously sequenced oral Campylobacter showae isolate, carries potential virulence genes, and aggregates with a previously isolated tumor strain of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Conclusions A polymicrobial signature of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria is associated with colorectal carcinoma tissue. PMID:24450771

  20. Physical properties and biological/odontogenic effects of an experimentally developed fast-setting α-tricalcium phosphate-based pulp capping material

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, fast-setting α-tricalcium-phosphate (TCP) cement was developed for use in the pulp capping process. The aim of this study was to investigate the physical properties and biological effects of α-TCP cement in comparison with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Methods We measured the setting time, pH values, compressive strength, and solubility of the two materials. We evaluated biocompatibility on the basis of cell morphology and a viability test using human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Chemical composition of each material was analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic (EDS) analysis. The expression of odontogenic-related genes was evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The calcified nodule formation was measured by Alizarin red staining. We performed the pulp capping procedure on rat teeth for histological investigation. The data were analyzed by an independent t-test for physical properties, one-way ANOVA for biological effects, and the Mann-Whitney U test for tertiary dentin formation. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant for all tests. Results The setting time, pH values, and compressive strength of α-TCP was lower than that of MTA (P < 0.05); however, the solubility of α-TCP was higher than that of MTA (P < 0.05). The resultant cell viability observed with the two materials was similar (P > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that cells attached to both materials were flat and had cytoplasmic extensions. The expression of odontogenic-related markers and mineralized nodule formation were higher in the two experimental groups compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Continuous tertiary dentin was formed underneath the capping materials in all samples of the tested groups. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the α-TCP exhibited biocompatibility and odontogenicity comparable to MTA, whereas it had a quicker setting time. PMID:25015173

  1. Actinomyces Species Isolated from Breast Infections

    PubMed Central

    Loh, S. F.; Morris, T.; Hughes, H.; Dixon, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces species characterized by abscess formation, tissue fibrosis, and draining sinuses. The spectrum of infections caused by Actinomyces species ranges from classical invasive actinomycosis to a less invasive form of superficial skin and soft tissue infection. We present a review detailing all Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections in NHS Lothian between 2005 and 2013, Actinomyces species isolated from breast infections referred to the United Kingdom Anaerobe Reference Unit between 1988 and 2014, and cases describing Actinomyces breast infections published in the medical literature since 1994. Actinomyces species are fastidious organisms which can be difficult to identify and are likely to be underascertained as a cause of breast infections. Due to improved diagnostic methods, they are increasingly associated with chronic, recurrent breast infections and may play a more significant role in these infections than has previously been appreciated. PMID:26224846

  2. Activation of Cholera Toxin Production by Anaerobic Respiration of Trimethylamine N-oxide in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Bari, Wasimul; Yoon, Mi Young; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Hyung-il; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes cholera. Although the pathogenesis caused by this deadly pathogen takes place in the intestine, commonly thought to be anaerobic, anaerobiosis-induced virulence regulations are not fully elucidated. Anerobic growth of the V. cholerae strain, N16961, was promoted when trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) was used as an alternative electron acceptor. Strikingly, cholera toxin (CT) production was markedly induced during anaerobic TMAO respiration. N16961 mutants unable to metabolize TMAO were incapable of producing CT, suggesting a mechanistic link between anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production. TMAO reductase is transported to the periplasm via the twin arginine transport (TAT) system. A similar defect in both anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production was also observed in a N16961 TAT mutant. In contrast, the abilities to grow on TMAO and to produce CT were not affected in a mutant of the general secretion pathway. This suggests that V. cholerae may utilize the TAT system to secrete CT during TMAO respiration. During anaerobic growth with TMAO, N16961 cells exhibit green fluorescence when stained with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, a specific dye for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, CT production was decreased in the presence of an ROS scavenger suggesting a positive role of ROS in regulating CT production. When TMAO was co-administered to infant mice infected with N16961, the mice exhibited more severe pathogenic symptoms. Together, our results reveal a novel anaerobic growth condition that stimulates V. cholerae to produce its major virulence factor. PMID:23019319

  3. Diversity and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of cultivable anaerobic bacteria from soil and sewage samples of India.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Nabonita; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Ravi Bhushan; Singh, Lokendra

    2011-01-01

    Soil and sewage act as a reservoir of animal pathogens and their dissemination to animals profoundly affects the safety of our food supply. Moreover, acquisition and further spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among pathogenic bacterial populations is the most relevant problem for the treatment of infectious diseases. Bacterial strains from soil and sewage are a potential reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. Accurate species determination for anaerobes from environmental samples has become increasingly important with the re-emergence of anaerobic bacteremia and prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant microorganisms. Soil samples were collected from various locations of planar India and the diversity of anaerobic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Viable counts of anaerobic bacteria on anaerobic agar and SPS agar ranged from 1.0 × 10(2)cfu/g to 8.8 × 10(7)cfu/g and nil to 3.9 × 10(6)cfu/g, respectively. Among clostrdia, Clostridium bifermentans (35.9%) was the most dominant species followed by Clostridium perfringens (25.8%). Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of C. perfringens beta2 toxin gene (cpb2) fragment indicated specific phylogenetic affiliation with cluster Ia for 5 out of 6 strains. Antibiotic susceptibility for 30 antibiotics was tested for 74 isolates, revealing resistance for as high as 16-25 antibiotics for 35% of the strains tested. Understanding the diversity of the anaerobic bacteria from soil and sewage with respect to animal health and spread of zoonotic pathogen infections is crucial for improvements in animal and human health. PMID:20965279

  4. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  5. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  6. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  7. Anaerobic lipid degradation through acidification and methanization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ijung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Shin, Hang-Sik; Jung, Jin-Young

    2010-01-01

    In biological wastewater treatment high lipid concentration is known to inhibit microorganisms and cause active biomass flotation. To reduce lipid inhibition, a two-phase anaerobic system, consisting of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, was applied to synthetic dairy wastewater. During 153 days of operation, the two-phase system showed stable performance in lipid degradation. In the ASBR, a 13% lipid removal efficiency and 10% double bond removal efficiency were maintained. In the UASB, the chemical oxygen demand (COD), lipid and volatile fatty acid (VFA) removal efficiencies were more than 80%, 70% and 95%, respectively, up to organic loading rate 6.5 g COD/L/day. There were no operational problems such as serious scum formation or sludge washout. Protein degradation occurred prior to degradation during acidogenesis. PMID:20134250

  8. Anaerobes: a new aetiology in cavitary pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, J M; Hitado, J; Gea, G; Colmeiro, A; Lanza, A M; Muñoz, J A; Mosquera, J A

    1982-01-01

    The role of mycobacteria in the cavitation of large pneumoconiotic masses is well established. In other cases softness is attributed to an ischaemic or aseptic necrosis. Five cases are described in which cavitation of the pulmonary masses was caused by anaerobic bacteria, confirmed by the growth of such bacterial in cultures after transtracheal or transpleural puncture. Repeated cultures for mycobacteria gave negative results. Two cases were acute, having serious complications such as bronchopleural fistula, empyema, and serious respiratory insufficiency. The role of anaerobes in cavitary pneumoconiosis has not been recognised previously, probably because of the special conditions required to culture these bacteria and the infrequent use of transtracheal puncture in the diagnosis of this entity. The prevalence of anaerobes as agents capable of cavitating pneumoconiotic masses remains to be established. Images PMID:6128024

  9. Submerged filter biotreatment of hazardous leachate in aerobic, anaerobic, and anaerobic/aerobic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.

    1995-12-31

    Aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic/aerobic biotreatment of an industrial hazardous waste landfill leachate was evaluated in bench scale biofilm reactor systems operated under steady-and non-steady-state conditions. The leachate contained volatile and semi-volatile organics that exceeded the best-demonstrated-available-technology (BDAT) standard established for multi-source leachate wastewater under the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The influent leachate stream was continuously applied to three parallel systems: (1) an upflow anaerobic filter followed by a submerged aerobic filter, both plastic packing, (2) an anaerobic granular activated carbon column, and (3) an upflow, plastic packed aerobic filter. All systems achieved steady-state COD removals of 66-82 percent. The sequential anaerobic/aerobic filter system was most resistant to hydraulic and organic shock loading, whereas the aerobic filter performance deteriorated significantly. Though transformations of specific chemical compounds were achieved in both anaerobic and aerobic treatment, the sequential anaerobic/aerobic system was cost effective for meeting BDAT standards for hazardous organics. 25 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Microbiology and management of soft tissue and muscle infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2008-08-01

    This review summarizes the microbiological aspects and management of soft tissue and muscle infections. The infections presented are: impetigo, folliculitis, furunculosis and carbuncles, cellulitis, erysipelas, infectious gangrene (includes necrotizing fasciitis or streptococcal gangrene, gas gangrene or clostridium myonecrosis, anaerobic cellulites, progressive bacterial synergistic gangrene, synergistic necrotizing cellulitis or perineal phlegmon, gangrenous balanitis, and gangrenous cellulitis in the immunocompromised patient), secondary bacterial infections complication skin lesions, diabetic and other chronic superficial skin ulcers and subcutaneous abscesses and myositis. These infections often occur in body sites or in those that have been compromised or injured by foreign body, trauma, ischemia, malignancy or surgery. In addition to Group A streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, the indigenous aerobic and anaerobic cutaneous and mucous membranes local microflora usually is responsible for polymicrobial infections. These infections may occasionally lead to serious potentially life-threatening local and systemic complications. The infections can progress rapidly and early recognition and proper medical and surgical management is the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:17720643

  11. Ginsenoside Rg1 of Panax ginseng stimulates the proliferation, odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation and gene expression profiles of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Fujun; Yang, Kai; Qu, Chen; Luo, Huiqiong; He, Longzhu

    2014-01-15

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is one of the major active components of Panax ginseng C. A. Mey. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) play an important role in the dentin formation, reparation and tooth tissue engineering. This study investigated the effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on the proliferation, odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs and revealed the underlying molecular mechanisms. [³H]-thymidine incorporation assay and cell cycle analysis were applied to investigate the proliferation of hDPSCs after the treatment of ginsenoside Rg1. Immunocytochemistry analysis and fluorescent quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) were performed to evaluate the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Gene and protein expressions of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) were detected by FQ-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Roche Nimblegen Whole Human Genome Expression profile microarray was used to detected representative gene expression profiles of hDPSCs by ginsenoside Rg1. The results indicated that ginsenoside Rg1 significantly increased hDPSCs proliferation (p<0.05). Gene expressions of DSPP, ALP, OCN, BMP-2, FGF2 and protein expressions of BMP-2 and FGF2 were increased compared with the untreated group (p<0.05). Gene expression profile analysis revealed that 2059 differentially expressed genes were detected by ginsenoside Rg1. Ginsenoside Rg1 promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPSCs through alteration of gene expression profiles. PMID:24075212

  12. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Verzola, Mario H.; Pires, Luana C.; Mascarenhas, Vinicius I.; da Silva, Rodrigo B.; Cirelli, Joni A.; Barbeiro, Roberto H.

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed. PMID:25821360

  13. Bilateral adenomatoid odontogenic tumour of the maxilla in a 2-year-old female—the report of a rare case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehkri, S; Rajkumar, GC; Nagesh, KS; Manjunath, GS

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal odontogenic lesions are uncommon and have only been observed in conditions associated with known genetic mutations. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of multifocal adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOT) have previously been reported in the literature. In this study, we report the first case of a bilateral, separate AOT in the maxilla in the midline in a 2-year-old female. The patient presented with bilateral expansile masses in the maxilla on either side of the midline which had been present for 6 months. She was asymptomatic and had occasional difficulty in breathing. The tumour was diagnosed as AOT and was surgically enucleated along with the associated teeth. The patient recovered well and has been on recall for 5 years. The follow-up panoramic radiograph made a fortnight ago revealed evidence of three new radio-opaque lesions with an associated tooth in the region of the anterior mandible, the premolar region of the right maxilla and the molar region of the left maxilla. To acquire additional information about AOT, all reports regarding AOT cited in ‘PubMed’ from 1995 onward were reviewed and the incidence, clinical features, radiographic features and management of AOT are discussed in this study. PMID:22241880

  14. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  15. Computer-assisted identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R W; Kellogg, S T

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed to identify anaerobic bacteria by using simultaneous pattern recognition via a Bayesian probabilistic model. The system is intended for use as a rapid, precise, and reproducible aid in the identification of unknown isolates. The program operates on a data base of 28 genera comprising 238 species of anaerobic bacteria that can be separated by the program. Input to the program consists of biochemical and gas chromatographic test results in binary format. The system is flexible and yields outputs of: (i) most probable species, (ii) significant test results conflicting with established data, and (iii) differential tests of significance for missing test results. PMID:345970

  16. Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

  17. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to carbenicillin.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, D J; Matsen, J M

    1974-05-01

    One hundred and seventy-one strains of anaerobes were tested for susceptibility to carbenicillin by using agar dilution, broth dilution, and two disk diffusion methods. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for 67% of 51 strains of Bacteroides fragilis, 7 of 9 strains of Bacteroides melaninogenicus, and all of 8 strains of Eubacterium was 100 mug or less per ml. The MICs of the remaining anaerobes were 50 mug or less per ml. The broth dilution results were felt to be the most accurate of the four methods utilized. PMID:4462461

  18. The bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of infected and non-infected dog bite wounds: fifty cases.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Bruce; Schoeman, Johan P; Goddard, Amelia; Picard, Jackie

    2008-03-18

    Dog bite wounds are a common reason for dogs requiring veterinary care, but there is surprisingly little data on the bacteriology of bite wounds. A prospective study was performed on dogs with various grades of bite wound to identify the bacteria present in these wounds. Swabs were collected from all wounds for bacterial culture and cytology. All swabs were cultured aerobically and anaerobically and all aerobic cultures were evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion test. Fifty dogs with 104 bite wounds, inflicted within the previous 72h, were included. The victims were predominately intact male small breed dogs. Of the 104 wounds, 21 were judged by cytology to be infected and 83 non-infected. Infected wounds were significantly more likely to culture positive (p=0.02). Sixteen percent of wounds showed no growth. Sixteen percent grew aerobes, 1% anaerobes and 67% a mixture of aerobes and anaerobes. Pasteurella canis and pyogenic streptococci were common in infected wounds, whereas Bacillus spp., Actinomyces spp. and the oral streptococci were usually found in contaminated wounds. Three anaerobic genera were cultured, namely, Prevotella, Clostridium and Peptostreptococcus. One case represented the first isolation of Capnocytophaga canimorsus in an infected dog bite wound. Although no single antibiotic therapy was considered to be effective against all the bacteria, amoxycillin plus clavulanic acid, 1st and 3rd generation cephalosporins ampicillin or amoxycillin and potentiated sulphonamides gave the best in vitro sensitivity results. PMID:18029118

  19. The Influence of Hydration on Anaerobic Performance: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Justin A.; Green, James M.; Bishop, Phillip A.; Richardson, Mark T.; Neggers, Yasmin H.; Leeper, James D.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the influence of dehydration on muscular strength and endurance and on single and repeated anaerobic sprint bouts. Describing hydration effects on anaerobic performance is difficult because various exercise modes are dominated by anaerobic energy pathways, but still contain inherent physiological differences. The critical…

  20. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  1. The Influence of Hydration on Anaerobic Performance: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Justin A.; Green, James M.; Bishop, Phillip A.; Richardson, Mark T.; Neggers, Yasmin H.; Leeper, James D.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the influence of dehydration on muscular strength and endurance and on single and repeated anaerobic sprint bouts. Describing hydration effects on anaerobic performance is difficult because various exercise modes are dominated by anaerobic energy pathways, but still contain inherent physiological differences. The critical

  2. Optimizing anaerobic soil disinfestation: an alternative to soil fumigation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil disinfestation methods using anaerobic decomposition of organic matter were developed in the Netherlands and Japan as an ecological alternative to MeBr. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) works by creating a combination of anaerobic soil conditions and readily available carbon pools to stimula...

  3. [Serious infection with Lactococcus garvieae].

    PubMed

    Fog-Møller, Tobias; Andersen, Jacob

    2012-04-16

    Lactococcus garvieae are Gram-positive, facultative anaerobe cocci. The bacterium is a known pathogen in fish, but is also described in mastitis among ruminants. In recent years it has been found in a Danish fish farm. Only 15 cases documenting infection in humans are found in English literature. We present an 83 year-old female in antihypertensive treatment admitted to hospital because of hypothermia and sepsis. In two of two blood cultures L. garvieae were found. No infection site was found. The patient received ampicillin and ciprofloxacin and was discharged to her home after 18 days. PMID:22510553

  4. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection. PMID:23805543

  5. Comparative in vitro activity of cefpodoxime against anaerobes other than Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Heizmann, W R; Höflsauer, M

    1991-01-01

    To assess the in vitro activity of cefpodoxime against anaerobic respiratory tract and oropharyngeal pathogens 77 strains belonging to 18 gram-negative and 7 gram-positive species were studied by means of agar dilution tests. For comparison cefuroxime, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were also tested. Cefpodoxime was found to be active at concentrations of less than or equal to 0.125 mg/l against Prevotella oralis, Prevotella buccalis, Prevotella bivia, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, Bacteroides corporis, Bacteroides gracilis, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Fusobacterium naviforme and Propionibacterium acnes. Prevotella oris, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, and Ruminococcus bromii were inhibited at concentrations of less than or equal to 1 mg/l and Prevotella denticola, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides pneumosintes, and Peptostreptococcus micros at concentrations of less than or equal to 4 mg/l. Strains of Veillonella parvula were inhibited by cefpodoxime at 0.25-8 mg/l, and single strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Peptostreptococcus magnus showed MICs of 32 and 64 mg/l, respectively. The results obtained warrant the use of cefpodoxime in therapy of anaerobic and mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract and similar infections not involving Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:1800380

  6. Faropenem, a new oral penem: antibacterial activity against selected anaerobic and fastidious periodontal isolates.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, I; Blandino, G; Caccamo, F; Musumeci, R; Nicoletti, G; Speciale, A

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro activity of faropenem, an oral penem, was compared with those of penicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefoxitin, clindamycin, erythromycin and metronidazole against 106 isolates of anaerobic pathogens involved in systemic infections. The organisms tested comprised Porphyromonas gingivalis (29), Prevotella spp. (eight), Prevotella melaninogenica (seven), Prevotella intermedia (five), Actinomyces spp. (25), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14), Peptostreptococcus spp. (11), Bacteroides ureolyticus (five) and Bacteroides forsythus (two). The antimicrobial properties of faropenem were investigated by studying MICs, MBCs, time-kill kinetics and post-antibiotic effect (PAE). Faropenem was highly active against all the anaerobes tested (MIC(90) < or = 0.5 mg/L) and was bactericidal against both beta-lactamase-positive and -negative anaerobes, with a maximum bactericidal effect at 10 x MIC at between 12 and 24 h. In addition, faropenem had an in vitro PAE on all the tested isolates and this was not influenced by beta-lactamase production. Faropenem may be useful for treating infections caused by periodontal bacteria or oral flora. PMID:12615878

  7. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  8. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  9. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  10. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs-acetogens and methanogens-look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. PMID:26684184

  11. Anaerobic codigestion of hog and poultry waste.

    PubMed

    Magbanua, B S; Adams, T T; Johnston, P

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic batch tests were performed using hog and poultry wastes in various proportions. Treatments that received both wastes produced higher yields of biogas, up to 200 +/- 30 mL/g volatile solids (VS) destroyed, and methane, up to 130 +/- 20 mL/g VS destroyed, compared to either waste alone. PMID:11187082

  12. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADABILITY OF NON-PETROLEUM OILS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has demonstrated that vegetable oils are amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. This is in contrast to petroleum oils. Vegetable oils are already oxygenated because they are composed of fatty acids and glycerols, which contribute to the biodegradability. A strategy has be...

  13. Analysis of denitrification in swine anaerobic lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a common management practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very sophisticated. To get a better understanding of the processes which occur i...

  14. Effect of CO2 on susceptibilities of anaerobes to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, S K; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1994-01-01

    The Oxyrase agar dilution method (Oxyrase, Inc., Mansfield, Ohio), which provides an anaerobic environment without added CO2, was compared with the reference agar dilution method recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (anaerobic chamber with 10% CO2) to test the susceptibilities of 302 gram-negative and gram-positive anaerobes to erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin. For erythromycin, the overall MIC for 50% of isolates tested (MIC50) was 0.5 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 was 8.0 micrograms/ml by the Oxyrase method, whereas they were 4.0 and 64.0 micrograms/ml, respectively, under standard anaerobic conditions with CO2. At a breakpoint of 4.0 micrograms/ml, 88% of strains were susceptible to erythromycin by the Oxyrase method, whereas 63% were susceptible in the chamber. The corresponding MIC50s and MIC90s of azithromycin, clarithromycin, and roxithromycin by the Oxyrase method were 0.5 and 8.0, 0.25 and 4.0, and 0.5 and 16.0 micrograms/ml, respectively, whereas in the chamber they were 4.0 and > 64.0, 2.0 and 64.0, and 2.0 and 64.0 micrograms/ml, respectively. At a breakpoint of 8.0 micrograms/ml for these three drugs, 89, 92, and 85% of the isolates, respectively, were susceptible by the Oxyrase method, whereas 67%, 72, and 68% of the isolates, respectively, were susceptible in the chamber. Most strains resistant to all four compounds by both methods were Bacteroides distasonis, Fusobacterium mortiferum, Fusobacterium varium and non-Clostridium perfringens Clostridium species. Results of the study may lead to a reappraisal of the role played by macrolides and azalides in the treatment of anaerobic infections. PMID:8192445

  15. Continuous Drip Flow System to Develop Biofilm of E. faecalis under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Corpus, Erika; Silva-Herzog, Daniel; Aragon-Piña, Antonio; Cohenca, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate a structurally mature E. faecalis biofilm developed under anaerobic/dynamic conditions in an in vitro system. Methods. An experimental device was developed using a continuous drip flow system designed to develop biofilm under anaerobic conditions. The inoculum was replaced every 24 hours with a fresh growth medium for up to 10 days to feed the system. Gram staining was done every 24 hours to control the microorganism purity. Biofilms developed under the system were evaluated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results. SEM micrographs demonstrated mushroom-shaped structures, corresponding to a mature E. faecalis biofilm. In the mature biofilm bacterial cells are totally encased in a polymeric extracellular matrix. Conclusions. The proposed in vitro system model provides an additional useful tool to study the biofilm concept in endodontic microbiology, allowing for a better understanding of persistent root canal infections. PMID:25371913

  16. Survival of Alternaria alternata during anaerobic digestion of biomass in stirred tank reactors.

    PubMed

    Schleusner, Y; Bandte, M; Gossmann, M; Heiermann, M; Plöchl, M; Büttner, C

    2012-01-01

    The survival of Alternaria alternate during anaerobic digestion was investigated in context of a joint research project. The aim of this project was to estimate the phytosanitary risk of dissemination of pathogens by returning treated biomass as organic fertilizer to arable land. The studies were carried out in lab-scale stirred tank reactors under mesophilic conditions. After insertion of infected plant material into the reactors the influence on the viability of the fungal pathogen was studied concerning exposure time, pretreatment and storage of the digestates for four weeks or six months. The results clearly showed that anaerobic digestion leads to a complete inactivation of A. alternate already after an exposure time of six hours. PMID:23878963

  17. The aggressive nature of the odontogenic keratocyst: is it a benign cystic neoplasm? Part 3. Immunocytochemistry of cytokeratin and other epithelial cell markers.

    PubMed

    Shear, Mervyn

    2002-07-01

    Numerous studies of keratin expression by the more common odontogenic cysts were done to determine whether patterns of cytokeratin staining could provide accurate diagnostic markers for the different varieties; to see whether comparative studies with oral mucosa and developing odontogenic epithelium could explain the pathogenesis of the cysts; and whether cytokeratin patterns could provide clues in elucidating the aggressive nature of the OKC. This review was a complex task with a range of at least 19 different cytokeratins being studied and also a broad range of antibodies in use for the same cytokeratin or group of cytokeratins. Moreover, there was not always standardisation of laboratory techniques in the selection and preparation of material. These difficulties were, in general, recognised by the different workers in the field, particularly when there was disagreement on results and caution was expressed about drawing conclusions from some positive findings. It would be fair to conclude that cytokeratin immunocytochemistry has not advanced to any meaningful extent, its use as a diagnostic marker for the OKC nor in eludidating its pathogenesis. With regard to OKC behaviour, it has been pointed out that there was strong reaction of OKC lining for keratin 16, a cytokeratin that has been associated with high proliferative activity. Yet other studies have also shown keratin 16 expression in dentigerous and radicular cysts. Differences in cytokeratin, EMA and CEA immunocytochemical reactivity between the parakeratinised and orthokeratinised varieties of cyst were demonstrated and the suggestion made that the orthokeratinised type has a considerably less aggressive behaviour, is a different entity and should bear a different name. Furthermore, Ki67 positive cells in the parakeratinised OKC linings were considerably more frequent than in the orthokeratinised linings.OKC, dentigerous and radicular cyst epithelium reacted positively for epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFr) but a trend indicating the most intense staining in the OKCs, followed by the dentigerous and then the radicular cyst linings led to the conclusion that the OKCs have an intrinsic growth potential not present in other odontogenic cysts. PMID:12110333

  18. Deep Neck Space Infections: A Study of 76 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Gaurav; Saxena, Aditi; Bhagat, Sanjeev; Singh, Baldev; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deep neck space infections (DNSI) are serious diseases that involve several spaces in the neck. The common primary sources of DNSI are dental infections, tonsillar and salivary gland infections, malignancies, and foreign bodies. With widespread use of antibiotics, the prevalence of DNSI has been reduced. Common complications of DNSI include airway obstruction, jugular vein thrombosis, and sepsis. Treatment principally comprises airway management, antibiotic therapy, and surgical intervention. This study was conducted to investigate the age and sex distribution of patients, symptoms, presentation, sites involved, bacteriology, and management and complications of DNSI. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed from October 2010 to January 2013, and included 76 patients with DNSI. Patients of all age groups and gender were included. All parameters including age, gender, co-morbidities, presentation, site, bacteriology, complications, and required interventions were studied. Results: In our study, the majority of patients were in the 31–50-year age group. Males accounted for 55.26% of the sample and females for 44.74%, with a male:female ratio of 1.23. Most of the patients were from a rural background. Diabetes was found as a co-morbid condition in 10.52% cases. Neck pain was the most common symptom, identified in 89.47% cases. The most common etiological factor was odontogenic infection (34.21%), followed by tonsillar and pharyngeal infection (27.63%). The most common presentation was Ludwig’s angina (28.94%), followed by peritonsillar abscess and submandibular abscess. In 50% of cases, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus were found in the culture. Surgical intervention was carried out in 89.47% cases. Emergency tracheotomy was required in 5.26% cases. Conclusion: DNSI can be life-threatening in diabetic patients, the immunocompromised, and elderly patients, and special attention should therefore be given to these groups. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent complications. All patients must be treated initially with intravenous antibiotics, with treatment subsequently updated based on a culture and sensitivity report. Due to poor oral hygiene, lack of nutrition, smoking and chewing of beetle nut and tobacco, odontogenic infections are the most common cause of DNSI. Thus, DNSI could be prevented by making the population aware of dental and oral hygiene and offering regular check-ups for dental infections. PMID:26788478

  19. Patched homolog 1 gene mutation (p.G1093R) induces nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PONTI, GIOVANNI; POLLIO, ANNAMARIA; PASTORINO, LORENZA; PELLACANI, GIOVANNI; MAGNONI, CRISTINA; NASTI, SABINA; FORTUNA, GIULIO; TOMASI, ALDO; SCARRÀ, GIOVANNA BIANCHI; SEIDENARI, STEFANIA

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the Patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) gene lead to an autosomal dominant disorder known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) or Gorlin syndrome (GS). Several PTCH1 mutations have been observed in NBCCS associated with keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), including non-syndromic KCOTs. The missense mutation c.3277G>C (p.G1093R) in exon 19 of the PTCH1 gene has only been reported in non-syndromic KCOTs. The present study reports for the first time a familial case (father and daughter) of NBCCS and KCOTs, carrying the same c.3277G>C (p.G1093R) germline mutation. This observation suggests that this missense mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of NBCCS as well as in a subset of non-syndromic KCOTs. The identification of a missense mutation may lead to an earlier diagnosis of NBCCS. PMID:22844361

  20. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  1. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells and impairs mineralization in tooth models of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Benjamin; Bardet, Claire; Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide - a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization - derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23451077

  2. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23451077

  3. New anaerobic process of nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Mulder, A; Versprille, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for the treatment of strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite within an anaerobic biofilm. The achieved results with a nitrogen loading rate of higher than 1,000 mg/L/d and nitrogen removal of around 90% look very promising because they exceed (by 9-18 times) the corresponding nitrogen removal rates of conventional activated sludge systems. The paper describes also some characteristics of DEAMOX sludge, as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterization. PMID:17163025

  4. Potential for anaerobic treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Schlottfeldt, G.A.B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of experiments on 3 laboratory-scale reactors loaded with whey at different daily rates showed that a daily loading of 85 lb COD/1000 cubic feet achieved a COD reduction efficiency of 86% with a gas yield (50% methane) of 5 cubic feet/gal of treated whey. High microorganism population and pH control were essential for stable operation. Overall 1st order COD removal rate constants were 1.13, 0.70 and 1.73/day at 35, 50 and 60 degrees Celcius respectively. The economic impact of anaerobic whey treatment was evaluated for small, medium and large cheese plants, and annual operating costs were projected for a 20-year period. Among several systems that were compared, the anaerobic treatment of whey was shown to be the only one that had a potential of paying for itself. Treatment costs represented from 0.85 to 2.6% of the mean US milk price to producers.

  5. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P.; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  6. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Adrien A P; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A; Chergui, Majed

    2015-10-01

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment. PMID:26520998

  7. Recent developments in anaerobic membrane reactors.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, David C

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic membrane reactors (AnMBRs) have recently evolved from aerobic MBRs, with the membrane either external or submerged within the reactor, and can achieve high COD removals (~98%) at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) as low as 3 h. Since membranes stop biomass being washed out, they can enhance performance with inhibitory substrates, at psychrophilic/thermophilic temperatures, and enable nitrogen removal via Anammox. Fouling is important, but addition of activated carbon or resins/precipitants can remove soluble microbial products (SMPs)/colloids and enhance flux. Due to their low energy use and solids production, and solids free effluent, they can enhance nutrient and water recycling. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: compare fouling between aerobic and anaerobic systems; determine how reactor operation influences fouling; evaluate the effect of different additives on membrane fouling; determine whether nitrogen removal can be incorporated into AnMBRs; recover methane solubility from low temperatures effluents; and, establish sound mass and energy balances. PMID:22749372

  8. Anaerobic biological treatment of coal gasifier effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Harper, S.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Lu, F.

    1982-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor system consisting of two columns in series, containing Raschig rings and granular activated carbon, respectively, has been acclimated to operate on dilute coal gasification wastewater. The system has been successfully operated at loadings of 2.5 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/m/sup 3/d resulting in removals as high as 92% COD, 78% total organic carbon (TOC), 93% phenol, and 99% cresol. Methane gas was generated at a rate of 3.6 to 8.1 L/d. The effluent from the anaerobic system was treated in an aerobic nitrifying system for ammonia removal. Complete conversion of ammonia-nitrogen to nitrate-nitrogen occurred with further reduction in COD and TOC of 74 and 85%, respectively. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Robust regulation of anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Mailleret, L; Bernard, O; Steyer, J P

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling anaerobic digestion processes. A two-step (i.e. acidogenesis-methanization) mass balance model is considered for a 1 m3 fixed bed digester treating industrial wine distillery wastewater. The control law aims at regulating the organic pollution level while avoiding washout of biomass. To this end, a simple output feedback controller is considered which regulates a variable strongly related to the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). Numerical simulations assuming noisy measurements first illustrate the robustness of this control procedure. Then, the regulating procedure is implemented on the considered anaerobic digestion process in order to validate and demonstrate its efficiency in real life experiments. PMID:14640204

  10. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  11. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  12. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  13. Anaerobic biodegradability and treatment of grey water in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek A; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2007-03-01

    Feasibility of grey water treatment in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor operated at different hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 16, 10 and 6h and controlled temperature of 30 degrees C was investigated. Moreover, the maximum anaerobic biodegradability without inoculum addition and maximum removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) fractions in grey water were determined in batch experiments. High values of maximum anaerobic biodegradability (76%) and maximum COD removal in the UASB reactor (84%) were achieved. The results showed that the colloidal COD had the highest maximum anaerobic biodegradability (86%) and the suspended and dissolved COD had similar maximum anaerobic biodegradability of 70%. Furthermore, the results of the UASB reactor demonstrated that a total COD removal of 52-64% was obtained at HRT between 6 and 16 h. The UASB reactor removed 22-30% and 15-21% of total nitrogen and total phosphorous in the grey water, respectively, mainly due to the removal of particulate nutrients. The characteristics of the sludge in the UASB reactor confirmed that the reactor had a stable performance. The minimum sludge residence time and the maximum specific methanogenic activity of the sludge ranged between 27 and 93 days and 0.18 and 0.28 kg COD/(kg VS d). PMID:17276482

  14. Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test as a Procedure to Evaluate Anaerobic Power.

    PubMed

    Andrade, V L; Zagatto, A M; Kalva-Filho, C A; Mendes, O C; Gobatto, C A; Campos, E Z; Papoti, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the running anaerobic sprint test (RAST) as a predictor of anaerobic capacity, compare it to the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and to compare the RAST's parameters with the parameters of 30-s all-out tethered running on a treadmill. 39 (17.0±1.4 years) soccer players participated in this study. The participants underwent an incremental test, 10 submaximal efforts [50-95% of velocity correspondent to VO(2MAX) (vVO(2MAX))] and one supramaximal effort at 110% of vVO(2MAX) for the determination of MAOD. Furthermore, the athletes performed the RAST. In the second stage the 30-s all-out tethered running was performed on a treadmill (30-s all-out), and compared with RAST. No significant correlation was observed between MAOD and RAST parameters. However, significant correlations were found between the power of the fifth effort (P5) of RAST with peak and mean power of 30-s all-out (r=0.73 and 0.50; p<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, the parameters from RAST do not have an association with MAOD, suggesting that this method should not be used to evaluate anaerobic capacity. Although the correlations between RAST parameters with 30-s all-out do reinforce the RAST as an evaluation method of anaerobic metabolism, such as anaerobic power. PMID:26422055

  15. Anaerobic contribution during maximal anaerobic running test: correlation with maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A; Redkva, P; Loures, J; Kalva Filho, C; Franco, V; Kaminagakura, E; Papoti, M

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to measure energy system contributions in maximal anaerobic running test (MART); and (ii) to verify any correlation between MART and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Eleven members of the armed forces were recruited for this study. Participants performed MART and MAOD, both accomplished on a treadmill. MART consisted of intermittent exercise, 20 s effort with 100 s recovery, after each spell of effort exercise. Energy system contributions by MART were also determined by excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, lactate response, and oxygen uptake measurements. MAOD was determined by five submaximal intensities and one supramaximal intensity exercises corresponding to 120% at maximal oxygen uptake intensity. Energy system contributions were 65.4±1.1% to aerobic; 29.5±1.1% to anaerobic a-lactic; and 5.1±0.5% to anaerobic lactic system throughout the whole test, while only during effort periods the anaerobic contribution corresponded to 73.5±1.0%. Maximal power found in MART corresponded to 111.25±1.33 mL/kg/min but did not significantly correlate with MAOD (4.69±0.30 L and 70.85±4.73 mL/kg). We concluded that the anaerobic a-lactic system is the main energy system in MART efforts and this test did not significantly correlate to MAOD. PMID:21210856

  16. Cultivation of Anaerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Bacteria from Spacecraft-Associated Clean Rooms▿

    PubMed Central

    Stieglmeier, Michaela; Wirth, Reinhard; Kminek, Gerhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In the course of this biodiversity study, the cultivable microbial community of European spacecraft-associated clean rooms and the Herschel Space Observatory located therein were analyzed during routine assembly operations. Here, we focused on microorganisms capable of growing without oxygen. Anaerobes play a significant role in planetary protection considerations since extraterrestrial environments like Mars probably do not provide enough oxygen for fully aerobic microbial growth. A broad assortment of anaerobic media was used in our cultivation strategies, which focused on microorganisms with special metabolic skills. The majority of the isolated strains grew on anaerobic, complex, nutrient-rich media. Autotrophic microorganisms or microbes capable of fixing nitrogen were also cultivated. A broad range of facultatively anaerobic bacteria was detected during this study and also, for the first time, some strictly anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium and Propionibacterium) were isolated from spacecraft-associated clean rooms. The multiassay cultivation approach was the basis for the detection of several bacteria that had not been cultivated from these special environments before and also led to the discovery of two novel microbial species of Pseudomonas and Paenibacillus. PMID:19363082

  17. Anaerobic fermentations--some new possibilities.

    PubMed

    Morris, J G

    1983-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentations start with the major advantage that, unlike aerobic processes, they do not incur the cost penalties associated with the need to sustain high rates of culture aeration, agitation and cooling. Even so, many of the more traditional fermentations that yield high volume, low value products (such as alcohols or fatty acids) are currently only economically viable if they utilize biological wastes and agricultural surpluses as substrates. To achieve maximum conversion efficiency it is necessary to select the appropriate species/strain of micro-organism which will perform best under the intended conditions of operation (which could include elevated temperatures and extremes of pH). Knowledge of the mechanisms whereby the fermentation is physiologically controlled can then suggest means, including genetically engineered strain improvements and/or the establishment of stable co-cultures with other microbes, whereby the yield of a desired product can be optimized. The biology of a fermentation process can thus be rendered sufficiently consistent and predictable for the biochemical engineer to be able to achieve optimal fermenter productivity. Anaerobic processes are particularly well suited to a continuous flow mode of operation (with cell retention) and new techniques for selective product removal and concentration can reduce the energy costs associated with 'downstream processing'. Hitherto, most interest has been centred on those anaerobic fermentations of renewable biomass which yield immediately useful products (fuel alcohols, methane). However, by combining biological and chemical procedures the profitability of even some superficially unpromising fermentations could be substantially enhanced. Collaborative research by microbial physiologists, geneticists and biochemical engineers is a prerequisite for marketable success in new applications of fermentative anaerobes and their enzymes. PMID:6400481

  18. Anaerobic expanded bed treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Switzenbaum, M.S.; Danskin, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of anaerobic attached film expanded bed (AAFEB) for whey treatment is described and the potential for implementation of substitute natural gas from whey is discussed. A significant portion (less than or equal to 46%) of the energy needs at cheese-production plants could be recovered by CH/sub 4/ manufactured from whey. Efficient treatment of whey is possible by AAFEB at low retention times and at high organic loading rates.

  19. Anaerobic Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Stephan; Pané-Farré, Jan; Kohler, Christian; Hecker, Michael; Engelmann, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus after a switch from aerobic to anaerobic growth was initiated by using the proteomic and transcriptomic approaches. In the absence of external electron acceptors like oxygen or nitrate, an induction of glycolytic enzymes was observed. At the same time the amount of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes was very low. NAD is regenerated by mixed acid and butanediol fermentation, as indicated by an elevated synthesis level of fermentation enzymes like lactate dehydrogenases (Ldh1 and Ldh2), alcohol dehydrogenases (AdhE and Adh), α-acetolactate decarboxylase (BudA1), acetolactate synthase (BudB), and acetoin reductase (SACOL0111) as well as an accumulation of fermentation products as lactate and acetate. Moreover, the transcription of genes possibly involved in secretion of lactate (SACOL2363) and formate (SACOL0301) was found to be induced. The formation of acetyl-coenzyme A or acetyl-phosphate might be catalyzed by pyruvate formate lyase, whose synthesis was found to be strongly induced as well. Although nitrate was not present, the expression of genes related to nitrate respiration (NarH, NarI, and NarJ) and nitrate reduction (NirD) was found to be upregulated. Of particular interest, oxygen concentration might affect the virulence properties of S. aureus by regulating the expression of some virulence-associated genes such as pls, hly, splC and splD, epiG, and isaB. To date, the mechanism of anaerobic gene expression in S. aureus has not been fully characterized. In addition to srrA the mRNA levels of several other regulatory genes with yet unknown functions (e.g., SACOL0201, SACOL2360, and SACOL2658) were found to be upregulated during anaerobic growth, indicating a role in the regulation of anaerobic gene expression. PMID:17384184

  20. Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.E.; Aller, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf is strongly controlled by dynamic physical sedimentation processes. Rapidly accumulating, physically reworked deltaic sediments characteristic of much of the shelf typically support what appear to be low rates of steady state anaerobic methane oxidation at depths of 5-8 m below the sediment-water interface. Methane oxidation in these cases is responsible for < {approximately}10% of the {Sigma}CO{sub 2} inventory in the oxidation zone and is limited largely by the steady-state diffusive flux of methane into the overlying sulfate reduction zone. In contrast, a large area of the shelf has been extensively eroded, reexposing once deeply buried (>10 m) methane-charged sediment directly to seawater. In this nonsteady-state situation, methane is a major source of recently produced {Sigma}CO{sub 2} and an important reductant for sulfate. These observations suggest that authigenic sedimentary carbonates derived from anaerobic methane oxidation may sometimes reflect physically enhanced nonsteady-state exposure of methane to sulfate in otherwise biogeochemically unreactive deposits. The concentration profiles of CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} in the eroded deposit were reproduced by a coupled reaction-transport model. This area of the shelf was reexposed to seawater approximately 5-10 years ago based on the model results and the assumption that the erosion of the deposit occurred as a single event that has now ceased. The necessary second order rate constant for anaerobic methane oxidation was {le}0.1 mM{sup -1} d{sup -1}.

  1. Anaerobic biodegradation of surrogate naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Lindsay N; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Surface bitumen extraction from the Alberta's oil sands region generates large settling basins known as tailings ponds. The oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in these ponds contain solid and residual bitumen-associated compounds including naphthenic acids (NAs) that can potentially be biodedgraded by indigenous tailings microorganisms. While the biodegradation of some NAs is known to occur under aerobic conditions, little is understood about anaerobic NA biodegradation even though tailings ponds are mainly anoxic. Here, we investigated the potential for anaerobic NA biodegradation by indigenous tailings microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established from anoxic tailings that were amended with 5 single-ringed surrogate NAs or acid-extractable organics (AEO) from OSPW and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Surrogate NA depletion was observed under all anaerobic conditions tested to varying extents, correlating to losses in the respective electron acceptor (sulfate or nitrate) or the production of predicted products (Fe(II) or methane). Tailings-containing cultures incubated under the different electron-accepting conditions resulted in the enrichment and putative identification of microbial community members that may function in metabolizing surrogate NAs under the various anoxic conditions. In addition, more complex NAs (in the form of AEO) was observed to drive sulfate and iron reduction relative to controls. Overall, this study has shown that simple surrogate NAs can be biodegraded under a variety of anoxic conditions, a key first step in understanding the potential anaerobic metabolism of NAs in oil sands tailings ponds and other industrial wastewaters. PMID:26724449

  2. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation: Occurrence and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Brock, Thomas D.

    1980-01-01

    Anoxic sediments and digested sewage sludge anaerobically oxidized methane to carbon dioxide while producing methane. This strictly anaerobic process showed a temperature optimum between 25 and 37°C, indicating an active microbial participation in this reaction. Methane oxidation in these anaerobic habitats was inhibited by oxygen. The rate of the oxidation followed the rate of methane production. The observed anoxic methane oxidation in Lake Mendota and digested sewage sludge was more sensitive to 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid than the simultaneous methane formation. Sulfate diminished methane formation as well as methane oxidation. However, in the presence of iron and sulfate the ratio of methane oxidized to methane formed increased markedly. Manganese dioxide and higher partial pressures of methane also stimulated the oxidation. The rate of methane oxidation in untreated samples was approximately 2% of the CH4 production rate in Lake Mendota sediments and 8% of that in digested sludge. This percentage could be increased up to 90% in sludge in the presence of 10 mM ferrous sulfate and at a partial pressure of methane of 20 atm (2,027 kPa). PMID:16345488

  3. Some unique features of alkaliphilic anaerobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roof, Erin; Pikuta, Elena; Otto, Christopher; Williams, George; Hoover, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This article explores two topics involving the examination of four strains of alkaliphilic anaerobes. The first topic was dedicated to detection of the ability of microorganisms to metabolize alternative chirality substrates. Two saccharolytic anaerobic bacteria were chosen for the first experiment: Anaerovirgula multivorans strain SCAT, which is gram positive and spore-forming; and Spirochaeta dissipatitropha, strain ASpC2T, which is gram negative. It was found that both checked sugarlytics were able to use L-ribose and L-arabinose, as growth substrates. The second part was concerned of study a chemolithotrophy in two halo-alkaliphilic sulfate reducing bacteria: Desulfonatornum thiodismutans strain MLF1T and Desulfonatronum lacustre strain Z-7951T. The experiments with lithotrophs had demonstrated that strain MLF1T was capable to grow without any organic source of carbon, while strain Z-7951T had required at least 2 mM sodium acetate for growth. Anaerobic technique was used for preparation of the growth media and maintenance of these bacterial cultures. Standard methods for Gram, spore, and flagella staining were applied for characterization of cytomorphology. In this article, the results of the experiments performed on cytological, physiological, and biochemical levels are presented and discussed.

  4. Microbiota Associated with Infections of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Landucci, Luis Fernando; de Oliveira, Kathlenn Liezbeth; Costa, Iracy; Ranieri, Robson Varlei; Okamoto, Ana Cláudia; Schweitzer, Christiane Marie

    2012-01-01

    The microbial infections involving the craniofacial skeleton, particularly maxilla and mandible, have direct relationship with the dental biofilm, with predominance of obligate anaerobes. In some patients, these infections may spread to bone marrow or facial soft tissues, producing severe and life-threatening septic conditions. In such cases, local treatment associated with systemic antimicrobials should be used in order to eradicate the sources of contamination. This paper discuss the possibility of spread of these infections and their clinical implications for dentistry, as well as their etiology and aspects related to microbial virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:22829824

  5. Intracranial and internal jugular vein thrombosis secondary to ENT infections: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Riffat, Faruque; Forer, Martin; Wignall, Andrew; Veivers, David; Patel, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    We report 3 cases of rare, life-threatening intracranial and internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis that were caused by common ENT infections. These infections included otitis media in a 6-year-old girl, tonsillitis in a 21-year-old woman, and odontogenic sepsis in a 56-year-old woman. All 3 patients were treated with culture-directed systemic antibiotics; 2 of them also required surgical drainage (the child and the older adult). The 2 adults also received therapeutic anticoagulation, which was continued until venous recanalization was documented; the duration of combined antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment was 6 weeks. All 3 patients made uneventful recoveries. Significant morbidities associated with intracranial and IJV thrombosis were avoided as a result of prompt diagnosis and judicious treatment. PMID:24170472

  6. Carbon source-dependent effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation on soil microbiome and suppression of rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and pratylenchus penetrans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of carbon source on efficacy of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) toward suppression of apple root infection by Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans was examined. Orchard grass (GR), rice bran (RB), ethanol (ET), composted steer manure (CM) and Brassica juncea seed meal (S...

  7. Anaerobic Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent in Pilot-Scale Anaerobic EGSB Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Mahmood, Qaisar; Qiu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yin-Sheng; Chang, Yoon-Seong; Li, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of untreated palm oil mill effluent (POME) pose threat to aquatic environment due to the presence of very high organic content. The present investigation involved two pilot-scale anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors, continuously operated for 1 year to treat POME. Setting HRT at 9.8 d, the anaerobic EGSB reactors reduced COD from 71179 mg/L to 12341 mg/L and recycled half of sludge by a dissolved air flotation (DAF). The average effluent COD was 3587 mg/L with the consistent COD removal efficiency of 94.89%. Adding cationic polymer (PAM) dose of 30 mg/L to DAF unit and recycling its half of sludge caused granulation of anaerobic sludge. Bacilli and small coccid bacteria were the dominant microbial species of the reactor. The reactor produced 27.65 m(3) of biogas per m(3) of POME which was utilized for electricity generation. PMID:26167485

  8. Anaerobic Degradation of Cyanuric Acid, Cysteine, and Atrazine by a Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jessee, J. A.; Benoit, R. E.; Hendricks, A. C.; Allen, G. C.; Neal, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacterium that rapidly degrades cyanuric acid (CA) was isolated from the sediment of a stream that received industrial wastewater effluent. CA decomposition was measured throughout the growth cycle by using a high-performance liquid chromatography assay, and the concomitant production of ammonia was also measured. The bacterium used CA or cysteine as a major, if not the sole, carbon and energy source under anaerobic, but not aerobic, conditions in a defined medium. The cell yield was greatly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of cysteine and CA in the medium. Cysteine was preferentially used rather than CA early in the growth cycle, but all of the CA was used without an apparent lag after the cysteine was metabolized. Atrazine was also degraded by this bacterium under anaerobic conditions in a defined medium. PMID:16346187

  9. Bacteria in the apical 5 mm of infected root canals.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, J C; Falkler, W A

    1991-08-01

    Ten freshly extracted teeth which had carious pulpal exposures and periapical lesions contiguous with the root apex were placed inside an anaerobic chamber and the apical 5 mm of the root canals cultured. In addition to anaerobic incubation, duplicate cultures were incubated aerobically. Fifty strains of bacteria from the 10 root canals were isolated and identified. The most prominent bacteria cultured from the 10 root canals were Actinomyces, Lactobacillus, black-pigmented Bacteroides, Peptostreptococcus, nonpigmented Bacteroides, Veillonella, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus mutans. Of the 50 bacterial isolates, 34 (68%) were strict anaerobes. This study demonstrates the presence of predominantly anaerobic bacteria in the apical 5 mm of infected root canals in teeth with carious pulpal exposures and periapical lesions. PMID:1809801

  10. Odontoblasts in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Milos, Nadine C; Peters, Edmund; Daley, Tom

    2013-09-01

    Odontoblasts are secretory cells displaying epithelial and mesenchymal features, which exist in a monolayer at the interface between the dentin and pulp of a tooth. During embryogenesis, these cells form a dentin shell and throughout life continue to produce dentin while, also acting as sensor cells helping to mediate tooth sensitivity. In this process, odontoblasts are forced to migrate inwards, resulting in an ongoing loss of pulp volume. Correspondingly, there is also a decrease in the surface area of the dentin which supports the odontoblast cell layer. As these events transpire, odontoblasts maintain a tightly controlled monolayer relationship to each other as well as to their dentin substrate. Stability is maintained laterally by epithelial attachment structures and transversely by complex cytoplasmic extensions into the supporting dentin. As a result, it is not possible for the layer to buckle to relieve the mechanical stresses, which develop during the inward migration. A theoretical consequence of this distinctive self-generated niche is the development of long term compressive stresses within the odontoblast population. We present a mechanobiology model, which causally relates the increase in cellular compressive stresses to contact inhibition of proliferation. We link this hypothesis to the observation that there are no reports of pulpal odontoblasts showing neoplasia or acquisition of changes suggestive of a pre-neoplastic phenotype. PMID:23786903

  11. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males. PMID:16861848

  12. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  13. Critical analysis of PCDD/F emissions from anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Rada, E C; Ragazzi, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper concerns a particular aspect of anaerobic digestion, that is the emission of PCDD/F in different scenarios where this biological process is present. The considered scenarios are: anaerobic digestion of automatically sorted Municipal Solid Waste, source separated organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste treated in an anaerobic digester, anaerobic process developed in a Municipal Solid Waste sanitary landfill. Not always the emissions taken into account are related to combustion of biogas from anaerobic digestion: the loss of biogas from a landfill causes an uncontrolled emission of PCDD/F. The paper is completed with an analysis of the role of anaerobic digestion in PCDD/F inventories and health risk considerations. Indeed the most detailed inventories offer emission factors useful for a deep understanding of the phenomenon of PCDD/F release into the atmosphere. Concerning health risk, some suggestions in order to decrease it are proposed. PMID:19029711

  14. Staphylococcus epidermidis saeR is an effector of anaerobic growth and a mediator of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Handke, L D; Rogers, K L; Olson, M E; Somerville, G A; Jerrells, T J; Rupp, M E; Dunman, P M; Fey, P D

    2008-01-01

    The saeRS two-component regulatory system regulates transcription of multiple virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus. In the present study, we demonstrated that the saePQRS region in Staphylococcus epidermidis is transcriptionally regulated in a temporal manner and is arranged in a manner similar to that previously described for S. aureus. Studies using a mouse foreign body infection model demonstrated that the virulence of strain 1457 and the virulence of a mutant, strain 1457 saeR, were statistically equivalent. However, histological analyses suggested that the polymorphonuclear neutrophil response at 2 days postinfection was significantly greater in 1457-infected mice than in 1457 saeR-infected mice, demonstrating that SaeR influences the early, acute phases of infection. Microarray analysis demonstrated that a saeR mutation affected the transcription of 65 genes (37 genes were upregulated and 28 genes were downregulated); in particular, 8 genes that facilitate growth under anaerobic conditions were downregulated in 1457 saeR. Analysis of growth under anaerobic conditions demonstrated that 1457 saeR had a decreased growth rate compared to 1457. Further metabolic experiments demonstrated that 1457 saeR had a reduced capacity to utilize nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor and exhibited increased production of lactic acid in comparison to 1457. These data suggest that in S. epidermidis SaeR functions to regulate the transition between aerobic growth and anaerobic growth. In addition, when grown anaerobically, 1457 saeR appeared to compensate for the redox imbalance created by the lack of electron transport-mediated oxidation of NADH to NAD+ by increasing lactate dehydrogenase activity and the subsequent oxidation of NADH. PMID:17954724

  15. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9–10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26940198

  16. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9–10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  17. Differential Susceptibility of Bacteria to Mouse Paneth Cell α-Defensins under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni, Jennifer R.; Lu, Wuyuan; Selsted, Michael E.; Ouellette, André J.

    2014-01-01

    Small intestinal Paneth cells secrete α-defensin peptides, termed cryptdins (Crps) in mice, into the intestinal lumen, where they confer immunity to oral infections and define the composition of the ileal microbiota. In these studies, facultative bacteria maintained under aerobic or anaerobic conditions displayed differential sensitivities to mouse α-defensins under in vitro assay conditions. Regardless of oxygenation, Crps 2 and 3 had robust and similar bactericidal activities against S. Typhimurium and S. flexneri, but Crp4 activity against S. flexneri was attenuated in the absence of oxygen. Anaerobic bacteria varied in their susceptibility to Crps 2–4, with Crp4 showing less activity than Crps 2 and 3 against Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis in anaerobic assays, but Fusobacterium necrophorum was killed only by Crp4 and not by Crps 2 and 3. The influence of anaerobiosis in modulating Crp bactericidal activities in vitro suggests that α-defensin effects on the enteric microbiota may be subject to regulation by local oxygen tension. PMID:25383215

  18. Effect of radiation dose on the recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.; Walker, R.I.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in the blood, spleen, and liver was investigated in mice that were exposed to 7, 8, 9, or 10 Gy /sup 60/Co radiation. Microorganisms were detected more often in animals exposed to higher doses of radiation. The number of mice that were culture positive and the number of isolates in one site increased with increasing dose. Bacteria were recovered in mice killed at various times after radiation, in 3 of 100 mice exposed to 7 Gy, in 13 of 100 irradiated with 8 Gy, in 23 of 90 exposed to 9 Gy, and in 34 of 87 irradiated with 10 Gy. The predominant organisms recovered were Escherichia coli, anerobic Gram-positive cocci, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides spp. Escherichia coli and anaerobes were more often isolated in animals exposed to 10 Gy, while S. aureus was more often recovered in those irradiated with 9 Gy. These data demonstrate a relationship between the dose of radiation and the rate of infection due to entire aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Reprints.

  19. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9-10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26940198

  20. Anaerobic Metabolism and Bioremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathy, Raj

    Nitroaromatic compounds pollute soil, water, and food via use of pesticides, plastics, pharmaceuticals, landfill dumping of industrial wastes, and the military use of explosives. Biotransformation of trinitrotoluene and other nitroaromatics by aerobic bacteria in the laboratory has been frequently reported, but the anaerobic bacterial metabolism of nitroaromatics has not been studied as extensively perhaps due to the difficulty in working with anaerobic cultures and the slow growth of anaerobes. Sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria can metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19.7%) received empiric antimicrobial therapy. One hundred and one patients (82.8%) had polymicrobial aerobic/anaerobic isolates cultivated from the same specimens. Almost all aerobic bacteria were of endogenous origin and showed fully susceptible antimicrobial profile; only 8.7% (9/104) were multiresistant and considered as hospital acquired. Based on our findings, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations and metronidazole remain useful antimicrobials for empiric treatment of anaerobic infections, while carbapenems should be reserved for situations were multidrug resistant, aerobic or facultative Gram-negative bacteria are expected. However, a certain percentage of resistant isolates were observed for each of these agents. Therefore, periodic resistance surveillance in anaerobes is highly recommended in order to guide empirical therapy. PMID:25479237

  2. Anaerobic capacity: a maximal anaerobic running test versus the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, N S; Nimmo, M A

    1996-02-01

    The present investigation evaluates a maximal anaerobic running test (MART) against the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) for the determination of anaerobic capacity. Essentially, this involved comparing 18 male students performing two randomly assigned supramaximal runs to exhaustion on separate days. Post warm-up and 1, 3, and 6 min postexercise capillary blood samples were taken during both tests for plasma blood lactate (BLa) determination. In the MART only, blood ammonia (BNH3) concentration was measured, while capillary blood samples were additionally taken after every second sprint for BLa determination. Anaerobic capacity, measured as oxygen equivalents in the MART protocol, averaged 112.2 +/- 5.2 ml.kg-1.min-1. Oxygen deficit, representing the anaerobic capacity in the MAOD test, was an average of 74.6 +/- 7.3 ml.kg-1. There was a significant correlation between the MART and MAOD (r = .83, p < .001). BLa values obtained over time in the two tests showed no significant difference, nor was there any difference in the peak BLa recorded. Peak BNH3 concentration recorded was significantly increased from resting levels at exhaustion during the MART. PMID:8664845

  3. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for simulating anaerobic mesophilic sludge digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Carlos Esquerre, Karla Matos Queiroz, Luciano

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The behavior of a anaerobic reactor was evaluated through modeling. • Parametric sensitivity analysis was used to select most sensitive of the ADM1. • The results indicate that the ADM1 was able to predict the experimental results. • Organic load rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the process. - Abstract: Improving anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by monitoring common indicators such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), gas composition and pH is a suitable solution for better sludge management. Modeling is an important tool to assess and to predict process performance. The present study focuses on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the dynamic behavior of a reactor fed with sewage sludge under mesophilic conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis is used to select the most sensitive ADM1 parameters for estimation using a numerical procedure while other parameters are applied without any modification to the original values presented in the ADM1 report. The results indicate that the ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to predict the experimental results of effluent acetate, propionate, composites and biogas flows and pH with reasonable accuracy. The simulation of the effect of organic shock loading clearly showed that an organic shock loading rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the reactor. The results demonstrate that simulations can be helpful to support decisions on predicting the anaerobic digestion process of sewage sludge.

  4. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  5. Anaerobic wastewater treatment of concentrated sewage using a two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket- anaerobic filter system.

    PubMed

    Halalsheh, Maha M; Abu Rumman, Zainab M; Field, Jim A

    2010-01-01

    A two-stage pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket - anaerobic filter (UASB-AF) reactors system treating concentrated domestic sewage was operated at 23 degrees C and at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 15 and 4 h, respectively. Excess sludge from the downstream AF stage was returned to the upstream UASB reactor. The aim was to obtain higher sludge retention time (SRT) in the UASB reactor for better methanization of suspended COD. The UASB-AF system removed 55% and 65% of the total COD (COD(tot)) and suspended COD (COD(ss)), respectively. The calculated SRT in the UASB reactor ranged from 20-35 days. The AF reactor removed the washed out sludge from the first stage reactor with average COD(ss) removal efficiency of 55%. The volatile fatty acids concentration in the effluent of the AF was 39 mg COD/L compared with 78 mg COD/L measured for the influent. The slightly higher COD(tot) removal efficiency obtained in this study compared with a single stage UASB reactor was achieved at 17% reduction in the total volume. PMID:20390881

  6. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Dohányos, M; Zábranská, J; Kutil, J; Jenícek, P

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion improvement can be accomplished by different methods. Besides optimization of the process conditions, pretreatment of input sludge and increase of process temperature is frequently used. The thermophilic process brings a higher solids reduction and biogas production, a high resistance to foaming, no problems with odour, better pathogens destruction and an improvement of the energy balance of the whole treatment plant. Disintegration of excess activated sludge in a lysate centrifuge was proved to cause increase of biogas production in full-scale conditions. The rapid thermal conditioning of digested sludge is an acceptable method of particulate matter disintegration and solubilization. PMID:15259942

  7. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) enrichment of anaerobic microbial consortia in a coal fed chemostat, (2) characterization of biocoal products and examination of liquefaction potential, (3) isolation of decarboxylating organisms and evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation. The project began on September 12, 1990. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Anaerobic utilization of aromatic carboxylates by bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.; Harwood, C.S.

    1996-03-25

    Very large quantities of compounds containing aromatic nuclei are produced annually from natural and industrial sources. A substantial portion of these materials accumulates in anaerobic environments, and since some of these are known or potential carcinogens, there has been growing interest in understanding how aromatics are degraded in the absence of molecular oxygen, an essential substrate in the aerobic catabolism of benzene rings. The microbiology and biochemistry involved in the degradation of natural products, mostly those derived from lignin, is considered in this chapter, with special emphasis on the role and contribution of studies with phototrophic bacteria to current understanding of these processes.

  9. Bacteremic Infection with Pantoea ananatis

    PubMed Central

    De Baere, Thierry; Verhelst, Rita; Labit, Caroline; Verschraegen, Gerda; Wauters, Georges; Claeys, Geert; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was hospitalized for dyspnea and bilateral ankle edema. During his hospital stay he presented anal hemorrhage and developed a high fever after colonoscopy. A set of aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles yielded a pure culture of gram-negative rods, susceptible to all antibiotics tested. The API20E code was 1005133, resulting in a very good identification as Pantoea sp. Subsequent sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed a final identification as Pantoea ananatis. The patient was given intravenous and oral therapy with piperacillin-tazobactam and ofloxacin and recovered completely from his infection. PMID:15365053

  10. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  11. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  12. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  13. Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a yeast infection and what causes it?  Yeast vaginitis is the second most common vaginal infection after ... risk for yeast Signs and symptoms of yeast vaginitis  Yeast infections may cause no symptoms  Sometimes yeast ...

  14. Hand Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause infection in the case of human or animal bites. Thorough washing, soaking, or even surgical drainage ... infection of the joint. Rabies infection from an animal may be serious or even fatal, so it ...

  15. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Staphylococcal Infections Page Content Article Body Infections caused by staphylococcal ... bacteria. (More often, it is caused by a staphylococcal infection.) Staphylococcal organisms sometimes can cause blisters. Your pediatrician ...

  16. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ... risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and ...

  17. LOVES CREEK ANAEROBIC, UPFLOW (ANFLOW) PILOT PLANT: PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic filter technology for municipal wastewater treatment has been studied in Knoxville, Tennessee with a 190-m exp 3 /d facility from August 1981 to October 1983. The ORNL project (described by the acronym ANFLOW for the anaerobic, upflow characteristics of the technology) ...

  18. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  19. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  20. Denitrification in anaerobic lagoons used to treat swine wastewater.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are commonly used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very complex. This study of anaerobic lagoons had twofold objectives: 1] quantify denitrification e...

  1. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction. PMID:22932878

  2. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  3. Urinary tract infection caused by Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Pant, Narayan Dutt; Sharma, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a proteobacterium, is a facultative anaerobe, which is generally present as the normal flora of water and soil in tropical and subtropical regions. The infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare but mostly fatal. It is responsible for causing fatal cases of septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis, diarrhea, and rarely urinary tract infection. The bacteria has high propensity to spread causing sepsis. Delayed proper treatment due to limited awareness related to the C. violaceum infection is responsible for the high mortality rate. Here, we describe a rare case of urinary tract infection by C. violaceum in a chronic kidney disease patient, which was managed with timely proper antimicrobial therapy as per the culture sensitivity report. PMID:26392784

  4. Urinary tract infection caused by Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Narayan Dutt; Sharma, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a proteobacterium, is a facultative anaerobe, which is generally present as the normal flora of water and soil in tropical and subtropical regions. The infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare but mostly fatal. It is responsible for causing fatal cases of septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis, diarrhea, and rarely urinary tract infection. The bacteria has high propensity to spread causing sepsis. Delayed proper treatment due to limited awareness related to the C. violaceum infection is responsible for the high mortality rate. Here, we describe a rare case of urinary tract infection by C. violaceum in a chronic kidney disease patient, which was managed with timely proper antimicrobial therapy as per the culture sensitivity report. PMID:26392784

  5. [Sensitivity of anaerobes to 8 antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sedallian, A

    1986-06-01

    We studied the susceptibility of 282 obligate anaerobes to 8 antibiotics. The strains were isolated from clinical specimens taken during 1983 and 1984. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using a microplate method for 245 strains and agar dilution for 33 Bacteroides asaccharolyticus strains. Tested strains were as follows: 85 Bacteroides fragilis, 71 Clostridium, 19 Fusobacterium nucleatum, 35 Peptostreptococcus, 39 Bacteroides oralis and Bacteroides bivius and 33 Bacteroides asaccharolyticus. Tested antibiotics were: metronidazole, clindamycin, minocycline, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, moxalactam, keflin and carbenicillin. For Bacteroides fragilis, the three most active antibiotics were metronidazole (inhibition of all strains with 8 micrograms/ml), minocycline and clindamycin (inhibition of 95% of strains by MICs less than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml). However, four strains were resistant to clindamycin (MICs greater than 8 micrograms/ml). The other anaerobic strains tested were susceptible. However, a few Bacteroides bivius strains were resistant to keflin (MIC greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml for 5% of strains). PMID:3534760

  6. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  7. Anaerobic expanded bed treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Switzenbaum, M.S.; Danskin, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of whey offers the dual advantage of energy production and pollution control. The energy produced is in the form of methane which is a valuable form of energy in that it is easily separated from the liquid digesting whey, has a high caloric value and can be used for heating and cooking at the cheese plants where it is produced. Based on the data of a survey conducted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, it was shown that a significant portion (up to 46%) of the energy needs (in natural gas and oil) at cheese production plants in New York State could be recovered by methane generated from whey produced as a by-product of cheese manufacturing at the plants. Finally, the results of a preliminary feasibility study of a new type of innovative, compact, high rate, anaerobic fixed film process show that efficient treatment of whey is possible at low retention times, and at high organic loading rates.

  8. Tolerance of Anaerobic Bacteria to Chlorinated Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Joanna C.; Groissmeier, Kathrin D.; Manefield, Mike J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), perchloroethene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), on the growth of eight anaerobic bacteria: four fermentative species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Clostridium sp. and Paenibacillus sp.) and four respiring species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Desulfovibrio vulgaris). Effective concentrations of solvents which inhibited growth rates by 50% (EC50) were determined. The octanol-water partition coefficient or log Po/w of a CAH proved a generally satisfactory measure of its toxicity. Most species tolerated approximately 3-fold and 10-fold higher concentrations of the two relatively more polar CAHs CF and 1,2-DCA, respectively, than the two relatively less polar compounds PCE and CT. EC50 values correlated well with growth rates observed in solvent-free cultures, with fast-growing organisms displaying higher tolerance levels. Overall, fermentative bacteria were more tolerant to CAHs than respiring species, with iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in particular appearing highly sensitive to CAHs. These data extend the current understanding of the impact of CAHs on a range of anaerobic bacteria, which will benefit the field of bioremediation. PMID:24441515

  9. Kinetics of anaerobic purification of industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Bolle, W.L.; van Breugel, J.; van Eybergen, G.C.; Kossen, N.W.F.; van Gils, W.

    1986-04-01

    As part of the development of an integral mathematical model describing the up-flow anaerobic sludges blanket (UASB) reactor, the kinetics of the conversion of organic wastes has to be known. The Mondod model is compared with the model proposed by Andrews, et al. Together with the assumption that the substrate for the anaerobic bacteria is formed by nonionized, volatile fatty acids, the Andrews model is able to describe substrate inhibition and reactor failure due to pH changes. From four batch experiments, with different concentrations of microorganisms, it could be concluded with a reliability of over 95% that the Monod model was inadequate and Andrews' model was adequate to describe the measurements. Standard statistical techniques like the X2 and the F-test were used for this purpose. From a parameter sensitivity analysis for the Andrews model it followed that the maximum specific growth rate Mu(A) max of the bacteria and the inhibition constant K, are the parameters which influance the systems most. Thus, these parameters were determined experimentally and most accurately. The other parameters were taken from literature. From a calculation of the Thiele modulus for the particles it follows that transport limitation of the substrate in the flocs is not significant. The efficiency Eta is 0.85 in the worst case. 11 references.

  10. Anaerobic biodegradation of nitroglycerin by digester sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulatos, C.; Pal, N.; Bhaumik, S.

    1995-12-31

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is an energetic compound primarily present in gun and rocket propellants as a primary explosive. It was also abundantly found in spent wastes from several chemical or pharmaceutical industries and in the wastewater of munitions manufacturing facilities causing significant environmental pollution. Incineration, other thermal processes, and chemical treatment such as acid or alkaline hydrolysis can effectively destroy these high energy compounds but they are associated with high treatment costs. Moreover, chemical processes may generate waste streams which require further treatment prior to their discharge in the environment. There is therefore, a pressing need for the development of new technologies that can economically and effectively deal with the disposal of energetic compounds. Biological treatment of energetic compounds amenable to microbial degradation provides an alternative to costly thermal and chemical methods. NG can be aerobically biodegraded by several fungal and bacterial consortia in the presence of co-substrates. The decomposition proceeds through a number of intermediate products whose formation is catalyzed by extra-cellular enzymes. The anaerobic biodegradation of NG by a mixed bacterial culture from digester sludge was investigated in this study. the study focused on the ability of anaerobic bacteria to degrade NG and utilize it as sole carbon source, the identification of possible intermediates,and the effect of co-substrates on the rates of transformation.

  11. Tolerance of anaerobic bacteria to chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Joanna C; Groissmeier, Kathrin D; Manefield, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), perchloroethene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), on the growth of eight anaerobic bacteria: four fermentative species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Clostridium sp. and Paenibacillus sp.) and four respiring species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Desulfovibrio vulgaris). Effective concentrations of solvents which inhibited growth rates by 50% (EC50) were determined. The octanol-water partition coefficient or log Po/w of a CAH proved a generally satisfactory measure of its toxicity. Most species tolerated approximately 3-fold and 10-fold higher concentrations of the two relatively more polar CAHs CF and 1,2-DCA, respectively, than the two relatively less polar compounds PCE and CT. EC50 values correlated well with growth rates observed in solvent-free cultures, with fast-growing organisms displaying higher tolerance levels. Overall, fermentative bacteria were more tolerant to CAHs than respiring species, with iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in particular appearing highly sensitive to CAHs. These data extend the current understanding of the impact of CAHs on a range of anaerobic bacteria, which will benefit the field of bioremediation. PMID:24441515

  12. Treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters using anaerobic filters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sandra Luz; Torretta, Vincenzo; Minguelac, Jésus Vázquez; Siñeriz, Faustino; Raboni, Massimo; Copelli, Sabrina; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-scale experimentation allowed comparing the performances of two upflow anaerobic packed-bed filters filled with different packing materials and operating at mesophilic conditions (30 degreeC) for treating slaughterhouse wastewaters. Methane production was experimentally evaluated considering different volumetric organic loading rates as well as feeding overloading conditions. Although filter performances declined with loading rates higher than 6 kg CODin m-3 d-1 , the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained always above 60%. The experimental results allowed for determining kinetic parameters for bacterial growth rate and methane production, following Monod and Chen-Hashimoto models, respectively. Results demonstrated that the reactors reached a cellular retention time significantly greater than the hydraulic retention time. The kinetic parameter values (Ks, l/max) revealed the low microorganisms' affinity for the substrate and confirmed the moderate biodegradability of slaughterhouse wastewater. The kinetic analysis also allowed the comparison of the filters performances with another anaerobic system and the assessment of the parameters useful for real-scale plant design. The system design, applied to a medium-sized Argentinean slaughterhouse, demonstrated to (i) be energetically self-sufficient and (ii) contribute to the plant's water heating requirements. PMID:24600871

  13. [Microecology of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu-jie; Zhou, Shao-qi; Zhu, Ming-shi

    2008-06-01

    The microbial community structure and biodiversity in the ANAMMOX system were studied by applying the methods of microtechnic, separation and purification technology of microorganisms, and molecular biotechnology. The ANAMMOX microbial population in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor and a UASB-biofilm bioreactor was successfully enriched in the laboratory with inorganic and dark condition. The removal efficiencies of NH4+-N and NO2(-)-N in UASB reactor were 99.99% and 99.9% respectively. For the UASB- biofilm, they were 99.3% and 97.4% respectively in an optimal condition in which the temperature was 30-34 degrees C and the pH was 7-8. In traditional methods of identifying microorganism, the population of bacteria, actinomycete and fungi were researched and the species in the two reactors were basically identical. Most of the microorganisms were anaerobic and anoxic bacteria. The size of the preponderant bacteria was (0.6-0.8) microm x (0.9-1.2) microm from the scanning electron micrographs of sludge cultivated in the two reactors, and the shape was oval. The rate of this preponderant bacteria was above 90%. The result of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE) and 16S rDNA digested reveals that there was one predominant species and the biodiversity was not high. PMID:18763515

  14. The anaerobic digestion of solid organic waste.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Anjum, Muzammil; Mahmood, Tariq; Dawson, Lorna

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of solid organic waste is thought to be reaching critical levels in almost all regions of the world. These organic wastes require to be managed in a sustainable way to avoid depletion of natural resources, minimize risk to human health, reduce environmental burdens and maintain an overall balance in the ecosystem. A number of methods are currently applied to the treatment and management of solid organic waste. This review focuses on the process of anaerobic digestion which is considered to be one of the most viable options for recycling the organic fraction of solid waste. This manuscript provides a broad overview of the digestibility and energy production (biogas) yield of a range of substrates and the digester configurations that achieve these yields. The involvement of a diverse array of microorganisms and effects of co-substrates and environmental factors on the efficiency of the process has been comprehensively addressed. The recent literature indicates that anaerobic digestion could be an appealing option for converting raw solid organic wastes into useful products such as biogas and other energy-rich compounds, which may play a critical role in meeting the world's ever-increasing energy requirements in the future. PMID:21530224

  15. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... for spinal infections include poor nutrition, immune suppression, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Surgical risk factors include a long surgical time, instrumentation and re- ...

  16. Absence of microbial mineralization of lignin in anaerobic enrichment cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Odier, E; Monties, B

    1983-01-01

    The existence of anaerobic biodegradation of lignin was examined in mixed microflora. Egyptian soil samples, in which rapid mineralization of organic matter takes place in the presence of an important anaerobic microflora, were used to obtain the anaerobic enrichment cultures for this study. Specifically, 14CO2 or [14C]lignin wood was used to investigate the release of labeled gaseous or soluble degradation products of lignin in microbial cultures. No conversion of 14C-labeled lignin to 14CO2 or 14CH4 was observed after 6 months of incubation at 30 degrees C in anaerobic conditions with or without NO3-. A small increase in soluble radioactivity was observed in certain cultures, but it could not be related to the release of catabolic products during the anaerobic biodegradation of lignin. PMID:6639020

  17. Biodegradability of fluorinated surfactants under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Remde, A; Debus, R

    1996-04-01

    The "ready biodegradability" of three fluorinated surfactants was determined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Surfactant 1, a solution of a fluorinated surfactant in water, was easily degradable under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions during the incubation periods of 28 and 60 days, respectively. Surfactant 2, a nonionic fluorinated surfactant, was degraded under aerobic conditions in a range of 35-77% during 28 days depending on the source of activated sludge. Aerobic degradation was inhibited by the nitrification-inhibitor dicyandiamide indicating that ammonium oxidizing bacteria may play a role in degradation of surfactant 2. Under anaerobic conditions surfactant 2 was not degraded. Surfactant 3, an anionic fluorinated surfactant, was degraded neither under aerobic nor under anaerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, surfactant 3 inhibited the methane production rate of sludge from a digester. The EC50, i.e. the concentration of surfactant 3 that inhibited 50% of methanogenesis, was determined at 160 mg/l. PMID:8653387

  18. Influence of cyanide on the anaerobic degradation of glucose.

    PubMed

    Pirc, E Tratar; Levstek, Meta; Bukovec, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in the anaerobic degradation process convert the substrate to the final products methane and carbon dioxide. Toxic substances can change the process substantially. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of toxic cyanide on biogas production in anaerobic degradation of glucose at 40°C. The OxiTop respirometric system offers a quick and simple method for measurement of the biogas formed. Concentrations of cyanide (CN(-)) added to 640 mg COD/L of glucose varied from 0.325 up to 31.000 mg/L. The inhibition of anaerobic degradation of glucose was evaluated from the lag phase, the coefficient of anaerobic degradation (D(h)), the volume and composition of the biogas and degradation of COD in the liquid phase. If the concentration of cyanide was above 2.600 mg/L inhibition of the anaerobic process was substantial. PMID:20962395

  19. Anaerobic digestion of hog wastes: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszkiewicz, J.A.; Bujoczek, G.

    1996-12-31

    The principles and overview of research, development and implementation of anaerobic digestion for hog wastes are discussed. Based on economic evaluations, an anaerobic technology is cost-effective, especially for a larger herd and becomes more competitive with aerobic treatment. Nevertheless, the rate of treatment is more sensitive and dependent on the particular fraction of manure being processed. Considering the different factors affecting anaerobic digestion, a complete mixed reactor with solids recycle (having high solids retention time and low hydraulic retention time) was found to be the more reliable system with regards to methane generation and manure stabilization. By solids recycle one can obtain significant saving in the reactor volume required, while still achieving the expected degree of treatment. It was also found that even though treatment using advanced anaerobic systems when compared with simple anaerobic systems is more expensive, the rate of return on investment and efficiency of the process are higher.

  20. [Sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria to therapeutic agents (Zurich 1984)].

    PubMed

    Wüst, J; Hardegger, U

    1985-12-28

    There are several reports in the literature on resistance of anaerobic bacteria against antimicrobial agents. Therefore, 231 anaerobic strains of various bacterial genera, isolated from clinical specimens during fall 1984, were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents active against anaerobic bacteria. Whereas 23% of the Bacteroides species not belonging to the B. fragilis group were resistant to penicillin, the anaerobic bacteria were still susceptible to chloramphenicol, clindamycin and the nitroimidazoles. The resistance rate against the various new beta-lactam antibiotics was comparable to results of other studies. Due to the increasing resistance it is recommended that the susceptibility of clinically important anaerobes be tested by appropriate techniques. The agar diffusion test must not be used due to unreliable results. Instead, the minimal inhibitory concentration should be determined or the "broth-disk" test performed. PMID:4089587