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Sample records for anaerobic respiration isolation

  1. Alkaline Anaerobic Respiration: Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Roh, Yul; Carroll, Susan L.; Blair, Benjamin; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    Iron-reducing enrichments were obtained from leachate ponds at the U.S. Borax Company in Boron, Calif. Based on partial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (approximately 500 nucleotides), six isolates shared 98.9% nucleotide identity. As a representative, the isolate QYMF was selected for further analysis. QYMF could be grown with Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, Co(III)-EDTA, or Cr(VI) as electron acceptors, and yeast extract and lactate could serve as electron donors. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.5 to 11.0 (optimum, pH 9.5), a sodium chloride range of 0 to 80 g/liter (optimum, 20 g/liter), and a temperature range of 4 to 45°C (optimum, approximately 35°C), and iron precipitates were formed. QYMF was a strict anaerobe that could be grown in the presence of borax, and the cells were straight rods that produced endospores. Sodium chloride and yeast extract stimulated growth. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA gene indicated that the bacterium was a low-G+C gram-positive microorganism and had 96 and 92% nucleotide identity with Alkaliphilus transvaalensis and Alkaliphilus crotonatoxidans, respectively. The major phospholipid fatty acids were 14:1, 16:1ω7c, and 16:0, which were different from those of other alkaliphiles but similar to those of reported iron-reducing bacteria. The results demonstrated that the isolate might represent a novel metal-reducing alkaliphilic species. The name Alkaliphilus metalliredigens sp. nov. is proposed. The isolation and activity of metal-reducing bacteria from borax-contaminated leachate ponds suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated alkaline environments may be feasible and have implications for alkaline anaerobic respiration. PMID:15345448

  2. Halanaeroarchaeum sulfurireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., the first obligately anaerobic sulfur-respiring haloarchaeon, isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Kublanov, Ilya V; Yakimov, Mikhail M; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as electron donor and carbon source, and elemental sulfur as electron acceptor at 4 M NaCl using anaerobic sediments and brines from several hypersaline lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in isolation in pure culture of four strains of obligately anaerobic haloarchae growing exclusively by sulfur respiration. Such metabolism has not yet been demonstrated in any known species of Halobacteria, and in the whole archaeal kingdom, acetate oxidation with sulfur as acceptor was not previously demonstrated. The four isolates had nearly identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and formed a novel genus-level branch within the family Halobacteriaceae. The strains had a restricted substrate range limited to acetate and pyruvate as electron donors and elemental sulfur as electron acceptor. In contrast to aerobic haloarchaea, the biomass of anaerobic isolates completely lacked the typical red pigments. Growth with acetate+sulfur was observed between 3-5 M NaCl and at a pH range from 6.7 to 8.0. The membrane core lipids were dominated by archaeols. On the basis of distinct physiological and phylogenetic data, the sulfur-respiring isolates represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halanaeroarchaeaum sulfurireducens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is HSR2T (=JCM 30661T=UNIQEM U935T). PMID:27031647

  3. Isolation, growth, and metabolism of an obligately anaerobic, selenate- respiring bacterium, strain SES-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Strohmaier, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell suspensions of selenate- grown cells did not reduce nitrate, and nitrate-grown cells did not reduce selenate, indicating that these reductions are achieved by separate inducible enzyme systems. However, both nitrate-grown and selenate-grown cells have a constitutive ability to reduce selenite or nitrite. The oxidation of [14C]lactate to 14CO2 coupled to the reduction of selenate or nitrate by cell suspensions was inhibited by CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m- chlorophenylhydrazone), cyanide, and azide. High concentrations of selenite (5 mM) were readily reduced to Se0 by selenate-grown cells, but selenite appeared to block the synthesis of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Tracer experiments with [75Se]selenite indicated that cell suspensions could achieve a rapid and quantitative reduction of selenite to Se0. This reduction was totally inhibited by sulfite, partially inhibited by selenate or nitrite, but unaffected by sulfate or nitrate. Cell suspensions could reduce thiosulfate, but not sulfite, to sulfide. These results suggest that reduction of selenite to Se0 may proceed, in part, by some of the components of a dissimilatory system for sulfur oxyanions.

  4. Tellurite-, tellurate-, and selenite-based anaerobic respiration by strain CM-3 isolated from gold mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The newly discovered strain CM-3, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium from gold mine tailings of the Central Mine in Nopiming Provincial Park, Canada, is capable of dissimilatory anaerobic reduction of tellurite, tellurate, and selenite. CM-3 possesses very high level resistance to these oxides, both aerobically and anaerobically. During aerobic growth, tellurite and tellurate resistance was up to 1500 and 1000 µg/ml, respectively. In the presence of selenite, growth occurred at the highest concentration tested, 7000 µg/ml. Under anaerobic conditions, resistance was decreased to 800 µg/ml for the Te oxides; however, much like under aerobic conditions, growth with selenite still took place at 7000 µg/ml. In the absence of oxygen, CM-3 couples oxide reduction to an increase in biomass. Following an initial drop in viable cells, due to switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, there was an increase in CFU/ml greater than one order of magnitude in the presence of tellurite (6.6 × 10(3)-8.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml), tellurate (4.6 × 10(3)-1.4 × 10(5) CFU/ml), and selenite (2.7 × 10(5)-5.6 × 10(6) CFU/ml). A control culture without metalloid oxides showed a steady decrease in CFU/ml with no recovery. ATP production was also increased in the presence of each oxide, further indicating anaerobic respiration. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a 99.0 % similarity of CM-3 to Pseudomonas reactans. PMID:26254805

  5. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  6. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  7. Aerobic and Anaerobic Respiration in Profiles of Polesie Lubelskie Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafranek-Nakonieczna, Anna; Stêpniewska, Zofia

    2014-04-01

    Soil respiration is a very important factor influencing carbon deposition in peat and reflecting the intensity of soil organic matter decomposition, root respiration, and the ease of transporting gases to the surface. Carbon dioxide release from three different peat soil profiles (0-80 cm) of the Polesie Lubelskie Region (Eastern Poland) was analyzed under laboratory conditions. Peat samples were incubated at 5, 10, and 20°C in aerobic and anaerobic environments, and their CO2-evolution was analyzed up to 14 days. The respiration activity was found to be in the range of 0.013-0.497 g CO2 kg-1 DW d-1. The respiratory quotient was estimated to be in the range of 0.51-1.51, and the difference in respiration rates over 10°C ranged between 4.15 and 8.72 in aerobic and from 1.15 to 6.53 in anaerobic conditions. A strong influence of temperature, depth, the degree of peat decomposition, pH, and nitrate content on respiration activity was found. Lack of oxygen at low temperature caused higher respiration activity than under aerobic conditions. These results should be taken into account when the management of Polish peatlands is considered in the context of climate and carbon storage, and physicochemical properties of soil in relation to soil respiration activity are considered.

  8. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  9. Enumeration of Organohalide Respirers in Municipal Wastewater Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan JK; Boothe, Melissa A; Fiddler, Brice A; Lozano, Tania M; Rahi, Russel K; Krzmarzick, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Organohalide contaminants such as triclosan and triclocarban have been well documented in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), but the degradation of these contaminants is not well understood. One possible removal mechanism is organohalide respiration by which bacteria reduce the halogenated compound. The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance of organohalide-respiring bacteria in eight WWTP anaerobic digesters. The obligate organohalide respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi was the most abundant and averaged 3.3 × 107 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram, while the Dehalobacter was much lower at 2.6 × 104 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. The genus Sulfurospirillum spp. was also detected at 1.0 × 107 copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. No other known or putatively organohalide-respiring strains in the Dehalococcoidaceae family were found to be present nor were the genera Desulfitobacterium or Desulfomonile. PMID:26508873

  10. Enumeration of Organohalide Respirers in Municipal Wastewater Anaerobic Digesters.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bryan Jk; Boothe, Melissa A; Fiddler, Brice A; Lozano, Tania M; Rahi, Russel K; Krzmarzick, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Organohalide contaminants such as triclosan and triclocarban have been well documented in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), but the degradation of these contaminants is not well understood. One possible removal mechanism is organohalide respiration by which bacteria reduce the halogenated compound. The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance of organohalide-respiring bacteria in eight WWTP anaerobic digesters. The obligate organohalide respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi was the most abundant and averaged 3.3 × 10(7) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram, while the Dehalobacter was much lower at 2.6 × 10(4) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. The genus Sulfurospirillum spp. was also detected at 1.0 × 10(7) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. No other known or putatively organohalide-respiring strains in the Dehalococcoidaceae family were found to be present nor were the genera Desulfitobacterium or Desulfomonile. PMID:26508873

  11. Anaerobic respiration on tellurate and other metalloids in bacteria from hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and reduces metal(loid)s anaerobically than aerobically, suggesting that anaerobic metal(loid) respiration might be an important process in bacteria that are symbiotic with vent fauna. Isolates from Axial Volcano and Explorer Ridge were tested for their ability to reduce tellurate, selenite, metavanadate, or orthovanadate in the absence of alternate electron acceptors. In the presence of metal(loid)s, strains showed an ability to grow and produce ATP, whereas in the absence of metal(loid)s, no growth or ATP production was observed. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone depressed metal(loid) reduction. Anaerobic tellurate respiration will be a significant component in describing biogeochemical cycling of Te at hydrothermal vents. PMID:16820492

  12. Enrichment and isolation of Bacillus beveridgei sp. nov., a facultative anaerobic haloalkaliphile from Mono Lake, California, that respires oxyanions of tellurium, selenium, and arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Stolz, J.F.; Kulp, T.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mono Lake sediment slurries incubated with lactate and tellurite [Te(IV)] turned progressively black with time because of the precipitation of elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. An enrichment culture was established from these slurries that demonstrated Te(IV)-dependent growth. The enrichment was purified by picking isolated black colonies from lactate/Te(IV) agar plates, followed by repeated streaking and picking. The isolate, strain MLTeJB, grew in aqueous Te(IV)-medium if provided with a small amount of sterile solid phase material (e.g., agar plug; glass beads). Strain MLTeJB grew at high concentrations of Te(IV) (~8 mM) by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus formate, while reducing Te(IV) to Te(0). Other electron acceptors that were found to sustain growth were tellurate, selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and oxygen. Notably, growth on arsenate, nitrate, nitrite and fumarate did not result in the accumulation of formate, implying that in these cases lactate was oxidized to acetate plus CO2. Strain MLTeJB is a low G + C Gram positive motile rod with pH, sodium, and temperature growth optima at 8.5-9.0, 0.5-1.5 M, and 40??C, respectively. The epithet Bacillus beveridgei strain MLTeJBT is proposed. ?? 2009 Springer.

  13. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  14. The respiration pattern as an indicator of the anaerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Leila; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Lemay, Mathieu; Deriaz, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    The anaerobic threshold (AT) is a good index of personal endurance but needs a laboratory setting to be determined. It is important to develop easy AT field measurements techniques in order to rapidly adapt training programs. In the present study, it is postulated that the variability of the respiratory parameters decreases with exercise intensity (especially at the AT level). The aim of this work was to assess, on healthy trained subjects, the putative relationships between the variability of some respiration parameters and the AT. The heart rate and respiratory variables (volume, rate) were measured during an incremental exercise performed on a treadmill by healthy moderately trained subjects. Results show a decrease in the variance of 1/tidal volume with the intensity of exercise. Consequently, the cumulated variance (sum of the variance measured at each level of the exercise) follows an exponential relationship with respect to the intensity to reach eventually a plateau. The amplitude of this plateau is closely related to the AT (r=-0.8). It is concluded that the AT is related to the variability of the respiration. PMID:26736320

  15. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26297676

  16. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  17. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  18. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature-pH-salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jesse P; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-09-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  19. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature–pH–salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  20. Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (NapABC Enzyme) Supports Anaerobic Respiration by Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Valley; Lu, Yiran; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapABC enzyme) has been characterized from a variety of proteobacteria, especially Paracoccus pantotrophus. Whole-genome sequencing of Escherichia coli revealed the structural genes napFDAGHBC, which encode NapABC enzyme and associated electron transfer components. E. coli also expresses two membrane-bound proton-translocating nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHJI and narZYWV operons. We measured reduced viologen-dependent nitrate reductase activity in a series of strains with combinations of nar and nap null alleles. The napF operon-encoded nitrate reductase activity was not sensitive to azide, as shown previously for the P. pantotrophus NapA enzyme. A strain carrying null alleles of narG and narZ grew exponentially on glycerol with nitrate as the respiratory oxidant (anaerobic respiration), whereas a strain also carrying a null allele of napA did not. By contrast, the presence of napA+ had no influence on the more rapid growth of narG+ strains. These results indicate that periplasmic nitrate reductase, like fumarate reductase, can function in anaerobic respiration but does not constitute a site for generating proton motive force. The time course of Φ(napF-lacZ) expression during growth in batch culture displayed a complex pattern in response to the dynamic nitrate/nitrite ratio. Our results are consistent with the observation that Φ(napF-lacZ) is expressed preferentially at relatively low nitrate concentrations in continuous cultures (H. Wang, C.-P. Tseng, and R. P. Gunsalus, J. Bacteriol. 181:5303-5308, 1999). This finding and other considerations support the hypothesis that NapABC enzyme may function in E. coli when low nitrate concentrations limit the bioenergetic efficiency of nitrate respiration via NarGHI enzyme. PMID:11844760

  1. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  2. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  3. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  4. Natural organic matter as electron acceptor: experimental evidence for its important role in anaerobic respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Maximilian Peter; Sander, Michael; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Hupfer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbial respiration is a key driver of element cycling in oxic and anoxic environments. Upon depletion of oxygen as terminal electron acceptor (TEA), a number of anaerobic bacteria can employ alternative TEA for intracellular energy generation. Redox active quinone moieties in dissolved organic matter (DOM) are well known electron acceptors for microbial respiration. However, it remains unclear whether quinones in adsorbed and particulate OM accept electrons in a same way. In our studies we aim to understand the importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as electron acceptors for microbial energy gain and its possible implications for methanogenesis. Using a novel electrochemical approach, mediated electrochemical reduction and -oxidation, we can directly quantify reduced hydroquinone and oxidized quionone moieties in dissolved and particulate NOM samples. In a mesocosm experiment, we rewetted sediment and peat soil and followed electron transfer to the inorganic and organic electron acceptors over time. We found that inorganic and organic electron acceptor pools were depleted over the same timescales. More importantly, we showed that organic, NOM-associated electron accepting moieties represent as much as 21 40% of total TEA inventories. These findings support earlier studies that propose that the reduction of quinone moieties in particulate organic matter competitively suppresses methanogenesis in wetland soils. Our results indicate that electron transfer to organic, particulate TEA in inundated ecosystems has to be accounted for when establishing carbon budgets in and projecting greenhouse gas emissions from these systems.

  5. Isolation and Cr(VI) reduction characteristics of quinone respiration in Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain CR1.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jing; Li, Zifu; Xu, Zhifang; Guo, Jianbo; Hu, Zhenzhen; Guo, Yankai; Li, Min; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-07-01

    A Cr(VI)-reducing Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain, CR1, was isolated from tannery effluent sludge and had quinone respiration characteristics. Its chromate (CrO4 (2-) ) resistance, quinone respiration characteristics, and Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies were evaluated in detail. Strain CR1 exhibited a high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 mM in LB medium, and its quinone respiration could occur when an electron donor and strain CR1 both existed in the reaction system. Cr(VI) reduction by strain CR1 was significantly enhanced by a factor of 0.4-4.3 with five different quinone compounds: anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonate, anthraquinone-1-sulfonate, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, and anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonate. AQS was the best electron shuttle among them, and the greatest enhancement to the Cr(VI) bio-reduction was achieved with 0.96 mM AQS. The correlation between the reaction constant k (mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) ) and thermodynamic temperature T (K) was expressed as an Arrhenius equation lnk=-7662.9/T+27.931(R2=0.9486); the activation energy Ea was 63.71 kJ mol(-1) , and the pre-exponential factor A was 1.35 × 10(12)  mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) . During the Cr(VI) reduction process, the pH tended to become neutral, and the oxidation-reduction potential decreased to -440 mV. The efficient reduction of Cr(VI) mediated by a quinone respiration strain shows potential for the rapid anaerobic removal of Cr(VI). PMID:25952742

  6. Cholera Toxin Production during Anaerobic Trimethylamine N-Oxide Respiration Is Mediated by Stringent Response in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M.; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-01-01

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae. PMID:24648517

  7. Relative recovery of anaerobes on different isolation media.

    PubMed Central

    Sondag, J E; Ali, M; Murray, P R

    1979-01-01

    The recovery of clinical anaerobic isolates on selective and nonselective agar media, as well as the time required to detect the isolates, was examined. Of a total of 235 isolates, 77, 46, and 40% were detected on Schaedler blood agar, colistinnalidixic acid blood agar, and kanamycin-vancomycin-lysed blood agar, respectively, and 94% were detected on the combination of Schaedler blood agar with kanamycin-vancomycin-lysed blood agar. A total of 19% of the anaerobes were detected after incubation for 1 day, and 70% were detected after 2 days. PMID:544636

  8. Bacillus macyae sp. nov., an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from an Australian gold mine.

    PubMed

    Santini, Joanne M; Streimann, Illo C A; vanden Hoven, Rachel N

    2004-11-01

    A strictly anaerobic arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from a gold mine in Bendigo, Victoria, Australia, belonging to the genus Bacillus is described. Cells are Gram-positive, motile rods capable of respiring with arsenate and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors using a variety of substrates, including acetate as the electron donor. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite is catalysed by a membrane-bound arsenate reductase that displays activity over a broad pH range. Synthesis of the enzyme is regulated; maximal activity is obtained when the organism is grown with arsenate as the terminal electron acceptor and no activity is detectable when it is grown with nitrate. Mass of the catalytic subunit was determined to be approximately 87 kDa based on ingel activity stains. The closest phylogenetic relative, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, is Bacillus arseniciselenatis, but DNA-DNA hybridization experiments clearly show that strain JMM-4(T) represents a novel Bacillus species, for which the name Bacillus macyae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JMM-4(T) (=DSM 16346(T)=JCM 12340(T)). PMID:15545465

  9. The role of anaerobic respiration in the immobilization of uranium through biomineralization of phosphate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome, Kathleen R.; Green, Stefan J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Kostka, Joel E.; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-04-01

    Although bioreduction of uranyl ions (U(VI)) and biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals are both able to immobilize uranium in contaminated sediments, the competition between these processes and the role of anaerobic respiration in the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals has yet to be investigated. In this study, contaminated sediments incubated anaerobically in static microcosms at pH 5.5 and 7.0 were amended with the organophosphate glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) as sole phosphorus and external carbon source and iron oxides, sulfate, or nitrate as terminal electron acceptors to determine the most favorable geochemical conditions to these two processes. While sulfate reduction was not observed even in the presence of G2P at both pHs, iron reduction was more significant at circumneutral pH irrespective of the addition of G2P. In turn, nitrate reduction was stimulated by G2P at both pH 5.5 and 7.0, suggesting nitrate-reducing bacteria provided the main source of inorganic phosphate in these sediments. U(VI) was rapidly removed from solution in all treatments but was not reduced as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Simultaneously, wet chemical extractions and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy of these sediments indicated the presence of U-P species in reactors amended with G2P at both pHs. The rapid removal of dissolved U(VI), the simultaneous production of inorganic phosphate, and the existence of U-P species in the solid phase indicate that uranium was precipitated as U(VI)-phosphate minerals in sediments amended with G2P. Thus, under reducing conditions and in the presence of G2P, bioreduction of U(VI) was outcompeted by the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals and U(VI) sorption at both pHs.

  10. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  11. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  12. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M; Gilbert, Jack A; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands. PMID:26000553

  13. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-05-22

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  14. Characterization of anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria isolated from freshwater lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Molongoski, J J; Klug, M J

    1976-01-01

    Strict anaerobic culture techniques were used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria present at the sediment-water interface of hyperutrophic Wintergreen Lake (Augusta, Mich.). Anaerobic plate counts remained constant from March through December, 1973, ranging from 2.4 X 10(6) to 5.7 X 10(6) organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment. The isolatable bacteria represented a small percentage of the total microbial community, which was shown by direct microscopic counts to be 2.0 X 10'' organisms/g (dry weight) of sediment during June and July. Bacteria of the genus Clostridium dominated the isolates obtained, accounting for 71.8% of the 960 isolates examined. A single species, Clostridium bifermentens, comprised 47.7% of the total. Additional bacterial groups and the percentage in which they were isolated included: Streptococcus sp. (10.8%), unidentified curved rods (9.5%y, gram-positive nonsporing rods (5.6%), and motile gram-negative rods (1.9%). Temperature growth studies demonstrated the ability of all the isolates to grow at in situ sediment temperatures. Gas-liqid radiochromatography was used to determine the soluble metabolic end products from [U-14C]glucose and a U-14C-labeled amino acid mixture by representative sedimentary clostridial isolates and by natural sediment microbial communities. At in situ temperatures the natural sediment microflora produced soluble fermentative end products characteristic of those elaborated by the clostridial isolates tested. These results are considered strong presumptive evidence that clostridia are actively metabolizing in the sediments of Wintergreen Lake. PMID:942211

  15. Production of Submicron-Sized Elemental Selenium Spheres by Anaerobic Bacteria that Respire Oxyanions of Selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Herbel, M. J.; Switzer Blum, J.; Oscarson, R.

    2002-12-01

    Since the phenomenon of dissimilatory selenate reduction (DSeR) was first reported in (Macy et al., 1989; Oremland et al., 1989) at least 13 phylogenetically and physiologically diverse species of prokaryotes have been isolated from both the Bacterial and Archaeal domains that are capable of growth via DSeR. These microbes link the oxidation of various electron donors (e.g, lactate, acetate, hydrogen) to the terminal electron acceptors selenate, or in some cases selenite. The reduction product is amorphous, elemental selenium [Se(0)] that accumulates in large quantities in the medium as a bright orange-red precipitate. It was not clear to us how this precipitate was first formed on the cell surface. We first noted the accumulation of sub-micron sized spheres of Se(0) on the surface of Bacillus selenitireducens (Switzer Blum et al., 1998) grown on selenite. Here we report that this phenomenon occurs in at least 3 other species, including another haloalkaliphile B. arsenicoselenatis, the moderate halophile Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii, and the fresh water isolate Sulfurosprillum barnseii. Cell suspensions of all four species examined by scanning electron microscopy were noted to form spheres of Se(0) on their surfaces that sometimes accumulated in clusters. In general, the diameter of these spheres uniformly ranged in size between 100 - 200 nm. These results imply that most, if not all species of prokaryotes that respire via DSeR form these spheres. Although Se(0) spheres have not been as yet looked for as in anoxic sediments via imaging techniques, we would predict that they occur therein. Moreover, the emerging field of nanotechnology could find some application for uniformly-sized spheres of these dimensions because Se(0) is both a semiconductor and photoconductor. Macy et al. 1989, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 61: 195 - 198. Oremland et al., 1989. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55: 2333 - 2343. Switzer Blum et al., 1998. Arch. Microbiol. 171: 19 - 30.

  16. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression. PMID:26381456

  17. Numbers and types of anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens since 1960.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J W; Hill, E O; Altemeier, W A

    1977-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1974, 826 specimens, excluding stool, urine, sputum, and blood, yielded 689 (83%) positive cultures, of which 403 (58.5%) contained anaerobic bacteria. This represents 48.8% of the total specimens cultured. Isolates from 153 specimens obtained and stocked from 1965 to 1974 were reidentified by current criteria. Gram-negative bacilli, primarily bacteroides, were the most frequently isolated anaerobes, being found in 70% of 153 anaerobe-positive specimens and accounting for 42% of the total anaerobes isolated. Gram-positive cocci were second in occurrence, being found in 66% of 153 specimens and accounting for 40% of the total isolates. Bacteroides fragilis was by far the most frequently isolated species. Compairson of 14 years of cumulative data with data from current studies covering 1- to 2-year periods indicated that the anaerobes isolated from clinical material have not changed significantly in type or relative numbers. PMID:833266

  18. Anaerobic survival of clinical isolates and laboratory strains of Neisseria gonorrhoea: use in transfer and storage.

    PubMed Central

    Short, H B; Clark, V L; Kellogg, D S; Young, F E

    1982-01-01

    Eleven laboratory strains and 67 clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were tested for the ability to survive during anaerobic incubation. The survival of the laboratory strains was dependent on auxotype, temperature, and cell density on agar plates. For both the laboratory strains and the clinical isolates, anaerobic survival was better at lower temperatures. We concluded that anaerobic incubation, for as long as 7 days, is useful when transporting or storing N. gonorrhoeae. Images PMID:6808019

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  20. [2, 4, 6-Trichlorophenol Mineralization Promoted by Anaerobic Reductive Dechlorination of Acclimated Sludge and Extracellular Respiration Dechlorination Pathway].

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xiu; Li, Ling; Sheng, Fan-fan; Guo, Cui-xiang; Zhang, Yong-ming; Li, Zu-yuan; Wang, Tian-li

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic conditions, the acclimation of activated sludge was studied with sodium lactate as the electron donor and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol as the electron acceptor. Metabolic characteristics of dechlorination were the focus of this study. The result showed highly efficient dechlorination on 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol that the conversion rate reached to 100% in 9 - 24 h when initial concentrations of sodium lactate and 2,4, 6-trichlorophenol were 20 mmol x L(-1) and 40 - 80 μmol x L(-1), respectively. The intermediate product 2,4-dichlorophenol was found in low concentration (< 4.22 μmol x L(-1)). And 4-chlorophenol and phenol were the main products. Ortho chlorophenol (2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol, 2, 4-dichlorophenol) can be converted rapidly by acclimated sludge, while the further conversion of 4-chlorophenol and phenol was limited. The residues of anaerobic metabolism were degraded by aerobic sludge, among which 4-chlorophenol (initial concentration of 33 mol x L(-1)) removal rate was up to 100% under aerobic conditions. The acclimated bacteria can rapidly transfer Fe(III) and humus (AQDS) into reductive Fe(II) and AQH2DS which indicated that the dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria was enriched in the acclimated sludge. The electron mediator [Fe(III) and AQDS] significantly accelerated the dechlorination rate. The acclimated sludge could perform extracellular respiration dechlorination with electron mediators. PMID:26841610

  1. Molecular characterization and biological response to respiration inhibitors of Pyricularia isolates from ctenanthe and rice plants.

    PubMed

    Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Pappas, Athanasios C; Syranidou, Elene

    2005-07-01

    The molecular profile and the biological response of isolates of Pyricularia oryzae Cavara obtained from ctenanthe to two strobilurins (azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl) and the phenylpyridinamine fungicide fluazinam were characterized, and compared with isolates from rice plants. Five different isozymes (alpha-esterase, lactate, malate, isocitrate and sorbitol dehydrogenases) and five random decamer primers for RAPD-PCR were used to generate molecular markers. Using unweighted pair-group with arithmetic average analysis, ctenanthe isolates were found to form a separate group distinct from that of the rice isolates for both sets of markers. Amplified polymorphic sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b that were digested with Fnu4HI or StyI revealed no differences among Pyricularia isolates at amino acid positions 143 or 129 which confer resistance to strobilurins in several fungi. In absence of the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) the three fungicides showed inferior and variable efficacy, with a trend toward the rice isolate being less sensitive. The addition of SHAM enhanced the effectiveness of all fungicides against isolates regardless of their origin. Appressorium formation was the most vulnerable target of action of the respiration inhibitors and azoxystrobin the most effective. This is the first report of a comparison between the molecular profiles and sensitivities to respiration inhibitors for Pyricularia oryzae isolates from a non-gramineous host and from rice. PMID:15739234

  2. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  3. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  4. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  5. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  6. Mechanism and Consequences of Anaerobic Respiration of Cobalt by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Heidi H.; Gilbert, Alan; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Shewanella are the most diverse respiratory organisms studied to date and can utilize a variety of metals and metal(loid)s as terminal electron acceptors. These bacteria can potentially be used in bioremediation applications since the redox state of metals often influences both solubility and toxicity. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which metal transformations occur and the consequences of by-products that may be toxic to the organism and thus inhibitory to the overall process is significant to future applications for bioremediation. Here, we examine the ability of Shewanella oneidensis to catalyze the reduction of chelated cobalt. We describe an unexpected ramification of [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis: the formation of a toxic by-product. We found that [Co(II)-EDTA]2−, the product of [Co(III)-EDTA]− respiration, inhibited the growth of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 and that this toxicity was partially abolished by the addition of MgSO4. We demonstrate that [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis requires the Mtr extracellular respiratory pathway and associated pathways required to develop functional Mtr enzymes (the c-type cytochrome maturation pathway) and ensure proper localization (type II secretion). The Mtr pathway is known to be required for a variety of substrates, including some chelated and insoluble metals and organic compounds. Understanding the full substrate range for the Mtr pathway is crucial for developing S. oneidensis strains as a tool for bioremediation. PMID:18836009

  7. Use of the Anaerobic Pouch in Isolating Clostridium botulinum Spores from Fresh Meats

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard A.; Bladel, Bendt O.; Zingelmann, Walter J.

    1966-01-01

    The anaerobic film pouch was demonstrated to be an effective device for the primary isolation of Clostridium botulinum types A and B spores from raw pork, beef, and chicken. Optimal pasteurization of these meats (for reduction of nonspore microflora without affecting indigenous putrefactive anaerobic spore levels) was 50 min at 60 C. C. botulinum spores were recovered with good precision from meat samples inoculated with mixtures of C. botulinum and Putrefactive Anaerobe 3679 at 1:1 and at 1:99 ratios. Verification of C. botulinum isolates was accomplished by protection testing of subcultures in mice. PMID:5335387

  8. What iron minerals contribute to anaerobic respiration in peats differing in maturity on the Arctic Coastal Plain ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Wagner, F. E.; Lipson, D.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial Fe-reduction accounts for 30-60% of ecosystem respiration in drained thaw-lake tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain. Near Barrow, we collected diffraction, Fe-XANES, Moessbauer spectra (RT and liqHe), and wet-chemical data on the Fe mineralogy of DTLB over an age gradient from 0 - 5500 y BP to delineate the important phases involved in microbial cycling of Fe. Soils were cored frozen in early June of 2010/ 2011, wrapped/ transported to CA by overnight express. Cores varying in age since formation were further sectioned, and transferred to an anaerobic hood for size-fractionation based on settling velocity, and subjected to bulk XRD at SSRL. Fe-XANES of both clay-separates and bulk soil were collected at BL 4-1. Subsamples were packed into anaerobic vials and sent for Moessbauer spectroscopy. Present in bulk soils of all ages by XRD were quartz, albite and vermiculite. Additional smectitic minerals, goethite and Fe-phosphates were evident in some basin classes, esp. Young and Medium. XANES confirmed wet-chem results of a highly-reduced state for Fe in bulk soils, and fits of XAFS indicated goethite as 20% of the reactive Fe-pool among basin-age classes. The most abundant Fe-containing minerals in clay fractions (Old and Young soils) were a ferrosmectite, or hornblende-derived mineral. (Fig.1) MB spectra from various depths of an Old Basin (300-2000 yrs BP) - the DTLB class of greatest areal extent -- revealed largely reduced Fe pools (50-60%), with goethite and a Fhd-like component visible (~23%). LHe spectra indicated the presence of goethite as ~ 20% of the MB-visible pool (Fig 2). Two prominent quadrupole doublets had QS=3.24 mm/s; IS = 1.10 mm/s and QS = 2.84; IS=1.05 mm/s, respectively, and upon oxidation, demonstrated divergent kinetics. We attribute the doublet with lower splitting to the ferrosmectite component visible by XAFS. Although previous sequential extractions of Barrow soil minerals suggested a sizeable component of siderites (indeed geochem

  9. Isolation and characterisation of non-anaerobic butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06.

    PubMed

    Wang, Genyu; Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Ya; Mi, Shuo; Mai, Shuai; Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Børresen, Børre Tore; Mellemsæther, Evy; Kotlar, Hans Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Butanol-producing microorganisms are all obligate anaerobes. In this study, a unique symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated to be capable of producing butanol under non-anaerobic condition. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) revealed that two strains coexist in TSH06. The two strains were identical to Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus, respectively. They were isolated individually and named as C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2. C. acetobutylicum TSH1 is a butanol-producing, obligate anaerobic strain. Facultative anaerobic B. cereus TSH2 did not possess the ability of butanol production; however, it offered C. acetobutylicum TSH1 the viability under non-anaerobic condition. Moreover, B. cereus TSH2 enhanced butanol yield and speed of fermentation. TSH06 produced 12.97 g/L butanol and 15.39 g/L total solvent under non-anaerobic condition, which is 25 and 24 %, respectively, higher than those of C. acetobutylicum TSH1. In addition, TSH06 produced butanol faster under non-anaerobic condition than under anaerobic condition. Butanol accounted for more than 80 % of total solvent, which is higher than the known report. TSH06 was stable during passage. In all, TSH06 is a promising candidate for industrialisation of biobutanol with high yield, high butanol proportion, easy-handling and time-saving system. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of symbiosis. This study also provides a promising strategy for butanol fermentation. PMID:26272091

  10. Anaerobic respiration in engineered Escherichia coli with an internal electron acceptor to produce fuel ethanol.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joy Doran; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2008-03-01

    Environmental concerns and unease with U.S. dependence on foreign oil have renewed interest in converting biomass into fuel ethanol. The volume of plant matter available makes lignocellulose conversion to ethanol desirable, although no one isolated organism has been shown to break bonds in lignocellulose and efficiently metabolize resulting sugars into one product. This work reviews directed engineering coupled with metabolic evolution resulting in microbial biocatalysts that produce up to 45 g L(-1) ethanol in 48 hours in a simple mineral salts medium and that convert various compounds of lignocellulosic materials to ethanol. Mutations contributing to ethanologenesis are discussed along with adding enzymatic capabilities to existing biocatalysts in order to decrease the commercial enzymes required to reduce plant matter into fermentable sugars. PMID:18378606

  11. Two-pronged survival strategy for the major cystic fibrosis pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, lacking the capacity to degrade nitric oxide during anaerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Lipscomb, John D; Hennigan, Robert F; Lymar, Sergei V; Groce, Stephanie L; Herr, Andrew B; Howell, Michael L; Kiley, Patricia J; Schurr, Michael J; Gaston, Benjamin; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Schweizer, Herbert P; Hassett, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Protection from NO gas, a toxic byproduct of anaerobic respiration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) reductase (NOR), the norCB gene product. Nevertheless, a norCB mutant that accumulated ∼13.6 μM NO paradoxically survived anaerobic growth. Transcription of genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, the enzymes responsible for NO production, was reduced >50- and 2.5-fold in the norCB mutant. This was due, in part, to a predicted compromise of the [4Fe–4S]2+ cluster in the anaerobic regulator ANR by physiological NO levels, resulting in an inability to bind to its cognate promoter DNA sequences. Remarkably, two O2-dependent dioxygenases, homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase (HmgA) and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (Hpd), were derepressed in the norCB mutant. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed that HmgA and Hpd bound NO avidly, and helped protect the norCB mutant in anaerobic biofilms. These data suggest that protection of a P. aeruginosa norCB mutant against anaerobic NO toxicity occurs by both control of NO supply and reassignment of metabolic enzymes to the task of NO sequestration. PMID:17627281

  12. Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic activities of anaerobic gut fungi isolated from wild and domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Kamra, Devki N; Sastry, Vadali R B

    2010-08-01

    Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic enzyme activities of anaerobic gut fungi from wild (17 isolates) and domestic ruminants (15 isolates) were examined. In a medium containing 0.5% wheat straw and 0.02% cellobiose as energy source, activities of carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), avicelase, xylanase, acetyl esterase and protease produced by the fungal isolates were investigated. Average activity of CMCase (17.4 vs. 8.25 mIU ml(-1)), acetyl esterase (134 vs. 57 mIU ml(-1)) and protease (4400 vs. 1683 mIU ml(-1)) were significantly higher in isolates from wild ruminants than those from domestic ruminants. Xylanase and avicelase activities were comparable. When compared irrespective of source, fungal isolates having monocentric growth pattern produced more fibrolytic enzymes than isolates having polycentric growth pattern. CMCase, xylanase, avicelase activities were highest in Neocallimastix isolates. Acetyl esterase activity was highest in Piromyces and Neocallimastix isolates. Protease activity was highest in Piromyces isolates followed closely by Neocallimastix isolates. Between isolates from wild and domestic ruminants few differences were observed in pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and end products of fermentation. Inter-strain differences in the end product formation were apparent. All of the isolates produced acetate, lactate and formate; only a few isolates produced succinate. For isolation of superior fibrolytic isolates of anaerobic fungi, greater emphasis should be given to the screening of enzyme activities of isolates of genera Neocallimastix and Piromyces. PMID:20722299

  13. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibilities of wound isolates of obligate anaerobes from combat casualties.

    PubMed

    White, Brian K; Mende, Katrin; Weintrob, Amy C; Beckius, Miriam L; Zera, Wendy C; Lu, Dan; Bradley, William; Tribble, David R; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth R; Murray, Clinton K

    2016-02-01

    Data from recent conflicts related to war wounds and obligate anaerobes are limited. We define the epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobes from Iraq and Afghanistan casualties (6/2009-12/2013), as well as their association with clinical outcomes. Susceptibility against eleven antibiotics (7 classes) was tested. Overall, 59 patients had 119 obligate anaerobes identified (83 were first isolates). Obligate anaerobes were isolated 7-13 days post-injury, primarily from lower extremity wounds (43%), and were largely Bacteroides spp. (42%) and Clostridium spp. (19%). Patients with pelvic wounds were more likely to have Bacteroides spp. and concomitant resistant gram-negative aerobes. Seventy-three percent of isolates were resistant to ≥1 antimicrobials. Bacteroides spp. demonstrated the most resistance (16% of first isolates). Patients with resistant isolates had similar outcomes to those with susceptible strains. Serial recovery of isolates occurred in 15% of patients and was significantly associated with isolation of Bacteroides spp., along with resistant gram-negative aerobes. PMID:26607420

  14. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. PMID:26630583

  15. Properties of anaerobic fungi isolated from several habitats: complexity of phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zelená, Viera; Birošová, Lucia; Olejníková, Petra; Polák, Martin; Lakatoš, Boris; Varečka, Ľudovít

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of anaerobic fungi from rumen, animal faeces and compost displayed morphological similarity with known anaerobic fungi. According to their ITS sequences, species were related to Neocallimastix and Piromyces. Rumen fungi tolerated exposure to an aerobic atmosphere for at least four days. Under anaerobic conditions, they could grow on both, defined or complex substrates. Growth in liquid media was monitored by the continuous measurement of metabolic gases (O2, CO2, H2, CO, H2S, CH4). Monitored metabolism was complex, showed that both CO2 and H2 were produced and subsequently consumed by yet unknown metabolic pathway(s). CO and H2S were evolved similarly, but not identically with the generation of CO2 and H2 suggesting their connection with energetic metabolism. Anaerobic fungi from snail faeces and compost produced concentrations of H2S, H2, CO near the lower limit of detection. The rumen isolates produced cellulases and xylanases with similar pH and temperature optima. Proteolytic enzymes were secreted as well. Activities of some enzymes of the main catabolic pathways were found in cell-free homogenates of mycelia. The results indicate the presence of the pentose cycle, the glyoxylate cycle and an incomplete citrate cycle in these fungi. Differences between isolates indicate phenotypic variability between anaerobic fungi. PMID:26612922

  16. Isolation, Characterization, and Ecology of Sulfur-Respiring Crenarchaea Inhabiting Acid-Sulfate-Chloride-Containing Geothermal Springs in Yellowstone National Park▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Jackson, Robert A.; Encarnacion, Gem; Zahn, James A.; Beard, Trevor; Leavitt, William D.; Pi, Yundan; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Pearson, Ann; Geesey, Gill G.

    2007-01-01

    Elemental sulfur (S0) is associated with many geochemically diverse hot springs, yet little is known about the phylogeny, physiology, and ecology of the organisms involved in its cycling. Here we report the isolation, characterization, and ecology of two novel, S0-reducing Crenarchaea from an acid geothermal spring referred to as Dragon Spring. Isolate 18U65 grows optimally at 70 to 72°C and at pH 2.5 to 3.0, while isolate 18D70 grows optimally at 81°C and pH 3.0. Both isolates are chemoorganotrophs, dependent on complex peptide-containing carbon sources, S0, and anaerobic conditions for respiration-dependent growth. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing four to six cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolates 18U65 and 18D70. Physiological characterization suggests that the isolates are adapted to the physicochemical conditions of Dragon Spring and can utilize the natural organic matter in the spring as a carbon and energy source. Quantitative PCR analysis of 16S rRNA genes associated with the S0 flocs recovered from several acid geothermal springs using isolate-specific primers indicates that these two populations together represent 17 to 37% of the floc-associated DNA. The physiological characteristics of isolates 18U65 and 18D70 are consistent with their potential widespread distribution and putative role in the cycling of sulfur in acid geothermal springs throughout the Yellowstone National Park geothermal complex. Based on phenotypic and genetic characterization, the designations Caldisphaera draconis sp. nov. and Acidilobus sulfurireducens sp. nov. are proposed for isolates 18U65 and 18D70, respectively. PMID:17720836

  17. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF STRICT AND FACULTATIVE ANAEROBES ISOLATED FROM ENDODONTIC INFECTIONS TO METRONIDAZOLE AND β-LACTAMS

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Lins, Samira Âmbar; Vieira, Evanice Menezes Marçal; de Oliveira, Sérgio Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Endodontic infections are mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections and several microbial groups associated to these pathologies are also involved in orofacial infections. The goal of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of microorganisms isolated from endodontic infections to β-lactams and metronidazole and verify the production of β-lactamases. Clinical specimens were collected from 58 endodontic infections of 52 patients. The microorganisms were isolated in selective and non-selective culture media, under anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, and identified using biochemical methods. In the susceptibility tests, it was used an agar dilution method, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar enriched with blood, hemin and menadione for the anaerobes, while Mueller- Hinton agar was employed for the facultative anaerobes. The production of β-lactamases was evaluated through the biological and chromogenic cephalosporin methods. All tested isolates were sensitive to imipenem and 99.3% to amoxicillin/clavulanate association, while 16.1% showed resistance to amoxicillin and penicillin G, and 4.89% to cefoxitin. Resistance to metronidazole was just found in facultative anaerobes. Production of β-lactamases was detected in 18.2% of the isolates and presented a correlation with resistance to β-lactams. PMID:19089195

  18. Clostridium perfringens and other anaerobes isolated from bile.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Y; Murata, K; Kimura, M

    1983-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens was isolated from bile in 13 cases of 150 patients examined. The serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from bile and faeces were investigated using antisera to Hobbs' type 1-17. Two or more serological types were often found in a single specimen, but in the same patient the serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from the bile were identical with those from the faeces. Beta-glucuronidase production in these C perfringens serotypes was tested with the API-Strep system. Strains agglutinated with Hobbs' antisera produced beta-glucuronidase, but non-agglutinated strains did not. PMID:6298284

  19. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Filamentous Fungus from Japanese Rice Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonouchi, Akio

    2009-01-01

    A novel filamentous fungus strain designated RB-1 was isolated into pure culture from Japanese rice field soil through an anaerobic role tube technique. The strain is a mitosporic fungus that grows in both aerobic and strict anaerobic conditions using various mono-, di-, tri-, and polysaccharides with acetate and ethanol productions. The amount of acetate produced was higher than that of ethanol in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The characteristic verrucose or punctuate conidia of RB-1 closely resembled those of some strains of the genus Thermomyces, a thermophilic or mesophilic anamorphic ascomycete. However, based on phylogenetic analysis with the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences, RB-1 was characterized as a member of the class Lecanoromycetes of the phylum Ascomycota. Currently, RB-1 is designated as an anamorphic ascomycete and is phylogenetically considered an incertae sedis within the class Lecanoromycetes. PMID:20148171

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified. PMID:25977440

  3. The effect of statherin and its shortened analogues on anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kochańska, B; Kedzia, A; Kamysz, W; Maćkiewicz, Z; Kupryszewski, G

    2000-01-01

    The susceptibility (MIC) of 44 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity and 3 standard strains to statherin and its C-terminal fragments with sequences QYQQYTF, YQQYTF, QQYTF, QYTF and YTF was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar with 5% content of defibrinated sheep's blood, menadione and hemin. The culture was anaerobic. As shown, at concentrations from 12.5 to 100 microg/ml statherin and its C-terminal fragments inhibited the growth of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity. Peptostreptococcus strains were the most susceptible to statherin and YTF (MIC < or = 12.5 mg/ml), whereas the most susceptible to the peptides investigated were Fusobacterium necrogenes and Fusobacterium necrophorum strains: QYQQYTF, YQQYTF, QQYTF, QYTF (MIC < or = 12.5 microg/ml). Prevotella oralis, Bacteroides forsythus and Bacteroides ureolyticus strains exhibited the lowest susceptibility (MIC > 100 microg/ml). When analysing the bacteriostatic activity of statherin it should be pointed out that the concentrations of this peptide used in microbiological investigations are within the range of physiological concentrations determined for whole saliva when at rest and stimulated in healthy donors of 19-25 years of age. Since the anaerobes investigated may be involved in the diseases of periodontum, the results presented seem to have also a practical aspect, i.e. a possibility to apply the C-terminal fragments of statherin as a novel therapeutic agent, affecting favourably the oral cavity. PMID:11293657

  4. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism. PMID:26022424

  5. Isolation of a tannic acid-degrading Streptococcus sp. from an anaerobic shea cake digester.

    PubMed

    Nitiema, L W; Dianou, D; Simpore, J; Karou, S D; Savadogo, P W; Traore, A S

    2010-01-01

    An anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds rich-shea cake and previously inoculated with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse, enabled six months acclimatization of the bacteria to aromatic compounds. Afterwards, digester waste water samples were subject to successive culture on media with 1 g L(-1) tannic acid allowing the isolation of a bacterial strain coded AB. Strain AB was facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic, non-motile, non-sporulating, catalase and oxidase negative bacterium, namely strain AB, was isolated from an anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds, after inoculation with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse and enrichment on tannic acid. The coccoid cells occurred in pair, short or long chains and stained Gram-positive. Strain AB fermented a wide range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, galactose, raffinose, arabinose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, starch and cellulose. Optimum growth occurred with glucose and tannic acid at 37 degrees C and pH 8. The pH, temperature and salt concentration for growth ranged from 5 to 9, 20 to 45 degrees C and 0 to 15 g L(-1), respectively. Strain AB converted tannic acid to gallic acid. These features were similar to those of the Streptococcus genus. The determination of tannic acid hydrolysis end products, ability to utilize various organic acids, alcohols and peptides, GC% of the DNA, the sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization will permit to confirm this affiliation and to determine the species. PMID:20415153

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  7. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  8. Faropenem, a new oral penem: antibacterial activity against selected anaerobic and fastidious periodontal isolates.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, I; Blandino, G; Caccamo, F; Musumeci, R; Nicoletti, G; Speciale, A

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro activity of faropenem, an oral penem, was compared with those of penicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefoxitin, clindamycin, erythromycin and metronidazole against 106 isolates of anaerobic pathogens involved in systemic infections. The organisms tested comprised Porphyromonas gingivalis (29), Prevotella spp. (eight), Prevotella melaninogenica (seven), Prevotella intermedia (five), Actinomyces spp. (25), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14), Peptostreptococcus spp. (11), Bacteroides ureolyticus (five) and Bacteroides forsythus (two). The antimicrobial properties of faropenem were investigated by studying MICs, MBCs, time-kill kinetics and post-antibiotic effect (PAE). Faropenem was highly active against all the anaerobes tested (MIC(90) < or = 0.5 mg/L) and was bactericidal against both beta-lactamase-positive and -negative anaerobes, with a maximum bactericidal effect at 10 x MIC at between 12 and 24 h. In addition, faropenem had an in vitro PAE on all the tested isolates and this was not influenced by beta-lactamase production. Faropenem may be useful for treating infections caused by periodontal bacteria or oral flora. PMID:12615878

  9. Anaerobic gut fungi: Advances in isolation, culture, and cellulolytic enzyme discovery for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Charles H; Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi are an early branching family of fungi that are commonly found in the digestive tract of ruminants and monogastric herbivores. It is becoming increasingly clear that they are the primary colonizers of ingested plant biomass, and that they significantly contribute to the decomposition of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. As such, anaerobic fungi harbor a rich reservoir of undiscovered cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes that can potentially transform the conversion of lignocellulose into bioenergy products. Despite their unique evolutionary history and cellulolytic activity, few species have been isolated and studied in great detail. As a result, their life cycle, cellular physiology, genetics, and cellulolytic metabolism remain poorly understood compared to aerobic fungi. To help address this limitation, this review briefly summarizes the current body of knowledge pertaining to anaerobic fungal biology, and describes progress made in the isolation, cultivation, molecular characterization, and long-term preservation of these microbes. We also discuss recent cellulase- and cellulosome-discovery efforts from gut fungi, and how these interesting, non-model microbes could be further adapted for biotechnology applications. PMID:24788404

  10. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacter sp. Strain OR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Japanese Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. strain OR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from Japanese paddy soil. It contained two distinct arsenic islands, one including genes for a respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr) as well as for arsenic resistance (arsD-arsA-acr3-arsR-arrA-arrB) and the second containing only genes for arsenic resistance. PMID:25635012

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Geobacter sp. Strain OR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Japanese Paddy Soil.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Geobacter sp. strain OR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from Japanese paddy soil. It contained two distinct arsenic islands, one including genes for a respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr) as well as for arsenic resistance (arsD-arsA-acr3-arsR-arrA-arrB) and the second containing only genes for arsenic resistance. PMID:25635012

  13. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic ruminal bacterium capable of degrading hydrolyzable tannins.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K E; Pell, A N; Schofield, P; Zinder, S

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic diplococcoid bacterium able to degrade hydrolyzable tannins was isolated from the ruminal fluid of a goat fed desmodium (Desmodium ovalifolium), a tropical legume which contains levels as high as 17% condensed tannins. This strain grew under anaerobic conditions in the presence of up to 30 g of tannic acid per liter and tolerated a range of phenolic monomers, including gallic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids. The predominant fermentation product from tannic acid breakdown was pyrogallol, as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Tannic acid degradation was dependent on the presence of a sugar such as glucose, fructose, arabinose, sucrose, galactose, cellobiose, or soluble starch as an added carbon and energy source. The strain also demonstrated resistance to condensed tannins up to a level of 4 g/liter. PMID:7574640

  14. Growth characteristics on cellobiose of three different anaerobic fungi isolated from the ovine rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M W; Gordon, G L

    1989-01-01

    Three morphologically different anaerobic fungi, a Neocallimastix sp. strain (LM-1), a Piromonas sp. strain (SM-1), and a Sphaeromonas sp. strain (NM-1), were isolated from the rumens of sheep. Growth studies were conducted with each isolate in batch cultures by using an anaerobic semidefined medium that lacked ruminal fluid and contained 0.5% cellobiose. Cultures were incubated for periods of up to 10 days, and fungal growth was assessed at regular intervals by dry weight measurements. Samples of fungal biomass were also analyzed for cell-associated protein and, after acid hydrolysis, for chitin as hexosamine. The isolates produced similar yields of dry weight and contained similar amounts of protein. However, strain LM-1 grew at a higher rate and contained less than half the level of chitin compared with the other two isolates. There were high positive correlations between chitin and protein for all three fungi, but comparisons of these parameters with dry weights were affected by the presence of variable amounts of storage carbohydrate. The amount of storage carbohydrate reached maximum levels in strain LM-1 during mid-growth phase and then quickly declined thereafter. When dry weight yields for strain LM-1 were adjusted for changes in storage carbohydrate, high positive correlations were obtained between dry weight and protein or chitin. The storage carbohydrate was probably an alpha-1,4-glucan with alpha-1,6 branches. Images PMID:2669633

  15. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from acidic river sediments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Brienza, Claudio; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stained Gram-negative, and was obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming and motile. Cells were short rods (1.5-2 × 0.5-0.7 μm), appearing singly or in pairs. Strain TR1T was catalase-negative and slightly oxidase-positive. Urease activity and indole formation were absent, but gelatin hydrolysis was present. Growth was observed at 20-52 °C with an optimum close to 50 °C, and a pH range of 3-7 with optimum between pH 6 and 6.5. Yeast extract was essential for growth, but extra vitamins were not required. In the presence of sulfur, strain TR1T grew with acetate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, stearate, arginine and H2/CO2. All substrates were completely oxidized and H2S and CO2 were the only metabolic products detected. Besides elemental sulfur, thiosulfate was used as an electron acceptor. The isolate also grew by disproportionation of elemental sulfur. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated components: C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C18 : 0. The only quinone component detected was menaquinone MK-7(H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34 mol%. The isolate is affiliated to the genus Desulfurella of the class Deltaproteobacteria, sharing 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the four species described in the genus Desulfurella. Considering the distinct physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TR1T represents a novel species within the genus Desulfurella, for which the name Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TR1T ( = DSM 29984T = JCM 30680T). PMID:26704766

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  17. Growth of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria on agar media: effects of media composition, storage conditions, and reduction under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P R

    1978-01-01

    The quantitative growth, the colony size, and the rate of growth of 47 clinical anaerobic isolates were compared on five different media, namely Brucella agar, brain heart infusion agar, Columbia agar, Schaedler agar, and tryptic soy agar. There was no significant difference in the quantitative growth of the anaerobes inoculated onto the five media. Although no single medium was superior for the growth of all isolates, 12 of 22 isolates, inoculated onto media stored for 4 weeks or less, grew best on Schaedler agar. The effects of supplementation of the media with reducing agents and reduction of the media before use were also analyzed and were found to be affected by the composition and length of storage of the media, as well as the bacteria tested. PMID:744801

  18. Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Allman, Steve L; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Elkins, James G

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  19. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel. PMID:26489344

  20. The contribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiration to intestinal colonization and virulence for Salmonella typhimurium in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Paul Andrew; Berchieri, Angelo; Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano de; Lovell, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    The basic mechanism whereby Salmonella serovars colonize the chicken intestine remains poorly understood. Previous studies have indicated that proton-translocating proteins utilizing oxygen as terminal electron acceptor do not appear to be of major importance in the gut of the newly hatched chicken and consequently they would be even less significant during intestinal colonization of more mature chickens where the complex gut microflora would trap most of the oxygen in the lumen. Consequently, alternative electron acceptors may be more significant or, in their absence, substrate-level phosphorylation may also be important to Salmonella serovars in this environment. To investigate this we constructed mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium defective in various aspects of oxidative or substrate-level phosphorylation to assess their role in colonization of the chicken intestine, assessed through faecal shedding, and virulence. Mutations affecting use of oxygen or alternative electron acceptors did not eliminate faecal shedding. By contrast mutations in either pta (phosphotransacetylase) or ackA (acetate kinase) abolished shedding. The pta but not the ackA mutation also abolished systemic virulence for chickens. An additional ldhA (lactate dehydrogenase) mutant also showed poor colonizing ability. We hypothesise that substrate-level phosphorylation may be more important than respiration using oxygen or alternative electron acceptors for colonization of the chicken caeca. PMID:26443064

  1. A comparison of media used in vitro to isolate non-sporing Gram-negative anaerobes from blood.

    PubMed

    Forgan-Smith, W R; Darrell, J H

    1974-04-01

    Five anaerobic media were compared in a model blood culture system for their ability to recover small inocula of Gram-negative non-sporing anaerobes. Dehydrated cooked meat medium was the least effective; USP thioglycollate medium was the most effective isolation medium and is recommended for routine use. Freshly prepared cooked meat medium has the advantage of allowing prolonged survival of strains. PMID:4850178

  2. Effects of the Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the Stability of Extracellular U(VI) Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO3·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes. PMID:23719584

  3. Effects of the anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO(3)·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes. PMID:23719584

  4. ANAEROBIC RESISTANCE TO HIGH LEVELS OF CADMIUM AND OTHER TOXIC METALS IN A FACULTATIVE ANAEROBE ISOLATED FROM PRISTINE SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SHARMA,P.K.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,A.; KIELECZAWA,J.

    1999-06-20

    The authors have isolated many Cd (II) resistant bacterial strains from relatively pristine sediments collected from salt marshes in Shelter Island, New York. Detailed studies are being performed on one isolate, strain Cd-1. Strain Cd-1 is metabolically diverse, halotolerant, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe. It can resist high amounts of Cd (II), Cr (VI), As (V), Se (IV), Co (II), Pb (II), or Zn (II) under defined anaerobic conditions. With pyruvate as the energy source, Cd-1 can grow well at examined Cd (II) concentrations ranging up to 15 mM. It can resist Cd (II) with or without marine level NaCl concentration, under acidic or neutral conditions. It can resist Cd (II) under aerobic conditions as well. These features are novel for a heavy metal resistant bacterium.

  5. Antibacterial effect of imipenem in vitro against important aerobic and anaerobic strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Klietmann, W; Focht, J; Nösner, K

    1987-08-01

    Imipenem is a thienamycin antibiotic of the first generation with broad antibacterial activity. It covers all gram-positive organisms (including Streptococcus faecalis) and gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp.) as well as Bacteroides fragilis and other Bacteroides species. In this comparative study the antimicrobic effect against 1020 gram-negative, 927 gram-positive and 352 anaerobic strains from fresh clinical isolates was tested and compared with that of other frequently used antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by means of a serial dilution test with micro standard plates. Within the group of gram-negative strains, imipenem was the most active antibiotic with a MIC90 of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/l for most isolates. Imipenem shows a broad spectrum of activity against gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp. and Serratia spp., and also covers resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Alcaligenes faecalis. Imipenem also shows high inhibiting activity against gram-positive strains and anaerobic pathogens. PMID:3477332

  6. Anaerobic liquefaction/solubilization of coal by microorganisms and isolated enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Woodward, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Biocatalytic systems utilizing either living organisms or modified enzymes have been shown to enhance the liquefaction (products are liquid at ambient conditions) or solubilization of coal under anaerobic conditions. Microbial tests have been carried out in aqueous media with organisms isolated from outcropping of coal or from premium coal samples. Some of these isolates have been shown to grow on coal as the only carbon source and to produce small quantities of oxychemicals such as acetate or ethanol. Reducing enzymes, such as hydrogenase and cytochrome C, can be chemically modified to increase solubilization in organic solvents by attaching less polar chemicals, such as phenyl groups or polyethylene glycol, to the free amino groups on the enzymes. These biocatalysts have been shown to degrade model compounds and enhance the solubilization of coal in organic solvents under a hydrogen atmosphere. The resulting product is a relatively light hydrocarbon mixture with reasonably high volatility. 5 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of the ATB 32 A system for identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Looney, W J; Gallusser, A J; Modde, H K

    1990-01-01

    A new miniaturized 4-h method for the identification of anaerobic bacteria, ATB 32 A (API System SA, Montalieu Vercieu, France), was evaluated against conventional methods of identification. The evaluation was done by using 260 recent clinical isolates and 21 reference strains of anaerobic bacteria. All reference strains were correctly identified and did not figure in the detailed analysis. Of the 140 gram-negative bacilli, 90.6% of Bacteroides spp. and 95.5% of Fusobacterium spp. were correctly identified to the species level, with an additional 8.4% of the Bacteroides spp. being identified to the genus level. Clostridia were correctly identified in 85.9% of cases, with an additional 9.9% being identified to the genus level. Peptostreptococci were correctly identified in 91.6% of cases. The 4 strains of Actinomyces spp. were all identified correctly, as were 10 of the 11 strains of Propionibacterium spp. A total of 3.1% of strains were not identified by ATB 32 A, while for 1.9% of strains, completely false identifications were obtained. Estimation of the individual preformed enzyme results may pose problems, although these decrease with familiarity with the system. With certain enzyme profiles, additional testing was necessary to arrive at an identification; however, there was no requirement for gas-liquid chromatography. If certain additions are made to the data base and the difficulties of determination of organisms to the species level among the non-Bacteroides fragilis (sensu stricto) members of the B. fragilis group can be reduced, this system holds promise as a reliable standardized alternative for the identification of anaerobic bacteria in clinical laboratories. PMID:2199516

  8. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  9. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  10. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  11. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-01

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells. PMID:27288117

  12. Anaerobic Life at Extremely High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, Karl O.

    1984-12-01

    Continental and submarine solfataric fields turned out to contain various extremely thermophilic anaerobic organisms which all belong to the archaebacteria. They are living autotrophically on sulphur, hydrogen and CO2 or by methanogenesis or heterotrophically on different organic substrates by sulphur respiration or, less frequently, by fermentation. The most extremely thermophilic isolates are growing between 80 and 110°C with an optimum around 105°C.

  13. Development of a Molecular System for Studying Microbial Arsenate Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltikov, C. W.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    The toxic element arsenic is a major contaminant of many groundwaters and surface waters throughout the world. Arsenic enrichment is primarily of geological origin resulting from weathering processes and geothermal activity. Not surprisingly, microorganisms inhabiting anoxic arsenic-contaminated environments have evolved to exploit arsenate during respiration. Numerous bacteria have been isolated that use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor for respiratory growth. The diversity of this metabolism appears to be widespread throughout the microbial tree of life, suggesting respiratory arsenate reduction is ancient in origin. Yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms for how these organisms respire arsenate. We have developed a model system in Shewanella trabarsenatis, strain ANA-3, a facultative anaerobe that respires arsenate and tolerates high concentrations of arsenite (10 mM). Through loss-of-function studies, we have identified genes involved in both arsenic resistance and arsenate respiration. The genes that confer resistance to arsenic are homologous to the well-characterized ars operon of E. coli. However, the respiratory arsenate reductase is predicted to encode a novel protein that shares homologous regions (~ 40 % similarity) to molybdopterin anaerobic reductases specific for DMSO, thiosulfate, nitrate, and polysulfide. I will discuss our emerging model for how strain ANA-3 respires arsenate and the relationship between arsenite resistance and arsenate respiration. I will also highlight the relevance of this type of analysis for biogeochemical studies.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  15. Anaerobic Roll Tube Media for Nonselective Enumeration and Isolation of Bacteria in Human Feces

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Charles; Crabill, Melvin R.; Bryant, Marvin P.

    1971-01-01

    Medium 10 (M10), developed for rumen bacteria and containing small amounts of sugars, starch, volatile fatty acids, hemin, Trypticase, yeast extract, cysteine, and sulfide, plus agar, minerals and CO2-HCO3-buffer, was used with the Hungate anaerobic method as a basal medium to evaluate the efficacy of various ingredients. Three-day-old colony counts from adults on normal diets (17 samples) were 0.55 × 1011 to 1.7 × 1011 per g (mean, 1.15 × 1011) for M10. Single deletion of volatile fatty acids, Trypticase, yeast extract, or sulfide did not reduce counts. Deletion of hemin or both Trypticase and yeast extract significantly lowered counts. Addition of fecal extract, rumen fluid, 1% dehydrated Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) or 2 to 6% liver infusion did not increase counts; 1% dehydrated bile or 3.7% BHI markedly depressed them. Decreasing the gas-phase CO2 concentration from 100 to 5% with N2 and correspondingly lowering the HCO3 had little effect. Counts in supplemented Brewer Thioglycollate (Difco), BHI, and Trypticase soy agar were similar or lower than in M10; ease in counting was best in M10. Comparison of features of 88 predominant strains of fecal bacteria randomly isolated indicated that M10 supported growth of as many or more species of bacteria as compared to supplemented BHI. The results suggest that predominant bacteria of human feces, in general, are not as nutritionally fastidious as rumen bacteria and indicate that media for counts or isolation containing large amounts of rich organic materials are neither necessary nor desirable when adequate anaerobic techniques are used. PMID:4943269

  16. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)). PMID:23041645

  17. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source. PMID:24648142

  18. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)). PMID:25866024

  19. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  20. Thermosipho activus sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, hydrolytic bacterium isolated from a deep-sea sample.

    PubMed

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Godfroy, Anne; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Beskorovaynaya, Daria A; Sokolova, Tatyana G; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Toshchakov, Stepan V; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2014-09-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain Rift-s3(T), was isolated from a deep-sea sample containing Riftia pachyptila sheath from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. Cells of the novel isolate were rods, 0.3-0.8 µm in width and 1.5-10 µm in length, surrounded by a sheath-like structure (toga). Strain Rift-s3(T) grew at temperatures ranging from 44 to 75 °C, at pH 5.5 to 8.0, and with NaCl concentrations of 3 to 60 g l(-1). Under optimum conditions (65 °C, pH 6.0, NaCl 25 g l(-1)), the doubling time was 30 min. The isolate was able to ferment mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides including cellulose, chitin, xylan and pectin, and proteins including β-keratins, casein and gelatin. Acetate, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were the main products of glucose fermentation. The G+C content of the DNA was 30 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the affiliation of strain Rift-s3(T) with the genus Thermosipho, with Thermosipho atlanticus Ob7(T) as the closest relative (96.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological properties of the novel isolate we propose a novel species of the genus Thermosipho, Thermosipho activus sp. nov., with Rift-s3(T) ( = DSM 26467(T) = VKM B-2803(T)) as the type strain. PMID:24994778

  1. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  2. Anaerobic Growth and Fermentation Characteristics of Paecilomyces lilacinus Isolated from Mullet Gut

    PubMed Central

    Mountfort, Douglas O.; Rhodes, Lesley L.

    1991-01-01

    The anaerobic growth and fermentation of a marine isolate of Paecilomyces lilacinus is described. The fungus was isolated from mullet gut and grew optimally at 30°C and at a salinity of ≥10%. The best growth was obtained with glucose or laminarin as substrate, and the growth yield was 5.0 g (dry weight of fungus) per mol of hexose fermented. Moles of products as a percentage of moles of hexose fermented were acetate, 29.0%; ethanol, 156.6%; CO2, 108.0%; and lactate, 4.3%. Together these products accounted for >80% of hexose carbon. Hydrogen and formate were not detectable as fermentation end products (<0.5%). Other substrates utilized for growth, although less effectively than laminarin or glucose, included the monosaccharides galactose, fructose, arabinose, and xylose and the disaccharides maltose and cellobiose. No growth of the fungus occurred on cellulose, and of a variety of other polysaccharides tested only xylan supported growth. Images PMID:16348521

  3. Selenate reduction to elemental selenium by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and culture: biogeochemical significance of a novel, sulfate-independent respiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Maest, Ann S.; Presser, Theresa S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial water profiles of SeO42−, SeO32−, SO42−, and Cl− in anoxic sediments indicated removal of the seleno-oxyanions by a near-surface process unrelated to sulfate reduction. In sediment slurry experiments, a complete reductive removal of SeO42− occurred under anaerobic conditions, was more rapid with H2 or acetate, and was inhibited by O2, NO3−, MnO2, or autoclaving but not by SO42− or FeOOH. Oxidation of acetate in sediments could be coupled to selenate but not to molybdate. Reduction of selenate to elemental selenium was determined to be the mechanism for loss from solution. Selenate reduction was inhibited by tungstate and chromate but not by molybdate. A small quantity of the elemental selenium precipitated into sediments from solution could be resolublized by oxidation with either nitrate or FeOOH, but not with MnO2. A bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments demonstrated selenate-dependent growth on acetate, forming elemental selenium and carbon dioxide as respiratory end products. These results indicate that dissimilatory selenate reduction to elemental selenium is the major sink for selenium oxyanions in anoxic sediments. In addition, they suggest application as a treatment process for removing selenium oxyanions from wastewaters and also offer an explanation for the presence of selenite in oxic waters.

  4. Anaerobic bioremediation of RDX by ovine whole rumen fluid and pure culture isolates.

    PubMed

    Eaton, H L; Duringer, J M; Murty, L D; Craig, A M

    2013-04-01

    The ability of ruminal microbes to degrade the explosive compound hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in ovine whole rumen fluid (WRF) and as 24 bacterial isolates was examined under anaerobic conditions. Compound degradation was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification of metabolites. Organisms in WRF microcosms degraded 180 μM RDX within 4 h. Nitroso-intermediates hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5-nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX) were present as early as 0.25 h and were detected throughout the 24-h incubation period, representing one reductive pathway of ring cleavage. Following reduction to MNX, peaks consistent with m/z 193 and 174 were also produced, which were unstable and resulted in rapid ring cleavage to a common metabolite consistent with an m/z of 149. These represent two additional reductive pathways for RDX degradation in ovine WRF, which have not been previously reported. The 24 ruminal isolates degraded RDX with varying efficiencies (0-96 %) over 120 h. Of the most efficient degraders identified, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. desulfuricans degraded RDX when medium was supplemented with both nitrogen and carbon, while Anaerovibrio lipolyticus, Prevotella ruminicola, and Streptococcus bovis IFO utilized RDX as a sole source of nitrogen. This study showed that organisms in whole rumen fluid, as well as several ruminal isolates, have the ability to degrade RDX in vitro and, for the first time, delineated the metabolic pathway for its biodegradation. PMID:22688904

  5. Trends in the susceptibility of commonly encountered clinically significant anaerobes and susceptibilities of blood isolates of anaerobes to 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, 2008-2012, northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F D; Liao, C H; Lin, Y T; Sheng, W H; Hsueh, P R

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial resistance trends and profiles of clinical anaerobic isolates in northern Taiwan. Trends in the susceptibility of five commonly encountered clinical anaerobic isolates to seven agents from 2008 to 2012 were measured using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, against anaerobic blood isolates from two medical centers were determined using the agar dilution method. During the study period, susceptibility data on 11,105 isolates were evaluated. Metronidazole and chloramphenicol retained excellent activities. Around 20-30 % of isolates of Bacteroides and Prevotella species were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefmetazole, flomoxef, and clindamycin. Of the 507 tested blood isolates, the rates of resistance to commonly used agents were much higher, namely, 16.2 % for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 15.6 % for ampicillin-sulbactam, 24.7 % for cefmetazole, and 36.1 % for clindamycin. Notably, 13.5 % of B. fragilis isolates were resistant to ertapenem. Also, 15.2 % of B. uniformis, 17.2 % of other Bacteroides species, 14.3 % of Prevotella species, and 14 % of Clostridium other than C. perfringens isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was active against most isolates, except for Clostridium species other than perfringens (resistance rate, 18.6 %). Fidaxomicin exerted poor activities against most anaerobes tested (MIC90 of >128 μg/ml for B. fragilis and all isolates), except for C. perfringens (MIC90 of 0.03 μg/ml) and Peptostreptococcus micros (MIC90 of 2 μg/ml). However, rifaximin showed a wide range of susceptibilities against the tested anaerobes (MIC90 of 0.5 μg/ml for B. fragilis). The emergence of resistance to ertapenem and moxifloxacin among bacteremic anaerobes highlights the need for continuous monitoring. PMID:24930042

  6. Increased in vitro activity of ceftriaxone by addition of tazobactam against clinical isolates of anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, K E; Morice, N; Schiro, D D

    1994-08-01

    A total of 461 clinical strains of anaerobes were tested using a broth microdilution test to determine the activity of the combination of ceftriaxone and tazobactam and other antimicrobials against these isolates. Ceftriaxone was combined with tazobactam in ratios of 1:1, 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 and twofold dilutions of ceftriaxone in constant concentrations to tazobactam of 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 micrograms/ml. Against beta-lactamase-producing strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group, B. capillosus, and Prevotella species all combinations of ceftriaxone and tazobactam showed enhanced in vitro activity and were eight- to 2048-fold more active than ceftriaxone alone. By comparison ceftriaxone and tazobactam showed superior or equal activity to ampicillin and sulbactam, piperacillin and tazobactam, amoxicillin and clavulanate, ticarcillin and clavulanate, and metronidazole against these same strains. Against beta-lactamase nonproducing strains of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella parvula the addition of tazobactam produced no appreciable enhanced ceftriaxone activity. Fixed concentrations of tazobactam at 2 and 4 micrograms/ml appear to be most suitable for susceptibility testing and are within the pharmacologic profile of this inhibitor. Pharmacologic and toxicity studies will be needed to define the role of ceftriaxone and tazobactam in infectious diseases. PMID:7851086

  7. Pectinatus brassicae sp. nov., a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium isolated from salty wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-wu; Fang, Ming-xu; Tan, Hai-qin; Zhang, Xin-qi; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-fen

    2012-09-01

    A novel Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, strictly anaerobic, heterotrophic bacterium, strain TY(T), was isolated from salty pickle wastewater. Cells were rod-shaped with comb-like flagella, slightly curved and very variable in length. Optimal growth occurred at 28 °C and pH 6.5. Cells were resistant to up to 50 g NaCl l(-1). Strain TY(T) produced acid from glycerol, sucrose, glucose, fructose and mannitol. The main fermentation products from glucose were acetic and propionic acids. Tests for acid phosphatase and naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase activities were positive. The major fatty acids were C(14 : 0) DMA (18.7 %), C(15 : 0) (15.4 %), anteiso-C(18 : 1) (15.2 %), C(11 : 0) (13.3 %) and summed feature 5 (C(17 : 1)ω7c and/or C(17 : 2)) (11.0 %). The DNA G+C content was 35.9 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain TY(T) represented a novel species of the genus Pectinatus (sequence similarity to other members of the genus ranged from 93.2 to 94.8 %). Based on its phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TY(T) is proposed to represent a novel species, named Pectinatus brassicae sp. nov. (type strain TY(T) = JCM 17499(T) = DSM 24661(T)). PMID:22058316

  8. Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium isolated from a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibing; Yang, Guiqin; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium, designated as C-89(T), was isolated from a paddy field soil in Haikou, Hainan Province, People's Republic of China. Optimal growth was observed at 37 °C and pH 7.0 in the presence of 4% NaCl (w/v). The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7, the major cellular fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:0), and the major cellular polar lipids were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and two unknown phospholipids. The peptidoglycan type was determined to be based on meso-DAP. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relatives were identified as Bacillus vietnamensis JCM 11124(T) (98.8% sequence similarity), Bacillus aquimaris JCM 11545(T) (98.6%) and Bacillus marisflavi JCM 11544(T) (98.5%). The DNA G+C content of strain C-89(T) was determined to be 45.4 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain C-89(T) with its closest relatives were below 18%. Therefore, on the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and phenotypic results, strain C-89(T) can be considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is C-89(T) (=KCTC 33545(T) = CCTCC AB 2014076(T)). PMID:25100188

  9. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of aerobic Gram-positive cocci and anaerobic bacteria in 2006].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yoshida, Isamu; Itoh, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Mineji; Takahashi, Choichiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Okada, Masahiko; Horikawa, Yoshinori; Shiotani, Joji; Kino, Hiroyoshi; Ono, Yuka; Baba, Hisashi; Matsuo, Shuji; Asari, Seishi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Kimiko; Kusano, Nobuchika; Nose, Motoko; Murase, Mitsuharu; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kohno, Shigeru; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    The activity of antibacterial agents against aerobic Gram-positive cocci (26 species, 1022 strains) and anaerobic bacteria (23 species, 184 strains) isolated from clinical specimens in 2006 at 16 clinical facilities in Japan were studied using either broth microdilution or agar dilution method. The ratio of methicillin-resistant strains among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 53.0% and 65.8%, suggesting that resistant strains were isolated at high frequency. Vancomycin (VCM) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (QPR/DPR) had good antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, with MIC90s of < or = 2 micrcog/mL. The ratio of penicillin (PC) intermediate and resistant strains classified by mutations of PC-binding proteins among Streptococcus pneumoniae was 87.6%. Ceftriaxone, cefpirome, cefepime, carbapenem antibiotics, VCM, teicoplanin, linezolid(LZD) and QPR/DPR had MIC90s of < or = 1 microg/mL against PC-intermediate and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Against all strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, the MICs of VCM and TEIC were under 2 microg/mL, and no resistant strain was detected, suggesting that these agents had excellent activities against these species. 10.9% of E. faecalis strains or 3.5% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to LZD. 24.4% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to QPR/DPR. Against all strains of Clostridium difficile, the MIC of VCM were under 1 microg/mL, suggesting that VCM had excellent activity against C. difficile. Carbapenems showed good activity against Peptococcaceae, Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp. However since several strains of Bacteroides fragilis showed resistant to carbapenems and the susceptibility of this species should be well-focused in the future. PMID:21425596

  10. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of aerobic gram-positive cocci and anaerobic bacteria in 2008].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Isamu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kudo, Reiko; Fuji, Rieko; Takahashi, Choichiro; Oota, Reiko; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Okada, Masahiko; Horikawa, Yoshinori; Shiotani, Joji; Kino, Hiroyoshi; Ono, Yuka; Fujita, Shinichi; Matsuo, Shuji; Kono, Hisashi; Asari, Seishi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Kusano, Nobuchika; Nose, Motoko; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanimoto, Ayako; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kohno, Shigeru; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2012-02-01

    The activity of antibacterial agents against aerobic Gram-positive cocci (25 genus or species, 1029 strains) and anaerobic bacteria (21 genus or species, 187 strains) isolated from clinical specimens in 2008 at 16 clinical facilities in Japan were studied using either broth microdilution or agar dilution method. The ratio of methicillin-resistant strains among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 59.6% and 81.2%, suggesting that resistant strains were isolated at high frequency. Vancomycin (VCM), linezolid (LZD) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (QPR/DPR) had good antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, with MIC90s of < or = 2 microg/mL. The ratio of penicillin (PC) intermediate and resistant strains classified by mutations of PC-binding proteins among Streptococcus pneumoniae was 92.0% that was highest among our previous reports. Cefpirome, carbapenems, VCM, teicoplanin (TEIC), LZD and QPR/DPR had MIC90s of < or = 1 microg/mL against PC-intermediate and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Against all strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, the MICs of VCM and TEIC were under 2 microg/mL, and no resistant strain was detected, suggesting that these agents had excellent activities against these species. 15.9% of E. faecalis strains and 1.2% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate to LZD. 17.1% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to QPR/DPR. Against all strains of Clostridium difficile, the MIC of VCM was under 1 microg/mL, suggesting that VCM had excellent activity. Carbapenems showed good activity against Clostridiales, Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp., but one strain of Bacteroides fragilis showed resistant to carbapenems. And so, the susceptibility of this species should be well-focused in the future at detecting continuously. PMID:22808693

  11. Fusibacter fontis sp. nov., a sulfur-reducing, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a mesothermic Tunisian spring.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Fauque, Guy; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-10-01

    Strain KhalAKB1T, a mesophilic, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, was isolated from water collected from a mesothermic Tunisian spring. Cells were Gram-staining-positive rods, occurring singly or in pairs and motile by one lateral flagellum. Strain KhalAKB1T grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-35 g NaCl l- 1 (optimum 1 g NaCl l- 1). It fermented yeast extract and a wide range of carbohydrates including cellobiose, d-glucose, d-ribose, sucrose, d-xylose, maltose, d-galactose and starch as electron donors. Acetate, ethanol, CO2 and H2 were end products of glucose metabolism. It reduced elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite, into sulfide. The DNA G+C content was 37.6 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggested Fusibacter bizertensis as the closest relative of this isolate (identity of 97.2 % to the type strain). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic taxonomic characteristics, strain KhalAKB1T is proposed to be assigned to a novel species within the genus Fusibacter, order Clostridiales, Fusibacter fontis sp. nov. The type strain is KhalAKB1T ( = DSM 28450T = JCM 19912T). PMID:26296995

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain DL-VIII, a Novel Solventogenic Clostridium Species Isolated from Anaerobic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII, a novel Gram-positive, endospore-forming, solventogenic bacterium isolated from activated anaerobic sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Aside from a complete sol operon, the 6,477,357-bp genome of DL-VIII reveals genes for several unique enzymes with applications in lignocellulose degradation, including two phenolic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23929491

  13. A Simple, Semiselective Medium for Anaerobic Isolation of Anginosus Group Streptococci from Patients with Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Richard D.; Wareham, David W.; Gardiner, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic isolation of anginosus group streptococci (AGS) from respiratory specimens containing diverse microbiota using a semiselective blood agar medium incorporating nalidixic acid and sulfamethazine (NAS) is described. AGS were detected in 60% of tested sputa from patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis. This demonstrates NAS to be a diagnostic tool for detecting AGS within the complex microbial communities associated with chronic lung disorders. PMID:22238446

  14. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Results Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Conclusion Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3–100%. However, the

  15. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of 'Desulfuromonas soudanensis WTL', a Metal- and Electrode-Respiring Bacterium from Anoxic Deep Subsurface Brine.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Jonathan P; Summers, Zarath M; Chan, Chi Ho; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Reaching a depth of 713 m below the surface, the Soudan Underground Iron Mine (Soudan, MN, USA) transects a massive Archaean (2.7 Ga) banded iron formation, providing a remarkably accessible window into the terrestrial deep biosphere. Despite organic carbon limitation, metal-reducing microbial communities are present in potentially ancient anoxic brines continuously emanating from exploratory boreholes on Level 27. Using graphite electrodes deposited in situ as bait, we electrochemically enriched and isolated a novel halophilic iron-reducing Deltaproteobacterium, 'Desulfuromonas soudanensis' strain WTL, from an acetate-fed three-electrode bioreactor poised at +0.24 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that 'D. soudanensis' releases electrons at redox potentials approximately 100 mV more positive than the model freshwater surface isolate Geobacter sulfurreducens, suggesting that its extracellular respiration is tuned for higher potential electron acceptors. 'D. soudanensis' contains a 3,958,620-bp circular genome, assembled to completion using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing reads, which encodes a complete TCA cycle, 38 putative multiheme c-type cytochromes, one of which contains 69 heme-binding motifs, and a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing cassette that produces an unidentified N-acyl homoserine lactone. Another cytochrome is predicted to lie within a putative prophage, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer plays a role in respiratory flexibility among metal reducers. Isolation of 'D. soudanensis' underscores the utility of electrode-based approaches for enriching rare metal reducers from a wide range of habitats. PMID:27445996

  16. Expression of Genes Involved in Iron and Sulfur Respiration in a Novel Thermophilic Crenarchaeon Isolated from Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubal, M.; Macur, R.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic geothermal springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an excellent opportunity to study microbial populations and their relationship with geochemical processes such as redox cycling and biomineralization of iron. Fourteen acid-sulfate-chloride (ASC) and acid-sulfate (AS) geothermal springs located in (YNP) have been extensively characterized for aqueous chemistry, solid phase mineral deposition and microbial diversity and distribution. The oxidation of Fe(II) with oxygen as an electron acceptor is exergonic under these conditions, consequently, Fe(II) may be an important electron donor driving primary production in ASC and AS habitats, and products of biomineralization (e.g. Fe[III]-oxides of varying crystallinity and structure, as well as jarosite in some cases) are common in the outflow channels of these environments. Recently, we isolated a novel Metallosphaera-like microorganism (Metallosphaera strain MK1) from an ASC spring in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP. Clone libraries (16S rRNA gene) from multiple sites suggest that microorganisms closely related to strain MK1 (between 98-100 percent similarity) dominate many spring locations between 55-80 C. The in situ abiotic oxidation rate of Fe(II) has been shown to be very slow in these systems and Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been directly implicated in biotic Fe(II) oxidation. Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been submitted for full genome sequencing and is yielding gene sequences related to the terminal oxidases SOXABC and SOXM super-complex. In addition, sequences from a recently characterized terminal oxidase FOX complex involved in Fe(II) and pyrite oxidation from Sulfolobus metallicus have been found in Metallosphaera strain MK1. A protein complex analogous to Metallosphaera sedula has been identified in strain MK1 and this complex has also been expressed in cells grown on pyrite and Fe(II). Other sequences identified in Metallosphaera strain MK1 that are involved in respiration are the TQO

  17. Isolation and characterization of p-coumaroyl esterase from the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix strain MC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, W S; Ljungdahl, L G; Hartley, R D; Akin, D E

    1991-01-01

    An extracellular p-coumaroyl esterase produced by the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix strain MC-2 released p-coumaroyl groups from 0-[5-0-((E)-p-coumaroyl)-alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl]-(1----3)-0-beta -D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)-D-xylopyranose (PAXX). The esterase was purified 121-fold from culture medium in successive steps involving ultrafiltration column chromatography on S-sepharose and hydroxylapatite, isoelectric focusing, and gel filtration. The native enzyme had an apparent mass of 11 kDa under nondenaturing conditions and a mass of 5.8 kDa under denaturing conditions, suggesting that the enzyme may exist as a dimer. The isoelectric point was 4.7, and the pH optimum was 7.2. The purified esterase had 100 times more activity towards PAXX than towards the analogous feruloyl ester (FAXX). The apparent Km and Vmax of the purified p-coumaroyl esterase for PAXX at pH 7.2 and 40 degrees C were 19.4 microM and 5.1 microM min(-1), respectively. p-Coumaroyl tetrasaccharides isolated from plant cell walls were hydrolyzed at rates similar to that for PAXX, whereas a dimer of PAXX was hydrolyzed at a rate 20-fold lower, yielding 4,4'-dihydroxy-alpha-truxillic acid as an end product. Ethyl and methyl p-coumarates were hydrolyzed at very slow rates, if at all. The purified esterase released p-coumaroyl groups from finely, but not coarsely, ground plant cell walls, and this activity was enhanced by the addition of xylanase and other cell wall-degrading enzymes. Images PMID:1768103

  18. Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov., an anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline spring.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cárdenas, C; López, G; Patel, B K C; Baena, S

    2010-04-01

    A mesophilic, strictly anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain USBA 82(T), was isolated from a terrestrial saline spring in the Colombian Andes. The non-spore-forming curved rods (5-7 x 1.3 microm) with pointed or rounded ends, stained Gram-negative and were motile by means of laterally inserted flagella. The strain grew optimally at 30 degrees C (growth range 20-40 degrees C), pH 7.3 (growth range pH 5.5-8.5) and 2 % (w/v) NaCl (growth range 0.1-7 % NaCl). The strain fermented peptides, amino acids and a few organic acids, but growth was not observed on carbohydrates, alcohols or fatty acids. The strain reduced thiosulfate and sulfur to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as electron acceptors. On peptone alone, acetate, succinate, propionate and traces of ethanol were formed, but in the presence of thiosulfate, acetate and succinate were formed. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 52 mol% (T(m)). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA 82(T) was affiliated to Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans within the phylum Synergistetes with a similarity value of approximately 93 %. Based on the differences between the new strain and the type species of the genus Dethiosulfovibrio, we suggest that strain USBA 82(T) represents a novel species of the genus for which the name Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is USBA 82(T) (=DSM 21565(T)=KCTC 5659(T)). PMID:19661517

  19. Proteocatella sphenisci gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, spore-forming anaerobe isolated from penguin guano.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Lupa, Boguslaw; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2009-09-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, psychrotolerant bacterium, designated strain PPP2T, was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Chilean Patagonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, straight rods (0.7-0.8x3.0-5.0 microm) that were motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed at pH 6.7-9.7 (optimum pH 8.3) and 2-37 degrees C (optimum 29 degrees C). Growth was observed between 0 and 4% (w/v) NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PPP2T was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that was capable of fermentative metabolism. Peptone, bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, oxalate, starch, chitin and yeast extract were utilized as substrates. The major metabolic products were acetate, butyrate and ethanol. Strain PPP2T was resistant to ampicillin, but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin, vancomycin and gentamicin. The DNA G+C content of strain PPP2T was 39.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain PPP2T was related most closely to Clostridium sticklandii SR (approximately 90% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, strain PPP2T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Proteocatella sphenisci gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Proteocatella sphenisci is PPP2T (=ATCC BAA-755T=JCM 12175T=CIP 108034T). PMID:19620379

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Haloanaerobacter chitinovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Halophilic, Anaerobic, Chitinolytic Bacterium from a Solar Saltern

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Hungming J.; Mah, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Two halophilic anaerobic bacteria, one of which had chitinolytic activity, were isolated from a solar saltern in southern California. These organisms were long, gram-negative, motile, flexible rods. The biochemical and physiological characteristics of these bacteria were very similar but were different from the characteristics of other haloanaerobic bacteria. Both grew at salt concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 M and at temperatures ranging from 23 to 50°C. They were sensitive to chloramphenicol but resistant to penicillin, carbenicillin, d-cycloserine, streptomycin, and tetracycline. An analysis of DNAs and whole-cell proteins showed that they were closely related taxonomically and distinguishable from other halophilic anaerobic bacteria. They exhibited 92.3 to 100% DNA homology as determined by DNA-DNA hybridization. The guanine-plus-cytosine contents of their DNAs were 34.8±1 mol%. The two isolates, strains W5C8 and W3C1, differed from other halophilic anaerobic bacteria sufficiently to support establishment of a new genus and species, Haloanaerobacter chitinovorans. Strain W5C8 exhibited chitinolytic activity and is designated the type strain. Two chitin-induced extracellular proteins with molecular weights of 38 × 103 and 40 × 103 were detected in strain W5C8. Images PMID:16348626

  1. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized. PMID:22791052

  2. Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov., a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate Isolated from the Meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takahiko; Kondo, Ryuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel facultative anaerobic bacterivorous nanoflagellate was isolated from the water just below the permanent oxic-anoxic interface of the meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan. We characterized the isolate using light and transmission electron microscopy and molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred from 18S rDNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to class Placididea (stramenopiles). The isolate showed key ultrastructural features of the Placididea, such as flagellar hairs with two unequal terminal filaments, microtubular root 2 changing in shape from an arced to an acute-angled shape, and a lack of an x-fiber in root 2. However, the isolate had a single helix in the flagellar transition region, which is a double helix in the two known placidid nanoflagellates Placidia cafeteriopsis and Wobblia lunata. Moreover, the isolate had different intracellular features compared with these two genera, such as the arrangement of basal bodies, the components of the flagellar apparatus, the number of mitochondria, and the absence (or presence) of paranuclear bodies. The 18S rDNA sequence was also phylogenetically distant from the clades of the known Placididae W. lunata and P. cafeteriopsis. Consequently, the newly isolated nanoflagellate was described as Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov. PMID:26202992

  3. Properties of Desulfovibrio carbinolicus sp. nov. and Other Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Isolated from an Anaerobic-Purification Plant

    PubMed Central

    Nanninga, Henk J.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1987-01-01

    Several sulfate-reducing microorganisms were isolated from an anaerobic-purification plant. Four strains were classified as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio sapovorans, Desulfobulbus propionicus, and Desulfovibrio sp. The D. sapovorans strain contained poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules and seemed to form extracellular vesicles. A fifth isolate, Desulfovibrio sp. strain EDK82, was a gram-negative, non-spore-forming, nonmotile, curved organism. It was able to oxidize several substrates, including methanol. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were utilized as electron acceptors. Pyruvate, fumarate, malate, and glycerol could be fermented. Because strain EDK82 could not be ascribed to any of the existing species, a new species, Desulfovibrio carbinolicus, is proposed. The doubling times of the isolates were determined on several substrates. Molecular hydrogen, lactate, propionate, and ethanol yielded the shortest doubling times (3.0 to 6.3 h). Due to the presence of support material in an anaerobic filter system, these species were able to convert sulfate to sulfide very effectively at a hydraulic retention time as short as 0.5 h. Images PMID:16347324

  4. Caloramator quimbayensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a terrestrial hot spring.

    PubMed

    Rubiano-Labrador, Carolina; Baena, Sandra; Díaz-Cárdenas, Carolina; Patel, Bharat K C

    2013-04-01

    An anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, terminal-spore-forming bacterium, designated strain USBA A(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at an altitude of 2683 m in the Andean region of Colombia (04° 50' 14.0″ N 75° 32' 53.4″ W). Cells of strain USBA A(T) were Gram-stain-positive, straight to slightly curved rods (0.9×2.5 µm), that were arranged singly or in pairs, and were motile by means of flagella. Growth occurred at 37-55 °C and pH 6.0-8.0, with a doubling time of 2 h under the optimal conditions (50 °C and pH 7.0). Glucose fermentation in strain USBA A(T) required yeast extract or peptone (each at 0.2 %, w/v). The novel strain fermented sugars, amino acids, Casamino acids, propanol, propionate, starch and dextrin, but no growth was observed on galactose, lactose, xylose, histidine, serine, threonine, benzoate, butyrate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, methanol, ethanol, glycerol, casein, gelatin or xylan. The end products of glucose fermentation were formate, acetate, ethanol and lactate. Strain USBA A(T) did not grow autotrophically (with CO2 as carbon source and H2 as electron donor) and did not reduce thiosulfate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, vanadium (V) or Fe (III) citrate. Growth of strain USBA A(T) was inhibited by ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, penicillin and streptomycin (each at 10 µg ml(-1)). The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 32.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA A(T) belonged in the phylum Firmicutes and that its closest relative was Caloramator viterbiensis JW/MS-VS5(T) (95.0 % sequence similarity). A DNA-DNA relatedness value of only 30 % was recorded in hybridization experiments between strain USBA A(T) and Caloramator viterbiensis DSM 13723(T). Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic evidence and the results of the DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, strain USBA A

  5. Thermanaeromonas burensis sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobe isolated from a subterranean clay environment.

    PubMed

    Gam, Zouhaier Ben Ali; Daumas, Sylvie; Casalot, Laurence; Bartoli-Joseph, Manon; Necib, Sophia; Linard, Yannick; Labat, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic and halotolerant strain, designated IA106T, was isolated from the seepage water collected in a metal biocorrosion test at a depth of 490 m, in a 130-160 m thick, subterranean Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation (158-152 million years old) in northern France. This geological formation has been selected as the potential host rock for the French high-level nuclear waste repository. Cells of strain IA106T stained Gram-positive and were non-motile, spore-forming, straight rods (0.5 × 2-6 μm). The five major fatty acids were C16 : 0 (15.9 %), C18 : 0 (15.4 %), iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B(14.8 %), iso-C17 : 0 (14.7 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (13.0 %). Growth was observed at temperatures ranging from 55 to 70 °C and at pH 5.5-9. The salinity range for growth was 0-20 g NaCl 1- 1. Yeast extract was required for growth. Strain IA106T was able to grow on lactate and various sugars in the presence of thiosulfate as electron acceptor. Sulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate and nitrite were not reduced. The DNA G+C content was 60.2 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain IA106T belonged to the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae, class Clostridia, phylum Firmicutes, and was most closely related to Thermanaeromonas toyohensis DSM 14490T (95.16 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain IA106T represents a novel species of the genus Thermanaeromonas, for which the name Thermanaeromonas burensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IA106T ( = DSM 26576T = JCM 18718T). PMID:26541283

  6. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy. PMID:25800668

  7. Effect of supra-ambient oxygen on nitrogenase activity (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/) and root respiration of soybeans and isolated soybean bacteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, T.G.; Peterson, J.B.; LaRue, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Isolated soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Wilkin) bacteroids have O/sub 2/-dependent nitrogenase activity which is strongly inhibited by supraoptimal O/sub 2/ concentrations. Oxygen-inhibited nitrogenase activity is recovered by addition of 10 millimolar sodium succinate or by lowering the O/sub 2/ concentration. Brief treatment of roots of intact soybean plants with 1.0 atmosphere O/sub 2/ reduces nitrogenase activity (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/). There is a rapid partial recovery of activity within 2 to 3 hours, and a slower return to near normal levels by 36 hours. The drop and recovery of nitrogenase activity is accompanied by a parallel drop and increase in root respiration. There is a direct relationship between the change in respiration and the change in acetylene reduction following O/sub 2/ treatment. The O/sub 2/-mediated changes in nitrogenase activity and root respiration are not affected by the planting medium. The ratio of the change in respiration to the change in nitrogenase activity was the same in 13 soybean cultivars.

  8. Interactions of Cd and Cu in anaerobic estuarine sediments. 2: Bioavailability, body burdens and respiration effects as related to geochemical partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, J.H.; Alden, R.W. III

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between Cd and Cu distribution in sediment geochemical fractions and their bioavailability was studied. A fine-sandy textured estuarine sediment was treated with all combinations of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg Cd and 0, 12, and 25 mg/kg Cu using the chloride salts of each metal. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) were exposed to the treated sediments in aquaria with 20 ppt artificial seawater for 14 d. Sediments were sequentially extracted before and after organism exposure to determine the exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulfide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. Low mortalities were observed for all organism types and none were attributable to any of the treatments. The Cd and Cu concentrations in the easily reducible and organic-sulfide phases were found to be significantly related to the bioavailability of these metals. The most highly significant relationship was established between Cd in the easily reducible phase and body burden of Cd in the blue mussel. Notable interactions were found between Cd and Cu in some of the geochemical phases, body burdens, and respiration rates. Metal uptake, respiration, and interactions were highly dependent on the test species. A significant correlation was found between increased body burden and depressed respiration for Cd but not for Cu. Multiple regression models are used to describe these relationships. It appears that the interactive responses in the organisms are driven primarily by the sediment geochemical effects and mediated by individual organism processes. These results underscore the necessity of multicomponent (multielement) studies in assessing the fate and effects of toxic elements in the environment.

  9. Evaluation of some Mannich bases derived from substituted acetophenones against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia and on respiration in isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dimmock, J R; Shyam, K; Hamon, N W; Logan, B M; Raghavan, S K; Harwood, D J; Smith, P J

    1983-08-01

    Series of 3-dimethylamino-1-aryl-1-propanone hydrobromides (IV) and 3-dimethylamino-2-dimethylaminomethyl-1-aryl-1-propanone dihydrobromides (V) were synthesized. Evaluation of these derivatives against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia growth revealed that two compounds show promise as antineoplastic agents. Compounds of the V series were unstable in phosphate buffer (in contrast to series IV), and when the same nuclear substituent was present in both series of compounds, V was approximately 100 times more active than IV in both the stimulation and inhibition of respiration of mitochondria isolated from rat liver cells. Representatives from both series showed that respiration in mitochondria was affected by changing the pH of the aqueous buffer from 7.4 to 6.9 or 6.4 and by reducing the temperature from 37 degrees to 20 degrees. The compounds showed reactivity toward a biomimetic thiol. PMID:6620142

  10. Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic planctomycete isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Panteleeva, Angela N; Beskorovaynaya, Darya A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic planctomycete (strain SVX8T) was isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent, Vulcano Island, Italy. The temperature range for growth was 30-68 °C, with an optimum at 55 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0-8.0. Growth was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 4.5 % (w/v) with an optimum at 2.5-3.5 % (w/v). The isolate grew anaerobically using a number of mono-, di- and polysaccharides as electron donors and nitrate or elemental sulfur as electron acceptors or by fermentation. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite; sulfur was reduced to sulfide. Strain SVX8T did not grow at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but grew microaerobically (up to 2 % oxygen in the gas phase). The G+C content of the DNA of strain SVX8T was 58.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic position and phenotypic features, the new isolate is considered to represent a novel species belonging to a new genus in the order Planctomycetales, for which the name Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Thermostilla marina is SVX8T ( = JCM 19992T = VKM B-2881T). Strain SVX8T is the first thermophilic planctomycete isolated from a marine environment. PMID:26559645

  11. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRl, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0(raised dot)6-0(raised dot)7 x 0(raised dot)9-1(raised dot)5 microns. Growth occurred within the pH range 6(raised dot)5-9(raised dot)5 with optimum growth at pH 7(raised dot)3-7(raised dot)5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0(raised dot)5% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99(raised dot)8% similarity between strain FTR1 and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 1(raised dot)5% relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTRl (= ATCC BAA-754T= JCM 12174T=CIP 108033) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  12. Carnobacterium Pleistocaenium sp. nov.: A Novel Psychrotolerant, Facultative Anaerobe Isolated from Permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRIT1(sup T), was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 micrometers were observed. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 and optimum at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range of the new isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate requires NaCl (growth absent at 0 %) and growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum at 0.5% (w/v). The new isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were: acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed 99.8% similarity of strain FTR1 with Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but the DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 5% homology. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain FTR1(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-754(sup T) = JSM 12174(sup T) is assigned to the new species of the genus Carnobacterium with proposed name Carnobacterium pleistocaenium sp. nov.

  13. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTR1T, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 microm. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 degrees C and optimum growth occurred at 24 degrees C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTR1T was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99.8 % similarity between strain FTR1T and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39+/-1.5 % relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTR1T (=ATCC BAA-754T=JCM 12174T=CIP 108033T) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  14. Identification and isolation of a gene required for nitrate assimilation and anaerobic growth of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Danchin, A; Kunst, F; Zuber, P; Nakano, M M

    1995-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis narA locus was shown to include narQ and narA. The putative product of narQ is similar to FdhD, which is required for formate dehydrogenase activity in Escherichia coli. NarA showed homology to MoaA, a protein involved in biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor for nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase. Analysis of mutants showed that narA but not narQ is required for both nitrate assimilation and respiration. PMID:7860592

  15. (Summer investigations into the isolation, cultivation and metabolism of anaerobes involved in biodegradation): Progress report, year 4, summer 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In the laboratory our students were trained in modern techniques for the isolation and study of a wide variety of microbes from marine and brackish environments. Special emphasis was placed on anaerobes and archaebacteria. Microbial groups that were studied included the propionic bacteria, clostridia, methanogens, acetogens, hydrogen oxidizing anaerobes and aerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfur-reducing bacteria, anoxic photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, spirochetes, symbiotic and non-symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria, luminescent bacteria, iron bacteria, magnetic bacteria, and sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The permanent staff led discussions and presented lectures on the metabolism, physiology and biochemistry of the groups listed above. Material was also presented on motility and chemotaxis of bacteria, and particular emphasis was given to molecular approaches to studying evolution of bacteria. We also had five successful Microbiology Mini-symposia (see attached schedule). These one-day symposia involved lecture/seminar presentations by investigators involved in state-of-the-art working particularly exciting areas within the scope of our course.

  16. Influence of Antimycin A and Uncouplers on Anaerobic Photosynthesis in Isolated Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Slovacek, Rudolf E.; Hind, Geoffrey

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobiosis depresses the light- and bicarbonate-saturated rates of O2 evolution in intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts by as much as 3-fold from those observed under aerobic conditions. These lower rates are accelerated 2-fold or more by the addition of 1 μm antimycin A or by low concentrations of the uncouplers 0.3 mm NH4Cl or 0.25 μm carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Oxaloacetate and glycerate 3-phosphate reduction rates are also increased by antimycin A or an uncoupler under anaerobic conditions. At intermediate light intensities, the rate accelerations by either antimycin A or uncoupler are inversely proportional to the adenosine 5′-triphosphate demand of the reduction process for the acceptors HCO3−, glycerate 3-phosphate, and oxaloacetate. The acceleration of bicarbonate-supported O2 evolution may also be produced by adding an adenosine 5′-triphosphate sink (ribose 5-phosphate) to anaerobic chloroplasts. The above results suggest that a proton gradient back pressure resulting from antimycin A-sensitive cyclic electron flow is responsible for the depression of light-saturated photosynthesis under anaerobiosis. PMID:16660133

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate. PMID:25635015

  18. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, Paul; De Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  19. Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from sediment of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Min, Ui-Gi; Kim, So-Jeong; Hong, Heeji; Kim, Song-Gun; Gwak, Joo-Han; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain B5(T), was isolated from sediment of an abandoned coal mine in Taebaek, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain B5(T) were non-spore-forming, straight, Gram-positive rods. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 30°C, respectively, while the strain was able to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 5.5-7.5 and 25-45°C, respectively. Growth of strain B5(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations of 0 to 6.0% (w/v) with an optimum at 3.0-4.0% (w/v). The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and three unknown polar lipids. Strain B5(T) grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate, nitrite, ferric-citrate, ferric-nitrilotriacetate, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in the presence of proteinaceous compounds, organic acids, and carbohydrates as electron donors. The isolate was not able to grow by fermentation. Strain B5(T) did not grow under aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B5(T) is most closely related to the genus Tepidibacillus (T. fermentans STGH(T); 96.3%) and Vulcanibacillus (V. modesticaldus BR(T); 94.6%). The genomic DNA G+C content (36.9 mol%) of strain B5(T) was higher than those of T. fermentans STGH(T) (34.8 mol%) and V. modesticaldus BR(T) (34.5 mol%). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, we describe a new species of a novel genus Calculibacillus, represented by strain B5(T) (=KCTC 15397(T) =JCM 19989(T)), for which we propose the name Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov. PMID:27225457

  20. Purification and Properties of a Thermostable Pullulanase from a Newly Isolated Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium, Fervidobacterium pennavorans Ven5

    PubMed Central

    Koch, R.; Canganella, F.; Hippe, H.; Jahnke, K. D.; Antranikian, G.

    1997-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic anaerobic fermentative bacteria growing at temperatures between 50 and 80(deg)C (optimum, 65 to 70(deg)C) were isolated from mud samples collected at Abano Terme spa (Italy). The cells were gram-negative motile rods, about 1.8 (mu)m in length and 0.6 (mu)m in width, occurring singly and in pairs. Cells commonly formed spheroids at one end similar to Fervidobacterium islandicum and Fervidobacterium nodosum. The new isolate differs from F. nodosum by the 7% higher G+C content of its DNA (40.6 mol%) but is similar to Fervidobacterium pennavorans and F. islandicum in its G+C content and phenotypic properties. The phylogenetic dendrogram indicates that strain Ven5 belongs to the order Thermotogales and shows the highest 16S ribosomal DNA sequence similarity to F. pennavorans, F. islandicum, and F. nodosum, with similarities of 99.0, 98.6, and 96.0%, respectively. During growth on starch the strain produced a thermostable pullulanase of type I which preferentially hydrolyzed (alpha)-1,6 glucosidic linkages. The enzyme was purified 65-fold by anion-exchange, gel permeation, and hydrophobic chromatography. The native pullulanase has a molecular mass of 240,000 Da and is composed of three subunits, each with a molecular mass of 77,600 Da as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Optimal conditions for the activity and stability of the purified pullulanase were pH 6.0 and 85(deg)C. At pH 6.0, the half-life of the enzyme was over 2 h at 80(deg)C and 5 min at 90(deg)C. This is the first report on the presence of pullulanase type I in an anaerobic bacterium. PMID:16535541

  1. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an Anaerobic, Extremely Thermophilic, Cellulolytic Bacterium Isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park▿

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J.; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 μm long by 0.2 μm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85°C, with the optimum at 78°C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h−1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073). PMID:20023107

  2. Gelidivirgula Patagoniensis Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., A Novel Psychrotolerant, Sporeforming Anaerobe Isolated from Magellanic Penguin Guano in Patagonia, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, psychrotrophic bacterium, strain PPP2(sup T), was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Patagonia, Chile. The Gram-positive, sporeforming, straight rods with sizes 0.6-0.9 x 3.0-5.0 microns, are motile by peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed to occur within the pH range 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH x), and temperature range 2-28 C (optimum 20 C). The novel isolate does not require NaCl for growth, but is halotolerant and growth was observed between 0 and 7 % NaCl (w/v) with optimum at 0.5 % (w/v). The new isolate is a catalase negative chemoorganohetherotroph with fermentative metabolism and uses as substrates: peptone, Bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, and yeast extract. The major metabolic products are: acetate, butyrate, ethanol, and hydrogen is a minor gas product.. Strain PPP2 was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the DNA is 43.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequences and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain PPP2(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-755(sup T) = JSM ...(sup T)) is assigned to the new genus Gelidivirgula gen. nov., as a representative of the new species, Gelidivirgula patagonensis sp. nov.

  3. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Elkins, James G; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Keller, Martin; Carroll, Sue L; Allman, Steve L; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. The isolate was a non-motile, non-spore forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 m long by 0.2 m wide and grew at temperatures between 55-85oC with the optimum at 78oC. The pH range for growth was 6.0-8.0 with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rates at 0.75 hr-1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbital, carboxymethylcellulose and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2 although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5 l batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol% and sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47T is the type stain (ATCC = ____, JCM = ____).

  4. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2010-02-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47(T), was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 microm long by 0.2 microm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85 degrees C, with the optimum at 78 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h(-1). The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47(T) was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47(T) within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073). PMID:20023107

  5. BENTHIC MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN, PIEDMONT, AND COASTAL PLAINS, STREAMS OF THE EASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study had two objectives. First, in order to quantify the potential underestimation of community respiration caused by the exclusion of anaerobic processes, we compared benthic microbial respiration measured as 02 consumption with estimated based on DHA. Second, our previous ...

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR–1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1. PMID:26949961

  7. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry.

    PubMed

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR-1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1. PMID:26949961

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  9. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:23108290

  10. Unusual coiled gram-positive anaerobe isolated from a gutter wall abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, H M; Rintala, L

    1977-01-01

    A gram-positive, nonsporing coiled rod was visible on Gram stain and isolated in pure culture from 20 ml of pus. This organism differs from previously described species in that it produces only acetic acid from glucose metabolism, hydrolyzes esculin, and has less fermentative activity in carbohydrates. Images PMID:145446

  11. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  12. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  13. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge. PMID:25799955

  14. Light-enhanced dark respiration in leaves, isolated cells and protoplasts of various types of C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Parys, Eugeniusz; Jastrzebski, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    The rate of respiratory CO2 evolution from the leaves of Zea mays, Panicum miliaceum, and Panicum maximum, representing NADP-ME, NAD-ME, and PEP-CK types of C4 plants, respectively, was increased by approximately two to four times after a period of photosynthesis. This light-enhanced dark respiration (LEDR) was a function of net photosynthetic rate specific to plant species, and was depressed by 1% O2. When malate, aspartate, oxaloacetate or glycine solution at 50 mM concentration was introduced into the leaves instead of water, the rate of LEDR was enhanced, far less in Z. mays (by 10-25%) than in P. miliaceum (by 25-35%) or P. maximum (by 40-75%). The enhancement of LEDR under glycine was relatively stable over a period of 1 h, whereas the remaining metabolites caused its decrease following a transient increase. The metabolites reduced the net photosynthesis rate in the two Panicum species, but not in Z. mays, where this process was stimulated by glycine. The bundle sheath cells from P. miliaceum exhibited a higher rate of LEDR than those of Z. mays and P. maximum. Glycine had no effect on the respiration rate of the cells, but malate increased in cells of Z. mays and P. miliaceum by about 50% and 30%, respectively. With the exception of aspartate, which stimulated both the O2 evolution and O2 uptake in P. maximum, the remaining metabolites reduced photosynthetic O2 evolution from bundle sheath cells in Panicun species. The net O2 exchange in illuminated cells of Z. mays did not respond to CO2 or metabolites. Leaf mesophyll protoplasts of Z. mays and P. miliaceum, and bundle sheath protoplasts of Z. mays, which are unable to fix CO2 photosynthetically, also produced LEDR, but the mesophyll protoplasts, compared with bundle sheath protoplasts, required twice the time of illumination to obtain the maximal rate. The results suggest that the substrates for LEDR in C4 plants are generated during a period of illumination not only via the Calvin cycle reactions, but

  15. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  16. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  17. Isolation and characterization of transposon Tn5-induced mutants of Pseudomonas perfectomarina defective in nitrous oxide respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Zumft, W G; Döhler, K; Körner, H

    1985-01-01

    Transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis of Pseudomonas perfectomarina with the plasmid pSUP2021 [(pBR325-Mob(RP4))::Tn5] and the chromosomally integrated RP4 plasmid in Escherichia coli as the donor, produced three distinct groups of mutants that were defective in nitrous oxide respiration. One group of mutants lacked the structural protein of N2O reductase, the second synthesized a copper-free apoprotein; and a third group expressed a low level of intact enzyme. The mutants provided evidence for N2O being the immediate precursor of dinitrogen in denitrification and documented the essentiality of the copper enzyme. Synthesis of N2O reductase depended strongly on the growth conditions, with N2O-grown cells expressing the lowest level of enzyme. Regulatory responses of mutants elicited by nitrate or oxygen were unaltered when compared with wild-type behavior. Images PMID:2993252

  18. In Vitro Activities of ABT-773, a New Ketolide, against Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathogens Isolated from Antral Sinus Puncture Specimens from Patients with Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Conrads, Georg; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrell, Kerin

    2001-01-01

    The comparative in vitro activities of ABT-773 against 207 aerobic and 162 anaerobic antral sinus puncture isolates showed that erythromycin-resistant pneumococcal strains were susceptible to ABT-773 (≤0.125 μg/ml); the MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited for Haemophilus influenzae and other Haemophilus spp. was 4 μg/ml; and all Moraxella spp. and beta-lactamase-producing Prevotella species strains were inhibited by ≤0.125 μg/ml. Among the anaerobes tested, only fusobacteria (45%) required ≥4 μg of ABT-773/ml for inhibition. ABT-773 may offer a therapeutic alternative for sinus infections. PMID:11451698

  19. Partial characterization of xylanase produced by Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, a new thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Boucherba, Nawel; Joseph, Manon; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Hacène, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-11-01

    To date, xylanases have expanded their use in many processing industries, such as pulp, paper, food, and textile. This study aimed the production and partial characterization of a thermostable xylanase from a novel thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T) isolated from a northeast hot spring in Algeria. The obtained results showed that C. algeriensis xylanase seems not to be correlated with the biomass growth profile whereas the maximum enzyme production (140.0 U/ml) was recorded in stationary phase (18 h). The temperature and pH for optimal activities were 70 °C and 11.0, respectively. The enzyme was found to be stable at 50, 60, 70, and 80 °C, with a half-life of 10, 9, 8, and 4 h, respectively. Influence of metal ions on enzyme activity revealed that Ca(+2) enhances greatly the relative activity to 151.3 %; whereas Hg(2+) inhibited significantly the enzyme. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of xylanase by the thermophilic bacterium C. algeriensis. This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant xylanase could be used in pulp bleaching process. PMID:25161038

  20. Isolation and characterization of Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium with keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Yingjie; Ma, Shichun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Yu

    2013-08-01

    A novel thermophilic, anaerobic, keratinolytic bacterium designated KD-1 was isolated from grassy marshland. Strain KD-1 was a spore-forming rod with a Gram-positive type cell wall, but stained Gram-negative. The temperature, pH, and NaCl concentration range necessary for growth was 30-65 °C (optimum 55 °C), 6.0-10.5 (optimum 8.0-8.5), and 0-6% (optimum 0.2%) (w/v), respectively. Strain KD-1 possessed extracellular keratinase, and the optimum activity of the crude enzyme was pH 8.5 and 70 °C. The enzyme was identified as a thermostable serine-type protease. The strain was sensitive to rifampin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and tetracycline and was resistant to erythromycin, neomycin, penicillin, and streptomycin. The main cellular fatty acid was predominantly C15:0 iso (64%), and the G+C content was 28 mol%. Morphological and physiological characterization, together with phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified KD-1 as a new species of a novel genus of Clostridiaceae with 95.3%, 93.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Clostridium ultunense BS(T) (DSM 10521(T)) and Tepidimicrobium xylanilyticum PML14(T) (= JCM 15035(T)), respectively. We propose the name Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., with KD-1 (=JCM 18769(T) =DSM 26752(T)) as the type strain. PMID:23710623

  1. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  2. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  3. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-07-01

    An extremely thermophilic, xylanolytic, spore-forming and strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain DTU01(T), was isolated from a continuously stirred tank reactor fed with xylose and household waste. Cells stained Gram-negative and were rod-shaped (0.5-2 µm in length). Spores were terminal with a diameter of approximately 0.5 µm. Optimal growth occurred at 70 °C and pH 7, with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h(-1). DNA G+C content was 34.2 mol%. Strain DTU01(T) could ferment arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, mannitol, mannose, melibiose, pectin, starch, sucrose, xylan, yeast extract and xylose, but not cellulose, Avicel, inositol, inulin, glycerol, rhamnose, acetate, lactate, ethanol, butanol or peptone. Ethanol was the major fermentation product and a maximum yield of 1.39 mol ethanol per mol xylose was achieved when sulfite was added to the cultivation medium. Thiosulfate, but not sulfate, nitrate or nitrite, could be used as electron acceptor. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain DTU01(T) was shown to be closely related to Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3(T), Thermoanaerobacter italicus Ab9(T) and Thermoanaerobacter thermocopriae JT3-3(T), with 98-99 % similarity. Despite this, the physiological and phylogenetic differences (DNA G+C content, substrate utilization, electron acceptors, phylogenetic distance and isolation site) allow for the proposal of strain DTU01(T) as a representative of a novel species within the genus Thermoanaerobacter, for which the name Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DTU01(T) ( = DSM 25963(T) = KCTC 4529(T) = VKM B-2752(T) = CECT 8142(T)). PMID:23178727

  4. Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov., a facultative anaerobe that grows at -5 degrees C, isolated from penguin guano in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Krader, Paul E; Tang, Jane

    2006-09-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagG1(T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 mum were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 degrees C, with optimum growth at 28-30 degrees C. Strain PmagG1(T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). Strain PmagG1(T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and CO(2). Strain PmagG1(T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of <45+/-1 %. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47+/-1.5 %. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(T) (=ATCC BAA-756(T)=JCM 12176(T)=CIP 108035(T)) as the type strain. PMID:16957099

  5. Alternative anaerobic enrichments to the bacteriological analytical manual culture method for isolation of Shigella sonnei from selected types of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Andrew P; Thunberg, Richard L; Johnson, Mildred L; Hammack, Thomas S; Andrews, Wallace H

    2004-01-01

    Alternative methods of reducing oxygen during anaerobic enrichment in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Shigella culture method were evaluated and compared to the current and less practical GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic methods included the use of reducing agents in Shigella broth and reducing culture container headspace volume to minimize atmospheric effects on oxygen concentration in Shigella broth during enrichment. The reducing agents evaluated were sodium thioglycollate, L-cystine, L-cysteine, titanium(III) citrate, and dithiothreitol, each at concentrations of 0.1, 0.05, and 0.01%. The use of Oxyrase for Broth with the enrichment medium (Shigella broth) was evaluated at concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 microL/mL. Recoveries of chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were determined with each anaerobic method, including the GasPak method, using inoculation levels ranging from 10(0)to 10(3) cells. For each anaerobic method, strain, inoculation level, and stress type, 5 replicate enrichments were evaluated by streaking to MacConkey agar for isolation. The numbers of cultures with each method from which S. sonnei was isolated were used to compare the alternative anaerobic methods to the GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic method with which chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were isolated most consistently was the use of Oxyrase for Broth in Shigella broth at a concentration of 20 microL/mL. This method was compared to the GasPak anaerobic method in evaluations on the recovery of S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 from artificially contaminated test portions of parsley, cilantro, green onions, strawberries, carrots, and celery. A third anaerobic method included the use of 0.5 cm mineral oil overlay on cultures containing Oxyrase for Broth at concentrations of 20 microL/mL. Recovery rates of strain 357 were significantly greater (p < 0.05) with the GasPak method than with Oxyrase for Broth, with and

  6. Comparison of growth characteristics of anaerobic fungi isolated from ruminant and non-ruminant herbivores during cultivation in a defined medium.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, M J; Op den Camp, H J; Orpin, C G; Huis in 't Veld, J H; Vogels, G D

    1991-06-01

    Anaerobic fungi were isolated from rumen fluid of a domestic sheep (Ovis aries; a ruminant) and from faeces of five non-ruminants: African elephant (Loxodonta africana), black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), Indian elephant (Elephas maximus) and mara (Dolichotis patagonum). The anaerobic fungus isolated from the sheep was a Neocallimastix species and the isolates from non-ruminants were all species similar to Piromyces spp. A defined medium is described which supported growth of all the isolates, and was used to examine growth characteristics of the different strains. For each fungus the lipid phosphate content was determined after growth on cellobiose and the resulting values were used to estimate fungal biomass after growth on solid substrates. The ability of isolates from ruminants and non-ruminants to digest both wheat straw and cellulose was comparable. More than 90% and 60%, respectively, of filter paper cellulose and wheat straw were digested by most strains within 60-78 h. Growth of two fungi, isolated from rumen fluid of a sheep (Neocallimastix strain N1) and from faeces of an Indian rhinoceros (Piromyces strain R1), on cellobiose was studied in detail. Fungal growth yields on cellobiose were 64.1 g (mol substrate)-1 for N1 and 34.2 g mol-1 for R1. The major fermentation products of both strains were formate, lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. PMID:1919514

  7. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-11-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. PMID:1383156

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a New Denitrifying Spirillum Capable of Anaerobic Degradation of Phenol

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yoshifumi; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Ué, Makiko; Hiraishi, Akira; Kato, Nobuo

    2000-01-01

    Two kinds of phenol-degrading denitrifying bacteria, Azoarcus sp. strain CC-11 and spiral bacterial strain CC-26, were isolated from the same enrichment culture after 1 and 3 years of incubation, respectively. Both strains required ferrous ions for growth, but strain CC-26 grew better than strain CC-11 grew under iron-limited conditions, which may have resulted in the observed change in the phenol-degrading bacteria during the enrichment process. Strain CC-26 grew on phenol, benzoate, and other aromatic compounds under denitrifying conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA sequences revealed that this strain is most closely related to a Magnetospirillum sp., a member of the α subclass of the class Proteobacteria, and is the first strain of a denitrifying aromatic compound-degrading bacterium belonging to this group. Unlike previously described Magnetospirillum strains, however, this strain did not exhibit magnetotaxis. It grew on phenol only under denitrifying conditions. Other substrates, such as acetate, supported aerobic growth, and the strain exhibited microaerophilic features. PMID:10742201

  9. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wen

    The overall objective of my research was to improve the efficiencies of bioconversions that produce renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass. To this end, my studies addressed issues important to two promising strategies: consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and anaerobic digestion (AD). CBP achieves saccharolytic enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation in a single step and is considered to be the most cost-effective model. Anaerobic bacteria that can be used in CBP are highly desirable. To that end, two thermophilic and cellulolytic bacterial strains were isolated and characterized (Chapter 3). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains CS7 and CS8 are closely related to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. However, they had significantly higher specific cellulase activities and ethanol/acetate ratios than C. thermocellum ATCC 27405. As a result, CS7 and CS8 are two new highly cellulolytic and ethanologenic C. thermocellum strains, with application potentials in research and development of CBP. As some of the most promising AD processes, two temperature-phased AD (TPAD) systems, in comparison with a thermophilic single-stage AD (TSAD) system and a mesophilic two-stage AD (MTAD) system, were studied in treating high-strength dairy cattle manure. The TPAD systems, with the thermophilic digesters acidified (AT-TPAD, Chapter 4) or operated at neutral pH (NT-TPAD, Chapter 5), were optimized at the thermophilic temperature of 50°C and a volume ratio between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of 1:2. Despite similar methane productions, the NT-TPAD system achieved significantly higher volatile solid (VS) removal than the AT-TPAD system and needed no external pH adjustments (Chapter 6). At the same overall OLR, the TSAD system achieved the highest performance, followed by the NT-TPAD and the MTAD systems (Chapter 7). Each digester harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, some of which were significantly correlated or associated

  10. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Bes, Méline; Merrouch, Mériem; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erauso, Gaël; Postec, Anne

    2015-08-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 × 3.0-5.0 μm) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 °C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 g l- 1 NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Yeast extract, peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, crotonate, pyruvate, galactose, maltose, sucrose, ribose, trehalose and glucose were used as carbon sources. Glucose fermentation led to acetate, H2 and CO2 formation. Arginine, serine, histidine, lysine, methionine and cysteine improved growth, but the Stickland reaction was negative for the combinations of amino acids tested. The major metabolic products from yeast extract fermentation were H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate and propionate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16  :  0, C16  :  1cis9, C14  :  0 and C16  :  1cis7 (>5 % of total fatty acids). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain ST07-YET was most closely related to Clostridium sticklandii DSM 519T and Acetoanaerobium noterae NOT-3T (96.7 % and 96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, strain ST07-YET is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Acetoanaerobium (order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes) with the name Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov. The type strain is ST07-YET ( = DSM 27512T = JCM 19400T). PMID:25948619

  11. Spirochaeta Americana sp. Nov., A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochaete Isolated from Soda Mona Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microns. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 C (optimum 37 C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 % NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG1(sup T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(sup T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(sup T) revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7 %. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(sup T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC 13AA-392(sup T) = DSM 14872(sup T)).

  12. Comparative in vitro activity of faropenem and 11 other antimicrobial agents against 405 aerobic and anaerobic pathogens isolated from skin and soft tissue infections from animal and human bites.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Fernandez, Helen T

    2002-09-01

    Faropenem, a new oral beta-lactam agent with a penem structure, was very active against 405 aerobic and anaerobic bite isolates. It inhibited 232 of 236 (98%) aerobic isolates, including all Pasteurella spp. and Eikenella corrodens at < or = 0.25 mg/L, and 164/169 (97%) anaerobic isolates, at < or = 1 mg/L. The 10 isolates that required > or = 2 mg/L for inhibition were one strain each of Acinetobacter lwoffi, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Bacteroides ovatus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Peptostreptococcus tetradius, plus Corynebacterium 'aquaticum' (two strains) and Veillonella sp. (three strains). PMID:12205068

  13. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126–1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  14. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG).

    PubMed

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-12-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126-1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  15. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  16. Genomic characterization of three unique Dehalococcoides that respire on persistent polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanquan; Chng, Kern Rei; Wilm, Andreas; Zhao, Siyan; Yang, Kun-Lin; Nagarajan, Niranjan; He, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobic bacteria play critical roles in environmental bioremediation of halogenated compounds. However, their characterization and application have been largely impeded by difficulties in growing them in pure culture. Thus far, no pure culture has been reported to respire on the notorious polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and functional genes responsible for PCB detoxification remain unknown due to the extremely slow growth of PCB-respiring bacteria. Here we report the successful isolation and characterization of three Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains that respire on commercial PCBs. Using high-throughput metagenomic analysis, combined with traditional culture techniques, tetrachloroethene (PCE) was identified as a feasible alternative to PCBs to isolate PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides from PCB-enriched cultures. With PCE as an alternative electron acceptor, the PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides were boosted to a higher cell density (1.2 × 108 to 1.3 × 108 cells per mL on PCE vs. 5.9 × 106 to 10.4 × 106 cells per mL on PCBs) with a shorter culturing time (30 d on PCE vs. 150 d on PCBs). The transcriptomic profiles illustrated that the distinct PCB dechlorination profile of each strain was predominantly mediated by a single, novel reductive dehalogenase (RDase) catalyzing chlorine removal from both PCBs and PCE. The transcription levels of PCB-RDase genes are 5–60 times higher than the genome-wide average. The cultivation of PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides in pure culture and the identification of PCB-RDase genes deepen our understanding of organohalide respiration of PCBs and shed light on in situ PCB bioremediation. PMID:25028492

  17. Extracellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although it has long been known that microbes can generate energy using diverse strategies, only recently has it become clear that a growing number involve electron transfer to or from extracellular substrates. The best-known example of what we will term ‘extracellular respiration’ is electron transfer between microbes and minerals, such as iron and manganese (hydr)oxides. This makes sense, given that these minerals are sparingly soluble. What is perhaps surprising, however, is that a number of substrates that might typically be classified as ‘soluble’ are also respired at the cell surface. There are several reasons why this might be the case: the substrate, in its ecological context, might be associated with a solid surface and thus effectively insoluble; the substrate, while soluble, might simply be too large to transport inside the cell; or the substrate, while benign in one redox state, might become toxic after it is metabolized. In this review, we discuss various examples of extracellular respiration, paying particular attention to what is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. As will become clear, much remains to be learned about the biochemistry, cell biology and regulation of extracellular respiration, making it a rich field of study for molecular microbiologists. PMID:17581115

  18. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  19. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  20. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  1. Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Novel Spore-Forming, Alkaliphilic Anaerobe Isolated from Owens Lake, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Krader, Paul; Whitman, William B.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium, strain SCAT, was isolated from mud sediments of a soda lake in California, USA. The rod-shaped cells were motile, Gram-positive, formed spores and were 0.4-0.5x2.5-5.0 micrometers in size. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.7-10.0 and was optimal at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-45 degrees C, with optimal growth at 35 degrees C. NaCl was required for growth. Growth occurred at 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl and was optimal at 1-2% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that fermented sugars, proteolysis products, some organic and amino acids, glycerol, d-cellobiose and cellulose. It was also capable of growth by the Stickland reaction. Strain SCAT was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and gentamicin, but it was resistant to ampicillin and kanamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.2 mol%. Major fatty acid components were C14:0, iso-C15:0, C16:1omega9c and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain SCAT showed a similarity of approximately 97% with the type strains of Clostridium formicaceticum and Clostridium aceticum in clostridial cluster XI and a similarity of less than 94.2% to any other recognized Clostridium species and those of related genera in this cluster. Strain SCAT was clearly differentiated from C. formicaceticum and C. aceticum based on comparison of their phenotypic properties and fatty acid profiles, as well as low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SCAT and the type strains of these two species. Therefore, strain SCAT is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., in clostridial cluster XI. The type strain is SCAT (=ATCC BAA-1084T=JCM 12857T=DSM 17722T=CIP 107910T).

  2. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...

  3. Biodegradation of Reactive blue 13 in a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic fluidized beds system with a Pseudomonas sp. isolate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Xingwang; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L1 capable of degrading the azo textile dye Reactive blue 13, was isolated from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor. A continuous two-stage anaerobic/aerobic biological fluidized bed system was used to decolorize and mineralize Reactive blue 13. The key factors affecting decolorization were investigated and the efficiency of degradation was also optimized. An overall color removal of 83.2% and COD removal of 90.7% was achieved at pH 7, a residence time of 70 h and a glucose concentration of 2 g/L, HRT=70 h and C(glucose)=2000 mg/L. Oxygen was contributing to blocking the azo bond cleavage. Consequently, decolorization occurred in the anaerobic reactor while partial mineralization was achieved in the aerobic reactor. A possible degradation pathway based on the analysis of intermediates and involving azoreduction, desulfonation, deamination and further oxidation reactions is presented. PMID:19713103

  4. Comparison of a homemade blood culture broth containing a papain digest of liver, with four commercially available media for the isolation of anaerobes from simulated paediatric blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, G H; Price, E H

    1982-01-01

    The recovery of small inocula of fastidious organisms, mainly non-sporing anaerobes, was studied in simulated paediatric blood culture experiments where only 1.5 ml of blood was added to each broth. A 25 ml homemade Queen Elizabeth Hospital medium (QEH medium) containing a papain digest of liver showed the best overall performance during the first four days of incubation; this medium was also satisfactory for maintenance of the majority of the organisms tested for longer than one week. LAB M Fastidious Anaerobe Broth (75 ml) with thymidine, also showed early isolation and satisfactory survival of most organisms. Difco Thiol broth, 50 ml with Liquoid, yielded early growth of the three strains of Bacteroides fragilis tested and maintained these organisms well; however, variable results were obtained with some other organisms in Difco Thiol media. Southern Group Brewer's thioglycollate broth (80 ml) gave the least satisfactory performance. PMID:6752208

  5. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of ‘Desulfuromonas soudanensis WTL’, a Metal- and Electrode-Respiring Bacterium from Anoxic Deep Subsurface Brine

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Jonathan P.; Summers, Zarath M.; Chan, Chi Ho; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching a depth of 713 m below the surface, the Soudan Underground Iron Mine (Soudan, MN, USA) transects a massive Archaean (2.7 Ga) banded iron formation, providing a remarkably accessible window into the terrestrial deep biosphere. Despite organic carbon limitation, metal-reducing microbial communities are present in potentially ancient anoxic brines continuously emanating from exploratory boreholes on Level 27. Using graphite electrodes deposited in situ as bait, we electrochemically enriched and isolated a novel halophilic iron-reducing Deltaproteobacterium, ‘Desulfuromonas soudanensis’ strain WTL, from an acetate-fed three-electrode bioreactor poised at +0.24 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that ‘D. soudanensis’ releases electrons at redox potentials approximately 100 mV more positive than the model freshwater surface isolate Geobacter sulfurreducens, suggesting that its extracellular respiration is tuned for higher potential electron acceptors. ‘D. soudanensis’ contains a 3,958,620-bp circular genome, assembled to completion using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing reads, which encodes a complete TCA cycle, 38 putative multiheme c-type cytochromes, one of which contains 69 heme-binding motifs, and a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing cassette that produces an unidentified N-acyl homoserine lactone. Another cytochrome is predicted to lie within a putative prophage, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer plays a role in respiratory flexibility among metal reducers. Isolation of ‘D. soudanensis’ underscores the utility of electrode-based approaches for enriching rare metal reducers from a wide range of habitats. PMID:27445996

  6. Anoxybacter fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov., a piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Cao, Junwei; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine; Shao, Zongze

    2015-02-01

    A novel piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterial strain, designated strain DY22613(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide deposit at the East Pacific Rise (GPS position: 102.6° W 3.1° S). Cells of strain DY22613(T) were long, motile rods (10 to 20 µm in length and 0.5 µm in width) with peritrichous flagella and were Gram-stain-negative. Growth was recorded at 44-72 °C (optimum 60-62 °C) and at hydrostatic pressures of 0.1-55 MPa (optimum 20 MPa). The pH range for growth was from pH 5.0 to 9.0 with an optimum at pH 7.0. Growth was observed in the presence of 1 to 8 % (w/v) sea salts and 0.65 to 5.2 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimum salt concentrations at 3.5 % for sea salts and at 2.3 % for NaCl. Under optimal growth conditions, the shortest generation time observed was 27 min (60 °C, 20 MPa). Strain DY22613(T) was heterotrophic, able to utilize complex organic compounds, amino acids, sugars and organic acids including peptone, tryptone, beef extract, yeast extract, alanine, glutamine, methionine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine, fructose, fucose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, mannose, melibiose, palatinose, rhamnose, turanose, pyruvate, lactic acid, methyl ester, erythritol, galacturonic acid and glucosaminic acid. Strain DY22613(T) was able to reduce Fe(III) compounds, including Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (pH 7.0), amorphous iron(III) oxide (pH 9.0), goethite (α-FeOOH, pH 12.0), Fe(III) citrate and elementary sulfur. Products of fermentation were butyrate, acetate and hydrogen. Main cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 3-OH and C14 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain DY22613(T) was 36.7 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain forms a novel lineage within the class Clostridia and clusters with the order Haloanaerobiales (86.92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The phylogenetic data suggest that the lineage represents at least a novel genus and species, for which the name Anoxybacter

  7. Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov., an anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from subseafloor sediment, and emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Sakai, Sanae; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Saito, Yayoi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yumi; Tame, Akihiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Löffler, Frank E; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    An anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium, strain MO-SPC2(T), was isolated from a methanogenic microbial community in a continuous-flow bioreactor that was established from subseafloor sediments collected from off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan in the north-western Pacific Ocean. Cells were pleomorphic: spherical, annular, curved rod, helical and coccoid cell morphologies were observed. Motility only occurred in helical cells. Strain MO-SPC2(T) grew at 0-17 °C (optimally at 9 °C), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimally at pH 6.8-7.2) and in 20-40 g NaCl l(-1) (optimally at 20-30 NaCl l(-1)). The strain grew chemo-organotrophically with mono-, di- and polysaccharides. The major end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The abundant polar lipids of strain MO-SPC2(T) were phosphatidylglycolipids, phospholipids and glycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9. Isoprenoid quinones were not detected. The G+C content of the DNA was 32.3 mol%. 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis showed that strain MO-SPC2(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphaerochaeta within the phylum Spirochaetes, and its closest relatives were Sphaerochaeta pleomorpha Grapes(T) (88.4 % sequence identity), Sphaerochaeta globosa Buddy(T) (86.7 %) and Sphaerochaeta coccoides SPN1(T) (85.4 %). Based on phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic traits, strain MO-SPC2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Sphaerochaeta, for which the name Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MO-SPC2(T) ( = JCM 17281(T) = DSM 23952(T)). An emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta is also proposed. PMID:25249566

  8. Anaerosolibacter carboniphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic iron-reducing bacterium isolated from coal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeji; Kim, So-Jeong; Min, Ui-Gi; Lee, Yong-Jae; Kim, Song-Gun; Roh, Seong Woon; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2015-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, iron-reducing bacterial strain, IRF19(T), was isolated from coal-contaminated soil in the Republic of Korea. IRF19(T) cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-staining-negative and motile by means of flagella. The optimum pH and temperature for their growth were determined to be pH 7.5-8.0 and 40 °C, while the optimum range was pH 6.5-10.0 and 20-45 °C, respectively. Strain IRF19(T) did not require NaCl for growth but it tolerated up to 2% (w/v). Growth was observed with yeast extract, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-ribose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, L-serine, L-alanine and L-isoleucine. Fe(III), elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and sulfate were used as electron acceptors. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain IRF19(T) is affiliated to the family Clostridiaceae and is most closely related to Salimesophilobacter vulgaris Zn2(T) (93.5% similarity), Geosporobacter subterraneus VNs68(T) (93.2%) and Thermotalea metallivorans B2-1(T) (92.3%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain IRF19(T) were C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0, and the profile was distinct from those of the closely related species. The major respiratory quinone of strain IRF19(T) was menaquinone MK-5 (V-H2). The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and two unknown polar lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain IRF19(T) was determined to be 37.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results, strain IRF19(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a novel genus of the family Clostridiaceae , for which we propose the name Anaerosolibacter carboniphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., with the type strain IRF19(T) ( =KCTC 15396(T) =JCM 19988(T)). PMID:25701849

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Microbes Mediating Thermodynamically Favorable Coupling of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane and Metal Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Reed, B. C.; Sarode, N. D.; Kretz, C. B.; Bray, M. S.; DiChristina, T. J.; Stewart, F. J.; Fowle, D. A.; Crowe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is the third most reduced environmentally relevant electron donor for microbial metabolisms after organic carbon and hydrogen. In anoxic ecosystems, the major sink for methane is anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) mediated by syntrophic microbial consortia that couple AOM to reduction of an oxidized electron acceptor to yield free energy. In marine sediments, AOM is generally coupled to reduction of sulfate despite an extremely small amount of free energy yield because sulfate is the most abundant electron acceptor in seawater. While AOM coupled to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction (Fe- and Mn-AOM) is 10-30x more thermodynamically favorable than sulfate-AOM, and geochemical data suggests that it occurs in diverse environments, the microorganisms mediating Fe- and Mn-AOM remain unknown. Lake Matano, Indonesia is an ideal ecosystem to enrich for Fe- and Mn-AOM microbes because its anoxic ferruginous deep waters and sediments contain abundant Fe(III), Mn(IV) and methane, and extremely low sulfate and nitrate. Our research aims to isolate and characterize the microbes mediating Fe- and Mn-AOM from three layers of Lake Matano sediments through serial enrichment cultures in minimal media lacking nitrate and sulfate. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of sediment inoculum revealed the presence of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter (5-10% total microbial community in shallow sediment and 35-60% in deeper sediment) as well as 1-2% Euryarchaeota implicated in methane cycling, including ANME-1 and 2d and Methanosarcinales. After 90 days of primary enrichment, all three sediment layers showed high levels of Fe(III) reduction (60-90 μM Fe(II) d-1) in the presence of methane compared to no methane and heat-killed controls. Treatments with added Fe(III) as goethite contained higher abundances of Geobacter than the inoculum (60-80% in all layers), suggesting that Geobacter may be mediating Fe(III) reduction in these enrichments. Quantification of AOM rates is underway, and

  10. Spirochaeta odontotermitis sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic, cellulolytic, halotolerant, alkaliphilic spirochaete isolated from the termite Odontotermes obesus (Rambur) gut.

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, T; Tushar, L; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative spirochaete (strain JC202T) was isolated from the gut of the termite Odontotermes obesus (Rambur) from Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. This strain was obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, halotolerant and required alkaline conditions for growth. Strain JC202T was resistant to rifampicin and kanamycin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline, ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Strain JC202T possessed phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, glycolipid and six unidentified lipids. C18 : 1ω7c was the predominant cellular fatty acid with significant proportions of C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c, C14 : 0, C18 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c, C18 : 1ω5c and C20 : 1ω9c. The DNA G+C content of strain JC202T was 59 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain JC202T is considered to belong to the genus Spirochaeta with Spirochaeta sphaeroplastigenens JC133T (100 % similarity), Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491T (99.92 %), Spirochaeta americana ATCC BAA-392T (99.47 %) and other members of the genus Spirochaeta ( < 93.83 %) as the closest phylogenetic neighbours. However, mean DNA-DNA hydridization values between strain JC202T and S. sphaeroplastigenens JC133T, S. alkalica DSM 8900T ( = Z-7491T) and S. americana DSM 14872T ( = ASpG1T) were 55 ± 2, 22 ± 3 and 32 ± 1 %, respectively. On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic (including metabolome) and genomic differences from the previously described taxa, strain JC202T is differentiated from other members of the genus Spirochaeta and is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Spirochaeta odontotermitis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC202T ( = KCTC 15324T = NBRC 110104T). PMID:26377069

  11. Effect of feeding isolates of anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. CF 17 on growth rate and fibre digestion in buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Deb, Sitangshu M; Punia, Balbir S; Das, Kalyan S; Singh, Ghansham; Ashar, Manisha N; Kumar, Rajiv

    2011-06-01

    In this investigation, the effects of feeding encapsulated cells (rhizomycelia and zoospores) of a fibrolytic isolate from an anaerobic fungus (Neocallimastix sp. CF 17) on nutrient digestion, ruminal fermentation, microbial populations, enzyme profile and growth performance were evaluated in buffaloes. In three in vitro studies, the true digestibility of wheat straw was increased after addition of CF 17 to buffalo rumen fluid (p < 0.05). In Exp. 1, three groups of six buffaloes each (initial BW [body weight] 148 +/- 12.0 kg) were allotted to three dosing regimes: Group 1 received 200 ml of liquid culture of Neocallimastix sp. CF 17 (about 10(6) TFU [thallus-forming units]/ml); Group 2 received an encapsulated culture of the same fungi prepared from 200 ml liquid culture; Group 3: received 200 ml of autoclaved culture (Control). The supplementations were given weekly for four weeks (on days 1,7, 14 and 21). During the dosing period, the average daily gain of Group 2 was higher than in the Control group (444 g/d compared with 264 g/d; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the digestibility of organic matter increased in Group 1 and 2 compared with the Control (64.8, 64.0 and 60.4% respectively; p < 0.05), resulting in an increase in the total digestible nutrient (TDN) percent of ration (p < 0.05). But these effects disappeared post-dosing. There were also an increase in concentration of volatile fatty acids, trichloroacetic acid precipitable N and number of fibrolytic microbes in the rumen during the dosing period (p < 0.05), but these effects declined post-dosing. Results of Exp 2., where the encapsulated culture was applied at intervals of 4 d or 8 d for 120 d, showed that a shorter dosing frequency did not improve growth performance or feed intake. However, independent of the dosing frequency the growth rate of both groups fed the encapsulated culture were about 20% higher than in the Control group (p < 0.05). The present study showed that encapsulated fungi have a high

  12. Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic, gluconate-fermenting bacterium isolated from a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogita; Junghare, Madan; Pester, Michael; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, mesophilic bacterium was enriched and isolated with gluconate as sole substrate from a methanogenic sludge collected from a biogas reactor. Cells of strain GluBS11T stained Gram-positive and were non-motile, straight rods, measuring 3.0-4.5 × 0.8-1.2 μm. The temperature range for growth was 15-37 °C, with optimal growth at 30 °C, the pH range was 6.5-8.5, with optimal growth at pH 7, and the generation time under optimal conditions was 60 min. API Rapid 32A reactions were positive for α-galactosidase, α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase and negative for catalase and oxidase. A broad variety of substrates was utilized, including gluconate, glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, lactose, galactose, melezitose, melibiose, mannitol, erythritol, glycerol and aesculin. Products of gluconate fermentation were ethanol, acetate, formate, H2 and CO2. Neither sulfate nor nitrate served as an electron acceptor. Predominant cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and C18 : 1ω7c. The DNA G+C content of strain GluBS11T was 44.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that strain GluBS11T is a member of subcluster XIVa within the order Clostridiales. The closest cultured relatives are Clostridium herbivorans (93.1 % similarity to the type strain), Clostridium populeti (93.3 %), Eubacterium uniforme (92.4 %) and Clostridium polysaccharolyticum (91.5 %). Based on this 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence (>6.5 %) as well as on chemotaxonomic and phenotypic differences from these taxa, strain GluBS11T is considered to represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anaerobium acetethylicum is GluBS11T ( = LMG 28619T = KCTC 15450T = DSM 29698T). PMID:26297346

  13. The phylogeny of archaebacteria, including novel anaerobic thermoacidophiles in the light of RNA polymerase structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillig, Wolfram; Schnabel, Ralf; Tu, Jenn; Stetter, Karl Otto

    1982-05-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of archaebacteria are distinct from those of eubacteria both in structure and in function. They show similarities to those of the eukaryotic cytoplasm. Extremely thermophilic anaerobic sulfur-respiring archaebacteria isolated from solfataric waters represent four different families, the Thermoproteaceae, the “stiff filaments”, the Desulfurococcaceae and the Thermococcaceae, of a novel order, Thermoproteales. Together with the Sulfolobales, they form the second branch of the urkingdom of the archaebacteria besides that of the methanogens and extreme halophiles. Thermoplasma appears isolated.

  14. Psychromonas antarcticus gen. nov., sp. nov., A new aerotolerant anaerobic, halophilic psychrophile isolated from pond sediment of the McMurdo ice shelf, antarctica

    PubMed

    Mountfort; Rainey; Burghardt; Kaspar; Stackebrandt

    1998-03-01

    A gram-negative, rod- to oval-shaped, aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium was isolated from an anaerobic enrichment inoculated with sediment taken from below the cyanobacterial mat of a high-salinity pond near Bratina Island on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The organism was positive for terminal oxidase and catalase and was motile by means of a polar flagellum. Optimal growth of anaerobic cultures occurred at 12 degrees C, at pH 6.5, and at an NaCl concentration of 3% (w/v). Of a variety of polysaccharides tested, only starch and glycogen supported growth. No growth was observed on cellulosic substrates and xylan, and the organism was unable to attack esculin. Monosaccharides and disaccharides, including the cyanobacterial cell-wall constituent N-acetyl glucosamine, were fermented. Per 100 mol of hexose, the following products (in mol) were formed: acetate, 60; formate, 130; ethanol, 56; lactate, 73; CO2, 15; and butyrate, 2. Propionate, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol and succinate were not detectable in the culture medium (< 1 mol per 100 mol of monomer). Hydrogen was not detected in the head space (detection limit < 10(-5) atm). Growth yields in aerobic static liquid cultures were slightly higher than those in anaerobic culture, and fermentation favoured acetate at the expense of electron sink products. Growth was inhibited in aerobic shaking cultures, and the organism did not utilize nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the DNA from the bacterium was 42.8 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the organism is a member of the gamma-subgroup of Proteobacteria, but that it is distinct from other members of this group based on the sequence of its 16S rRNA gene, mol% G+C, morphology, and physiological and biochemical characteristics. It is designated as a new genus and species; the type strain is star-1 (DSM 10704). PMID:9477258

  15. Comparative In Vitro Activities of ABT-773 against Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathogens Isolated from Skin and Soft-Tissue Animal and Human Bite Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrell, Kerin

    2000-01-01

    We studied the comparative in vitro activities of ABT-773, a new ketolide, against 268 aerobic and 148 anaerobic recent isolates from clinical bites using an agar dilution method and inocula of 104 CFU/spot for aerobes and 105 CFU for anaerobes. The following are the MIC ranges and MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited (MIC90s) of ABT-773 for various isolates, respectively: Pasteurella multocida and Pasteurella septica, 0.125 to 2 and 1 μg/ml; other Pasteurella species, 0.125 to 1 and 0.5 μg/ml; Corynebacterium spp., 0.015 to 0.06 and 0.015 μg/ml; Staphylococcus aureus, 0.03 to 0.06 and 0.06 μg/ml; coagulase-negative staphylococci, 0.015 to >32 and 32 μg/ml; streptococci, 0.015 to 0.03 and 0.03 μg/ml; Eikenella corrodens, 0.25 to 1 and 1 μg/ml; and Bergeyella zoohelcum, 0.03 to 0.25 and 0.06 μg/ml. For anaerobes the MIC ranges and MIC90s of ABT-773 were as follows, respectively: Prevotella heparinolytica, 0.06 to 0.125 and 0.125 μg/ml; Prevotella spp., 0.015 to 0.125 and 0.06 μg/ml; Porphyromonas spp., 0.015 to 0.03 and 0.015 μg/ml; Fusobacterium nucleatum, 0.5 to 8 and 8 μg/ml; other Fusobacterium spp., 0.015 to 8 and 0.5 μg/ml; Bacteroides tectum, 0.015 to 0.5 and 0.06 μg/ml; and Peptostreptococcus spp., 0.015 to 0.25 and 0.03 μg/ml. ABT-773 was more active than all macrolides tested against S. aureus, E. corrodens, and anaerobes, but all compounds were poorly active against F. nucleatum. The activity of ABT-773 was within 1 dilution of that of azithromycin against Pasteurella spp., and ABT-773 was four- to eightfold more active than clarithromycin against Pasteurella spp. ABT-773 may offer a therapeutic alternative for bite wound infections. PMID:10952607

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Willis Poratti, Graciana; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M Sofía; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Goh, Kian Mau; Donati, Edgardo R

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M. Sofía; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  18. The aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology of perirectal abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H

    1997-01-01

    The microbiology of perirectal abscesses in 144 patients was studied. Aerobic or facultative bacteria only were isolated in 13 (9%) instances, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 27 (19%) instances, and mixed aerobic and anaerobic flora were isolated in 104 (72%) instances. A total of 325 anaerobic and 131 aerobic or facultative isolates were recovered (2.2 anaerobic isolates and 0.9 aerobic isolates per specimen). The predominant anaerobes were as follows: Bacteroides fragilis group (85 isolates), Peptostreptococcus spp. (72 isolates), Prevotella spp. (71 isolates), Fusobacterium spp. (21 isolates), Porphyromonas spp. (20 isolates), and Clostridium spp. (15 isolates). The predominant aerobic and facultative bacteria were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (34 isolates), Streptococcus spp. (28 isolates), and Escherichia coli (19 isolates). These data illustrate the polymicrobial aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of perirectal abscesses. PMID:9350771

  19. Antimicrobials therapy of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobes predominant in the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora are often a cause of endogenous infections. Anaerobic bacteria are difficult to isolate from infectious sites, and are often overlooked. Anaerobic infections caused by anaerobes can occur in all body sites, including the central nervous system (CNS), oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin and soft tissues. The treatment of these infections is complicated by the slow growth of these organisms, their polymicrobial nature and the growing resistance of anaerobes to antimicrobials agents. Antimicrobials are frequently the only form of therapy needed, but in others, they are an important adjunct to surgical drainage and correction of pathology. Because anaerobes are often recovered with aerobic and facultative bacteria, the chosen antimicrobials should cover all pathogens. The antimicrobials effective against anaerobic organisms are metronidazole, carbapenems, combinations of a beta-lactam and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, chloramphenicol, tigecycline and clindamycin. PMID:26365224

  20. Anaerobic denitrification in fungi from the coastal marine sediments off Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Cathrine, Sumathi J; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2009-01-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process during which nitrate or nitrite is reduced under anaerobic condition to gaseous nitrogen. The Arabian Sea contains one of the major pelagic denitrification zones and in addition to this, denitrification also takes places along the continental shelf. Prokaryotic microorganisms were considered to be the only players in this process. However recent studies have shown that higher microeukaryotes such as fungi can also adapt to anaerobic mode of respiration and reduce nitrate to harmful green house gases such as NO and N2O. In this study we examined the distribution and biomass of fungi in the sediments of the seasonal anoxic region off Goa from two stations. The sampling was carried out in five different periods from October 2005, when dissolved oxygen levels were near zero in bottom waters to March 2006. We isolated mycelial fungi, thraustochytrids and yeasts. Species of Aspergillus and thraustochytrids were dominant. Fungi were isolated under aerobic, as well as anaerobic conditions from different seasons. Four isolates were examined for their denitrification activity. Two cultures obtained from the anoxic sediments showed better growth under anaerobic condition than the other two cultures that were isolated from oxic sediments. Our preliminary results suggest that several species of fungi can grow under oxygen deficient conditions and participate in denitrification processes. PMID:18834939

  1. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  2. Sensitive and selective culture medium for detection of environmental Clostridium difficile isolates without requirement for anaerobic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Cadnum, Jennifer L; Hurless, Kelly N; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-09-01

    Effective and easy-to-use methods for detecting Clostridium difficile spore contamination would be useful for identifying environmental reservoirs and monitoring the effectiveness of room disinfection. Culture-based detection methods are sensitive for detecting C. difficile, but their utility is limited due to the requirement of anaerobic culture conditions and microbiological expertise. We developed a low-cost selective broth medium containing thioglycolic acid and l-cystine, termed C. difficile brucella broth with thioglycolic acid and l-cystine (CDBB-TC), for the detection of C. difficile from environmental specimens under aerobic culture conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of CDBB-TC (under aerobic culture conditions) were compared to those of CDBB (under anaerobic culture conditions) for the recovery of C. difficile from swabs collected from hospital room surfaces. CDBB-TC was significantly more sensitive than CDBB for recovering environmental C. difficile (36/41 [88%] versus 21/41 [51%], respectively; P = 0.006). C. difficile latex agglutination, an enzyme immunoassay for toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase, and a PCR for toxin B genes were all effective as confirmatory tests. For 477 total environmental cultures, the specificity of CDBB-TC versus that of CDBB based upon false-positive yellow-color development of the medium without recovery of C. difficile was 100% (0 false-positive results) versus 96% (18 false-positive results), respectively. False-positive cultures for CDBB were attributable to the growth of anaerobic non-C. difficile organisms that did not grow in CDBB-TC. Our results suggest that CDBB-TC provides a sensitive and selective medium for the recovery of C. difficile organisms from environmental samples, without the need for anaerobic culture conditions. PMID:24958803

  3. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications. PMID:26925616

  4. A fast and reliable procedure for spore collection from anaerobic fungi: Application for RNA uptake and long-term storage of isolates.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Shelby; Elledge, Nicole C; Hanafy, Radwa A; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi (AGF) represent a basal fungal lineage (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) that resides in the rumen and alimentary tracts of herbivores. The AGF reproduce asexually, with a life cycle that involves flagellated zoospores released from zoosporangia followed by encystment, germination and the subsequent development of rhizomycelia. A fast and reliable approach for AGF spore collection is critical not only for developmental biology studies, but also for molecular biological (e.g. AMT-transformation and RNAi) approaches. Here, we developed and optimized a simple and reliable procedure for the collection of viable, competent, and developmentally synchronized AGF spores under strict anaerobic conditions. The approach involves growing AGF on agar medium in serum bottles under anaerobic conditions, and flooding the observed aerial growth to promote spore release from sporangia into the flooding suspension. The released spores are gently collected using a wide bore sterile needle. Process optimization resulted in the recovery of up to 7×10(9) spores per serum bottle. Further, the released spores exhibited synchronized development from flagellated spores to encysted spores and finally to germinating spores within 90min from the onset of flooding. At the germinating spore stage, the obtained spores were competent, and readily uptook small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides. Finally, using multiple monocentric and polycentric AGF isolates, we demonstrate that AGF grown on agar surface could retain viability for up to 16weeks at 39°C, and hence this solid surface growth procedure represents a simple, cryopreservative- and freezing temperature-free approach for AGF storage. PMID:27288952

  5. Respiration in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Spiders (Araneae) are unique regarding their respiratory system: they are the only animal group that breathe simultaneously with lungs and tracheae. Looking at the physiology of respiration the existence of tracheae plays an important role in spiders with a well-developed tracheal system. Other factors as sex, life time, type of prey capture and the high ability to gain energy anaerobically influence the resting and the active metabolic rate intensely. Most spiders have metabolic rates that are much lower than expected from body mass; but especially those with two pairs of lungs. Males normally have higher resting rates than females; spiders that are less evolved and possess a cribellum have lower metabolic rates than higher evolved species. Freely hunting spiders show a higher energy turnover than spiders hunting with a web. Spiders that live longer than 1 year will have lower metabolic rates than those species that die after 1 year in which development and reproduction must be completed. Lower temperatures and starvation, which most spiders can cope with, will decrease the metabolic rate as well. PMID:26820263

  6. Short inhalation exposures of the isolated and perfused rat lung to respirable dry particle aerosols; the detailed pharmacokinetics of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Per; Eirefelt, Stefan J; Andersson, Paul; Blomgren, Anders; Ryrfeldt, Ake; Gerde, Per

    2008-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in using the lung as a route of entry for both local and systemic administration of drugs. However, because adequate technologies have been missing in the preclinical setting, few investigators have addressed the detailed disposition of drugs in the lung following short inhalation exposures to highly concentrated dry powder aerosols. New methods are needed to explore the disposition of drugs after short inhalation exposures, thus mimicking a future clinical use. Our aim was to study the pulmonary disposition of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, which are clinically used for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Using the recently developed DustGun aerosol technology, we exposed by inhalation for approximately 1 min the isolated and perfused rat lung (IPL) to respirable dry particle aerosols of the three drugs at high concentrations. The typical aerosol concentration was 1 mug/mL, and the particle size distribution of the tested substances varied with a MMAD ranging from 2.3 to 5.3 mum. The IPL was perfused in single pass mode and repeated samples of the perfusate were taken for up to 80 min postexposure. The concentration of drug in perfusate and in lung extracts was measured using LC-MS/MS. The deposited dose was determined by adding the amounts of drug collected in perfusate to the amount extracted from the tissues at 80 min. Deposited amounts of budesonide, formoterol fumarate, and terbutaline sulphate were 23 +/- 17, 36 +/- 8, and 60 +/- 3.2 mug (mean +/- SD, n = 3), respectively. Retention in lung tissues at the end of the perfusion period expressed as fraction of deposited dose was 0.19 +/- 0.05, 0.19 +/- 0.06, and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SD, n = 3) for budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, respectively. Each short inhalation exposure to the highly concentrated aerosols consumed 1-3 mg powder. Hence, this system can be particularly useful for obtaining a detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of inhaled compounds in

  7. In Vitro Activities of Daptomycin, Vancomycin, Quinupristin- Dalfopristin, Linezolid, and Five Other Antimicrobials against 307 Gram-Positive Anaerobic and 31 Corynebacterium Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerrin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2003-01-01

    The activities of daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide, and eight other agents were determined against 338 strains of gram-positive anaerobic bacteria and corynebacteria by the NCCLS reference agar dilution method with supplemented brucella agar for the anaerobes and Mueller-Hinton agar for the corynebacteria. The daptomycin MICs determined on Ca2+-supplemented (50 mg/liter) brucella agar plates were one- to fourfold lower than those determined in unsupplemented media. Daptomycin was highly active (MICs, ≤2 μg/ml) against many strains including 36 of 37 peptostreptococci, 37 of 48 isolates of the Eubacterium group, and all strains of Propionibacterium spp., Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and other Clostridium spp. It was fourfold or greater more active than vancomycin against Clostridium innocuum and 16 of 34 strains of vancomycin-resistant lactobacilli. Three strains of C. difficile for which quinupristin-dalfopristin and linezolid MICs were >8 μg/ml were inhibited by <1 μg of daptomycin per ml. Daptomycin MICs were ≥4 μg/ml for most strains of Clostridium clostridioforme, Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium tertium, and Clostridium ramosum; the isolates were generally more resistant to other antimicrobials. Daptomycin was two- to fourfold less active against Actinomyces spp. than vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, or linezolid. Twenty-nine of 31 strains of Corynebacterium spp., including Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium amycolatum, and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, were inhibited by ≤0.25 μg of daptomycin per ml. For two strains of “Corynebacterium aquaticum,” 8 μg of daptomycin per ml was required for inhibition. Daptomycin demonstrated very good activities against a broad range of gram-positive organisms including vancomycin-resistant C. innocuum and lactobacillus strains and quinupristin-dalfopristin- and linezolid-resistant C. difficile strains. PMID:12499210

  8. In Vitro Activities of the Des-Fluoro(6) Quinolone BMS-284756 against Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathogens Isolated from Skin and Soft Tissue Animal and Human Bite Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen

    2002-01-01

    BMS-284756, a new des-fluoro(6) quinolone, was very active against 240 aerobic and 180 anaerobic isolates from bite victims. It inhibited 403 of 420 (96%) isolates, including those of Moraxella spp., CDC group EF-4, and Eikenella corrodens at ≤2 μg/ml and those of all Pasteurella spp. and Bergeyella zoohelcum at ≤0.015 μg/ml. Fusobacterium russii and 6 of 11 Fusobacterium nucleatum isolates of animal bite origin were resistant, but isolates of human bite origin were susceptible, which suggests that they were of a different subspecies. PMID:11850275

  9. Genetic identification of three ABC transporters as essential elements for nitrate respiration in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, C; Soppa, J

    1999-01-01

    More than 40 nitrate respiration-deficient mutants of Haloferax volcanii belonging to three different phenotypic classes were isolated. All 15 mutants of the null phenotype were complemented with a genomic library of the wild type. Wild-type copies of mutated genes were recovered from complemented mutants using two different approaches. The DNA sequences of 13 isolated fragments were determined. Five fragments were found to overlap; therefore nine different genomic regions containing genes essential for nitrate respiration could be identified. Three genomic regions containing genes coding for subunits of ABC transporters were further characterized. In two cases, genes coding for an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit were clustered and overlapped by four nucleotides. The third gene for a permease subunit had no additional ABC transporter gene in proximity. One ABC transporter was found to be glucose specific. The mutant reveals that the ABC transporter solely mediates anaerobic glucose transport. Based on sequence similarity, the second ABC transporter is proposed to be molybdate specific, explaining its essential role in nitrate respiration. The third ABC transporter is proposed to be anion specific. Genome sequencing has shown that ABC transporters are widespread in Archaea. Nevertheless, this study represents only the second example of a functional characterization. PMID:10430572

  10. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  11. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  12. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste. PMID:17277963

  13. Complete Oxidation of Propionate, Valerate, Succinate, and Other Organic Compounds by Newly Isolated Types of Marine, Anaerobic, Mesophilic, Gram-Negative, Sulfur-Reducing Eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Finster, Kai; Bak, Friedhelm

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment cultures with either propionate, succinate, lactate, or valerate and elemental sulfur and inocula from shallow marine or deep-sea sediments were dominated by rod-shaped motile bacteria after three transfers. By application of deep-agar dilutions, five eubacterial strains were obtained in pure culture and designated Kyprop, Gyprop, Kysw2, Gylac, and Kyval. All strains were gram negative and grew by complete oxidation of the electron donors and concomitant stoichiometric reduction of elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide. The isolates used acetate, propionate, succinate, lactate, pyruvate, oxaloacetate, maleate, glutamate, alanine, aspartate, and yeast extract. All isolates, except strain Gylac, used citrate as an electron donor but valerate was oxidized only by strain Kyval. Fumarate and malate were degraded by all strains without an additional electron donor or acceptor. Kyprop, Gyprop, and Gylac utilized elemental sulfur as the sole inorganic electron acceptor, while Kysw2 and Kyval also utilized nitrate, dimethyl sulfoxide, or Fe(III)-citrate as an electron acceptor. Images PMID:16348934

  14. Anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Jothimani, P; Kalaichelvan, G; Bhaskaran, A; Selvaseelan, D Augustine; Ramasamy, K

    2003-09-01

    Many aromatic compounds and their monomers are existing in nature. Besides they are introduced into the environment by human activity. The conversion of these aromatic compounds is mainly an aerobic process because of the involvement of molecular oxygen in ring fission and as an electron acceptor. Recent literatures indicated that ring fission of monomers and obligomers mainly occurs in anaerobic environments through anaerobic respiration with nitrate, sulphate, carbon dioxide or carbonate as electron acceptors. These anaerobic processes will help to work out the better situation for bioremediation of contaminated environments. While there are plenty of efforts to reduce the release of these chemicals to the environment, already contaminated sites need to be remediated not only to restore the sites but to prevent the leachates spreading to nearby environment. Basically microorganisms are better candidates for breakdown of these compounds because of their wider catalytic mechanisms and the ability to act even in the absence of oxygen. These microbes can be grouped based on their energy mechanisms. Normally, the aerobic counterparts employ the enzymes like mono-and-dioxygenases. The end product is basically catechol, which further may be metabolised to CO2 by means of quinones reductases cycles. In the absense of reductases compounds, the reduced catechols tend to become oxidised to form many quinone compounds. The quinone products are more recalcitrant and lead to other aesthetic problems like colour in water, unpleasant odour, etc. On the contrary, in the reducing environment this process is prevented and in a cascade of pathways, the cleaved products are converted to acetyl co-A to be integrated into other central metabolite paths. The central metabolite of anaerobic degradation is invariably co-A thio-esters of benzoic acid or hydroxy benzoic acid. The benzene ring undergoes various substitution and addition reactions to form chloro-, nitro-, methyl- compounds

  15. Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed bioreactor operated at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Parshina, Sofiya N; Ermakova, Anna V; Bomberg, Malin; Detkova, Ekaterina N

    2014-01-01

    A psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain Pt1, was isolated from a syntrophic propionate-oxidizing methanogenic consortium obtained from granulated biomass of a two-stage low-temperature (3-8 °C) anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) bioreactor, fed with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) (acetate, propionate and butyrate). The strain was strictly anaerobic, and cells were curved rods, 0.4-0.5×7.5-25 µm, that sometimes formed wavy filaments from 25 to several hundred micrometres in length. Cells stained Gram-negative and were non-sporulating. They were gently motile by means of tufted flagella. The strain grew at 5-37 °C (optimum at 20-30 °C), at pH 6.0-10 (optimum 7.0-7.5) and with 0-0.3 M NaCl (optimum 0 M NaCl). Growth and methane production was found with H2/CO2 and very weak growth with formate. Acetate and yeast extract stimulated growth, but were not essential. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Pt1 was 40 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Pt1 was a member of the genus Methanospirillum and showed 97.5 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) and 94 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum lacunae Ki8-1(T). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain Pt1 with Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) revealed 39 % relatedness. On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strain Pt1 is a representative of a novel species of the genus Methanospirillum, for which the name Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Pt1(T) ( = DSM 26304(T) = VKM B-2808(T)). PMID:24048867

  16. Hungatella effluvii gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic bacterium isolated from an effluent treatment plant, and reclassification of Clostridium hathewayi as Hungatella hathewayi gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhpreet; Yawar, Mir; Kumar, P Anil; Suresh, K

    2014-03-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming and strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated UB-B.2(T), was isolated from an industrial effluent anaerobic digester sample. It grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence confirmed that strain UB-B.2(T) was closely related to Clostridium hathewayi DSM 13479(T) (97.84% similarity), a member of rRNA gene cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium, and formed a coherent cluster with other related members of the Blautia (Clostridium) coccoides rRNA group in phylogenetic analyses. The end products of glucose fermentation by strain UB-B.2(T) were acetate and propionate. The G+C content of the DNA was 51.4 mol%. Although strain UB-B.2(T) showed 97.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to the type strain of C. hathewayi, it exhibited only 38.4% relatedness at the whole-genome level. It also showed differences from its closest phylogenetic relative, C. hathewayi DSM 13479(T), in phenotypic characteristics such as hydrolysis of aesculin, starch and urea and fermentation end products. Both strains showed phenotypic differences from the members of rRNA gene cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium. Based on these differences, C. hathewayi DSM 13479(T) and strain UB-B.2(T) were identified as representatives of a new genus of the family Clostridiaceae. Thus, we propose the reclassification of Clostridium hathewayi as Hungatella hathewayi gen. nov., comb. nov., the type species of the new genus (type strain DSM 13479(T) = CCUG 43506(T) = MTCC 10951(T)). Strain UB-B.2(T) ( = MTCC 11101(T) = DSM 24995(T)) is assigned to the novel species Hungatella effluvii gen. nov., sp. nov as the type strain. PMID:24186873

  17. Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Bomar, Lindsey; Maltz, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Three anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana, using mucin as the primary carbon and energy source. These strains, designated M3T, M4 and M6, were Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile. Cells were elongated bacilli approximately 2.4 µm long and 0.6 µm wide. Growth only occurred anaerobically under mesophilic and neutral pH conditions. All three strains could utilize multiple simple and complex sugars as carbon sources, with glucose fermented to acid by-products. The DNA G+C contents of strains M3T, M4 and M6 were 44.9, 44.8 and 44.8 mol%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acid of strain M3T was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the three strains shared >99 % similarity with each other and represent a new lineage within the family Rikenellaceae of the order Bacteroidales, phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related bacteria to strain M3T based on 16S rRNA gene sequences were Rikenella microfusus DSM 15922T (87.3 % similarity) and Alistipes finegoldii AHN 2437T (87.4 %). On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strains M3T, M4 and M6 are proposed as representing a novel species of a new genus within the family Rikenellaceae, for which the name Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Mucinivorans hirudinis is M3T ( = ATCC BAA-2553T = DSM 27344T). PMID:25563920

  18. RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing and Isolation of Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading Bacteria from Gasoline-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Yuki; Takahata, Yoh; Manefield, Mike; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of benzene-degrading bacteria in gasoline-contaminated groundwater was coupled to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of DNA fragments amplified by reverse transcription-PCR from community 16S rRNA molecules. Supplementation of the groundwater with [13C6]benzene together with an electron acceptor (nitrate, sulfate, or oxygen) showed that a phylotype affiliated with the genus Azoarcus specifically appeared in the 13C-RNA fraction only when nitrate was supplemented. This phylotype was also observed as the major band in DGGE analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified by PCR from the gasoline-contaminated groundwater. In order to isolate the Azoarcus strains, the groundwater sample was streaked on agar plates containing nonselective diluted CGY medium, and the DGGE analysis was used to screen colonies formed on the plates. This procedure identified five bacterial isolates (from 60 colonies) that corresponded to the SIP-identified Azoarcus phylotype, among which two strains (designated DN11 and AN9) degraded benzene under denitrifying conditions. Incubation of these strains with [14C]benzene showed that the labeled carbon was mostly incorporated into 14CO2 within 14 days. These results indicate that the Azoarcus population was involved in benzene degradation in the gasoline-contaminated groundwater under denitrifying conditions. We suggest that RNA-based SIP identification coupled to phylogenetic screening of nonselective isolates facilitates the isolation of enrichment/isolation-resistant microorganisms with a specific function. PMID:16672506

  19. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meixian; Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  2. Chemoautotrophic production and respiration in the hyporheic zone of a sonoran desert stream

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B. Jr.; Holmes, R.M.; Fisher, S.G.; Grimm, N.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chemoautotrophic production and respiration (aerobic and anaerobic) were examined along flowpaths in three subsystems in Sycamore Creek, Arizona. Chemoautotrophic production was highest where surface waters enter parafluvial sediments (64 to 76 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}) and lowest in anoxic bank sediments (14 to 16 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Aerobic respiration was considerable greater than chemoautotrophy in oxygenated hyporheic and parafluvial zones (2,400 to 4,900 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). In anoxic bank sediments, respiration was also much greater than chemoautotrophy, but was entirely anaerobic (i.e., methane production; 3,500 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Weighting subsystems by areal extent, the largest proportion of aerobic respiration and chemoautotrophic production occurred in parafluvial sediments (64 to 76%), whereas anoxic bank sediments were most important for anaerobic respiration (94% of total anaerobic respiration). Overall, chemoautotrophic production was only 1.0 to 1.3% of respiration and methane production was only 5% of total sediment respiration.

  3. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  4. H2-CO2-Dependent Anaerobic O-Demethylation Activity in Subsurface Sediments and by an Isolated Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shi; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms in sediments from the Atlantic Coastal Plain to biodegrade methoxylated aromatic compounds was examined. O-demethylation activity was detected in deep (121- and 406-m) sediments, as well as in the surface soil. A syringate-demethylating consortium, containing at least three types of bacteria, was enriched from a deep-sediment sample in a medium containing syringate as the sole organic carbon source and with a N2-CO2 atmosphere. An isolate which demethylated syringate was obtained from the enrichment on an agar medium incubated under a H2-CO2 but not a N2-CO2 or N2 atmosphere. O demethylation of syringate of this isolate was dependent on the presence of both H2 and CO2 in the gas phase. The metabolism of syringate occurred in a sequential manner: methylgallate accumulated transiently before it was converted to gallate. Mass balance analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the reaction in this isolate proceeds in accordance with the following generalized equation: C7H3O3(OCH3)n- + nHCO3- + nH2 → C7H3O3(OH)n- + nCH3COO- + nH2O. Images PMID:16348928

  5. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Terrance W.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1979-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed. PMID:16660982

  6. Cefamandole Therapy in Anaerobic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Scalcini, Marcella C.; Sanders, Charles V.; Lewis, A. Carter

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one adult patients with infections due to anaerobic bacteria were treated with cefamandole. Bacteroides fragilis group (17) and Bacteroides melaninogenicus (13) were the most frequent anaerobes isolated. Duration of therapy varied from 2 to 49 days. Results were judged satisfactory in 26 cases, and unsatisfactory in 1 case. Four cases could not be evaluated. Adverse reactions occurred in 16 patients and included positive direct Coombs' test without hemolysis, transient liver function abnormalities, phlebitis, reversible neutropenia, fever, eosinophilia, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The more significant reactions were associated with prolonged therapy. None was lethal. These data suggest that cefamandole is effective in treatment of most anaerobic infections. PMID:380458

  7. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 °C (optimum 37 °C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5%), but is tolerated up to 3%. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain FatMR1(T) fermented pyruvate, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypcase and used fructose as the only sugar. The main fermentation products from fructose and proteinaceous compounds (e.g. peptone and biotrypcase) were acetate, H2 and CO2. Crotonate was disproportionated to acetate and butyrate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0 and C16:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 37.1 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic, and physiological properties, strain FatMR1(T) (=DSM 25890(T), =JCM 18390(T)) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as a novel species of the genus Alkaliphilus, A. hydrothermalis sp. nov. PMID:25319677

  8. Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a L-lysine-degrading, strictly anaerobic bacterium in the class Clostridia isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Shibuya, Toru; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN037(T)) was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Cells were Gram-positive rods. Strain WN037(T) was asaccharolytic. The strain fermented L-lysine in the presence of B-vitamin mixture or vitamin B12 and produced acetate and butyrate. L-arginine and casamino acids poorly supported the growth. Strain WN037(T) used neither other amino acids nor organic acids examined. The strain had C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c DMA as the predominant cellular fatty acids. The genomic DNA G + C content was 44.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN037(T) in the family Eubacteriaceae in the class Clostridia. The closest relative was Eubacterium pyruvativorans (sequence similarity, 92.8 %). Based on the comprehensive analyses, the novel genus and species, Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN037(T) (= JCM 19863(T) = DSM 28287(T)). PMID:25449329

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium isolated from marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, J F; Gilewicz, M J; Michotey, V D; Zheng, T L; Bonin, P C; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium (Marinobacter sp. strain CAB) isolated from marine sediments. Under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, this strain efficiently degraded this ubiquitous isoprenoid ketone. Several bacterial metabolites, 4,8,12-trimethyl-tridecan-1-ol, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanal, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid, Z-3,7-dimethylocten-2-oic acid, Z-3,7,11-trimethyldodecen-2-oic acid, and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, were formally identified, and different pathways were proposed to explain the formation of such isoprenoid compounds. PMID:9023941

  10. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones of anaerobically induced lactate dehydrogenase from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    In barley roots during hypoxia, five lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes accumulate with a concomitant increase in enzyme activity ({approximately}20-fold). These isozymes are thought to be tetramers resulting from the random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH have been isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library using antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approximately}3,000-fold and using nucleic acid probes synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction. Two cDNA clones were obtained (1,305 and 1,166 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs are 96% identical to each other, and 50% and 40% identical to vertebrate and bacterial LDHs, respectively. Northern blots identified a single mRNA band ({approximately}1.5 kb) whose level rose 8-fold during hypoxia.

  12. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  13. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  14. Anaerobic Biotransformation of High Concentrations of Chloroform by an Enrichment Culture and Two Bacterial Isolates ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Huifeng; Kurtz, Harry D.; Mykytczuk, Nadia; Trevors, Jack T.; Freedman, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A fermentative enrichment culture (designated DHM-1) was developed that is capable of cometabolically biotransforming high concentrations of chloroform (CF) to nontoxic end products. Two Pantoea spp. were isolated from DHM-1 that also possess this dechlorination capability. Following acclimation to increasing levels of CF, corn syrup-grown DHM-1 was able to transform over 500 mg/liter CF in the presence of vitamin B12 (approximately 3% of CF on a molar basis) at a rate as high as 22 mg/liter/day in a mineral salts medium. CO, CO2, and organic acids were the predominant biodegradation products, suggesting that hydrolytic reactions predominate during CF transformation. DHM-1 was capable of growing on corn syrup in the presence of high concentrations of CF (as may be present near contaminant source zones in groundwater), which makes it a promising culture for bioaugmentation. Strains DHM-1B and DHM-1T transform CF at rates similar to that of the DHM-1 enrichment culture. The ability of these strains to grow in the presence of high concentrations of CF appears to be related to alteration of membrane fluidity or homeoviscous and homeophasic adaptation. PMID:20693443

  15. Geosporobacter ferrireducens sp. nov., an anaerobic iron-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeji; Kim, So-Jeong; Min, Ui-Gi; Lee, Yong-Jae; Kim, Song-Gun; Jung, Man-Young; Seo, Yong-Seok; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an alkaliphilic and heterotrophic iron-reducing bacterial strain, IRF9(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated soil in the Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain IRF9(T) belongs to the genus Geosporobacter in the family Clostridiaceae and is most closely related to Geosporobacter subterraneus VNs68(T) (96.9 % sequence similarity). Cells of strain IRF9(T) were observed to be straight or curved rod-shaped, motile and Gram-negative. Optimal growth of strain IRF9(T) was observed at pH 9.0-9.5 and 40 °C. The strain was found to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 6.5-10.0 and 25-45 °C, respectively. NaCl was not required for growth. Fe(III), but not sulfate, thiosulfate or elemental sulfur can be used by strain IRF9(T) as an electron acceptor. A limited number of carbohydrates and amino acids, including D-glucose, D-fructose, D-mannitol, D-ribose and L-arginine, support growth of strain IRF9(T). The main fatty acids (>10 %) of strain IRF9(T) were identified as C14:0 (18.4 %), C16:1 cis9 (13.6 %), C16:0 (12.4 %) and C16:0 dimethyl acetal (17.7 %). Major respiratory quinone was identified as menaquinone MK-5 (V-H2). The main polar lipids were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain IRF9(T) was determined to be 37.2 mol%, which is lower than that of G. subterraneus VNs68(T) (42.2 mol%). Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic studies, we conclude that strain IRF9(T) (=JCM 19987(T) = KCTC 15395(T)) represents a new species of the genus Geosporobacter, for which we propose the name Geosporobacter ferrireducens sp. nov. PMID:25663026

  16. Anaerobic infections in children: a prospective survey.

    PubMed Central

    Thirumoorthi, M C; Keen, B M; Dajani, A S

    1976-01-01

    Over an 18-month period, cultures from 95 infants and children yielded 146 anaerobic organisms in 110 clinical specimens. Bacteroides was the most frequently isolated anaerobe, followed by Propionibacterium and Clostridium species. Intra-abdominal sources, soft tissues, and blood were the three major sources (82%) of isolation of anaerobes. Whereas most patients (58%) were over 5 years of age and only 11% were newborns, anaerobic infections constituted a rather uniform proportion of all infections, regardless of sources, in all age groups. Anaerobes accounted for only 2.9% of all positive cultures encountered from the various sources. Rates of recovery of anaerobes from intra-abdominal sources were significantly the highest, and from soft-tissue infections they were significantly the lowest. The anaerobic bacteremias observed were of no clinical significance when Propionibacterium species were isolated; however, recovery of other anaerobes from the blood, and primarily Bacteroides species, was usually associated with clinical disease. Except in blood cultures, anaerobes almost invariably coexisted with facultative bacteria. PMID:1270594

  17. Role of Rhodobacter sp. Strain PS9, a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Isolated from an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon, in Odor Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young S.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; de la Mora, Arlene; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal pigmentation changes resulting from the development of a purple color in anaerobic swine waste lagoons were investigated during a 4-year period. The major purple photosynthetic bacterium responsible for these color changes and the corresponding reductions in odor was isolated from nine photosynthetic lagoons. By using morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characterization methods we identified the predominant photosynthetic bacterium as a new strain of Rhodobacter, designated Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9. Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 is capable of photoorganotrophic growth on a variety of organic compounds, including all of the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOC) responsible for the odor associated with swine production facilities (J. A. Zahn, A. A. DiSpirito, Y. S. Do, B. E. Brooks, E. E. Copper, and J. L. Hatfield, J. Environ. Qual. 30:624-634, 2001). The seasonal variations in airborne VOC emitted from waste lagoons showed that there was a 80 to 93% decrease in the concentration of VOC during a photosynthetic bloom. During the height of a bloom, the Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 population accounted for 10% of the total community and up to 27% of the eubacterial community based on 16S ribosomal DNA signals. Additional observations based on seasonal variations in meteorological, biological, and chemical parameters suggested that the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were correlated with lagoon water temperature and with the concentrations of sulfate and phosphate. In addition, the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were inversely correlated with the concentrations of protein and fluoride. PMID:12620863

  18. Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, proteolytic bacterium isolated from a decaying algal bloom, and proposal of Proteinivoraceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim; Boltyanskaya, Yulia; Zhilina, Tatjana; Kolganova, Tatjana; Lavrentjeva, Elena; Kuznetsov, Boris

    2013-09-01

    Two strains of a novel anaerobic, protein- and nucleoside-utilizing bacterium, Z-910(T) and Z-810, were isolated. The strains were spore-forming, mainly nonmotile rods, exhibiting positive Gram reaction with Gram-positive cell wall structure. The strains were mesophilic and haloalkaliphilic. Cultures used proteins and proteinaceous substrates as carbon, nitrogen, and energy sources. Both strains used also ribonucleosides, cellobiose, pyruvate, and glycerol. Ribose and nucleobases did not support growth. The fermentation products from all utilized substrates were identical but varied in content and included straight and branched acids, as well as hydrogen and ammonia. When grown on tryptone, strain Z-910(T) was able to reduce fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Neither nitrate nor sulfate was reduced. The DNA G + C content of strain Z-910(T) was 32.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed that strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new branch within the order Clostridiales, with 90.2 % similarity to the nearest genus with a validly published name Anaerobranca gottschalkii DSM 13577(T). According to their physiological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new genus and novel species, for which the name Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca formed a separate cluster within the order Clostridiales. The family Proteinivoraceae fam. nov. comprising the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca was therefore proposed within the order Clostridiales of the phylum Firmicutes with Proteinivorax as a type genus of the new family. PMID:23807772

  19. Clostridium vincentii sp. nov., a new obligately anaerobic, saccharolytic, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from low-salinity pond sediment of the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mountfort, D O; Rainey, F A; Burghardt, J; Kaspar, H F; Stackebrandt, E

    1997-01-01

    A gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from an enrichment initiated with sediment taken from below the cyanobacterial mat of a low-salinity pond on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The organism grew optimally at 12 degrees C, at pH 6.5, and at an NaCl concentration of< 0.5% (w/v). It survived freeze-thawing at low salt concentrations,but not exposure to temperatures over 25 degrees C for more than 20 h or short-term exposure to temperatures> 50 degrees C. Out of a variety of polysaccharides tested as growth substrates, only xylan supported growth. The organism also grew on a variety of mono- and disaccharides including the cyanobacterial cell wall constituent, N-acetyl glucosamine. Fermentation products on a mol product per 100 mol of hexose monomer fermented basis were: acetate, 72; formate, 72; butyrate, 55; hydrogen, 114; and CO2, 100. Not detectable in the culture medium(< 2 mol per 100 mol of monomer) were lactate, propionate, ethanol,n-propanol, n-butanol, and succinate. The G+C content of the DNA from the bacterium was 33 mol%, and a phylogenetic analysis indicated that it grouped closely with members of the RNA-DNA homology group 1 of the genus Clostridium. It differed from other species of this genus with regard to growth temperature optimum, substrate range, and fermentation pattern, and is therefore designated as a new species of Clostridium for which the name Clostridium vincentii is proposed. The type strain is lac-1 (DSM 10228). PMID:9000342

  20. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zun; Qian, Yang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Ju, Meiting

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2014 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. •Pretreatment •Organic waste •multiple-stage co-digestion •Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:26420080

  1. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  2. Microbial Iron Respiration Can Protect Steel from Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Dubiel, M.; Hsu, C. H.; Chien, C. C.; Mansfeld, F.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  3. Microbial iron respiration can protect steel from corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, M; Hsu, C H; Chien, C C; Mansfeld, F; Newman, D K

    2002-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  4. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  5. Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov., an anaerobic but low concentration oxygen adapted coccobacillus isolated from lizards (Pogona vitticeps) or human clinical specimens, and emended description of the genus Porphyromonas Shah and Collins 1988.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kuwabara, Saki; Kania, Stephen A; Kato, Hisayuki; Hamagishi, Manami; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Sato, Takuichi; Tomida, Junko; Tanaka, Kaori; Bemis, David A

    2015-03-01

    During the process of identifying a Gram-negative coccobacillus isolated from a human clinical specimen, we found that the isolate's 16S rRNA gene had very close sequence identity with that of a variant Porphyromonas isolated from polymicrobial infections in the central bearded dragon, a species of lizard [2]. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the human isolate and of six isolates from lizards were nearly identical (99.9-100%). Phylogenetic analysis placed all of these isolates in a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from other species in the genus Porphyromonas. The closest species was Porphyromonas catoniae with 90.7-90.9% sequence identity, although there was less than 6% DNA similarity between the P. catoniae type strain and our representative isolates from lizards (PAGU 1787(T)) and human (PAGU 1776). These isolates could grow under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions (6% O2 atmosphere). The isolates were positive for catalase and very strong β-hemolytic activity, but did not show black or brown pigmentation. Biochemically, the isolates could be differentiated from closely related species by pyroglutamic acid arylamidase and glycine arylamidase activity, and some others. The fermentation products mainly included succinic acid and propionic acid. The major fatty acids detected in cells of the isolates were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, and 3OH-iso-C17:0. The G+C content was 43.0 ± 0.62 mol%. The species name Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates with the type strain of PAGU 1787(T) (=MI 10-1288(T)=JCM 19732(T)=ATCC BAA-2643(T)). PMID:25481042

  6. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  7. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  8. Teaching Cellular Respiration & Alternate Energy Sources with a Laboratory Exercise Developed by a Scientist-Teacher Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Brandon; Mitton, Teri; Smith, Rosemary; Magnuson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a current research area that harvests electricity from bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration. Graphite is an electrically conductive material that bacteria can respire on, thus it can be used to capture electrons from bacteria. When bacteria transfer electrons to graphite, an electrical potential is created that can…

  9. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator. PMID:26507955

  10. Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kunihiro; Ueki, Atsuko; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN081(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming straight rods. The strain grew rather well on PY agar slants supplemented with a B-vitamin mixture as well as sugars (PYV4S medium) and made translucent and glossy colonies. Growth in liquid medium with the same composition, however, was scanty, and growth was not improved in spite of various additives to the medium. Strain WN081(T) produced small amounts of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, butyrate, isovalerate and H(2) from PYV liquid medium. The strain did not use carbohydrates or organic acids. The pH range for growth was narrow (pH 6.8-8.2), having a pH optimum at 6.8-7.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-37°C, the optimum being 25-30°C. The strain was sensitive to bile, and did not have catalase or oxidase activities. Hydrogen sulfide was produced from L-cysteine and L-methionine as well as peptone. Indole was produced from L-tryptophan and peptone. The strain had iso-C(15:0) as the exclusively predominant cellular fatty acid (70%) together with some branched chain components (such as iso-C(15:0) DMA, iso-C(17:0) 3-OH and iso-C(15:0) aldehyde) as minor components. The genomic DNA G+C content was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN081(T) in the phylum Bacteroidetes with rather low sequence similarities with the related species such as Rikenella microfusus (85.7% sequence similarity), Alistipes putredinis (85.5%) and Alistipes finegoldii (85.5%) in the family Rikenellaceae. Based on the phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, the novel genus and species Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN081(T) (= JCM 17049(T) = DSM 23595(T)). PMID:23337575