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Sample records for anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium

  1. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  2. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giovanna . E-mail: giovanna.speranza@unimi.it; Morelli, Carlo F.; Cairoli, Paola; Mueller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH{sub 2} -O- to =N-CH{sub 2} - without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  3. Anaerobic degradation of toluene by a denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Kim, K S; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, designated strain T1, that grew with toluene as the sole source of carbon under anaerobic conditions was isolated. The type of agar used in solid media and the toxicity of toluene were determinative factors in the successful isolation of strain T1. Greater than 50% of the toluene carbon was oxidized to CO2, and 29% was assimilated into biomass. The oxidation of toluene to CO2 was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate reduction and denitrification. Strain T1 was tolerant of and grew on 3 mM toluene after a lag phase. The rate of toluene degradation was 1.8 mumol min-1 liter-1 (56 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1) in a cell suspension. Strain T1 was distinct from other bacteria that oxidize toluene anaerobically, but it may utilize a similar biochemical pathway of oxidation. In addition, o-xylene was transformed to a metabolite in the presence of toluene but did not serve as the sole source of carbon for growth of strain T1. This transformation was dependent on the degradation of toluene. Images PMID:2059037

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Shinyako-Hata, Kaori; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica,” was determined by pyrosequencing and by screening a fosmid library. A 4.07-Mb genome sequence comprising 3 contigs was assembled, in which 3,912 gene-coding regions, 47 tRNAs, and a single rrn operon were annotated. PMID:25883286

  5. Robinsoniella peoriensis: A model anaerobic commensal bacterium for acquisition of antibiotic resistance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: R. peoriensis was characterized in our laboratories from swine manure and feces as a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Since then strains of this species have been identified from a variety of mammalian and other gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, suggesting it is a member of the commensal ...

  6. Methanogenesis from acetate: a nonmethanogenic bacterium from an anaerobic acetate enrichment.

    PubMed

    Ward, D M; Mah, R A; Kaplan, I R

    1978-06-01

    A methanogenic acetate enrichment was initiated by inoculation of an acetate-mineral salts medium with domestic anaerobic digestor sludge and maintained by weekly transfer for 2 years. The enrichment culture contained a Methanosarcina and several obligately anaerobic nonmethanogenic bacteria. These latter organisms formed varying degrees of association with the Methanosarcina, ranging from the nutritionally fastidious gram-negative rod called the satellite bacterium to the nutritionally nonfastidious Eubacterium limosum. The satellite bacterium had growth requirements for amino acids, a peptide, a purine base, vitamin B12, and other B vitamins. Glucose, mannitol, starch, pyruvate, cysteine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, arginine, and asparagine stimulated growth and hydrogen production. Acetate was neither incorporated nor metabolized by the satellite organism. Since acetate was the sole organic carbon source in the enrichment culture, organism(s) which metabolize acetate (such as the Methanosarcina) must produce substrates and growth factors for associated organisms which do not metabolize acetate. PMID:677881

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21′43.9″, longitude −65°46′8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Mack, E Erin; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9″, longitude -65°46'8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  9. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  10. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated with nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium. PMID:15812053

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  12. Anaerobic CO2 fixation by the acetogenic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P; Rismani-Yazdi, H; Stephanopoulos, G

    2013-05-16

    Anaerobic bacteria such as Moorella thermoacetica have the capacity of fixing carbon dioxide with carbon monoxide and hydrogen for the production of ethanol, acetic acid, and other useful chemicals. In this study, we evaluated the fixation of CO2 for the production of acetic acid, as a product in its own right but also as precursor for lipid synthesis by oleaginous organisms. We achieved maximum cell optical density of 11.3, acetic acid titer of 31 g/L, and productivity of 0.55 g/L-h at CO mass-transfer rate of 83 mM/h. We also showed electron availability by CO mass transfer limited the process at CO mass transfer rates lower than 30 mM/h. Further enhancement of mass-transfer rate removed such limitations in favor of biological kinetics as main limitation. This work underlines the potential of microbial processes for converting syngas to fuel and chemical products in processes suitable for distributed feedstock utilization. (c) 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 59: 3176-3183, 2013

  13. Initial reactions in anaerobic ethylbenzene oxidation by a denitrifying bacterium, strain EB1.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, H A; Johnson, H A; Reinhard, M; Spormann, A M

    1996-01-01

    Initial reactions in anaerobic oxidation of ethylbenzene were investigated in a denitrifying bacterium, strain EB1. Cells of strain EB1 mineralized ethylbenzene to CO2 under denitrifying conditions, as demonstrated by conversion of 69% of [14C]ethylbenzene to 14CO2. In anaerobic suspensions of strain EB1 cells metabolizing ethylbenzene, the transient formation and consumption of 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, and an as yet unidentified compound were observed. On the basis of growth experiments and spectroscopic data, the unknown compound is proposed to be benzoyl acetate. Cell suspension experiments using H2(18)O demonstrated that the hydroxyl group of the first product of anoxic ethylbenzene oxidation, 1-phenylethanol, is derived from water. A tentative pathway for anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization by strain EB1 is proposed. PMID:8824622

  14. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Identification of an anaerobic bacterium which reduces perchlorate and chlorate as Wolinella succinogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Attaway, H. |

    1995-12-31

    Perchlorate and chlorate salts are widely used by the chemical, aerospace and defense industries as oxidizers in propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics. The authors have isolated a anaerobic bacterium which is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of both perchlorate and chlorate for energy and growth. Strain HAP-1 is a gram negative, thin rod, non-sporeforming, highly motile strict anaerobe. Antibiotic resistance profiles, utilization of carbon substrates and electron acceptors demonstrated similar physiological characteristics to Wolinella succinogenes. Pairwise comparisons of 16S RNA sequences showed only a 0.75% divergence between strain HAP-1 and W. succinogenes. Physiological, morphological and 16S RRNA sequence data indicate strain HAP-1 is a subspecies of W. succinogenes that can utilize perchlorate and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors.

  16. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic ruminal bacterium capable of degrading hydrolyzable tannins.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K E; Pell, A N; Schofield, P; Zinder, S

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic diplococcoid bacterium able to degrade hydrolyzable tannins was isolated from the ruminal fluid of a goat fed desmodium (Desmodium ovalifolium), a tropical legume which contains levels as high as 17% condensed tannins. This strain grew under anaerobic conditions in the presence of up to 30 g of tannic acid per liter and tolerated a range of phenolic monomers, including gallic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids. The predominant fermentation product from tannic acid breakdown was pyrogallol, as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Tannic acid degradation was dependent on the presence of a sugar such as glucose, fructose, arabinose, sucrose, galactose, cellobiose, or soluble starch as an added carbon and energy source. The strain also demonstrated resistance to condensed tannins up to a level of 4 g/liter. PMID:7574640

  17. [Mechanisms of Forespore Formation during Polysporogenesis of an Anaerobic Bacterium Anaerobacter polyendosporus PST(T)].

    PubMed

    Duda, V I; Suzina, N E

    2015-01-01

    Forespore formation in the anaerobic bacterium Anaerobacterpolyendosporus PS-1(T) was studied by phase contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. It is concluded that in this bacterium the formation of all forespores in multispore sporangia occurs via the same mechanism as that operating in all known bacilli and clostridia during the single-spore variant of endogenous sporogenesis. Its cytological indicators are as follows: (1) formation of the forespore septum, (2) engulfment of the smaller prespore cell by the larger mother cell, (3) cortex synthesis, (4) assembly of the spore coats, (5) exosporium formation, and (6) lysis of the mother cell. Polysporogenesis in strain PS-1(T) is characterized by synchronous formation of all spores (siblings) in a given sporangium and by the absence of any indication of forespore division within the mother cell. These data suggest that multiple spores within a single PS-1(T) cell result not from division of the first forespores developing at one or two cell poles, as it was reported for another polysporogenic bacterium, "Metabacterium polyspora", but rather from simultaneous independent formation of several prespores in a single mother cell in the course of modified cell division. PMID:27169242

  18. Electron microscopic investigation of the hydrogen-oxidizing acetate-forming anaerobic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii.

    PubMed

    Mayer, F; Lurz, R; Schoberth, S

    1977-11-18

    Acetobacterium woodii is a Gram-positive anaerobic nonsporeforming bacterium able to grow on H2 and CO2 as sole sources of energy. The product of fermentation is acetic acid. Fine structural analysis showed rod-shaped flagellated cells, and coccoid cells without flagella arranged predominantly in pairs and chains. The cell wall was found to be composed of three layers. The cell surface exhibited a periodic array of particles consisting of subunits. The cytoplasmic membrane showed particles either in random distribution or in a hexagonal pattern. Intracytoplasmic membranes were rarely observed, whereas inclusion bodies of varying shapes, predominantly in an uncommon disc-shape, could frequently be observed. Their content was dissolved in ultrathin sections indicating hydrophobic nature. PMID:596994

  19. The glucose transport system of the hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, M.Y.; Noll, K.M.; Romano, A.H.

    1996-08-01

    The glucose transport system of the extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana was studied with the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DOG). T. neapolitana accumulated 2-DOG against a concentration gradient in an intracellular free sugar pool that was exchangeable with external D-glucose. This active transport of 2-DOG was dependent upon the presence of sodium ion and an external source of energy, such as pyruvate, and was inhibited by arsenate and gramicidin D. There was no phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of glucose, 2-DOG, or fructose by cell extracts or toluene-treated cells, indicating the absence of a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. These data indicate that D-glucose is taken up by T.neapolitana via an active transport system that is energized by an ion gradient generated by ATP, derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Detoxification of vinyl chloride to ethene coupled to growth of an anaerobic bacterium.

    PubMed

    He, Jianzhong; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Yang, Kun-Lin; Koenigsberg, Stephen S; Löffler, Frank E

    2003-07-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are ideal solvents for numerous applications, and their widespread use makes them prominent groundwater pollutants. Even more troubling, natural biotic and abiotic processes acting on these solvents lead to the accumulation of toxic intermediates (such as dichloroethenes) and carcinogenic intermediates (such as vinyl chloride). Vinyl chloride was found in at least 496 of the 1,430 National Priorities List sites identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and its precursors PCE and TCE are present in at least 771 and 852 of these sites, respectively. Here we describe an unusual, strictly anaerobic bacterium that destroys dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride as part of its energy metabolism, generating environmentally benign products (biomass, ethene and inorganic chloride). This organism might be useful for cleaning contaminated subsurface environments and restoring drinking-water reservoirs. PMID:12840758

  1. Studies of the extracellular glycocalyx of the anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Paul J; Price, Neil P J; Kroukamp, Otini; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Van Zyl, Willem H

    2006-12-01

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, including production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the compositions and structures of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM) and chemical analysis were used to characterize the glycocalyx of the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus strain 7. VP-SEM revealed that growth of this strain was accompanied by the formation of thin cellular extensions that allowed the bacterium to adhere to cellulose, followed by formation of a ramifying network that interconnected individual cells to one another and to the unraveling cellulose microfibrils. Extraction of 48-h-old whole-culture pellets (bacterial cells plus glycocalyx [G] plus residual cellulose [C]) with 0.1 N NaOH released carbohydrate and protein in a ratio of 1:5. Boiling of the cellulose fermentation residue in a neutral detergent solution removed almost all of the adherent cells and protein while retaining a residual network of adhering noncellular material. Trifluoroacetic acid hydrolysis of this residue (G plus C) released primarily glucose, along with substantial amounts of xylose and mannose, but only traces of galactose, the most abundant sugar in most characterized bacterial exopolysaccharides. Linkage analysis and characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance suggested that most of the glucosyl units were not present as partially degraded cellulose. Calculations suggested that the energy demand for synthesis of the nonprotein fraction of EPS by this organism represents only a small fraction (<4%) of the anabolic ATP expenditure of the bacterium. PMID:17028224

  2. Haloanaerobium salsugo sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from a subterranean brine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Sharma, P.K.; Tanner, R.S.; McInerney, M.J.; Oren, A.; Woese, C.R.

    1994-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a highly saline oil field brine. The bacterium was a non-spore-forming, nonmotile rod, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains, and measured 0.3 to 0.4 by 2.6 to 4 {micro}m. The bacterium had a specific requirement for NaCl and grew at NaCl concentrations of between 6 and 24%, with optimal growth at 9% NaCl. The isolate grew at temperatures of between 22 and 51 C and pH values of between 5.6 and 8.0. The doubling time in a complex medium containing 10% NaCl was 9 h. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and penicillin but not by cycloheximide or azide. Fermentable substrates were predominantly carbohydrates. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C{sub 14:0}, C{sub 16:0}, C{sub 16:1}, and C{sub 17:0 cyc} acids. The DNA base composition of the isolate was 34 mol% G+C. Oligonucleotide catalog and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA showed that strain VS-752{sup T} was most closely related to Haloanaerobium praevalens GSL{sup T} (ATCC 33744), the sole member of the genus Haloanaerobium. The authors propose that strain VS-752 (ATCC 51327) by established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium salsugo, in the genus Haloanaerobium. 40 refs., 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  3. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitfificans.

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Larimer, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, {beta}-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by {beta}-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  4. A Novel Electrophototrophic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris Strain RP2, Exhibits Hydrocarbonoclastic Potential in Anaerobic Environments.

    PubMed

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-01-01

    An electrophototrophic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris stain RP2 was isolated from the anodic biofilms of hydrocarbon fed microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS). Salient properties of the strain RP2 were direct electrode respiration, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction, spore formation, anaerobic nitrate reduction, free living diazotrophy and the ability to degrade n-alkane components of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) in anoxic, photic environments. In acetate fed microbial electrochemical cells, a maximum current density of 305 ± 10 mA/m(2) (1000Ω) was generated (power density 131.65 ± 10 mW/m(2)) by strain RP2 with a coulombic efficiency of 46.7 ± 1.3%. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain RP2 is electrochemically active and likely to transfer electrons extracellularly to solid electron acceptors through membrane bound compounds, however, aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. The ability of strain RP2 to produce current (maximum current density 21 ± 3 mA/m(2); power density 720 ± 7 μW/m(2), 1000 Ω) using PH as a sole energy source was also examined using an initial concentration of 800 mg l(-1) of diesel range hydrocarbons (C9-C36) with a concomitant removal of 47.4 ± 2.7% hydrocarbons in MERS. Here, we also report the first study that shows an initial evidence for the existence of a hydrocarbonoclastic behavior in the strain RP2 when grown in different electron accepting and illuminated conditions (anaerobic and MERS degradation). Such observations reveal the importance of photoorganotrophic growth in the utilization of hydrocarbons from contaminated environments. Identification of such novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading electricigens, not only expands the knowledge on the range of bacteria known for the hydrocarbon bioremediation but also shows a biotechnological potential that goes well beyond its applications to MERS. PMID:27462307

  5. A Novel Electrophototrophic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris Strain RP2, Exhibits Hydrocarbonoclastic Potential in Anaerobic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-01-01

    An electrophototrophic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris stain RP2 was isolated from the anodic biofilms of hydrocarbon fed microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS). Salient properties of the strain RP2 were direct electrode respiration, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction, spore formation, anaerobic nitrate reduction, free living diazotrophy and the ability to degrade n-alkane components of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) in anoxic, photic environments. In acetate fed microbial electrochemical cells, a maximum current density of 305 ± 10 mA/m2 (1000Ω) was generated (power density 131.65 ± 10 mW/m2) by strain RP2 with a coulombic efficiency of 46.7 ± 1.3%. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain RP2 is electrochemically active and likely to transfer electrons extracellularly to solid electron acceptors through membrane bound compounds, however, aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. The ability of strain RP2 to produce current (maximum current density 21 ± 3 mA/m2; power density 720 ± 7 μW/m2, 1000 Ω) using PH as a sole energy source was also examined using an initial concentration of 800 mg l-1 of diesel range hydrocarbons (C9-C36) with a concomitant removal of 47.4 ± 2.7% hydrocarbons in MERS. Here, we also report the first study that shows an initial evidence for the existence of a hydrocarbonoclastic behavior in the strain RP2 when grown in different electron accepting and illuminated conditions (anaerobic and MERS degradation). Such observations reveal the importance of photoorganotrophic growth in the utilization of hydrocarbons from contaminated environments. Identification of such novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading electricigens, not only expands the knowledge on the range of bacteria known for the hydrocarbon bioremediation but also shows a biotechnological potential that goes well beyond its applications to MERS. PMID:27462307

  6. Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus sp. nov., a novel dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, A I; Tourova, T P; Kuznetsov, B B; Kostrikina, N A; Chernyh, N A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A

    1999-10-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, spore-forming, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, designated strain SR4T, was isolated from sediment of newly formed hydrothermal vents in the area of the eruption of Karymsky volcano on the Kamchatka peninsula. Cells of strain SR4T were straight-to-curved, peritrichous rods, 0.4-0.6 micron in diameter and 3.5-9.0 microns in length, and exhibited a slight tumbling motility. Strain SR4T formed round, refractile, heat-resistant endospores in terminally swollen sporangia. The temperature range for growth was 39-78 degrees C, with an optimum at 69-71 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 4.8-8.2, with an optimum at 6.3-6.5. Strain SR4T grew anaerobically with peptone as carbon source. Amorphous iron(III) oxide present in the medium stimulated the growth of strain SR4T; cell numbers increased with the concomitant accumulation of Fe(II). In the presence of Fe(III), strain SR4T grew on H2/CO2 and utilized molecular hydrogen. Strain SR4T reduced 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and MnO2. Strain SR4T did not reduce nitrate or sulfate and was not capable of growth with O2. The fermentation products from glucose were ethanol, lactate, H2 and CO2. The G + C content of DNA was 32 mol%. 16S rDNA sequence analysis placed the organism in the genus Thermoanaerobacter. On the basis of physiological properties and phylogenetic analysis, it is proposed that strain SR4T (= DSM 12299T) should be assigned to a new species, Thermoanaerobacter siderophilus sp. nov. PMID:10555328

  7. Biochemical and genetic analyses of a catalase from the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E R; Smith, C J

    1995-01-01

    A single catalase enzyme was produced by the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis when cultures at late log phase were shifted to aerobic conditions. In anaerobic conditions, catalase activity was detected in stationary-phase cultures, indicating that not only oxygen exposure but also starvation may affect the production of this antioxidant enzyme. The purified enzyme showed a peroxidatic activity when pyrogallol was used as an electron donor. It is a hemoprotein containing one heme molecule per holomer and has an estimated molecular weight of 124,000 to 130,000. The catalase gene was cloned by screening a B. fragilis library for complementation of catalase activity in an Escherichia coli catalase mutant (katE katG) strain. The cloned gene, designated katB, encoded a catalase enzyme with electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the purified protein from the B. fragilis parental strain. The nucleotide sequence of katB revealed a 1,461-bp open reading frame for a protein with 486 amino acids and a predicted molecular weight of 55,905. This result was very close to the 60,000 Da determined by denaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified catalase and indicates that the native enzyme is composed of two identical subunits. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified catalase obtained by Edman degradation confirmed that it is a product of katB. The amino acid sequence of KatB showed high similarity to Haemophilus influenzae HktE (71.6% identity, 66% nucleotide identity), as well as to gram-positive bacterial and mammalian catalases. No similarities to bacterial catalase-peroxidase-type enzymes were found. The active-site residues, proximal and distal hemebinding ligands, and NADPH-binding residues of the bovine liver catalase-type enzyme were highly conserved in B. fragilis KatB. PMID:7768808

  8. Alkaline Anaerobic Respiration: Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Roh, Yul; Carroll, Susan L.; Blair, Benjamin; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    Iron-reducing enrichments were obtained from leachate ponds at the U.S. Borax Company in Boron, Calif. Based on partial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (approximately 500 nucleotides), six isolates shared 98.9% nucleotide identity. As a representative, the isolate QYMF was selected for further analysis. QYMF could be grown with Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, Co(III)-EDTA, or Cr(VI) as electron acceptors, and yeast extract and lactate could serve as electron donors. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.5 to 11.0 (optimum, pH 9.5), a sodium chloride range of 0 to 80 g/liter (optimum, 20 g/liter), and a temperature range of 4 to 45°C (optimum, approximately 35°C), and iron precipitates were formed. QYMF was a strict anaerobe that could be grown in the presence of borax, and the cells were straight rods that produced endospores. Sodium chloride and yeast extract stimulated growth. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA gene indicated that the bacterium was a low-G+C gram-positive microorganism and had 96 and 92% nucleotide identity with Alkaliphilus transvaalensis and Alkaliphilus crotonatoxidans, respectively. The major phospholipid fatty acids were 14:1, 16:1ω7c, and 16:0, which were different from those of other alkaliphiles but similar to those of reported iron-reducing bacteria. The results demonstrated that the isolate might represent a novel metal-reducing alkaliphilic species. The name Alkaliphilus metalliredigens sp. nov. is proposed. The isolation and activity of metal-reducing bacteria from borax-contaminated leachate ponds suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated alkaline environments may be feasible and have implications for alkaline anaerobic respiration. PMID:15345448

  9. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)). PMID:23041645

  10. Genomic Analysis of Melioribacter roseus, Facultatively Anaerobic Organotrophic Bacterium Representing a Novel Deep Lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi Group

    PubMed Central

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Podosokorskaya, Olga A.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi. PMID:23301019

  11. Amino acid transport by membrane vesicles of an obligate anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Ubbink-Kok, T; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from the obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was inserted in these membrane vesicles by membrane fusion by using the freeze-thaw sonication technique (A. J. M. Driessen, W. de Vrij, and W. N. Konings, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7555-7559, 1985) to accommodate them with a functional proton motive force-generating system. With ascorbate-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine-cytochrome c as the electron donor, a proton motive force (delta p) of -80 to -120 mV was generated in these fused membranes. This delta p drove the accumulation of leucine and lysine up to 40- and 100-fold, respectively. High transport activities were observed in fused membranes containing Escherichia coli lipids, whereas the transport activities in fused membranes containing mainly soybean lipids or phosphatidylcholine were low. It is suggested that branched-chain amino acids and lysine were taken up by separate systems. The effects of the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin indicated that lysine and leucine were translocated in symport with a proton. PMID:2828326

  12. Pectinatus brassicae sp. nov., a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium isolated from salty wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-wu; Fang, Ming-xu; Tan, Hai-qin; Zhang, Xin-qi; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-fen

    2012-09-01

    A novel Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, strictly anaerobic, heterotrophic bacterium, strain TY(T), was isolated from salty pickle wastewater. Cells were rod-shaped with comb-like flagella, slightly curved and very variable in length. Optimal growth occurred at 28 °C and pH 6.5. Cells were resistant to up to 50 g NaCl l(-1). Strain TY(T) produced acid from glycerol, sucrose, glucose, fructose and mannitol. The main fermentation products from glucose were acetic and propionic acids. Tests for acid phosphatase and naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase activities were positive. The major fatty acids were C(14 : 0) DMA (18.7 %), C(15 : 0) (15.4 %), anteiso-C(18 : 1) (15.2 %), C(11 : 0) (13.3 %) and summed feature 5 (C(17 : 1)ω7c and/or C(17 : 2)) (11.0 %). The DNA G+C content was 35.9 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain TY(T) represented a novel species of the genus Pectinatus (sequence similarity to other members of the genus ranged from 93.2 to 94.8 %). Based on its phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TY(T) is proposed to represent a novel species, named Pectinatus brassicae sp. nov. (type strain TY(T) = JCM 17499(T) = DSM 24661(T)). PMID:22058316

  13. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  14. Haloanaerobium kushneri sp. nov., an obligately halophilic, anaerobic bacterium from an oil brine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhupathiraju, V. K.; McInerney, M. J.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Three strains, designated VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732, of a strictly anaerobic, moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium were isolated from a highly saline (15-20%) brine from an oil reservoir in central Oklahoma, USA. The optimal concentration of NaCl for growth of these three strains was 2 M (12%), and the strains also grew in the presence of an additional 1 M MgCl2. The strains were mesophilic and grew at a pH range of 6-8. Carbohydrates used by all three strains included glucose, fructose, arabinose, galactose, maltose, mannose, cellobiose, sucrose and inulin. Glucose fermentation products included ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2, with formate produced by two of the three strains. Differences were noted among strains in the optimal temperature and pH for growth, the maximum and minimum NaCl concentration that supported growth, substrate utilization and cellular fatty acid composition. Despite the phenotypic differences among the three strains, analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridizations showed that these three strains were members of the same genospecies which belonged to the genus Haloanaerobium. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of strains VS-751T, VS-511 and VS-732 are different from those of previously described species of Haloanaerobium. It is proposed that strain VS-751T (ATCC 700103T) be established as the type strain of a new species, Haloanaerobium kushneri.

  15. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)). PMID:25866024

  16. Ercella succinigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic succinate-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, Antonie H; Sousa, Diana Z; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2014-07-01

    A novel anaerobic succinate-producing bacterium, strain ZWB(T), was isolated from sludge collected from a biogas desulfurization bioreactor (Eerbeek, the Netherlands). Cells were non-spore-forming, motile, slightly curved rods (0.4-0.5 µm in diameter and 2-3 µm in length), and stained Gram-negative. The temperature range for growth was 25-40 °C, with an optimum at 37 °C. The pH range for growth was 7.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.5. Strain ZWB(T) was able to ferment glycerol and several carbohydrates mainly to H2, succinate and acetate. Sulfur and fumarate could be used as electron acceptors by strain ZWB(T). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.6 mol%. The most abundant fatty acids were iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0 DMA. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain ZWB(T) belongs to the family Ruminococcaceae and it is distantly related to Saccharofermentans acetigenes JCM 14006(T) (92.1%). Based on the physiological features and phylogenetic analysis, strain ZWB(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Ercella succinigenes gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Ercella succinigenes is ZWB(T) ( = DSM 27333(T) = JCM 19283(T)). PMID:24776531

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters. PMID:8285707

  18. Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium isolated from a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibing; Yang, Guiqin; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium, designated as C-89(T), was isolated from a paddy field soil in Haikou, Hainan Province, People's Republic of China. Optimal growth was observed at 37 °C and pH 7.0 in the presence of 4% NaCl (w/v). The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7, the major cellular fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:0), and the major cellular polar lipids were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and two unknown phospholipids. The peptidoglycan type was determined to be based on meso-DAP. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relatives were identified as Bacillus vietnamensis JCM 11124(T) (98.8% sequence similarity), Bacillus aquimaris JCM 11545(T) (98.6%) and Bacillus marisflavi JCM 11544(T) (98.5%). The DNA G+C content of strain C-89(T) was determined to be 45.4 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain C-89(T) with its closest relatives were below 18%. Therefore, on the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and phenotypic results, strain C-89(T) can be considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is C-89(T) (=KCTC 33545(T) = CCTCC AB 2014076(T)). PMID:25100188

  19. [Screening, denitrification characteristics, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation ability of denitrifying bacterium aHD7].

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Yi; Jiang, Hui-Xia; Xiao, Ji-Bo; Shan, Sheng-Dao

    2012-11-01

    A highly efficient denitrifying bacterium aHD7 was screened from activated sludge. After static culture at 30 degrees C for 3 days, the denitrification rate of the aHD7 reached 91.7%, and during denitrification, nitrite had lower accumulation, with its concentration basically maintained at 1.8 mg x L(-1). The microscopy observation demonstrated that the aHD7 was a gram-negative bacillus, with an average size of 0.5 microm x (1.5-2.5) microm. Based on its biochemical/morphological characteristics and homologic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the aHD7 was identified as Pseudomonas mendocina. The investigation on the factors affecting the denitrification capacity of aHD7 showed that at the initial concentration of nitrate nitrogen being less than 276.95 mg x L(-1), the denitrification rate was almost 100%, and when the initial concentration of nitrate nitrogen was as high as 553.59 mg x L(-1), the denitrification rate could reach 66.8%, with little nitrite accumulated. Ethanol was the most suitable carbon source. C/N ratio 6-8 and pH value 6-9 benefited the denitrification. The aHD7 had a good ability of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and its average ammonium utilization rate reached 4.56 mg x L(-1) x d(-1). PMID:23431796

  20. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  1. Thermosipho activus sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, hydrolytic bacterium isolated from a deep-sea sample.

    PubMed

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Godfroy, Anne; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Beskorovaynaya, Daria A; Sokolova, Tatyana G; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Toshchakov, Stepan V; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2014-09-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain Rift-s3(T), was isolated from a deep-sea sample containing Riftia pachyptila sheath from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. Cells of the novel isolate were rods, 0.3-0.8 µm in width and 1.5-10 µm in length, surrounded by a sheath-like structure (toga). Strain Rift-s3(T) grew at temperatures ranging from 44 to 75 °C, at pH 5.5 to 8.0, and with NaCl concentrations of 3 to 60 g l(-1). Under optimum conditions (65 °C, pH 6.0, NaCl 25 g l(-1)), the doubling time was 30 min. The isolate was able to ferment mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides including cellulose, chitin, xylan and pectin, and proteins including β-keratins, casein and gelatin. Acetate, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were the main products of glucose fermentation. The G+C content of the DNA was 30 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the affiliation of strain Rift-s3(T) with the genus Thermosipho, with Thermosipho atlanticus Ob7(T) as the closest relative (96.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological properties of the novel isolate we propose a novel species of the genus Thermosipho, Thermosipho activus sp. nov., with Rift-s3(T) ( = DSM 26467(T) = VKM B-2803(T)) as the type strain. PMID:24994778

  2. The core genome of the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Gram negative anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has long been recognized as a causative agent of periodontitis. Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease of the tooth supporting tissues eventually leading to tooth-loss. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of P. gingivalis has been shown to be an important virulence determinant. Seven capsular serotypes have been described. Here, we used micro-array based comparative genomic hybridization analysis (CGH) to analyze a representative of each of the capsular serotypes and a non-encapsulated strain against the highly virulent and sequenced W83 strain. We defined absent calls using Arabidopsis thaliana negative control probes, with the aim to distinguish between aberrations due to mutations and gene gain/loss. Results Our analyses allowed us to call aberrant genes, absent genes and divergent regions in each of the test strains. A conserved core P. gingivalis genome was described, which consists of 80% of the analyzed genes from the sequenced W83 strain. The percentage of aberrant genes between the test strains and control strain W83 was 8.2% to 13.7%. Among the aberrant genes many CPS biosynthesis genes were found. Most other virulence related genes could be found in the conserved core genome. Comparing highly virulent strains with less virulent strains indicates that hmuS, a putative CobN/Mg chelatase involved in heme uptake, may be a more relevant virulence determinant than previously expected. Furthermore, the description of the 39 W83-specific genes could give more insight in why this strain is more virulent than others. Conclusion Analyses of the genetic content of the P. gingivalis capsular serotypes allowed the description of a P. gingivalis core genome. The high resolution data from three types of analysis of triplicate hybridization experiments may explain the higher divergence between P. gingivalis strains than previously recognized. PMID:20920246

  3. Fusibacter fontis sp. nov., a sulfur-reducing, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a mesothermic Tunisian spring.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Fauque, Guy; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-10-01

    Strain KhalAKB1T, a mesophilic, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, was isolated from water collected from a mesothermic Tunisian spring. Cells were Gram-staining-positive rods, occurring singly or in pairs and motile by one lateral flagellum. Strain KhalAKB1T grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-35 g NaCl l- 1 (optimum 1 g NaCl l- 1). It fermented yeast extract and a wide range of carbohydrates including cellobiose, d-glucose, d-ribose, sucrose, d-xylose, maltose, d-galactose and starch as electron donors. Acetate, ethanol, CO2 and H2 were end products of glucose metabolism. It reduced elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite, into sulfide. The DNA G+C content was 37.6 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggested Fusibacter bizertensis as the closest relative of this isolate (identity of 97.2 % to the type strain). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic taxonomic characteristics, strain KhalAKB1T is proposed to be assigned to a novel species within the genus Fusibacter, order Clostridiales, Fusibacter fontis sp. nov. The type strain is KhalAKB1T ( = DSM 28450T = JCM 19912T). PMID:26296995

  4. Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov., an anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline spring.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cárdenas, C; López, G; Patel, B K C; Baena, S

    2010-04-01

    A mesophilic, strictly anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain USBA 82(T), was isolated from a terrestrial saline spring in the Colombian Andes. The non-spore-forming curved rods (5-7 x 1.3 microm) with pointed or rounded ends, stained Gram-negative and were motile by means of laterally inserted flagella. The strain grew optimally at 30 degrees C (growth range 20-40 degrees C), pH 7.3 (growth range pH 5.5-8.5) and 2 % (w/v) NaCl (growth range 0.1-7 % NaCl). The strain fermented peptides, amino acids and a few organic acids, but growth was not observed on carbohydrates, alcohols or fatty acids. The strain reduced thiosulfate and sulfur to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as electron acceptors. On peptone alone, acetate, succinate, propionate and traces of ethanol were formed, but in the presence of thiosulfate, acetate and succinate were formed. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 52 mol% (T(m)). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA 82(T) was affiliated to Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans within the phylum Synergistetes with a similarity value of approximately 93 %. Based on the differences between the new strain and the type species of the genus Dethiosulfovibrio, we suggest that strain USBA 82(T) represents a novel species of the genus for which the name Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is USBA 82(T) (=DSM 21565(T)=KCTC 5659(T)). PMID:19661517

  5. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  6. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  7. Breakdown of food waste by anaerobic fermentation and non-oxygen producing photosynthesis using a photosynthetic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mekjinda, N; Ritchie, R J

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of food waste are produced by restaurants, hotels, etc generating problems in its collection, processing and disposal. Disposal as garbage increases the organic matter in landfills and leachates. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris (CGA 009) easily broke down food waste. R. palustris produces H2 under anaerobic conditions and digests a very wide range of organic compounds. R. palustris reduced BOD by ≈70% and COD by ≈33%, starch, ammonia, nitrate, was removed but had little effect on reducing sugar or the total phosphorus, lipid, protein, total solid in a 7-day incubation. R. palustris produced a maximum of 80ml H2/g COD/day. A two-stage anaerobic digestion using yeast as the first stage, followed by a R. palustris digestion was tested but production of H2 was low. PMID:25465509

  8. Fervidicella metallireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium from geothermal waters.

    PubMed

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2010-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain AeB(T), was isolated from microbial mats colonizing a run-off channel formed by free-flowing thermal water from a bore well (registered number 17263) of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia. Cells of strain AeB(T) were slightly curved rods (2.5-6.0x1.0 mum) that stained Gram-negative and formed spherical terminal to subterminal spores. The strain grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-Casamino acids medium at 50 degrees C (range 37-55 degrees C) and pH 7 (range pH 5-9). Strain AeB(T) grew poorly on yeast extract (0.2 %) and tryptone (0.2 %) as sole carbon sources, which were obligately required for growth on other energy sources. Growth of strain AeB(T) increased in the presence of various carbohydrates and amino acids, but not organic acids. End products detected from glucose fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2. In the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract, iron(III), manganese(IV), vanadium(V) and cobalt(III) were reduced, but not sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. Iron(III) was also reduced in the presence of tryptone, peptone, Casamino acids and amyl media (Research Achievement), but not starch, xylan, chitin, glycerol, ethanol, pyruvate, benzoate, lactate, acetate, propionate, succinate, glycine, serine, lysine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, valine, leucine, histidine, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine or methionine. Growth was inhibited by chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, penicillin, ampicillin and NaCl concentrations >2 %. The DNA G+C content was 35.4+/-1 mol%, as determined by the thermal denaturation method. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AeB(T) is a member of the family Clostridiaceae, class Clostridia, phylum 'Firmicutes', and is positioned approximately equidistantly between the genera Sarcina, Anaerobacter, Caloramator and Clostridium (16S rRNA gene similarity values of 87.8-90.9 %). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene

  9. Caloramator quimbayensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a terrestrial hot spring.

    PubMed

    Rubiano-Labrador, Carolina; Baena, Sandra; Díaz-Cárdenas, Carolina; Patel, Bharat K C

    2013-04-01

    An anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, terminal-spore-forming bacterium, designated strain USBA A(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at an altitude of 2683 m in the Andean region of Colombia (04° 50' 14.0″ N 75° 32' 53.4″ W). Cells of strain USBA A(T) were Gram-stain-positive, straight to slightly curved rods (0.9×2.5 µm), that were arranged singly or in pairs, and were motile by means of flagella. Growth occurred at 37-55 °C and pH 6.0-8.0, with a doubling time of 2 h under the optimal conditions (50 °C and pH 7.0). Glucose fermentation in strain USBA A(T) required yeast extract or peptone (each at 0.2 %, w/v). The novel strain fermented sugars, amino acids, Casamino acids, propanol, propionate, starch and dextrin, but no growth was observed on galactose, lactose, xylose, histidine, serine, threonine, benzoate, butyrate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, methanol, ethanol, glycerol, casein, gelatin or xylan. The end products of glucose fermentation were formate, acetate, ethanol and lactate. Strain USBA A(T) did not grow autotrophically (with CO2 as carbon source and H2 as electron donor) and did not reduce thiosulfate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, vanadium (V) or Fe (III) citrate. Growth of strain USBA A(T) was inhibited by ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, penicillin and streptomycin (each at 10 µg ml(-1)). The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 32.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA A(T) belonged in the phylum Firmicutes and that its closest relative was Caloramator viterbiensis JW/MS-VS5(T) (95.0 % sequence similarity). A DNA-DNA relatedness value of only 30 % was recorded in hybridization experiments between strain USBA A(T) and Caloramator viterbiensis DSM 13723(T). Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic evidence and the results of the DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, strain USBA A

  10. Toxicity assessment of anaerobic digestion intermediates and antibiotics in pharmaceutical wastewater by luminescent bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun-Yuan; Xing, Ya-Juan; Ma, Zi-Tao; Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Hui-Feng

    2013-02-15

    In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion intermediates and antibiotics in pharmaceutical wastewaters on anaerobic digestion process, their acute toxicities were tested using the 15 min median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) at pH 7.00 ± 0.05. The results showed that the IC(50) of ethanol, acetate, propionate and butyrate were 19.40, 20.71, 10.47 and 12.17 g L(-1) respectively, which suggested the toxicity descended in the order of propionate, butyrate, ethanol and acetate. The IC(50) of aureomycin, polymyxin and chloromycetin were 12.06, 6.24 and 429.90 mg L(-1) respectively, which indicated the toxicity descended in the order of polymyxin, aureomycin and chloromycetin. Using equitoxic ratio mixing method, the joint toxicities of five groups referred by A (four anaerobic digestion intermediates), B (four anaerobic digestion intermediates and aureomycin), C (four anaerobic digestion intermediates and polymyxin), D (four anaerobic digestion intermediates and chloromycetin) and E (four anaerobic digestion intermediates, aureomycin, polymyxin and chloromycetin) were investigated respectively. Their interactions were additive (A), synergistic (B), additive (C), synergistic (D) and synergistic (E). The investigation would lay a basis for the optimization of anaerobic biotechnology for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. PMID:23334482

  11. Initial Reactions in Anaerobic Oxidation of m-Xylene by the Denitrifying Bacterium Azoarcus sp. Strain T

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Cynthia J.; Beller, Harry R.; Reinhard, Martin; Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    The initial enzymatic steps in anaerobic m-xylene oxidation were studied in Azoarcus sp. strain T, a denitrifying bacterium capable of mineralizing m-xylene via 3-methylbenzoate. Permeabilized cells of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T catalyzed the addition of m-xylene to fumarate to form (3-methylbenzyl)succinate. In the presence of succinyl coenzyme A (CoA) and nitrate, (3-methylbenzyl)succinate was oxidized to E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or a closely related isomer) and 3-methylbenzoate. Kinetic studies conducted with permeabilized cells and whole-cell suspensions of m-xylene-grown Azoarcus sp. strain T demonstrated that the specific rate of in vitro (3-methylbenzyl)succinate formation accounts for at least 15% of the specific rate of in vivo m-xylene consumption. Based on these findings, we propose that Azoarcus sp. strain T anaerobically oxidizes m-xylene to 3-methylbenzoate (or its CoA thioester) via (3-methylbenzyl)succinate and E-(3-methylphenyl)itaconate (or its CoA thioester) in a series of reactions that are analogous to those recently proposed for anaerobic toluene oxidation to benzoyl-CoA. A deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed in the (3-methylbenzyl)succinate synthase reaction (and the benzylsuccinate synthase reaction), suggesting that a rate-determining step in this novel fumarate addition reaction involves breaking a C-H bond. PMID:10515931

  12. Production of an extracellular thermohalophilic lipase from a moderately halophilic bacterium, Salinivibrio sp. strain SA-2.

    PubMed

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Salehghamari, Ensieh; Khajeh, Khosro; Kabiri, Mahbube; Naddaf, Saied

    2008-06-01

    Fifty strains of moderately halophilic bacteria were isolated from various salty environments in Iran. A strain designated as SA-2 was shown to be the best producer of extracellular lipase and was selected for further studies. Biochemical and physiological characterization along with 16S rDNA sequence analysis placed SA-2 in the genus Salinivibrio. The optimum salt, pH, temperature and aeration for enzyme production were 0.1 M KCl, pH 8, 35 degrees C and 150 rpm, respectively. The enzyme production was synchronized bacterial growth and reached a maximum level during the early-stationary phase in the basal medium containing 1 M NaCl. Triacylglycerols enhanced lipase production, while carbohydrates had inhibitory effects on it. The maximum lipase activity was obtained at pH 7.5, 50 degrees C and CaCl(2) concentration of 0.01 M. The enzyme was stable at pH range of 7.5-8 and retained 90% of its activity at 80 degrees C for 30 min. Different concentrations of NaNO(3), Na(2)SO(4), KCl and NaCl had no affect on lipase stability for 3 h. These results suggest that the lipase secreted by Salinivibrio sp. strain SA-2 is industrially important from the perspective of its tolerance to a broad temperature range, its moderate thermoactivity and its high tolerance to a wide range of salt concentrations (0-3 M NaCl). PMID:18506896

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate. PMID:25635015

  14. Attack on Lignified Grass Cell Walls by a Facultatively Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Danny E.

    1980-01-01

    A filamentous, facultatively anaerobic microorganism that attacked lignified tissue in forage grasses was isolated from rumen fluid with a Bermuda grass-containing anaerobic medium in roll tubes. The microbe, designated 7-1, demonstrated various colony and cellular morphologies under different growth conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 7-1 attacked lignified cell walls in aerobic and anaerobic culture. 7-1 predominately degraded tissues reacting positively for lignin with the chlorine-sulfite stain (i.e., sclerenchyma in leaf blades and parenchyma in stems) rather than the more resistant acid phloroglucinol-positive tissues (i.e., lignified vascular tissue and sclerenchyma ring in stems), although the latter tissues were occasionally attacked. Turbidimetric tests showed that 7-1 in anaerobic culture grew optimally at 39°C at a pH of 7.4 to 8.0. Tests for growth on plant cell wall carbohydrates showed that 7-1 grew on xylan and pectin slowly in aerobic cultures but not with pectin and only slightly with xylan in anaerobic culture. 7-1 was noncellulolytic as shown by filter paper tests. The microbe used the phenolic acids sinapic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids as substrates for growth; the more highly methoxylated acids were used more effectively. Images PMID:16345651

  15. Purification and characterization of konjac glucomannan degrading enzyme from anaerobic human intestinal bacterium, Clostridium butyricum-Clostridium beijerinckii group.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, N; Matsuura, Y

    1997-10-01

    Konjac glucomannan degrading enzyme was purified to homogeneity from the culture broth of an anaerobic human intestinal bacterium, Clostridium butyricum-Clostridium beijerinckii group. The enzyme was composed of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 50,000-53,000. The enzyme was an endo-beta-mannanase that acted specifically on the polysaccharides such as konjac glucomannan and coffee mannan, producing exclusively their smaller oligosaccharides and the monosaccharides. The optimal pH of the enzyme for the hydrolysis of konjac glucomannan was around 7-8 and the enzyme was stable in rather alkaline pH range of 8-10. The enzyme reaction was activated by the addition of CaCl2 and dithiothreitol. It was suggested that the enzyme might contribute to the decomposition of konjac glucomannan in human digestive tract. PMID:9362121

  16. Insights into plant biomass conversion from the genome of the anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii DSM 6725

    PubMed Central

    Dam, Phuongan; Kataeva, Irina; Yang, Sung-Jae; Zhou, Fengfeng; Yin, Yanbin; Chou, Wenchi; Poole, Farris L.; Westpheling, Janet; Hettich, Robert; Giannone, Richard; Lewis, Derrick L.; Kelly, Robert; Gilbert, Harry J.; Henrissat, Bernard; Xu, Ying; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2011-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii DSM 6725 utilizes various polysaccharides and grows efficiently on untreated high-lignin grasses and hardwood at an optimum temperature of ∼80°C. It is a promising anaerobic bacterium for studying high-temperature biomass conversion. Its genome contains 2666 protein-coding sequences organized into 1209 operons. Expression of 2196 genes (83%) was confirmed experimentally. At least 322 genes appear to have been obtained by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Putative functions were assigned to 364 conserved/hypothetical protein (C/HP) genes. The genome contains 171 and 88 genes related to carbohydrate transport and utilization, respectively. Growth on cellulose led to the up-regulation of 32 carbohydrate-active (CAZy), 61 sugar transport, 25 transcription factor and 234 C/HP genes. Some C/HPs were overproduced on cellulose or xylan, suggesting their involvement in polysaccharide conversion. A unique feature of the genome is enrichment with genes encoding multi-modular, multi-functional CAZy proteins organized into one large cluster, the products of which are proposed to act synergistically on different components of plant cell walls and to aid the ability of C. bescii to convert plant biomass. The high duplication of CAZy domains coupled with the ability to acquire foreign genes by LGT may have allowed the bacterium to rapidly adapt to changing plant biomass-rich environments. PMID:21227922

  17. Partial characterization of xylanase produced by Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, a new thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Boucherba, Nawel; Joseph, Manon; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Hacène, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-11-01

    To date, xylanases have expanded their use in many processing industries, such as pulp, paper, food, and textile. This study aimed the production and partial characterization of a thermostable xylanase from a novel thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T) isolated from a northeast hot spring in Algeria. The obtained results showed that C. algeriensis xylanase seems not to be correlated with the biomass growth profile whereas the maximum enzyme production (140.0 U/ml) was recorded in stationary phase (18 h). The temperature and pH for optimal activities were 70 °C and 11.0, respectively. The enzyme was found to be stable at 50, 60, 70, and 80 °C, with a half-life of 10, 9, 8, and 4 h, respectively. Influence of metal ions on enzyme activity revealed that Ca(+2) enhances greatly the relative activity to 151.3 %; whereas Hg(2+) inhibited significantly the enzyme. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of xylanase by the thermophilic bacterium C. algeriensis. This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant xylanase could be used in pulp bleaching process. PMID:25161038

  18. Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic amino-acid-degrading bacterium from an upflow anaerobic sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Díaz, C; Baena, S; Fardeau, M-L; Patel, B K C

    2007-08-01

    Strain ILE-2(T) was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating brewery wastewater. The motile, non-sporulating, slightly curved cells (2-4 x 0.1 microm) stained Gram-negative and grew optimally at 42 degrees C and pH 7.1 with 0.5 % NaCl. The strain required yeast extract for growth and fermented Casamino acids, peptone, isoleucine, arginine, lysine, alanine, valine, glutamate, histidine, glutamine, methionine, malate, fumarate, glycerol and pyruvate to acetate, propionate and minor amounts of branched-chain fatty acids. Carbohydrates, formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, butanol, lactate, succinate, starch, casein, gelatin, xylan and a number of other amino acids were not utilized. The DNA G+C content of strain ILE-2(T) was 52.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that ILE-2(T) was distantly related to members of the genera Aminobacterium (83 % similarity) and Aminomonas (85 % similarity) in the family Syntrophomonadaceae, order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes. On the basis of the results of our polyphasic analysis, strain ILE-2(T) represents a novel species and genus within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, for which the name Aminiphilus circumscriptus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aminiphilus circumscriptus is ILE-2(T) (=DSM 16581(T) =JCM 14039(T)). PMID:17684281

  19. STUDIES OF THE EXTRACELLULAR GLYCOCALYX OF THE ANAEROBIC RUMINAL BACTERIUM RUMINOCOCCUS ALBUS 7.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are thought to adhere to cellulose via several mechanisms, one of which is the production of a glycocalyx containing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As the composition and structure of these glycocalyces have not been elucidated, a combination of scanning e...

  20. Anaerobic n-Alkane Metabolism by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium, Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans Strain CV2803T

    PubMed Central

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Grossi, Vincent; Raphel, Danielle; Matheron, Robert; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2005-01-01

    The alkane-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans strain CV2803T, recently isolated from marine sediments, was investigated for n-alkane metabolism. The total cellular fatty acids of this strain had predominantly odd numbers of carbon atoms (C odd) when the strain was grown on a C-odd alkane (pentadecane) and even numbers of carbon atoms (C even) when it was grown on a C-even alkane (hexadecane). Detailed analyses of those fatty acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry allowed us to identify saturated 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-methyl- and monounsaturated 6-methyl-branched fatty acids, with chain lengths that specifically correlated with those of the alkane. Growth of D. aliphaticivorans on perdeuterated hexadecane demonstrated that those methyl-branched fatty acids were directly derived from the substrate. In addition, cultures on pentadecane and hexadecane produced (1-methyltetradecyl)succinate and (1-methylpentadecyl)succinate, respectively. These results indicate that D. aliphaticivorans strain CV2803T oxidizes n-alkanes into fatty acids anaerobically, via the addition of fumarate at C-2. Based on our observations and on literature data, a pathway for anaerobic n-alkane metabolism by D. aliphaticivorans is proposed. This involves the transformation of the initial alkylsuccinate into a 4-methyl-branched fatty acid which, in addition to catabolic reactions, can alternatively undergo chain elongation and desaturation to form storage fatty acids. PMID:16000749

  1. Expression of arsenic resistance genes in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482, a gut microbiome bacterium.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaojiao; Mandal, Goutam; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    The response of the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482, a common human gut microbiota, to arsenic was determined. B. vulgatus ATCC 8482 is highly resistant to pentavalent As(V) and methylarsenate (MAs(V)). It is somewhat more sensitive to trivalent inorganic As(III) but 100-fold more sensitive to methylarsenite (MAs(III)) than to As(III). B. vulgatus ATCC 8482 has eight continuous genes in its genome that we demonstrate form an arsenical-inducible transcriptional unit. The first gene of this ars operon, arsR, encodes a putative ArsR As(III)-responsive transcriptional repressor. The next three genes encode proteins of unknown function. The remaining genes, arsDABC, have well-characterized roles in detoxification of inorganic arsenic, but there are no known genes for MAs(III) resistance. Expression of each gene after exposure to trivalent and pentavalent inorganic and methylarsenicals was analyzed. MAs(III) was the most effective inducer. The arsD gene was the most highly expressed of the ars operon genes. These results demonstrate that this anaerobic microbiome bacterium has arsenic-responsive genes that confer resistance to inorganic arsenic and may be responsible for the organism's ability to maintain its prevalence in the gut following dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic. PMID:27040269

  2. Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a continental hot spring.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, A; Reysenbach, A L; Strutz, N; Dreier, M; Wiegel, J

    1997-04-01

    A strain of a thermophilic, anaerobic, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/AS-Y7T; DSM 11255), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells occurred singly or in pairs as straight to slightly curved rods, 0.3 to 0.4 by 1.6 to 2.7 microns, with rounded ends and exhibited a tumbling motility. Spores were not observed. The temperature range for growth was 50 to 74 degrees C with an optimum at 65 degrees C. The pH range for growth at 65 degrees C was from 5.5 to 7.6, with an optimum at 6.0 to 6.2. The organism coupled the oxidation of glycerol to reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as an electron acceptor. In the presence as well as in the absence of Fe(III) and in the presence of CO2, glycerol was metabolized by incomplete oxidation to acetate as the only organic metabolic product; no H2 was produced during growth. The organism utilized glycerol, lactate, 1,2-propanediol, glycerate, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, mannose, and yeast extract as substrates. In the presence of Fe(III) the bacterium utilized molecular hydrogen. The organism reduced 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, fumarate (to succinate), and thiosulfate (to elemental sulfur) but did not reduce MnO2, nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur. The G + C content of the DNA was 41 mol% (as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography). The 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis placed the isolated strain as a member of a new genus within the gram-type-positive Bacillus-Clostridium subphylum. PMID:9103646

  3. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation by an autotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium from an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Wuxian; Liu, Bingbing; He, Jian; Shen, Qirong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2015-05-19

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) redox reactions play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of As. Reduction of arsenate [As(V)] generally leads to As mobilization in paddy soils and increased As availability to rice plants, whereas oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] results in As immobilization. A novel chemoautotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain SY, was isolated from an As-contaminated paddy soil. The isolate was able to derive energy from the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O2 or NO3(-) as the respective electron acceptor. Inoculation of the washed SY cells into a flooded soil greatly enhanced As(III) oxidation to As(V) both in the solution and adsorbed phases of the soil. Strain SY is phylogenetically closely related to Paracoccus niistensis with a 16S rRNA gene similarity of 96.79%. The isolate contains both the denitrification and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene clusters, underscoring its ability to denitrify and to fix CO2 while coupled to As(III) oxidation. Deletion of the aioA gene encoding the As(III) oxidase subunit A abolished the As(III) oxidation ability of strain SY and led to increased sensitivity to As(III), suggesting that As(III) oxidation is a detoxification mechanism in this bacterium under aerobic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Analysis of the aioA gene clone library revealed that the majority of the As(III)-oxidizing bacteria in the soil were closely related to the genera Paracoccus of α-Proteobacteria. Our results provide direct evidence for As(III) oxidation by Paracoccus species and suggest that these species may play an important role in As(III) oxidation in paddy soils under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions. PMID:25905768

  4. Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a continental hot spring

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodkin, A.; Wiegel, J.; Reysenbach, A.L.

    1997-04-01

    A strain of a thermophilic, anaerobic, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/AS-Y7{sup T}; DSM 11255), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells occurred singly or in pairs as straight to slightly curved rods, 0.3 to 0.4 by 1.6 to 2.7 {mu}m, with rounded ends and exhibited a tumbling motility. Spores were not observed. The temperature range for growth was 50 to 74{degrees}C with an optimum at 65{degrees}C. The pH range for growth at 65{degrees}C was from 5.5 to 7.6, with an optimum at 6.0 to 6.2. The organism coupled the oxidation of glycerol to reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as an electron acceptor. In the presence as well as in the absence of Fe(III) and in the presence of CO{sub 2}, glycerol was metabolized by incomplete oxidation to acetate as the only organic metabolic product; no H{sub 2} was produced during growth. The organism utilized glycerol, lactate, 1,2-propanediol, glycerate, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, mannose, and yeast extract as substrates. In the presence of Fe(III) the bacterium utilized molecular hydrogen. The organism reduced 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, fumarate (to succinate), and thiosulfate (to elemental sulfur) but did not reduce MnO{sub 2}, nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur. The G+C content of the DNA was 41 mol% (as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography). The 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis placed the isolated strain as a member of a new genus within the gram-type positive Bacillus-Clostridium subphylum.

  5. Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from sediment of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Min, Ui-Gi; Kim, So-Jeong; Hong, Heeji; Kim, Song-Gun; Gwak, Joo-Han; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain B5(T), was isolated from sediment of an abandoned coal mine in Taebaek, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain B5(T) were non-spore-forming, straight, Gram-positive rods. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 30°C, respectively, while the strain was able to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 5.5-7.5 and 25-45°C, respectively. Growth of strain B5(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations of 0 to 6.0% (w/v) with an optimum at 3.0-4.0% (w/v). The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and three unknown polar lipids. Strain B5(T) grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate, nitrite, ferric-citrate, ferric-nitrilotriacetate, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in the presence of proteinaceous compounds, organic acids, and carbohydrates as electron donors. The isolate was not able to grow by fermentation. Strain B5(T) did not grow under aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B5(T) is most closely related to the genus Tepidibacillus (T. fermentans STGH(T); 96.3%) and Vulcanibacillus (V. modesticaldus BR(T); 94.6%). The genomic DNA G+C content (36.9 mol%) of strain B5(T) was higher than those of T. fermentans STGH(T) (34.8 mol%) and V. modesticaldus BR(T) (34.5 mol%). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, we describe a new species of a novel genus Calculibacillus, represented by strain B5(T) (=KCTC 15397(T) =JCM 19989(T)), for which we propose the name Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov. PMID:27225457

  6. Purification and Properties of a Thermostable Pullulanase from a Newly Isolated Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium, Fervidobacterium pennavorans Ven5

    PubMed Central

    Koch, R.; Canganella, F.; Hippe, H.; Jahnke, K. D.; Antranikian, G.

    1997-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic anaerobic fermentative bacteria growing at temperatures between 50 and 80(deg)C (optimum, 65 to 70(deg)C) were isolated from mud samples collected at Abano Terme spa (Italy). The cells were gram-negative motile rods, about 1.8 (mu)m in length and 0.6 (mu)m in width, occurring singly and in pairs. Cells commonly formed spheroids at one end similar to Fervidobacterium islandicum and Fervidobacterium nodosum. The new isolate differs from F. nodosum by the 7% higher G+C content of its DNA (40.6 mol%) but is similar to Fervidobacterium pennavorans and F. islandicum in its G+C content and phenotypic properties. The phylogenetic dendrogram indicates that strain Ven5 belongs to the order Thermotogales and shows the highest 16S ribosomal DNA sequence similarity to F. pennavorans, F. islandicum, and F. nodosum, with similarities of 99.0, 98.6, and 96.0%, respectively. During growth on starch the strain produced a thermostable pullulanase of type I which preferentially hydrolyzed (alpha)-1,6 glucosidic linkages. The enzyme was purified 65-fold by anion-exchange, gel permeation, and hydrophobic chromatography. The native pullulanase has a molecular mass of 240,000 Da and is composed of three subunits, each with a molecular mass of 77,600 Da as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Optimal conditions for the activity and stability of the purified pullulanase were pH 6.0 and 85(deg)C. At pH 6.0, the half-life of the enzyme was over 2 h at 80(deg)C and 5 min at 90(deg)C. This is the first report on the presence of pullulanase type I in an anaerobic bacterium. PMID:16535541

  7. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.; Zhou, Peng; Legler, Tina C.; Chakicherla, Anu; Kane, Staci; Letain, Tracy E.; A. O’Day, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process. PMID:24065960

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans TGE-P1T, an Obligately Anaerobic, Thermophilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium in the Phylum Nitrospirae

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Ohashi, Akiko; Tourlousse, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the type strain (TGE-P1T) of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans, an obligately anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium in the phylum Nitrospirae. The genome comprises 2.00 Mb in 16 contigs (3 scaffolds), has a G+C content of 34.5%, and contains 1,998 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:26966200

  9. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an Anaerobic, Extremely Thermophilic, Cellulolytic Bacterium Isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park▿

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J.; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 μm long by 0.2 μm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85°C, with the optimum at 78°C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h−1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073). PMID:20023107

  10. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Elkins, James G; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Keller, Martin; Carroll, Sue L; Allman, Steve L; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. The isolate was a non-motile, non-spore forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 m long by 0.2 m wide and grew at temperatures between 55-85oC with the optimum at 78oC. The pH range for growth was 6.0-8.0 with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rates at 0.75 hr-1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbital, carboxymethylcellulose and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2 although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5 l batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol% and sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47T is the type stain (ATCC = ____, JCM = ____).

  11. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2010-02-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47(T), was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 microm long by 0.2 microm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85 degrees C, with the optimum at 78 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h(-1). The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47(T) was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47(T) within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073). PMID:20023107

  12. Isolation and characterization of Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium with keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Yingjie; Ma, Shichun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Yu

    2013-08-01

    A novel thermophilic, anaerobic, keratinolytic bacterium designated KD-1 was isolated from grassy marshland. Strain KD-1 was a spore-forming rod with a Gram-positive type cell wall, but stained Gram-negative. The temperature, pH, and NaCl concentration range necessary for growth was 30-65 °C (optimum 55 °C), 6.0-10.5 (optimum 8.0-8.5), and 0-6% (optimum 0.2%) (w/v), respectively. Strain KD-1 possessed extracellular keratinase, and the optimum activity of the crude enzyme was pH 8.5 and 70 °C. The enzyme was identified as a thermostable serine-type protease. The strain was sensitive to rifampin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and tetracycline and was resistant to erythromycin, neomycin, penicillin, and streptomycin. The main cellular fatty acid was predominantly C15:0 iso (64%), and the G+C content was 28 mol%. Morphological and physiological characterization, together with phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified KD-1 as a new species of a novel genus of Clostridiaceae with 95.3%, 93.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Clostridium ultunense BS(T) (DSM 10521(T)) and Tepidimicrobium xylanilyticum PML14(T) (= JCM 15035(T)), respectively. We propose the name Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., with KD-1 (=JCM 18769(T) =DSM 26752(T)) as the type strain. PMID:23710623

  13. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Billings, Andrew F; Fortney, Julian L; Hazen, Terry C; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1(T) sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1(T) are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involved in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. By characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material. PMID:26594307

  14. Anaerobic Chemolithotrophic Growth of the Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Strain MLMS-1 by Disproportionation of Monothioarsenate.

    PubMed

    Planer-Friedrich, B; Härtig, C; Lohmayer, R; Suess, E; McCann, S H; Oremland, R

    2015-06-01

    A novel chemolithotrophic metabolism based on a mixed arsenic-sulfur species has been discovered for the anaerobic deltaproteobacterium, strain MLMS-1, a haloalkaliphile isolated from Mono Lake, California, U.S. Strain MLMS-1 is the first reported obligate arsenate-respiring chemoautotroph which grows by coupling arsenate reduction to arsenite with the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In that pathway the formation of a mixed arsenic-sulfur species was reported. That species was assumed to be monothioarsenite ([H2As(III)S(-II)O2](-)), formed as an intermediate by abiotic reaction of arsenite with sulfide. We now report that this species is monothioarsenate ([HAs(V)S(-II)O3](2-)) as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Monothioarsenate forms by abiotic reaction of arsenite with zerovalent sulfur. Monothioarsenate is kinetically stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions. However, it was metabolized rapidly by strain MLMS-1 when incubated with arsenate. Incubations using monothioarsenate confirmed that strain MLMS-1 was able to grow (μ = 0.017 h(-1)) on this substrate via a disproportionation reaction by oxidizing the thio-group-sulfur (S(-II)) to zerovalent sulfur or sulfate while concurrently reducing the central arsenic atom (As(V)) to arsenite. Monothioarsenate disproportionation could be widespread in nature beyond the already studied arsenic and sulfide rich hot springs and soda lakes where it was discovered. PMID:25941832

  15. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involvedmore » in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.« less

  16. Anaerobic chemolithotrophic growth of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium strain MLMS‑1 by disproportionation of monothioarsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planer-Friedrich, B.; Hartig, C.; Lohmayer, R.; Suess, E.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel chemolithotrophic metabolism based on a mixed arsenic−sulfur species has been discovered for the anaerobic deltaproteobacterium, strain MLMS-1, a haloalkaliphile isolated from Mono Lake, California, U.S. Strain MLMS‑1 is the first reported obligate arsenate-respiring chemoautotroph which grows by coupling arsenate reduction to arsenite with the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In that pathway the formation of a mixed arsenic−sulfur species was reported. That species was assumed to be monothioarsenite ([H2AsIIIS−IIO2] −), formed as an intermediate by abiotic reaction of arsenite with sulfide. We now report that this species is monothioarsenate ([HAsVS−IIO3] 2−) as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Monothioarsenate forms by abiotic reaction of arsenite with zerovalent sulfur. Monothioarsenate is kinetically stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions. However, it was metabolized rapidly by strain MLMS-1 when incubated with arsenate. Incubations using monothioarsenate confirmed that strain MLMS-1 was able to grow (μ = 0.017 h−1 ) on this substrate via a disproportionation reaction by oxidizing the thio-group-sulfur (S−II) to zerovalent sulfur or sulfate while concurrently reducing the central arsenic atom (AsV) to arsenite. Monothioarsenate disproportionation could be widespread in nature beyond the already studied arsenic and sulfide rich hot springs and soda lakes where it was discovered.

  17. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; DeAngelis, Kristen M.

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involved in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.

  18. Isolation, growth, and metabolism of an obligately anaerobic, selenate- respiring bacterium, strain SES-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Strohmaier, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell suspensions of selenate- grown cells did not reduce nitrate, and nitrate-grown cells did not reduce selenate, indicating that these reductions are achieved by separate inducible enzyme systems. However, both nitrate-grown and selenate-grown cells have a constitutive ability to reduce selenite or nitrite. The oxidation of [14C]lactate to 14CO2 coupled to the reduction of selenate or nitrate by cell suspensions was inhibited by CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m- chlorophenylhydrazone), cyanide, and azide. High concentrations of selenite (5 mM) were readily reduced to Se0 by selenate-grown cells, but selenite appeared to block the synthesis of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Tracer experiments with [75Se]selenite indicated that cell suspensions could achieve a rapid and quantitative reduction of selenite to Se0. This reduction was totally inhibited by sulfite, partially inhibited by selenate or nitrite, but unaffected by sulfate or nitrate. Cell suspensions could reduce thiosulfate, but not sulfite, to sulfide. These results suggest that reduction of selenite to Se0 may proceed, in part, by some of the components of a dissimilatory system for sulfur oxyanions.

  19. Genome-Enabled Studies of Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation in the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Zhou, P.; Legler, T. C.; Chakicherla, A.; O'Day, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. Of the transposon mutants defective in Fe(II) oxidation, one mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  20. Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a new anaerobic, slightly halophilic, thiosulfate-reducing bacterium from corroding offshore oil wells.

    PubMed

    Magot, M; Ravot, G; Campaignolle, X; Ollivier, B; Patel, B K; Fardeau, M L; Thomas, P; Crolet, J L; Garcia, J L

    1997-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic thiosulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from a corroding offshore oil well in Congo and was designated strain SEBR 4207T. Pure culture of the strain induced a very active pitting corrosion of mild steel, with penetration rates of up to 4 mm per year. This constitutes the first experimental evidence of the involvement of thiosulfate reduction in microbial corrosion of steel. Strain SEBR 4207T cells were vibrios (3 to 5 by 1 microns), stained gram negative, and possessed lateral flagella. Spores were not detected. Optimum growth occurred in the presence of 3% NaCl at pH 7.0 and 42 degrees C. Strain SEBR 4207T utilized peptides and amino acids, but not sugars or fatty acids. It fermented serine, histidine, and Casamino Acids, whereas arginine, glutamate, leucine, isoleucine, alanine, valine, methionine, and asparagine were only used in the presence of thiosulfate. Peptides were fermented to acetate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, 2-methylbutyrate, H2, and CO2. The addition of either thiosulfate or sulfur but not sulfate increased peptide utilization, growth rate, and biomass; during growth, H2S was produced and a concomitant decrease in H2 was observed. The addition of either thiosulfate or sulfur also reversed H2 inhibition. 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicates that strain SEBR 4207T is distantly related to members of the genus Thermoanaerobacter (83% similarity). Because the phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics cannot be assigned to any described genus, strain SEBR 4207T is designated as a new species of a new genus, Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans gen. nov., sp. nov. Strain SEBR 4207T has been deposited in the Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und zellkulturen GmbH (= DSM 11002). PMID:9226912

  1. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-07-01

    An extremely thermophilic, xylanolytic, spore-forming and strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain DTU01(T), was isolated from a continuously stirred tank reactor fed with xylose and household waste. Cells stained Gram-negative and were rod-shaped (0.5-2 µm in length). Spores were terminal with a diameter of approximately 0.5 µm. Optimal growth occurred at 70 °C and pH 7, with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h(-1). DNA G+C content was 34.2 mol%. Strain DTU01(T) could ferment arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, mannitol, mannose, melibiose, pectin, starch, sucrose, xylan, yeast extract and xylose, but not cellulose, Avicel, inositol, inulin, glycerol, rhamnose, acetate, lactate, ethanol, butanol or peptone. Ethanol was the major fermentation product and a maximum yield of 1.39 mol ethanol per mol xylose was achieved when sulfite was added to the cultivation medium. Thiosulfate, but not sulfate, nitrate or nitrite, could be used as electron acceptor. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain DTU01(T) was shown to be closely related to Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3(T), Thermoanaerobacter italicus Ab9(T) and Thermoanaerobacter thermocopriae JT3-3(T), with 98-99 % similarity. Despite this, the physiological and phylogenetic differences (DNA G+C content, substrate utilization, electron acceptors, phylogenetic distance and isolation site) allow for the proposal of strain DTU01(T) as a representative of a novel species within the genus Thermoanaerobacter, for which the name Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DTU01(T) ( = DSM 25963(T) = KCTC 4529(T) = VKM B-2752(T) = CECT 8142(T)). PMID:23178727

  2. Isolation of a new thermohalophilic Thermus thermophilus strain from hot spring, able to grow on a renewable source of polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ida; Lama, Licia; Moriello, Vincenzo Schiano; Poli, Annarita; Gambacorta, Agata; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    A thermohalophilic strain, Samu-Sal, isolated from hot springs of the Mount Grillo (Baia, Naples, Italy) at a depth of 60 m, according to its genotypic analyses is related to Thermus genus and should be classified as a new strain of Thermus thermophilus. Strain Samu-SA1 grew using, as sole carbon source, a polysaccharide extracted from waste industrial tomato process with a yield of 3.5 g l(-1). Strain Samu-SA1 synthesized several alpha- and beta-glycosidases. PMID:15005151

  3. Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov., an anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from subseafloor sediment, and emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Sakai, Sanae; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Saito, Yayoi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Saito, Yumi; Tame, Akihiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Löffler, Frank E; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    An anaerobic, psychrophilic bacterium, strain MO-SPC2(T), was isolated from a methanogenic microbial community in a continuous-flow bioreactor that was established from subseafloor sediments collected from off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan in the north-western Pacific Ocean. Cells were pleomorphic: spherical, annular, curved rod, helical and coccoid cell morphologies were observed. Motility only occurred in helical cells. Strain MO-SPC2(T) grew at 0-17 °C (optimally at 9 °C), at pH 6.0-8.0 (optimally at pH 6.8-7.2) and in 20-40 g NaCl l(-1) (optimally at 20-30 NaCl l(-1)). The strain grew chemo-organotrophically with mono-, di- and polysaccharides. The major end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The abundant polar lipids of strain MO-SPC2(T) were phosphatidylglycolipids, phospholipids and glycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9. Isoprenoid quinones were not detected. The G+C content of the DNA was 32.3 mol%. 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis showed that strain MO-SPC2(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphaerochaeta within the phylum Spirochaetes, and its closest relatives were Sphaerochaeta pleomorpha Grapes(T) (88.4 % sequence identity), Sphaerochaeta globosa Buddy(T) (86.7 %) and Sphaerochaeta coccoides SPN1(T) (85.4 %). Based on phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic traits, strain MO-SPC2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Sphaerochaeta, for which the name Sphaerochaeta multiformis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MO-SPC2(T) ( = JCM 17281(T) = DSM 23952(T)). An emended description of the genus Sphaerochaeta is also proposed. PMID:25249566

  4. Characterization of a corrinoid protein involved in the C1 metabolism of strict anaerobic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica.

    PubMed

    Das, Amaresh; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Tempel, Wolfram; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Chang, Jessie; Chen, Lirong; Lee, Doowon; Zhou, Weihong; Xu, Hao; Shaw, Neil; Rose, John P; Ljungdahl, Lars G; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2007-04-01

    The strict anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica metabolizes C1 compounds for example CO(2)/H(2), CO, formate, and methanol into acetate via the Wood/Ljungdahl pathway. Some of the key steps in this pathway include the metabolism of the C1 compounds into the methyl group of methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF) and the transfer of the methyl group from MTHF to the methyl group of acetyl-CoA catalyzed by methyltransferase, corrinoid protein and CO dehydrogenase/acetyl CoA synthase. Recently, we reported the crystallization of a 25 kDa methanol-induced corrinoid protein from M. thermoacetica (Zhou et al., Acta Crystallogr F 2005; 61:537-540). In this study we analyzed the crystal structure of the 25 kDa protein and provide genetic and biochemical evidences supporting its role in the methanol metabolism of M. thermoacetia. The 25 kDa protein was encoded by orf1948 of contig 303 in the M. thermoacetica genome. It resembles similarity to MtaC the corrinoid protein of the methanol:CoM methyltransferase system of methane producing archaea. The latter enzyme system also contains two additional enzymes MtaA and MtaB. Homologs of MtaA and MtaB were found to be encoded by orf2632 of contig 303 and orf1949 of contig 309, respectively, in the M. thermoacetica genome. The orf1948 and orf1949 were co-transcribed from a single polycistronic operon. Metal analysis and spectroscopic data confirmed the presence of cobalt and the corrinoid in the purified 25 kDa protein. High resolution X-ray crystal structure of the purified 25 kDa protein revealed corrinoid as methylcobalamin with the imidazole of histidine as the alpha-axial ligand replacing benziimidazole, suggesting base-off configuration for the corrinoid. Methanol significantly activated the expression of the 25 kDa protein. Cyanide and nitrate inhibited methanol metabolism and suppressed the level of the 25 kDa protein. The results suggest a role of the 25 kDa protein in the methanol metabolism of M

  5. Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic, gluconate-fermenting bacterium isolated from a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogita; Junghare, Madan; Pester, Michael; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, mesophilic bacterium was enriched and isolated with gluconate as sole substrate from a methanogenic sludge collected from a biogas reactor. Cells of strain GluBS11T stained Gram-positive and were non-motile, straight rods, measuring 3.0-4.5 × 0.8-1.2 μm. The temperature range for growth was 15-37 °C, with optimal growth at 30 °C, the pH range was 6.5-8.5, with optimal growth at pH 7, and the generation time under optimal conditions was 60 min. API Rapid 32A reactions were positive for α-galactosidase, α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase and negative for catalase and oxidase. A broad variety of substrates was utilized, including gluconate, glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, lactose, galactose, melezitose, melibiose, mannitol, erythritol, glycerol and aesculin. Products of gluconate fermentation were ethanol, acetate, formate, H2 and CO2. Neither sulfate nor nitrate served as an electron acceptor. Predominant cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and C18 : 1ω7c. The DNA G+C content of strain GluBS11T was 44.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that strain GluBS11T is a member of subcluster XIVa within the order Clostridiales. The closest cultured relatives are Clostridium herbivorans (93.1 % similarity to the type strain), Clostridium populeti (93.3 %), Eubacterium uniforme (92.4 %) and Clostridium polysaccharolyticum (91.5 %). Based on this 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence (>6.5 %) as well as on chemotaxonomic and phenotypic differences from these taxa, strain GluBS11T is considered to represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anaerobium acetethylicum is GluBS11T ( = LMG 28619T = KCTC 15450T = DSM 29698T). PMID:26297346

  6. Phenotypic and Genomic Properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., A Haloalkaliphilic Anaerobic Chitinolytic Bacterium Representing a Novel Class in the Phylum Fibrobacteres.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Rakitin, Andrey L; Gumerov, Vadim M; Beletsky, Alexey V; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5-10.5 and total Na(+) concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase, and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres. PMID:27065971

  7. Phenotypic and Genomic Properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., A Haloalkaliphilic Anaerobic Chitinolytic Bacterium Representing a Novel Class in the Phylum Fibrobacteres

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Rakitin, Andrey L.; Gumerov, Vadim M.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5–10.5 and total Na+ concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase, and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres. PMID:27065971

  8. Transposon Mutagenesis Identified Chromosomal and Plasmid Genes Essential for Adaptation of the Marine Bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae to Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Matthias; Laaß, Sebastian; Burghartz, Melanie; Petersen, Jörn; Koßmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic growth and survival are integral parts of the life cycle of many marine bacteria. To identify genes essential for the anoxic life of Dinoroseobacter shibae, a transposon library was screened for strains impaired in anaerobic denitrifying growth. Transposon insertions in 35 chromosomal and 18 plasmid genes were detected. The essential contribution of plasmid genes to anaerobic growth was confirmed with plasmid-cured D. shibae strains. A combined transcriptome and proteome approach identified oxygen tension-regulated genes. Transposon insertion sites of a total of 1,527 mutants without an anaerobic growth phenotype were determined to identify anaerobically induced but not essential genes. A surprisingly small overlap of only three genes (napA, phaA, and the Na+/Pi antiporter gene Dshi_0543) between anaerobically essential and induced genes was found. Interestingly, transposon mutations in genes involved in dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate reduction (napA, nasA) and corresponding cofactor biosynthesis (genomic moaB, moeB, and dsbC and plasmid-carried dsbD and ccmH) were found to cause anaerobic growth defects. In contrast, mutation of anaerobically induced genes encoding proteins required for the later denitrification steps (nirS, nirJ, nosD), dimethyl sulfoxide reduction (dmsA1), and fermentation (pdhB1, arcA, aceE, pta, acs) did not result in decreased anaerobic growth under the conditions tested. Additional essential components (ferredoxin, cccA) of the anaerobic electron transfer chain and central metabolism (pdhB) were identified. Another surprise was the importance of sodium gradient-dependent membrane processes and genomic rearrangements via viruses, transposons, and insertion sequence elements for anaerobic growth. These processes and the observed contributions of cell envelope restructuring (lysM, mipA, fadK), C4-dicarboxylate transport (dctM1, dctM3), and protease functions to anaerobic growth require further investigation to unravel the

  9. Fervidicola ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium from geothermal waters of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ogg, Christopher D; Patel, Bharat K C

    2009-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium, designated strain Y170(T), was isolated from a microbial mat colonizing thermal waters of a run-off channel created by the free-flowing waters of a Great Artesian Basin (GAB) bore well (New Lorne bore; registered number 17263). Cells of strain Y170(T) were slightly curved rods (1.2-12x0.8-1.1 mum) and stained Gram-negative. The strain grew optimally in tryptone-yeast extract-glucose medium at 70 degrees C (temperature range for growth was 55-80 degrees C) and pH 7 (pH range for growth was 5-9). Strain Y170(T) grew poorly on yeast extract as a sole carbon source, but not on tryptone (0.2 %). Yeast extract could not be replaced by tryptone and was obligately required for growth on tryptone, peptone, glucose, fructose, galactose, cellobiose, mannose, sucrose, xylose, mannitol, formate, pyruvate, Casamino acids and threonine. No growth was observed on arabinose, lactose, maltose, raffinose, chitin, xylan, pectin, starch, acetate, benzoate, lactate, propionate, succinate, myo-inositol, ethanol, glycerol, amyl media, aspartate, leucine, glutamate, alanine, arginine, serine and glycine. End products detected from glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and presumably CO(2) and H(2). Iron(III), manganese(IV), thiosulfate and elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, sulfite, nitrate or nitrite, were used as electron acceptors in the presence of 0.2 % yeast extract. Iron(III) in the form of amorphous Fe(III) oxhydroxide and Fe(III) citrate was also reduced in the presence of tryptone, peptone and Casamino acids, but not with chitin, xylan, pectin, formate, starch, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate, threonine, lactate, propionate, succinate, inositol, ethanol, glycerol, mannitol, aspartate, leucine, glutamate, alanine, arginine, serine or glycine. Strain Y170(T) was not able to utilize molecular hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide in the presence or absence of iron(III). Chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, penicillin and ampicillin and

  10. ["Candidatus contubernalis alkalaceticum," an obligately syntrophic alkaliphilic bacterium capable of anaerobic acetate oxidation in a coculture with Desulfonatronum cooperativum].

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Zavarzina, D G; Kolganova, T V; Turova, T P; Zavarzin, G A

    2005-01-01

    From the silty sediments of the Khadyn soda lake (Tuva), a binary sulfidogenic bacterial association capable of syntrophic acetate oxidation at pH 10.0 was isolated. An obligately syntrophic, gram-positive, spore-forming alkaliphilic rod-shaped bacterium performs acetate oxidation in a syntrophic association with a hydrogenotrophic, alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium; the latter organism was previously isolated and characterized as the new species Desulfonatronum cooperativum. Other sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Desulfonatronum and Desulfonatronovibrio can also act as the hydrogenotrophic partner. Apart from acetate, the syntrophic culture can oxidize ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, serine, fructose, and isobutyric acid. Selective amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments of the acetate-utilizing syntrophic component of the binary culture was performed; it was found to cluster with clones of uncultured gram-positive bacteria within the family Syntrophomonadaceae. The acetate-oxidizing bacterium is thus the first representative of this cluster obtained in a laboratory culture. Based on its phylogenetic position, the new acetate-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium is proposed to be assigned, in a Candidate status, to a new genus and species: "Candidatus Contubernalis alkalaceticum." PMID:16400991

  11. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Megaspheara elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 per h), but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able t...

  12. Fermentative degradation of polyethylene glycol by a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporeforming bacterium, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Schink, B; Stieb, M

    1983-06-01

    The synthetic polyether polyethylene glycol (PEG) with a molecular weight of 20,000 was anaerobically degraded in enrichment cultures inoculated with mud of limnic and marine origins. Three strains (Gra PEG 1, Gra PEG 2, and Ko PEG 2) of rod-shaped, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated in mineral medium with PEG as the sole source of carbon and energy. All strains degraded dimers, oligomers, and polymers of PEG up to a molecular weight of 20,000 completely by fermentation to nearly equal amounts of acetate and ethanol. The monomer ethylene glycol was not degraded. An ethylene glycol-fermenting anaerobe (strain Gra EG 12) isolated from the same enrichments was identified as Acetobacterium woodii. The PEG-fermenting strains did not excrete extracellular depolymerizing enzymes and were inhibited by ethylene glycol, probably owing to a blocking of the cellular uptake system. PEG, some PEG-containing nonionic detergents, 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-butanediol, glycerol, and acetoin were the only growth substrates utilized of a broad variety of sugars, organic acids, and alcohols. The isolates did not reduce sulfate, sulfur, thiosulfate, or nitrate and were independent of growth factors. In coculture with A. woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei, PEGs and ethanol were completely fermented to acetate (and methane). A marine isolate is described as the type strain of a new species, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov. Its physiology and ecological significance, as well as the importance and possible mechanism of anaerobic polyether degradation, are discussed. PMID:6881964

  13. Fermentative degradation of polyethylene glycol by a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporeforming bacterium, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Schink, B; Stieb, M

    1983-01-01

    The synthetic polyether polyethylene glycol (PEG) with a molecular weight of 20,000 was anaerobically degraded in enrichment cultures inoculated with mud of limnic and marine origins. Three strains (Gra PEG 1, Gra PEG 2, and Ko PEG 2) of rod-shaped, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated in mineral medium with PEG as the sole source of carbon and energy. All strains degraded dimers, oligomers, and polymers of PEG up to a molecular weight of 20,000 completely by fermentation to nearly equal amounts of acetate and ethanol. The monomer ethylene glycol was not degraded. An ethylene glycol-fermenting anaerobe (strain Gra EG 12) isolated from the same enrichments was identified as Acetobacterium woodii. The PEG-fermenting strains did not excrete extracellular depolymerizing enzymes and were inhibited by ethylene glycol, probably owing to a blocking of the cellular uptake system. PEG, some PEG-containing nonionic detergents, 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-butanediol, glycerol, and acetoin were the only growth substrates utilized of a broad variety of sugars, organic acids, and alcohols. The isolates did not reduce sulfate, sulfur, thiosulfate, or nitrate and were independent of growth factors. In coculture with A. woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei, PEGs and ethanol were completely fermented to acetate (and methane). A marine isolate is described as the type strain of a new species, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov. Its physiology and ecological significance, as well as the importance and possible mechanism of anaerobic polyether degradation, are discussed. Images PMID:6881964

  14. Ethanol Production from Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw Hydrolysate by Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a Continuous Immobilized Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70°C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/1. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/1) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

  15. Characterization of Melioribacter roseus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel facultatively anaerobic thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium from the class Ignavibacteria, and a proposal of a novel bacterial phylum Ignavibacteriae.

    PubMed

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Mardanov, Andrey V; Merkel, Alexander Y; Karnachuk, Olga V; Ravin, Nikolay V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2013-06-01

    A novel moderately thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic chemoorganotrophic bacterium strain P3M-2(T) was isolated from a microbial mat developing on the wooden surface of a chute under the flow of hot water (46°C) coming out of a 2775-m-deep oil exploration well (Tomsk region, Russia). Strain P3M-2(T) is a moderate thermophile and facultative anaerobe growing on mono-, di- or polysaccharides by aerobic respiration, fermentation or by reducing diverse electron acceptors [nitrite, Fe(III), As(V)]. Its closest cultivated relative (90.8% rRNA gene sequence identity) is Ignavibacterium album, the only chemoorganotrophic member of the phylum Chlorobi. New genus and species Melioribacter roseus are proposed for isolate P3M-2(T) . Together with I. album, the new organism represents the class Ignavibacteria assigned to the phylum Chlorobi. The revealed group includes a variety of uncultured environmental clones, the 16S rRNA gene sequences of some of which have been previously attributed to the candidate division ZB1. Phylogenetic analysis of M. roseus and I. album based on their 23S rRNA and RecA sequences confirmed that these two organisms could represent an even deeper, phylum-level lineage. Hence, we propose a new phylum Ignavibacteriae within the Bacteroidetes-Chlorobi group with a sole class Ignavibacteria, two families Ignavibacteriaceae and Melioribacteraceae and two species I. album and M. roseus. This proposal correlates with chemotaxonomic data and phenotypic differences of both organisms from other cultured representatives of Chlorobi. The most essential differences, supported by the analyses of complete genomes of both organisms, are motility, facultatively anaerobic and obligately organotrophic mode of life, the absence of chlorosomes and the apparent inability to grow phototrophically. PMID:23297868

  16. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source. PMID:24648142

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Haloanaerobacter chitinovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Halophilic, Anaerobic, Chitinolytic Bacterium from a Solar Saltern

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Hungming J.; Mah, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Two halophilic anaerobic bacteria, one of which had chitinolytic activity, were isolated from a solar saltern in southern California. These organisms were long, gram-negative, motile, flexible rods. The biochemical and physiological characteristics of these bacteria were very similar but were different from the characteristics of other haloanaerobic bacteria. Both grew at salt concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 M and at temperatures ranging from 23 to 50°C. They were sensitive to chloramphenicol but resistant to penicillin, carbenicillin, d-cycloserine, streptomycin, and tetracycline. An analysis of DNAs and whole-cell proteins showed that they were closely related taxonomically and distinguishable from other halophilic anaerobic bacteria. They exhibited 92.3 to 100% DNA homology as determined by DNA-DNA hybridization. The guanine-plus-cytosine contents of their DNAs were 34.8±1 mol%. The two isolates, strains W5C8 and W3C1, differed from other halophilic anaerobic bacteria sufficiently to support establishment of a new genus and species, Haloanaerobacter chitinovorans. Strain W5C8 exhibited chitinolytic activity and is designated the type strain. Two chitin-induced extracellular proteins with molecular weights of 38 × 103 and 40 × 103 were detected in strain W5C8. Images PMID:16348626

  18. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium isolated from marine sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rontani, J F; Gilewicz, M J; Michotey, V D; Zheng, T L; Bonin, P C; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the metabolism of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one by a denitrifying bacterium (Marinobacter sp. strain CAB) isolated from marine sediments. Under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, this strain efficiently degraded this ubiquitous isoprenoid ketone. Several bacterial metabolites, 4,8,12-trimethyl-tridecan-1-ol, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanal, 4,8,12-trimethyltridecanoic acid, Z-3,7-dimethylocten-2-oic acid, Z-3,7,11-trimethyldodecen-2-oic acid, and 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-ol, were formally identified, and different pathways were proposed to explain the formation of such isoprenoid compounds. PMID:9023941

  19. Genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a selenite and nitrate reducer from paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Su, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Zheng-Yi; Häggblom, Max M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-06-15

    Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a member of the phylum Firmicutes, is of interest for its ability to reduce nitrate and selenite and for its resistance to arsenic under anaerobic conditions. Here we describe some key features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,575,797 bp long chromosome with its 3,454 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes, and the information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the elucidation of microbially-mediated transformations of nitrogen, selenium and arsenic in paddy soil. PMID:25197451

  20. Genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a selenite and nitrate reducer from paddy soil

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Peng; Su, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Zheng-Yi; Häggblom, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a member of the phylum Firmicutes, is of interest for its ability to reduce nitrate and selenite and for its resistance to arsenic under anaerobic conditions. Here we describe some key features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,575,797 bp long chromosome with its 3,454 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes, and the information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the elucidation of microbially-mediated transformations of nitrogen, selenium and arsenic in paddy soil. PMID:25197451

  1. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Bacteroides neonati sp. nov., a new species of anaerobic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Cassir, Nadim; Croce, Olivier; Pagnier, Isabelle; Benamar, Samia; Couderc, Carine; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides neonati strain MS4T, is the type strain of Bacteroides neonati sp. nov., a new species within the genus Bacteroides. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from a premature neonate stool sample. B. neonati strain MS4T is an obligate anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5.03 Mbp long genome exhibits a G+C content of 43.53% and contains 4,415 protein-coding and 91 RNA genes, including 9 rRNA genes. PMID:25197464

  2. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Anaerococcus pacaensis sp. nov., a new species of anaerobic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Croce, Olivier; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Anaerococcus pacaensis strain 9403502T, is the type strain of Anaerococcus pacaensis sp. nov., a new species within a new genus Anaerococcus. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from a blood sample. A. pacaensis strain 9403502T is an obligate anaerobic Gram-positive coccus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2.36 Mbp long genome exhibits a G+C content of 35.05% and contains 2,186 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes, including 3 rRNA genes. PMID:24501638

  3. Role of Rhodobacter sp. Strain PS9, a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Isolated from an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon, in Odor Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young S.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; de la Mora, Arlene; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal pigmentation changes resulting from the development of a purple color in anaerobic swine waste lagoons were investigated during a 4-year period. The major purple photosynthetic bacterium responsible for these color changes and the corresponding reductions in odor was isolated from nine photosynthetic lagoons. By using morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characterization methods we identified the predominant photosynthetic bacterium as a new strain of Rhodobacter, designated Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9. Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 is capable of photoorganotrophic growth on a variety of organic compounds, including all of the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOC) responsible for the odor associated with swine production facilities (J. A. Zahn, A. A. DiSpirito, Y. S. Do, B. E. Brooks, E. E. Copper, and J. L. Hatfield, J. Environ. Qual. 30:624-634, 2001). The seasonal variations in airborne VOC emitted from waste lagoons showed that there was a 80 to 93% decrease in the concentration of VOC during a photosynthetic bloom. During the height of a bloom, the Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 population accounted for 10% of the total community and up to 27% of the eubacterial community based on 16S ribosomal DNA signals. Additional observations based on seasonal variations in meteorological, biological, and chemical parameters suggested that the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were correlated with lagoon water temperature and with the concentrations of sulfate and phosphate. In addition, the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were inversely correlated with the concentrations of protein and fluoride. PMID:12620863

  4. Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a lipolytic, anaerobic, alkalitolerant, thermophilic bacterium utilizing short- and long-chain fatty acids in syntrophic coculture with a methanogenic archaeum

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlitshnyi, V.; Wiegel, J.; Rainey, F.

    1996-10-01

    Three strains of an anaerobic thermophilic organoheterotrophic lipolytic alkalitolerant bacterium, Thermosyntropha lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/VS-264{sup T}; DSM 11003) were isolated from alkaline hot springs of Lake Bogoria (Kenya). The cells were nonmotile, non-spore forming, straight or slightly curved rods. At 60{degrees}C, the pH range for growth determined at 25{degrees}C [pH{sup 25{degrees}C}] was 7.15 to 9.5, with an optimum between 8.1 and 8.9 (pH{sup 60{degrees}C} of 7.6 and 8.1). At a pH{sup 25{degrees}C} of 8.5 temperature range for growth was from 52 to 70{degrees}C, with an optimum between 60 and 66{degrees}C. The shortest doubling time was around 1 h. In pure culture the bacterium grew in a mineral base medium supplemented with yeast extract, tryptone, Casamino Acids, betaine, and crotonate as carbon sources, producing acetate as a major product and constitutively a lipase. During growth in the presence of olive oil, free long-chain fatty acids were accumulated in the medium but the pure culture syntrophic coculture (Methanobacterium strain JW/VS-M29) the lipolytic bacteria grew on triacylglycerols and linear saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with 4 to 18 carbon atoms, but glycerol was not utilized. Fatty acids with even numbers of carbon atoms were degraded to acetate and methane, while from odd-numbered fatty acids 1 mol of propionate per mol of fatty acid was additionally formed. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified Syntrophospora and Syntrophomonas spp. as closest phylogenetic neighbors.

  5. Clostridium vincentii sp. nov., a new obligately anaerobic, saccharolytic, psychrophilic bacterium isolated from low-salinity pond sediment of the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mountfort, D O; Rainey, F A; Burghardt, J; Kaspar, H F; Stackebrandt, E

    1997-01-01

    A gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from an enrichment initiated with sediment taken from below the cyanobacterial mat of a low-salinity pond on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The organism grew optimally at 12 degrees C, at pH 6.5, and at an NaCl concentration of< 0.5% (w/v). It survived freeze-thawing at low salt concentrations,but not exposure to temperatures over 25 degrees C for more than 20 h or short-term exposure to temperatures> 50 degrees C. Out of a variety of polysaccharides tested as growth substrates, only xylan supported growth. The organism also grew on a variety of mono- and disaccharides including the cyanobacterial cell wall constituent, N-acetyl glucosamine. Fermentation products on a mol product per 100 mol of hexose monomer fermented basis were: acetate, 72; formate, 72; butyrate, 55; hydrogen, 114; and CO2, 100. Not detectable in the culture medium(< 2 mol per 100 mol of monomer) were lactate, propionate, ethanol,n-propanol, n-butanol, and succinate. The G+C content of the DNA from the bacterium was 33 mol%, and a phylogenetic analysis indicated that it grouped closely with members of the RNA-DNA homology group 1 of the genus Clostridium. It differed from other species of this genus with regard to growth temperature optimum, substrate range, and fermentation pattern, and is therefore designated as a new species of Clostridium for which the name Clostridium vincentii is proposed. The type strain is lac-1 (DSM 10228). PMID:9000342

  6. Hungatella effluvii gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic bacterium isolated from an effluent treatment plant, and reclassification of Clostridium hathewayi as Hungatella hathewayi gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhpreet; Yawar, Mir; Kumar, P Anil; Suresh, K

    2014-03-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming and strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated UB-B.2(T), was isolated from an industrial effluent anaerobic digester sample. It grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence confirmed that strain UB-B.2(T) was closely related to Clostridium hathewayi DSM 13479(T) (97.84% similarity), a member of rRNA gene cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium, and formed a coherent cluster with other related members of the Blautia (Clostridium) coccoides rRNA group in phylogenetic analyses. The end products of glucose fermentation by strain UB-B.2(T) were acetate and propionate. The G+C content of the DNA was 51.4 mol%. Although strain UB-B.2(T) showed 97.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to the type strain of C. hathewayi, it exhibited only 38.4% relatedness at the whole-genome level. It also showed differences from its closest phylogenetic relative, C. hathewayi DSM 13479(T), in phenotypic characteristics such as hydrolysis of aesculin, starch and urea and fermentation end products. Both strains showed phenotypic differences from the members of rRNA gene cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium. Based on these differences, C. hathewayi DSM 13479(T) and strain UB-B.2(T) were identified as representatives of a new genus of the family Clostridiaceae. Thus, we propose the reclassification of Clostridium hathewayi as Hungatella hathewayi gen. nov., comb. nov., the type species of the new genus (type strain DSM 13479(T) = CCUG 43506(T) = MTCC 10951(T)). Strain UB-B.2(T) ( = MTCC 11101(T) = DSM 24995(T)) is assigned to the novel species Hungatella effluvii gen. nov., sp. nov as the type strain. PMID:24186873

  7. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 °C (optimum 37 °C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5%), but is tolerated up to 3%. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain FatMR1(T) fermented pyruvate, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypcase and used fructose as the only sugar. The main fermentation products from fructose and proteinaceous compounds (e.g. peptone and biotrypcase) were acetate, H2 and CO2. Crotonate was disproportionated to acetate and butyrate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0 and C16:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 37.1 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic, and physiological properties, strain FatMR1(T) (=DSM 25890(T), =JCM 18390(T)) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as a novel species of the genus Alkaliphilus, A. hydrothermalis sp. nov. PMID:25319677

  8. Moderate temperature increase leads to disintegration of floating sludge and lower abundance of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Lienen, T; Kleyböcker, A; Verstraete, W; Würdemann, H

    2014-11-15

    Filamentous bacteria such as Microthrix parvicella can cause serious foaming and floating sludge problems in anaerobic digesters fed with sewage sludge. The sewage sludge and oil co-fermenting laboratory-scale biogas digesters in this study were fed with substrates from a foaming-prone full-scale biogas plant containing the filamentous bacterium M. parvicella. At 37 °C, in both pneumatically mixed digesters a highly viscous and approximately 3 cm thick floating sludge was observed. A gradual increase of the temperature from 37 °C to 56 °C led to a significant decrease in the floating sludge thickness, which correlated with a strong decrease in the abundance of M. parvicella in the digestate. Furthermore, the stepwise temperature increase allowed for an adaption of the microbial community and prevented process failure. The study indicates that already a moderate temperature increase from 37 °C to 41 °C might help to control the M. parvicella abundance in full-scale biogas plants. PMID:25117937

  9. Syntrophus aciditrophicus sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium that degrades fatty acids and benzoate in syntrophic association with hydrogen-using microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. E.; Bhupathiraju, V. K.; Tanner, R. S.; Woese, C. R.; McInerney, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Strain SBT is a new, strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonmotile, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacterium that degrades benzoate and certain fatty acids in syntrophic association with hydrogen/formate-using microorganisms. Strain SBT produced approximately 3 mol of acetate and 0.6 mol of methane per mol of benzoate in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei strain JF1. Saturated fatty acids, some unsaturated fatty acids, and methyl esters of butyrate and hexanoate also supported growth of strain SBT in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. Strain SBT grew in pure culture with crotonate, producing acetate, butyrate, caproate, and hydrogen. The molar growth yield was 17 +/- 1 g cell dry mass per mol of crotonate. Strain SBT did not grow with fumarate, iron(III), polysulfide, or oxyanions of sulfur or nitrogen as electron acceptors with benzoate as the electron donor. The DNA base composition of strain SBT was 43.1 mol% G+C. Analysis of the 16 S rRNA gene sequence placed strain SBT in the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria, with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Strain SBT was most closely related to members of the genus Syntrophus. The clear phenotypic and genotypic differences between strain SBT and the two described species in the genus Syntrophus justify the formation of a new species, Syntrophus aciditrophicus.

  10. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Karen Møller; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47-0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose), volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2-2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90-99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion. PMID:26295944

  11. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Karen Møller; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47–0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose), volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2–2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90–99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion. PMID:26295944

  12. Quantitative analysis of growth and volatile fatty acid production by the anaerobic ruminal bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii T81.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Moen, G N

    2013-05-01

    Megasphaera elsdenii T81 grew on either DL-lactate or D-glucose at similar rates (0.85 h(-1)) but displayed major differences in the fermentation of these substrates. Lactate was fermented at up to 210-mM concentration to yield acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids. The bacterium was able to grow at much higher concentrations of D-glucose (500 mM), but never removed more than 80 mM of glucose from the medium, and nearly 60 % the glucose removed was sequestered as intracellular glycogen, with low yields of even-carbon acids (acetate, butyrate, caproate). In the presence of both substrates, glucose was not used until lactate was nearly exhausted, even by cells pregrown on glucose. Glucose-grown cultures maintained only low extracellular concentrations of acetate, and addition of exogenous acetate increased yields of butyrate, but not caproate. By contrast, exogenous acetate had little effect on lactate fermentation. At pH 6.6, growth rate was halved by exogenous addition of 60 mM propionate, 69 mM butyrate, 44 mM valerate, or 33 mM caproate; at pH 5.9, these values were reduced to 49, 49, 18, and 22 mM, respectively. The results are consistent with this species' role as an effective ruminal lactate consumer and suggest that this organism may be useful for industrial production of volatile fatty acids from lactate if product tolerance could be improved. The poor fermentation of glucose and sensitivity to caproate suggests that this strain is not practical for industrial caproate production. PMID:23271673

  13. Identification of a novel acetate-utilizing bacterium belonging to Synergistes group 4 in anaerobic digester sludge

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsukasa; Yoshiguchi, Kazumi; Ariesyady, Herto Dwi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Major acetate-utilizing bacterial and archaeal populations in methanogenic anaerobic digester sludge were identified and quantified by radioisotope- and stable-isotope-based functional analyses, microautoradiography-fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) and stable-isotope probing of 16S rRNA (RNA-SIP) that can directly link 16S rRNA phylogeny with in situ metabolic function. First, MAR-FISH with 14C-acetate indicated the significant utilization of acetate by only two major groups, unidentified bacterial cells and Methanosaeta-like filamentous archaeal cells, in the digester sludge. To identify the acetate-utilizing unidentified bacteria, RNA-SIP was conducted with 13C6-glucose and 13C3-propionate as sole carbon source, which were followed by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA. We found that bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 were commonly detected in both 16S rRNA clone libraries derived from the sludge incubated with 13C-glucose and 13C-propionate. To confirm that this bacterial group can utilize acetate, specific FISH probe targeting for Synergistes group 4 was newly designed and applied to the sludge incubated with 14C-acetate for MAR-FISH. The MAR-FISH result showed that bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 significantly took up acetate and their active population size was comparable to that of Methanosaeta in this sludge. In addition, as bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 had high Km for acetate and maximum utilization rate, they are more competitive for acetate over Methanosaeta at high acetate concentrations (2.5–10 m). To our knowledge, it is the first time to report the acetate-utilizing activity of uncultured bacteria belonging to Synergistes group 4 and its competitive significance to acetoclastic methanogen, Methanosaeta. PMID:21562600

  14. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Bes, Méline; Merrouch, Mériem; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erauso, Gaël; Postec, Anne

    2015-08-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 × 3.0-5.0 μm) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 °C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 g l- 1 NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Yeast extract, peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, crotonate, pyruvate, galactose, maltose, sucrose, ribose, trehalose and glucose were used as carbon sources. Glucose fermentation led to acetate, H2 and CO2 formation. Arginine, serine, histidine, lysine, methionine and cysteine improved growth, but the Stickland reaction was negative for the combinations of amino acids tested. The major metabolic products from yeast extract fermentation were H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate and propionate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16  :  0, C16  :  1cis9, C14  :  0 and C16  :  1cis7 (>5 % of total fatty acids). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain ST07-YET was most closely related to Clostridium sticklandii DSM 519T and Acetoanaerobium noterae NOT-3T (96.7 % and 96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, strain ST07-YET is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Acetoanaerobium (order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes) with the name Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov. The type strain is ST07-YET ( = DSM 27512T = JCM 19400T). PMID:25948619

  15. Anoxybacter fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov., a piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Cao, Junwei; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine; Shao, Zongze

    2015-02-01

    A novel piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterial strain, designated strain DY22613(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide deposit at the East Pacific Rise (GPS position: 102.6° W 3.1° S). Cells of strain DY22613(T) were long, motile rods (10 to 20 µm in length and 0.5 µm in width) with peritrichous flagella and were Gram-stain-negative. Growth was recorded at 44-72 °C (optimum 60-62 °C) and at hydrostatic pressures of 0.1-55 MPa (optimum 20 MPa). The pH range for growth was from pH 5.0 to 9.0 with an optimum at pH 7.0. Growth was observed in the presence of 1 to 8 % (w/v) sea salts and 0.65 to 5.2 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimum salt concentrations at 3.5 % for sea salts and at 2.3 % for NaCl. Under optimal growth conditions, the shortest generation time observed was 27 min (60 °C, 20 MPa). Strain DY22613(T) was heterotrophic, able to utilize complex organic compounds, amino acids, sugars and organic acids including peptone, tryptone, beef extract, yeast extract, alanine, glutamine, methionine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine, fructose, fucose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, mannose, melibiose, palatinose, rhamnose, turanose, pyruvate, lactic acid, methyl ester, erythritol, galacturonic acid and glucosaminic acid. Strain DY22613(T) was able to reduce Fe(III) compounds, including Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (pH 7.0), amorphous iron(III) oxide (pH 9.0), goethite (α-FeOOH, pH 12.0), Fe(III) citrate and elementary sulfur. Products of fermentation were butyrate, acetate and hydrogen. Main cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 3-OH and C14 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain DY22613(T) was 36.7 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain forms a novel lineage within the class Clostridia and clusters with the order Haloanaerobiales (86.92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The phylogenetic data suggest that the lineage represents at least a novel genus and species, for which the name Anoxybacter

  16. Anaerosolibacter carboniphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic iron-reducing bacterium isolated from coal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeji; Kim, So-Jeong; Min, Ui-Gi; Lee, Yong-Jae; Kim, Song-Gun; Roh, Seong Woon; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2015-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, iron-reducing bacterial strain, IRF19(T), was isolated from coal-contaminated soil in the Republic of Korea. IRF19(T) cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-staining-negative and motile by means of flagella. The optimum pH and temperature for their growth were determined to be pH 7.5-8.0 and 40 °C, while the optimum range was pH 6.5-10.0 and 20-45 °C, respectively. Strain IRF19(T) did not require NaCl for growth but it tolerated up to 2% (w/v). Growth was observed with yeast extract, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-ribose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, L-serine, L-alanine and L-isoleucine. Fe(III), elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and sulfate were used as electron acceptors. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain IRF19(T) is affiliated to the family Clostridiaceae and is most closely related to Salimesophilobacter vulgaris Zn2(T) (93.5% similarity), Geosporobacter subterraneus VNs68(T) (93.2%) and Thermotalea metallivorans B2-1(T) (92.3%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain IRF19(T) were C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0, and the profile was distinct from those of the closely related species. The major respiratory quinone of strain IRF19(T) was menaquinone MK-5 (V-H2). The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and two unknown polar lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain IRF19(T) was determined to be 37.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic results, strain IRF19(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a novel genus of the family Clostridiaceae , for which we propose the name Anaerosolibacter carboniphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., with the type strain IRF19(T) ( =KCTC 15396(T) =JCM 19988(T)). PMID:25701849

  17. Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately anaerobic, alkaliphilic, xylanolytic bacterium from a meromictic soda lake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Chen, Shulin

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, motile, slender, flexible rod, designated SC/BZ-SP2(T), was isolated from mixed alkaline water and sediment of Soap Lake, Washington State, USA. Strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) formed salmon to pink colonies and was alkaliphilic. The isolate grew at pH(35 °C) 7.5-10.5 (optimum pH(35 °C) 9.7), at 8-40 °C (optimum 35-37 °C) and with 0.35-1.38 M Na(+) (optimum 0.44-0.69 M Na(+)). The isolate utilized L-arabinose, D-ribose, D-xylose, D-fructose, D-mannose, D-galactose, cellobiose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose, sorbitol, xylan, malate and yeast extract as carbon and energy sources; best growth was observed with L-arabinose, cellobiose, maltose and trehalose. The major fermentation products from beechwood xylan were propionate and acetate. The dominant fatty acids were iso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH, C(17:0) 3-OH and C(15:0) 3-OH. The cell-wall sugars were ribose, xylose, galactose and glucose. Thiosulfate and sulfite could be reduced to sulfide. The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.5 ± 0.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) belonged to the family Marinilabiliaceae of the order Bacteroidales, class Bacteroidia. The most closely related strains were Alkaliflexus imshenetskii Z-7010(T) (91.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Marinilabilia salmonicolor Cy s1(T) (91.0%) and Anaerophaga thermohalophila Fru22(T) (90.4%). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic features, strain SC/BZ-SP2(T) represents a novel species in a new genus of the family Marinilabiliaceae, for which the name Alkalitalea saponilacus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alkalitalea saponilacus is SC/BZ-SP2(T) (=ATCC BAA-2172(T) =DSM 24412(T)). PMID:22199219

  18. Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mesophilic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid-degrading bacterium in the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-06-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, lactate-, alcohol-, carbohydrate- and amino-acid- degrading bacterium, designated strain 7WAY-8-7(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from isomerized sugar production processes. Cells of strain 7WAY-8-7(T) were motile, curved rods (0.7-1.0×5.0-8.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth was 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (pH 6.0-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on yeast extract, glucose, ribose, xylose, malate, tryptone, pyruvate, fumarate, Casamino acids, serine and cysteine. The main end-products of glucose fermentation were acetate and hydrogen. In co-culture with the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanospirillum hungatei DSM 864(T), strain 7WAY-8-7(T) could utilize lactate, glycerol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, L-glutamate, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, histidine, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, lysine, threonine, 2-oxoglutarate, aspartate and methionine. A Stickland reaction was not observed with some pairs of amino acids. Yeast extract was required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe (III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.4 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the uncultured environmental clone clade (called 'PD-UASB-13' in the Greengenes database) in the bacterial phylum Synergistetes, showing less than 90% sequence similarity with closely related described species such as Aminivibrio pyruvatiphilus and Aminobacterium colombiense (89.7% and 88.7%, respectively). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(13 : 0), iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(18 : 1), C(19 : 1), C(20 : 1) and C(21 : 1). A novel genus and species, Lactivibrio alcoholicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain 7WAY-8-7(T) ( = JCM 17151(T

  19. Evidence that anaerobic oxidation of toluene in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica is initiated by formation of benzylsuccinate from toluene and fumarate.

    PubMed

    Biegert, T; Fuchs, G; Heider, J

    1996-06-15

    Toluene is degraded anoxically to CO2 by the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica. Toluene first becomes oxidized to benzoyl-CoA by O2-independent reactions. Benzoyl-CoA is then reduced to non-aromatic products by benzoyl-CoA reductase. We set out to study the reactions employed for the initial activation of toluene and its oxidation to the level of benzoate. Evidence is provided for a novel way of toluene degradation based on experiments with cell-free extracts and with whole toluene-grown cells: Cell-free extracts oxidized [14C]toluene to [14C]benzoyl-CoA via several radioactive intermediates. This reaction was strictly dependent on the presence of fumarate, coenzyme A and nitrate as electron acceptor; acetyl-CoA and ATP were not necessary for the reaction. The first product formed in vitro was benzylsuccinate; (2H8)toluene was converted to (2H7)benzylsuccinate. Formation of benzylsuccinate from toluene was independent of coenzyme A and nitrate, but it required the presence of fumarate. Other tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were converted to fumarate in cell extracts and therefore could partially substitute for fumarate. [14C]Benzylsuccinate was oxidized further to [14C]benzoyl-CoA and [14C]benzoate in cell extracts if coenzyme A and nitrate were present. No benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde and no phenylpropionate could be detected as intermediates. In isotope trapping experiments with cell suspensions, two intermediates from [14C]toluene were detected, benzoate and benzylsuccinate. This corroborates the sequence of reactions deduced from in vitro experiments. A hypothetical degradation pathway for the anaerobic oxidation of toluene to benzoyl-CoA via an initial addition of fumarate to the methyl group of toluene and following beta-oxidation of the benzylsuccinate formed is suggested. PMID:8706665

  20. Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, proteolytic bacterium isolated from a decaying algal bloom, and proposal of Proteinivoraceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim; Boltyanskaya, Yulia; Zhilina, Tatjana; Kolganova, Tatjana; Lavrentjeva, Elena; Kuznetsov, Boris

    2013-09-01

    Two strains of a novel anaerobic, protein- and nucleoside-utilizing bacterium, Z-910(T) and Z-810, were isolated. The strains were spore-forming, mainly nonmotile rods, exhibiting positive Gram reaction with Gram-positive cell wall structure. The strains were mesophilic and haloalkaliphilic. Cultures used proteins and proteinaceous substrates as carbon, nitrogen, and energy sources. Both strains used also ribonucleosides, cellobiose, pyruvate, and glycerol. Ribose and nucleobases did not support growth. The fermentation products from all utilized substrates were identical but varied in content and included straight and branched acids, as well as hydrogen and ammonia. When grown on tryptone, strain Z-910(T) was able to reduce fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Neither nitrate nor sulfate was reduced. The DNA G + C content of strain Z-910(T) was 32.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed that strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new branch within the order Clostridiales, with 90.2 % similarity to the nearest genus with a validly published name Anaerobranca gottschalkii DSM 13577(T). According to their physiological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new genus and novel species, for which the name Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca formed a separate cluster within the order Clostridiales. The family Proteinivoraceae fam. nov. comprising the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca was therefore proposed within the order Clostridiales of the phylum Firmicutes with Proteinivorax as a type genus of the new family. PMID:23807772

  1. Comparison of the Copan eSwab System with an Agar Swab Transport System for Maintenance of Fastidious Anaerobic Bacterium Viability

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Leoncio, Eliza S.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the eSwab system to a swab with an anaerobic transport semisolid agar system for their capacities to maintain the viability of 20 species of fastidious anaerobes inoculated on the bench and held at ambient or refrigerator temperature for 24 or 48 h. On average, both systems maintained similar viabilities among analogous groups of organisms at both temperatures, although there were quantitative differences among some species. PMID:26888906

  2. Comparison of the Copan eSwab System with an Agar Swab Transport System for Maintenance of Fastidious Anaerobic Bacterium Viability.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Leoncio, Eliza S; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2016-05-01

    We compared the eSwab system to a swab with an anaerobic transport semisolid agar system for their capacities to maintain the viability of 20 species of fastidious anaerobes inoculated on the bench and held at ambient or refrigerator temperature for 24 or 48 h. On average, both systems maintained similar viabilities among analogous groups of organisms at both temperatures, although there were quantitative differences among some species. PMID:26888906

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Sims, D; Brettin, T; Bruce, D C; Detter, J C; Han, C S; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F W; Land, M L; Hauser, L J; Kyrpides, N; Lykidis, A; Richardson, P; Belieav, A; Sanford, R A; Löeffler, F E; Fields, M W

    2015-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium's genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation. PMID:25614562

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidibacillus decaturensis Strain Z9, an Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Heterotrophic Bacterium from the Deep Subsurface of the Illinois Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiran; Chang, Yun-Juan; Sanford, Robert A; Fouke, Bruce W

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the moderately thermophilic and halotolerant bacteriumTepidibacillus decaturensisstrain Z9 was sequenced. The draft genome comprises three scaffolds, for a total of 2.95 Mb. As the first sequenced genome within the genusTepidibacillus, 2,895 protein-coding genes, 52 tRNA genes, and 3 rRNA operons were predicted. PMID:27056217

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidibacillus decaturensis Strain Z9, an Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Heterotrophic Bacterium from the Deep Subsurface of the Illinois Basin, USA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Sanford, Robert A.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the moderately thermophilic and halotolerant bacterium Tepidibacillus decaturensis strain Z9 was sequenced. The draft genome comprises three scaffolds, for a total of 2.95 Mb. As the first sequenced genome within the genus Tepidibacillus, 2,895 protein-coding genes, 52 tRNA genes, and 3 rRNA operons were predicted. PMID:27056217

  6. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, Paul; De Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  7. Substrate-Dependent Regulation of Anaerobic Degradation Pathways for Toluene and Ethylbenzene in a Denitrifying Bacterium, Strain EbN1

    PubMed Central

    Kühner, Simon; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Fritz, Ingo; Wruck, Wasco; Hultschig, Claus; Hufnagel, Peter; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Rabus, Ralf

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and ethylbenzene is of environmental concern and biochemical interest due to toxicity and novel reactions, respectively. The denitrifying strain EbN1 is unique in anaerobically degrading both alkylbenzenes via different pathways which converge at benzoyl coenzyme A. The organization of genes involved in both pathways was only recently determined for strain EbN1. In the present study, global expression analysis (DNA microarray and proteomics) indicated involvement of several thus-far-unknown proteins in the degradation of both alkylbenzenes. For example, orf68 and orf57, framing the ebd operon, are implicated in ethylbenzene degradation, and the ebA1932 and ebA1936 genes, located 7.2 kb upstream of the bbs operon, are implicated in toluene degradation. In addition, expression studies were now possible on the level of the complete pathways. Growth experiments demonstrated that degradative capacities for toluene and ethylbenzene could be simultaneously induced, regardless of the substrate used for adaptation. Regulation was studied at the RNA (real-time reverse transcription-PCR and DNA microarray) and protein (two-dimensional-difference gel electrophoresis) level by using cells adapted to anaerobic growth with benzoate, toluene, ethylbenzene, or a mixture of toluene and ethylbenzene. Expression of the two toluene-related operons (bss and bbs) was specifically induced in toluene-adapted cells. In contrast, genes involved in anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation were induced in ethylbenzene- and toluene-adapted cells, suggesting that toluene may act as a gratuitous inducer. In agreement with the predicted sequential regulation of the ethylbenzene pathway, Ebd proteins (encoding subunits of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase) were formed in ethylbenzene- but not in acetophenone-adapted cells, while Apc proteins (subunits of predicted acetophenone carboxylase) were formed under both conditions. PMID:15687214

  8. Degradation of Glyoxylate and Glycolate with ATP Synthesis by a Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium, Moorella sp. Strain HUC22-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Inokuma, Kentaro; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Nishio, Naomichi

    2008-01-01

    The thermophilic homoacetogenic bacterium Moorella sp. strain HUC22-1 ferments glyoxylate to acetate roughly according to the reaction 2 glyoxylate → acetate + 2 CO2. A batch culture with glyoxylate and yeast extract yielded 11.7 g per mol of cells per substrate, which was much higher than that obtained with H2 plus CO2. Crude extracts of glyoxylate-grown cells catalyzed the ADP- and NADP-dependent condensation of glyoxylate and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to pyruvate and CO2 and converted pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2, which are the key reactions of the malyl-CoA pathway. ATP generation was also detected during the key enzyme reactions of this pathway. Furthermore, this bacterium consumed l-malate, an intermediate in the malyl-CoA pathway, and produced acetate. These findings suggest that Moorella sp. strain HUC22-1 can generate ATP by substrate-level phosphorylation during glyoxylate catabolism through the malyl-CoA pathway. PMID:18083850

  9. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Fenollaria massiliensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a new genus of anaerobic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Croce, Olivier; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Fenollaria massiliensis strain 9401234T, is the type strain of Fenollaria massiliensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a new species within a new genus Fenollaria. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from an osteoarticular sample. F. massiliensis strain 9401234T is an obligate anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1.71 Mbp long genome exhibits a G+C content of 34.46% and contains 1,667 protein-coding and 30 RNA genes, including 3 rRNA genes. PMID:25197455

  10. Development of a PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer for identification of strictly anaerobic bacterium Zymophilus.

    PubMed

    Felsberg, Jurgen; Jelínková, Markéta; Kubizniaková, Petra; Matoulková, Dagmar

    2015-06-01

    PCR-primers were designed for identification of strictly anaerobic bacteria of the genus Zymophilus based on genus-specific sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region. The specificity of the primers was tested against 37 brewery-related non-target microorganisms that could potentially occur in the same brewery specimens. None DNA was amplified from any of the non-Zymophilus strains tested including genera from the same family (Pectinatus, Megasphaera, Selenomonas), showing thus 100% specificity. PCR assay developed in this study allows an extension of the spectra of detected beer spoilage microorganisms in brewery laboratories. PMID:25725268

  11. Clostridium geopurificans strain MJ1 sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium that grows via fermentation and reduces the cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; Wei, Na; Millerick, Kayleigh; Popovic, Jovan; Finneran, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    A fermentative, non-spore forming, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MJ1(T), was isolated from an RDX contaminated aquifer at a live-fire training site in Northwest NJ, United States. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA base composition, strain MJ1(T) was assigned to the Firmicutes. The DNA G+C content was 42.8 mol%. Fermentative growth was supported by glucose and citrate in a defined basal medium. The bacterium is a strict anaerobe that grows between at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0 and 18 and 37 °C. The culture did not grow with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) as the electron acceptor or mineralize RDX under these conditions. However, MJ1(T) transformed RDX into MNX, methylenedinitramine, formaldehyde, formate, ammonium, nitrous oxide, and nitrate. The nearest phylogenetic relative with a validly published name was Desulfotomaculum guttoideum (95 % similarity). However, MJ1(T) was also related to Clostridium celerecrescens DSM 5628 (95 %), Clostridium indolis DSM 755 (94 %), and Clostridium sphenoides DSM 632 (94 %). DNA:DNA hybridization with these strains was between 6.7 and 58.7 percent. The dominant cellular fatty acids (greater than 5 % of the total, which was 99.0 % recovery) were 16:0 fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) (32.12 %), 18:1cis 11 dimethyl acetal (DMA) (16.47 %), 16:1cis 9 DMA (10.28 %), 16:1cis 9 FAME (8.10 %), and 18:1cis 9 DMA (5.36 %). On the basis of morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic data, Clostridium geopurificans is proposed as a new species in genus Clostridium, with strain MJ1(T) as the type strain. PMID:24522483

  12. Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Bomar, Lindsey; Maltz, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Three anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana, using mucin as the primary carbon and energy source. These strains, designated M3T, M4 and M6, were Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile. Cells were elongated bacilli approximately 2.4 µm long and 0.6 µm wide. Growth only occurred anaerobically under mesophilic and neutral pH conditions. All three strains could utilize multiple simple and complex sugars as carbon sources, with glucose fermented to acid by-products. The DNA G+C contents of strains M3T, M4 and M6 were 44.9, 44.8 and 44.8 mol%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acid of strain M3T was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the three strains shared >99 % similarity with each other and represent a new lineage within the family Rikenellaceae of the order Bacteroidales, phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related bacteria to strain M3T based on 16S rRNA gene sequences were Rikenella microfusus DSM 15922T (87.3 % similarity) and Alistipes finegoldii AHN 2437T (87.4 %). On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strains M3T, M4 and M6 are proposed as representing a novel species of a new genus within the family Rikenellaceae, for which the name Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Mucinivorans hirudinis is M3T ( = ATCC BAA-2553T = DSM 27344T). PMID:25563920

  13. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, George Saad; Abu-Tahon, Medhat Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens) and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen) to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v), temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0–11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g), CMCase (1,783 U/g), and β-glucosidase (342 U/g), which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover. PMID:26691490

  14. Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a L-lysine-degrading, strictly anaerobic bacterium in the class Clostridia isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Shibuya, Toru; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN037(T)) was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Cells were Gram-positive rods. Strain WN037(T) was asaccharolytic. The strain fermented L-lysine in the presence of B-vitamin mixture or vitamin B12 and produced acetate and butyrate. L-arginine and casamino acids poorly supported the growth. Strain WN037(T) used neither other amino acids nor organic acids examined. The strain had C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c DMA as the predominant cellular fatty acids. The genomic DNA G + C content was 44.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN037(T) in the family Eubacteriaceae in the class Clostridia. The closest relative was Eubacterium pyruvativorans (sequence similarity, 92.8 %). Based on the comprehensive analyses, the novel genus and species, Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN037(T) (= JCM 19863(T) = DSM 28287(T)). PMID:25449329

  15. Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kunihiro; Ueki, Atsuko; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN081(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming straight rods. The strain grew rather well on PY agar slants supplemented with a B-vitamin mixture as well as sugars (PYV4S medium) and made translucent and glossy colonies. Growth in liquid medium with the same composition, however, was scanty, and growth was not improved in spite of various additives to the medium. Strain WN081(T) produced small amounts of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, butyrate, isovalerate and H(2) from PYV liquid medium. The strain did not use carbohydrates or organic acids. The pH range for growth was narrow (pH 6.8-8.2), having a pH optimum at 6.8-7.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-37°C, the optimum being 25-30°C. The strain was sensitive to bile, and did not have catalase or oxidase activities. Hydrogen sulfide was produced from L-cysteine and L-methionine as well as peptone. Indole was produced from L-tryptophan and peptone. The strain had iso-C(15:0) as the exclusively predominant cellular fatty acid (70%) together with some branched chain components (such as iso-C(15:0) DMA, iso-C(17:0) 3-OH and iso-C(15:0) aldehyde) as minor components. The genomic DNA G+C content was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN081(T) in the phylum Bacteroidetes with rather low sequence similarities with the related species such as Rikenella microfusus (85.7% sequence similarity), Alistipes putredinis (85.5%) and Alistipes finegoldii (85.5%) in the family Rikenellaceae. Based on the phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, the novel genus and species Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN081(T) (= JCM 17049(T) = DSM 23595(T)). PMID:23337575

  16. Isolation, Characterization, and U(VI)-Reducing Potential of a Facultatively Anaerobic, Acid-Resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, Nitrate- and U(VI)-Contaminated Subsurface Sediment and Description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Sullivan, Sara A.; O'Neill, Kathleen R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 μm long and 0.7 to 0.9 μm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H2S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O2, NO3−, S2O32−, fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  17. Isolation, characterization, and U(VI)-reducing potential of a facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment and description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Sullivan, Sara A; O'Neill, Kathleen R; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2004-05-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 micro m long and 0.7 to 0.9 microm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H(2)S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O(2), NO(3)(-), S(2)O(3)(2-), fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  18. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  19. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  20. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; et al

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  1. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  2. Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihu; Zeng, Raymond J; Burow, Luke C; Lant, Paul; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-10-01

    The microorganisms responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to denitrification have not been clearly elucidated. Three recent publications suggested it can be achieved by a denitrifying bacterium with or without the involvement of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. A key factor limiting the progress in this research field is the shortage of enrichment cultures performing denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO). In this study, DAMO cultures were enriched from mixed inoculum including sediment from a freshwater lake, anaerobic digester sludge and return activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. Two reactors, operated at 35°C and at 22°C, respectively, showed simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrate reduction after several months of operation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the 35°C enrichment showed the presence of an archaeon closely related to other DAMO archaea and a dominated bacterium belonging to the yet uncultivated NC10 phylum. This culture preferred nitrite to nitrate as the electron acceptor. The present study suggests that the archaea are rather methanotrophs than methanogens. The highest denitrification rate achieved was 2.35 mmol NO3 (-) -N gVSS(-1)  day(-1) . The culture enriched at 22°C contained the same NC10 bacterium observed in the culture enriched at 35°C but no archaea. PMID:23765890

  3. Ottowia thiooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel facultatively anaerobic, N2O-producing bacterium isolated from activated sludge, and transfer of Aquaspirillum gracile to Hylemonella gracilis gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Jäckel, Udo; Wagner, Michael; Kämpfer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Strain K11T was isolated from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater-treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that it represents a distinct line of descent within the Comamonadaceae. The novel strain was a Gram-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-motile, straight to slightly curved rod. Polyhydroxyalkanoate granules were stored intracellularly as reserve material. Colonies on agar plates were small, regular and characterized by a water-insoluble yellow pigment. Unbranched fatty acids 16:1omega7c, 16:0 and 18:1omega7c dominated the cellular fatty acid pattern and ubiquinone-8 (Q-8) was the major component of the respiratory lipoquinones, both traits typical of members of the Comamonadaceae. A distinguishing characteristic was the presence of the two hydroxy fatty acids 10:0 3-OH and 12:0 2-OH, each in significant amounts. The G+C content of the DNA was 59 mol%. Strain K11T was capable of aerobic chemolithoheterotrophic growth using thiosulfate as an additional substrate, but could not grow autotrophically with thiosulfate or hydrogen. Facultative anaerobic growth was possible with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors, but not with ferric iron, sulfate or by fermentation. The sole end product of denitrification was N2O; nitrite accumulated only transiently in small amounts. Based upon phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed to establish the novel taxon Ottowia thiooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov., represented by the type strain K11T (=DSM 14619T=JCM 11629T). Aquaspirillum gracile was among the phylogenetically most closely related species to strain K11T. This species has been wrongly classified, and it is proposed to reclassify it as Hylemonella gracilis gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain is ATCC 19624T (=DSM 9158T). PMID:14742465

  4. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zun; Qian, Yang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Ju, Meiting

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2014 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. •Pretreatment •Organic waste •multiple-stage co-digestion •Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:26420080

  5. Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov., an alkane-degrading, anaerobic bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system, and emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica.

    PubMed

    Schouw, Anders; Leiknes Eide, Tove; Stokke, Runar; Birger Pedersen, Rolf; Helene Steen, Ida; Bødtker, Gunhild

    2016-04-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, syntrophic, alkane-degrading strain, L81T, was isolated from a biofilm sampled from a black smoker chimney at the Loki's Castle vent field. Cells were straight, rod-shaped, Gram-positive-staining and motile. Growth was observed at pH 6.2-9.5, 14-42 °C and 0.5-6 % (w/w) NaCl, with optima at pH 7.0-8.2, 37 °C and 3% (w/w) NaCl. Proteinaceous substrates, sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons were utilized for growth. Thiosulfate was used as an external electron acceptor during growth on crude oil. Strain L81T was capable of syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation when co-cultured with a methanogenic archaeon, designated strain LG6, isolated from the same enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain L81T is affiliated with the family Lachnospiraceae, and is most closely related to the type strains of Natranaerovirga pectinivora (92 % sequence similarity) and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica (90%). The major cellular fatty acids of strain L81T were C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0, and the profile was distinct from those of the species of the genus Natranaerovirga. The polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, four unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified phosphoglycolipids. The G+C content of genomic DNA was determined to be 31.7 mol%. Based on our phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic results, strain L81T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus of the family Lachnospiraceae, for which we propose the name Abyssivirga alkaniphila gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Abyssivirga alkaniphila is L81T (=DSM 29592T=JCM 30920T). We also provide emended descriptions of Natranaerovirga pectinivora and Natranaerovirga hydrolytica. PMID:26822139

  6. Purification and Characterization of α-l-Arabinopyranosidase and α-l-Arabinofuranosidase from Bifidobacterium breve K-110, a Human Intestinal Anaerobic Bacterium Metabolizing Ginsenoside Rb2 and Rc

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ho-Young; Park, Sun-Young; Hwan Sung, Jong; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2003-01-01

    Two arabinosidases, α-l-arabinopyranosidase (no EC number) and α-l-arabinofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.55), were purified from ginsenoside-metabolizing Bifidobacterium breve K-110, which was isolated from human intestinal microflora. α-l-Arabinopyranosidase was purified to apparent homogeneity, using a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose, butyl Toyopearl, hydroxyapatite Ultrogel, QAE-cellulose, and Sephacryl S-300 HR column chromatography, with a final specific activity of 8.81 μmol/min/mg. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase was purified to apparent homogeneity, using a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose, butyl Toyopearl, hydroxyapatite Ultrogel, Q-Sepharose, and Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography, with a final specific activity of 6.46 μmol/min/mg. The molecular mass of α-l-arabinopyranosidase was found to be 310 kDa by gel filtration, consisting of four identical subunits (77 kDa each, measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis [SDS-PAGE]), and that of α-l-arabinofuranosidase was found to be 60 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. α-l-Arabinopyranosidase and α-l-arabinofuranosidase showed optimal activity at pH 5.5 to 6.0 and 40°C and pH 4.5 and 45°C, respectively. Both purified enzymes were potently inhibited by Cu2+ and p-chlormercuryphenylsulfonic acid. α-l-Arabinopyranosidase acted to the greatest extent on p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinopyranoside, followed by ginsenoside Rb2. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase acted to the greatest extent on p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside, followed by ginsenoside Rc. Neither enzyme acted on p-nitrophenyl-β-galactopyranoside or p-nitrophenyl-β-d-fucopyranoside. These findings suggest that the biochemical properties and substrate specificities of these purified enzymes are different from those of previously purified α-l-arabinosidases. This is the first reported purification of α-l-arabinopyranosidase from an anaerobic Bifidobacterium sp. PMID:14660356

  7. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  8. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  9. Physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of a pure culture of an obligatory anaerobic bacterium that utilizes 2,4,-6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and biodegradation of RDX by pure cultures of obligatory anaerobic bacteria of the genus clostridium. Final report, 1 September 1993-31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.L.; Crawford, D.L.

    1996-09-01

    In work supported by the US AFOSR (grant F49620-94-1-0306) we are conducting detailed biochemical and genetic studies of three strains of Clostridium bifernientans, obligatory anaerobic bacteria that appear to completely degrade a variety of nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). We are determining the optimal physiological conditions for the degradative activities of C. bifermentans strains; and identifying and characterizing enzymes and genes involved in the biotransformation of nitroaromatic compounds by C. bifermentans. In our AASERT supplemental grant(AFOSR-93-1-O464) we expanded these goals to the explosive RDX (1,3,5-triaza-1, 3,5-trinitrocyclohexane). The AASERT grant funded two graduate students, who characterized the ability of C. bifermentans to degrade RDX (Regan, K. N., and R.L. Crawford, 1994. Biotechnol. Kett. 16: 1081- 1086), and prepared both genomic and plasmid DNA libraries from C. bifermentans. This genetic work will accelerate our progress toward our goal of characterizing the genetics of TNT/RDx degradation by our clostridia (K. Diedrich, M.S. thesis, University of Idaho; in preparation).

  10. Clostridium difficile: the anaerobe that made the grade.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Jon S

    2012-04-01

    Unlike other anaerobic bacteria of clinical importance, Clostridium difficile has managed to enter into the realm of public awareness. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous "superbug" responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This report picks out key moments, particularly in the UK, which tracked the rise in both the public and political awareness of this organism. PMID:22293217

  11. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  12. Decreased competiveness of the foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, co-culture with the hyper-ammonia anaerobe, Clostridium aminophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are a leading bacterial cause of human foodborne illness. When co-cultured in anaerobic Bolton broth with the hyper-ammonia-producing bacterium, Clostridium aminophilum, ammonia accumulation was greater (P 1...

  13. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium. PMID:26717697

  14. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  15. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  16. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; Zhivin, Olga; Bayer, Edward A.; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cellulose-Degrading Bacterium Cellulosilyticum lentocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David A; Suen, Garret; Bruce, David; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Meincke, Linda; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Teshima, Hazuki; Woyke, Tanja; Fox, Brian G.; Angert, Esther R.; Currie, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosilyticum lentocellum DSM 5427 is an anaerobic, endospore-forming member of the Firmicutes. We describe the complete genome sequence of this cellulose-degrading bacterium; originally isolated from estuarine sediment of a river that received both domestic and paper mill waste. Comparative genomics of cellulolytic clostridia will provide insight into factors that influence degradation rates.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Syntrophic Lactate-Degrading Bacterium Tepidanaerobacter syntrophicus JLT

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Ohashi, Akiko; Tourlousse, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here a high-quality draft genome sequence of the type strain (JL) of Tepidanaerobacter syntrophicus, an obligately anaerobic and moderately thermophilic bacterium, which is able to perform syntrophic lactate degradation with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The genome comprises 2.43 Mb in 9 scaffolds, with a G+C content of 38.6%. PMID:26868399

  19. Culturing and Maintaining Clostridium difficile in an Anaerobic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Suárez, Jose M.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, sporogenic bacterium that is primarily responsible for antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and is a significant nosocomial pathogen. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to isolate and cultivate and is extremely sensitive to even low levels of oxygen in the environment. Here, methods for isolating C. difficile from fecal samples and subsequently culturing C. difficile for preparation of glycerol stocks for long-term storage are presented. Techniques for preparing and enumerating spore stocks in the laboratory for a variety of downstream applications including microscopy and animal studies are also described. These techniques necessitate an anaerobic chamber, which maintains a consistent anaerobic environment to ensure proper conditions for optimal C. difficile growth. We provide protocols for transferring materials in and out of the chamber without causing significant oxygen contamination along with suggestions for regular maintenance required to sustain the appropriate anaerobic environment for efficient and consistent C. difficile cultivation. PMID:24084491

  20. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  1. Proteomic dataset of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 grown on hexachlorobenzene as electron acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Schiffmann, Christian L.; Otto, Wolfgang; Hansen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Adrian, Lorenz; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of the anaerobic organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 was analyzed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two different preparation methods, (i) in-solution and (ii) in-gel proteolytic digestion were assessed to elucidate the core and the functional proteome of bacterial cultures grown in synthetic anaerobic medium with hexachlorobenzene as sole electron acceptor. A detailed analysis of the data presented is available (Schiffmann et al., 2014) [1]. PMID:26958645

  2. Proteomic dataset of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 grown on hexachlorobenzene as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Christian L; Otto, Wolfgang; Hansen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Adrian, Lorenz; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-06-01

    The proteome of the anaerobic organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 was analyzed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two different preparation methods, (i) in-solution and (ii) in-gel proteolytic digestion were assessed to elucidate the core and the functional proteome of bacterial cultures grown in synthetic anaerobic medium with hexachlorobenzene as sole electron acceptor. A detailed analysis of the data presented is available (Schiffmann et al., 2014) [1]. PMID:26958645

  3. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  4. pmoA Primers for Detection of Anaerobic Methanotrophs▿

    PubMed Central

    Luesken, Francisca A.; Zhu, Baoli; van Alen, Theo A.; Butler, Margaret K.; Diaz, Marina Rodriguez; Song, Bongkeun; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2011-01-01

    Published pmoA primers do not match the pmoA sequence of “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” a bacterium that performs nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. Therefore, new pmoA primers for the detection of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera”-like methanotrophs were developed and successfully tested on freshwater samples from different habitats. These primers expand existing molecular tools for the study of methanotrophs in the environment. PMID:21460105

  5. Anaerobic decomposition of humic substances by Clostridium from the deep subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akio; Shimizu, Satoru; Tamamura, Shuji; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Naganuma, Takeshi; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of humic substances (HSs) is a slow and cryptic but non-negligible component of carbon cycling in sediments. Aerobic decomposition of HSs by microorganisms in the surface environment has been well documented; however, the mechanism of anaerobic microbial decomposition of HSs is not completely understood. Moreover, no microorganisms capable of anaerobic decomposition of HSs have been isolated. Here, we report the anaerobic decomposition of humic acids (HAs) by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium sp. HSAI-1 isolated from the deep terrestrial subsurface. The use of 14C-labelled polycatechol as an HA analogue demonstrated that the bacterium decomposed this substance up to 7.4% over 14 days. The decomposition of commercial and natural HAs by the bacterium yielded lower molecular mass fractions, as determined using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the removal of carboxyl groups and polysaccharide-related substances, as well as the generation of aliphatic components, amide and aromatic groups. Therefore, our results suggest that Clostridium sp. HSAI-1 anaerobically decomposes and transforms HSs. This study improves our understanding of the anaerobic decomposition of HSs in the hidden carbon cycling in the Earth’s subsurface. PMID:26743007

  6. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-13

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH{sub 3}COO{sup -} as an electron donor. Moessbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the {gamma}-bebam.

  7. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  8. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  9. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  10. Anaerobic specimen transport device.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, T D; Jimenez-Ulate, F

    1975-01-01

    A device is described and evaluated for the anaerobic transport of clinical specimens. The device limits the amount of oxygen entering with the sample to a maximum of 2%, which is rapidly removed by reacting with hydrogen in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The viability on swabs of 12 species of anaerobes, four strains of facultative anaerobes and a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was maintained during the length of the tests (24 or 48 h). The results demonstrated that this device protected even the more oxygen-sensitive clinical anaerobes from death due to oxygen exposure. This device can be used for swabs as well as for anaerobic collection and liquid and solid specimens. Images PMID:1104656

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Strict Anaerobe Clostridium neopropionicum X4 (DSM 3847T)

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Matthias H.; Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium neopropionicum X4 (DSM 3847T), a strictly anaerobic bacterium capable of fermenting ethanol and CO2 to propionate, acetate, and propanol. The genome consists of a single chromosome (3.19 Mb). PMID:27081124

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic, Piezophilic, Heterotrophic Bacterium Marinitoga piezophila KA3

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Mikhailova, Natalia; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Vannier, Pauline; Oger, Phil; Bartlett, Douglas; Noll, Kenneth M; Woyke, Tanja; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Marinitoga piezophila KA3 is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from the Grandbonum deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the East Pacific Rise (13 degrees N, 2,630-m depth). The genome of M. piezophila KA3 comprises a 2,231,407-bp circular chromosome and a 13,386-bp circular plasmid. This genome was sequenced within Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute CSP 2010.

  13. The F- or V-type Na(+)-ATPase of the thermophilic bacterium Clostridium fervidus.

    PubMed Central

    Speelmans, G; Poolman, B; Abee, T; Konings, W N

    1994-01-01

    Clostridium fervidus is a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium which uses solely Na+ as a coupling ion for energy transduction. Important features of the primary Na+ pump (ATPase) that generates the sodium motive force are presented. The advantage of using a sodium rather than a proton motive force at high temperatures becomes apparent from the effect of temperature on H+ and Na+ permeation in liposomes. PMID:8051034

  14. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  15. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  16. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  17. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  18. The fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium in pharmaceutical wastewater treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Yang, Juan; Chen, Shaoyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the fate of a nitrobenzene-degrading bacterium, Klebsiella oxytoca NBA-1, which was isolated from a pharmaceutical wastewater treatment facility. The 90-day survivability of strain NBA-1 after exposure to sludge under anaerobic and aerobic conditions was investigated. The bacterium was inoculated into sludge amended with glucose and p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) to compare the bacterial community variations between the modified sludge and nitrobenzene amendment. The results showed that glucose had no obvious effect on nitrobenzene biodegradation in the co-metabolism process, regardless of the presence/absence of oxygen. When p-CNB was added under anaerobic conditions, the biodegradation rate of nitrobenzene remained unchanged although p-CNB inhibited the production of aniline. The diversity of the microbial community increased and NBA-1 continued to be one of the dominant strains. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation rate of both nitrobenzene and p-CNB was only 20% of that under anaerobic conditions. p-CNB had a toxic effect on the microorganisms in the sludge so that most of the DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) bands, including that of NBA-1, began to disappear under aerobic conditions after 90days of exposure. These data show that the bacterial community was stable under anaerobic conditions and the microorganisms, including NBA-1, were more resistant to the adverse environment. PMID:26086561

  19. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Amrita B.; Han, Andrew W.; Mehta, Angad P.; Mok, Kenny C.; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P.; Taga, Michiko E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism. PMID:26246619

  20. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  1. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-09-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulphuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings, we show that D.desulphuricans ND132 can both oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. We find that the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is about one-third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidize, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulphurreducens PCA is able to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  2. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  3. Isolation of a bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to ethene

    SciTech Connect

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Chien, Yueh-tyng; Zinder, S.H.

    1997-06-06

    Tetrachloroethene is a prominent groundwater pollutant that can be reductively dechlorinated by mixed anaerobic microbial populations to the nontoxic product ethene. Strain 195, a coccoid bacterium that dechlorinates tetrachlorethene to ethene, was isolated and characterized. Growth of strain 195 with H{sub 2} and tetrachloroethene as the electron donor and acceptor pair required extracts from mixed microbial cultures. Growth of strain 195 was resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin; its cell wall did not react with a peptidoglycan-specific lectin and its ultrastructure resembled S-layers of Archaea. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of strain 195 indicated that it is a eubacterium without close affiliation to any known groups. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    PubMed Central

    Maud, P J; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gross work completed and relative to body weight. However, these differences are reduced when data is adjusted for body weight and further reduced when corrected for FFM. The study found no significant differences between men and women in either anaerobic power or anaerobic capacity when values were given relative to FFM. PMID:3730753

  5. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism

    PubMed Central

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH4) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH4 and hydrogen (H2) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH4, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H2 was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H2 decreased, rapid CH4 production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH4 production. For H2 production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H2 was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H2-producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  6. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism.

    PubMed

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH₄) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH₄ and hydrogen (H₂) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH₄, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H₂ was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H₂ decreased, rapid CH₄ production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH₄ production. For H₂ production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H₂ was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  7. THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PHENOLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a series of anaerobic microbial acclimation and treatment performance tests with synthetic phenolic substrates. The research is a feasibility level assessment of substituting anaerobic biodegradation of phenolics for solvent extraction. The tests showe...

  8. Identification and catalytic residues of the arsenite methyltransferase from a sulfate-reducing bacterium, Clostridium sp. BXM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Pei; Bao, Peng; Sun, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic methylation is an important process frequently occurring in anaerobic environments. Anaerobic microorganisms have been implicated as the major contributors for As methylation. However, very little information is available regarding the enzymatic mechanism of As methylation by anaerobes. In this study, one novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolate, Clostridium sp. BXM, which was isolated from a paddy soil in our laboratory, was demonstrated to have the ability of methylating As. One putative arsenite S-Adenosyl-Methionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene, CsarsM was cloned from Clostridium sp. BXM. Heterologous expression of CsarsM conferred As resistance and the ability of methylating As to an As-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli. Purified methyltransferase CsArsM catalyzed the formation of methylated products from arsenite, further confirming its function of As methylation. Site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that three conserved cysteine residues at positions 65, 153 and 203 in CsArsM are necessary for arsenite methylation, but only Cysteine 153 and Cysteine 203 are required for the methylation of monomethylarsenic to dimethylarsenic. These results provided the characterization of arsenic methyltransferase from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium. Given that sulfate-reducing bacteria are ubiquitous in various wetlands including paddy soils, enzymatic methylation mediated by these anaerobes is proposed to contribute to the arsenic biogeochemical cycling. PMID:25790486

  9. Hydrogenomics of the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Verhaart, Marcel R. A.; VanFossen, Amy L.; Willquist, Karin; Lewis, Derrick L.; Nichols, Jason D.; Goorissen, Heleen P.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Nelson, Karen E.; van Niel, Ed W. J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Ward, Donald E.; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Oost, John; Kelly, Robert M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is an extremely thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobe which ferments cellulose-, hemicellulose- and pectin-containing biomass to acetate, CO2, and hydrogen. Its broad substrate range, high hydrogen-producing capacity, and ability to coutilize glucose and xylose make this bacterium an attractive candidate for microbial bioenergy production. Here, the complete genome sequence of C. saccharolyticus, consisting of a 2,970,275-bp circular chromosome encoding 2,679 predicted proteins, is described. Analysis of the genome revealed that C. saccharolyticus has an extensive polysaccharide-hydrolyzing capacity for cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and starch, coupled to a large number of ABC transporters for monomeric and oligomeric sugar uptake. The components of the Embden-Meyerhof and nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways are all present; however, there is no evidence that an Entner-Doudoroff pathway is present. Catabolic pathways for a range of sugars, including rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, glucuronate, fructose, and galactose, were identified. These pathways lead to the production of NADH and reduced ferredoxin. NADH and reduced ferredoxin are subsequently used by two distinct hydrogenases to generate hydrogen. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed that there is significant upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and an ABC-type sugar transporter during growth on glucose and xylose, indicating that C. saccharolyticus coferments these sugars unimpeded by glucose-based catabolite repression. The capacity to simultaneously process and utilize a range of carbohydrates associated with biomass feedstocks is a highly desirable feature of this lignocellulose-utilizing, biofuel-producing bacterium. PMID:18776029

  10. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne d...

  11. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  12. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne di...

  13. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  14. Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. A2, a Highly Copper Resistant, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Effluents of a Zinc Smelter at the Urals

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Stefano; Abicht, Helge K.; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Solioz, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Desulfovibrio sp. A2 is an anaerobic Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacterium with remarkable tolerance to copper. It was isolated from wastewater effluents of a zinc smelter at the Urals. Here, we report the 4.2-Mb draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio sp. A2 and identify potential copper resistance mechanisms. PMID:22072648

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Willis Poratti, Graciana; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M Sofía; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Goh, Kian Mau; Donati, Edgardo R

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M. Sofía; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  17. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  18. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  19. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  20. Complete genome sequence of the novel Porphyromonadaceae bacterium strain ING2-E5B isolated from a mesophilic lab-scale biogas reactor.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Tomazetto, Geizecler; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2015-01-10

    In this study, the whole genome sequence of the mesophilic, anaerobic Porphyromonadaceae bacterium strain ING2-E5B (LMG 28429, DSM 28696) is reported. The new isolate belongs to the phylum Bacteroidetes and was obtained from a biogas-producing lab-scale completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) optimized for anaerobic digestion of maize silage in co-fermentation with pig and cattle manure. The genome of strain ING2-E5B contains numerous genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in the degradation of complex carbohydrates and proteinaceous compounds. Moreover, it possesses genes catalyzing the production of volatile fatty acids. Hence, this bacterium was predicted to be involved in hydrolysis and acidogenesis during anaerobic digestion and biomethanation. PMID:25444871

  1. Antimicrobials therapy of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobes predominant in the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora are often a cause of endogenous infections. Anaerobic bacteria are difficult to isolate from infectious sites, and are often overlooked. Anaerobic infections caused by anaerobes can occur in all body sites, including the central nervous system (CNS), oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin and soft tissues. The treatment of these infections is complicated by the slow growth of these organisms, their polymicrobial nature and the growing resistance of anaerobes to antimicrobials agents. Antimicrobials are frequently the only form of therapy needed, but in others, they are an important adjunct to surgical drainage and correction of pathology. Because anaerobes are often recovered with aerobic and facultative bacteria, the chosen antimicrobials should cover all pathogens. The antimicrobials effective against anaerobic organisms are metronidazole, carbapenems, combinations of a beta-lactam and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, chloramphenicol, tigecycline and clindamycin. PMID:26365224

  2. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  3. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  4. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  5. Identification of a Ruminococcaceae Species as the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) Degrading Bacterium in a Methanogenic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Ahn, Hyeri; Sun, Weimin; McGuinness, Lora R; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-02-01

    The widespread use of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has caused major contamination of groundwater sources and is a concern due to its taste and odor problems, as well as its toxicity. MTBE can be degraded anaerobically which makes bioremediation of contaminated aquifers a potential solution. Nevertheless, the organisms and mechanisms that are responsible for anaerobic MTBE degradation are still unknown. The aim of our research was to identify the organisms actively degrading MTBE. For this purpose we characterized an anaerobic methanogenic culture enriched with MTBE as the sole carbon source from the New Jersey Arthur Kill intertidal strait sediment. The cultures were analyzed using stable isotope probing (SIP) combined with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The sequence data indicated that phylotypes belonging to the Ruminococcaceae in the Firmicutes were predominant in the methanogenic cultures. SIP experiments also showed sequential incorporation of the (13)C labeled MTBE by the bacterial community with a bacterium most closely related to Saccharofermentans acetigenes identified as the bacterium active in O-demethylation of MTBE. Identification of the microorganisms responsible for the activity will help us better understand anaerobic MTBE degradation processes in the field and determine biomarkers for monitoring natural attenuation. PMID:26727046

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  7. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  8. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae GGT036: a furfural tolerant soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gyeongtaek; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Tai Hyun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Enterobacter cloacae is a facultative anaerobic bacterium to be an important cause of nosocomial infection. However, the isolated E. cloacae GGT036 showed higher furfural-tolerant cellular growth, compared to industrial relevant strains such as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 isolated from Mt. Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The genomic DNA sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 will provide valuable genetic resources for engineering of industrially relevant strains being tolerant to cellular inhibitors present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:25444880

  9. Carbohydrate Transport by the Anaerobic Thermophile Clostridium thermocellum LQRI

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, H. J.; Caldwell, F. C.; Dawson, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium which degrades cellulose and ferments the resulting glucose, cellobiose, and cellodextrins predominantly to ethanol. However, relatively little information was available on carbohydrate uptake by this bacterium. Washed cells internalized intact oligomers as large as cellopentaose. Since cellobiose and cellodextrin phosphorylase activities were detected in the cytosol and were not associated with cell membranes, phosphorylation of carbohydrates occurred intracellularly. Kinetic studies indicated that cellobiose and larger cellodextrins were taken up by a common uptake system while glucose entered via a separate mechanism. When cells were treated with metabolic inhibitors including iodoacetate and arsenate, the uptake of radiolabeled glucose or cellobiose was reduced by as much as 90%, and this reduction was associated with a 95% decline in intracellular ATP content. A combination of the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin abolished the proton-motive force but only slightly decreased transport and ATP. These results suggested that the two modes of carbohydrate transport in C. thermocellum were ATP dependent. This work is the first demonstration of cellodextrin transport by a cellulolytic bacterium. PMID:16535164

  10. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  11. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  12. Localization of cytochromes to the outer membrane of anaerobically grown Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    1992-01-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, numerous cell functions, including respiration-linked electron transport, have been ascribed to the cytoplasmic membrane. Gram-negative bacteria which use solid substrates (e.g., oxidized manganese or iron) as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration are presented with a unique problem: they must somehow establish an electron transport link across the outer membrane between large particulate metal oxides and the electron transport chain in the cytoplasmic membrane. When the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 is grown under anaerobic conditions and membrane fractions are purified from cells lysed by an EDTA-lysozyme-polyoxyethylene cetyl ether (Brij 58) protocol, approximately 80% of its membrane-bound cytochromes are localized in its outer membrane. These outer membrane cytochromes could not be dislodged by treatment with chaotropic agents or by increased concentrations of the nonionic detergent Brij 58, suggesting that they are integral membrane proteins. Cytochrome distribution in cells lysed by a French press protocol confirm the localization of cytochromes to the outer membrane of anaerobically grown cells. This novel cytochrome distribution could play a key role in the anaerobic respiratory capabilities of this bacterium, especially in its ability to mediate manganese and iron reduction. Images PMID:1592800

  13. Azoarcus sp. CIB, an Anaerobic Biodegrader of Aromatic Compounds Shows an Endophytic Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Helga; Prandoni, Nicolás; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes; Fajardo, Susana; Morcillo, César; Díaz, Eduardo; Carmona, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophytic bacteria that have plant growth promoting traits are of great interest in green biotechnology. The previous thought that the Azoarcus genus comprises bacteria that fit into one of two major eco-physiological groups, either free-living anaerobic biodegraders of aromatic compounds or obligate endophytes unable to degrade aromatics under anaerobic conditions, is revisited here. Methodology/Principal Findings Light, confocal and electron microscopy reveal that Azoarcus sp. CIB, a facultative anaerobe β-proteobacterium able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions, is also able to colonize the intercellular spaces of the rice roots. In addition, the strain CIB displays plant growth promoting traits such nitrogen fixation, uptake of insoluble phosphorus and production of indoleacetic acid. Therefore, this work demonstrates by the first time that a free-living bacterium able to degrade aromatic compounds under aerobic and anoxic conditions can share also an endophytic lifestyle. The phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rDNA and nifH genes confirmed that obligate endophytes of the Azoarcus genus and facultative endophytes, such as Azoarcus sp. CIB, locate into different evolutionary branches. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a bacterium, Azoarcus sp. CIB, able to degrade anaerobically a significant number of aromatic compounds, some of them of great environmental concern, and to colonize the rice as a facultative endophyte. Thus, Azoarcus sp. CIB becomes a suitable candidate for a more sustainable agricultural practice and phytoremediation technology. PMID:25340341

  14. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes. PMID:24762045

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of cholesterol by a denitrifying enrichment.

    PubMed

    Barrandeguy, E; Tarlera, S

    2001-01-01

    Sterols (e.g. cholesterol) present in wool scouring effluent represent the most recalcitrant fraction in anaerobic treatment. This study was conducted to examine the feasibility of removal of this organic load through a denitrifying post-treatment stage. A stable cholesterol-denitrifying enrichment (CHOL-1) was obtained from sludge of a bench-scale upflow sludge bed (USB) denitrifying reactor integrated to a carbon and nitrogen removal system for sanitary landfill leachate. According to the amounts of cholesterol degraded and of nitrite and nitrogen gas formed, the capacity for complete cholesterol oxidation under anaerobic conditions by CHOL-1 can be assumed. Nitrite accumulation observed at a low C/N ratio outlines the importance of determining the optimal C/N ratio for adequate denitrifying reactor performance. The enrichment was partly identified with molecular analysis of cloned 16S rDNA sequences revealing the presence of two groups of bacteria belonging to the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria. According to analysis of sequences, it can be inferred that a yet uncultivated new bacterium is the one responsible for cholesterol oxidation. Results of this study suggest that sludge from a denitrifying reactor treating leachate is potentially useful in a combined anaerobic-anoxic system for degradation of cholesterol that remains after methanogenic treatment. PMID:11575077

  16. Biohydrogenation of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids by anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sakurama, Haruko; Kishino, Shigenobu; Mihara, Kousuke; Ando, Akinori; Kita, Keiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Shimizu, Sakayu; Ogawa, Jun

    2014-09-01

    The PUFAs include many bioactive lipids. The microbial metabolism of C18 PUFAs is known to produce their bioactive isomers, such as conjugated FAs and hydroxy FAs, but there is little information on that of C20 PUFAs. In this study, we aimed to obtain anaerobic bacteria with the ability to produce novel PUFAs from C20 PUFAs. Through the screening of ∼100 strains of anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium bifermentans JCM 1386 was selected as a strain with the ability to saturate PUFAs during anaerobic cultivation. This strain converted arachidonic acid (cis-5,cis-8,cis-11,cis-14-eicosatetraenoic acid) and EPA (cis-5,cis-8,cis-11,cis-14,cis-17-EPA) into cis-5,cis-8,trans-13-eicosatrienoic acid and cis-5,cis-8,trans-13,cis-17-eicosatetraenoic acid, giving yields of 57% and 67% against the added PUFAs, respectively. This is the first report of the isolation of a bacterium transforming C20 PUFAs into corresponding non-methylene-interrupted FAs. We further investigated the substrate specificity of the biohydrogenation by this strain and revealed that it can convert two cis double bonds at the ω6 and ω9 positions in various C18 and C20 PUFAs into a trans double bond at the ω7 position. This study should serve to open up the development of novel potentially bioactive PUFAs. PMID:25002034

  17. Anaerobic Mercury Methylation and Demethylation by Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Xia; Liu, Yurong; Johs, Alexander; Zhao, Linduo; Wang, Tieshan; Yang, Ziming; Lin, Hui; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pierce, Eric M.; Liang, Liyuan; et al

    2016-03-28

    Two competing processes controlling the net production and bioaccumulation of neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) in natural ecosystems are microbial methylation and demethylation. Though mercury (Hg) methylation by anaerobic microorganisms and demethylation by aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria have both been extensively studied, little attention has been given to MeHg degradation by anaerobic bacteria, particularly the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter bemidjensis Bem. Here we report, for the first time, that the strain G. bemidjensis Bem can methylate inorganic Hg and degrade MeHg concurrently under anoxic conditions. Our results suggest that G. bemidjensis cells utilize a reductive demethylation pathway to degrade MeHg, with elemental Hg(0) asmore » the major reaction product, possibly due to the presence of homologs encoding both organo-mercurial lyase (MerB) and mercuric reductase (MerA) in this organism. In addition, the cells can mediate multiple reactions including Hg/MeHg sorption, Hg reduction and oxidation, resulting in both time and concentration dependent Hg species transformations. Moderate concentrations (10 500 M) of Hg-binding ligands such as cysteine enhance Hg(II) methylation but inhibit MeHg degradation. These findings indicate a cycle of methylation and demethylation among anaerobic bacteria and suggest that mer-mediated demethylation may play a role in the net balance of MeHg production in anoxic water and sediments.« less

  18. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  19. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  20. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2006-04-05

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also

  1. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  2. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  3. Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips

    SciTech Connect

    van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to

  4. Molecular study on cloned endoglucanase gene from rumen bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ozkose, Emin; Akyol, Ismail; Ekinci, Mehmet Sait

    2004-01-01

    An endoglucanase gene was subcloned from anaerobic rumen bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens strain 17. To express endoglucanase gene in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus bovis JB1, an endoglucanase gene fragment was inserted into pVA838-based shuttle vectors. Removal of endoglucanase gene promoter and expression of endoglucanase by promoter of S. bovis JB1 alpha-amylase gene (pACMCS) was also achieved. Survival of constructs pVACMCI, pTACMC and pACMCS, which carry endoglucanase gene, and stability of endoglucanase gene in S. bovis JB1, were observed. Maximal endoglucanase activities from S. bovis JB1/pVACMCI were 2- to 3-fold higher than from E. coli/pVACMCI. Specific cell activity of E. coli/pACMCS was found to be approximately 2- to -3 fold higher than the both E. coli/pVACMCI and E. coli/pTACMC. Specific cell activity of S. bovis JB1/pACMCS was also found to be approximately 2-fold higher than the both S. bovis/pVACMCI and S. bovis JB1/pTACMC. PMID:15925902

  5. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  6. Cefamandole Therapy in Anaerobic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Scalcini, Marcella C.; Sanders, Charles V.; Lewis, A. Carter

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one adult patients with infections due to anaerobic bacteria were treated with cefamandole. Bacteroides fragilis group (17) and Bacteroides melaninogenicus (13) were the most frequent anaerobes isolated. Duration of therapy varied from 2 to 49 days. Results were judged satisfactory in 26 cases, and unsatisfactory in 1 case. Four cases could not be evaluated. Adverse reactions occurred in 16 patients and included positive direct Coombs' test without hemolysis, transient liver function abnormalities, phlebitis, reversible neutropenia, fever, eosinophilia, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The more significant reactions were associated with prolonged therapy. None was lethal. These data suggest that cefamandole is effective in treatment of most anaerobic infections. PMID:380458

  7. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  8. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  9. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  10. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  11. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  12. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  13. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Hosseini Salekdeh, Ghasem; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated. PMID:26725518

  14. Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.

    1986-02-28

    The present invention relates to a method of solubilizing lead, in the form of lead oxide, found in industrial wastes, before these wastes are dumped into the environment. The lead is solubilized by dissolving the lead oxide in the wastes through contact with an anaerobic bacterial culture containing the bacterium ATCC No. 53464. The solubilized lead can then be removed from the wastes by chemical separation. It could also be removed by extending the contact period with the bacterial culture. As the culture grows, the solubilized lead is removed from the wastes by bioaccumulation by the microorganism or by immobilization by a polymer-like material produced by the microorganism. At this point, the lead is then removed from the wastes when the waste material is separated from the bacterial culture. If desired, the bacterial culture could be digested at this point to yield relatively pure lead for further industrial use.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain DL-VIII, a Novel Solventogenic Clostridium Species Isolated from Anaerobic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Izquierdo, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Clostridium sp. strain DL-VIII, a novel Gram-positive, endospore-forming, solventogenic bacterium isolated from activated anaerobic sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. Aside from a complete sol operon, the 6,477,357-bp genome of DL-VIII reveals genes for several unique enzymes with applications in lignocellulose degradation, including two phenolic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23929491

  16. ANAEROBIC RESISTANCE TO HIGH LEVELS OF CADMIUM AND OTHER TOXIC METALS IN A FACULTATIVE ANAEROBE ISOLATED FROM PRISTINE SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SHARMA,P.K.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,A.; KIELECZAWA,J.

    1999-06-20

    The authors have isolated many Cd (II) resistant bacterial strains from relatively pristine sediments collected from salt marshes in Shelter Island, New York. Detailed studies are being performed on one isolate, strain Cd-1. Strain Cd-1 is metabolically diverse, halotolerant, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe. It can resist high amounts of Cd (II), Cr (VI), As (V), Se (IV), Co (II), Pb (II), or Zn (II) under defined anaerobic conditions. With pyruvate as the energy source, Cd-1 can grow well at examined Cd (II) concentrations ranging up to 15 mM. It can resist Cd (II) with or without marine level NaCl concentration, under acidic or neutral conditions. It can resist Cd (II) under aerobic conditions as well. These features are novel for a heavy metal resistant bacterium.

  17. Characterization of the anaerobic denitrification bacterium Acinetobacter sp. SZ28 and its application for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun feng; Zheng, Sheng Chen; Huang, Ting lin; Ma, Fang; Shao, Si Cheng; Yang, Shao Fei; Zhang, Li na

    2015-09-01

    Acinetobacter sp. SZ28 exhibited efficient autotrophic denitrification ability using Mn(2+) as an electron donor. Sequence amplification identified the presence of the nirS gene. Meteorological chromatography analysis showed that N2 was produced as an end product. Response surface methodology experiments showed that the maximum removal of nitrate occurred under the following conditions: Mn(2+) concentration of 143.56 mg/L, C/N ratio of 6.82, initial pH of 5.17, and temperature of 34.26 °C, where the initial Mn(2+) concentration produced the largest effect. In the groundwater experiment, nitrate levels decreased from 1.63 mg/L to 0 mg/L. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis showed a decrease in the peak intensity of the original humus. Humus and the small-molecule amino acid tryptophan were detected. These results demonstrated that strain SZ28 is a suitable candidate for the simultaneous removal of nitrogen and Mn(2+) in groundwater treatment. PMID:26094190

  18. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    PubMed Central

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768362

  20. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Alternative Fuels and Associated Biocorrosion of Carbon Steel in Marine Environments.

    PubMed

    Liang, Renxing; Aktas, Deniz F; Aydin, Egemen; Bonifay, Vincent; Sunner, Jan; Suflita, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Fuels that biodegrade too easily can exacerbate through-wall pitting corrosion of pipelines and tanks and result in unintentional environmental releases. We tested the biological stability of two emerging naval biofuels (camelina-JP5 and Fischer-Tropsch-F76) and their potential to exacerbate carbon steel corrosion in seawater incubations with and without a hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacterium. The inclusion of sediment or the positive control bacterium in the incubations stimulated a similar pattern of sulfate reduction with different inocula. However, the highest rates of sulfate reduction were found in incubations amended with camelina-JP5 [(57.2 ± 2.2)-(80.8 ± 8.1) μM/day] or its blend with petroleum-JP5 (76.7 ± 2.4 μM/day). The detection of a suite of metabolites only in the fuel-amended incubations confirmed that alkylated benzene hydrocarbons were metabolized via known anaerobic mechanisms. Most importantly, general (r(2) = 0.73) and pitting (r(2) = 0.69) corrosion were positively correlated with sulfate loss in the incubations. Thus, the anaerobic biodegradation of labile fuel components coupled with sulfate respiration greatly contributed to the biocorrosion of carbon steel. While all fuels were susceptible to anaerobic metabolism, special attention should be given to camelina-JP5 biofuel due to its relatively rapid biodegradation. We recommend that this biofuel be used with caution and that whenever possible extended storage periods should be avoided. PMID:27058258

  1. Microbial selenite reduction with organic carbon and electrode as sole electron donor by a bacterium isolated from domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2016-07-01

    Selenium is said to be multifaceted element because it is essential at a low concentration but very toxic at an elevated level. For the purpose of screening a potential microorganism for selenite bioremediation, we isolated a bacterium, named strain THL1, which could perform both heterotrophic selenite reduction, using organic carbons such as acetate, lactate, propionate, and butyrate as electron donors under microaerobic condition, and electrotrophic selenite reduction, using an electrode polarized at -0.3V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) as the sole electron donor under anaerobic condition. This bacterium determined to be a new strain of the genus Cronobacter, could remove selenite with an efficiency of up to 100%. This study is the first demonstration on a pure culture could take up electrons from an electrode to perform selenite reduction. The selenium nanoparticles produced by microbial selenite reduction might be considered for recovery and use in the nanotechnology industry. PMID:27099943

  2. Production of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein by a novel oxygen-tolerant bovine rumen bacterium in the presence of atmospheric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Hong-Lei; Li, Chao-Dong; Wang, Shi-Ying

    2011-11-01

    The original bovine rumen bacterial strain Niu-O16, capable of anaerobically bioconverting isoflavones daidzein and genistein to dihydrodaidzein (DHD) and dihydrogenistein (DHG), respectively, is a rod-shaped obligate anaerobic bacterium. After a long-term domestication, an oxygen-tolerant bacterium, which we named Aeroto-Niu-O16 was obtained. Strain Aeroto-Niu-O16, which can grow in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, differed from the original obligate anaerobic bacterium Niu-O16 by various characteristics, including a change in bacterial shape (from rod to filament), in biochemical traits (from indole negative to indole positive and from amylohydrolysis positive to negative), and point mutations in 16S rRNA gene (G398A and G438A). We found that strain Aeroto-Niu-O16 not only grew aerobically but also converted isoflavones daidzein and genistein to DHD and DHG in the presence of atmospheric oxygen. The bioconversion rate of daidzein and genistein by strain Aeroto-Niu-O16 was 60.3% and 74.1%, respectively. And the maximum bioconversion capacity for daidzein was 1.2 and 1.6 mM for genistein. Furthermore, when we added ascorbic acid (0.15%, m/v) in the cultural medium, the bioconversion rate of daidzein was increased from 60.3% to 71.7%, and that of genistein from 74.1% to 89.2%. This is the first reported oxygen-tolerant isoflavone biotransforming pure culture capable of both growing and executing the reductive activity under aerobic conditions. PMID:21626023

  3. PILOT ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PULP MILL EVAPORATOR FOUL CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of three new anaerobic biological treatment technologies were compared and evaluated. Data were obtained from the operation of pilot plants representative of the anaerobic filter, anaerobic upflow sludge bed, and anaerobic fluidized bed. A review of recent literat...

  4. Study of Resource Recovery and Epidemiology in an Anaerobic Digester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. Y.; Cao, Song; Hunt, M. D.; Fu, Xuping

    1995-01-01

    Three 4-liter packed bed anaerobic digesters were fabricated and operated at 35 degrees C, pH around 7, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20, 10 and 5 days to study the resource recovery and epidemiology in a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). A simulated wastewater, consisted of shower water, clothwash water, dishwasher water, handwash water, and urine flush water was used as the feeding solution. Under steady-state operation, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium wer monitored in the digester input and output solutions. The volume and the CH4/CO2 ratios in the biogas produced from the anaerobic digesters were measured. The results indicate about 90 percent of TOC is converted while only 5-8 percent of N-P-K are consumed in the digester. A multi-drug resistant strain of Salmonella choleraesuis was used as the indicator bacterium in the epidemiology study. The levels of Salmonella choleraesuis in the influent and the effluent wer determined and decimal decay rate constants, k(d), were estimated. The k(d) values were greater at higher initial doses than lower doses for the same HR, and greater for batch digestion (7.89/d) than for continuous digestion (4.28, 3.82, and 3.82/d for 20, 10, and 5 d HRT, respectively).

  5. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  6. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  7. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  8. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  9. Effect of community structure on the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by Syntrophus buswellii grown in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11 was determined. Benzoate was degraded to a threshold value where no futher benzoate degradation was detected even after long incubation times. The addition of sodium acetate, but not sodium chloride, was found to affect the threshold value with higher values observed at higher acetate concentrations. Syntrophus buswellii was isolated in pure culture with crotonate as the substrate. Also, an anaerobic, fermentative bacterium that metabolizes 3-chlorophenoxyacetate and phenoxyacetate to the corresponding phenol was isolated in pure culture. The synthesis of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in Syntrophomonas wolfei was studied. The bacterium synthesized PHA directly from the {Beta}-oxidation intermediate during the initial stages of growth. Later, PHA was made by the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. The genes for PHA synthesis in S. wolfei have been cloned into Escherichia coli.

  10. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand < 1 g/l) and psychrophilic temperatures (10°C). For the treatment of organic suspensions, there is currently a tendency to evolve from the conventional mesophilic