Science.gov

Sample records for anaerobic process effects

  1. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zun; Qian, Yang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Ju, Meiting

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2014 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. •Pretreatment •Organic waste •multiple-stage co-digestion •Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:26420080

  2. Anaerobic digestion of tomato processing waste: Effect of alkaline pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Paolo S; Greco, Rosa; Evangelou, Alexandros; Komilis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the work was to assess the effect of mild alkaline pretreatment on the anaerobic biodegradability of tomato processing waste (TPW). Experiments were carried out in duplicate BMP bottles using a pretreatment contact time of 4 and 24 h and a 1% and 5% NaOH dosage. The cumulative methane production during a 30 d period was recorded and modelled. The alkaline pretreatment did not significantly affect methane production in any of the treatments in comparison to the control. The average methane production for all runs was 320 NmL/gVS. Based on first order kinetic modelling, the alkaline pretreatment was found to slow down the rate of methanogenesis, mainly in the two reactors with the highest NaOH dosage. The biodegradability of the substrates ranged from 0.75 to 0.82 and from 0.66 to 0.72 based on two different approaches. PMID:26292773

  3. Dynamics of the anaerobic process: effects of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pind, Peter F; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-06-30

    A complex and fast dynamic response of the anaerobic biogas system was observed when the system was subjected to pulses of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). It was shown that a pulse of specific VFAs into a well-functioning continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system operating on cow manure affected both CH(4) yield, pH, and gas production and that a unique reaction pattern was seen for the higher VFAs as a result of these pulses. In this study, two thermophilic laboratory reactors were equipped with a novel VFA-sensor for monitoring specific VFAs online. Pulses of VFAs were shown to have a positive effect on process yield and the levels of all VFA were shown to stabilize at a lower level after the biomass had been subjected to several pulses. The response to pulses of propionate or acetate was different from the response to butyrate, iso-butyrate, valerate, or iso-valerate. High concentrations of propionate affected the degradation of all VFAs, while a pulse of acetate affected primarily the degradation of iso-valerate or 2-methylbutyrate. Pulses of n-butyrate, iso-butyrate, and iso-valerate yielded only acetate, while degradation of n-valerate gave both propionate and acetate. Product sensitivity or inhibition was shown for the degradation of all VFAs tested. Based on the results, it was concluded that measurements of all specific VFAs are important for control purposes and increase and decrease in a specific VFA should always be evaluated in close relationship to the conversion of other VFAs and the history of the reactor process. It should be pointed out that the observed dynamics of VFA responses were based on hourly measurements, meaning that the response duration was much lower than the hydraulic retention time, which exceeds several days in anaerobic CSTR systems. PMID:12701145

  4. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  5. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  6. Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) anaerobic digestion and related processes, odour and health effects study.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, J R; Adams, G; Cain, W; Cometto-Muniz, E; Forbes, B; Hentz, L; Novack, J T; Higgins, M; Murthy, S; McEwen, D; Ong, H T; Daigger, G T

    2004-01-01

    Biosolids odour emissions can affect the ability of wastewater utilities to implement beneficial biosolids processing and reuse programs. Communities often become more sensitised and vocal about biosolids issues, once they experience odours emanating from a nearby site. Odour impacts from biosolids, including potential human health effects, have been targeted recently by many national and local newspapers, citizens' groups, and regulatory agencies, who have raised significant concerns, ranging from viable disposal methods/sites to outright bans. Many national and local regulatory agencies in the United States are considering biosolids disposal bans in their communities because of misinformation, poor science, and citizen pressure, but primarily because of odour impact concerns. The wastewater industry has a relatively poor understanding of the operations and treatment parameters that influence biosolids odour emissions. Thus, wastewater treatment plants are often unable to control the odour quality of the biosolids that are delivered into communities. A research study to demonstrate the influence of anaerobic digestion, mechanical dewatering, and storage design and operating parameters on the odour quality of the final product was performed and is the subject of this paper. Established and new sampling and analytical methods were used to measure biosolids odour emissions from 11 test sites in North America. By determining the impacts of these control variables on biosolids odour quality, design and operations of anaerobic digestion systems might be enhanced. This paper also summarises a corollary study performed as part of the WERF research study that addresses the health effects of biosolids odours. PMID:15484737

  7. Evaluation of COD effect on anammox process and microbial communities in the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongjun; Sun, Faqian; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Jianfang; Shen, Yaoliang; Liang, Xinqiang

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen removal with different organic carbon effect was investigated using anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) anammox reactor. Results indicated that organic carbon exert an important effect on nitrogen removal through anammox process. When the feeding COD concentration was lower than 99.7mgL(-1), nitrogen removal could be enhanced via the coexistence of denitrification and anammox. Elevated COD could further deteriorate the anammox activity with almost complete inhibition at the COD concentration of 284.1mgL(-1). The nitrogen removal contribution rate of anammox was varied from 92.7% to 6.9%. However, the anammox activity was recovered when the COD/TN was decreased from 2.33 to 1.25 with influent nitrite addition. And, the anammox process was again intensified from 27.0 to 51.2%. High-throughput Miseq sequencing analyses revealed that the predominant phylum changed from Chloroflexi to Proteobacteria with the elevated COD addition, which indicated COD concentration was the most important factor regulating the bacterial community structure. PMID:27285572

  8. Effects of multiple inhibitory components on anaerobic treatment processes in municipal solid waste incineration leachate.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuqing; Dang, Yan; Lan, Zhangheng; Sun, Dezhi

    2016-06-01

    This study served to investigate the comparative and combined effects of calcium, ammonia nitrogen, and aquatic humic substances (AHS) on specific methanogenic activity (SMA) in municipal solid waste leachate at mesophilic conditions. Using orthogonal experiments, anaerobic granular sludge was cultured with different concentrations combinations of the three added components for 13 days. The combination of 6000 mg/L calcium, 400 mg/L ammonia nitrogen, and 4000 mg/L AHS was the most inhibitory combination on the SMA of granular sludge, with a calculated 4.49 mL (standard temperature and atmospheric pressure) (STP) CH4/(gVSS·d) of SMA. The SMA with the addition of the inhibitory components was much lower than the control group's (1000 mg/L calcium, 200 mg/L ammonia nitrogen and 2000 mg/L AHS) with a calculated 12.97 mL (STP) CH4/(gVSS·d) of SMA. Calcium was the major inhibitor among the three components followed by AHS. High concentrations of calcium significantly inhibited the utilization of propionate and butyrate in the substrate and further affected the methanogenic process. PMID:26830102

  9. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. PMID:24907580

  10. Inhibition of anaerobic digestion process: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Cheng, Jay J; Creamer, Kurt S

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive waste treatment practice in which both pollution control and energy recovery can be achieved. Many agricultural and industrial wastes are ideal candidates for anaerobic digestion because they contain high levels of easily biodegradable materials. Problems such as low methane yield and process instability are often encountered in anaerobic digestion, preventing this technique from being widely applied. A wide variety of inhibitory substances are the primary cause of anaerobic digester upset or failure since they are present in substantial concentrations in wastes. Considerable research efforts have been made to identify the mechanism and the controlling factors of inhibition. This review provides a detailed summary of the research conducted on the inhibition of anaerobic processes. The inhibitors commonly present in anaerobic digesters include ammonia, sulfide, light metal ions, heavy metals, and organics. Due to the difference in anaerobic inocula, waste composition, and experimental methods and conditions, literature results on inhibition caused by specific toxicants vary widely. Co-digestion with other waste, adaptation of microorganisms to inhibitory substances, and incorporation of methods to remove or counteract toxicants before anaerobic digestion can significantly improve the waste treatment efficiency. PMID:17399981

  11. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  12. Effect of temperature decrease on the microbial population and process performance of a mesophilic anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Bohn, I; Björnsson, L; Mattiasson, B

    2007-08-01

    The effect of a temperature decrease from 33 degrees C to 12 degrees C was investigated for anaerobic digestion of crop residues. A laboratory-scale reactor (R0) was inoculated with mesophilic sludge and operated as continuously stirred fed-batch system at temperatures of 12 degrees C, 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C. Changes in the microbial populations of the sludge were followed by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Methane was produced in R0 at all temperatures. Stable long-term operation at 18 degress C was achieved yielding 151 mlCH4 gVS(added(-1) at a rate of 108 mlCH4 l(R)(-1)d(-1) once the microbial populations of the sludge had adapted to this temperature. After operation at 18 degrees C, the contents of R0 was mixed and distributed into three smaller reactors, which were operated at 18 degrees C (R18), 25 degrees C (R25) and 37 degrees C (R37), respectively. Methane production rates for R37 and R25 were 366 and 310 mlCH4 l(R)(-1)d(-1), respectively, which were higher than the 215 mlCH4 l(R)(-1)d(-1) obtained in R0 when this was operated at 33 degrees C. Hydrolysis was found to decrease when temperature was decreased and especially below 25 degrees C. At temperatures below 16 degrees C, acidogenesis and methanogenesis were the rate-limiting steps. Adaptation of the mesophilic sludge to 18 degrees C was indicated by an increase in the ratio of Bacteria to total prokaryotes (sum of Archaea and Bacteria). This was thought to be caused by enrichment of Bacteria in the sludge, which appeared to be an important adaptation mechanism. During the adaptation, the Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinaceae populations increased relative to the total Archaea population whereas the Methanosaeta population decreased. The population changes were reflected by reactor performance. PMID:17879853

  13. Process configuration role in anaerobic biotransformations

    SciTech Connect

    Speece, R.E.

    1998-07-01

    Defining the environmental conditions which would enable anaerobic processes to consistently produce effluents containing only non-detectable concentrations of degradable organics would remove one of the main drawbacks to wider application of this important treatment technology. Recently specific metabolic intermediates formed in the anaerobic biotransformation of complex organics have been found to enhance or curtail process performance. Using acrylate and acrolein as representative hazardous chemicals, modifications in staging and reactor operation procedures have been observed in the author's laboratory to profoundly impact the rate and completeness of the biotransformation process. Specific metabolic intermediates formed in the biotransformation of complex substrates to a large extent will control a given process performance and process configuration greatly impacts the metabolic pathway, thus impacting the intermediates formed as well. There is a growing body of literature to indicate that process performance in anaerobic biotransformation is greatly impacted by reactor configuration. There is also some evidence that metabolic precursors impact the subsequent efficiency of conversion of volatile fatty acids (VFA) ultimately to CH{sub 4}. But although profound differences in the performance of anaerobic biotransformation are reported for various process configurations, there are no published criteria to guide the rational design of stages/phased processes. Clarification of the relative merits of single stage, two stage, two phase, granules and biofilms as well as CSTR and plug flow modes in the biotransformation of hazardous pollutants would be foundational for future research and development.

  14. Anammox for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater: Effect of COD/N ratios on process performance and bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Leal, Cíntia Dutra; Pereira, Alyne Duarte; Nunes, Fernando Terra; Ferreira, Luísa Ornelas; Coelho, Aline Carolina Cirilo; Bicalho, Sarah Kinaip; Mac Conell, Erika F Abreu; Ribeiro, Thiago Bressani; de Lemos Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto; de Araújo, Juliana Calábria

    2016-07-01

    Long-term effects of COD/N ratios on the nitrogen removal performance and bacterial community of an anammox reactor were evaluated by adding a synthetic medium (with glucose) and real anaerobic effluent to a SBR. At a COD/N ratio of 2.8 (COD, 390mg·L(-1)) ammonium removal efficiency was 66%, while nitrite removal remained high (99%). However, at a COD/N ratio of 5.0 (COD, 300mg·L(-1)), ammonium and nitrite removal efficiencies were high (84% and 99%, respectively). High COD, nitrite, and ammonium removal efficiencies (80%, 90% and 95%, respectively) were obtained on adding anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater (with nitrite) to the reactor. DGGE revealed that the addition of anaerobic effluent changed the bacterial community structure and selected for DNA sequences related to Brocadia sinica and Chloroflexi. Adding glucose and anaerobic effluent increased denitrifiers concentration threefold. Thus, the possibility of using the anammox process to remove nitrogen from anaerobically pre-treated municipal wastewater was demonstrated. PMID:27023380

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Removal of Organic Pollutants and Sulfate in an Anaerobic Biological Wastewater Treatment Process.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in commercial products and industrial processes raises issues regarding the toxicity of sludge biomass in biological wastewater treatment plants, due to potential antimicrobial properties. This study investigated the effects of AgNPs on removal of organic pollutants and sulfate in an anaerobic biological sulfate reduction process. At AgNPs concentrations of up to 10 mg/L, no significant inhibition of sulfate and COD removal was observed. However, at higher concentrations (50-200 mg/L) sulfate and COD removal efficiencies were significantly decreased to 51.8% and 33.6%, respectively. Sulfate and COD reduction followed first-order kinetics at AgNPs concentrations of up to 10 mg/L and second-order kinetics at AgNPs concentrations of 50-200 mg/L. Lactate dehydrogenase release profiles showed increases in cytotoxicity at AgNPs concentrations greater than 50 mg/L suggesting cell membrane disruption. Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfidogenic sludge biomass and of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra showed a decrease in concentrations of carbohydrates, proteins, humic substances, and lipids in the presence of AgNPs. Moreover, the interaction of AgNPs with sludge biomass and the damage caused to cell walls were confirmed through scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27483773

  16. New anaerobic process of nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Gladchenko, M; Mulder, A; Versprille, B

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on successful laboratory testing of a new nitrogen removal process called DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) for the treatment of strong nitrogenous wastewater such as baker's yeast effluent. The concept of this process combines the recently discovered ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulfide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite within an anaerobic biofilm. The achieved results with a nitrogen loading rate of higher than 1,000 mg/L/d and nitrogen removal of around 90% look very promising because they exceed (by 9-18 times) the corresponding nitrogen removal rates of conventional activated sludge systems. The paper describes also some characteristics of DEAMOX sludge, as well as the preliminary results of its microbiological characterization. PMID:17163025

  17. ASSESSING TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS TO ANAEROBIC TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A screening protocol has been developed to provide a rapid but dependable and repeatable assessment of the effect of toxic organic chemicals on anaerobic treatment processes. his protocol provides information on the rate limiting biological reactions and the concentration of toxi...

  18. Anaerobic Mesophilic Codigestion of Rice Straw and Chicken Manure: Effects of Organic Loading Rate on Process Stability and Performance.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zili; Liu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xianbo; Li, Dong; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Huang, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) on performance and stability of mesophilic co-digestion of rice straw (RS) and chicken manure (CM), benchtop experiments (40 L) were carried out at OLRs of 3.0, 3.6, 4.2, 4.8, 6.0, 8.0, and 12.0 kg volatile solid (VS)/(m(3)·day) with volatile solid (VS) ratio of 1:1 (RS/CM) which was based on batch tests. Anaerobic co-digestion was slightly and severely inhibited by the accumulation of ammonia when the digester was overloaded at an OLR of 6 and 12 kg VS/(m(3)·day), respectively. The recommended OLR for co-digestion is 4.8 kg VS/(m(3)·day), which corresponds to average specific biogas production (SBP) of 380 L/kg VS and volumetric biogas production rate (VBPR) of 1.8 m(3)/(m(3)·day). An OLR of 6-8 kg VS/(m(3)·d) with SBP of 360-440 L/kg VS and VBPR of 2.1-3.5 m(3)/(m(3)·day) could be considered, if an Anaerobic digestion (AD) system assisted by in situ removal of ammonia was adopted. PMID:26940572

  19. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  20. Pulse power enhancement of the anaerobic digester process

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot study of the effects of Pulse Power Processing on an anaerobic digester system was completed at the Decatur Utilities Dry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, in Decatur Alabama, in September, 1995. This patented method generates several significant effects when all biosolids material is treated as it enters the anaerobic system. Intense, high peak-power plasma arcs are created, one at each end of the parabolic processing chamber, to produce an amplified synergy of alterations to the digester sludge flowing between them. The millisecond electric discharges generate localized temperatures as high as 30,000 K{degrees}, followed by a rapid cooling of the flowing liquid, which produces acoustic shock waves with pressures approaching 5,000 atmospheres. This destructive force: ruptures many of the cell walls of the bacteria and other single-cell organisms, releasing their vacuole fluids; breaks carbon bonds to form smaller organic compounds; and pulverizes large particle conglomerates, increasing the overall surface area of the solids. These beneficial results serve to boost the nutrient source for the anaerobes in the digester. In conjunction with LTV radiation, the formation of excited chemical radicals (including OH{sup -}), and the changes in ionic charge through alteration of the zeta potential, the bioreactor system is turbocharged to enhance the conversion of volatile biosolids to methane gas, which is the natural respiratory by-product of anaerobic digestion.

  1. Effects of metal salt addition on odor and process stability during the anaerobic digestion of municipal waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Timothy; Eskicioglu, Cigdem

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an effective way to recover energy and nutrients from organic waste; however, several issues including the solubilization of bound nutrients and the production of corrosive, highly odorous and toxic volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in AD biogas can limit its wider adoption. This study explored the effects of adding two different doses of ferric chloride, aluminum sulfate and magnesium hydroxide directly to the feed of complete mix semi-continuously fed mesophilic ADs on eight of the most odorous VSCs in AD biogas at three different organic loading rates (OLR). Ferric chloride was shown to be extremely effective in reducing VSCs by up to 87%, aluminum sulfate had the opposite effect and increased VSC levels by up to 920%, while magnesium hydroxide was not shown to have any significant impact. Ferric chloride, aluminum sulfate and magnesium hydroxide were effective in reducing the concentration of orthophosphate in AD effluent although both levels of alum addition caused digester failure at elevated OLRs. Extensive foaming was observed within the magnesium hydroxide dosed digesters, particularly at higher doses and high OLRs. Certain metal salt additions may be a valuable tool in overcoming barriers to AD and to meet regulatory targets. PMID:26260964

  2. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  3. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  4. Composting of bio-waste, aerobic and anaerobic sludges--effect of feedstock on the process and quality of compost.

    PubMed

    Himanen, Marina; Hänninen, Kari

    2011-02-01

    In-vessel composting of three stocks with originally different degree of organic matter degradation was conducted for: (1) kitchen source-separated bio-waste (BW), (2) aerobic (AS) as well as (3) anaerobic sludges (AnS) from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Composting experiment lasted over a year. The highest activity of the process was in the BW compost. It was implied by the highest temperature, CO(2) release, ammonification and nitrification, intensive accumulation and removal of low-weight carboxylic acids (water- and NaOH-extractable). Between the sludges higher mineralization and CO2 release was in AnS, while ammonification and nitrification were higher in AS compost; no significant difference between sludge composts was noticed for dynamics of pH, conductivity, concentrations of LWCA, and some nutrient compounds and heavy metals. Nitrogen content of the final compost increased in BW, but decreased in AS and AnS. Phytotoxicity of Lepidium sativum was eliminated faster in sludge composts compared to BW compost. PMID:21095117

  5. Effects of Benzalkonium Chloride, Proxel LV, P3 Hypochloran, Triton X-100 and DOWFAX 63N10 on anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Flores, German Antonio Enriquez; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kjellberg, Kasper; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the individual and synergistic toxicity of the following xenobiotics: Benzalkonium Chloride (BKC), Proxel LV (PRX), P3 Hypochloran (HPC), Triton X-100 (TRX), and DOWFAX 63N10 (DWF), on anaerobic digestion (AD) process, was assessed. The experiments were performed in batch and continuous (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket, UASB) reactors with biochemical-industrial wastewater, as substrate. In batch experiments, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the tested xenobiotics were found to be 13.1, 1003, 311.5 and 24.3 mg L(-1) for BKC, PRX, DWF and TRX, respectively while HPC did not affect the AD process. Furthermore, the xenobiotics mixture tested did not present any synergistic inhibitory effect on the AD process. In continuous experiments, BKC and xenobiotics' mixture induced even stronger (more than 85%) of inhibition, expressed as IC50, compared to the levels observed from the batch reactors. Oppositely, TRX showed no inhibition in continuous mode, while inhibition was detected at batch mode. PMID:26143575

  6. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  7. Effect of different pH-values on process parameters in two-phase anaerobic digestion of high-solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In many publications, primary fermentation is described as a limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of fibre-rich biomass [Eastman JA, Ferguson JF. Solubilization of particulacte carbon during the anaerobic digeston. J WPCF. 1981;53:352-366; Noike T, Endo G, Chang J, Yaguchi J, Matsumoto J. Characteristics of carbohydrate degradation and the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. Biotechnol Bioeng. 1985;27:1482-1489; Arntz HJ, Stoppok E, Buchholz K. Anaerobic hydroysis of beet pulp-discontiniuous experiments. Biotechnol Lett. 1985;7:113-118]. The microorganisms of the primary fermentation process differ widely from the methanogenic microorganisms [Pohland FG, Ghosh S. Developments in anaerobic stabilization of organic wastes-the two-phase concept. Environ Lett. 1971;1:255-266]. To optimize the biogas process, a separation in two phases is suggested by many authors [Fox P, Pohland GK. Anaerobic treatment applications and fundamentals: substrate specificity during phase separation. Water Environ Res. 1994;66:716-724; Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580]. To carry out the examination, a two-phase laboratory-scale biogas plant was established, with a physical phase separation. In previous studies, the regulation of the pH-value during the acid formation was usually carried out by the addition of sodium hydroxide [Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580; Ueno Y, Tatara M, Fukui H, Makiuchi T, Goto M, Sode K. Production of hydrogen and methane from organic solid wastes by phase separation of anaerobic process. Bioresour Technol. 2007;98:1861-1865; Zoetemeyer RJ, van den Heuvel JC, Cohen A. pH influence on acidogenic dissimilation of glucose in an anaerobic digestor. Water Res. 1982;16:303-311]. A new technology

  8. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  9. Characteristics, process parameters, and inner components of anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  10. A novel application of an anaerobic membrane process in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    You, H S; Tseng, C C; Peng, M J; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Peng, S H

    2005-01-01

    The applications of membrane processes in anaerobic biological wastewater treatment still have some limitations due to severe membrane scaling and fouling, although they have been proven to achieve superior COD removal and biomass retention. An innovative anaerobic membrane process for wastewater treatment was conducted to control the membrane scaling problems. The process comprises an anaerobic reactor, an aerobic reactor, and a membrane separation tank. Anaerobic sludge from a full-scale UASB reactor treating food wastewater was inoculated to anaerobic and aerobic reactor to purify synthetic wastewater consisting of glucose and sodium acetate. The anaerobic reactor was operated in a sludge bed type without three-phase separator. The aerobic reactor can eliminate residual organics from the anaerobic reactor effluent using facultative microorganisms. To provide solid-liquid separation, hollow fiber ultrafiltration module was submerged in the separation tank. The results clearly show that the anaerobic membrane process combined methanogenic and aerobic COD reduction is a stable system. No fatal scaling was found after two months of operation even without chemical cleaning for the membrane. It was also found that inorganic precipitates formed in the aerobic reactor were reduced due to CO2 stripping in aerobic reactor. Another important finding was that the inorganic precipitates were entrapped into facultative aerobes floc. The ash/SS ratio of aerobes floc increased from 0.17 to 0.55 after 50 days of operation, which confirms this phenomenon. Based on our investigation, the new process can control scaling effectively to extend the membrane application in anaerobic treatment. PMID:16003960

  11. Modeling a granule-based anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (ANAMMOX) process.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Chen, You-Peng; Liu, Shao-Yang; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Yu, Han-Qing

    2009-06-15

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) process in a granular upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. ANAMMOX granules were cultivated in the UASB reactor by seeding aerobic granules. The granule-based reactor had a great N-loading resistant capacity. The model simulation results on the 1-year reactor performance matched the experimental data well. The yield coefficient for the growth and the decay rate coefficient of the ANAMMOX granules were estimated to be 0.164 g COD g(-1) N and 0.00016 h(-1), respectively. With this model, the effects of process parameters on the reactor performance were evaluated. Results showed that the optimum granule diameter for the maximum N-removal should be between 1.0 and 1.3 mm and that the optimum N loading rate should be 0.8 kg N m(-3) d(-1). In addition, the substrate micro-profiles in the ANAMMOX granules were measured with a microelectrode to explore the diffusion dynamics within the granules, and the measured profiles matched the predicted results well. PMID:19280667

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of TOC removal from slaughterhouse wastewater using combined anaerobic-aerobic and UV/H2O2 processes.

    PubMed

    Bustillo-Lecompte, Ciro Fernando; Mehrvar, Mehrab; Quiñones-Bolaños, Edgar

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the operating costs of treating slaughterhouse wastewater (SWW) using combined biological and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). This study compares the performance and the treatment capability of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), an aerated completely mixed activated sludge reactor (AS), and a UV/H2O2 process, as well as their combination for the removal of the total organic carbon (TOC). Overall efficiencies are found to be up to 75.22, 89.47, 94.53, 96.10, 96.36, and 99.98% for the UV/H2O2, ABR, AS, combined AS-ABR, combined ABR-AS, and combined ABR-AS-UV/H2O2 processes, respectively. Due to the consumption of electrical energy and reagents, operating costs are calculated at optimal conditions of each process. A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is performed at optimal conditions for the SWW treatment by optimizing the total electricity cost, H2O2 consumption, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). The combined ABR-AS-UV/H2O2 processes have an optimal TOC removal of 92.46% at an HRT of 41 h, a cost of $1.25/kg of TOC removed, and $11.60/m(3) of treated SWW. This process reaches a maximum TOC removal of 99% in 76.5 h with an estimated cost of $2.19/kg TOC removal and $21.65/m(3) treated SWW, equivalent to $6.79/m(3) day. PMID:24486468

  13. Effects of oxidation reduction potential in the bypass micro-aerobic sludge zone on sludge reduction for a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexun; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhongpin; Liu, Dongfang

    2014-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to determine the effect of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) on sludge reduction in a bypass micro-aerobic sludge reduction system. The system was composed of a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process with a sludge holding tank in the sludge recycle loop. The ORPs in the micro-aerobic tanks were set at approximately +350, -90, -150, -200 and -250 mV, by varying the length of aeration time for the tanks. The results show that lower ORP result in greater sludge volume reduction, and the sludge production was reduced by 60% at the lowest ORP. In addition, low ORP caused extracellular polymer substances dissociation and slightly reduced sludge activity. Comparing the sludge backflow characteristics of the micro-aerobic tank's ORP controlled at -250 mV with that of +350 mV, the average soluble chemical oxygen (SCOD), TN and TP increased by 7, 0.4 and 2 times, median particle diameter decreased by 8.5 μm and the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) decreased by 0.0043 milligram O2 per gram suspended solids per minute. For the effluent, SCOD and TN and TP fluctuated around 30, 8.7 and 0.66 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the effective assignment of ORP in the micro-aerobic tank can remarkably reduce sludge volume and does not affect final effluent quality. PMID:24845332

  14. Carbon balance of anaerobic granulation process: carbon credit.

    PubMed

    Wong, Biing-Teo; Show, K Y; Lee, D J; Lai, J Y

    2009-03-01

    The concept of carbon credit arose out of increasing awareness of the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to combat global warming which was formalized in the Kyoto protocol. In addition to contribution to sustainable development with energy recovery in the form of methane, carbon credits can be claimed by application of advanced anaerobic processes in wastewater treatment for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. As anaerobic granular systems are capable of handling high organic loadings concomitant with high strength wastewater and short hydraulic retention time, they could render much more carbon credits than other conventional anaerobic systems. This study investigated the potential carbon credit derived from laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors based on a carbon balance analysis. Methane emission reduction could be calculated by calculating the difference of UASB reactors and open lagoon treatment systems. Based on the 2.5l bench-scale reactor, the total CH(4) emissions reduction was calculated as 29 kg CO(2)/year. On scaling up to a typical full-scale anaerobic digester, the total CH(4) emissions reduction could achieve 46,420 tons CO(2) reduction/year. The estimated carbon credits would amount to 278,500 US$ per year by assuming a carbon price of 6 US$ per metric ton CO(2) reduction. The analysis postulated that it is financially viable to invest in advanced anaerobic granular treatment system from the revenue generated from carbon credits. PMID:18990565

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an "active" microbial process.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-02-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. AOM was first found to be coupled with sulfate reduction and mediated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME, often forming consortia with SRB, are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. ANME-1 is even able to produce methane. Subsequently, it has been found that AOM can also be coupled with denitrification. The known microbes responsible for this process are Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (M. oxyfera) and Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens (M. nitroreducens). Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera belongs to the NC10 bacteria, can catalyze nitrite reduction through an "intra-aerobic" pathway, and may catalyze AOM through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. However, M. nitroreducens, which is affiliated with ANME-2d archaea, may be able to catalyze AOM through the reverse methanogenesis pathway. Moreover, manganese (Mn(4+) ) and iron (Fe(3+) ) can also be used as electron acceptors of AOM. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM. It also discusses recent progress in some unclear key issues about AOM, including ANME-1 in hypersaline environments, the effect of oxygen on M. oxyfera, and the relationship of M. nitroreducens with ANME. PMID:25530008

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an “active” microbial process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. AOM was first found to be coupled with sulfate reduction and mediated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME, often forming consortia with SRB, are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. ANME-1 is even able to produce methane. Subsequently, it has been found that AOM can also be coupled with denitrification. The known microbes responsible for this process are Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (M. oxyfera) and Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens (M. nitroreducens). Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera belongs to the NC10 bacteria, can catalyze nitrite reduction through an “intra-aerobic” pathway, and may catalyze AOM through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. However, M. nitroreducens, which is affiliated with ANME-2d archaea, may be able to catalyze AOM through the reverse methanogenesis pathway. Moreover, manganese (Mn4+) and iron (Fe3+) can also be used as electron acceptors of AOM. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM. It also discusses recent progress in some unclear key issues about AOM, including ANME-1 in hypersaline environments, the effect of oxygen on M. oxyfera, and the relationship of M. nitroreducens with ANME. PMID:25530008

  17. The effect of acidic pH and presence of metals as parameters in establishing a sulfidogenic process in anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bárbara F; Couto, Pâmela T; Sancinetti, Giselle P; Klein, Bernhard; van Zyl, Dirk; Rodriguez, Renata P

    2016-08-23

    The successful use of anaerobic reactors for bioremediation of acid mine drainage has been shown in systems with neutral pH. However, the choice of an efficient and suitable process for such wastewater must consider the capability of operating at acidic pH and in the presence of metals. This work studies the performance of an anaerobic batch reactor, under conditions of varying initial pH for its efficiencies in sulfate removal and metal precipitation from synthetic acid mine drainage. The chemical oxygen demand/sulfate (COD/SO4(2-)) ratio used was 1.00, with ethanol chosen as the only energy and carbon source. The initial pH of the synthetic drainage was progressively set from 7.0 to 4.0 to make it as close as possible to that of real acid mine drainage. Metals were also added starting with iron, zinc, and finally copper. The effectiveness of sulfate and COD removal from the synthetic acid mine drainage increased as the initial pH was reduced. The sulfate removal increased from 38.5 ± 3.7% to 52.2 ± 3%, while the removal of organic matter started at 91.7 ± 2.4% and ended at 99 ± 1%. These results indicate that the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) community adapted to lower pH values. The metal removal observed was 88 ± 7% for iron, 98.0 ± 0.5% for zinc and 99 ± 1% for copper. At this stage, an increase in the sulfate removal was observed, which reaches up to 82.2 ± 5.8%. The kinetic parameters for sulfate removal were 0.22 ± 0.04 h(-1) with Fe, 0.26 ± 0.04 h(-1) with Fe and Zn and 0.44 ± 0.04 h(-1) with Fe, Zn, and Cu. PMID:27222283

  18. State indicators for monitoring the anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Boe, Kanokwan; Batstone, Damien John; Steyer, Jean-Phillippe; Angelidaki, Irini

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic process state indicators were used to monitor a manure digester exposed to different types of disturbances, in order to find the most proper indicator(s) for monitoring the biogas process. Online indicators tested were biogas production, pH, volatile fatty acids (VFA), and dissolved hydrogen. Offline indicators tested were methane and hydrogen content in the biogas. A CSTR reactor with 7.2 L working volume was operated at a varying hydraulic loading rate (HRT 10-20 days) for 200 days. During this period, the reactor was overloaded with extra organic matter such as glucose, lipid, gelatine, and bio-fibers, in order to create dynamic changes in the process state. Biogas production increased in response to the increase in organic load with a slight decrease in methane content. pH was relatively stable and did not show clear response to hydraulic load changes. However, pH changes were observed in response to extra organic load. Individual VFA concentrations were an effective indicator, with propionate persistent for the longest time after introduction of the disturbance. Dissolved hydrogen was very sensitive to the addition of easily degradable organics. However, it responded also to other disturbances such as slight air exposure which had no impact on process performance. A combination of acetate, propionate and biogas production is an effective combination to monitor this type of digesters effectively. PMID:20692680

  19. The effect of anaerobic fermentation processing of cattle waste for biogas as a renewable energy resources on the number of contaminant microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnani, Tb. Benito A.; Hidayati, Yuli Astuti; Marlina, Eulis Tanti; Harlia, Ellin

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle waste has a positive potential that can be exploited, as well as a negative potential that must be controlled so as not to pollute the environment. Beef cattle waste can be processed into an alternative energy, namely biogas. Anaerobic treatment of livestock waste to produce gas can be a solution in providing optional energy, while the resulted sludge as the fermentation residue can be used as organic fertilizer for crops. However, this sludge may containt patogenic microorganism that will damage human and environmet healt. Therefor, this study was aimed to know the potency of beef cattle waste to produce biogas and the decrease of the microorganism's number by using fixed dome digester. Beef cattle waste was processed into biogas using fixed dome digester with a capacity of 12 m3. Biogas composition was measured using Gas Cromatografi, will microorganism species was identified using Total plate Count Methode. The result of this study shows that the produced biogas contains of 75.77% Mol (CH4), 13.28% Mol (N), and 6.96% Mol (CO2). Furthermor, this study show that the anaerobic fermrntation process is capable of reducing microorganisms that could potentially pollute the environment. The number of Escherichia coli and Samonella sp. were <30 MPN/ml respectively save for environment. This process can reduce 84.70% the amount of molds. The only molds still existed after fermentation was A.fumigatus. The number of protozoa can be reduced in order of 94.73%. Protozoa that can be identified in cattle waste before, and after anaerobic fermentation was merely Eimeria sp.. The process also reduced the yeast of 86.11%. The remaining yeast after fermentation was Candida sp. Finally, about 93.7% of endoparasites was reduced by this process. In this case, every trematode and cestoda were 100% reduced, while the nematode only 75%. Reducing some microorganisms that have the potential to pollute the environment signifies sludge anaerobic fermentation residue is safe to

  20. Aerobic and anaerobic cecal bacterial flora of commercially processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the bacterial flora of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of broiler ceca collected from a commercial poultry processing facility were determined. Bacterial isolates from cecal cultures were selected based on the ability of the bacteria to grow in media supplemented with lactate and succ...

  1. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    's surface area, they have a profound influence on the biogeochemistry of the planet. This is evident from the observation that the O2 and CH4 content of Earth's atmosphere are in extreme disequilibrium (Sagan et al., 1993). The combination of high aerobic primary production and anoxic sediments provided the large deposits of fossil fuels that have become vital and contentious sources of energy for modern industrialized societies. Anaerobic metabolism is responsible for the abundance of N2 in the atmosphere; otherwise N2-fixing bacteria would have consumed most of the N2 pool long ago (Schlesinger, 1997). Anaerobic microorganisms are common symbionts of termites, cattle, and many other animals, where they aid digestion. Nutrient and pollutant chemistry are strongly modified by the reduced conditions that prevail in wetland and aquatic ecosystems.This review of anaerobic metabolism emphasizes aerobic oxidation, because the two processes cannot be separated in a complete treatment of the topic. It is process oriented and highlights the fascinating microorganisms that mediate anaerobic biogeochemistry. We begin this review with a brief discussion of CO2 assimilation by autotrophs, the source of most of the reducing power on Earth, and then consider the biological processes that harness this potential energy. Energy liberation begins with the decomposition of organic macromolecules to relatively simple compounds, which are simplified further by fermentation. Methanogenesis is considered next because CH4 is a product of acetate fermentation, and thus completes the catabolism of organic matter, particularly in the absence of inorganic electron acceptors. Finally, the organisms that use nitrogen, manganese, iron, and sulfur for terminal electron acceptors are considered in order of decreasing free-energy yield of the reactions.

  2. [Enhancement for anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge pretreated by microwave and its combined processes ].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-bao; Ni, Xiao-tang; Wei, Yuan-song; Tong, Juan; Wang, Ya-wei

    2014-09-01

    To improve anaerobic digestion and dewatering of sludge, impacts of sludge pretreated by microwave (MW) and its combined processes on sludge anaerobic digestion and dewatering were investigated. The results showed that microwave and its combined processes could effectively enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. Not only the cumulative methane production in the test of the MW-H2O2-alkaline (0. 2) was increased by 13. 34% compared with the control, but also its methane production rate was much higher than that of the control. Compared with the single MW process, the addition of both H2O2 and alkaline enhanced the solubilization of particle COD( >0. 45 micron) , indicating that synergistically generated soluble organics were faster to biodegrade which resulted in the enhancement of anaerobic digestion. The MW-acid process was effective in improving sludge dewaterability, e. g. , Capillary Suction Time (CST) at only 9. 85 s. The improvement of sludge dewatering was significantly correlated with sludge physical properties such as zeta potential, surface charge density and particle size. Under different sludge pretreatment conditions, the sludge dewatering after anaerobic digestion was similar, though the difference of sludge dewatering to some degrees was observed for pretreated sludge. PMID:25518665

  3. A bio-hybrid anaerobic treatment of papaya processing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.Y.; Chou, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Hybrid anaerobic treatment of papaya processing wastes is technically feasible. At 30/sup 0/C, the optimal organic loading rates for maximizing organic removal efficiency and methane production are 1.3 and 4.8 g TCOD/1/day, respectively. Elimination of post-handling and treatment of digested effluent can also be achieved. The system is more suitable for those processing plants with a waste amount of more than 3,000 metric tons per year.

  4. A robust and cost-effective integrated process for nitrogen and bio-refractory organics removal from landfill leachate via short-cut nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation in tandem with electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Na; Liang, Da-Wei; Xu, Ying-Ying; Liu, Ting; Peng, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    A cost-effective process, consisting of a denitrifying upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), an oxygen-limited anoxic/aerobic (A/O) process for short-cut nitrification, and an anaerobic reactor (ANR) for anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox), followed by an electrochemical oxidation process with a Ti-based SnO2-Sb2O5 anode, was developed to remove organics and nitrogen in a sewage diluted leachate. The final chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and total nitrogen (TN) of 70, 11.3 and 39 (all in mg/L), respectively, were obtained. TN removal in UASB, A/O and ANR were 24.6%, 49.6% and 16.1%, respectively. According to the water quality and molecular biology analysis, a high degree of anammox besides short-cut nitrification and denitrification occurred in A/O. Counting for 16.1% of TN removal in ANR, at least 43.2-49% of TN was removed via anammox. The anammox bacteria in A/O and ANR, were in respective titers of (2.5-5.9)×10(9) and 2.01×10(10)copy numbers/(gSS). PMID:27115616

  5. Effect of ultrasonication on anaerobic degradability of solid waste digestate.

    PubMed

    Boni, M R; D'Amato, E; Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Rossi, A

    2016-02-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of ultrasonication on anaerobic biodegradability of lignocellulosic residues. While ultrasonication has been commonly applied as a pre-treatment of the feed substrate, in the present study a non-conventional process configuration based on recirculation of sonicated digestate to the biological reactor was evaluated at the lab-scale. Sonication tests were carried out at different applied energies ranging between 500 and 50,000kJ/kg TS. Batch anaerobic digestion tests were performed on samples prepared by mixing sonicated and untreated substrate at two different ratios (25:75 and 75:25 w/w). The results showed that when applied as a post-treatment of digestate, ultrasonication can positively affect the yield of anaerobic digestion, mainly due to the dissolution effect of complex organic molecules that have not been hydrolyzed by biological degradation. A good correlation was found between the CH4 production yield and the amount of soluble organic matter at the start of digestion tests. The maximum gain in biogas production was 30% compared to that attained with the unsonicated substrate, which was tentatively related to the type and concentration of the metabolic products. PMID:26586420

  6. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION POTENTIAL FOR ETHANOL PROCESSING RESIDUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of corn-based ethanol in the U.S. is dramatically increasing, and consequently so is the quantity of byproduct materials generated from this processing sector. These coproduct streams are currently solely utilized as livestock feed, which is a route that provides ethanol processors w...

  7. Continuous process for producing n-butanol employing anaerobic fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a continuous process for the production of n-butanol from the starting materials of an anaerobic fermentation. The process consists of: (a) continuously contacting at least one carbohydrate-containing substrate with an n-butanol producing culture in water to effect the fermentation of substrate and form a product mixture consisting of n-butanol; (b) continuously extracting the product mixture from the substrate, the culture and the water by forming a solution of the product mixture with an extraction solvent while substantially avoiding the formation of a solution of the solvent with the substrate, the culture, and the water. The extraction solvent has at least one fluorocarbon solvent selected from the group consisting of fluorocarbons that boil at temperatures between -41/sup 0/C. and +48/sup 0/C., and have vapor pressures at 21/sup 0/C. between 10 PSIA and 165 PSIA. They also have heats of vaporization below 60 calories per gram, and a specific heat below 0.28. They have a surface tension below 20 dynes per centimeter, a viscosity below 0.5 centipoise, a solubility below 1% in water, and a solubility below 0.2% of water in the fluorocarbon; (c) continuously separating the extraction solvent from the product mixture by vaporizing substantially all of the solvent without substantial vaporization of the product mixture, and (d) continuously condensing the vaporized solvent for reuse as an extraction solvent in step (b).

  8. A model for anaerobic ponds combining settling and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Effebi, K R; Jupsin, H; Keffala, C; Vasel, J L

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an approach to an anaerobic pond model by combining the stoichiometry of the hydrolysis and acidogenic processes of the main constituents of wastewater, i.e. carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, grouped as a 'combined substrate' with a previously published settling model (see 'Suspended solids settling and half removal time in stabilization ponds (Tunisia)' by Effebi et al. (2011)). This approach includes biomass production. Coupling the kinetics and stoichiometry of the previous processes with the usual methanogenic model, we developed an anaerobic pond model. This paper gives the stoichiometry of the different chemical reactions that occur during the degradation of a conventional influent (corresponding to what we define as a 'combined substrate') of domestic wastewater and the model's first results. PMID:23787301

  9. Improved ADM1 model for anaerobic digestion process considering physico-chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Piccard, Sarah; Zhou, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The "Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1" (ADM1) was modified in the study by improving the bio-chemical framework and integrating a more detailed physico-chemical framework. Inorganic carbon and nitrogen balance terms were introduced to resolve the discrepancies in the original bio-chemical framework between the carbon and nitrogen contents in the degraders and substrates. More inorganic components and solids precipitation processes were included in the physico-chemical framework of ADM1. The modified ADM1 was validated with the experimental data and used to investigate the effects of calcium ions, magnesium ions, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen on anaerobic digestion in batch reactor. It was found that the entire anaerobic digestion process might exist an optimal initial concentration of inorganic nitrogen for methane gas production in the presence of calcium ions, magnesium ions and inorganic phosphorus. PMID:26253912

  10. ANAMMOX process start up and stabilization with an anaerobic seed in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR).

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2011-10-01

    ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal alternative to traditional nitrification--denitrification removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. The feasibility of enriching anammox bacteria from anaerobic seed culture to start up an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR) for N-removal is reported in this paper. The Anammox activity was established in the AnMBR with anaerobic digester seed culture from a Sewage Treatment Plant in batch mode with recirculation followed by semi continuous process and continuous modes of operation. The AnMBR performance under varying Nitrogen Loading Rates (NLR) and HRTs is reported for a year, in terms of nitrogen transformations to ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate along with hydrazine and hydroxylamine. Interestingly ANAMMOX process was evident from simultaneous Amm-N and nitrite reduction, consistent nitrate production, hydrazine and hydroxylamine presence, notable organic load reduction and bicarbonate consumption. PMID:21775136

  11. Recent development of anaerobic digestion processes for energy recovery from wastes.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2007-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion leads to the overall gasification of organic wastewaters and wastes, and produces methane and carbon dioxide; this gasification contributes to reducing organic matter and recovering energy from organic carbons. Here, we propose three new processes and demonstrate the effectiveness of each process. By using complete anaerobic organic matter removal process (CARP), in which diluted wastewaters such as sewage and effluent from a methane fermentation digester were treated under anaerobic condition for post-treatment, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater was decreased to less than 20 ppm. The dry ammonia-methane two-stage fermentation process (Am-Met process) is useful for the anaerobic treatment of nitrogen-rich wastes such as waste excess sludge, cow feces, chicken feces, and food waste without the dilution of the ammonia produced by water or carbon-rich wastes. The hydrogen-methane two-stage fermentation (Hy-Met process), in which the hydrogen produced in the first stage is used for a fuel cell system to generate electricity and the methane produced in the second stage is used to generate heat energy to heat the two reactors and satisfy heat requirements, is useful for the treatment of sugar-rich wastewaters, bread wastes, and biodiesel wastewaters. PMID:17368391

  12. Influent Fractionation for Modeling Continuous Anaerobic Digestion Processes.

    PubMed

    Lübken, Manfred; Kosse, Pascal; Koch, Konrad; Gehring, Tito; Wichern, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The first dynamic model developed to describe anaerobic digestion processes dates back to 1969. Since then, considerable improvements in identifying the underlying biochemical processes and associated microorganisms have been achieved. These have led to an increasing complexity of both model structure and the standard set of stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. Literature has always paid attention to kinetic parameter estimation, as this determines model accuracy with respect to predicting the dynamic behavior of biogas systems. As sufficient computing power is easily available nowadays, sophisticated linear and nonlinear parameter estimation techniques are applied to evaluate parameter uncertainty. However, the uncertainty of influent fractionation in these parameter optimization procedures is generally neglected. As anaerobic digestion systems are currently increasingly used to convert a broad variety of organic biomass to methane, the lack of generally accepted guidelines for input characterization adapted to the simulation model's characteristics is a considerable limitation of model application to these substrates. Directly after the introduction of the standardized Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1), several publications pointed out that the model's requirement of a detailed influent characterization can hardly be fulfilled. The main shortcoming of the model application was addressed in the reliable and practical identification of the model's input state variables for particulate and soluble carbohydrates, proteins and lipids, as well as for the inerts. Several authors derived biomass characterization procedures, most of them dedicated to a particular substrate, and some of them being of general nature, but none of these approaches have resulted in a practical standard protocol so far. This review provides an overview of existing approaches that improve substrate influent characterization to be used for state of the art anaerobic digestion models. PMID

  13. Automatic process control in anaerobic digestion technology: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Nitayavardhana, Saoharit; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a mature technology that relies upon a synergistic effort of a diverse group of microbial communities for metabolizing diverse organic substrates. However, AD is highly sensitive to process disturbances, and thus it is advantageous to use online monitoring and process control techniques to efficiently operate AD process. A range of electrochemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic devices can be deployed for on-line monitoring and control of the AD process. While complexity of the control strategy ranges from a feedback control to advanced control systems, there are some debates on implementation of advanced instrumentations or advanced control strategies. Centralized AD plants could be the answer for the applications of progressive automatic control field. This article provides a critical overview of the available automatic control technologies that can be implemented in AD processes at different scales. PMID:26148991

  14. Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, B; Flotats, X

    2014-11-01

    Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24-192 mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively. PMID:25081855

  15. Effect of pectin on anaerobic digestion of cattle dung

    SciTech Connect

    Madamwar, D.B.; Mithal, B.M.

    1986-04-01

    It is therefore desirable to discover procedures to increase the rate of digestion. It has been reported that addition of powdered activated carbon results in an increase in total gas production with high methane content. Based on a review of the literature, it is evident that carbon is responsible for improved digestion. The surface of the activated carbon provides adsorption sites where substrate can accumulate, thereby providing high localized substrate concentration. These areas of adsorption provide a more favorable growth environment for bacterial-substrate systems. No study, however, seems to have been made so far on the effect of other additives like pectin on anaerobic digestion of cattle dung. Since pectin is also used as one of the adsorbents in many cases, it appears desirable to study the effect of pectin on anaerobic digestion of cattle dung with the ultimate aim of improving the production of gas with increased methane content. Experiments carried out with this object in view are reported in this paper. The impact of pectin on volatile acid, pH, and process stability has also been examined. This paper presents the results of two sets of experiments involving pectin addition to bench-scale digesters. One set of experiments is carried out at a controlled temperature of 38 +/- 1 degree C, while the other is carried out at ambient temperature-ambient temperature varied from 40 to 15 degrees C, that is from August to November. 14 references.

  16. Anaerobic digestion and co-digestion processes of vegetable and fruit residues: process and microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Peña, E I; Parameswaran, P; Kang, D W; Canul-Chan, M; Krajmalnik-Brown, R

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of methane production from fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) obtained from the central food distribution market in Mexico City using an anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Batch systems showed that pH control and nitrogen addition had significant effects on biogas production, methane yield, and volatile solids (VS) removal from the FVW (0.42 m(biogas)(3)/kg VS, 50%, and 80%, respectively). Co-digestion of the FVW with meat residues (MR) enhanced the process performance and was also evaluated in a 30 L AD system. When the system reached stable operation, its methane yield was 0.25 (m(3)/kg TS), and the removal of the organic matter measured as the total chemical demand (tCOD) was 65%. The microbial population (general Bacteria and Archaea) in the 30 L system was also determined and characterized and was closely correlated with its potential function in the AD system. PMID:21865034

  17. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98... process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank...

  18. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98... process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank...

  19. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield. PMID:27570139

  20. Bench-scale Analysis of Surrogates for Anaerobic Digestion Processes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Zachary S; Long, Sharon C

    2016-05-01

    Frequent monitoring of anaerobic digestion processes for pathogen destruction is both cost and time prohibitive. The use of surrogates to supplement regulatory monitoring may be one solution. To evaluate surrogates, a semi-batch bench-scale anaerobic digester design was tested. Bench-scale reactors were operated under mesophilic (36 °C) and thermophilic (53-55 °C) conditions, with a 15 day solids retention time. Biosolids from different facilities and during different seasons were examined. USEPA regulated pathogens and surrogate organisms were enumerated at different times throughout each experiment. The surrogate organisms included fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, male-specific and somatic coliphages, Clostridium perfringens, and bacterial spores. Male-specific coliphages tested well as a potential surrogate organism for virus inactivation. None of the tested surrogate organisms correlated well with helminth inactivation under the conditions studied. There were statistically significant differences in the inactivation rates between the facilities in this study, but not between seasons. PMID:27131309

  1. Treatment of artificial soybean wastewater anaerobic effluent in a continuous aerobic-anaerobic coupled (CAAC) process with excess sludge reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaoxia; Fu, Weichao; Wu, Shihan; Li, Chun

    2012-12-01

    In this study, treatment of artificial soybean wastewater anaerobic effluent was studied in a continuous aerobic-anaerobic coupled (CAAC) process. The focus was on COD and nitrogen removal as well as excess sludge reduction. During the continuous operation without reflux, the COD removal efficiency was 96.5% at the optimal hydraulic retention time (HRT) 1.3 days. When HRT was shortened to 1.0 day, reflux from anaerobic zone to moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was introduced. The removal efficiencies of COD and TN were 94.4% and 76.0% at the optimal reflux ratio 30%, respectively. The sludge yield coefficient of CAAC was 0.1738, the simultaneous removal of COD and nitrogen with in situ sludge reduction could be achieved in this CAAC process. The sludge reduction mechanism was discussed by soluble components variation along the water flow. PMID:23073101

  2. Removal of fecal coliforms by thermophilic anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    De León, C; Jenkins, D

    2002-01-01

    Recent U.S. EPA regulations (40 CFR Section 503) specify maximum concentrations of pathogens and metals for Class A wastewater treatment plant sludges. The most common sludge process is mesophilic (35 degrees C) digestion which stabilizes the solids, produces a combustible gas but does not create an effluent that meets the 503 Class A pathogen requirements. This investigation was conducted to determine whether anaerobic digestion processes incorporating a thermophilic stage could achieve 503 Class A pathogen levels. The research reported here was a bench-scale screening study meant to identify the most promising process alternatives for further investigation. Fecal Coliform (FC) concentrations were used to assess disinfection efficiency. Digesters were 30 L capacity fed semi-continuously in draw-fill mode. Digester startup was rapid to produce true thermophiles. Temperature staging and pH were assessed in 3 sets of experiments: Set 1 were one stage ("acid phase"), Set 2 were one stage ("acid + methane phases") and Set 3 were two stage ("acid phase" then "methanogenic phase"). Feed was a 1:1 mixture of Thickened Waste Activated Sludge and Primary Sludge. The following anaerobic digestion configurations and operating parameters allowed the production of digested sludge with a mean FC concentration statistically less than 10(3) (the regulatory value for Class A sludge): thermophilic single stage acid phase at 52 and 62 degrees C; thermophilic single stage acid + methane phase at 48 degrees C, 52 degrees C and 62 degrees C; two-stage mesophilic acid phase followed by mesophilic methane phase; two stage mesophilic acid phase followed by thermophilic methane phase at 48 degrees C, 52 degrees C and 62 degrees C. If the maximum digested FC concentration must be below 10(3) MPN/g TS then the following digester configurations and operating conditions will be compliant: two stage mesophilic acid phase followed by thermophilic methane phase at 52 degrees C and 62 degrees C

  3. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA. PMID:25915186

  4. Impact of agricultural activities on anaerobic processes in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, J. D.; Ludwig, S.; Nelson, L. C.; Porterfield, J.; Sather, K. L.; Songpitak, M.; Spawn, S.; Weigel, B.

    2013-12-01

    Streams draining agriculture watersheds are subject to significant anthropogenic impacts, including sedimentation from soil erosion and high nitrate input from heavy fertilizer application. Sedimentation degrades habitat and can reduce hydrologic exchange between surface and subsurface waters. Disconnecting surface and subsurface flow reduces oxygen input to hyporheic water, increasing the extent of anoxic zones in stream sediments and creating hotspots for anaerobic processes like denitrification and methanogenesis that can be important sources of nitrous oxide and methane, both powerful greenhouse gases. Increased nitrate input may influence greenhouse gas fluxes from stream sediments by stimulating rates of denitrification and potentially reducing rates of methanogenesis, either through direct inhibition or by increasing competition for organic substrates from denitrifying bacteria. We hypothesized that accumulation of fine sediments in stream channels would result in high rates of methanogenesis in stream sediments, and that increased nitrate input from agricultural runoff would stimulate denitrification and reduce rates of methane production. Our work focused on streams in northern and central Minnesota, in particular on Rice Creek, a small stream draining an agricultural watershed. We used a variety of approaches to test our hypotheses, including surveys of methane concentrations in surface waters of streams ranging in sediment type and nitrate concentration, bottle incubations of sediment from several sites in Rice Creek, and the use of functional gene probes and RNA analyses to determine if genes for these processes are present and being expressed in stream sediments. We found higher methane concentrations in surface water from streams with large deposits of fine sediments, but significantly less methane in these streams when nitrate concentrations were high. We also found high potential for both methanogenesis and denitrification in sediment incubations

  5. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  6. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  7. Effect of high salinity on anaerobic treatment of low strength effluents.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, G; Gomec, C Y; Ozturk, I; Gonuldinc, S; Altinbas, M

    2003-01-01

    In anaerobic treatment, it is obligatory to know the effect of potentially inhibitory compounds due to the fact that methane formation may retard severely and may proceed slower than organic acid production. One of the most important inhibitory substances in anaerobic treatment is high salinity. In many cases, the main collectors of a municipal sewer system should have been built in the coastal zone and below the ground water level due to the available topography of wastewater catchments area, which is carrying the risk of seawater infiltration. Besides, one of the most convenient methods for leachate control is to treat landfill leachates with domestic wastewaters in the central municipal wastewater treatment plants such as in Istanbul. Thus, the nitrogen load of the treatment plants increase significantly. In this study, the effects of high salinity and ammonium nitrogen levels on mesophilic anaerobic tretament processes were investigated. In the first part of the study, high salinity effect on anaerobic treatment was investigated by feeding synthetic wastewater containing high salinity between 0.15%-1.5% ratios. In the second part of the study, the simultaneous effect of high salinity and ammonia (1.5% salinity+1,000 mg NH3/l) was examined by a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed Reactor (UASBR). Results indicated no significant inhibition in both cases and effective COD removals (89%) and total biogas productions having methane content of 84% could be achieved. PMID:14753538

  8. Integrated anaerobic-aerobic process for the biodegradation of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Armenante, P.M.; Lewandowski, G.; Chengming Kung ); Kafkewitz, D. )

    1992-05-01

    An integrated anaerobic-aerobic process for the complete mineralization of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol was successfully tested and operated. The sludge obtained from the anaerobic digester of a commercial treatment plant was used to obtain an anaerobic consortium capable of partially dechlorinating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). The clarified and sterilized effluent from the same anaerobic digester was used as the medium for the anaerobic consortium. During the anaerobic process 2,4,6-TCP was first dechlorinated to 2,4-dichlorophenol and then to 4-chlorophenol (4CP). Stoichiometric amounts of 4-CP were recovered. Similar results were obtained when the anaerobic microorganisms were immobilized on Manville R-635 silica beads. After immobilization, the consortium was able to dechlorinate 150{mu}M of 2,4,6-TCP in four days. Pseudomonas Glathei and an indigenous culture obtained from same sludge used to produce the anaerobic enrichment culture were shown to be able to degrade the 4-CP produced from the anaerobic dechlorination of 2,4,6-TCP. However, for the aerobic 4-CP mineralization to occur the medium had to be buffered with phosphate, since high pH would inhibit the aerobic bacterial activity. It is expected that the proposed approach will be used to treat recalcitrant halogenated compounds that are not amenable to conventional biological treatment.

  9. Effect of respiratory warm-up on anaerobic power

    PubMed Central

    Özdal, Mustafa; Bostanci, Özgür; Dağlioğlu, Önder; Ağaoğlu, Seydi Ahmet; Kabadayi, Menderes

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of respiratory muscle warm-up on anaerobic power. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male field hockey players (age, 20.5 ± 2.0 years) each participated in a control (CAN) trial and an experimental (EAN) trial. The EAN trial involved respiratory muscle warm-up, while the CAN trial did not. Anaerobic power was measured using the Wingate protocol. Paired sample t-tests were used to compare the EAN and CAN trials. [Results] There were significant increases in peak power and relative peak power, and decreases in the time to peak after the EAN trial by 8.9%, 9.6%, and 28.8% respectively. [Conclusion] Respiratory muscle warm-up may positively affect anaerobic power due to faster attainment of peak power. PMID:27512273

  10. Characteristics of the bioreactor landfill system using an anaerobic-aerobic process for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Liu, Xin-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Jian; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2007-09-01

    A sequential upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and air-lift loop sludge blanket (ALSB) treatment was introduced into leachate recirculation to remove organic matter and ammonia from leachate in a lab-scale bioreactor landfill. The results showed that the sequential anaerobic-aerobic process might remove above 90% of COD and near to 100% of NH4+ -N from leachate under the optimum organic loading rate (OLR). The total COD removal efficiency was over 98% as the OLR increased to 6.8-7.7 g/l d, but the effluent COD concentration increased to 2.9-4.8 g/l in the UASB reactor, which inhibited the activity of nitrifying bacteria in the subsequent ALSB reactor. The NO3- -N concentration in recycled leachate reached 270 mg/l after treatment by the sequential anaerobic-aerobic process, but the landfill reactor could efficiently denitrify the nitrate. After 56 days operation, the leachate TN and NH4+ -N concentrations decreased to less than 200 mg/l in the bioreactor landfill system. The COD concentration was about 200 mg/l with less than 8 mg/l BOD in recycled leachate at the late stage. In addition, it was found that nitrate in recycled leachate had a negative effect on waste decomposition. PMID:17071082

  11. INVESTIGATING ANAEROBIC MICROBIAL PROCESSES IN AGRICULTURAL SOILS USING ANAEROMYXOBACTER DEHALOGENANS AS A COSMOPOLITAN MODEL [ABSTRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic microbial processes have not been thoroughly studied in agricultural soils. Yet, anaerobic conditions may significantly impact agrochemical fate, nutrient cycling, and plant/seed-microbe interactions. As part of a broader weed ecology/weed management experimental program we have selected...

  12. Microbiology, ecology, and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Dong; He, Zhan-Fei; Zhu, Qun; Chen, Dong-Qing; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.” M. oxyfera is affiliated with the “NC10” phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described microorganisms. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is a process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process. PMID:22905032

  13. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  14. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the

  15. Effective distribution of emulsified edible oil for enhanced anaerobic bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, Robert C.

    2007-10-01

    Recent laboratory and field studies have shown that injection of emulsified edible oils can provide an effective, low-cost alternative for stimulating anaerobic biodegradation processes. A pilot-scale permeable reactive bio-barrier (PRBB) was installed at a perchlorate and chlorinated solvent impacted site by injecting 380 L of commercially available emulsion (EOS ®) containing emulsified soybean oil, food-grade surfactants, lactate, and yeast extract through ten direct push injection wells over a two day period. Soil cores collected six months after emulsion injection indicate the oil was distributed up to 5 m downgradient of the injection wells. A previously developed emulsion transport model was used to simulate emulsion transport and retention using independently estimated model parameters. While there was considerable variability in the soil sampling results, the model simulations generally agreed with the observed oil distribution at the field site. Model sensitivity analyses indicate that increasing the injection flow rate or diluting the oil with more water will have little effect on final oil distribution in the aquifer. The only effective approach for enhancing the spread of emulsified oil away from the injection well appears to be injecting a greater mass of oil.

  16. Effective distribution of emulsified edible oil for enhanced anaerobic bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Borden, Robert C

    2007-10-30

    Recent laboratory and field studies have shown that injection of emulsified edible oils can provide an effective, low-cost alternative for stimulating anaerobic biodegradation processes. A pilot-scale permeable reactive bio-barrier (PRBB) was installed at a perchlorate and chlorinated solvent impacted site by injecting 380 L of commercially available emulsion (EOS) containing emulsified soybean oil, food-grade surfactants, lactate, and yeast extract through ten direct push injection wells over a two day period. Soil cores collected six months after emulsion injection indicate the oil was distributed up to 5 m downgradient of the injection wells. A previously developed emulsion transport model was used to simulate emulsion transport and retention using independently estimated model parameters. While there was considerable variability in the soil sampling results, the model simulations generally agreed with the observed oil distribution at the field site. Model sensitivity analyses indicate that increasing the injection flow rate or diluting the oil with more water will have little effect on final oil distribution in the aquifer. The only effective approach for enhancing the spread of emulsified oil away from the injection well appears to be injecting a greater mass of oil. PMID:17673332

  17. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF COMBINED POTATO PROCESSING AND MUNICIPAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Demonstration and evaluation of the treatment of combined potato processing waste-water and domestic wastes using various combinations of anaerobic and aerated lagoons. Measured parameters included: BOD, COD, TSS, VSS, nitrogen, phosphorus, volatile acids, total coliform, fecal c...

  18. CONTROL OF ODORS FROM ANAEROBIC LAGOONS TREATING FOOD PROCESSING WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic lagoons are used for the treatment of meat packing wastes in most areas of the country. They are a relatively low cost means of achieving BOD reduction. Although lagoon effluent is not suitable for stream discharge, it is amenable to further treatment or to land applica...

  19. Anaerobic Digestion. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. These materials include: (1) unit overview; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines; (4) student worksheets for each lesson (with answers); and (5) two copies of a final quiz (with and without answers). Lesson 1 is a review of the theory of…

  20. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Jagersma, Christian G.; Khadem, Ahmad F.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lens, Piet N. L.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study. PMID:20445975

  1. Parameter Sensitivity and Laboratory Benchmarking of a Biogeochemical Process Model for Enhanced Anaerobic Dechlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsova, I.; Gerhard, J. I.; Mao, X.; Barry, D. A.; Robinson, C.; Brovelli, A.; Harkness, M.; Fisher, A.; Mack, E. E.; Payne, J. A.; Dworatzek, S.; Roberts, J.

    2008-12-01

    A detailed model to simulate trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorination in anaerobic groundwater systems has been developed and implemented through PHAST, a robust and flexible geochemical modeling platform. The approach is comprehensive but retains flexibility such that models of varying complexity can be used to simulate TCE biodegradation in the vicinity of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zones. The complete model considers a full suite of biological (e.g., dechlorination, fermentation, sulfate and iron reduction, electron donor competition, toxic inhibition, pH inhibition), physical (e.g., flow and mass transfer) and geochemical processes (e.g., pH modulation, gas formation, mineral interactions). Example simulations with the model demonstrated that the feedback between biological, physical, and geochemical processes is critical. Successful simulation of a thirty-two-month column experiment with site soil, complex groundwater chemistry, and exhibiting both anaerobic dechlorination and endogenous respiration, provided confidence in the modeling approach. A comprehensive suite of batch simulations was then conducted to estimate the sensitivity of predicted TCE degradation to the 36 model input parameters. A local sensitivity analysis was first employed to rank the importance of parameters, revealing that 5 parameters consistently dominated model predictions across a range of performance metrics. A global sensitivity analysis was then performed to evaluate the influence of a variety of full parameter data sets available in the literature. The modeling study was performed as part of the SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project, a public/private consortium whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The modelling conducted has provided valuable insight into the complex interactions between processes in the evolving biogeochemical systems

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes in N2-fixing cyanobacterial aggregates.

    PubMed

    Klawonn, Isabell; Bonaglia, Stefano; Brüchert, Volker; Ploug, Helle

    2015-06-01

    Colonies of N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are key players in supplying new nitrogen to the ocean, but the biological fate of this fixed nitrogen remains poorly constrained. Here, we report on aerobic and anaerobic microbial nitrogen transformation processes that co-occur within millimetre-sized cyanobacterial aggregates (Nodularia spumigena) collected in aerated surface waters in the Baltic Sea. Microelectrode profiles showed steep oxygen gradients inside the aggregates and the potential for nitrous oxide production in the aggregates' anoxic centres. (15)N-isotope labelling experiments and nutrient analyses revealed that N(2) fixation, ammonification, nitrification, nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and possibly anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) can co-occur within these consortia. Thus, N. spumigena aggregates are potential sites of nitrogen gain, recycling and loss. Rates of nitrate reduction to ammonium and N(2) were limited by low internal nitrification rates and low concentrations of nitrate in the ambient water. Presumably, patterns of N-transformation processes similar to those observed in this study arise also in other phytoplankton colonies, marine snow and fecal pellets. Anoxic microniches, as a pre-condition for anaerobic nitrogen transformations, may occur within large aggregates (⩾1 mm) even when suspended in fully oxygenated waters, whereas anoxia in small aggregates (<1 to ⩾0.1 mm) may only arise in low-oxygenated waters (⩽25 μM). We propose that the net effect of aggregates on nitrogen loss is negligible in NO(3)(-)-depleted, fully oxygenated (surface) waters. In NO(3)(-)-enriched (>1.5 μM), O(2)-depleted water layers, for example, in the chemocline of the Baltic Sea or the oceanic mesopelagic zone, aggregates may promote N-recycling and -loss processes. PMID:25575306

  3. Aerobic and anaerobic nitrogen transformation processes in N2-fixing cyanobacterial aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Klawonn, Isabell; Bonaglia, Stefano; Brüchert, Volker; Ploug, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of N2-fixing cyanobacteria are key players in supplying new nitrogen to the ocean, but the biological fate of this fixed nitrogen remains poorly constrained. Here, we report on aerobic and anaerobic microbial nitrogen transformation processes that co-occur within millimetre-sized cyanobacterial aggregates (Nodularia spumigena) collected in aerated surface waters in the Baltic Sea. Microelectrode profiles showed steep oxygen gradients inside the aggregates and the potential for nitrous oxide production in the aggregates' anoxic centres. 15N-isotope labelling experiments and nutrient analyses revealed that N2 fixation, ammonification, nitrification, nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and possibly anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) can co-occur within these consortia. Thus, N. spumigena aggregates are potential sites of nitrogen gain, recycling and loss. Rates of nitrate reduction to ammonium and N2 were limited by low internal nitrification rates and low concentrations of nitrate in the ambient water. Presumably, patterns of N-transformation processes similar to those observed in this study arise also in other phytoplankton colonies, marine snow and fecal pellets. Anoxic microniches, as a pre-condition for anaerobic nitrogen transformations, may occur within large aggregates (⩾1 mm) even when suspended in fully oxygenated waters, whereas anoxia in small aggregates (<1 to ⩾0.1 mm) may only arise in low-oxygenated waters (⩽25 μM). We propose that the net effect of aggregates on nitrogen loss is negligible in NO3−-depleted, fully oxygenated (surface) waters. In NO3−-enriched (>1.5 μM), O2-depleted water layers, for example, in the chemocline of the Baltic Sea or the oceanic mesopelagic zone, aggregates may promote N-recycling and -loss processes. PMID:25575306

  4. Suitability of anaerobic digestion effluent as process water for corn fuel ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Pei; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-01-01

    A corn fuel ethanol plant integrated with anaerobic digestion treatment of thin stillage increases the net energy balance. Furthermore, the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) can be reused as a potential substitute for process water in the ethanol fermentation. In this study, the suitability of ADE as process water for corn ethanol fermentation was investigated by analyzing the potential inhibitory components in the ADE. It was found that ammonium influenced the growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Maximum ethanol production was obtained when the concentration of ammonium nitrogen was 200 mg/L, and ammonium could replace urea as the nitrogen source for S. cerevisiae under this concentration. In the ethanol fermentation with a higher concentration of ammonium, more glycerol was produced, thereby resulting in the decrease of ethanol production. In addition, components except ammonium in the ADE caused no inhibition to ethanol production. These results suggest that ADE could be reused as process water for corn ethanol fermentation without negative effect when ammonium concentration is well controlled. PMID:24804665

  5. Hydroponic potato production on nutrients derived from anaerobically-processed potato plant residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Garland, J. L.; Finger, B. W.; Ruffe, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    Bioregenerative methods are being developed for recycling plant minerals from harvested inedible biomass as part of NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) research. Anaerobic processing produces secondary metabolites, a food source for yeast production, while providing a source of water soluble nutrients for plant growth. Since NH_4-N is the nitrogen product, processing the effluent through a nitrification reactor was used to convert this to NO_3-N, a more acceptable form for plants. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cv. Norland plants were used to test the effects of anaerobically-produced effluent after processing through a yeast reactor or nitrification reactor. These treatments were compared to a mixed-N treatment (75:25, NO_3:NH_4) or a NO_3-N control, both containing only reagent-grade salts. Plant growth and tuber yields were greatest in the NO_3-N control and yeast reactor effluent treatments, which is noteworthy, considering the yeast reactor treatment had high organic loading in the nutrient solution and concomitant microbial activity.

  6. The alkaloid gramine in the anaerobic digestion process-inhibition and adaptation of the methanogenic community.

    PubMed

    Popp, Denny; Harms, Hauke; Sträuber, Heike

    2016-08-01

    As many plant secondary metabolites have antimicrobial activity, microorganisms of the anaerobic digestion process might be affected when plant material rich in these compounds is digested. Hitherto, the effects of plant secondary metabolites on the anaerobic digestion process are poorly investigated. In this study, the alkaloid gramine, a constituent of reed canary grass, was added daily to a continuous co-digestion of grass silage and cow manure. A transient decrease of the methane yield by 17 % and a subsequent recovery was observed, but no effect on other process parameters. When gramine was infrequently spiked in higher amounts, the observed inhibitory effect was even more pronounced including a 53 % decrease of the methane yield and an increase of acetic acid concentrations up to 96 mM. However, the process recovered and the process parameters were finally at initial values (methane yield around 255 LN CH4 per gram volatile solids of substrate and acetic acid concentration lower than 2 mM). The bacterial communities of the reactors remained stable upon gramine addition. In contrast, the methanogenic community changed from a well-balanced mixture of five phylotypes towards a strong dominance of Methanosarcina (more than two thirds of the methanogenic community) while Methanosaeta disappeared. Batch inhibition assays revealed that acetic acid was only converted to methane via acetoclastic methanogenesis which was more strongly affected by gramine than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis. Hence, when acetoclastic methanogenesis is the dominant pathway, a shift of the methanogenic community is necessary to digest gramine-rich plant material. PMID:27138201

  7. Anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by lime mud from papermaking process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Qinqing; Zheng, Pengwei; Wang, Yusong

    2014-10-01

    The effects of lime mud from papermaking process (LMP) addition as buffer agent and inorganic nutrient on the anaerobic digestion stability of food waste (FW) were investigated under mesophilic conditions with the aim of avoiding volatile fatty acids accumulation, and inorganic elements deficiency. When LMP concentration ranged from 6.0 to 10g/L, the FW anaerobic digestion could maintain efficient and stable state. These advantages are attributed to the existence of Ca, Na, Mg, K, Fe, and alkaline substances that favor the methanogenic process. The highest CH4 yield of 272.8mL/g-VS was obtained at LMP and VS concentrations of 10.0 and 19.8g/L, respectively, with the corresponding lag-phase time of 3.84d and final pH of 8.4. The methanogens from residue digestates mainly consisted of Methanobrevibacter, coccus-type and sarcina-type methanogens with LMP addition compared to Methanobacteria in control. However, higher concentration of LMP inhibited methanogenic activities and methane production. PMID:25151070

  8. Effect of solvents on obligately anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Martinez, Maria Fernanda; Kelessidou, Niki; Law, Zoe; Gardiner, John; Stephens, Gill

    2008-02-01

    Growth of Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium sporogenes was studied in the presence of water-immiscible solvents. Nitrogen purging, vacuum distillation or distillation under nitrogen were all suitable as methods to remove oxygen from the solvents, since growth rates and yields of A. woodii were unaffected in the presence of tetradecane which had been degassed by these methods. Varying the solvent volume from 20% to 80% of the culture volume had little effect on growth rate of A. woodii. A.woodii was relatively sensitive to organic solvents since growth was inhibited by alkanes with logP(octanol/water) values below 7.1. C. sporogenes was less solvent sensitive, since it grew without inhibition when the logP of the solvent was > or = 6.6. Nevertheless, both A. woodii and C. sporogenes were more sensitive to solvent polarity than aerobic bacteria. PMID:18083050

  9. Elemental copper nanoparticle toxicity to different trophic groups involved in anaerobic and anoxic wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Puyol, Daniel; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2015-04-15

    Elemental copper nanoparticles (Cu(0) NPs) are potentially inhibitory to the different key microbial trophic groups involved in biological wastewater treatment processes. Cu-based NPs are known to be toxic to methanogens at low concentrations. However, very little is known about the toxic effect of Cu(0) NPs on other microbial groups involved in either upper trophic levels of anaerobic digestion or anoxic nitrogen removal processes. This study evaluated the toxicity of Cu(0) NPs to glucose fermentation, syntrophic propionate oxidation and denitrification in shaken batch bioassays with soluble substrates. Batch experiments were also supplemented with CuCl2 to evaluate the inhibitory impact of soluble Cu(II) ions. Syntrophic propionate oxidation and glucose fermentation were the least and most inhibited processes with inhibition constant (Ki) values of 0.202 and 0.047 mM of added Cu(0) NPs, respectively. Further analyses revealed that the Ki values calculated as a function of the free soluble Cu concentration were <0.003 mM for every biological process tested and most of these Ki values were similar in order of magnitude regardless of whether the Cu source was CuCl2 or Cu(0) NPs. The results taken as a whole indicate that Cu(0) NPs are toxic to all the microbial processes studied. Therefore, Cu(0) NPs can potentially be an important inhibitor of anaerobic wastewater treatment processes that rely on these trophic groups. The evidence suggests that the inhibitory impact of Cu(0) NPs was mainly due to the release of toxic Cu(II) ions originating from the corrosion and dissolution of Cu(0) NPs. PMID:25634735

  10. Influence of adsorption and anaerobic granular sludge characteristics on long chain fatty acids inhibition process.

    PubMed

    Palatsi, J; Affes, R; Fernandez, B; Pereira, M A; Alves, M M; Flotats, X

    2012-10-15

    The impact of LCFA adsorption on the methanogenic activity was evaluated in batch assays for two anaerobic granular sludges in the presence and absence of bentonite as synthetic adsorbent. A clear inhibitory effect at an oleate (C18:1) concentration of 0.5 g(C18:1) L(-1) was observed for both sludges. Palmitate (C16:0) was confirmed to be the main intermediate of C18:1 degradation in not adapted sludge and its accumulation was further evidenced by fluorescence staining and microscopy techniques. LCFA inhibition could be decreased by the addition of bentonite, reducing the lag-phase and accelerating the kinetics of LCFA degradation, concluding in the importance of the adsorptive nature of the LCFA inhibitory process. Granule morphology and molecular profiling of predominant microorganisms revealed that biomass adaptation to LCFA could modify the intermediates accumulation profiles and process rates. PMID:22841596

  11. Spatial Variability of Anaerobic Processes and Wastewater pH in Force Mains.

    PubMed

    Rudelle, Elice Alice; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Vollertsen, Jes

    2016-08-01

    The present study focuses on anaerobic organic matter transformation processes in force mains for the purpose of improving existing sewer process models. Wastewater samples were obtained at 100 m intervals from a 1 km long pilot scale force main and measured for several wastewater parameters. Transformation rates for selected parameters were calculated and their spatial variability analyzed. In terms of electron transfer, fermentation was the most significant process, resulting in a net volatile fatty acid formation of 0.83 mmol/L. Sulfate reduction resulted in a production of 0.73 mmol/L of inorganic sulfide. Methanogenesis was negligable in all experiments despite an anaerobic residence time of more than 30 hours. As a result of the anaerobic processes, the wastewater pH decreased by approximately one pH unit, resulting in a corresponding increase in the fraction of molecular hydrogen sulfide. A significant spatial variablilty was observed for the average transformation rates of all parameters. PMID:27456145

  12. Optimization of the anaerobic treatment of a waste stream from an enhanced oil recovery process.

    PubMed

    Alimahmoodi, Mahmood; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the anaerobic treatment of a waste stream from an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) process. The treatment of a simulated waste water containing about 150 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and the saturation level of CO2 was evaluated. A two-step anaerobic system was undertaken in the mesophilic temperature range (30-40°C). The method of evolutionary operation EVOP factorial design was used to optimize pH, temperature and organic loading rate with the target parameters of CO2 reduction and CH4 production in the first reactor and TPH removal in the second reactor. The results showed 98% methanogenic removal of CO2 and CH4 yield of 0.38 L/gCOD in the first reactor and 83% TPH removal in the second reactor. In addition to enhancing CO2 and TPH removal and CH4 production, application of this method showed the degree of importance of the operational variables and their interactive effects for the two reactors in series. PMID:20846858

  13. Combined treatment of olive mill wastewater by Fenton's reagent and anaerobic biological process.

    PubMed

    Amor, Carlos; Lucas, Marco S; García, Juan; Dominguez, Joaquín R; De Heredia, J Beltrán; Peres, José A

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the application of Fenton's reagent process combined with anaerobic digestion to treat an olive mill wastewater (OMW). Firstly, OMW was pre-treated by chemical oxidation in a batch reactor with Fenton's reagent, using a fixed H2O2/COD ratio of 0.20, pH = 3.5 and a H2O2/Fe(2+) molar ratio of 15:1. This advanced oxidation treatment allowed reaching reductions of 17.6 and 82.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total polyphenols (TP), respectively. Secondly, OMW treatment by anaerobic digestion was performed using previously adapted microorganisms immobilized in Sepiolite. These biological tests were carried out varying the substrate concentration supplied to the reactor and COD conversions from 52 to 74% were obtained. Afterwards, Fenton's reagent followed by anaerobic digestion was applied to OMW treatment. This combined process presented a significant improvement on organic load removal, reaching COD degradations from 64 to 88%. Beyond the pollutant load removal, it was also monitored the yield of methane generated throughout anaerobic experiments. The methane produced ranged from 281 cm(3) to 322 cm(3) of CH4/g COD removed. Additionally, a methane generation kinetic study was performed using the Monod Model. The application of this model allowed observing a kinetic constant increase of the combined process (kFN = 0.036 h(-1)) when compared to the single anaerobic process (kF = 0.017 h(-1)). PMID:25560262

  14. Relating Anaerobic Digestion Microbial Community and Process Function

    PubMed Central

    Venkiteshwaran, Kaushik; Bocher, Benjamin; Maki, James; Zitomer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) involves a consortium of microorganisms that convert substrates into biogas containing methane for renewable energy. The technology has suffered from the perception of being periodically unstable due to limited understanding of the relationship between microbial community structure and function. The emphasis of this review is to describe microbial communities in digesters and quantitative and qualitative relationships between community structure and digester function. Progress has been made in the past few decades to identify key microorganisms influencing AD. Yet, more work is required to realize robust, quantitative relationships between microbial community structure and functions such as methane production rate and resilience after perturbations. Other promising areas of research for improved AD may include methods to increase/control (1) hydrolysis rate, (2) direct interspecies electron transfer to methanogens, (3) community structure–function relationships of methanogens, (4) methanogenesis via acetate oxidation, and (5) bioaugmentation to study community–activity relationships or improve engineered bioprocesses. PMID:27127410

  15. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  16. Resource recovery and epidemiology of anaerobic wastewater treatment process in a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ku-Yen; Hunt, Madelyn D.

    1995-01-01

    The results of work accomplished under two different areas: (1) Resource Recovery of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment process, and (2) Epidemiological Study of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Process are documented. The first part of the work was to set up and test three anaerobic digesters and then run these three digesters with a NASA-simulated wastewater. The second part of the work was to use a multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis as the indicator bacteria for the epidemiological study. Details of these two parts can be found in two master's theses and are described in Sections 3 and 4 of this report. Several important results condensed from these two parts are summarized in Section 2.

  17. Effect of Increasing Total Solids Contents on Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste under Mesophilic Conditions: Performance and Microbial Characteristics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingwei; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies. PMID:25051352

  18. Anaerobic digestion of post-hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater for improved energy efficiency of hydrothermal bioenergy processes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Schideman, Lance; Zheng, Mingxia; Martin-Ryals, Ana; Li, Peng; Tommaso, Giovana; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a promising process for converting wet biomass and organic wastes into bio-crude oil. It also produces an aqueous product referred to as post-hydrothermal liquefaction wastewater (PHWW) containing up to 40% of the original feedstock carbon, which reduces the overall energy efficiency of the HTL process. This study investigated the feasibility of using anaerobic digestion (AD) to treat PHWW, with the aid of activated carbon. Results showed that successful AD occurred at relatively low concentrations of PHWW (≤ 6.7%), producing a biogas yield of 0.5 ml/mg CODremoved, and ∼53% energy recovery efficiency. Higher concentrations of PHWW (≥13.3%) had an inhibitory effect on the AD process, as indicated by delayed, slower, or no biogas production. Activated carbon was shown to effectively mitigate this inhibitory effect by enhancing biogas production and allowing digestion to proceed at higher PHWW concentrations (up to 33.3%), likely due to sequestering toxic organic compounds. The addition of activated carbon also increased the net energy recovery efficiency of AD with a relatively high concentration of PHWW (33.3%), taking into account the energy for producing activated carbon. These results suggest that AD is a feasible approach to treat PHWW, and to improve the energy efficiency of the HTL processes. PMID:26676001

  19. Short term effects of copper, sulfadiazine and difloxacin on the anaerobic digestion of pig manure at low organic loading rates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Ostermann, Anne; Siemens, Jan; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics of inorganic and organic origin in pig manure can inhibit the anaerobic process in biogas plants. The influence of three frequently used antibiotics, copper dosed as CuSO(4), sulfadiazine (SDZ), and difloxacin (DIF), on the anaerobic digestion process of pig manure was studied in semi-continuous experiments. Biogas production recovered after every Cu dosage up to a sum of 12.94g Cukg(-1) organic dry matter (ODM), probably due to Cu precipitation following the formation of sulphide from sulphate. Complete inhibition was found at the very high Cu concentration of 19.40g Cukg(-1) ODM. Inhibitory effect of SDZ and DIF was observed at concentrations as high as 2.70gkg(-1) ODM and 0.54gkg(-1) ODM, respectively. It seems very unlikely that the antibiotics tested would inhibit the anaerobic process in a full-scale biogas plant. PMID:21868210

  20. Effect of feed/inoculum ratio on anaerobic digestion of sonicated sludge.

    PubMed

    Braguglia, C M; Mininni, G; Tomei, M C; Rolle, E

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, relevant interest has been devoted to activated sludge disintegration and solubilisation techniques in order to cope with the biological limitations related to particulate degradation. Mechanical disintegration with ultrasound can efficiently transform insoluble organics into a soluble form: the solubilised organic matter is released from the cells to the bulk phase, thus accelerating the hydrolysis step in the digestion process. Experiments were carried out on bench scale anaerobic reactors fed with either untreated or disintegrated excess sludge, added with a biomass inoculum taken from a full scale anaerobic digester. Digestion tests have been carried out at different feed/inoculum ratios (F/I) in the range of 0.1-2, kinetics of VS reduction has been investigated and a beneficial effect of sonication is observed for all the experimental conditions. Similar beneficial results have also been found for biogas production with a maximum gain of 25% at 0.5 F/I ratio. PMID:17087372

  1. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible. PMID:27020398

  2. Effect of sodium salt on anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Naveed; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yeqing; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing; Zhang, Ruihong

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different sodium salt concentration on anaerobic digestion of kitchen waste was investigated. The methane production performance, the corresponding methane production model and sodium salt inhibition model were studied, and the degradation efficiency was analyzed. With the increase of sodium salt concentration, the methane yield and the maximal methane production rate decreased along with the increase of lag phase time. The highest methane yield of 594 mL/g-VSadded (VS: volatile solids) was found with no sodium salt addition while the lowest was obtained with addition of 16 g/L NaCl. The declines of the methane yield were negligible when the sodium salt concentration was below 8 g/L, which corresponded to <10% inhibiting efficiency. In contrast, a sharp decrease of methane yield was observed with addition of >8 g/L NaCl (causing 17-80% inhibition). Five kinds of regression models were developed to describe the sodium salt inhibition efficiency, and the cubic regression model of y = 0.508 + 2.401x - 0.369x(2) + 0.033x(3) showed the best fitting. The volatile fatty acids/ethanol gradually accumulated along with the increase of the sodium salt concentration, and the volatile solid removal efficiency represented a gradual decline accordingly. It is recommended that the sodium salt concentration in the anaerobic digesters should be controlled below 8 g/L in order to avoid intense methane inhibition. PMID:27120641

  3. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste: Utility of process residues as a soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.; Kay, B.D.

    1995-12-31

    Tuna processing wastes (sludges high in fat, oil, and grease [FOG]) and municipal solid waste (MSW) generated on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, represent an ongoing disposal challenge. The biological conversion of the organic fraction of these wastes to useful products, including methane and fertilizer-grade residue, through anaerobic high-solids digestion is currently in scale-up development. The suitability of the anaerobic digestion residues as a soil amendment was evaluated through extensive chemical analysis and greenhouse studies using corn as an indicator crop. Additionally, native Samoan soil was used to evaluate the specific application rates for the compost. Experiments established that anaerobic residues increase crop yields in direct proportion to increases in the application rate. Additionally, nutrient saturation was not demonstrated within the range of application rates evaluated for the Samoan soil. Beyond nutrient supplementation, organic residue amendment to Samoan soil imparts enhanced water and nutrient-binding capacities.

  4. Optimization of anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in combined process and sequential staging.

    PubMed

    Juanga, Jeanger P; Visvanathan, Chettiyappen; Tränkler, Josef

    2007-02-01

    The optimization of anaerobic digestion aims to maximize organic waste stabilization after a short digestion period. This paper presents the optimization performance of the combined anaerobic digestion and sequential staging concept in a thermophilic, solid-state batch system as a treatment technology prior to landfill. The former involves enhanced pre-stage flushing with the addition of microaeration and inoculum in the methane phase. The latter involves leachate cross-recirculation between the mature and fresh waste reactors without conducting a pre-stage operation. The optimized process for combined anaerobic digestion showed that reducing the pre-stage operation with the maximum removal of organics from the waste bed is beneficial. Moreover, the sequential staging concept offers an improved process over the combined anaerobic digestion wherein the specific methane yield of 11.9 and 7.2 L CH4 kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) per day was achieved, respectively. After 28 days of operation, the sequential staging process showed an improved waste stabilization with 86 and 79% mass and volume reduction, respectively. A higher methane yield of 334 L CH4 kg(-1) VS with 86% VS reduction, which is equivalent to 84% process efficiency was obtained. PMID:17346005

  5. Biohydrogen Production from Cheese Processing Wastewater by Anaerobic Fermentation Using Mixed Microbial Communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrogen (H2) production from simulated cheese processing wastewater via anaerobic fermentation was conducted using mixed microbial communities under mesophilic conditions. In batch H2 fermentation experiments H2 yields of 8 and 10 mM/g-COD fed were achieved at food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratios of ...

  6. Two-stage anaerobic and post-aerobic mesophilic digestion of sewage sludge: Analysis of process performance and hygienization potential.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated to be effective for enhanced sludge stabilization, in terms of increased solid reduction and improvement of sludge dewaterability. In this study, we propose a modified version of the sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion process by operating the aerobic step under mesophilic conditions (T=37 °C), in order to improve the aerobic degradation kinetics of soluble and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD). Process performance has been assessed in terms of "classical parameters" such as volatile solids (VS) removal, biogas production, COD removal, nitrogen species, and polysaccharide and protein fate. The aerobic step was operated under intermittent aeration to achieve nitrogen removal. Aerobic mesophilic conditions consistently increased VS removal, providing 32% additional removal vs. 20% at 20 °C. Similar results were obtained for nitrogen removal, increasing from 64% up to 99% at the higher temperature. Improved sludge dewaterability was also observed with a capillary suction time decrease of ~50% during the mesophilic aerobic step. This finding may be attributable to the decreased protein content in the aerobic digested sludge. The post-aerobic digestion exerted a positive effect on the reduction of microbial indicators while no consistent improvement of hygienization related to the increased temperature was observed. The techno-economic analysis of the proposed digestion layout showed a net cost saving for sludge disposal estimated in the range of 28-35% in comparison to the single-phase anaerobic digestion. PMID:26760266

  7. Effect of anaerobic pretreatment on environmental and physicochemical characteristics of duckweed based stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, J R; Espinosa, C; Andrade, M; Gijzen, H

    2002-01-01

    Duckweed based stabilization ponds, an alternative for wastewater treatment, are attracting a growing interest from researchers because they are basically a low cost technology, easy to built and operate, and produce tertiary quality effluents. Besides, this technology offers the possibility of resource recovery by producing high quality duckweed protein, which can be of further use. Since the technology is rather new, there are many aspects to be studied before its full-scale implementation. It is necessary to gain sound knowledge of the basic principles of the complex processes occurring in the system, as well as of the practical aspects of design and operation. The presence of a layer of duckweed on the surface is expected to produce different environmental and physicochemical conditions in the water from those found in conventional stabilization ponds. These environmental and physicochemical conditions affect both plant growth and biological treatment processes in the system, therefore it is important to determine their behavior in a duckweed system and how they can be affected by an anaerobic pretreatment. Continuous flow pilot plants composed of seven ponds in series were operated with artificial substrate under two different conditions: with anaerobic pretreatment and without anaerobic pretreatment. The flow was kept constant during the operation. Conditions such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total and ammonium nitrogen, nitrites and nitrates, and phosphorus were evaluated in the system under steady state conditions. The main conclusions from the study include the following: pH, temperature and oxygen profiles are more stable in duckweed ponds than in conventional stabilization ponds; anaerobic pretreatment has a significant effect on the oxygen concentration in the system and on the organic matter removal but not on the nutrient removal. PMID:11833735

  8. Comparison of methanogenic community structure and anaerobic process performance treating swine wastewater between pilot and optimized lab scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong; Cho, Kyungjin; Lee, Seungyong; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2013-10-01

    To investigate methanogenic community structure and process performance of anaerobic digestion treating swine wastewater at different scale, a pilot plant with 20 m(3) of effective working volume and lab scale methanogenic digester with 6L working volume were operated for 71 days and 6 turnover periods, respectively. During the steady state of anaerobic digestion, COD and VS removal efficiency in pilot plant were 65.3±3.2, 51.6±4.3%, respectively, which was similar to those in lab scale. However, calculated VFAs removal efficiency and methane yield were lower in pilot plant than in lab scale digester. Also, organics removal efficiencies, which consist of total carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, were different between pilot and lab scale. These results were thought to be due to the ratio of carbohydrates to proteins in the raw swine wastewater. As a result of qualitative microbial analysis, Methanoculleus receptaculii, and Methanoculleus bourgensis, were commonly concerned with methane production. PMID:23489568

  9. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs. PMID:26897411

  10. What are the differences between aerobic and anaerobic toxic effects of sulfonamides on Escherichia coli?

    PubMed

    Qin, Mengnan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Long, Xi; Zheng, Min; Qiu, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the environment face the threat of antibiotics. However, most studies investigating the toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics have been conducted on microorganisms in aerobic conditions, while studies examining the anaerobic toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics are still limited. In this study, we determined the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities of sulfonamides (SAs) on Escherichia coli. Next, a comparison of the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities indicated that the SAs could be divided into three groups: Group I: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)>log(1/EC50-aerobic) (EC50-anaerobic/EC50-aerobic, the median effective concentration under anaerobic/aerobic conditions), Group II: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)≈log(1/EC50-aerobic), and Group III: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)anaerobic toxicities will benefit environmental science, and the results of this study will serve as a reference for the risk assessment of chemicals in the environment. PMID:26748048

  11. Start-up and inhibition analysis of the Anammox process seeded with anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chong-jian; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar; Chen, Jian-wei

    2009-08-01

    The longer start-up period of the Anammox process is due to the very low cellular yield and growth rates of Anammox bacteria. Nitrite inhibition is considered to be the key factor in the instability of the Anammox process during the operation. However, little attention was paid to the inhibitory effect of pH and free ammonia. This paper presents start-up and inhibition analysis of an Anammox biofilm reactor seeded with anaerobic granular sludge. Results showed that the start-up period could be divided into the sludge lysis phase, lag phase, propagation phase, stationary phase and inhibition phase. Optimization control could be implemented correspondingly to accelerate the start-up of Anammox bioreactors. Effluent pH increased to 8.7-9.1 when the nitrogen removal rate was higher than 1,200 mg l(-1) day(-1). The free ammonia concentration was accompanied with a higher level of 64-73 mg l(-1). Inhibitory effects of high pH and free ammonia on Anammox bacteria contributed to the destabilization of the Anammox bioreactor during the first 125 days with influent KHCO(3) of 0.5 g l(-1). Increasing the suffering capacity in the inlet by dosing 1.25 g KHCO(3) l(-1) effectively reduced the pH variation, and the nitrogen removal performance of the reactor was further developed. PMID:19479290

  12. The Effect of Enzyme Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Jose Tall Wheat Grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and Beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 35°C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations w...

  13. Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on the reduction of gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages were evaluated in this study. Screened dairy manure containing 3.5% volatile solids (VS) was either anaerobically digested or aerobically treated prior to storage in air-tight vessel...

  14. Treatment of olive oil mill wastewater by combined process electro-Fenton reaction and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Khoufi, Sonia; Aloui, Fathi; Sayadi, Sami

    2006-06-01

    In this work, we investigated an integrated technology for the treatment of the recalcitrant contaminants of olive mill wastewaters (OMW), allowing water recovery and reuse for agricultural purposes. The method involves an electrochemical pre-treatment step of the wastewater using the electro-Fenton reaction followed by an anaerobic bio-treatment. The electro-Fenton process removed 65.8% of the total polyphenolic compounds and subsequently decreased the OMW toxicity from 100% to 66.9%, which resulted in improving the performance of the anaerobic digestion. A continuous lab-scale methanogenic reactor was operated at a loading rate of 10 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)l(-1) d(-1) without any apparent toxicity. Furthermore, in the combined process, a high overall reduction in COD, suspended solids, polyphenols and lipid content was achieved by the two successive stages. This result opens promising perspectives since its conception as a fast and cheap pre-treatment prior to conventional anaerobic post-treatment. The use of electro-coagulation as post-treatment technology completely detoxified the anaerobic effluent and removed its toxic compounds. PMID:16678883

  15. Seasonal and spatial variation in soil chemistry and anaerobic processes in an Arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Mauritz, M.; Bozzolo, F.; Raab, T. K.; Santos, M. J.; Friedman, E. F.; Rosenbaum, M.; Angenent, L.

    2009-12-01

    Drained thaw lake basins (DTLB) are the dominant landform in the Arctic coastal plain near Barrow, Alaska. Our previous work in a DTLB showed that Fe(III) and humic substances are important electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration, and play a significant role in the C cycle of these organic-rich soils. In the current study, we investigated seasonal and spatial patterns of availability of electron acceptors and labile substrate, redox conditions and microbial activity. Landscapes within DTLB contain complex, fine-scale topography arising from ice wedge polygons, which produce raised and lowered areas. One goal of our study was to determine the effects of microtopographic variation on the potential for Fe(III) reduction and other anaerobic processes. Additionally, the soil in the study site has a complex vertical structure, with an organic peat layer overlying a mineral layer, overlying permafrost. We described variations in soil chemistry across depth profiles into the permafrost. Finally, we installed an integrated electrode/potentiostat system to electrochemically monitor microbial activity in the soil. Topographically low areas differed from high areas in most of the measured variables: low areas had lower oxidation-reduction potential, higher pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pore water from low areas had higher concentrations of Fe(III), Fe(II), dissolved organic C (DOC), and aromaticity (UV absorbance at 260nm, “A260”). Low areas also had higher concentrations of dissolve CO2 and CH4 in soil pore water. Laboratory incubations of soil showed a trend toward higher potentials for Fe(III) reduction in topographically low areas. Clearly, ice wedge-induced microtopography exerts a strong control on microbial processes in this DTLB landscape, with increased anaerobic activity occurring in the wetter, depressed areas. Soil water extracted from 5-15 cm depth had higher concentrations of Fe(III), Fe(II), A260, and DOC compared to soil water sampled from 0-5cm

  16. Effect of ferrihydrite biomineralization on methanogenesis in an anaerobic incubation from paddy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Li; Xu, Jielong; Tang, Jia; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-05-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) can be one of the major factors controlling methane production from anaerobic sedimentary environments, such as paddy soils and wetlands. Although secondary iron mineralization following Fe(III) reduction is a process that occurs naturally over time, it has not yet been considered in methanogenic systems. This study performed a long-term anaerobic incubation of a paddy soil and ferrihydrite-supplemented soil cultures to investigate methanogenesis during ferrihydrite biomineralization. The results revealed that the long-term effect of ferrihydrite on methanogenesis may be enhancement rather than suppression documented in previous studies. During initial microbial ferrihydrite reduction, methanogenesis was suppressed; however, the secondary minerals of magnetite formation was simultaneous with facilitated methanogenesis in terms of average methane production rate and acetate utilization rate. In the phase of magnetite formation, microbial community analysis revealed a strong stimulation of the bacterial Geobacter, Bacillus, and Sedimentibacter and the archaeal Methanosarcina in the ferrihydrite-supplemented cultures. Direct electric syntrophy between Geobacter and Methanosarcina via conductive magnetite is the plausible mechanism for methanogenesis acceleration along with magnetite formation. Our data suggested that a change in iron mineralogy might affect the conversion of anaerobic organic matter to methane and might provide a fresh perspective on the mitigation of methane emissions from paddy soils by ferric iron fertilization.

  17. Reducing waste contamination from animal-processing plants by anaerobic thermophilic fermentation and by flesh fly digestion.

    PubMed

    Marchaim, U; Gelman, A; Braverman, Y

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no market in Israel for the large amounts of waste from fish- and poultry-processing plants. Therefore, this waste is incinerated, as part of the measures to prevent the spread of pathogens. Anaerobic methanogenic thermophilic fermentation (AMTF) of wastes from the cattle-slaughtering industry was examined previously, as an effective system to treat pathogenic bacteria, and in this article, we discuss a combined method of digestion by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria and by flesh flies, as a means of waste treatment. The AMTF process was applied to the wastes on a laboratory scale, and digestion by rearing of flesh fly (Phaenicia sericata) and housefly (Musca domestica) larvae on the untreated raw material was done on a small scale and showed remarkable weight conversion to larvae. The yield from degradation of poultry waste by flesh fly was 22.47% (SD = 3.89) and that from fish waste degradation was 35.34% (SD = 12.42), which is significantly higher than that from rearing houseflies on a regular rearing medium. Bacterial contents before and after thermophilic anaerobic digestion, as well as the changes in the chemical composition of the components during the rearing of larvae, were also examined. PMID:12794287

  18. Nutrient removal and microbial granulation in an anaerobic process treating inorganic and organic nitrogenous wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Y H; Kim, H C

    2004-01-01

    The sustainable anaerobic nitrogen removal and microbial granulation were investigated by using a laboratory anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor, treating synthetic (inorganic and organic) wastewater and piggery waste. From inorganic synthetic wastewater, lithoautotrophic ammonium oxidation to nitrite/nitrate was observed by an addition of hydroxylamine. Also, the results revealed that the Anammox intermediates (particularly, hydrazine) contents in the substrate would be one of the important parameters for success of the anaerobic nitrogen removal process. The results from organic synthetic wastewater show that if the Anammox organism were not great enough in the startup of the process, denitritation and anaerobic ammonification would be a process prior to the Anammox reaction. The anaerobic ammonium removal from the piggery waste was performed successfully, probably due to the Anammox intermediates contained in the substrate. This reactor shows a complex performance including the Anammox reaction and HAP crystallization, as well as having partial denitritation occurring simultaneously. From the activity test, the maximum specific N conversion rate was 0.1 g NH4-N/g VSS/day (0.77 g T-N/g VSS/day), indicating that potential denitritation is quite high. The NO2-N/NH4-N ratio to Anammox is 1.17. The colour of the biomass treating the piggery waste changed from black to dark red. It was also observed that the red-colored granular sludge had a diameter of 1-2 mm. The settleability assessment of the granular sludge revealed that the granular sludge had a good settleability even though it was worse than that of seed granular sludge. PMID:15537009

  19. Schistosoma mansoni: effects of in vitro serotonin (5-HT) on aerobic and anaerobic carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Mettrick, D F; Podesta, R B

    1985-08-01

    The effect of Serotonin on carbohydrate metabolism, excreted end products, and adenine nucleotide pools in Schistosoma mansoni was determined following 60 min in vitro incubations under air (= 21% O2) and anaerobic (95% N2:5% CO2) conditions. In the presence of 0.25 mM Serotonin, glucose uptake increased by 82-84% and lactate excretion increased by 77-78%; levels of excreted lactate were significantly higher under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. The tissue pools of glucose, hexosephosphates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, pyruvate, and lactate were significantly increased under anaerobic conditions compared to air incubation; the presence of Serotonin decreased tissue glucose pools and increased the size of the pyruvate and lactate tissue pools. The glycolytic carbon pool was significantly greater under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions, irrespective of Serotonin. Serotonin increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate and adenosine 5'-monophosphate levels under aerobic conditions; neither Serotonin nor gas phase significantly affected total adenine nucleotide levels or the adenylate energy charge. Serotonin increased energy requirements by S. mansoni due to increased muscle contractions; demand was met by enhanced rates of carbohydrate metabolism. Irrespective of gas phase, 74-78% of available carbohydrate was converted to lactate. In the presence of Serotonin, conversion of glucose to lactate was reduced to 63-67%. In view of the requirements by S. mansoni for an abundant supply of glycoprotein and glycolipid precursors for surface membrane renewal, it is suggested that carbohydrate (glucose and glycogen) that was not converted to lactate may have been incorporated into biosynthetic processes leading to membrane synthesis. PMID:4018216

  20. Evaluation of granular anaerobic ammonium oxidation process for the disposal of pre-treated swine manure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    With rising environmental concerns on potable water safety and eutrophication, increased media attention and tighter environmental regulations, managing animal waste in an environmentally responsible and economically feasible way can be a challenge. In this study, the possibility of using granular anammox process for ammonia removal from swine waste treatment water was investigated. A rapid decrease of NO2−–N and NH4+–N was observed during incubation with wastewater from an activated sludge deodorization reactor and anaerobic digestion-partial oxidation treatment process treating swine manure and its corresponding control artificial wastewaters. Ammonium removal dropped from 98.0 ± 0.6% to 66.9 ± 2.7% and nearly absent when the organic load in the feeding increased from 232 mg COD/L to 1160 mg COD/L and 2320 mg COD/L. The presence of organic carbon had limited effect on nitrite and total nitrogen removal. At a COD to N ratio of 0.9, COD inhibitory organic load threshold concentration was 727 mg COD/L. Mass balance indicated that denitrifiers played an important role in nitrite, nitrate and organic carbon removal. These results demonstrated that anammox system had the potential to effectively treat swine manure that can achieve high nitrogen standards at reduced costs. PMID:24765570

  1. [Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for treating agricultural and food processing wastewater at high strength].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan-Song; Yu, Da-Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-04-01

    As the second largest amounts of COD discharged in 41 kinds of industrial wastewater, it is of great urgency for the agricultural and food processing industry to control water pollution and reduce pollutants. Generally the agricultural and food processing industrial wastewater with high strength COD of 8 000-30 000 mg x L(-1), is mainly treated with anaerobic and aerobic processes in series, but which exists some issues of long process, difficult maintenance and high operational costs. Through coupling anaerobic digestion and membrane separation together, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) has typical advantages of high COD removal efficiency (92%-99%), high COD organic loading rate [2.3-19.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)], little sludge discharged (SRT > 40 d) and low cost (HRT of 8-12 h). According to COD composition of high strength industrial wastewater, rate-limiting step of methanation could be either hydrolysis and acidification or methanogenesis. Compared with aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR), membrane fouling of AnMBR is more complicated in characterization and more difficult in control. Measures for membrane fouling control of AnMBR are almost the same as those of MBR, including cross flow, air sparging and membrane relaxation. For meeting discharging standard of food processing wastewater with high strength, AnMBR is a promising technology with very short process, by enhancing COD removal efficiency, controlling membrane fouling and improving energy recovery. PMID:24946624

  2. Enhanced Versus Conventional Sludge Anaerobic Processes: Performances and Techno-Economic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gianico, Andrea; Bertanza, Giorgio; Braguglia, Camilla M; Canato, Matteo; Gallipoli, Agata; Laera, Giuseppe; Levantesi, Caterina; Mininni, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Sewage sludge processing is a key issue in water resource recovery facilities due to the inefficacy of conventional treatments to produce high quality biosolids to be safely used in agriculture. Under this framework, the performances of several enhanced stabilization processes, namely ultrasound-pretreated Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion (US+MAD), thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD), thermal-pretreated TAD (TH+TAD) and ultrasound-pretreated inverse Temperature Phased Anaerobic Digestion (US+iTPAD) have been investigated. Such enhanced processes resulted in higher biogas yields and higher destruction of pathogens with respect to conventional MAD process, thus suggesting their feasibility in full-scale implementation perspectives. A procedure for technical-economic comparison of new sludge processing lines against conventional ones (benchmarking) was developed, based on the definition of technical issues (e.g. reliability, complexity, etc.) which are rated for each situation. Moreover, capital and operating costs were estimated. The enhanced processes analyzed in this work showed some potentially critical items, mainly related to energy balance and reagent consumption. PMID:27131310

  3. Sequential anaerobic/aerobic digestion for enhanced sludge stabilization: comparison of the process performance for mixed and waste sludge [corrected].

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Carozza, Nicola Antonello

    2015-05-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated as a promising alternative for enhanced sludge stabilization. In this paper, a feasibility study of the sequential digestion applied to real waste activated sludge (WAS) and mixed sludge is presented. Process performance is evaluated in terms of total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) removal, biogas production, and dewaterability trend in the anaerobic and double-stage digested sludge. In the proposed digestion lay out, the aerobic stage was operated with intermittent aeration to reduce the nitrogen load recycled to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Experimental results showed a very good performance of the sequential digestion process for both waste and mixed sludge, even if, given its better digestibility, higher efficiencies are observed for mixed sludge. VS removal efficiencies in the anaerobic stage were 48 and 50% for waste and mixed sludge, respectively, while a significant additional improvement of the VS removal of 25% for WAS and 45% for mixed sludge has been obtained in the aerobic stage. The post-aerobic stage, operated with intermittent aeration, was also efficient in nitrogen removal, providing a significant decrease of the nitrogen content in the supernatant: nitrification efficiencies of 90 and 97% and denitrification efficiencies of 62 and 70% have been obtained for secondary and mixed sludges, respectively. A positive effect due to the aerobic stage was also observed on the sludge dewaterability in both cases. Biogas production, expressed as Nm(3)/(kgVSdestroyed), was 0.54 for waste and 0.82 for mixed sludge and is in the range of values reported in the literature in spite of the low anaerobic sludge retention time of 15 days. PMID:25028317

  4. Evaluation of an Anaerobic Digestion System for Processing CELSS Crop Residues for Resource Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Three bioreactors, connected in series, were used to process CELSS potato residues for recovery of resources. The first stage was an anaerobic digestor (8 L working volume; cow rumen contents inoculum; fed-batch; 8 day retention time; feed rate 25 gdw/day) that converted 33% of feed (dry weight loss) to CO2 and "volatile fatty acids" (vfa, 83:8:8 mmolar ratio acetic:propionic:butyric). High nitrate-N in the potato residue feed was absent in the anaerobic effluent, with a high portion converted to NH4(+)-N and the remainder unaccounted and probably lost to denitrification and NH4(+) volatilization. Liquid anaerobic effluent was fed to an aerobic, yeast biomass production vessel (2 L volume; Candida ingens inoculum; batch [pellicle] growth; 2 day retention time) where the VFAs and some NH4(+)-N were converted into yeast biomass. Yeast yields accounted for up to 8% of potato residue fed into the anaerobic bioreactor. The third bioreactor (0.5 L liquid working volume; commercial nitrifier inoculum; packed-bed biofilm; continuous yeast effluent feed; recirculating; constant volume; 2 day hydraulic retention time) was used to convert successfully the remaining NH4(+)-N into nitrate-N (preferred form of N for CELSS crop production) and to remove the remaining degradable soluble organic carbon. Effluents from the last two stages were used for partial replenishment of minerals for hydroponic potato production.

  5. Evaluation of an anaerobic digestion system for processing CELSS crop residues for resource recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.

    1997-01-01

    Three bioreactors, connected in series, were used to process CELSS potato residues for recovery of resources. The first stage was an anaerobic digestor (8 L working volume; cow rumen contents inoculum; fed-batch; 8 day retention time; feed rate 25 gdw day^-1) that converted 33% of feed (dry weight loss) to CO_2 and ``volatile fatty acids'' (vfa, 83:8:8 mmolar ratio acetic:propionic:butyric). High nitrate-N in the potato residue feed was absent in the anaerobic effluent, with a high portion converted to NH_4^+-N and the remainder unaccounted and probably lost to denitrification and NH_4^+ volatilization. Liquid anaerobic effluent was fed to an aerobic, yeast biomass production vessel (2 L volume; Candida ingens inoculum; batch [pellicle] growth; 2 day retention time) where the VFAs and some NH_4^+-N were converted into yeast biomass. Yeast yields accounted for up to 8% of potato residue fed into the anaerobic bioreactor. The third bioreactor (0.5 L liquid working volume; commercial nitrifier inoculum; packed-bed biofilm; continuous yeast effluent feed; recirculating; constant volume; 2 day hydraulic retention time) was used to convert successfully the remaining NH_4^+-N into nitrate-N (preferred form of N for CELSS crop production) and to remove the remaining degradable soluble organic carbon. Effluents from the last two stages were used for partial replenishment of minerals for hydroponic potato production.

  6. Evaluation of an anaerobic digestion system for processing CELSS crop residues for resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Strayer, R F; Finger, B W; Alazraki, M P

    1997-01-01

    Three bioreactors, connected in series, were used to process CELSS potato residues for recovery of resources. The first stage was an anaerobic digestor (8 L working volume; cow rumen contents inoculum; fed-batch; 8 day retention time; feed rate 25 gdw day-1) that converted 33% of feed (dry weight loss) to CO2 and "volatile fatty acids" (vfa, 83:8:8 mmolar ratio acetic:propionic:butyric). High nitrate-N in the potato residue feed was absent in the anaerobic effluent, with a high portion converted to NH4(+)-N and the remainder unaccounted and probably lost to denitrification and NH4+ volatilization. Liquid anaerobic effluent was fed to an aerobic, yeast biomass production vessel (2 L volume; Candida ingens inoculum; batch [pellicle] growth; 2 day retention time) where the VFAs and some NH4(+)-N were converted into yeast biomass. Yeast yields accounted for up to 8% of potato residue fed into the anaerobic bioreactor. The third bioreactor (0.5 L liquid working volume; commercial nitrifier inoculum; packed-bed biofilm; continuous yeast effluent feed; recirculating; constant volume; 23 day hydraulic retention time) was used to convert successfully the remaining NH4(+)-N into nitrate-N (preferred form of N for CELSS crop production) and to remove the remaining degradable soluble organic carbon. Effluents from the last two stages were used for partial replenishment of minerals for hydroponic potato production. PMID:11542583

  7. Hybrid alkali-hydrodynamic disintegration of waste-activated sludge before two-stage anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Grübel, Klaudiusz; Suschka, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The first step of anaerobic digestion, the hydrolysis, is regarded as the rate-limiting step in the degradation of complex organic compounds, such as waste-activated sludge (WAS). The aim of lab-scale experiments was to pre-hydrolyze the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline sludge conditioning before applying hydrodynamic disintegration, as the pre-treatment procedure. Application of both processes as a hybrid disintegration sludge technology resulted in a higher organic matter release (soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD)) to the liquid sludge phase compared with the effects of processes conducted separately. The total SCOD after alkalization at 9 pH (pH in the range of 8.96-9.10, SCOD = 600 mg O2/L) and after hydrodynamic (SCOD = 1450 mg O2/L) disintegration equaled to 2050 mg/L. However, due to the synergistic effect, the obtained SCOD value amounted to 2800 mg/L, which constitutes an additional chemical oxygen demand (COD) dissolution of about 35 %. Similarly, the synergistic effect after alkalization at 10 pH was also obtained. The applied hybrid pre-hydrolysis technology resulted in a disintegration degree of 28-35%. The experiments aimed at selection of the most appropriate procedures in terms of optimal sludge digestion results, including high organic matter degradation (removal) and high biogas production. The analyzed soft hybrid technology influenced the effectiveness of mesophilic/thermophilic anaerobic digestion in a positive way and ensured the sludge minimization. The adopted pre-treatment technology (alkalization + hydrodynamic cavitation) resulted in 22-27% higher biogas production and 13-28% higher biogas yield. After two stages of anaerobic digestion (mesophilic conditions (MAD) + thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD)), the highest total solids (TS) reduction amounted to 45.6% and was received for the following sample at 7 days MAD + 17 days TAD. About 7% higher TS reduction was noticed compared with the sample after 9

  8. Full-scale application of anaerobic digestion process with partial ozonation of digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Yasui, H; Komatsu, K; Goel, R; Li, Y Y; Noike, T

    2005-01-01

    For improving sludge digestion and biogas recovery, a new anaerobic digestion process combined with ozonation was tested at a full-scale unit for 2 years and its performance was compared with a simultaneously operated conventional anaerobic digestion process. The new process requires two essential modifications, which includes ozonation for enhancing the biological degradability of sludge organics and concentrating of solids in the digester through a solid/liquid separation for extension of SRT. These modifications resulted in high VSS degradation efficiency of ca. 88%, as much as 1.3 times of methane production and more than 70% reduction in dewatered sludge cake production. Owing to accumulation of inorganic solids in the digested sludge, water content of the dewatered sludge cake also reduced from 80% to 68%. An energy analysis suggested that no supplemental fuel was necessary for the subsequent incineration of the cake from the new process scheme. The process is suitable to apply to a low-loaded anaerobic digestion tank, where power production is used. PMID:16180435

  9. Novel anaerobic digestion process with sludge ozonation for economically feasible power production from biogas.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Yasui, H; Goel, R; Li, Y Y; Noike, T

    2011-01-01

    A novel process scheme was developed to achieve economically feasible energy recovery from anaerobic digestion. The new process scheme employs a hybrid configuration of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion with sludge ozonation: the ozonated sludge is first degraded in a thermophilic digester and then further degraded in a mesophilic digester. In small-scale pilot experiments of the new process scheme, degradation of VSS improved by 3.5% over the control (mesophilic-only configuration) with 20% less ozone consumption. Moreover, biogas conversion also improved by 7.1% over the control. Selective enrichment of inorganic compounds during centrifugation produced a dewatered sludge cake with very low water content (59.4%). This low water content in the sludge cake improved its auto-thermal combustion potential during incineration and added to the overall energy savings. We conducted a case study to evaluate power generation from biogas for a municipal wastewater treatment plant with an average dry weather flow of 43,000 m3/d. Electricity production cost was 5.2 ¢/kWh for the advanced process with power generation, which is lower than the current market price of 7.2 ¢/kWh. The new anaerobic digestion scheme with power generation may reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 1,000 t-CO(2)/year compared with the conventional process without power generation. PMID:21508552

  10. Hyperspectral imaging techniques applied to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Fabbri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    An anaerobic digestion process, finalized to biogas production, is characterized by different steps involving the variation of some chemical and physical parameters related to the presence of specific biomasses as: pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile solids, nitrate (NO3-) and phosphate (PO3-). A correct process characterization requires a periodical sampling of the organic mixture in the reactor and a further analysis of the samples by traditional chemical-physical methods. Such an approach is discontinuous, time-consuming and expensive. A new analytical approach based on hyperspectral imaging in the NIR field (1000 to 1700 nm) is investigated and critically evaluated, with reference to the monitoring of wine waste anaerobic digestion process. The application of the proposed technique was addressed to identify and demonstrate the correlation existing, in terms of quality and reliability of the results, between "classical" chemical-physical parameters and spectral features of the digestate samples. Good results were obtained, ranging from a R2=0.68 and a RMSECV=12.83 mg/l for nitrate to a R2=0.90 and a RMSECV=5495.16 mg O2/l for COD. The proposed approach seems very useful in setting up innovative control strategies allowing for full, continuous control of the anaerobic digestion process.

  11. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes.

    PubMed

    López Torres, M; Espinosa Lloréns, Ma del C

    2008-11-01

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH)2), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH)2/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m3CH4/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW. PMID:18068345

  12. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  13. Physicothermochemical pretreatments of food processing waste for enchancing anaerobic digestion and biogas generation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. Menoufia Univ., Sadat City ); Nasr, M.I. )

    1993-10-01

    This paper was conducted to evaluate the effect of milling and alkali lime cooking pretreatments on the rate and extent of methane generation from sugar Cane bagasse. The effect of pretreatment process variables (Particle size 8.0.003 mm, temperature between 100 and 250[degree]C and alkaline dosage between 0 and 8g CaO/kg VS) on the biogas generation from Sugar Cane bagasse has been investigated. Methane generation from the pretreated cane bagasse was studied using serum bottle technique and an upflow anaerobic filter bioreactor. The optimum condition involves alkali-cooking of cane bagasse (0.5 mm) with 4% CaO at 200[degree]C, dissolving most of the cellulose and converting it in a mixture of organic acids, including formic, acetic, lactic, and succinic acids. About 80% of the COD content of the cellulose was retained in the cooked liquor. A very rapid biogas were observed in the first three days of 70% methane content from the pretreated cane bagasse and the digestion was completed within 8 days. It has been concluded, that the lime-cooking of CB could produce methane as much as 70% of that from glucose. Inhibition did not seems to be serious problem in the biogas generation from the alkali-cooking cane bagasse. 29 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Effects of TNT and its metabolites on anaerobic TNT degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.J.; Pendharkar, S.; Ahmad, F.

    1998-07-01

    The effects of the presence of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene on the anaerobic treatment procedure developed for munitions-contaminated soil were examined. When 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene was spiked in increasing levels into cultures containing TNT, inhibition of the rate of TNT degradation was observed. The degradation of 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene did not proceed while TNT was present in the cultures. When 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was spiked into cultures that also contained TNT, TNT degradation rates were inhibited, and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene were not degraded at all. When 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was spiked into cultures containing 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, degradation of 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene was not effected but 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene was not degraded. These results suggest that the rapid removal of TNT from the treatment system, before the intermediates have a chance to accumulate, or the rapid removal of the intermediates of TNT degradation is of utmost importance during the remediation of TNT-contaminated soils. If these intermediates are allowed to accumulate above inhibitory levels, the degradation of TNT will be slowed and the removal of the intermediates will halt completely.

  15. Methanogenic pathway and community structure in a thermophilic anaerobic digestion process of organic solid waste.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Hori, Tomoyuki; Haruta, Shin; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The methanogenic pathway and microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digestion process of organic solid waste were investigated in a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor using artificial garbage slurry as a feedstock. The decomposition pathway of acetate, a significant precursor of CH(4) and a key intermediate metabolite in the anaerobic digestion process, was analyzed by using stable isotopes. A tracer experiment using (13)C-labeled acetate revealed that approximately 80% of the acetate was decomposed via a non-aceticlastic oxidative pathway, whereas the remainder was converted to methane via an aceticlastic pathway. Archaeal 16S rRNA analyses demonstrated that the hydrogenotrophic methanogens Methanoculleus spp. accounted for >90% of detected methanogens, and the aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcina spp. were the minor constituents. The clone library targeting bacterial 16S rRNA indicated the predominance of the novel Thermotogales bacterium (relative abundance: ~53%), which is related to anaerobic acetate oxidizer Thermotoga lettingae TMO, although the sequence similarity was low. Uncultured bacteria that phylogenetically belong to municipal solid waste cluster I were also predominant in the microflora (~30%). These results imply that the microbial community in the thermophilic degrading process of organic solid waste consists exclusively of unidentified bacteria, which efficiently remove acetate through a non-aceticlastic oxidative pathway. PMID:20851673

  16. Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation using anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater in an airlift circulation photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaobo; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Libin; Zhao, Fangchao; Zhou, Xuefei

    2014-10-01

    To explore the integration of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment, we utilized an airlift circulation photobioreactor and a dynamic membrane reactor for microalgae cultivation in combination with an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor for starch processing wastewater (SPW) treatment. Chlorella pyrenoidosa completely adapted to the digested SPW without any chemical additives, and it grew normally under a wide temperature range in different seasons. C. pyrenoidosa was always the dominant microorganism in the photobioreactors although bacteria and some wild type microalgae were observed. Optimal biomass growth and pollutants removal was achieved at temperatures between 35 and 38°C in summer, removing 65.99% of COD, 83.06% of TN, 96.97% of TP and a biomass productivity of 0.37gL(-1)d(-1). Temperature fluctuation significantly influenced lipid contents and FAMEs compositions in biomass. The results demonstrate the successful integration of microalgae biomass production and anaerobic processing for wastewater treatment. PMID:25164347

  17. Effects of lipid concentration on anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yifei; Wang, Dian; Yan, Jiao; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Tianle

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Lipid in municipal biomass would not inhibited the anaerobic digestion process. • A lipid concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. • The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with the increasing of the lipid contents. • Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process. - Abstract: The influence of the lipid concentration on the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste-activated sludge was assessed by biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests and by bench-scale tests in a mesophilic semi-continuous stirred tank reactor. The effect of increasing the volatile solid (VS) concentration of lipid from 0% to 75% was investigated. BMP tests showed that lipids in municipal biomass waste could enhance the methane production. The results of bench-scale tests showed that a lipids concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. Methane yields increased with increasing lipid concentration when lipid concentrations were below 60%, but when lipid concentration was set as 65% or higher, methane yields decreased sharply. When lipid concentrations were below 60%, the pH values were in the optimum range for the growth of methanogenic bacteria and the ratios of volatile fatty acid (VFA)/alkalinity were in the range of 0.2–0.6. When lipid concentrations exceeded 65%, the pH values were below 5.2, the reactor was acidized and the values of VFA/alkalinity rose to 2.0. The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with increasing lipid content. Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process, thereby inhibiting anaerobic digestion.

  18. Research on Anaerobic Digestion: Optimization and Scalability of Mixed High-strength Food Processing Wastes for Renewable Biogas Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhongtang; Hitzhusen, Fredrick

    2012-12-27

    This research project developed and improved anaerobic digestion technologies, created a comprehensive Inventory of Ohio Biomass and a database of microorganisms of anaerobic digesters, and advanced knowledge and understanding of the underpinning microbiology of the anaerobic digestion process. The results and finding of this research project may be useful for future development and implementation of anaerobic digesters, especially at livestock farms. Policy makers and investors may also find the information on the biomass availability in Ohio and valuation of energy projects useful in policy making and making of investment decisions. The public may benefit from the information on biogas as an energy source and the potential impact of anaerobic digester projects on their neighborhoods.

  19. Start-up of an anaerobic/oxic process for phosphorus removal at the Northwest Quadrant Wastewater Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This study investigated the suitability and effectiveness of a proprietary anaerobic/oxic (A/0) process to facilitate the biological removal of phosphorus from domestic wastewater. The study took place at the Northwest Quadrant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Hilton, New York, and was conducted in conjunction with the New York State Energy Research Development Authority (the Energy Authority) and the Monroe County Department of Pure Waters. The NWQWWTP concentration limit for total effluent phosphorus is 1.0 mg/l. Influent phosphorus concentrations usually vary from 4 to 5 mg/l at the plant.

  20. Effect of simulated weightlessness on exercise-induced anaerobic threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Karst, G. M.; Kirby, C. R.; Goldwater, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simulated weightlessness, induced by ten days of continuous bedrest (BR) in the -6 deg head-down position, on the exercise-induced anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined by comparing specific ventilatory and gas-exchange measurements during an incremental ergometer test performed before and after BR. The primary index for determining the exercise-induced AT values of each subject was visual identification of the workrate or oxygen uptake (VO2) at which the ratio of the expired minute ventilation volume (VE) to VO2 exhibited a systematic increase without a concomitant increase in the VE/VCO2 value. Following BR, the mean VO2max of the subjects decreased by 7.0 percent, and the AT decreased from a mean of 1.26 L/min VO2 before BR to 0.95 L/min VO2 after BR. The decrease in AT was manifested by a decrease in both absolute and relative workrates. The change in AT correlated significantly with the change in plasma volume but not with the change in VO2max. The results suggest that the reduction in AT cannot be completely explained by the reduction in VO2, and that the AT decrease is associated with the reduction in intravascular fluid volume.

  1. Characterization of products from hydrothermal carbonization of orange pomace including anaerobic digestibility of process liquor.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Ezgi; Atila, Buse; Mumme, Jan; Reza, M Toufiq; Toptas, Asli; Elibol, Murat; Yanik, Jale

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effect of the temperature and reaction time on hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of orange pomace was investigated. In addition, a set of anaerobic batch tests were performed to determine the resulting biogas and methane potential of the spent liquor. Hydrochar yields followed a decreasing trend with the increasing temperature, whereas reaction time had no considerably effect on the yield. The evolution of the H/C and O/C atomic ratios from the raw material to the hydrochars suggested that dehydration reactions prevail during HTC. The hydrochars tended to become enriched in Ca, Mg and P minerals by increasing HTC temperature. The heavy metal contents in hydrochars were found below limits and no PAH compound was detected. Anaerobic digestion tests showed that the aqueous phase from HTC can be used as feedstocks for biogas production. PMID:26226579

  2. Decolorization and biogas production by an anaerobic consortium: effect of different azo dyes and quinoid redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, L H; Valdez-Espinoza, R; García-Reyes, R B; Olivo-Alanis, D; Garza-González, M T; Meza-Escalante, E R; Gortáres-Moroyoqui, P

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of azo dyes and quinoid compounds on an anaerobic consortium was evaluated during a decolorization process and biogas production. In addition, the impact of quinoid compounds such as lawsone (LAW) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) on the rate of decolorization of Direct Blue 71 (DB71) was assessed. The anaerobic consortium was not completely inhibited under all tested dye concentrations (0.1-2 mmol l(-1)), evidenced by an active decolorization process and biogas production. The presence of quinoid compounds at different concentrations (4, 8, and 12 mmol l(-1)) also inhibited biogas production compared to the control incubated without the quinoid compounds. In summary, the anaerobic consortium was affected to a greater extent by increasing the quantity of azo dyes or quinoid compounds. Nevertheless, at a lower concentration (1 mmol l(-1)) of quinoid compounds, the anaerobic consortium effectively decolorized 2 mmol l(-1) of DB71, increasing up to 5.2- and 20.4-fold the rate of decolorization with AQDS and LAW, respectively, compared to the control lacking quinoid compounds. PMID:26287839

  3. Combined anaerobic-ozonation process for treatment of textile wastewater: removal of acute toxicity and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Punzi, Marisa; Nilsson, Filip; Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Svensson, Britt-Marie; Jönsson, Karin; Mattiasson, Bo; Jonstrup, Maria

    2015-07-15

    A novel set up composed of an anaerobic biofilm reactor followed by ozonation was used for treatment of artificial and real textile effluents containing azo dyes. The biological treatment efficiently removed chemical oxygen demand and color. Ozonation further reduced the organic content of the effluents and was very important for the degradation of aromatic compounds, as shown by the reduction of UV absorbance. The acute toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri and the shrimp Artemia salina increased after the biological treatment. No toxicity was detected after ozonation with the exception of the synthetic effluent containing the highest concentration, 1 g/l, of the azo dye Remazol Red. Both untreated and biologically treated textile effluents were found to have mutagenic effects. The mutagenicity increased even further after 1 min of ozonation. No mutagenicity was however detected in the effluents subjected to longer exposure to ozone. The results of this study suggest that the use of ozonation as short post-treatment after a biological process can be beneficial for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds and the removal of toxicity of textile wastewater. However, monitoring of toxicity and especially mutagenicity is crucial and should always be used to assess the success of a treatment strategy. PMID:25781375

  4. Kinetics of phenol degradation in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.H.; Lee, K.K.

    2006-06-15

    A mathematical model was developed to describe phenol degradation in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process. The model incorporates the mechanisms of diffusive mass transport and Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A pilot-scale column reactor was used to verify the model. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to determine the biokinetic parameters used in the model, while shear loss and initial thickness of biofilm were assumed so that the model simulated the substrate concentration results well. The removal efficiency for phenol was approximately 98.5% at a steady-state condition. The model accurately described the effluent substrate concentrations and the sequence of biodegradation in the reactor. The model simulations are in agreement with the experimental results. The approaches presented in this paper could be used to design full-scale anaerobic fixed-biofilm reactor systems for the biodegradation of phenolic substrates.

  5. Characterization and single-stage denitrification anaerobic digestion of spent stream from the hydrolysis-fermentation-combustion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik

    The demand for ethanol as an oxygenate and octane booster in automobile fuel is growing. A number of processes are being investigated for conversion of biomass to ethanol. The Hydrolysis-Fermentation-Combustion (HFC) process for fuel ethanol production developed at the University of California Forest Products Laboratory, Richmond, California is at the stage of technology transfer following over two decades of research and development. This study addresses the technology to be used in treatment of spent streams to be discharged from this process. The treatment design combines a single stage denitrification and anaerobic digestion (SSDAD) for the biological treatment of a representative stream from this process. A typical spent stream contained a wide range of soluble organic materials including: unfermented sugars, components of the feedstocks solubilized in the hydrolysis, acid degradation products of carbohydrates, cleavage products of lignin, water-soluble extractives and phenolics, terpenes and other unfermented organic material, and nitrate ion from the nitric acid used as a catalyst in the hydrolysis reaction. Three sets of experiments were conducted in laboratory scale anaerobic digesters. Commonly available anaerobic sludge from local sewage treatment plants was used as a starter seed and was successfully acclimated to the high nitrate substrate leading to enrichment of denitrifiers. Necessary nutrients and trace elements were identified and supplied to satisfy the obligatory requirements of different groups of bacterial groups present. A major finding was the unique role of ammonium hydroxide in controlling pH leading to steady-state operation of the digester. At steady state operation the reduction in COD was 65%, the nitrate reduction was 88% and the nitrite reduction was 100%. Nitrate was reduced to safe nitrogen gas without buildup of any intermediate products. Organic material was converted to useful methane gas and carbon dioxide. The SSDAD system was

  6. Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process enhancing compost maturity of dewatered sludge with synchronous electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Yunshu; Zheng, Zhen; Hao, Xiaodi

    2015-10-01

    Bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic composting process (AnCBE) with dewatered sludge as the anode fuel was constructed to accelerate composting of dewatered sludge, which could increase the quality of the compost and harvest electric energy in comparison with the traditional anaerobic composting (AnC). Results revealed that the AnCBE yielded a voltage of 0.60 ± 0.02 V, and total COD (TCOD) removal reached 19.8 ± 0.2% at the end of 35 d. The maximum power density was 5.6 W/m(3). At the end of composting, organic matter content (OM) reduction rate increased to 19.5 ± 0.2% in AnCBE and to 12.9 ± 0.1% in AnC. The fuzzy comprehensive assessment (FCA) result indicated that the membership degree of class I of AnCBE compost (0.64) was higher than that of AnC compost (0.44). It was demonstrated that electrogenesis in the AnCBE could improve the sludge stabilization degree, accelerate anaerobic composting process and enhance composting maturity with bioelectricity generation. PMID:26115526

  7. Thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste for bio-hythane production: effect of recirculation sludge on process stability and microbiology over a long-term pilot-scale experience.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, A; Zanetti, L; Micolucci, F; Cavinato, C

    2014-01-01

    A two-stage thermophilic anaerobic digestion process for the concurrent production of hydrogen and methane through the treatment of the source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste was carried out over a long-term pilot scale experience. Two continuously stirred tank reactors were operated for about 1 year. The results showed that stable production of bio-hythane without inoculum treatment could be obtained. The pH of the dark fermentation reactor was maintained in the optimal range for hydrogen-producing bacteria activity through sludge recirculation from a methanogenic reactor. An average specific bio-hythane production of 0.65 m(3) per kg of volatile solids fed was achieved when the recirculation flow was controlled through an evaporation unit in order to avoid inhibition problems for both microbial communities. Microbial analysis indicated that dominant bacterial species in the dark fermentation reactor are related to the Lactobacillus family, while the population of the methanogenic reactor was mainly composed of Defluviitoga tunisiensis. The archaeal community of the methanogenic reactor shifted, moving from Methanothermobacter-like to Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales, the latter found also in the dark fermentation reactor when a considerable methane production was detected. PMID:24901613

  8. Pharmaceutical residues in sewage sludge: effect of sanitization and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, Jonas; Magnér, Jörgen

    2015-04-15

    The fate of pharmaceutical residues in treatment of WWTP sludge was evaluated during mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) and six sanitization technologies (pasteurization, thermal hydrolysis, advanced oxidation processes using Fenton's reaction, ammonia treatment, thermophilic dry digestion, and thermophilic anaerobic digestion). Sludge spiked with a selection of 13 substances was used and in total 23 substances were detected. A correlation between substance lipophilicity and sludge partitioning was found after sample centrifugation, with e.g., SSRI drugs (90-99%) and estrogens (96-98%) mainly found in the solid phase. A correlation between lipophilicity and persistence of pharmaceutical residues during AD was also detected, indicating that hydrophobic substances are less available to degrading microorganisms. Overall, AD was found to be the most effective technology in reducing a wide spectrum of organic substances (in average ca 30% reduction). Similar effects were obtained for both AD treatments, suggesting that temperature (mesophilic or thermophilic) is less important for micropollutant reduction. Advanced oxidation processes using Fenton's reaction also affected several compounds, including substances showing general stability over the range of treatments such as carbamazepine, propranolol, and sertraline. Pasteurization, ammonia treatment, and thermophilic dry digestion exhibited relatively modest reductions. Interestingly, only thermal hydrolysis efficiently removed the ecotoxicologically potent estrogenic compounds from the sludge. PMID:25645950

  9. Behavior of cellulose-degrading bacteria in thermophilic anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Syutsubo, K; Nagaya, Y; Sakai, S; Miya, A

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we found that the newly isolated Clostridium sp. strain JC3 became the dominant cellulose-degrading bacterium in thermophilic methanogenic sludge. In the present study, the behavior of strain JC3 in the thermophilic anaerobic digestion process was investigated quantitatively by molecular biological techniques. A cellulose-degrading experiment was conducted at 55 degrees C with a 9.5 L of anaerobic baffled reactor having three compartments (Nos. 1, 2, 3). Over 80% of the COD input was converted into methane when 2.5 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) was loaded for an HRT of 27 days. A FISH probe specific for strain JC3 was applied to sludge samples harvested from the baffled reactor. Consequently, the ratio of JC3 cells to DAPI-stained cells increased from below 0.5% (undetectable) to 9.4% (compartment 1), 13.1% (compartment 2) and 21.6% (compartment 3) at day 84 (2.5 kgCOD m(-3)d(-1)). The strain JC3 cell numbers determined by FISH correlated closely with the cellulose-degrading methanogenic activities of retained sludge. A specific primer set targeting the cellulase gene (cellobiohydrolaseA: cbhA) of strain JC3 was designed and applied to digested sludge for treating solid waste such as coffee grounds, wastepaper, garbage, cellulose and so on. The strain JC3 cell numbers determined by quantitative PCR correlated closely with the cellulose-sludge loading of the thermophilic digester. Strain JC3 is thus important in the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose in thermophilic anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:16180412

  10. Evaluation of anaerobic digestion processes for short sludge-age waste activated sludge combined with anammox treatment of digestate liquor.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien; Keller, Jurg

    2016-01-01

    The need to reduce energy input and enhance energy recovery from wastewater is driving renewed interest in high-rate activated sludge treatment (i.e. short hydraulic and solids retention times (HRT and SRT, respectively)). This process generates short SRT activated sludge stream, which should be highly degradable. However, the evaluation of anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge has been limited. This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge digestion derived from meat processing wastewater under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. The thermophilic digestion system (55°C) achieved 60 and 68% volatile solids destruction at 8 day and 10 day HRT, respectively, compared with 50% in the mesophilic digestion system (35°C, 10 day HRT). The digestion effluents from the thermophilic (8-10 day HRT) and mesophilic systems were stable, as assessed by residual methane potentials. The ammonia rich sludge dewatering liquor was effectively treated by a batch anammox process, which exhibited comparable nitrogen removal rate as the tests using a control synthetic ammonia solution, indicating that the dewatering liquor did not have inhibiting/toxic effects on the anammox activity. PMID:26942526

  11. Anaerobic sulphate-reducing microbial process using UASB reactor for heavy metals decontamination.

    PubMed

    de Lima, A C; Gonçalves, M M; Granato, M; Leite, S G

    2001-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using sewage as an organic substrate for the growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and to acclimatise anaerobic sludge to produce sulphide from sulphate reduction, with a view to metal precipitation. The experiments were carried out in a continuous bench-scale bioreactor (13 1 UASB reactor) operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 11 and 19 hours. The feed solution used was composed of the liquid part of the sewage (organic matter) supplemented with nickel sulphate and sodium sulphate. The results showed that it was possible to acclimatise anaerobic sludge for production of sulphide by sulphate reduction. A relation between the available COD and the concentration of sulphate reduced by SRB was observed. High nickel removal efficiency (96%) was obtained during the whole operation (320 days). However, the process required very strict control of the organic load available (sewage) in the solution and, if necessary, the addition of a complementary organic carbon source, in order to maintain a constant level of metal removal. The SRB were not affected by the HRT values studied and were installed and maintained in the system; however, granular sludge was not observed. The micrographs confirmed the presence of iron and nickel sulphides and also a mixed bacterial culture in the anaerobic sludge. The EDS spectrum of the sludge showed that nickel was retained in the sludge predominantly as a nickel sulphide. PMID:11346283

  12. Evaluation of a Ca-modified porphyritic andesite for ammonium removal in the anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Ca-modified porphyritic andesite (wheat-rice-stone (WRS)) was developed for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich wastes. The Ca-modified WRS was obtained with integrated Ca-salt treatment and calcination. Scanning electron microscope and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analyses were performed to characterize the Ca-modified WRS, and adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated to clarify the adsorption mechanism. The ammonium adsorption process was explained well with a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The specific surface area of the Ca-modified WRS was determined to be 4.56 sq. m/g, and the maximum NH4(+)-N adsorption capacity was determined to be 45.45 mg/g. These values are improvements over those of natural WRS. The ammonium adsorption capacity remained constant at a pH range from 5.0 to 9.0, which indicates that Ca-modified WRS is a promising material for various applications. The methane-production and chemical oxygen demand-removal aspects of anaerobic digestion were much improved with the addition of Ca-modified WRS. Therefore, Ca-modified WRS could be developed into a viable ammonium adsorbent for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich wastes. PMID:23837319

  13. Effect of sulfate on low-temperature anaerobic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Pádhraig; Al-Raei, Abdul M.; Enright, Anne M.; Chinalia, Fabio A.; de Beer, Dirk; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Collins, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sulfate addition on the stability of, and microbial community behavior in, low-temperature anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed-based bioreactors was investigated at 15°C. Efficient bioreactor performance was observed, with chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of >90%, and a mean SO2−4 removal rate of 98.3%. In situ methanogensis appeared unaffected at a COD: SO2−4 influent ratio of 8:1, and subsequently of 3:1, and was impacted marginally only when the COD: SO2−4 ratio was 1:2. Specific methanogenic activity assays indicated a complex set of interactions between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methanogens and homoacetogenic bacteria. SO2−4 addition resulted in predominantly acetoclastic, rather than hydrogenotrophic, methanogenesis until >600 days of SO2−4-influenced bioreactor operation. Temporal microbial community development was monitored by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH), qPCR and microsensor analysis were combined to investigate the distribution of microbial groups, and particularly SRB and methanogens, along the structure of granular biofilms. qPCR data indicated that sulfidogenic genes were present in methanogenic and sulfidogenic biofilms, indicating the potential for sulfate reduction even in bioreactors not exposed to SO2−4. Although the architecture of methanogenic and sulfidogenic granules was similar, indicating the presence of SRB even in methanogenic systems, FISH with rRNA targets found that the SRB were more abundant in the sulfidogenic biofilms. Methanosaeta species were the predominant, keystone members of the archaeal community, with the complete absence of the Methanosarcina species in the experimental bioreactor by trial conclusion. Microsensor data suggested the ordered distribution of sulfate reduction and sulfide accumulation, even in methanogenic granules. PMID:25120534

  14. Effect of anaerobic soil disinfestation on weed seed germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The project goal is to optimize anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation using strawberry in coastal California and pepper/eggplant double crop in southeast Florida as model systems (Shennan et al., 2007). In preparation for field experiments, a series of po...

  15. EFFECT OF BTEX AND ETHANOL ON ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have recently demonstrated that natural anaerobic biotransformation of MTBE to TBA can account for the natural attenuation of MTBE in a plume from a gasoline spill at Parsippany, New Jersey. It is well established in the literature that the presence of the BTEX compounds natu...

  16. [Pilot study of thermal treatment/thermophilic anaerobic digestion process treating waste activated sludge of high solid content].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Guang-qi; Cao, Zhi-ping; Li, Zhong-hua; Hu, Yu-ying; Wang, Kai-jun; Zu, Jian-e

    2014-09-01

    A pilot-scale experiment about the process of "thermal pretreatment at 70°C/thermophilic anaerobic digestion" of waste activated sludge of high solid content (8% -9% ) was conducted. The process employed thermal treatment of 3 days to accelerate the hydrolysis and thermophilic digestion to enhance anaerobic reaction. Thus it was good at organic removal and stabilization. When the solid retention time (SRT) was longer than 20 days, the VSS removal rate was greater than 42. 22% and it was linearly correlated to the SRT of the aerobic digestion with the R2 of 0. 915 3. It was suggested that SRT of anaerobic digestion was 25 days in practice. VSS removal rate and biogas production rate of the pilot experiment were similar to those of the run-well traditional full-scale sludge anaerobic digestion plants (solid content 3% -5% ) and the plant of high solid content using German technique. PMID:25518666

  17. Impact of Anaerobic Digestion of Liquid Dairy Manure on Ammonia Volatilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, K.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion (AD) on the mechanism of ammonia volatilization from liquid dairy manure, in storage or treatment lagoon, prior to land application. Physical-chemical properties of liquid dairy manure, which may affect ammonia volatilization process, were determined before and after AD. The properties of interest included: particle size distribution (PSD), total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), viscosity, pH, total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), and ionic strength (IS). The overall mass transfer coefficient of ammonia (KoL) and the NH3 fraction of TAN (β) for the undigested (UD) and AD manures were then experimentally determined in a laboratory convective emission chamber (CEC) at a constant wind speed of 1.5 m s-1 and fixed air temperature of 25 °C at liquid manure temperatures of 15, 25, and 35 °C. The PSD indicated non-normal left skewed distribution for both AD and UD manures particles, suggestive of heavier concentrations of particles towards the lower particle size range. The volume median diameters (VMD) for solids from UD and AD were not significantly different (p= 0.65), but the geometric standard deviations (GSD) were significantly different (p = 0.001), indicating slightly larger particles but more widely distributed solids in UD than AD manure. Results also indicated significantly higher pH, TAN, ionic strength (IS) and viscosity in AD manure. The KoL and β for AD manure determined under identical conditions (air temperature, liquid temperature, and airflow) were significantly higher (p > 0.05) than for UD manure. Overall, these findings suggest that AD of dairy manure significantly increased initial ammonia volatilization potential from liquid dairy manure; with the largest increase (~62%) emanating from increased ammonium dissociation. The initial flux of ammonia, during the experiment period, was ~84% more from AD than in UD dairy manure. Keywords. Process based models, mass transfer

  18. Bioaugmentation of anaerobic sludge digestion with iron-reducing bacteria: process and microbial responses to variations in hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-01-01

    Although anaerobic digestion (AD) is a widely used option to manage waste activated sludge (WAS), there are some drawbacks related to its slow reaction rate and low energy productivity. This study examined an anaerobic WAS digester, augmented with an iron-reducing microbial consortium, relative to changes in microbial community structure and process performance at decreasing hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 to 10 days. The enhanced methanation performance (approximately 40 % increase in methane yield) by the bioaugmentation was sustained until the HRT was decreased to 12.5 days, under Fe(3+)-rich conditions (ferric oxyhydroxide, 20 mM Fe). Enhanced iron-reducing activity was evidenced by the increased Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio maintained above 50 % during the stable operational phases. A further decrease in HRT to 10 days resulted in a significant performance deterioration, along with a drop in the Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio to <35 %, after four turnovers of operation. Prevailing existence of putative iron-reducing bacteria (IRBs) was identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), with Spirochaetaceae- and Thauera-related organisms being dominant members, and clear dominance shifts among them with respect to decrease in HRT were observed. Lowering HRT led to evident shifts in bacterial community structure likely associated with washout of IRBs, leading to decreases in iron respiration activity and AD performance at a lower HRT. The bacterial community structure shifted dynamically over phases, and the community transitions correlated well with the changes in process performance. Overall, the combined biostimulation and bioaugmentation investigated in this study proved effective for enhanced methane recovery from anaerobic WAS digestion, which suggests an interesting potential for high-rate AD. PMID:26428233

  19. The investigation of the sludge reduction efficiency and mechanisms in oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process.

    PubMed

    Demir, Özlem; Filibeli, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a full understanding of the sludge reduction mechanisms in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process and presents an evaluation of the sludge reduction efficiencies and sludge characteristics in this process compared to the conventional activated sludge process. Fifty-eight percent reduction in observed yield in the OSA process was achieved compared to the control system at the end of the operational period with no deterioration of effluent quality. The settleability of sludge in the OSA process was also found to be better than that of the control system in terms of sludge volume index. In long-term operation, capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration values confirmed that the OSA process showed good filterability characteristics. The results of batch experiments showed that higher endogenous respiration in the systems might lead to lower sludge production and that energy uncoupling had only a limited impact on sludge reduction. PMID:27191551

  20. Anaerobic processes in waste treatment: Methane production. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and applications of methane gas production by anaerobic conversion of waste materials, primarily agricultural and animal wastes, but including refuse and sewage wastes. Articles discuss the anaerobic processes involved in waste digestion, the microorganisms responsible for bioconversion of wastes, environmental variables and toxins, and energy production using biogas generators. Both large and small scale systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Anaerobic processes in waste treatment: Methane production. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research, development, and applications of methane gas production by anaerobic conversion of waste materials, primarily agricultural and animal wastes, but including refuse and sewage wastes. Articles discuss the anaerobic processes involved in waste digestion, the microorganisms responsible for bioconversion of wastes, environmental variables and toxins, and energy production using biogas generators. Both large and small scale systems are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Effects of Aerobic and Microaerobic Conditions on Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox) Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Strous, M.; Van Gerven, E.; Kuenen, J. G.; Jetten, M.

    1997-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is a promising novel option for removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this study it was shown that the Anammox process was inhibited reversibly by the presence of oxygen. Furthermore, aerobic nitrifiers were shown not to play an important role in the Anammox process. PMID:16535633

  3. Nitrogen availability of anaerobic swine lagoon sludge: sludge source effects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Amber D; Israel, Daniel W; Mikkelsen, Robert L

    2005-02-01

    Increased numbers of swine producers will be removing sludge from their anaerobic waste treatment lagoons in the next few years, due to sludge exceeding designed storage capacity. Information on availability of nitrogen (N) in the sludge is needed to improve application recommendations for crops. The objective of this study was to investigate possible effects of different companies and types of swine operations on the availability of N in sludge from their associated lagoons. A laboratory incubation study was conducted to quantify the availability of N (i.e. initial inorganic N plus the potentially mineralizable organic N) in the sludge. Nine sludge sources from lagoons of sow, nursery and finishing operations of three different swine companies were mixed with a loamy sand soil (200 mg total Kjeldahl N kg(-1) soil) and incubated at a water content of 0.19 g. water g(-1) dry soil and 25+/-2 degrees C for 12 weeks. Samples were taken at eight times over the 12-week period and analyzed for inorganic N (i.e. NH(4)-N and NO(3)-N) to determine mineralization of organic N in the sludge. Company and type of swine operation had no significant effects (P < 0.05) on the pattern of inorganic N accumulation over time. Thus, inorganic N accumulation from all sludge sources was fit to a first order equation [Nt = Ni + No (1-e(-kt)]. This relationship indicated that of the 200 mg of total sludge N added per kg soil, 23.5% was in the form of potentially mineralizable organic N (No) and 17.5% was in the form of inorganic N (Ni). The sum of these two pools (41%) represents an estimate of the proportion of total N in the applied sludge in plant available form after the 12 week incubation. While plant N availability coefficients were not measured in this study, the lack of significant company or type of swine operation effects on sludge N mineralization suggests that use of the same plant N availability coefficient for sludge from different types of lagoons is justifiable. The validity

  4. Effects of substrates on N2O emissions in an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) reactor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Wang, Dunqiu; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    N2O emission in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is of growing concern. In this study, effects of substrate concentrations on N2O emissions were investigated in an anammox reactor. Extremely high N2O emissions of 1.67 % were led by high NH4-N concentrations. Results showed that N2O emissions have a positive correlation with NH4-N concentrations in the anammox reactor. Reducing NH4-N concentrations by recycling pump resulted in decreasing N2O emissions. In addition, further studies were performed to identify a key biological process that is contributed to N2O emissions from the anammox reactor. Based on the results obtained, Nitrosomonas, which can oxidize ammonia to nitrite, was deemed as the main sources of N2O emissions. PMID:27376009

  5. The inhibitory effects and removal of dieldrin in continuous upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    PubMed

    Ergüder, Tuba H; Güven, Engin; Demirer, Göksel N

    2003-09-01

    The inhibitory effects and removal efficiency of dieldrin (DLD) in anaerobic reactors were investigated. Anaerobic toxicity assay (ATA) experiments conducted in batch reactors revealed that 30 mg/l DLD had inhibitory effects on the unacclimated mixed anaerobic cultures. Continuous reactor experiments performed in a lab-scale two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system which was fed with ethanol as the sole carbon source, indicated that anaerobic granular cultures could be successfully acclimated to DLD. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were 88-92% for the two-stage system. The influent DLD concentration of 10 mg/l was removed by 44-86% and 86-94% in the second stage and overall UASB system, respectively. Biosorption of DLD on granular anaerobic biomass was found to be a significant mechanism for DLD removal in the UASB system. The maximum DLD loading rate and minimum HRT achievable for the first stage UASB reactor were 0.5 mg/lday (76 microg DLD/g VSS.day) and 10 h, respectively, which resulted in the overall COD removal efficiency of 85%. PMID:12699940

  6. Kinetic study of anaerobic digestion of fruit-processing wastewater in immobilized-cell bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Borja, R; Banks, C J

    1994-08-01

    The kinetics of the anaerobic digestion of a fruit-processing wastewater [chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 5.1 g/l] were investigated. Laboratory experiments were carried out in bioreactors containing supports of different chemical composition and features, namely bentonite and zeolite (aluminum silicates), sepiolite and saponite (magnesium silicates) and polyurethane foam, to which the microorganisms responsible for the process adhered. The influence of the support medium on the kinetics was compared with a control digester with suspended biomass. Assuming the overall anaerobic digestion process conforms to first-order kinetics, the specific rate constant, K0, was determined for each of the experimental reactors. The average values obtained were: 0.080 h-1 (bentonite); 0.103 h-1 (zeolite); 0.180 h-1 (sepiolite); 0.198 h-1 (saponite); 0.131 h-1 (polyurethane); and 0.037 h-1 (control). The results indicate that the support used to immobilize the micro-organisms had a marked influence on the digestion process; the results were significant at the 95% confidence level. Methanogenic activity increased linearly with COD, with the saponite and sepiolite supports showing the highest values. The yield coefficient of methane was 270 ml of methane (under standard temperature and pressure conditions)/g of COD. The average elimination of COD was 89.5%. PMID:7917066

  7. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris on sugarcane vinasse: the effect of anaerobic digestion pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sheyla Santa Isabel; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; de Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Chinalia, Fábio Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Microalgae farming has been identified as the most eco-sustainable solution for producing biodiesel. However, the operation of full-scale plants is still limited by costs and the utilization of industrial and/or domestic wastes can significantly improve economic profits. Several waste effluents are valuable sources of nutrients for the cultivation of microalgae. Ethanol production from sugarcane, for instance, generates significant amounts of organically rich effluent, the vinasse. After anaerobic digestion treatment, nutrient remaining in such an effluent can be used to grow microalgae. This research aimed to testing the potential of the anaerobic treated vinasse as an alternative source of nutrients for culturing microalgae with the goal of supplying the biodiesel industrial chain with algal biomass and oil. The anaerobic process treating vinasse reached a steady state at about 17 batch cycles of 24 h producing about 0.116 m(3)CH4 kgCODvinasse (-1). The highest productivity of Chlorella vulgaris biomass (70 mg l(-1) day(-1)) was observed when using medium prepared with the anaerobic digester effluent. Lipid productivity varied from 0.5 to 17 mg l(-1) day(-1). Thus, the results show that it is possible to integrate the culturing of microalgae with the sugarcane industry by means of anaerobic digestion of the vinasse. There is also the advantageous possibility of using by-products of the anaerobic digestion such as methane and CO2 for sustaining the system with energy and carbon source, respectively. PMID:24013860

  8. Effects of lipid concentration on anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass wastes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifei; Wang, Dian; Yan, Jiao; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Tianle

    2014-06-01

    The influence of the lipid concentration on the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste-activated sludge was assessed by biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests and by bench-scale tests in a mesophilic semi-continuous stirred tank reactor. The effect of increasing the volatile solid (VS) concentration of lipid from 0% to 75% was investigated. BMP tests showed that lipids in municipal biomass waste could enhance the methane production. The results of bench-scale tests showed that a lipids concentration of 65% of total VS was the inhibition concentration. Methane yields increased with increasing lipid concentration when lipid concentrations were below 60%, but when lipid concentration was set as 65% or higher, methane yields decreased sharply. When lipid concentrations were below 60%, the pH values were in the optimum range for the growth of methanogenic bacteria and the ratios of volatile fatty acid (VFA)/alkalinity were in the range of 0.2-0.6. When lipid concentrations exceeded 65%, the pH values were below 5.2, the reactor was acidized and the values of VFA/alkalinity rose to 2.0. The amount of Brevibacterium decreased with increasing lipid content. Long chain fatty acids stacked on the methanogenic bacteria and blocked the mass transfer process, thereby inhibiting anaerobic digestion. PMID:24075452

  9. Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate bioegradation on actinide speciation.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; VanBriesen, J.; Rittmann, B.E.; Reed, D.T.

    1998-03-19

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems.

  10. Influence of wastewater composition on nutrient removal behaviors in the new anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Gu, Qian; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the new anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization (A2N-IC) system was compared with anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A2N) process to investigate nutrient removal performance under different influent COD and ammonia concentrations. Ammonia and COD removal rates were very stable in both processes, which were maintained at 84.9% and 86.6% when the influent ammonia varied from 30 mg L(-1) to 45 mg L(-1) and COD ranged from 250 mg L(-1) to 300 mg L(-1). The effluent phosphorus always maintained below 0.2 mg L(-1) in A2N-IC, whereas in A2N the effluent phosphorus concentration was 0.4-1.7 mg L(-1), demonstrating that A2N-IC is suitable to apply in a broader influent COD and ammonia concentration range. Under higher influent COD (300 mg L(-1)) or lower ammonia conditions (30 mg L(-1)), the main function of chemical induced crystallization was to coordinate better nutrient ratio for anoxic phosphorus uptake, whereas under high phosphorus concentration, it was to reduce phosphorus loading for biological system. Under the similar influent wastewater compositions, phosphorus release amounts were always lower in A2N-IC. To clarify the decrease procedure of phosphorus release in the A2N-IC, the equilibrium between chemical phosphorus removal and biological phosphorus removal in A2N-IC was analyzed by mass balance equations. During the long-term experiment, some undesirable phenomena were observed: the declining nitrification in post-aerobic tank and calcium phosphorus precipitation in the anaerobic tank. The reasons were analyzed; furthermore, the corresponding improvements were proposed. Nitrification effect could be enhanced in the post-aerobic tank, therefore ammonia removal rate could be increased; and biologically induced phosphorus precipitation could be inhibited by controlling pH at the anaerobic stage, so the phosphorus release and recovery could be improved. PMID:24596502

  11. Activated zeolite--suitable carriers for microorganisms in anaerobic digestion processes?

    PubMed

    Weiß, S; Lebuhn, M; Andrade, D; Zankel, A; Cardinale, M; Birner-Gruenberger, R; Somitsch, W; Ueberbacher, B J; Guebitz, G M

    2013-04-01

    Plant cell wall structures represent a barrier in the biodegradation process to produce biogas for combustion and energy production. Consequently, approaches concerning a more efficient de-polymerisation of cellulose and hemicellulose to monomeric sugars are required. Here, we show that natural activated zeolites (i.e. trace metal activated zeolites) represent eminently suitable mineral microhabitats and potential carriers for immobilisation of microorganisms responsible for anaerobic hydrolysis of biopolymers stabilising related bacterial and methanogenic communities. A strategy for comprehensive analysis of immobilised anaerobic populations was developed that includes the visualisation of biofilm formation via scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, community and fingerprint analysis as well as enzyme activity and identification analyses. Using SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, hydrolytical active protein bands were traced by congo red staining. Liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy revealed cellulolytical endo- and exoglucanase (exocellobiohydrolase) as well as hemicellulolytical xylanase/mannase after proteolytic digestion. Relations to hydrolytic/fermentative zeolite colonisers were obtained by using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) based on amplification of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA fragments. Thereby, dominant colonisers were affiliated to the genera Clostridium, Pseudomonas and Methanoculleus. The specific immobilisation on natural zeolites with functional microbes already colonising naturally during the fermentation offers a strategy to systematically supply the biogas formation process responsive to population dynamics and process requirements. PMID:23435898

  12. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. PMID:24837280

  13. [Modeling and dynamic simulation of the multimode anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic wastewater treatment process].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Du, Xing-Zhi; Jiang, Ling-Yan; Xing, Can

    2013-04-01

    Mathematical modeling is a useful tool for professional education, process development, design evaluation, operational optimization and automatic control of the wastewater treatment system, and has been extensively applied in numerous full-scale wastewater treatment plants. The ASM2d model was calibrated by the process data, and used to simulate 15 operational test runs of the multimode anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic (AAO) process. After calibration, the model was capable of simulating the sludge concentrations and effluent data in 15 test runs of the multimode AAO system. The dynamic simulation results showed an overall good agreement between the measured and simulated data, for both effluent data and sludge concentrations, with a good reproduction of dynamic processes in AO test runs. PMID:23798127

  14. Effects of thermal pre-treatment on anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biowastes at high organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Lian, Songjian; Zheng, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of thermal pre-treated municipal biowaste (MBW) is a field of research that has had limited contributions to date. In this study, laboratory-scale semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters treating thermally treated and non-treated MBW were operated at high organic loading rates (OLR). The results show that the methanogenesis process was inhibited by the accumulated volatile fatty acids when 30% (w/w) of dewatered activated sludge (DAS) was co-digested with food waste (FW) and fruit/vegetable residue (FVR) at high OLR≥10 kg volatile solid m(-3) d(-1). Co-digestion with thermal hydrolysed DAS can significantly improve digester performance. In contrast to DAS, some adverse effects of thermal pretreatment on the biodegradability of FW and FVR were observed. Therefore, co-digestion of FW, FVR with thermally treated DAS is suggested as an alternative to promote high methane production and process stability. PMID:24374189

  15. The effect of music during warm-up on consecutive anaerobic performance in elite adolescent volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, M; Meckel, Y; Nemet, D; Eliakim, A

    2007-04-01

    Music is believed to improve athletic performance. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of arousing music during warm-up on anaerobic performance in elite national level adolescent volleyball players. Twenty-four players (12 males and 12 females) performed the Wingate Anaerobic Test following a 10-minute warm-up with and without music (two separate occasions, random order). During warm-up with music, mean heart rate was significantly higher. Following the warm-up with music, peak anaerobic power was significantly higher in all volleyball players (10.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 11.1 +/- 0.3 Watts/kg, p < 0.05, without and with music, respectively). Gender did not influence the effect of music on peak anaerobic power. Music had no significant effect on mean anaerobic output or fatigue index in both genders. Music affects warm-up and may have a transient beneficial effect on anaerobic performance. PMID:17024625

  16. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  17. Synthetic effect between iron oxide and sulfate mineral on the anaerobic transformation of organic substance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Hu; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo; Xie, Qiao-Qin; Pan, Min

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic effect between sulfate minerals (gypsum) and iron oxide (hematite) on the anaerobic transformation of organic substance was investigated in the current study. The results showed that gypsum was completely decomposed while hematite was partially reduced. The mineral phase analysis results showed that FeS and CaCO3 was the major mineralization product. Methane generation process was inhibited and inorganic carbon contents in the precipitates were enhanced compared to the control without hematite and gypsum. The inorganic carbon content increased with the increasing of hematite dosages. Co-addition of sulfate minerals and iron oxide would have a potential application prospect in the carbon sequestration area and reduction of the greenhouse gas release. The results would also reveal the role of inorganic mineral in the global carbon cycle. PMID:24189378

  18. Model of the anaerobic metabolism of the biological phosphorus removal process: Stoichiometry and pH influence.

    PubMed

    Smolders, G J; van der Meij, J; van Loosdrecht, M C; Heijnen, J J

    1994-03-15

    In the anaerobic phase of a biological phosphorus removal process, acetate is taken up and converted to PHB utilizing both energy generated in the degradation of polyphosphate to phosphate, which is released, and energy generated in the conversion of glycogen to poly-beta-hydroxy butyrate (PHB). The phosphate/acetate ratio cannot be considered a metabolic constant, because the energy requirement for the uptake of acetate is strongly influenced by the pH value. The observed phosphate/acetate ratio shows a variation of 0.25 to 0.75 P-mol/C-mol in a pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. It is shown that stored glycogen takes part in the metabolism to provide reduction equivalents and energy for the conversion of acetate to PHB. A structured metabolic model, based on glycogen as the source of the reduction equivalents in the anaerobic phase and the effect of the pH on the energy requirement of the uptake of acetate, is developed. The model explains the experimental results satisfactorily. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18615742

  19. Prediction and quantifying parameter importance in simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal process using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Qaisar, Mahmood; Luo, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present investigation deals with the prediction of the performance of simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor through an artificial neural network (ANN). Influent sulfide concentration, influent nitrate concentration, S/N mole ratio, pH, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) for 144 days' steady-state condition were the inputs of the model; whereas output parameters were sulfide removal percentage, nitrate removal percentage, sulfate production percentage, and nitrogen production percentage. The prediction performance was evaluated by calculating root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), mean absolute relative error (MARE), and determination coefficient (R (2)) values. Generally, the ANN model exhibited good prediction of the simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal process. The effect of five input parameters to the performance of the reactor was quantified and compared using the connection weights method, Garson's algorithm method, and partial derivatives (PaD) method. The results showed that HRT markedly affects the performance of the reactor. PMID:25523291

  20. Feasibility and interest of the anammox process as treatment alternative for anaerobic digester supernatants in manure processing--an overview.

    PubMed

    Magrí, Albert; Béline, Fabrice; Dabert, Patrick

    2013-12-15

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (ANR) is based on the combination of partial nitritation (PN) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). It is a promising alternative for the subsequent treatment of biogas digester supernatants in livestock manure processing and nitrogen surplus scenarios. However, as no full-scale experiences in the treatment of manure digestates by ANR have been published to date, future field studies addressing treatment of this kind of effluent would be of great interest. Some topics to be considered in these studies would be coupling anaerobic digestion and ANR, analysis of the factors that affect the process, comparing reactor configurations, microbial ecology, gas emissions, and achieving robust performance. This paper provides an overview of published studies on ANR. Specific issues related to the applicability of the process for treating manure digestates are discussed. The energy requirements of ANR are compared with those of other technological alternatives aimed at recovering nitrogen from digester supernatants. The results of the assessment were shown to depend on the composition of the supernatant. In this regard, the PN-anammox process was shown to be more competitive than other alternatives particularly at concentrations of up to 2 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3). PMID:24161806

  1. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  2. [Study on the start-up of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process in biological activated carbon reactor].

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Yi; Zhou, Wei-Li; He, Sheng-Bing

    2013-08-01

    In order to shorten the start-up time of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) reactor, biological activated cabon reactor was applied. Three lab scale UASB reactors were seeded with anaerobic sludge, fed with synthetic wastewater containing ammonia and nitrite, and supplemented with granular activated carbon on day 0, 33 and 56, respectively. The nitrogen removal performance of the first reactor, into which GAC was added on day 0, showed no significant improvement in 90 days. After being suspended for about one month, the secondary start-up of this reactor succeeded in another 33 days (totally 123 days). 49 d and 85 d were taken for the other two reactors started up by the addition of GAC on day 33 and 56, respectively. After the reactors were started up, the average removal rates of total nitrogen were 89.8%, 86.7% and 86.7%, respectively. The start-up process could be divided into four stages, namely, the bacterial autolysis phase, the lag phase, the improve phase and the stationary phase, and the best time for adding GAC carrier was right after the start of the lag phase. PMID:24191565

  3. Comparison of static, in-vessel composting of MSW with thermophilic anaerobic digestion and combinations of the two processes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lee; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    The biological stabilisation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) into a form stable enough for land application can be achieved via aerobic or anaerobic treatments. To investigate the rates of degradation (e.g. via electron equivalents removed, or via carbon emitted) of aerobic and anaerobic treatment, OFMSW samples were exposed to computer controlled laboratory-scale aerobic (static in-vessel composting), and anaerobic (thermophilic anaerobic digestion with liquor recycle) treatment individually and in combination. A comparison of the degradation rates, based on electron flow revealed that provided a suitable inoculum was used, anaerobic digestion was the faster of the two waste conversion process. In addition to faster maximum substrate oxidation rates, anaerobic digestion (followed by post-treatment aerobic maturation), when compared to static composting alone, converted a larger fraction of the organics to gaseous end-products (CO2 and CH4), leading to improved end-product stability and maturity, as measured by compost self-heating and root elongation tests, respectively. While not comparable to windrow and other mixed, highly aerated compost systems, our results show that in the thermophilic, in-vessel treatment investigated here, the inclusion of a anaerobic phase, rather than using composting alone, improved hydrolysis rates as well as oxidation rates and product stability. The combination of the two methods, as used in the DiCOM process, was also tested allowing heat generation to thermophilic operating temperature, biogas recovery and a low odour stable end-product within 19 days of operation. PMID:19345576

  4. Development and optimisation of VFA driven DEAMOX process for treatment of strong nitrogenous anaerobic effluents.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S V; Gladchenko, M A; Kang, Ho; Mulder, A; Versprille, A

    2008-01-01

    The recently proposed DEAMOX (DEnitrifying AMmonium OXidation) process combines the anammox reaction with autotrophic denitrifying conditions using sulphide as an electron donor for the production of nitrite from nitrate within an anaerobic biofilm. This paper firstly presents a feasibility study of the DEAMOX process using synthetic (ammonia + nitrate) wastewater where sulphide is replaced by volatile fatty acids (VFA) as a more widespread electron donor for partial denitrification. Under the influent N-NH+4/N-NO3(-) and COD/N-NO3(-) ratios of 1 and 2.3, respectively, the typical efficiencies of ammonia removal were around 40% (no matter whether a VFA mixture or only acetate were used) for nitrogen loading rates (NLR) up to 1236 mg N/l/d. This parameter increased to 80% by increasing the influent COD/N-NO3(-) ratio to 3.48 and decreasing the influent N-NH4 +/N-NO3(-) ratio to 0.29. As a result, the total nitrogen removal increased to 95%. The proposed process was further tested with typical strong nitrogenous effluent such as reject water (total N, 530-566 mg N/l; total COD, 1530-1780 mg/l) after thermophilic sludge anaerobic digestion. For this, the raw wastewater was split and partially ( approximately 50%) fed to a nitrifying reactor (to generate nitrate) and the remaining part ( approximately 50%) was directed to the DEAMOX reactor where this stream was mixed with the nitrified effluent. Stable process performance up to NLR of 1,243 mg N/l/d in the DEAMOX reactor was achieved resulting in 40, 100, and 66% removal of ammonia, NOx(-), and total nitrogen, respectively. PMID:18309208

  5. Anaerobic slurry co-digestion of poultry manure and straw: effect of organic loading and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In order to obtain basic design criteria for anaerobic digestion of a mixture of poultry manure and wheat straw, the effects of different temperatures and organic loading rates on the biogas yield and methane contents were evaluated. Since poultry manure is a poor substrate, in term of the availability of the nutrients, external supplementation of carbon has to be regularly performed, in order to achieve a stable and efficient process. The complete-mix, pilot-scale digester with working volume of 70 L was used. The digestion operated at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C with organic loading rates of 1.0, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 kg Volatile solid/m3d and a HRT of 15 days. At a temperature of 35°C, the methane yield was increased by 43% compared to 25°C. Anaerobic co-digestion appeared feasible with a loading rate of 3.0 kg VS/m3d at 35°C. At this state, the specific methane yield was calculated about 0.12 m3/kg VS with a methane content of 53–70.2% in the biogas. The volatile solid (VS) removal was 72%. As a result of volatile fatty acid accumulation and decrease in pH, when the loading rate was less than 1 or greater than 4 kg VS/m3d, the process was inhibited or overloaded, respectively. Both the lower and higher loading rates resulted in a decline in the methane yield. PMID:24502409

  6. Influence of carbon source amendment on effectiveness of anaerobic soil disinfestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also termed biological soil disinfestation or soil reductive sterilization) is a non-chemical soil disinfestation process which includes 1) soil incorporation of a labile carbon (C) source, 2) mulching with a polyethylene film to limit gas exchange, and 3) drip ir...

  7. Resource recovery and epidemiology of anaerobic wastewater treatment process in a controlled ecological life support system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Hunt, M.D.

    1995-02-01

    The results of work accomplished under two different areas: (1) Resource Recovery of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment process, and (2) Epidemiological Study of an Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Process are documented. The first part of the work was to set up and test three anaerobic digesters and then run these three digesters with a NASA-simulated wastewater. The second part of the work was to use a multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis as the indicator bacteria for the epidemiological study. Details of these two parts can be found in two master`s theses and are described in Sections 3 and 4 of this report. Several important results condensed from these two parts are summarized in Section 2.

  8. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pretreatment: effect of volatile to total solids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Duan, Xu; Chen, Jianguang; Fang, Kuo; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this study the effect of volatile to total solids (VS/TS) on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) pretreated by alkaline, thermal and thermal-alkaline strategies was studied. Experimental results showed that the production of methane from sludge was increased with VS/TS. When anaerobic digesters were fed with sludge pretreated by the thermal-alkaline method, the average methane yield was improved from 2.8 L/d at VS/TS 0.35 to 4.7 L/d at VS/TS 0.56. Also, the efficiency of VS reduction during sludge anaerobic digestion varied between 18.9% and 45.6%, and increased gradually with VS/TS. Mechanism investigation of VS/TS on WAS anaerobic digestion suggested that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, activities of key enzymes related to sludge hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis, and the ratio of Archaea to Bacteria were all increased with VS/TS, showing good agreement with methane production. PMID:26698921

  9. Deterministic processes guide long-term synchronised population dynamics in replicate anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D; Dennis, Paul G; Hugenholtz, Philip; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    A replicate long-term experiment was conducted using anaerobic digestion (AD) as a model process to determine the relative role of niche and neutral theory on microbial community assembly, and to link community dynamics to system performance. AD is performed by a complex network of microorganisms and process stability relies entirely on the synergistic interactions between populations belonging to different functional guilds. In this study, three independent replicate anaerobic digesters were seeded with the same diverse inoculum, supplied with a model substrate, α-cellulose, and operated for 362 days at a 10-day hydraulic residence time under mesophilic conditions. Selective pressure imposed by the operational conditions and model substrate caused large reproducible changes in community composition including an overall decrease in richness in the first month of operation, followed by synchronised population dynamics that correlated with changes in reactor performance. This included the synchronised emergence and decline of distinct Ruminococcus phylotypes at day 148, and emergence of a Clostridium and Methanosaeta phylotype at day 178, when performance became stable in all reactors. These data suggest that many dynamic functional niches are predictably filled by phylogenetically coherent populations over long time scales. Neutral theory would predict that a complex community with a high degree of recognised functional redundancy would lead to stochastic changes in populations and community divergence over time. We conclude that deterministic processes may play a larger role in microbial community dynamics than currently appreciated, and under controlled conditions it may be possible to reliably predict community structural and functional changes over time. PMID:24739627

  10. Study of the sludge reduction in an oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process based on UNITANK.

    PubMed

    Sun, L P; Chen, J F; Guo, W Z; Fu, X P; Tan, J X; Wang, T J

    2015-01-01

    An oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) can effectively reduce sludge production, but most of the research studies on the OSA process have been either under laboratory test conditions or based on synthetic wastewater, which cannot fully reflect the performance and sludge reduction efficiency in existing OSA process. Thus, aiming at examining the sludge reduction efficiency and the stability of the OSA process, UNITANK and UNITANK-OSA processes were performed in a 120 m(3)/d pilot-scale system using actual sewage. The results indicate that UNITANK-OSA achieved a 48% reduction of the sludge compared to the reduction due to UNITANK, not considering the accumulation of the effluent-suspended solids. The effluent quality was not found to change significantly, except that the total phosphorus concentration increased slightly. The extracellular polymeric substances metal floc theory may, to some extent, explain this reduction in this study. The OSA process could be used to reform the classic wastewater treatment process to get lower sludge mass. PMID:25607677

  11. Bio-desulfurization and denitrification by anaerobic-anoxic process for the treatment of wastewater from flue gas washing.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyu; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    For amine-based carbon dioxide capture, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides were the main pollutants that had a negative effect on the regeneration of solvent. Before carbon dioxide capture, the sulfur oxides in flue gas should be removed by the method of calcium salt, and then washed by alkaline solution to eliminate the residual nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The washing wastewater containing sulfate and nitrate needs to be treated. In this study, a novel anaerobic-anoxic process was built up for the treatment of this washing wastewater. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria. Sulfate was firstly reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria, and then selectively oxidized to element sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The treated liquid could be reused as absorption after the adjustment of pH value. The performances of this bioprocess were investigated under various pH values and S/N ratios. It was found that the optimal pH value of influent was 6.0, the percentages of denitrification and sulfate reducing could reach 90 and 89%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of sulfate was transformed into element sulfur. Nitrate significantly had a negative effect on sulfate reduction above 10 mM. As 20 mM nitrate, the sulfate reducing percentage would drop to 67%. These results showed that the anaerobic-anoxic process was feasible for the treatment of flue gas washing wastewater. It would be prospectively applied to other wastewater with the higher ratio of SO4(2-)/NO3(-). PMID:23656948

  12. [Effect of substrate concentration on pathogen indicators inactivation during thermophilic anaerobic digestion].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Li, Jian; Tong, Zi-Lin; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2014-03-01

    Because excess sludge contains high density of pathogens, it has to be treated to reduce pathogens before being disposed for land application. In this study, the effect of substrate concentration on pathogen inactivation during thermophilic anaerobic digestion was investigated. The results show that, with the increase of substrate concentration, VFAs and cumulative methane production increased. The density of total coliforms in the suspension liquid has a 2.0-3.0 orders of magnitude decline and fecal coliforms has 1.8-3.3 orders of magnitude decline after 28 days thermophilic anaerobic digestion at substrate concentration of 28-84 g x L(-1) and temperature of 55 degrees C. More than 99% of total coliforms and fecal coliforms have been killed after 28 days digestion. Salmonella spp. was not detected in the suspension and solid after anaerobic digestion. When substrate concentration was higher than 45 g x L(-1), the inactivation of total coliforms and fecal coliforms declined. PMID:24881391

  13. Nutrient removal and phosphorus recovery performances of a novel anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying/induced crystallization process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Lu, Xiwu; Yu, Ran; Zhu, Wentao

    2012-10-01

    An anaerobic-anoxic/nitrifying (A(2)N) two sludge process coupled with induced crystallization (IC) called A(2)N-IC process was developed for wastewater nutrient removal and phosphorus recovery. The performances of A(2)N-IC process in comparison with A(2)N process at different COD to phosphorus (COD/P) feeding ratios were investigated. The results indicated that A(2)N-IC achieved not only high and stable nutrient removal but also phosphorus recovery. Calcium phosphorus crystals were formed in the crystallization reactor in A(2)N-IC. Moreover, the incorporation of chemical induced crystallization improved biological phosphorus removal. In A(2)N-IC process, phosphorus removal efficiency was consistently maintained at 99.2%, whereas in A(2)N it decreased from 93.0% to 65.7% with the decrease of feeding COD/P ratio. The COD and ammonia removal efficiencies were regardless of feeding COD/P ratio in the two processes. PMID:22858484

  14. The role of paraffin oil on the interaction between denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation and Anammox processes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    Methane is sparingly soluble in water, resulting in a slow reaction rate in the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process. The slow rate limits the feasibility of research to examine the interaction between the DAMO and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process. In this study, optimized 5 % (v/v) paraffin oil was added as a second liquid phase to improve methane solubility in a reactor containing DAMO and Anammox microbes. After just addition, methane solubility was found to increase by 25 % and DAMO activity was enhanced. After a 100-day cultivation, the paraffin reactor showed almost two times higher consumption rates of NO3 (-) (0.2268 mmol/day) and NH4 (+) (0.1403 mmol/day), compared to the control reactor without paraffin oil. The microbes tended to distribute in the oil-water interface. The quantitative (q) PCR result showed the abundance of gene copies of DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and Anammox bacteria in the paraffin reactor were higher than those in the control reactor after 1 month. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the percentages of the three microbes were 55.5 and 77.6 % in the control and paraffin reactors after 100 days, respectively. A simple model of mass balance was developed to describe the interactions between DAMO and Anammox microbes and validate the activity results. A mechanism was proposed to describe the possible way that paraffin oil enhanced DAMO activity. It is quite clear that paraffin oil enhances not only DAMO activity but also Anammox activity via the interaction between them; both NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) consumption rates were about two times those of the control. PMID:26036704

  15. Liquefaction and methanization of solid and liquid coffee wastes by two phase anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Houbron, E; Larrinaga, A; Rustrian, E

    2003-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the feasibility of volatile fatty acid (VFA) production from coffee pulp hydrolyse, and further to determine the potential of methanization of both the pre-acidified effluent and the coffee wastewater. The experiments were carried out in 2 completely mixed reactors, each one with a working volume of 4 litres. Coffee pulp was used as substrate in the acidogenic reactor and different mixtures of pulper and wash-water and pre-acidified effluent in the methanogenic one. The acidogenic and methanogenic reactors were operated at an organic loading rate of 5 COD g x l(-1) x d(-1) and 0.5 COD g x l(-1) x d(-1). The total, soluble and VFA's effluent COD concentrations of the acidogenic reactor present average values of 57.75, 17.00 and 13.92 g x l(-1) respectively. Under these experimental conditions, 23% (COD based) of coffee pulp was hydrolysed with a rate of 1.32 gCOD x l(-1) x d(-1) and the soluble fraction was transformed to VFA's with an acidification efficiency of 82%. Total VFA's concentration reached a value of 13.9 gCOD x l(-1), and acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate represented 52%, 28%, 9% and 11% respectively of the liquid phase COD. In the methanogenic reactor, COD removal and methanization of fresh coffee wastewater, pre-acidified effluent and both combined occur with an efficiency of 85% to 95% respectively, with a characteristic biogas composition of 80% CH4 and 20% CO2. These results show that a humid coffee "Beneficio" processing daily 23 tons of cherry coffee (fresh fruit), equipped with a two stage anaerobic digestion process could generate at least 1,886 CH4 m3 x d(-1). This represents an increase in methane production by a factor 3 to 5 compared to a "Beneficio" using anaerobic digestion only for the treatment of its wastewater. PMID:14640226

  16. Is anaerobic digestion effective for the removal of organic micropollutants and biological activities from sewage sludge?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, L; Papa, M; Feretti, D; Ceretti, E; Mazzoleni, G; Steimberg, N; Pedrazzani, R; Bertanza, G; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of emerging organic micropollutants (OMPs) in sewage sludge has been widely reported; nevertheless, their fate during sludge treatment remains unclear. The objective of this work was to study the fate of OMPs during mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD), the most common processes used for sludge stabilization, by using raw sewage sludge without spiking OMPs. Moreover, the results of analytical chemistry were complemented with biological assays in order to verify the possible adverse effects (estrogenic and genotoxic) on the environment and human health in view of an agricultural (re)use of digested sludge. Musk fragrances (AHTN, HHCB), ibuprofen (IBP) and triclosan (TCS) were the most abundant compounds detected in sewage sludge. In general, the efficiency of the AD process was not dependent on operational parameters but compound-specific: some OMPs were highly biotransformed (e.g. sulfamethoxazole and naproxen), while others were only slightly affected (e.g. IBP and TCS) or even unaltered (e.g. AHTN and HHCB). The MCF-7 assay evidenced that estrogenicity removal was driven by temperature. The Ames test did not show point mutation in Salmonella typhimurium while the Comet test exhibited a genotoxic effect on human leukocytes attenuated by AD. This study highlights the importance of combining chemical analysis and biological activities in order to establish appropriate operational strategies for a safer disposal of sewage sludge. Actually, it was demonstrated that temperature has an insignificant effect on the disappearance of the parent compounds while it is crucial to decrease estrogenicity. PMID:27344252

  17. Pilot plant study of the effects of quebracho and wattle on anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Eye, J.D.; Ficker, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    Quebracho and wattle tannin adversely affected the operational control required for the systems as well as CH4 production. The anaerobic organisms however degraded the tannins and the characteristic red color was effectively removed from the supernatant (liquid phase of digested sludge) during digestion.

  18. Effect of Short-Term, High-Intensity Exercise on Anaerobic Threshold in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.

    This study investigated the effects of a six-week, high-intensity cycling program on anaerobic threshold (AT) in ten women. Subjects trained four days a week using high-intensity interval-type cycle exercises. Workouts included six 4-minute intervals cycling at 85 percent maximal oxygen uptake (VO sub 2 max), separated by 3-minute intervals of…

  19. A new multiple-stage electrocoagulation process on anaerobic digestion effluent to simultaneously reclaim water and clean up biogas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Stromberg, David; Liu, Xuming; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-21

    A new multiple-stage treatment process was developed via integrating electrocoagulation with biogas pumping to simultaneously reclaim anaerobic digestion effluent and clean up biogas. The 1st stage of electrocoagulation treatment under the preferred reaction condition led to removal efficiencies of 30%, 81%, 37% and >99.9% for total solids, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, respectively. Raw biogas was then used as a reactant and pumped into the effluent to simultaneously neutralize pH of the effluent and remove H2S in the biogas. The 2nd stage of electrocoagulation treatment on the neutralized effluent showed that under the selected reaction condition, additional 60% and 10% of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand were further removed. The study concluded a dual-purpose approach for the first time to synergistically combine biogas purification and water reclamation for anaerobic digestion system, which well addresses the downstream challenges of anaerobic digestion technology. PMID:25540943

  20. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) under realistic seasonal temperature variations: Characteristics of biogranules and process performance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiong; Xing, Bao-Shan; Li, Peng; Xu, Jia-Li; Yang, Chen-Chen; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the effects of realistic seasonal temperatures on the nitrogen removal performance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and the properties of the anammox granules were comparatively investigated for 330 days. The results demonstrated that the nitrogen removal efficiency (NRE), nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and nitrogen removal rate (NRR) were decreased dramatically, as the temperature decreased from 31.2 to 2.5 °C. However, the nitrogen removal performance recovered andante as the temperature increased gradually. After low temperature exposure, the settleability tended to worsen, and granules appeared to be more irregular with a smaller average granule diameter, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content increased slightly, while the specific anammox activity (SAA) decreased obviously. This realistic seasonal temperatures based research was an illation of the actual operation, and could be potentially implemented to maintain stability for the application of anammox technology. PMID:26111630

  1. Color, organic matter and sulfate removal from textile effluents by anaerobic and aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Amaral, F M; Kato, M T; Florêncio, L; Gavazza, S

    2014-07-01

    An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-submerged aerated biofilter (SAB) system was evaluated to remove color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from real textile effluent. The system was operated for 335 days in three phases (P-1, P-2, P-3) with total hydraulic retention time varying from 21 h to 14 h. The results showed that high sulfate levels (>300 mg SO4(2-)/L) impaired the dye reduction. The best color removal efficiencies of 30% and 96% for the UASB and the reactor system, respectively, were obtained in P-1; the SAB higher efficiency was associated with adsorption. The best COD removal efficiency of 71% for the reactor system was obtained in P-2. Precipitation of some material composed mostly of sulfur (98%) and some metals occurred in the UASB. However, the precipitated sulfur was again oxidized in the SAB. The system also showed an effective toxicity reduction in tests (Daphnia magna) with the treated effluent. PMID:24813565

  2. High-rate two-phase process for the anaerobic degradation of cellulose, employing rumen microorganisms for an efficient acidogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gijzen, H.J.; Zwart, K.B.; Verhagen, F.J.M.; Vogels, G.D.

    1988-04-05

    A novel two-stage anaerobic process for the microbial conversion of cellulose into biogas has been developed. In the first phase, a mixed population of rumen bacteria and ciliates was used in the hydrolysis and fermentation of cellulose. The volatile fatty acids (VFA) produced in this acidogenic reactor were subsequently converted into biogas in a UASB-type methanogenic reactor. A stepwise increase of the loading rate from 11.9 to 25.8 g volatile solids/L reactor volume/day (g VS/L/day) did not affect the degradation efficiency in the acidogenic reactor, whereas the methanogenic reactor appeared to be overloaded at the highest loading rate. Cellulose digestion was almost complete at all loading rates applied. The two-stage anaerobic process was also tested with a closed fluid circuit. In this instance total methane production was 0.438 L CH/sub 4//g VS added, which is equivalent to 98% of the theoretical value. The application of rumen microorganisms in combination with a high-rate methane reactor is proposed as a means of efficient anaerobic degradation of cellulosic residues to methane. Because this newly developed two-phase system is based on processes and microorganisms from the ruminant, it will be referred to as Rumen Derived Anaerobic Digestion (RUDAD)-process.

  3. The effect of enzyme addition on anaerobic digestion of JoseTall Wheat Grass.

    PubMed

    Romano, Rowena T; Zhang, Ruihong; Teter, Sarah; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2009-10-01

    The effects of the addition of enzyme products containing cellulase, hemicellulase, and beta-glucosidase to anaerobic digestion systems were studied using JoseTall Wheat Grass (wheat grass) as a model substrate. Anaerobic digestion tests were performed using batch reactors operated at 50 degrees C. The application of enzyme products in three digestion configurations were simulated and investigated: (1) enzyme addition to a single-stage digester, (2) pre-treatment of wheat grass with enzymes followed by a single-stage anaerobic digestion, and (3) enzyme addition to the first stage (hydrolysis and acidification) of a two-stage digestion system. The enzyme products showed positive effects on the solubilization of wheat grass when used alone to treat the wheat grass. However, no significant differences in biogas and methane yields, and volatile solids reduction resulted when the enzyme products were tested in the anaerobic digestion systems. This reveals that the microorganisms present in the inoculum were effective in carrying out the digestion of wheat grass. The types of microorganisms present in the inoculum were identified using 16S rRNA sequence analysis. A comparison of the sequences between the different inocula revealed that the prevalent operational taxonomic units were similar, but that the acidified inoculum contained a higher percentage of the species Thermotogae. PMID:19467589

  4. Effects of psychological priming, video, and music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Loizou, G; Karageorghis, C I

    2015-12-01

    Peak performance videos accompanied by music can help athletes to optimize their pre-competition mindset and are often used. Priming techniques can be incorporated into such videos to influence athletes' motivational state. There has been limited empirical work investigating the combined effects of such stimuli on anaerobic performance. The present study examined the psychological and psychophysiological effects of video, music, and priming when used as a pre-performance intervention for an anaerobic endurance task. Psychological measures included the main axes of the circumplex model of affect and liking scores taken pre-task, and the Exercise-induced Feeling Inventory, which was administered post-task. Physiological measures comprised heart rate variability and heart rate recorded pre-task. Fifteen males (age = 26.3 ± 2.8 years) were exposed to four conditions prior to performing the Wingate Anaerobic Test: music-only, video and music, video with music and motivational primes, and a no-video/no-music control. Results indicate that the combined video, music, and primes condition was the most effective in terms of influencing participants' pre-task affect and subsequent anaerobic performance; this was followed by the music-only condition. The findings indicate the utility of such stimuli as a pre-performance technique to enhance athletes' or exercisers' psychological states. PMID:25556962

  5. Identification and quantification of microbial populations in activated sludge and anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Reyes, M; Borrás, L; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2015-01-01

    Eight different phenotypes were studied in an activated sludge process (AeR) and anaerobic digester (AnD) in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant by means of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and automated FISH quantification software. The phenotypes were ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO), sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), methanotrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Some findings were unexpected: (a) Presence of PAO, GAO and denitrifiers in the AeR possibly due to unexpected environmental conditions caused by oxygen deficiencies or its ability to survive aerobically; (b) presence of SRB in the AeR due to high sulphate content of wastewater intake and possibly also due to digested sludge being recycled back into the primary clarifier; (c) presence of methanogenic archaea in the AeR, which can be explained by the recirculation of digested sludge and its ability to survive periods of high oxygen levels; (d) presence of denitrifying bacteria in the AnD which cannot be fully explained because the nitrate level in the AnD was not measured. However, other authors reported the existence of denitrifiers in environments where nitrate or oxygen was not present suggesting that denitrifiers can survive in nitrate-free anaerobic environments by carrying out low-level fermentation; (e) the results of this paper are relevant because of the focus on the identification of nearly all the significant bacterial and archaeal groups of microorganisms with a known phenotype involved in the biological wastewater treatment. PMID:25409582

  6. A combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed and trickling biofilter process for the treatment of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bowei; Li, Jiangzheng; Buelna, Gerardo; Dubé, Rino; Le Bihan, Yann

    2016-05-01

    A combined upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-trickling biofilter (TBF) process was constructed to treat swine wastewater, a typical high-strength organic wastewater with low carbon/nitrogen ratio and ammonia toxicity. The results showed that the UASB-TBF system can remarkably enhance the removal of pollutants in the swine wastewater. At an organic loading rate of 2.29 kg/m(3) d and hydraulic retention time of 48 h in the UASB, the chemical oxygen demand (COD), Suspended Solids and Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen removals of the combined process reached 83.6%, 84.1% and 41.2%, respectively. In the combined system the UASB served as a pretreatment process for COD removal while nitrification and denitrification occurred only in the TBF process. The TBF performed reasonably well at a surface hydraulic load as high as 0.12 m(3)/m(2) d. Since the ratio of influent COD to total mineral nitrogen was less than 3.23, it is reasonable to suggest that the wood chips in TBF can serve as a new carbon source for denitrification. PMID:26588487

  7. An examination of the effects of detergents on anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Kojo Arthur; Forster, Christopher F

    2003-11-01

    An anaerobic filter was used to examine the treatability of wastewater formulated to simulate that from the manufacture of detergents. The detergent element was a mixture (1:1:1 v/v) of concentrated washing up liquid, a non-biological hand washing detergent and a fabric softener and, thus contained a combination of cationic surfactants, anionic surfactants, non-ionic surfactants and amphoteric surfactants. A concentration of 2 ml/l caused a deterioration in the performance of the digester which was pronounced after 7 days. When the packing of the filter was modified to include two layers of granular activated carbon, 320 g in total, the reactor was capable of treating a feed containing 10 ml/l. The amount of detergent removed during this second trial was greater than the Langmuir monolayer capacity of the carbon, indicating that both adsorption and degradation were occurring. The results also showed that, at detergent concentrations greater than 1 ml/l, the theoretical COD removal was lower than the actual COD removal. This was compatible with there being an element of adsorption by the activated carbon. PMID:12895555

  8. Effects of transient temperature increases on odor production from thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, R; Alatriste-Mondragon, F; Cox, H H J; Haug, R T

    2005-01-01

    The City of Los Angeles, Bureau of Sanitation, has implemented thermophilic anaerobic sludge digestion at the Hyperion and Terminal Island Treatment Plants (HTP and TITP). A two-stage continuous-batch process was established at HTP, while a single-stage sequencing batch process was established at TITP. This was to evaluate compliance with the Class A pathogen reduction requirements of U.S. EPA 40 CFR Part 503. A rapid increase of the digester temperature at TITP from 57.5 to 65.5 degrees C caused an increase of the volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio, a decline in digester performance, and an elevated production of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide. A rapid increase of the digester temperature at HTP from 54 to 58 degrees C caused an elevated production of methyl mercaptan, but the effect on the volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio and digester performance was insignificant. It is likely that these effects observed at TITP and HTP were transient responses to rapid changes in temperature. PMID:16180433

  9. Start-up of a combined anaerobic/partial nitritation/anammox process for high-salt mustard wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Ma, Teng-Fei; Hu, Xiao; Fang, Fang; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Guo, Jin-Song; Bao, Zhen-Guo; Yan, Peng

    2015-01-01

    To treat high salinity wastewater from the mustard pickling industry, a combined anaerobic, partial nitritation (PN), and anammox process was employed using three connected reactors: an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) for anaerobic treatment, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for PN, and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) for anammox. The start-up of the three individual reactors was investigated. Results showed that each reactor started up successfully, notwithstanding the stepwise increase of influent salinity to about 16.1 g NaCl/L. In the ASBBR, 89.7 % of chemical oxygen demand in the influent was removed and organic nitrogen was converted to ammonium (NH4 (+)-N). The SBR performed well with NO3 (-)-N concentration of 4.9 mg/L and ratio of NO2 (-)-N to NH4 (+)-N at the range of 1.0 to 1.3 in the effluent, which favored the anammox process. After the start-up of the UASB, the anammox process also showed stability and efficiency with a high total nitrogen removal efficiency of 86.2 % under high salinity of 12.0 g NaCl/L and nitrogen loading rate of 258 mg/(L · day). PMID:25240848

  10. Effect of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds pretreatments on foaming in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, N; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2014-10-01

    Foam appears regularly in anaerobic digesters producing operational and safety problems. In this research, based on the operational observation at semi-industrial pilot scale where sludge pretreatment mitigated foaming in anaerobic digesters, this study aimed at evaluating any potential relationship between foaming tools applied to activated sludge at lab-scale (foam potential, foam stability and Microthrix parvicella abundance) and the experimental behavior observed in pilot scale and full-scale anaerobic digesters. The potential of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds for reducing foaming capacity was also evaluated. Filamentous bacteria abundance was directly linked to foaming capacity in anaerobic processes. A maximum reduction of M.parvicella abundance (from 5 to 2) was reached using thermal hydrolysis with steam explosion at 170°C and ultrasounds at 66.7kWh/m(3), showing both good anti-foaming properties. On the other hand, foam potential and stability determinations showed a lack of consistency with the bacteria abundance results and experimental evidences. PMID:25168914

  11. Biotic and abiotic processes contribute to successful anaerobic degradation of cyanide by UASB reactor biomass treating brewery waste water.

    PubMed

    Novak, Domen; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Pirc, Elizabeta Tratar; Jerman, Vesna; Insam, Heribert; Logar, Romana Marinšek; Stres, Blaž

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the general aerobic detoxification of industrial effluents containing cyanide, anaerobic cyanide degradation is not well understood, including the microbial communities involved. To address this knowledge gap, this study measured anaerobic cyanide degradation and the rearrangements in bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor biomass treating brewery waste water using bio-methane potential assays, molecular profiling, sequencing and microarray approaches. Successful biogas formation and cyanide removal without inhibition were observed at cyanide concentrations up to 5 mg l(-1). At 8.5 mg l(-1) cyanide, there was a 22 day lag phase in microbial activity, but subsequent methane production rates were equivalent to when 5 mg l(-1) was used. The higher cumulative methane production in cyanide-amended samples indicated that part of the biogas was derived from cyanide degradation. Anaerobic degradation of cyanide using autoclaved UASB biomass proceeded at a rate more than two times lower than when UASB biomass was not autoclaved, indicating that anaerobic cyanide degradation was in fact a combination of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes for the first time identified and linked the bacterial phylum Firmicutes and the archaeal genus Methanosarcina sp. as important microbial groups involved in cyanide degradation. Methanogenic activity of unadapted granulated biomass was detected at higher cyanide concentrations than reported previously for the unadapted suspended biomass, making the aggregated structure and predominantly hydrogenotrophic nature of methanogenic community important features in cyanide degradation. The combination of brewery waste water and cyanide substrate was thus shown to be of high interest for industrial level anaerobic cyanide degradation. PMID:23726700

  12. Soaking pretreatment of corn stover for bioethanol production followed by anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhuang; Tian, Shen; Chen, Zebing; Li, Jia; Yang, Xiushan

    2012-08-01

    The production of ethanol and methane from corn stover (CS) was investigated in a biorefinery process. Initially, a novel soaking pretreatment (NaOH and aqueous-ammonia) for CS was developed to remove lignin, swell the biomass, and improve enzymatic digestibility. Based on the sugar yield during enzymatic hydrolysis, the optimal pretreatment conditions were 1 % NaOH+8 % NH(4)OH, 50°C, 48 h, with a solid-to-liquid ratio 1:10. The results demonstrated that soaking pretreatment removed 63.6 % lignin while reserving most of the carbohydrates. After enzymatic hydrolysis, the yields of glucose and xylose were 78.5 % and 69.3 %, respectively. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated CS using Pichia stipitis resulted in an ethanol concentration of 36.1 g/L, corresponding only to 63.3 % of the theoretical maximum. In order to simplify the process and reduce the capital cost, the liquid fraction of the pretreatment was used to re-soak new CS. For methane production, the re-soaked CS and the residues of SSF were anaerobically digested for 120 days. Fifteen grams CS were converted to 1.9 g of ethanol and 1337.3 mL of methane in the entire process. PMID:22669688

  13. Applications of Anammox based processes to treat anaerobic digester supernatant at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Padín, Jose; Fernádez, Isaac; Figueroa, Mónica; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, Jose-Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2009-06-01

    The supernatant of an anaerobic digester was treated at 20 degrees C in two systems. The first one is a two units configuration, conformed by two sequencing batch reactors (SBR), carrying out partial nitrification and Anammox processes, respectively. Partial nitrification was achieved by granular biomass with a mean diameter of 3 mm, operating at a dissolved oxygen concentration of 2.7 mg/L. The combined system allowed the removal of nitrogen loading rates around 0.08 g N/(Ld). Afterwards, Anammox biomass was spontaneously developed in the inner core of the nitrifying granules of the SBR and therefore, partial nitrification and Anammox process were carried out in a single unit. Once the stable CANON process was established, a mean nitrogen removal rate of 0.8 g N/(Ld) was registered. The settling velocities of the granules ranged from 70 to 150 m/h with sludge volumetric index values lower than 50 mL/g VSS during the whole operation. PMID:19246192

  14. Kinetics and thermodynamics of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process using Brocadia spp. dominated mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Puyol, D; Carvajal-Arroyo, J M; Garcia, B; Sierra-Alvarez, R; Field, J A

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial process commonly applied to treat ammonium pollution in effluents with low organic carbon content. Modeling anammox processes is important for simulating and controlling full-scale plants. In this study, the anammox process was simulated using three models, and substrate and growth parameters obtained by different research groups. Two Brocadia spp.-dominated mixed cultures, one granular and the other flocculent, were used for this purpose. A very good correlation between experimental data using both sludges and model predictions was achieved by one of the models, obtaining correlation coefficients higher than 0.997. Other models and stoichiometric equations tested were unable to predict the anammox kinetics and stoichiometry. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behavior of the two mixed cultures was compared through the determination of the energy of activation of the anammox conversion at temperatures ranging from 9 to 40 °C. Optimum temperature for anammox activity was established at 30-35 °C in both cases. The energy of activation values calculated for granular sludge and flocculent sludge were 64 and 124 kJ mol(-1), respectively. PMID:24759529

  15. Effects of alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion from food waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Xikui

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of some alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion (AD) from food waste (FW). Four alkalinity sources, namely lime mud from papermaking (LMP), waste eggshell (WES), CaCO3 and NaHCO3, were applied as buffer materials and their stability effects were evaluated in batch AD. The results showed that LMP and CaCO3 had more remarkable effects than NaHCO3 and WES on FW stabilization. The methane yields were 120.2, 197.0, 156.2, 251.0 and 194.8 ml g(-1) VS for the control and synergistic digestions of CaCO3, NaHCO3, LMP and WES added into FW, respectively. The corresponding final alkalinity reached 5906, 7307, 9504, 7820 and 6782 mg l(-1), while the final acidities were determined to be 501, 200, 50, 350 and 250 mg l(-1), respectively. This indicated that the synergism between alkalinity and inorganic micronutrients from different alkalinity sources played an important role in the process stability of AD from FW. PMID:26391806

  16. The effect of managing nutrients in the performance of anaerobic digesters of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Demirer, Sibel Uludag; Taskin, Bilgin; Demirer, Goksel N; Duran, Metin

    2013-09-01

    Is it possible to create conditions in the anaerobic digesters to control nutrients without changing the performance of a reactor? This study investigates an answer for this question. To this purpose, anaerobic reactors are operated at high concentrations of Mg(2+) ion to harvest the nutrient ions (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) in the form of struvite, that is, magnesium ammonium phosphate. The effects of this modification on the anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and cumulative CH4 production as well as the changes in the biological diversity. The results showed that approximately 50 % of the nutrients (NH4 (+) and PO4 (3-)) were removed regardless of the method adopted for the addition of Mg(2+) ion, slug or daily dosing. The numbers of Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina in the samples withdrawn prior to and after the addition of Mg(2+) did not show significant difference according to the results obtained from qPCR analyses. The research results showed that the addition of Mg(2+) into the anaerobic digesters in municipal wastewater treatment facilities may help to remove the nutrients from the effluent while recovering in their solid forms. PMID:23090053

  17. Acute effects of jaw clenching using a customized mouthguard on anaerobic ability and ventilatory flows.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jose; Buscà, Bernat; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; Miró, Adrià

    2015-12-01

    The latest findings on the ergogenic effects of a dentistry-design, bite-aligning mouthpiece require additional research to assess its impact on anaerobic ability and ventilatory parameters. This paper was aimed at determining the ergogenic acute effects of wearing a custom-made mouthpiece on oral airflow dynamics, 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test performance parameters. Twenty-eight healthy and physically-active male subjects (age: 24.50 ± 3.32, height: 181.34 ± 7.4, weight: 78.14 ± 8.21), were voluntarily studied. The subjects were first briefed on the test protocols, and then performed the 30s Wingate test and Spirometer test. The experimental trials were performed in a random counterbalanced order. We evaluate maximum expiratory volume (VEmax L min(-1)), mean power (W kg(-1)), peak power (W kg(-1)), time to peak (s), rate to fatigue (Ws(-1)) and lactate production (mMol L(-1)), rate of perceived exertion (RPE). There were significant differences between mouthguard and no-mouthguard conditions in mean power (W kg(-1)), peak power (W kg(-1)), time to peak (s), and rate to fatigue (Ws(-1)) for the 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test. Significantly lower lactate production (mMol L(-1)) was observed, in mouthguard condition but no significant differences were found in RPE. In airflow dynamics, the VEmax L min(-1) was significantly higher when comparing the mouthguard and the no mouthguard conditions in both forced and unforced conditions. In conclusion, wearing a customized mouthguard improves anaerobic ability and increases forced expiratory volume. This study will help practitioners improve athlete's performance in anaerobic activities where high intensity action might provoke jaw-clenching, contributing in reductions of lactate and fatigue, and improving ventilatory parameters. PMID:26415095

  18. The effect of motor imagery and static stretching on anaerobic performance in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Zakrajsek, Rebecca A; Nesser, Thomas W; Gage, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Athletes perform many different protocols as part of their warm-up routine before competition. Stretching has been suggested to decrease force and power production, whereas motor imagery (MI), the visualization of simple or complex motor activities in the absence of physical movement, may increase force and power production in young healthy individuals. Few studies have investigated either of these in trained individuals. No studies have compared the effects of static stretching (SS) with MI on anaerobic performance in trained cyclists. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of SS compared with MI and quiet rest (QR) on anaerobic performance in trained cyclists. Thirteen trained cyclists (9 men: 4 women; aged 21 ± 2 years) were assessed for height (1.76 ± 0.07 m), weight (73.4 ± 13 kg), % body fat (10.8 ± 6.2%), and maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O(2)max of 42.0 ± 5.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) on a cycle ergometer. The participants performed 3 randomized sessions consisting of cycling for 30 minutes at 65% of V[Combining Dot Above]O(2)max before undergoing 16 minutes of SS, MI, or QR followed by an anaerobic performance test. The SS consisted of 3 sets of 30-second stretches of the hamstrings, quadriceps, hip flexors, and piriformis. Imagery was based on the physical, environmental, task, learning, emotion, and perspective approach and was conducted by a trained technician. Both relative and absolute powers, and peak revolutions per minute, were quantified using the Wingate anaerobic threshold test. No significant interactions existed among SS, MI, and QR for relative peak power, absolute peak power, or peak RPM. In disagreement with current literature, this study suggests that neither SS nor a single session of MI immediately affect anaerobic performance in trained cyclists. If an event is <30 seconds, then SS or MI may not affect performance. PMID:22476165

  19. Techno-economic evaluation of stillage treatment with anaerobic digestion in a softwood-to-ethanol process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replacing the energy-intensive evaporation of stillage by anaerobic digestion is one way of decreasing the energy demand of the lignocellulosic biomass to the ethanol process. The biogas can be upgraded and sold as transportation fuel, injected directly into the gas grid or be incinerated on-site for combined heat and power generation. A techno-economic evaluation of the spruce-to-ethanol process, based on SO2-catalysed steam pretreatment followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, has been performed using the commercial flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus™. Various process configurations of anaerobic digestion of the stillage, with different combinations of co-products, have been evaluated in terms of energy efficiency and ethanol production cost versus the reference case of evaporation. Results Anaerobic digestion of the stillage showed a significantly higher overall energy efficiency (87-92%), based on the lower heating values, than the reference case (81%). Although the amount of ethanol produced was the same in all scenarios, the production cost varied between 4.00 and 5.27 Swedish kronor per litre (0.38-0.50 euro/L), including the reference case. Conclusions Higher energy efficiency options did not necessarily result in lower ethanol production costs. Anaerobic digestion of the stillage with biogas upgrading was demonstrated to be a favourable option for both energy efficiency and ethanol production cost. The difference in the production cost of ethanol between using the whole stillage or only the liquid fraction in anaerobic digestion was negligible for the combination of co-products including upgraded biogas, electricity and district heat. PMID:20843330

  20. Is the continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion process well suited for all substrates?

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two-stage anaerobic digestion systems are often considered to be advantageous compared to one-stage processes. Although process conditions and fermenter setups are well examined, overall substrate degradation in these systems is controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how substrates with different fibre and sugar contents (hay/straw, maize silage, sugar beet) influence the degradation rate and methane production. Intermediates and gas compositions, as well as methane yields and VS-degradation degrees were recorded. The sugar beet substrate lead to a higher pH-value drop 5.67 in the acidification reactor, which resulted in a six time higher hydrogen production in comparison to the hay/straw substrate (pH-value drop 5.34). As the achieved yields in the two-stage system showed a difference of 70.6% for the hay/straw substrate, and only 7.8% for the sugar beet substrate. Therefore two-stage systems seem to be only recommendable for digesting sugar rich substrates. PMID:26519699

  1. Dry anaerobic digestion of cow dung for methane production: effect of mixing.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ajay Kumar; Li, Jianzheng; Ban, Qiaoying; Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Bowei

    2012-12-01

    The performance characteristics of a dry batch reactor with a blender treating cow dung has been evaluated for 35 days in a single-stage batch reactor of 3 L effective volume at 35 +/- 1 degree C to investigate the effect of continuous-mixing on biogas production and organic materials removal. The results showed that the performance of unmixed and mixed digesters was quite different and the dry digester with mixing system produced methane of 0.358 LCH4/gVS(r) which was 7.50% higher than that for unmixed digester. Moreover, the organic material removal efficiency was increased by 9.73% in term of VS. The wide diversity of prominent bacteria and methanogenic archaea affiliated with all steps along the anaerobic degradation pathway made the process stable. But the dry digester with mixing system during start up was not beneficial, as it resulted in relatively higher volatile fatty acids, higher volatile fatty acid to alkalinity ratio, lower pH and consequently prolonged start up time. PMID:24261113

  2. Inoculum and zeolite synergistic effect on anaerobic digestion of poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Fotidis, Ioannis A; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Zaganas, Ioannis D; Kotsopoulos, Thomas A; Martzopoulos, Gerasimos G

    2014-01-01

    Poultry manure is an ammonia-rich substrate due to its high content of proteins and amino acids. Ammonia is the major inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, affecting biogas production and causing great economic losses to the biogas plants. In this study, the effect of different natural zeolite dosages on the mesophilic AD of poultry manure inoculated with a non-acclimatized to ammonia inoculum (dairy manure) was investigated. Additionally, a comparative analysis was performed between the data extracted from this study and the results of a previous study, which has been conducted under the same experimental conditions but with the use of ammonia acclimatized inoculum (swine manure). At 5 and 10 g zeolite L(-1), the methane yield of poultry manure was 43.4% and 80.3% higher compared with the experimental set without zeolite addition. However, the ammonia non-acclimatized inoculum was not efficient in digesting poultry manure even in the presence of 10 g zeolite L(-1), due to low methane production (only 39%) compared with the maximum theoretical yield. Finally, ammonia acclimatized inoculum and zeolite have demonstrated a possible 'synergistic effect', which led to a more efficient AD of poultry manure. The results of this study could potentially been used by the biogas plant operators to efficiently digest poultry manure. PMID:24701918

  3. Effect of temperature on anaerobic treatment of black water in UASB-septic tank systems.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, Sari; Sanders, Wendy; Kujawa-Roeleveld, Katarzyna; Zeeman, Grietje

    2007-03-01

    The effect of northern European seasonal temperature changes and low temperature on the performance of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-septic tanks treating black water was studied. Three UASB-septic tanks were monitored with different operational parameters and at different temperatures. The results indicated the feasibility of the UASB-septic tank for (pre)treatment of black water at low temperatures with respect to removal of suspended solids and dissolved organic material. Inoculum sludge had little effect on COD(ss) removal, though in the start-up phase some poorly adapted inoculum disintegrated and washed out, thus requiring consideration when designing the process. Removal of COD(dis) was at first negative, but improved as the sludge adapted to low temperature. The UASB-septic tank alone did not comply with Finnish or Dutch treatment requirements and should therefore be considered mainly as a pre-treatment method. However, measuring the requirements as mgCOD l(-1) may not always be the best method, as the volume of the effluent discharged is also an important factor in the final amount of COD entering the receiving water bodies. PMID:16765592

  4. Energy efficacy used to score organic refuse pretreatment processes for hydrogen anaerobic production.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Bernardo; Luongo Malave, Andrea C; Bernardi, Milena; Fino, Debora

    2013-11-01

    The production of hydrogen through Anaerobic Digestion (AD) has been investigated to verify the efficacy of several pretreatment processes. Three types of waste with different carbon structures have been tested to obtain an extensive representation of the behavior of the materials present in Organic Waste (OW). The following types of waste were selected: Sweet Product Residue (SPR), i.e., confectionary residue removed from the market after the expiration date, Organic Waste Market (OWM) refuse from a local fruit and vegetable market, and Coffee Seed Skin (CSS) waste from a coffee production plant. Several pretreatment processes have been applied, including physical, chemical, thermal, and ultrasonic processes and a combination of these processes. Two methods have been used for the SPR to remove the packaging, manual (SPR) and mechanical (SPRex). A pilot plant that is able to extrude the refuse to 200atm was utilized. Two parameters have been used to score the different pretreatment processes: efficiency (ξ), which takes into account the amount of energy produced in the form of hydrogen compared with the available energy embedded in the refuse, and efficacy (η), which compares the efficiency obtained using the pretreated refuse with that obtained using the untreated refuse. The best result obtained for the SPR was the basic pretreatment, with η=6.4, whereas the thermal basic pretreatment gave the highest value, η=17.0 for SPRex. The best result for the OWM was obtained through a combination of basic/thermal pretreatments with η=9.9; lastly, the CSS residue with ultrasonic pretreatment produced the highest quantity of hydrogen, η=5.2. PMID:23891078

  5. TIME-SETTLEMENT BEHAVIOR OF PROCESSED REFUSE. PART III: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF MILLED REFUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this laboratory investigation were to gain an understanding of the decomposition of milled refuse under anaerobic conditions, the rates of decomposition, and the gas production and composition. The rates of decomposition of cellulose and cellulosic materials, ga...

  6. Effects of thermo-chemical pre-treatment on anaerobic biodegradability and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T V; Bos, G J Klaasse; Zeeman, G; Sanders, J P M; van Lier, J B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of different thermo-chemical pre-treatment methods were determined on the biodegradability and hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass. Three plant species, hay, straw and bracken were thermo-chemically pre-treated with calcium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and maleic acid. After pre-treatment, the plant material was anaerobically digested in batch bottles under mesophilic conditions for 40 days. From the pre-treatment and subsequent anaerobic digestion experiments, it was concluded that when the lignin content of the plant material is high, thermo-chemical pre-treatments have a positive effect on the biodegradability of the substrate. Calcium hydroxide pre-treatment improves the biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass, especially for high lignin content substrates, like bracken. Maleic acid generates the highest percentage of dissolved COD during pre-treatment. Ammonium pre-treatment only showed a clear effect on biodegradability for straw. PMID:19144515

  7. Effect of inoculum-substrate ratio on the start-up of solid waste anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Fernández, B; Porrier, P; Chamy, R

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic systems start-up for solid waste treatment is a fundamental step, especially for those with two phases. It is necessary to know both the waste characteristics and the inoculum conditions. The objective of this work was to study the inoculum-substrate ratio (ISR) influence as a previous step of the start-up of an anaerobic system for the solid waste digestion. During this research spent grain was chosen as residue, working at three different concentrations (7; 13 and 20% w/v), studying the ISR effect in terms of anaerobic degradability (AD) and specific methane productivity (SMP). The initial acetoclastic activities (A0) were calculated based on the equation which describes the methane accumulation during each test. The model constants were also calculated and were adjusted to the experimental data. The results showed that in general the ISR variation has less impact on AD than on SMP. While maximum AD were reached in those tests with high ISR, the greatest values of SMP were with the lowest values of ISR ratio. A low ISR caused a slow hydrolysis, although the methane production was fast. So, during the start-up of a two-phase anaerobic system an elevated ISR would not be necessary in order to reach a good AD and a good intermediate products production, because the hydrolysis and the VFA production must be optimised in the first phase of these systems. While in conventional systems, where phases are together, it is much better to optimise the methane production. The ISR and the SMP indicated which inoculum percentage would be interesting based on the objective of the whole system; methane or intermediate compounds (VFA) production. All this information is important during the conventional anaerobic reactors operation because these tests would show which ISRs avoid inhibition. PMID:11575072

  8. Succession of microbial community and enhanced mechanism of a ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge process treating chloronitrobenzenes wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Jin, Jie; Lin, Haizhuan; Gao, Kaituo; Xu, Xiangyang

    2015-03-21

    The combined zero-valent iron (ZVI) and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process is established for the treatment of chloronitrobenzenes (ClNBs) wastewater, and the succession of microbial community and its enhanced mechanism are investigated in the study. Results showed that compared with the control UASB (R1), the stable COD removal, ClNBs transformation, and dechlorination occurred in the combined system (R2) when operated at influent COD and 3,4-Dichloronitrobenzene (3,4-DClNB) loading rates of 4200-7700 g m(-3) d(-1) and 6.0-70.0 g m(-3) d(-1), and R2 had the better shock resistance and buffering capacity for the anaerobic acidification. The dechlorination for the intermediate products of p-chloroanaline (p-ClAn) to analine (AN) occurred in R2 reactor after 45 days, whereas it did not occur in R1 after a long-term operation. The novel ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge (ZVI-AGS) was successfully developed in the combined system, and higher microbial activities including ClNB transformation and H2/CH4 production were achieved simultaneously. The dominant bacteria were closely related to the groups of Megasphaera, Chloroflexi, and Clostridium, and the majority of archaea were correlated with the groups of Methanosarcinalesarchaeon, Methanosaetaconcilii, and Methanothrixsoehngenii, which are capable of reductively dechlorinating PCB, HCB, and TCE in anaerobic niche and EPS secretion. PMID:25497029

  9. The effects of different mixing intensities during anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lindmark, Johan Eriksson, Per; Thorin, Eva

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Effects of mixing on the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste. • Digestion of fresh substrate and post-digestion at three mixing intensities were evaluated. • Mixing performed at 150 RPM, 25 RPM and minimally intermittently. • Increased biogas production rates and yields at lower mixing intensities. - Abstract: Mixing inside an anaerobic digester is often continuous and is not actively controlled. The selected mixing regime can however affect both gas production and the energy efficiency of the biogas plant. This study aims to evaluate these effects and compare three different mixing regimes, 150 RPM and 25 RPM continuous mixing and minimally intermittent mixing for both digestion of fresh substrate and post-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. The results show that a lower mixing intensity leads to a higher biogas production rate and higher total biogas production in both cases. 25 RPM continuous mixing and minimally intermittent mixing resulted in similar biogas production after process stabilization, while 150 RPM continuous mixing resulted in lower production throughout the experiment. The lower gas production at 150 RPM could not be explained by the inhibition of volatile fatty acids. Cumulative biogas production until day 31 was 295 ± 2.9, 317 ± 1.9 and 304 ± 2.8 N ml/g VS added during digestion of fresh feed and 113 ± 1.3, 134 ± 1.1 and 130 ± 2.3 N ml/g VS added during post digestion for the 150 RPM, 25 RPM and minimally mixed intensities respectively. As well as increasing gas production, optimal mixing can improve the energy efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process.

  10. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0-975.9 μmol N m-2 h-1, n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr-1, which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China’s inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale.

  11. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S M; Hefting, Mariet M; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0-975.9 μmol N m(-2) h(-1), n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr(-1), which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China's inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale. PMID:26610807

  12. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0–975.9 μmol N m−2 h−1, n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr−1, which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China’s inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale. PMID:26610807

  13. Anaerobic biodegradability and inhibitory effects of some anionic and cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Armendáriz, Beatriz; Moreno, Yésica Mayett; Monroy-Hermosillo, Oscar; Guyot, Jean Pierre; González, Rosa O

    2010-09-01

    The anaerobic biodegradability and inhibitory effects on the methane production of three different surfactants, two anionic: sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), and a cationic surfactant: trialkyl-methylammonium chloride (TMAC), were evaluated with two different anaerobic sludges, granular and flocculent. Five different concentrations of the surfactants, 5, 50, 100, 250 and 500 mg/L, were tested. SLS was biodegraded at concentrations of 5, 50 and 100 mg/L with flocculent sludge and at 100 and 250 mg/L with granular sludge. However an inhibitory effect on methane production was observed in both sludges at 500 mg/L. The results indicate that SDBS was not biodegradable under anoxic conditions. TMAC was slightly degraded 50 and 100 mg/L with the flocculent sludge, and from 100 to 500 mg/L with the granular sludge. PMID:20686749

  14. Modelling the effect of the antimicrobial tylosin on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Zilles, J L; Morgenroth, E; Raskin, L

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was fed a synthetic wastewater containing glucose to study the effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on treatment performance. Measurements of methane, volatile fatty acids, and COD concentrations suggested that the addition of 1.67 mg/L and 167 mg/l of tylosin to the synthetic wastewater inhibited propionate oxidizing syntrophic bacteria and aceticlastic methanogens. The latter is presumed to be an indirect effect. A modified version of the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) with extensions for microbial storage and hydrolysis of reserve carbohydrates, and tylosin liquid-solid mass transfer and inhibition adequately described the dynamic profiles observed in the ASBR. PMID:18547919

  15. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure.

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Hamed M; Zeeman, Grietje; van Loon, Wilko K P; Bot, Gerard P A; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-11-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 degrees C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature fluctuations has been studied. In the daily downward temperature fluctuation regime the temperatures of each reactor was reduced by 10 degrees C for 10 h while in the daily upward fluctuation regime the temperature of each reactor was increased 10 degrees C for 5 h. The results show that the methane production rate at 60 degrees C is lower than that at 50 degrees C at all experimental conditions of imposed HRT except when downward temperature fluctuations were applied at an HRT of 10 days. It also was found that the free ammonia concentration not only affects the acetate-utilising bacteria but also the hydrolysis and acidification process. The upward temperature fluctuation affects the maximum specific methanogenesis activity more severely as compared to imposed downward temperature fluctuations. The results clearly reveal the possibility of using available solar energy at daytime to heat up the reactor(s) without the need of heat storage during nights, especially at an operational temperature of 50 degrees C and at a 20 days HRT, and without the jeopardising of the overheating. PMID:15246444

  16. Effect of temperature on the treatment of domestic wastewater with a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yoo, R H; Kim, J H; McCarty, P L; Bae, J H

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR) system was applied to the treatment of primary clarifier effluent from a domestic wastewater treatment plant with temperature decreasing from 25 to 10 °C. At all temperatures and with a total hydraulic retention time of 2.3 h, overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removals were 89% and 94% or higher, with permeate COD and BOD5 of 30 and 7 mg/L or lower, respectively. No noticeable negative effects of low temperature on organic removal were found, although a slight increase to 3 mg/L in volatile fatty acids concentrations in the effluent was observed. Biosolids production was 0.01-0.03 kg volatile suspended solids/kg COD, which is far less than that with aerobic processes. Although the rate of trans-membrane pressure at the membrane flux of 9 L/m(2)/h increased as temperature decreased, the SAF-MBR was operated for longer than 200 d before chemical cleaning was needed. Electrical energy potential from combustion of the total methane production (gaseous and dissolved) was more than that required for system operation. PMID:24647177

  17. Effect of aerobic pretreatment with Aspergillus terreus on the anaerobic digestion of olive-mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Borja, R; Alba, J; Garrido, S E; Martínez, L; García, M P; Monteoliva, M; Ramos-Cormenzana, A

    1995-10-01

    A kinetic study was carried out on the anaerobic digestion of olive-mill wastewater (OMW) and OMW that was previously fermented with Aspergillus terreus. The bioreactors used were batch fed and contained saponite as support for the mediating bacteria. The anaerobic digestion process followed first-order kinetics, from which the kinetic constant A was calculated using a non-linear regression. This kinetic parameter was influenced by the pretreatment carried out, and was 3.7 times higher for pretreated OMW than for untreated OMW. The anaerobic processing of pretreated OMW seemingly involved no inhibition phenomena as the biotoxicity and the total phenolic compound content (analysed by HPLC) were reduced by 71.2% and 77.9% respectively as a result of the pretreatment. Finally, the yield coefficient of methane production was 0.345 litres of methane (at standard temperature and pressure)/g of chemical oxygen demand, that is, 23% higher than that provided by untreated wastewater. PMID:7576261

  18. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Mi-Sun; Sommer, Sven G

    2015-04-15

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic reactor (R2) for further digestion. Then, thermophilic aerobically-digested sludge was reintroduced into R1 to enhance reactor performance. The combined process was operated with two different Runs: Run I with hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 40 d (corresponding OLR = 3.5 kg COD/m(3) d) and Run II with HRT = 20 d (corresponding OLR = 7 kg COD/m(3)). For a comparison, a single-stage mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R3) was operated concurrently with same OLRs and HRTs as the combined process. During the overall digestion, all reactors showed high stability without pH control. The combined process demonstrated significantly higher organic matter removal efficiencies (over 90%) of TS, VS and COD and methane production than did R3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results indicated that higher populations of both bacteria and archaea were maintained in R1 than in R3. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed relatively high abundance of phylum Actinobacteria in both R1 and R2, and a predominance of phyla Synergistetes and Firmicutes in R3 during Run II. Furthermore, R1 and R2 shared genera (Prevotella, Aminobacterium, Geobacillus and Unclassified Actinobacteria), which suggests synergy between mesophilic anaerobic digestion and thermophilic aerobic digestion. For archaea, in R1 methanogenic archaea shifted from genus Methanosaeta to Methanosarcina, whereas genera Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium and Methanoculleus were predominant in R3. The results demonstrated dynamics of key microbial populations that were highly consistent with an enhanced reactor performance of the combined process. PMID:25689817

  19. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to examine the effects of shikimic acid (60 µg/mL) and(or) molybdate (1 mM) on the sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5 mM) during anaerobic (90% N2:5% CO2:5% H2) or aerobic growth in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 5 mM...

  20. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thermal pretreated sludge: role of microbial community structure and correlation with process performances.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, M C; Braguglia, C M; Gianico, A; Mininni, G; Nakamura, K; Rossetti, S

    2015-01-01

    Thermal hydrolysis pretreatment coupled with Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion (TAD) for Waste Activated Sludge (WAS) treatment is a promising combination to improve biodegradation kinetics during stabilization. However, to date there is a limited knowledge of the anaerobic biomass composition and its impact on TAD process performances. In this study, the structure and dynamics of the microbial communities selected in two semi-continuous anaerobic digesters, fed with untreated and thermal pretreated sludge, were investigated. The systems were operated for 250 days at different organic loading rate. 16S rRNA gene clonal analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analyses allowed us to identify the majority of bacterial and archaeal populations. Proteolytic Coprothermobacter spp. and hydrogenotrophic Methanothermobacter spp. living in strict syntrophic association were found to dominate in TAD process. The establishment of a syntrophic proteolytic pathway was favoured by the high temperature of the process and enhanced by the thermal pretreatment of the feeding sludge. Proteolytic activity, alone or with thermal pretreatment, occurred during TAD as proven by increasing concentration of soluble ammonia and soluble COD (sCOD) during the process. However, the availability of a readily biodegradable substrate due to pretreatment allowed to significant sCOD removals (more than 55%) corresponding to higher biogas production in the reactor fed with thermal pretreated sludge. Microbial population dynamics analysed by FISH showed that Coprothermobacter and Methanothermobacter immediately established a stable syntrophic association in the reactor fed with pretreated sludge in line with the overall improved TAD performances observed under these conditions. PMID:25462756

  1. Performance evaluation of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor process for dairy wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, C; Sekar, A S S

    2015-11-01

    Investigation on dairy wastewater treatment was undertaken at ambient temperature in 11 l effective volume of laboratory--scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor receiving an average influent chemical oxygen demand of 2100 mg 1(-1) for 3 months of 24 hours, hydraulic retention time. The feeds of the synthetic dairy wastewater operated with HRT of 12 hrs, 16 hrs, 20 hrs and 24 hrs was equivalent to organic loading rates of 1.20 kg COD m(-3) d-7.20 kg COD m(-3) d, 0.9 kg COD m(-3) d-5.40 kg COD m(-3) d, 0.72 kg COD m(-3) d--4.32 kg COD m(-3) d and 0.60 kg COD m(-3) d-3.60 kg COD m(-3) d respectively. After steady state condition was reached, which took about 2 months, the effluent quality parameter were sampled and analysed to quantify treatment efficiencies. The following removal efficiency observed were 73-94.33% COD; 50.04- 56.66% total solids; 45.55-70.63% total dissolved solids; 66-86.67% total nitrogen and 72-94% total phosphorous. Maximum biogas production rate was 383 l kg(-1) COD removed with 260 l of methane gas. Estimation of biogas production was analysed using artificial neural network software model, and the results predicted coincided well with the experimental results. PMID:26688965

  2. Study of the diversity of microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor oxic-settling-anaerobic process and its modified process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lianpeng; Chen, Jianfan; Wei, Xiange; Guo, Wuzhen; Lin, Meishan; Yu, Xiaoyu

    2016-05-01

    To further reveal the mechanism of sludge reduction in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process, the polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis protocol was used to study the possible difference in the microbial communities between a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-OSA process and its modified process, by analyzing the change in the diversity of the microbial communities in each reactor of both systems. The results indicated that the structure of the microbial communities in aerobic reactors of the 2 processes was very different, but the predominant microbial populations in anaerobic reactors were similar. The predominant microbial population in the aerobic reactor of the SBR-OSA belonged to Burkholderia cepacia, class Betaproteobacteria, while those of the modified process belonged to the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. These 3 types of microbes had a cryptic growth characteristic, which was the main cause of a greater sludge reduction efficiency achieved by the modified process. PMID:27021584

  3. Metabolic and microbial community dynamics during the anaerobic digestion of maize silage in a two-phase process.

    PubMed

    Sträuber, Heike; Lucas, Rico; Kleinsteuber, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Two-phasic anaerobic digestion processes (hydrolysis/acidogenesis separated from acetogenesis/methanogenesis) can be used for biogas production on demand or a combined chemicals/bioenergy production. For an effective process control, detailed knowledge about the microbial catalysts and their correlation to process conditions is crucial. In this study, maize silage was digested in a two-phase process and interrelationships between process parameters and microbial communities were revealed. In the first-phase reactor, alternating metabolic periods were observed which emerged independently from the feeding frequency. During the L-period, up to 11.8 g L(-1) lactic acid was produced which significantly correlated to lactic acid bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus as the most abundant community members. During the alternating G-period, the production of volatile fatty acids (up to 5.3, 4.0 and 3.1 g L(-1) for propionic, n-butyric and n-caproic acid, respectively) dominated accompanied by a high gas production containing up to 28 % hydrogen. The relative abundance of various Clostridiales increased during this metabolic period. In the second-phase reactor, the metabolic fluctuations of the first phase were smoothed out resulting in a stable biogas production as well as stable bacterial and methanogenic communities. However, the biogas composition followed the metabolic dynamics of the first phase: the hydrogen content increased during the L-period whereas highest CH4/CO2 ratios (up to 2.8) were reached during the G-period. Aceticlastic Methanosaeta as well as hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus and Methanobacteriaceae were identified as dominant methanogens. Consequently, a directed control of the first-phase stabilizing desired metabolic states can lead to an enhanced productivity regarding chemicals and bioenergy. PMID:26411455

  4. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  5. Effect of preozonation on the anaerobic biodegradability of resistant phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.T.; Pai, P.C.; Latchew, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Ozone pretreatment studies of four model phenolic compounds were conducted to evaluate the effects of ozonation on the anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of these compounds. Two types of batch studies, the Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) and the Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA), were performed on samples ozonated upon phenol, o-cresol, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Experimental results showed that toxic and refractory phenolic compounds were converted to methane gas by means of preozonation. In general, the biodegradable fraction of the oxidation products increased as the ozone dose was increased. The early ozonation products of o-cresol and phenol, however, were more toxic than the initial compounds. The rates of COD and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) reduction through ozonation were faster and products formed were less inhibitory in the basic pH range than in the acid pH range.

  6. Effect of digestion time on anaerobic digestion with high ammonia concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktavitri, Nur Indradewi; Purnobasuki, Hery; Kuncoro, Eko Prasetyo; Purnamasari, Indah; Semma Hadinnata, P.

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion was developed to treat high concentration organic compound efficiently in certain Digestion Time (DT). High ammonia concentration could influenced removal organic compound in digestion. This bench scale study investigated the effect of digestion time on anaerobic batch reactor with high ammonia concentration. Total Ammonia Nitrogen (TAN) concentration was adjusted 4000 and 5000 mg/1, Digestion time was ranged from 0-26 d, operation temperature was ranged from 28-29°C, inoculum was collected from slaughter house sludge. The degradation of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) correlated with digestion time. The concentration of TAN from synthetic wastewater contain 5000 mg/1 of TAN more fluctuated than those use 4000 mg/1 of TAN. However, the biogas production from wastewater contained 4000 mg/1 of TAN gradually increased until 24 d of DT. The reactor contain 5000 mg/1 of TAN only growth until 12 d and steady state at over 12 d of digestion time.

  7. Growth of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria on agar media: effects of media composition, storage conditions, and reduction under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P R

    1978-01-01

    The quantitative growth, the colony size, and the rate of growth of 47 clinical anaerobic isolates were compared on five different media, namely Brucella agar, brain heart infusion agar, Columbia agar, Schaedler agar, and tryptic soy agar. There was no significant difference in the quantitative growth of the anaerobes inoculated onto the five media. Although no single medium was superior for the growth of all isolates, 12 of 22 isolates, inoculated onto media stored for 4 weeks or less, grew best on Schaedler agar. The effects of supplementation of the media with reducing agents and reduction of the media before use were also analyzed and were found to be affected by the composition and length of storage of the media, as well as the bacteria tested. PMID:744801

  8. Treatment process and toxicities assessment of wastewater issued from anaerobic digestion of household wastes.

    PubMed

    Djelal, Hayet; Tahrani, Leyla; Fathallah, Salem; Cabrol, Audrey; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2014-02-01

    Modern society grapples with large amounts of household waste. The anaerobic digestion of this waste offers a promising source for energy-rich biogas production but generates high toxic effluents that require treatment before reuse or disposal into the environment. This study aimed to investigate three techniques, namely coagulation/flocculation, electro-coagulation, and activated sludge, in terms of efficiency in the treatment of these effluents. It also aimed to assess their toxicity effects on the germination and growth of durum wheat Triticum aestivum L. seeds before and after 6 days of treatment. Activated sludge was most efficient in reducing chemical oxygen demand, turbidity, and conductivity (95.7 %, 15.8 %, and 37.5 %, respectively). The effluent treated with this technique induced a marked delay in germination (low mean time of germination) and a significant reduction in the percentages of seed germination and root and leaf growths. It was also noted to strongly induce lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves, which presumably explained the germination/growth inhibition of the wheat seeds. The effluent also induced marked lipid peroxidation effects and strongly inhibited the activities of butyrylcholinesterase in mice bone marrows. The effluent shows a high ability to inhibit the growth of three microalgae; these endpoints are useful tools to biomonitor the physico-chemical quality of this wastewater. Overall, while no significant alterations were observed in terms of animal and vegetable toxicities when the effluent was treated by coagulation/flocculation, activated sludge treatment proved efficient in reducing the toxicities induced by the untreated effluents. The results indicate that the application of this technique is promising with regards to attaining efficient, eco-friendly, and cost-effective strategies for the management and treatment of household waste. PMID:24072641

  9. Effects of sulfide on the integration of denitrification with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhixuan; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The effects of sulfide on the integration of denitrification with anaerobic digestion using anaerobic effluents of cassava stillage as carbon source were investigated. Batch tests indicated that nitrate reduction efficiencies decreased from 96.5% to 15.8% as sulfide/nitrate (S/NO3(-)-N) ratios increased from 0.27 to 1.60. At low S/NO3(-)-N ratios (0.27-1.08) anaerobic acidogenesis was accelerated. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite via sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification, after which the formed nitrite and residual nitrate were converted to N2 via heterotrophic denitrification. Increases in the S/NO3(-)-N ratio (1.60) caused a shift (76.3%) in the nitrate reduction pathway from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). Sulfide concentrations (S/NO3(-)-N ratio of 1.60) suppressed not only heterotrophic denitrification but also acidogenesis. The potentially toxic effect of sulfide on acid production was mitigated by its rapid oxidation to sulfur, allowing the recovery of acidogenesis. PMID:25801462

  10. Effect of different carbon materials as electron shuttles in the anaerobic biotransformation of nitroanilines.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciana; Pereira, Raquel; Pereira, Manuel F R; Alves, Madalena M

    2016-06-01

    Aromatic amines resulted from azo dyes biotransformation under anaerobic conditions are generally recalcitrant to further anaerobic degradation. The catalytic effect of carbon materials (CM) on the reduction of azo dyes is known and has been confirmed in this work by increasing threefold the biological reduction rate of Mordant Yellow 1 (MY1). The resulting m-nitroaniline (m-NoA) was further degraded to m-phenylenediamine (m-Phe) only in the presence of CM. The use of CM to degraded anaerobically aromatic amines resulted from azo dye reduction was never reported before. In the sequence, we studied the effect of different CM on the bioreduction of o-, m-, and p-NoA. Three microporous activated carbons with different surface chemistry, original (AC0 ), chemical oxidized with HNO3 (ACHNO3 ), and thermal treated (ACH2 ), and three mesoporous carbons, xerogels (CXA and CXB) and nanotubes (CNT) were assessed. In the absence of CM, NoA were only partially reduced to the corresponding Phe, whereas in the presence of CM, more than 90% was converted to the corresponding Phe. ACH2 and AC0 were the best electron shuttles, increasing the rates up to eightfold. In 24 h, the biological treatment of NoA and MY1 with AC0 , decreased up to 88% the toxicity towards a methanogenic consortium, as compared to the non-treated solutions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1194-1202. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26614891