Sample records for anal sphincter rupture

  1. Obstetric anal sphincter lacerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria L Handa; Beate H Danielsen; William M Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To estimate the frequency of obstetric anal sphincter laceration and to identify characteristics associated with this complication, including modifiable risk factors.METHODS:A population-based, retrospective study of over 2 million vaginal deliveries at California hospitals was performed, using information from birth certificates and discharge summaries for 1992 through 1997. We excluded preterm births, stillbirths, breech deliveries, and multiple gestations. The main outcome

  2. Fatigability of the External Anal Sphincter in Anal Incontinence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Telford; A. S. M. Ali; K. Lymer; G. L. Hosker; E. S. Kiff; J. Hill

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anal incontinence commonly results from external anal sphincter dysfunction. The muscle is routinely assessed by anorectal physiology studies. Fatigability is not routinely measured but should be an important factor in the maintenance of continence. The fatigue rate index has been developed to address this. The purpose of this study was to investigate the fatigability of the external anal sphincter

  3. Obstetric events leading to anal sphincter damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valerie Donnelly; Michelle Fynes; Deirdre Campbell; Howard Johnson; P. Ronan O’Connell; Colm O’Herlihy

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To identify the obstetric factors relating to anal sphincter injury at first vaginal delivery by prospective cohort study of primiparous women.Methods: We compared the results of a bowel function questionnaire and anal vector manometry before and 6 weeks after delivery in 184 primiparous women. Postpartum, pudendal nerve conduction latency was measured in all women, and anal endosonography was performed

  4. Disturbed anal sphincter function following vaginal delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne, J M; Myles, J L; Jones, I; Sapsford, R; Young, R E; Hattam, A; Cantamessa, S E

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently interest in idiopathic (neurogenic) faecal incontinence has swung from denervation of the external anal sphincter to the internal sphincter. AIMS: To evaluate the effects of vaginal delivery on the internal sphincter. SUBJECTS: 1372 mothers were studied antenatally and 1202 were accepted into the study. METHODS: Sphincter pressures were measured antenatally, in the early postnatal period, and six to 10 weeks later in selected patients. RESULTS: 755 of 1202 subjects assessed antenatally were primiparous women and 447 multiparous women. Some 320 previous spontaneous vaginal deliveries (SVD) (mean 59 mm Hg) and 67 previous forceps deliveries (mean 58 mm Hg) had lower resting pressures than 755 primiparous women (mean 66 mm Hg) (p < 0.01). A total of 493 subjects were reassessed postnatally. There were 372 SVDs, 47 vacuum extractions, 20 forceps, and 54 caesarean deliveries. All vaginal deliveries but not caesarean sections dropped their resting anal pressures from antenatal values (p < 0.001). Some 227 first SVDs had a much greater fall than 145 subsequent SVDs. In 162 subjects who had undergone their first vaginal delivery and who were followed up there was some recovery but the resting pressures were still lowered at six to 10 weeks post partum. CONCLUSIONS: The first vaginal delivery causes a permanent lowering of resting anal pressures. The possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:8881822

  5. Overlapping Repair in Patients with Anal Sphincter Injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sezai Demirbas; Vedat Atay; Ilker Sucullu; A. Ilker Filiz

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the improvement of anal canal function after overlap sphincter repair and confirm that this treatment option is superior in patients with nonobstetric sphincter damage. Subjects and Methods: From 1998 to 2003, 44 women who underwent overlapping sphincter repair were enrolled in this study. The women were allocated to one of two

  6. The relation of sensation in the anal canal to the functional anal sphincter: a possible factor in anal continence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. L. Duthie; R. C. Bennett

    1963-01-01

    In normal subjects the length of the functional anal sphincter has been compared with the extent of sensation to light touch in the anal canal. At rest, the sphincteric zone was the longer. On distension of the rectum, a decrease in pressure in the anal canal so shortened the functional sphincter that intrarectal pressure extended down to contact the sensory

  7. [Anal sphincter injury caused by falling off a trampoline].

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    A girl of preschool age fell off a trampoline in a sitting position onto an iron bar sticking up from the ground. In addition to a laceration of the terminal portion of the rectum, she was found to have a severe sphincter injury. The sphincters were repaired by a surgeon the next morning. After one month from the surgery the anal canal pressure was found to be symmetrical with good contractile force of the sphincters. No abnormalities were found in a contrast study or in rectoscopy. The protective stoma was closed after three months from the injury and fecal continence was normal after one and a half years. PMID:23901741

  8. Anal sphincter repair for obstetric injury: Manometric evaluation of functional results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Fleshman; Zeev Dreznik; Robert D. Fry; Ira J. Kodner

    1991-01-01

    Anal manometry before and after surgical repair on a homogeneous group of patients with anterior sphincter defect caused by obstetric injury defined the parameters affected by the repair to achieve anal continence. Between November 1985 and April 1989, 28 patients who underwent anterior anal sphincter reconstruction were studied using anal manometry and were graded for continence. Anal function was improved

  9. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  10. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS. PMID:25545893

  11. Preliminary investigation of the pharmacology of the human internal anal sphincter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Parks; D. J. Fishlock; J. D. H. Cameron; H. May

    1969-01-01

    The smooth muscle from the human internal anal sphincter has been investigated pharmacologically in vitro. The upper and lower parts of the sphincter responded to catecholamines in a similar manner. Noradrenaline caused contraction which could be antagonized by phenoxybenzamine. After phenoxybenzamine, noradrenaline caused relaxation which could be blocked by pronethalol. Isoprenaline caused relaxation which could be specifically prevented by pronethalol.

  12. Digital examination compared to trans-perineal ultrasound for the evaluation of anal sphincter repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Shobeiri; T. E. Nolan; R. Yordan-Jovet; K. T. Echols; R. R. Chesson

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the adequacy of a third- or a fourth-degree laceration repair by comparing digital and trans-perineal ultrasound measurements. Method: During a 4-year period, 34 subjects without prior history of anal sphincter injury or fecal incontinence underwent ultrasound measurements of external anal sphincter muscle diameter and perineal length, which were compared to measurements obtained by digital examination. Results: Pearson's

  13. Strength-Duration Testing of the External Anal Sphincter in Females with Anorectal Dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Mills; G. L. Hosker; E. S. Kiff; A. R. B. Smith

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The strength-duration test has been suggested as a means of assessing external anal sphincter function. This study was designed to investigate this claim by comparing the strength-duration test with established measures of external anal sphincter function. METHODS: Forty-nine females undergoing diagnostic anorectal testing (manometry, rectal sensation, electromyogram, pudendal nerve terminal motor latency, and endoanal ultrasound) also had the strength-duration

  14. The magnetic anal sphincter: a new device in the management of severe fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mantoo, Surendra; Meurette, Guillaume; Podevin, Juliette; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2012-09-01

    The authors aim to report the concept and technique of implantation and the first results of the clinical use of the magnetic anal sphincter (MAS) in the management of fecal incontinence (FI). The MAS device is designed to augment the native anal sphincter. The implant is a series of titanium beads with magnetic cores linked together with independent titanium wires. To defecate, the force generated by straining separates the beads to open up the anal canal. The technique of implantation is simple with no requirement of adjustments. The MAS has a role in the management of severe FI. The device has acceptable and comparable adverse effects to other therapies. FI and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scores are significantly improved in the short term. The MAS offers a simple and less invasive option of anal reinforcement. It is one step further in the quest for an ideal artificial anal sphincter device. PMID:23116075

  15. Mode of Vaginal Delivery: A Modifiable Intrapartum Risk Factor for Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simó González, Marta; Porta Roda, Oriol; Perelló Capó, Josep; Gich Saladich, Ignasi; Calaf Alsina, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the comparative risks of this anal sphincter injury in relation to the type of intervention in vaginal delivery. We performed an observational, retrospective study of all vaginal deliveries attended at a tertiary university hospital between January 2006 and December 2009. We analyzed the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury for each mode of vaginal delivery: spontaneous delivery, vacuum, Thierry spatulas, and forceps. We determined the proportional incidence between methods taking spontaneous delivery as the reference. Ninety-seven of 4526 (2.14%) women included in the study presented obstetric anal sphincter injury. Instrumental deliveries showed a significantly higher risk of anal sphincter injury (2.7 to 4.9%) than spontaneous deliveries (1.1%). The highest incidence was for Thierry spatulas (OR 4.804), followed by forceps (OR 4.089) and vacuum extraction (OR 2.509). The type of intervention in a vaginal delivery is a modifiable intrapartum risk factor for obstetric anal sphincter injury. Tearing can occur in any type of delivery but proportions vary significantly. All healthcare professionals attending childbirth should be aware of the risk for each type of intervention and consider these together with the obstetric factors in each case. PMID:25722727

  16. Effect of Micturition on the External Anal Sphincter: Identification of the Urethro–Anal Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Ahmed; Sibai, Olfat El; Shafik, Ismail; Shafik, Ali A

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objective: A study on the response of the external anal sphincter (EAS) to the passage of urine through the urethra during micturition could not be found in the literature. We investigated the hypothesis that urine passage through the urethra effects EAS contraction to guard against possible flatus or stool leakage during micturition. Methods: The study was performed in 23 healthy volunteers (age, 38.6 ± 10.8 [SD] years; 14 men and 9 women). The EAS electromyogram (EMG) was performed during micturition by surface electrodes applied to the EAS. Also, the EAS EMG response to urethral stimulation by a catheter-mounted electrode was registered. The test was repeated after individual anesthetization of the EAS and urethra. Results: The EAS EMG recorded a significant increase (P < 0.01) during micturition and on urethral stimulation at the bladder neck. Stimulation of the prostatic, membranous, or penile urethra produced no significant change in the EAS EMG. Urethral stimulation after individual EAS and urethral anesthetization did not cause any changes in the EAS EMG. Conclusions: Urine passing through the urethra or urethral stimulation at the vesical neck produced an increase in the EAS EMG, which presumably denotes EAS contraction, which seems to guard against flatus or fecal leakage during micturition. EAS contraction on urethral stimulation is suggested to be mediated through a urethro–anal reflex. Further studies on this issue may potentially prove the diagnostic significance of this reflex in micturition and defecation disorders. PMID:16869089

  17. Loperamide improves anal sphincter function and continence after restorative proctocolectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Hallgren; S. Fasth; D. S. Delbro; S. Nordgren; T. Öresland; L. Hultén

    1994-01-01

    The physiological and clinical effects of loperamide treatment versus placebo were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study in patients operated with restorative proctocolectomy. Sixteen patients operated with endoanal mucosectomy and a handsewn ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and 14 patients operated with abdominal proctocolectomy and stapling of the pouch to the top of the anal canal were studied. While loperamide treatment

  18. Long-Term Outcome of Overlapping Anal Sphincter Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy L. Halverson; Tracy L. Hull

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study reviews the long-term outcome of overlapping anal sphincteroplasty for acquired anal incontinence. METHODS: Seventy-one consecutive patients underwent overlapping sphincteroplasty from 1989 to 1996. Current degree of continence and associated quality of life were determined by telephone interview using the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale, as validated by The American Society of

  19. Biomechanical modeling of the rectum for the design of a novel artificial anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yan, Guozheng; Liu, Hua; Yang, Banghua; Zhao, Yujuan; Luo, Nianting

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses biomechanical issues that are related to the option of a novel artificial anal sphincter around the human rectum. The prosthesis consists of a compression cuff system inside and a reservoir cuff system outside, which is placed around the debilitated sphincter muscle. The micropump shifts fluid between the cuffs and thus takes over the expansion and compression function of the sphincter muscle. However, the human rectum is not a rigid pipe, and motion in it is further complicated by the fact that the bowel is susceptible to damage. With the goal of engineering a safe and reliable machine, the biomechanical properties of the in-vivo porcine rectum are studied and the tissue ischemia is analyzed. PMID:20715360

  20. Biochemical evaluation of an artificial anal sphincter made from shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Luo, Yun; Higa, Masaru; Zhang, Xiumin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Severe anal incontinence is a socially incapacitating disorder and a major unresolved clinical problem that has a considerable negative impact on quality of life. In this study, we developed a new artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) in order to improve the quality of life of such patients and evaluated the influence of this sphincter on blood serum chemistry in animal experiments. The artificial anal sphincter was driven by two Ti-Ni SMA actuators sandwiching the intestine and was implanted in three female goats. Blood was collected from the jugular vein on days 1 and 4; at weeks 1 and 2; and at months 1, 2, and 3, postoperatively. Biochemical parameters including total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, aspartate amino-transferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein were examined. The time courses of total bilirubin and aspartate amino transferase of the three goats were within the baseline levels after 1 week of implantation and remained normal, demonstrating no liver function complications. The blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels remained within the normal range, indicating no renal function complications. The total protein and albumin fluctuated within the normal range throughout the duration of this study. In these goats, it was also found that the level of C-reactive protein did not increase and that there was no stricture of the intestine where the artificial sphincter was attached. Our findings indicate that the artificial sphincter SMA demonstrated no adverse influence on blood serum chemistry and exhibited an effective system performance. PMID:18071852

  1. A novel artificial anal sphincter system in an in vitro and in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guo-Zheng; Liu, Hua; Jiang, Ping-Ping; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Yong-Bing; Ding, Zai-Xian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents some of the latest progress in the development of a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) to treat severe fecal incontinence. We have redesigned and integrated an intelligent, remote-controlled artificial anal sphincter based on biological signal feedback mechanisms. The device consists of an external telemetry unit, an internal artificial anal sphincter (IAAS), and a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS). The mechanical medical micropump of the IAAS can realize bidirectional flow with a maximum flow rate of 8.5 ml/min and can build backpressure up to 170 kPa. The design of the prosthesis reduces occlusion pressure and allows for low inflation volumes (9 mL-10.5 mL); operating pressures between 4.05 kPa and 7.16 kPa indicate that the risk of ischemic injury to the bowel is minimal. Furthermore, the rechargeable battery based on TETS puts the operation time at an estimated 2 days. The performance characteristics of the AASS and its efficiency in achieving continence and sensing the stool inside the anorectum were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a pig model. Experimental results confirm that the system can maintain continence and build the sense of defecation successfully. Moreover, this innovation can be integrated into not only severe fecal incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and therapy-resistant reflux disease, but also morbid adiposity therapeutic AASS applications. PMID:24744170

  2. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied. PMID:24362899

  3. Purse-string morphology of external anal sphincter revealed by novel imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Valmik; Sheean, Geoff; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    The external anal sphincter (EAS) may be injured in 25–35% of women during the first and subsequent vaginal childbirths and is likely the most common cause of anal incontinence. Since its first description almost 300 years ago, the EAS was believed to be a circular or a “donut-shaped” structure. Using three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound imaging, MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and muscle fiber tracking, we delineated various components of the EAS and their muscle fiber directions. These novel imaging techniques suggest “purse-string” morphology, with “EAS muscles” crossing contralaterally in the perineal body to the contralateral transverse perineal (TP) and bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, thus attaching the EAS to the pubic rami. Spin-tag MRI demonstrated purse-string action of the EAS muscle. Electromyography of TP/BS and EAS muscles revealed their simultaneous contraction and relaxation. Lidocaine injection into the TP/BS muscle significantly reduced anal canal pressure. These studies support purse-string morphology of the EAS to constrict/close the anal canal opening. Our findings have implications for the effect of episiotomy on anal closure function and the currently used surgical technique (overlapping sphincteroplasty) for EAS reconstructive surgery to treat anal incontinence. PMID:24458022

  4. Purse-string morphology of external anal sphincter revealed by novel imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Bhargava, Valmik; Sheean, Geoff; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-03-01

    The external anal sphincter (EAS) may be injured in 25-35% of women during the first and subsequent vaginal childbirths and is likely the most common cause of anal incontinence. Since its first description almost 300 years ago, the EAS was believed to be a circular or a "donut-shaped" structure. Using three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound imaging, MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and muscle fiber tracking, we delineated various components of the EAS and their muscle fiber directions. These novel imaging techniques suggest "purse-string" morphology, with "EAS muscles" crossing contralaterally in the perineal body to the contralateral transverse perineal (TP) and bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, thus attaching the EAS to the pubic rami. Spin-tag MRI demonstrated purse-string action of the EAS muscle. Electromyography of TP/BS and EAS muscles revealed their simultaneous contraction and relaxation. Lidocaine injection into the TP/BS muscle significantly reduced anal canal pressure. These studies support purse-string morphology of the EAS to constrict/close the anal canal opening. Our findings have implications for the effect of episiotomy on anal closure function and the currently used surgical technique (overlapping sphincteroplasty) for EAS reconstructive surgery to treat anal incontinence. PMID:24458022

  5. Nerve mediated relaxation of the human internal anal sphincter: the role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, T; Brading, A; Mortensen, N

    1993-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if nitric oxide (NO) is the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmitter, released by enteric inhibitory nerves, which mediates relaxation of the human internal anal sphincter. Isolated muscle strips were mounted for isometric tension recording in superfusion organ baths. Sodium nitroprusside, an exogenous donor of NO, relaxed the strips in a concentration dependent manner. In the presence of atropine and guanethidine, transmural field stimulation produced tetrodotoxin sensitive relaxations, which were inhibited in a dose dependent and enantiomer specific manner by antagonists of NO synthase; completely by L-nitroarginine and partially by L-N-monomethyl arginine. The effect of these antagonists was reversed by L-arginine but not D-arginine. Oxyhaemoglobin, a scavenger of nitric oxide, also abolished the relaxations but methaemoglobin had no such effect. These results strongly suggest that NO is, or is very closely associated with, the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmitter mediating neurogenic relaxation of the human internal anal sphincter. PMID:7684992

  6. Automatic detection of motor unit innervation zones of the external anal sphincter by multichannel surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Khalil; Cescon, Corrado; Afsharipour, Babak; Merletti, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    A method to detect automatically the location of innervation zones (IZs) from 16-channel surface EMG (sEMG) recordings from the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle is presented in order to guide episiotomy during child delivery. The new algorithm (2DCorr) is applied to individual motor unit action potential (MUAP) templates and is based on bidimensional cross correlation between the interpolated image of each MUAP template and two images obtained by flipping upside-down (around a horizontal axis) and left-right (around a vertical axis) the original one. The method was tested on 640 simulated MUAP templates of the sphincter muscle and compared with previously developed algorithms (Radon Transform, RT; Template Match, TM). Experimental signals were detected from the EAS of 150 subjects using an intra-anal probe with 16 equally spaced circumferential electrodes. The results of the three algorithms were compared with the actual IZ location (simulated signal) and with IZ location provided by visual analysis (VA) (experimental signals). For simulated signals, the inter quartile error range (IQR) between the estimated and the actual locations of the IZ was 0.20, 0.23, 0.42, and 2.32 interelectrode distances (IED) for the VA, 2DCorr, RT and TM methods respectively. PMID:24948528

  7. Membrane hyperpolarization, cyclic nucleotide levels and relaxation in the guinea-pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, A. A.; Muir, T. C.

    1990-01-01

    1. Changes in membrane potential (measured with an intracellular microelectrode) and in cyclic nucleotide (adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate, cyclic AMP and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate, cyclic GMP) levels (measured by radioimmunoassay) in response to inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) field stimulation and drugs were investigated in the guinea-pig internal and anal sphincter (gpIAS) in the presence of phentolamine and atropine (each 10(-6) M). 2. Inhibitory NANC nerve stimulation (single pulse, 5 pulses at 5, 10 and 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP, 10(-7)-10(-3) M) inhibited spike discharge, hyperpolarized the membrane and relaxed the sphincter. The effects of inhibitory nerve stimulation were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10(-6) M) and, with those of ATP, were blocked by apamin (5 x 10(-6) M). 3. Isoprenaline (10(-9)-10(-4) M), cromakalim (10(-9)-10(-5) M), sodium nitroprusside (NaNP 10(-5) M), M&B 22948 (10(-4) M) and 8-bromocyclic GMP (8-Br-cyclic GMP, 10(-4) M) also inhibited spike discharge, hyperpolarized the membrane and relaxed the sphincter. The effects of isoprenaline were blocked by propranolol (10(-6) M). However, forskolin (10(-9)-10(-7) M), M&B 22948 (10(-9)-10(-5) M) and lower concentrations of NaNP (10(-9)-10(-6) M) relaxed the sphincter without affecting the membrane potential. 4. The characteristics of the membrane potential changes in response to different inhibitory stimuli in the gpIAS differed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1974160

  8. Function of posterior HoxD genes in the morphogenesis of the anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Dollé, P; Zákány, J; Duboule, D

    1996-09-01

    Vertebrate 5'-located HoxD genes are expressed in the most caudal part of the digestive tract and their potential functions during gut development have been assessed by gene disruptions. We have inserted reporter lacZ sequences within the Hoxd-12 gene and analysed the morphology of the gut in these mice as well as in Hoxd-13 mutant animals. When homozygous, both mutations induce an important disorganization of the anorectal region. In particular, severe alterations of the smooth muscle layers of the rectum led to defective morphogenesis of the internal anal sphincter. Similarly, Hoxd-12 and Hoxd-13 functionally overlap during digit development. The function of these genes in the morphogenesis of the digestive system as well as their functional evolution are discussed. PMID:8787740

  9. Anterior anal sphincter repair can be of long term benefit: a 12-year case cohort from a single surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Benjamin R; Sheldon, Rowena R; Telford, Karen J; Kiff, Edward S

    2007-01-01

    Background Early surgical results of anterior sphincter repair for faecal incontinence can be good, but in the longer term are often disappointing. This study aimed to determine the short and long term outcomes from anterior sphincter repair and identify factors predictive of long term success. Methods Patients who underwent anterior sphincter repair between 1989 and 2001 in one institution were identified. Postal questionnaires were sent to patients, which included validated scoring systems for symptom severity and quality of life assessments for faecal incontinence. Patient demographics and risk factors were recorded as were the results of anorectal physiology studies and endoanal ultrasound. Results Eighty-five patients underwent repair by one consultant. The length of follow up ranged from 1 to 12 years. Most patients (96%) had early symptom improvement postoperatively. Of the 47 patients assessed long term (? 5 years), 28 (60%) maintained this success. Significant improvements in quality of life were observed (P < 0.001). Neither patient, surgical nor anorectal physiology study parameters were predictive of outcome. Conclusion There were no predictive factors of outcome success and no changes in anal manometry identified, however anterior sphincter repair remains worthwhile. Changes in compliance of the anorectum may be responsible for symptom improvement. PMID:17217528

  10. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process. PMID:25808086

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 upregulation modulates tone and fibroelastic properties of internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2014-09-15

    A compromise in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone and fibroelastic properties (FEP) plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence. Herein, we examined the effects of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 upregulation on these IAS characteristics in young rats. We determined the effect of HO-1 upregulator hemin on HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions and on basal IAS tone and its FEP before and after HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX. For FEP, we determined the kinetics of the IAS smooth muscle responses, by the velocities of relaxation, and recovery of the IAS tone following 0 Ca(2+) and electrical field stimulation. To characterize the underlying signal transduction for these changes, we determined the effects of hemin on RhoA-associated kinase (RhoA)/Rho kinase (ROCK) II, myosin-binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase 1, fibronectin, and elastin expression levels. Hemin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein similar to the increases in the basal tone, and in the FEP of the IAS. Underlying mechanisms in the IAS characteristics are associated with increases in the genetic and translational expressions of RhoA/ROCKII, and elastin. Fibronectin expression levels on the other hand were found to be decreased following HO-1 upregulation. The results of our study show that the hemin/HO-1 system regulates the tone and FEP of IAS. The hemin/HO-1 system thus provides a potential target for the development of new interventions aimed at treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, specifically the age-related IAS dysfunction. PMID:25035109

  12. Immunoglobulins from scleroderma patients inhibit the muscarinic receptor activation in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Mehendiratta, Vaibhav; Del Galdo, Francesco; Jimenez, Sergio A.; Cohen, Sidney; DiMarino, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) IgGs affecting the M3-muscarinic receptor (M3-R) have been proposed to be responsible for the gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility in this disease. However, the effect of SSc IgGs on smooth muscle cell (SMC) function has not been studied. We determined the effect of SSc IgGs on the muscarinic receptor activation by bethanechol (BeCh; methyl derivate of carbachol) in SMC and smooth muscle strips from rat internal anal sphincter. IgGs were purified from GI-symptomatic SSc patients and normal volunteers, with protein G-Sepharose columns. SMC lengths were determined via computerized digital micrometry. The presence of M3-R and IgG-M3-R complex was determined by Western blot. IgGs from SSc patients but not from normal volunteers caused significant and concentration-dependent inhibition of BeCh response (P < 0.05). The maximal shortening of 22.2 ± 1.2% caused by 10?4 M BeCh was significantly attenuated to 8.3 ± 1.2% by 1 mg/ml of SSc IgGs (P < 0.05). Experiments performed in smooth muscle strips revealed a similar effect of SSc IgG that was fully reversible. In contrast to the effect on BeCh, the SSc IgGs caused no significant effect (P > 0.05) on K+ depolarization and ?1-adrenoceptor activation by phenylephrine. Western blot studies revealed the specific presence of SSc IgG-M3-R complex. SSc IgGs attenuated M3-R activation, which was reversible with antibody removal. These data suggest that SSc GI dysmotility may be caused by autoantibodies that inhibit the muscarinic neurotransmission. Future treatment of SSc patients may be directed at the removal or neutralization of these antibodies. PMID:19779020

  13. Effects of Scleroderma Antibodies and Pooled Human Immunoglobulin on Anal Sphincter and Colonic Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, JAGMOHAN; COHEN, SIDNEY; MEHENDIRATTA, VAIBHAV; MENDOZA, FABIAN; JIMENEZ, SERGIO A.; DIMARINO, ANTHONY J.; RATTAN, SATISH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) have impairments in gastrointestinal smooth muscle function. The disorder has been associated with circulating antibodies to cholinergic muscarinic type-3 receptor (M3-R). We investigated whether it is possible to neutralize these antibodies with pooled human immunoglobulin (Ig)Gs (pooledhIgG). METHODS We studied the effects of IgGs purified from patients with SSc (SScIgGs) on cholinergic nerve stimulation in rat colon tissues. We also examined the effects of SScIgGs on M3-R activation by bethanechol (BeCh), M3-R occupancy, and receptor binding using mmunofluorescence, immunoblot, and ELISA analyses of human internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle cells (hSMCs), before and after administration of pooledhIgG. Functional displacement of M3-R occupancy by the SScIgGs was compared with that of other IgGs during the sustained phase of BeCh-induced contraction of intact smooth muscles from rats. RESULTS SScIgG significantly attenuated neutrally mediated contraction and acetylcholine release in rat colon as well as BeCh-induced sustained contraction of the IAS smooth muscle. In immunofluorescence analysis, SScIgG co-localized with M3-R. In immunoblot and ELISA analyses, M3-R loop-2 peptide and human IAS SMC membrane lysates bound significant amounts of SScIgG, compared with IgGs from healthy individuals and pooledhIgG. Binding was significantly attenuated by application of pooledhIgG, which by itself had no significant effect. Incubation of samples with pooledhIgG, or mixing pooledhIgG with SScIgG before administration to tissues, significantly reduced binding of SScIgG, indicating that pooledhIgG prevents SScIgG blockade of M3-R. CONCLUSIONS In studies of rat and human tissues, pooled human IgGs prevent and reverse the cholinergic dysfunctions associated with the progressive gastrointestinal manifestations of SSc, by neutralizing functional M3-R antibodies present in the circulation of patients with SSc. PMID:22864255

  14. Dose-Response Relations for Anal Sphincter Regarding Fecal Leakage and Blood or Phlegm in Stools after Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Panayiotis Mavroidis; Massoud al-Abany; Ásgeir R. Helgason; Anna-Karin Ågren Cronqvist; Peter Wersäll; Helena Lind; Eva Qvanta; Kyriaki Theodorou; Constantin Kappas; Bengt K. Lind; Gunnar Steineck; Anders Brahme

    2005-01-01

    Background: The estimation of the parameters that describe the dose-response relations of anal sphincter regarding the clinical endpoints of fecal leakage and blood or phlegm in stools is important in the optimization of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Also, the validity of the relative seriality model for this clinical case needs to be examined by associating the clinical follow-up results with the

  15. Delivery through perineal body and severed external anal sphincter with an intact vaginal orifice during a precipitous labor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Khadijah Irfah; McDonnell, Brendan; O'Coigligh, Seosamh

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present the case of a patient who delivered her baby through the perineal body with an intact vaginal introitus. Damage to the perineal body through its connection to the external anal sphincter can involve the rectovaginal septum with increased morbidity and thought to be linked to rectocele development. PMID:25984315

  16. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Anal Sphincter Preservation with Locally Advanced Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro Luna-Pérez; Saúl Rodríguez-Ramírez; Darío F. Rodriguez-Coria; Armando Fernández; Sonia Labastida; Alejandro Silva; Marvin J. López

    2001-01-01

    .   Preoperative irradiation has been used to produce tumor regression and allow complete resection of rectal cancer with a sphincter-saving\\u000a procedure. To evaluate the associated toxicity, the response in the primary tumor, and the postsurgical morbidity in a group\\u000a of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy and low anterior resection,\\u000a 120 patients were treated with

  17. Increased motor unit fibre density in the external anal sphincter muscle in ano-rectal incontinence: a single fibre EMG study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M E Neill; M Swash

    1980-01-01

    The motor unit fibre density in the external anal sphincter muscle has been measured in 13 normal subjects aged 18 to 78 years, and in 14 patients with ano-rectal incontinence, aged 17 to 72 years. The mean fibre density in the normal subjects was 1.5 +\\/- 0.16, and in the incontinent subjects it was 2.17 +\\/- 0.28 (p less than

  18. Surgical Reconstruction of the Urinary Sphincter after Traumatic Longitudinal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Peter; Schillfahrt, Florian; Skradski, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    The question is whether the urethral sphincter may be reconstructed after longitudinal injury similar to anal sphincter injuries. Analogue to obstetric, anal sphincter repair, an approximation repair of the sphincter may be feasible. An overlap repair is possible in anal sphincter repair, but because of the little tissue available in the urethral sphincter this is not an option. We describe three cases of urethral sphincter injury of different aetiologies. All resulted in a total longitudinal disruption of the muscular components of the urethral sphincter complex. After making the diagnosis of urethral sphincter injury, a primary approximation repair was done. Follow-up of at least two and up to three years is promising with one male patient being completely continent and the two female patients needing one safety pad per day. Longitudinal disruption of the muscular elements of the sphincteric urethra may be primarily reconstructed with good success using an approximation technique with simple interrupted sutures. PMID:25258694

  19. Dosimetric Coverage of the External Anal Sphincter by 3-Dimensional Conformal Fields in Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Implications for the Concept of Sphincter-Preserving Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michelle B.; Liu, Alan J.; Tsai, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the anatomic location of the external anal sphincter (EAS) to pelvic bony landmarks related to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DRT) and studied the dosimetric coverage of the EAS in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods. Sixty-four consecutive rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were included. All patients were treated in a prone position on a bellyboard by 3DRT. The inferior border of the RT fields was at least 3–5?cm inferior to the gross tumorous volume (GTV) or at the inferior border of the obturator foramen (IBOF), whichever was more inferior. The EAS was contoured and dose distributions were determined using dose-volume histograms. Results. In 53 out of 64 cases (82.8%), the EAS was completely inferior to the IBOF. In the remaining 11 cases, the EAS was either overlapping the IBOF (10 cases; 15.6%) or completely superior to the IBOF (1 case; 1.7%). The average mean dose delivered to the EAS was 2795?cGy. Lower mean doses were delivered to the EAS when the center of the EAS was located more distant from the GTV. Conclusions. Meticulous planning to define the inferior border of the RT field is recommended to avoid irradiating the EAS. PMID:25089274

  20. [Anal fissure].

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Anal fissures are present in about 10-15% of proctological patients. The cause of the illness is unknown, but is probably multifactorial. Cardinal symptoms are pain during and after defecation, as well as persistent sphincter spasm. In most cases an acute anal fissure heals spontaneously or with adequate conservative therapy. Chronic anal fissures can be cured in some cases by conservative treatment. Where there is treatment resistance, surgical cleansing is necessary. PMID:15038578

  1. Anal Ultrasound Predicts the Response to Nonoperative Treatment of Fecal Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Herbert; Humphreys, M. Smilgin; Kettlewell, Michael G. W.; Bulkley , Gregory B.; Mortensen, Neil; George, Bruce D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To assess the etiology, treatment, and utility of anal ultrasound in men with fecal incontinence and to review the outcomes of conservative (nonoperative) treatment. Summary Background Data The etiology of fecal incontinence in women is almost exclusively from obstetric or iatrogenic surgical injuries resulting in damage to the anal sphincters and/or pudendal nerves. Corresponding data on men with fecal incontinence are sparse. Methods Between January 1995 and January 1998, 37 men with fecal incontinence were evaluated in the John Radcliffe Hospital anorectal ultrasound unit. Their clinical histories, anal ultrasound results, anorectal physiology studies, and responses to conservative therapy were reviewed. Results Median age was 57 years. Major incontinence was present in 27% of the patients. Anal ultrasound localized anal sphincter damage in nine patients, and the characteristics of these nine patients with sphincter damage were then compared with the remaining 28 without sphincter damage. Prior anal surgery was more common in patients with sphincter damage. Hemorrhoids were more common in patients without sphincter damage. Anorectal physiology studies revealed significantly lower mean maximum resting and squeeze pressures in patients with sphincter damage, confirming poor sphincter function. With 92% follow-up, patients without sphincter damage were more likely to improve with nonoperative therapy. Conclusions Anal ultrasound is extremely useful in the evaluation of fecal incontinence in men. Unlike women, the majority of men do not have a sphincter defect by anal ultrasound, and conservative management is usually successful in these patients. In contrast, in men with anal sphincter damage, almost all of these defects resulted from previous anal surgery. Conservative management rarely is successful in these cases, and surgical repair of the anal sphincter may be indicated. Therefore, because the presence or absence of sphincter damage on anal ultrasound usually predicts the response to nonoperative treatment, anal ultrasound should be used to guide the initial management of men with fecal incontinence. PMID:10235533

  2. Modern management of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques. PMID:25574077

  3. Modern management of anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques. PMID:25574077

  4. Anorectal conditions: anal fissure and anorectal fistula.

    PubMed

    Fox, Audralan; Tietze, Pamela H; Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Anal fissures are linear splits in the anal mucosa. Acute fissures typically resolve within a few weeks; chronic fissures persist longer than 8 to 12 weeks. Most fissures are posterior and midline and are related to constipation or anal trauma. Painful defecation and rectal bleeding are common symptoms. The diagnosis typically is clinical. High-fiber diet, stool softeners, and medicated ointments relieve symptoms and speed healing of acute fissures but offer limited benefit in chronic fissures. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical management of choice for chronic and refractory acute fissures. Anorectal fistula is an abnormal tract connecting the anorectal mucosa to the exterior skin. Fistulas typically develop after rupture or drainage of a perianal abscess. Fistulas are classified as simple or complex; low or high; and intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric, or extrasphincteric. Inspection of the perianal area identifies the skin opening, and anoscopy visualizes internal openings. The goal of management is to obliterate the tract and openings with negligible sphincter disruption to minimize incontinence. Fistulotomy is effective for simple fistulas; patients with complex fistulas may require fistulectomy. Other procedures that are used include injection of fibrin glue or insertion of a bioprosthetic plug into the fistula opening. PMID:24742084

  5. Fistulotomy or seton in anal fistula: a decisional algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Fistula in ano is a common proctological disease. Several authors stated that internal and external anal sphincters preservation is in the interest of continence maintenance. The aim of the present study is to report our experience using a decisional algorithm on sphincter saving procedures that achieved us to obtain good results with low rate of complications. From 2008 to 2011, 206 patients underwent surgical treatment for anal fistula; 28 patients underwent perianal abscess drainage plus seton placement of trans-sphincteric or supra-sphincteric fistula (13.6 %), 41 patients underwent fistulotomy for submucosal or low inter-sphincteric or low trans-sphincteric anal fistula (19.9 %) and 137 patients underwent partial fistulectomy or partial fistulotomy (from cutaneous plan to external sphincter muscle plan) and cutting seton placement without internal sphincterotomy for trans-sphincteric anal fistula (66.50 %). Healing rates have been of 100 % and healing times ranged from 1 to 6 months in 97 % of patients treated by setons. Transient fecal soiling was reported by 19 patients affected by trans-sphincteric fistula (11.5 %) for 4-6 months and then disappeared or evolved in a milder form of flatus occasional incontinence. No major incontinence has been reported also after fistulotomy. Fistula recurred in five cases of trans-sphincteric fistula treated by seton placement (one with abscess) (1/28) (3.5 %) and four with trans-sphincteric fistula (4/137) (3 %). Our algorithm permitted us to reduce to 20 % sphincter cutting procedures without reporting postoperative major anal incontinence; it seems to open an interesting way in the treatment of anal fistula. PMID:23729353

  6. Sphincter denervation in anorectal incontinence and rectal prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A G Parks; M Swash; H Urich

    1977-01-01

    Biopsies of the external anal sphincter, puborectalis, and levator ani muscles have been examined in 24 women and one man with long-standing anorectal incontinence, 18 of whom also had rectal prolapse, and in two men with rectal prolapse alone. In 16 of the women anorectal incontinence was of unknown cause, but in eight there was a history of difficult labour.

  7. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  8. Sphincteroplasty for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Pescatori, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Sphincteroplasty (SP) is the operation most frequently performed in patients suffering from moderate-to-severe anal incontinence (AI) who do not respond to conservative treatment. Other costly surgeries, such as artificial bowel sphincter (ABS) and electro-stimulated graciloplasty, have been more or less abandoned due to their high morbidity rate. Minimally invasive procedures are widely used, such as sacral neuromodulation and injection of bulking agents, but both are costly and the latter may cure only mild incontinence. The early outcome of SP is usually good if the sphincters are not markedly denervated, but its effect diminishes over time. SP is more often performed for post-traumatic than for idiopathic AI. It may also be associated to the Altemeier procedure, aimed at reducing the recurrence rate of rectal prolapse, and may be useful when AI is due either to injury to the sphincter, or to a narrowed rectum following the procedure for prolapse and haemorrhoids (PPH) and stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR). The outcome of SP is likely to be improved with biological meshes and post-operative pelvic floor rehabilitation. SP is more effective in males than in multiparous women, whose sphincters are often denervated, and its post-operative morbidity is low. In conclusion, SP, being both low-cost and safe, remains a good option in the treatment of selected patients with AI. PMID:24759337

  9. Sphincter-sparing techniques for fistulas-in-ano.

    PubMed

    Pommaret, E; Benfredj, P; Soudan, D; de Parades, V

    2015-04-01

    Anal fistulas require surgical treatment to cure the fistula. Fistulotomy is the treatment of choice because of its high success rate, but it also carries a risk of postoperative incontinence. Different methods have been proposed to overcome the need for dividing part or all of the sphincter, so-called "sphincter saving techniques" (SST), such as flap advancement, intrafistular injection of glue, or the insertion of a bio-prosthesis (collagen plug). However, the success rate of SSTs is lower than that of fistulotomy. Ligation of the Intersphincteric Fistula Tract (LIFT) is one of the most recent SSTs. It aims to ligate and transect the fistula by an approach through the intersphincteric space. The methodological quality of most published studies has been only average, but several studies have reported attractive success rates of 70 to 95% without postoperative incontinence. Other techniques such as endo-anal clip or injection of autologous stem cells are still anecdotal. PMID:25280598

  10. Endosonography of the Anal Canal and Rectum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adarsh Kumar; John Howard Scholefield

    2000-01-01

    .   Endosonography has evolved into an effective tool for the accurate preoperative assessment of anorectal pathology, from idiopathic\\u000a anal pain to malignancy. The published data suggest that endosonography is currently the best method for assessing the structural\\u000a integrity of the anal sphincter and for staging rectal cancer. The development of new treatment modalities for rectal cancer,\\u000a including local excision, preoperative

  11. Conservative management of anal leiomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Hajdu, S.I. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the large intestine are unusual neoplasms, comprising less than 0.1% of all malignancies of the colon and rectum. Six cases of leiomyosarcoma of the anus have been reported. The optimal treatment for this neoplasm is not known. The standard surgical approach is abdominoperineal resection. The authors report the seventh case of this rare neoplasm and outline its treatment using local excision and iridium 192 brachytherapy in an attempt to preserve the anal sphincter. In selected patients, conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy may be an alternative to radical surgery, with the goals of local control of the disease and anal sphincter preservation. However, more experience is needed before this approach could be recommended routinely.

  12. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (inventors)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  13. The cardiac sphincter in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C. G.; Vane, J. R.

    1961-01-01

    A study of the function of the lower end of the oesophagus in the cat confirms that it behaves as a true physiological sphincter, even though histological evidence for such a structure is absent. Sphincteric action is a function of the circular muscle fibres in the lowest 2 cm. of the oesophagus. Reflex changes in tone of the sphincter are mediated through the autonomic nervous system. The effects of possible neurohumoral transmitters, nerve stimulation, and antagonists have been studied. PMID:13879670

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Role of Raised Anal Pressures in the Pathogenesis of Symptomatic Early Hemorrhoids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashutosh Chauhan; Shaji Thomas; Prem Kumar Bishnoi; Niladhar S. Hadke

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increased maximum resting anal pressures (MRAP) have been found in patients with large prolapsed hemorrhoids undergoing hemorrhoidectomy, but their pathogenic role is controversial especially in view of the sphincteric damage that occurs with open and stapled procedures. This prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare anal pressure changes in early symptomatic hemorrhoidal disease before and after successful treatment

  15. Anal function in geriatric patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J A; Brocklehurst, J C; Kiff, E S; Ferguson, G; Faragher, E B

    1989-09-01

    The association of faecal incontinence with constipation and confusion in the elderly is well recognised but the anal function of faecally incontinent geriatric patients is poorly understood. Anal studies were therefore performed on 99 geriatric patients (49 with faecal incontinence, 19 continent patients with faecal impaction and 31 geriatric control patients with normal bowel habit) and 57 younger healthy control patients. An age related reduction in anal squeeze pressure but not resting pressure was identified. A reduction in anal resting pressure was detected in the faecally incontinent geriatric patients but squeeze pressure did not differ significantly from that found in the other geriatric patients. Anal sensation was impaired in the faecally incontinent patients. No difference was found between the groups as measured by pudendal nerve terminal motor latency. Gross neuropathy of the distal part of the pudendal nerve does not account for the observed external anal sphincter weakness in geriatric patients or for their faecal incontinence. Internal anal sphincter dysfunction is an important factor in faecal incontinence in the elderly. PMID:2806992

  16. Results with sphincter pharyngoplasty and pharyngeal flap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lianne M. de Serres; Frederic W.-B. Deleyiannis; Linda E. Eblen; Joseph S. Gruss; Mark A. Richardson; Kathleen C. Y. Sie

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate speech outcomes and complications of sphincter pharyngoplasty and pharyngeal flap performed for management of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Design: Case series. Setting: Tertiary care children’s hospital. Patients: All patients who underwent pharyngeal flap or sphincter pharyngoplasty from 1990 to 1995. Methods: Perceptual speech analysis was used to assess severity of VPI, presence of nasal air emissions and quality

  17. Anal Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... liquid nitrogen or removed surgically. Surgery typically involves cutting or burning the warts off. While this provides ... sexual contact with individuals who have anal (or genital) warts. Since many individuals may be unaware that ...

  18. The treatment of sphincter strictures.

    PubMed

    Mundy, A R

    1989-12-01

    A group of 25 patients with strictures of the membranous urethra following transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) were investigated and treated initially by careful urethral dilatation. This controlled the stricture in 14 patients, 6 of whom continued with occasional dilatation or self-catheterisation to maintain control; 8 required an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) and 2 required a "clam" ileocystoplasty for detrusor instability. Eleven had persistent or recurrent strictures requiring urethroplasty. Nine underwent bulbo-prostatic anastomotic urethroplasty, 4 with simultaneous bladder neck reconstruction and 5 with subsequent implantation of an AUS; 2 had a preputial patch urethroplasty with subsequent implantation of an AUS. Four of the 9 patients with a urethroplasty and an AUS are satisfactory, 1 developed a recurrent stricture and 2 developed erosions. Two of those with a bulbo-prostatic anastomosis and bladder neck reconstruction are satisfactory and 2 are incontinent. These results were compared with those of 18 other patients who underwent bladder neck reconstruction and 12 who had a urethroplasty in conjunction with an AUS for reasons other than a post-TURP sphincter stricture. The success rate of bladder neck reconstruction was 55% and the success rate of urethroplasty in conjunction with an AUS was 83%, but the main complication of AUS implantation, erosion, was a more serious problem than failure of bladder neck reconstruction. However, the much higher success rate makes AUS implantation a more satisfactory procedure. Surgery should be avoided if at all possible and reliance placed on urethral dilatation. PMID:2627637

  19. Anal Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qing Zhang; Shen Fu; Luther W. Brady

    \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal is a relatively rare malignancy, with an increasing incidence.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Symptoms of anal cancer depend on the location of the primary disease and its extent. Common signs and symptoms include rectal\\u000a bleeding, rectorrhagia, anal mass, and pain. Inguinal lymph adenopathy is common in diseases more advanced.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Histological confirmation of diagnosis

  20. Anal fissure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a warm water bath used for healing or cleansing. You should sit in the bath two to three times a day. The water should cover only your hips and buttocks. If the anal fissures do not go away with home care ...

  1. The importance of anal endosonography in the evaluation of idiopathic fecal incontinence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ragnhild Emblem; Gonda Dhaenens; Ragnar Stien; Lars Mørkrid; Ansgar O. Aasen; Anstein Bergan

    1994-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of anal endosonography in idiopathic incontinence. METHODS: In 29 patients and 26 normal controls, the relationship between sonography images and physiologic parameters was studied. RESULTS: External anal sphincter function, measured as fiber density by single-fiber electromyography (P=0.0001) and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (P=0.04), was significantly impaired in patients

  2. Anal canal anatomy showed by three-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Sergio P. Regadas; Sthela M. Murad-Regadas; Doryane M. R. Lima; Flavio R. Silva; Rosilma G. L. Barreto; Marcellus H. L. P. Souza; F. Sergio P. Regadas Filho

    2007-01-01

    Background  Demonstrate precisely the anatomic configuration of the anal canal and the length and thickness of the anal sphincters using\\u000a three-dimensional (3-D) anorectal ultra-sonography in both genders.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twelve normal volunteer males and 14 females, with a mean age of 52.4 and 50.3 years, respectively, were prospectively enrolled\\u000a in this study. All individuals from both groups were submitted to anorectal ultra-sonography. The

  3. What is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Toouli, J

    1989-01-01

    Ever since its description approximately 100 years ago, the sphincter of Oddi has been surrounded by controversy. First, whether it indeed existed, second, whether it had a significant physiological role in man and more recently whether abnormalities in its function give rise to a clinical syndrome. Data from animal and human studies, using sensitive techniques, have helped define the physiological role of the sphincter of Oddi, and more recent studies are determining the factors which control sphincter of Oddi function. These studies support Oddi's original description that the sphincter has a major role in the control of flow of bile and pancreatic juice into the duodenum, and equally importantly helps prevent the reflux of duodenal contents into the biliary and pancreatic ductal systems. The controversy of whether abnormalities in sphincter of Oddi motility result in clinical syndromes has not been totally resolved. Part of the difficulty has been inability to document normal and hence abnormal function of the sphincter. With the emergence of endoscopic biliary manometry as a sensitive and reproducible technique, however, the motility of the human sphincter of Oddi has come under closer scrutiny and allowed definition of possible disorders. We have used the term sphincter of Oddi dysfunction to define manometric abnormalities in patients who present with signs and symptoms consistent with a biliary or pancreatic ductal origin. Based on the manometry, we have subdivided the dysfunction into two groups; a group characterised by a stenotic pattern - that is, raised sphincter basal pressure - and a second group having a dyskinetic pattern - that is, paradoxical response to cholecystokinin injection, rapid contraction frequency, high percentage of retrograde contractions, or short periods of raised basal percentage of retrograde contractions, or short periods of raised basal pressure. It is apparent from the mamometry but also from the clinical data that the patients are a heterogeneous group and thus any therapy would need to be tailored for each patient and abnormality. The most recent therapeutic data suggest that patients with the stenotic pattern on manometry respond to division of the sphincter, however, those patients with the dyskinetic manometric pattern show no significant effect after sphincterotomy. Further prospective trials evaluating therapeutic options are under way and their results are eagerly awaited. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2666281

  4. Treatment of anal fistula and abscess.

    PubMed

    Pigot, F

    2015-04-01

    The glands of Hermann and Desfosses, located in the thickness of the anal canal, drain into the canal at the dentate line. Infection of these anal glands is responsible for the formation of abscesses and/or fistulas. When this presents as an abscess, emergency drainage of the infected cavity is required. At the stage of fistula, treatment has two sometimes conflicting objectives: effective drainage and preservation of continence. These two opposing constraints explain the existence of two therapeutic concepts. On one hand the laying-open of the fistulous tract (fistulotomy) in one or several operative sessions remains the treatment of choice because of its high cure rates. On the other hand surgical closure with tract ligation or obturation with biological components preserves sphincter function but suffers from a higher failure rate. PMID:25261376

  5. Anal lesions presenting in a cohort of child gastroenterological examinations. Implications for sexual traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde; Houdu, Sora; Darviot, Estelle; Buchaillet, Céline; Baron, Céline

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anal lesions found in children during a pediatric gastroenterology consultation when the reason for the complaint was related to a digestive disease. This prospective descriptive study included 100 children under 15 years of age over a 13-month period, consulting due to digestive symptoms. The children were under 8 years old (90%) and 25% were under 3.1 years old. Constipation was the most frequent reason for consultation (69%). Fifty-one anal lesions were observed, of which 58.8% were anal fissures, 15.7% were skin tags and 5.8% were venous congestions related to straining. Anal fissures and skin tags were located at the median line, according to the clock-face method in supine position. No child had more than two anal lesions. No anal dilatation, sphincter hypotonia, anal scars, anal lacerations or bruises were found. The two most common anal lesions were anal fissures and skin tags. These anal lesions were mainly observed at the median line and were due to constipation. No cases of multiple anal lesions were found in terms of common digestive diseases. PMID:25882145

  6. Das Faserkaliber in den Mm. transversus perinei und Sphincter urethrae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Hayek

    1960-01-01

    Der M. sphincter urethrae externus oder Rhabdosphincter des Mannes besteht im Gegensatz zum M. transversus perinei aus dünnen, quergestreiften Muskelfasern von nur 1\\/3–1\\/4 der Dicke der Fasern des letzteren. Die Fasern des Sphincter sind von reichlich Bindegewebe umhüllt und fest zusammengehalten. Der Sphincter erscheint von etwas hellerer Farbe als der Transversus und läßt sich präparatorisch leicht trennen. Die dünnen quergestreiften

  7. Monitoring of upper oesophageal sphincter pressure in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G P Davidson; J Dent; J Willing

    1991-01-01

    In children technical limitations of upper oesophageal sphincter manometry have restricted investigation to the pull through technique under sedation. In this study we have used an adapted sleeve manometric technique for upper oesophageal sphincter monitoring in unsedated children and determined the influence of the state of arousal on upper oesophageal sphincter pressure. Twenty six children aged 3 to 42 months

  8. Pancreatitis after sphincter of Oddi manometry.

    PubMed Central

    Rolny, P; Anderberg, B; Ihse, I; Lindström, E; Olaison, G; Arvill, A

    1990-01-01

    The nature, frequency, severity, and possible causes of complications after 207 sphincter of Oddi manometry measurements were studied in 146 patients. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 6% (12 of 207) of the investigations and in 8% (12 of 146) of the patients examined. The pancreatitis was mild in all patients. After cannulation of the pancreatic duct, acute pancreatitis occurred in 10 of 95 (11%) patients compared with one of 93 (1%) when the manometry catheter entered the bile duct only (p less than 0.02). Seven (58%) of the patients who developed acute pancreatitis, however, were found to be suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Some 26% of all sphincter of Oddi manometry measurements on patients with this diagnosis were complicated by an acute attack of pancreatitis compared with 3% (p less than 0.001) in patients without signs of chronic pancreatitis. In all patients the pancreatitis developed within three hours of manometry. We conclude that pancreatitis may occasionally follow sphincter of Oddi manometry measurement, even in patients without pancreaticobiliary disease, and that underlying chronic pancreatitis constitutes a definite risk. Sphincter of Oddi manometry measurement in control subjects should therefore be performed only in centres where the safety of the procedure has been established, and the presence of chronic pancreatitis should be excluded beforehand. Cannulation of the pancreatic duct should be avoided. Manometry can be safely performed, however, as an outpatient procedure. PMID:2370018

  9. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single “Calponin Family Member” Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23?kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of “sphincter proteome.” Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled “idiopathic” and facilitating practice of precision medicine. PMID:26151053

  10. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  11. Evaluation by three-dimensional anal endosonography of injectable silicone biomaterial (PTQ™) implants to treat fecal incontinence: long-term localization and relation with the deterioration of the continence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. de la Portilla; J. Vega; R. Rada; M. M. Segovia-Gonzáles; N. Cisneros; V. H. Maldonado; E. Espinosa

    2009-01-01

    Background  The purposes of the study were the long-term evaluation of silicone implants with three-dimensional (3D) anal endosonography\\u000a and its correlation with anal incontinence.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Fifteen patients were injected with silicone because of anal incontinence and co-existing internal anal sphincter disruption\\u000a (n = 8) or thinning (n = 7). The evaluation was performed with the Wexner score and 3D anal endosonographies.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Forty-four implants were performed. The

  12. Sphincter repair for fecal incontinence after obstetrical or iatrogenic injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E. Pezim; Robert J. Spencer; C. Robert Stanhope; Robert W. Beart; Roger L. Ready; Duane M. Ilstrup

    1987-01-01

    Forty patients with fecal incontinence underwent sphincter repair between 1975 and 1984. Divided sphincter musculature resulted\\u000a from obstetrical injury in 23 and previous anorectal surgery in 17. Eighteen had undergone a previous attempt at repair. Fifteen\\u000a patients experienced seepage of stool and 25 had gross incontinence. In nine patients, reconstruction of the external sphincter\\u000a was by overlap of the muscle

  13. Uterine Rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon R. Sheehan; Deirdre J. Murphy

    \\u000a Uterine rupture may be defined as a disruption of the uterine muscle extending to and involving the uterine serosa or disruption\\u000a of the uterine muscle with extension to the bladder or broad ligament [1]. Uterine dehiscence is defined as disruption of\\u000a the uterine muscle with intact uterine serosa [1]. Uterine rupture is associated with severe maternal and perinatal morbidity\\u000a and

  14. Treatment of non-IBD anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Lilli; Hagen, Kikke; Christensen, Peter; Buntzen, Steen; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Andersen, Jens; Krupa, Marek; Qvist, Niels

    2015-05-01

    The course of the fistula tract in relation to the anal sphincter is identified by clinical examination under general anaesthesia using a fistula probe and injection of fluid into the external fistula opening. In the event of a complex fistula or in the case of fistula recurrence, this should be supplemented with an endoluminal ultrasound scan and/or an MRI scan. St. Mark's fistula chart should be used for the description. Simple fistulas are amenable to fistulotomy, whereas treatment of complex fistulas requires special expertise and management of all available treatment modalities to tailor the right operation to the individual patient. The given levels of evidence and grades of recommendations are according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (www.cemb.net). PMID:26050835

  15. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Bariši?, Goran; Krivokapi?, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  16. Effects of pinaverium bromide on Oddi's sphincter.

    PubMed

    DiSomma, C; Reboa, G; Patrone, M G; Mortola, G P; Sala, G; Ciampini, M

    1986-01-01

    Twelve to 15 days after cholecystectomy, endocholedochal pressure was measured in ten patients before and one hour after oral administration of 15 mg of pinaverium bromide (six patients) or placebo. The mean endocholedochal pressure was 7.1 +/- 0.25 mmHg before and 3.1 +/- 0.2 mmHg after pinaverium (P less than 0.01), and 7.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg in the placebo-treated patients. The results suggest that pinaverium bromide has a specific effect on the common bile duct and probably on Oddi's sphincter. PMID:3815457

  17. Sphincters of the pulmonary veins in man, and their significance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. L. Kapuller; M. Lo Shik

    1961-01-01

    Pressure curves in the pulmonary vein and in the left auricle were recorded in patients with stenosis of the left atrioventricular valve before and after mitral valvotomy. The curves showed that the sphincters of the pulmonary veins may fail when the mean pressure in the left auricle exceeds 20 mm Hg. Normally, by blocking the reverse flow, the sphincters protect

  18. Application of YAG laser technique in the treatment of anal fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-xun; Zhang, Xinrong

    1993-03-01

    The method of treating anal fistula with YAG laser technique is described in this essay. One-hundred-twenty patients have been treated successfully with this method and no recurrence was found in our series. Anal fistula is a common disorder in the anus and rectum. The tunnel of fistula zigzags around the external or internal sphincters. If the drainage is poor, and the skin around the external opening grows rapidly, false healing may occur and cause recurrent abscess. In this case, a fistula can not be cured except by operation.

  19. Anal spindle cell lesion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charanjit Kaur; Caroline Finlayson

    2009-01-01

    Anal lumps are often clinically diagnosed as thrombosed or torted haemorrhoids or polyps. We report the case of an elderly woman who presented with a polypoid anal lesion, which showed pleomorphic spindle cell morphology on microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains revealed this to be a melanoma, which diffusely and strongly expressed CD117\\/c-kit protein. There is potential for misdiagnosis of CD117-positive amelanotic anal

  20. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  1. Bioengineering of Physiologically Functional Intrinsically Innervated Human Internal Anal Sphincter Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Gilmont, Robert R.; Raghavan, Shreya; Somara, Sita

    2014-01-01

    Muscle replacement for patients suffering from extensive tissue loss or dysfunction is a major objective of regenerative medicine. To achieve functional status, bioengineered muscle replacement constructs require innervation. Here we describe a method to bioengineer functionally innervated gut smooth muscle constructs using neuronal progenitor cells and smooth muscle cells isolated and cultured from intestinal tissues of adult human donors. These constructs expressed markers for contractile smooth muscle, glial cells, and mature neuronal populations. The constructs responded appropriately to physiologically relevant neurotransmitters, and neural network integration was demonstrated by responses to electrical field stimulation. The ability of enteric neuroprogenitor cells to differentiate into neuronal populations provides enormous potential for functional innervation of a variety of bioengineered muscle constructs in addition to gut. Functionally innervated muscle constructs offer a regenerative medicine-based therapeutic approach for neuromuscular replacement after trauma or degenerative disorders. PMID:24328537

  2. Bladder substitutes controlled by the anal sphincter: A comparison of the different absorption potentials

    SciTech Connect

    el-Mekresh, M.M.; Shehab el-Din, A.B.; Fayed, S.M.; Brevinge, H.; Kock, N.G.; Ghoneim, M.A. (Department of Urology, Urology-Nephrology Center, Mansoura (Egypt))

    1991-10-01

    A comparative study of the absorption potentials of the simple rectal bladder (10 patients), modified rectal bladder (20) and ureterosigmoidostomy (10) was done with intrarectal instillation of 22sodium. Results indicate that absorption is significantly greater among patients with ureterosigmoidostomy. The emptying patterns of ureterosigmoidostomy and the modified rectal bladder were also studied by ascending scintigraphy with 99mtechnetium. Evidence was provided that in cases with ureterosigmoidostomy the isotope is distributed throughout the entire colon. These studies proved the role of the colorectal valve in preventing reflux of urine from the rectum to the proximal colon. Consequently, the surface area of colonic mucosa exposed to urine is decreased and the rate of reabsorption is limited.

  3. Anal Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  4. Anal Cancer: An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HOPE E. URONIS; JOHANNA C. BENDELLb

    Anal cancer is a rare tumor with an incidence that has been rising over the last 25 years. The disease was once thoughttodevelopasaresultofchronicirritation,butit is now known that this is not the case. Multiple risk fac- tors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anoreceptiveintercourse,cigarettesmoking,andimmu- nosuppression, have been identified. HIV infection is also associated with anal cancer; there is a higher inci- dence

  5. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  6. Gallbladder ejection fraction and its relationship to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Ruffolo; Stuart Sherman; Glen A. Lehman; Robert H. Hawes

    1994-01-01

    Theoretically, relative distal common bile duct obstruction due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction may be a cause of poor gallbladder evacuation observed on quantitative cholescintigraphy. In this study, the relationship of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction to the gallbladder ejection fraction by quantitative cholescintigraphy was explored. Eighty-one patients with biliary-type pain and otherwise normal evaluations underwent quantitative cholescintigraphy, sphincter of Oddi

  7. [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Fathallah, Nadia; Barret, Maximilien; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Molinié, Vincent; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial lesions are caused by chronic infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus. Their incidence and prevalence are increasing, especially among patients with HIV infection. Their natural history is not well known, but high-grade intraepithelial lesions seem to have an important risk to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Their treatment can be achieved by many ways (surgery, coagulation, imiquimod, etc.) but there is a high rate of recurrent lesions. Pretherapeutic evaluation should benefit from high-resolution anoscopy. Periodic physical examination and anal cytology may probably be interesting for screening the disease among patients with risk factors. Vaccine against oncogenic types of papillomavirus may prevent the development of anal intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:23122632

  8. The Effect of Propofol on the Canine Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, C. B.; Cotton, P. B.; May, G. R.; Milton, L. G.; Chari, R. S.; Meyers, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the effect of propofol on the canine sphincter of Oddi (SO), sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) was performed in fasting dogs which had undergone cholecystectomy and placement of modified Thomas duodenal cannulae. Using two water-perfused, single-lumen manometric catheters, SO and duodenal pressures were measured simultaneously. Baseline SO activity was recorded for at least one complete interdigestive cycle followed by bolus injections of propofol (Diprivan ®) (N = 31) from 0.1 to 4.0 mg/kg during Phase I of the Migrating Motor Complex (MMC). When propofol was administered in bolus doses ? 0.5 mg/kg, no change in SO or duodenal motor function was seen. In doses ? 0.5 mg/kg, SO basal pressure, amplitude, and frequency of contractions increased significantly. Increases in duodenal activity paralleled SO activity. Our results suggest that propofol in low doses may be useful for sedation during Sphincter of Oddi manometry in humans. Further studies of the effects of propofol on the human sphincter of Oddi are warranted. PMID:8204549

  9. Botulinum toxin for chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion for morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Serafino; Brisinda, Giuseppe; Marniga, Gaia; Crocco, Anna; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of botulinum toxin in patients with chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) for severe obesity. METHODS: Fifty-nine symptomatic adults with chronic anal fissure developed after BPD were enrolled in an open label study. The outcome was evaluated clinically and by comparing the pressure of the anal sphincters before and after treatment. All data were analyzed in univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Two months after treatment, 65.4% of the patients had a healing scar. Only one patient had mild incontinence to flatus that lasted 3 wk after treatment, but this disappeared spontaneously. In the multivariate analysis of the data, two registered months after the treatment, sex (P = 0.01), baseline resting anal pressure (P = 0.02) and resting anal pressure 2 mo after treatment (P < 0.0001) were significantly related to healing rate. CONCLUSION: Botulinum toxin, despite worse results than in non-obese individuals, appears the best alternative to surgery for this group of patients with a high risk of incontinence. PMID:22416176

  10. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  11. [Death after anal "fisting"].

    PubMed

    Preuss, Johanna; Strehler, Marco; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    A 45-year-old homeless woman was found dead at her usual sleeping place. Apart from traces of blood on the lower abdomen of the body, the police investigations did not produce any clues pointing to an unnatural death. At autopsy, it was found, however, that death had been caused by extensive disruptions of the intestine. After being confronted with the results, the sexual partner of the victim admitted manual anal penetration, but claimed that this had been done by mutual agreement. The court did not accept that statement and sentenced him to life imprisonment for murder. The frequency of such fatal outcomes of anal penetration, the relationship between the perpetrator and the victim and the special features at the scene are discussed. PMID:18389861

  12. Stress Urinary Incontinence Secondary to Intrinsic Sphincteric Deficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Frederick; Gary E. Leach

    Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has evolved over the last 20 years. Numerous procedures have been\\u000a introduced and modifications to established procedures have been reported in the literature. Our understanding of the female\\u000a continence mechanism has evolved as well. Currently, female SUI is attributed to urethral hypermobility, intrinsic sphincteric\\u000a deficiency (ISD), or a combination of both conditions. This

  13. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tumors, not anal cancer . Being infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of developing anal ... bag is attached to the stoma. Having the human immunodeficiency virus can affect treatment of anal cancer. ...

  14. Outcome after treatment of detrusor–sphincter dyssynergia by temporary stent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Chartier-Kastler; N Ayoub; A Even-Schneider; F Richard; P Denys

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:To evaluate follow-up treatments used after treatment of detrusor–sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) by a temporary urethral sphincter stent.Materials and methods:Between February 1994 and June 2003, 147 men with a mean age of 41.3±14.4 years were treated by temporary urethral stent inserted across the external sphincter for DSD. The underlying neurologic disease was quadriplegia in 85 cases, multiple sclerosis in 24 cases

  15. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. El-Bahy; A. Kotb; A. Galal; A. EL-Hakim

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts (RICDC) is a rare phenomenon. The mechanism of rupture, pathophysiology of fat in the\\u000a ventricles and subarachnoid spaces, possible complications, and proper management of such conditions are proposed on the basis\\u000a of a review of the literature and experience with two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts (One was in the pineal\\u000a region, while another

  16. Investigation of cholecystokinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Xin-Bo; Drew, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the binding of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8 to CCK receptors in sling and clasp fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS: Esophageal sling and clasp fibers were isolated from eight esophagectomy specimens, resected for squamous cell carcinoma in the upper two thirds of the esophagus, which had been maintained in oxygenated Kreb’s solution. Western blot was used to measure CCK-A and CCK-B receptor subtypes in the two muscles. A radioligand binding assay was used to determine the binding parameters of 3H-CCK-8S to the CCK receptor subtypes. The specificity of binding was determined by the addition of proglumide, which blocks the binding of CCK to both receptor subtypes. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the sling and clasp fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter in the amount of CCK-A [integrated optical density (IOD) value: 22.65 ± 0.642 vs 22.328 ± 1.042, P = 0.806] or CCK-B receptor protein (IOD value: 13.20 ± 0.423 vs 12.45 ± 0.294, P = 0.224) as measured by Western blot. The maximum binding of radio-labeled CCK-8S was higher in the sling fibers than in the clasp fibers (595.75 ± 3.231 cpm vs 500.000 ± 10.087 cpm, P < 0.001) and dissociation constant was lower (Kd: 1.437 ± 0.024 nmol/L vs 1.671 ± 0.024 nmol/L, P < 0.001). The IC50 of the receptor specific antagonists were lower for the CCK-A receptors than for the CCK-B (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: CCK binding modulates the contractile function of the lower esophageal sphincter through differential binding to the CCK-A receptor on the sling and clasp fibers. PMID:24914377

  17. The effect of solifenacin on urethral sphincter morphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Duckett; Maya Basu

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis  The aim of the study was to determine whether a 6-week course of 5 mg of solifenacin succinate used to treat mixed incontinence,\\u000a produces measurable changes in the appearance of the urethral sphincter.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twenty-six women undergoing treatment for mixed incontinence were recruited from a urogynaecology unit after failing to improve\\u000a with conservative treatments and bladder drill. All underwent dual

  18. Effect of cholesterol liposomes on calcium mobilization in muscle cells from the rabbit sphincter of Oddi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin-Jiang Wang; Jing-Guo Wei; Chun-Mei Wang; Yao-Cheng Wang; Qiu-Zhen Wu; Jia-Kuan Xu; Xiang-Xin Yang

    AIM: To analyze the influence of cholesterol liposome on the Ca 2+ mobilization of cultured muscle cells in rabbit sphincter of Oddi's. METHODS: New Zealand rabbit was sacrificed and the sphincter of Oddi (SO) segement was obtained aseptically. The SO segment was cut into pieces and cultured in DMEM solution. Then the smooth muscle cells were subcultured, and the 4th-7th

  19. Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

    1998-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

  20. Muscle precursor cells for the restoration of irreversibly damaged sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Eberli, Daniel; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Soker, Shay; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Multiple modalities, including injectable bulking agents and surgery, have been used to treat stress urinary incontinence. However, none of these methods is able to fully restore normal striated sphincter muscle function. In this study, we explored the possibility of achieving functional recovery of the urinary sphincter muscle using autologous muscle precursor cells (MPCs) as an injectable, cell-based therapy. A canine model of striated urinary sphincter insufficiency was created by microsurgically removing part of the sphincter muscle in 24 dogs. Autologous MPCs were obtained, expanded in culture, and injected into the damaged sphincter muscles of 12 animals. The animals were followed for up to 6 months after injection, and urodynamic studies, functional organ bath studies, ultrastructural and histological examinations were performed. Animals receiving MPC injections demonstrated sphincter pressures of approximately 80% of normal values, while the pressures in the control animals without cells dropped and remained at 20% of normal values. Histological analysis indicated that the implanted cells survived and formed tissue, including new innervated muscle fibers, within the injected region of the sphincter. These results indicate that autologous muscle precursor cells may be able to restore otherwise irreversibly damaged urinary sphincter function clinically. PMID:22236637

  1. Nissen fundoplication has a vagolytic effect on the lower esophageal sphincter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Sarani; T. Chan; R. Wise; S. Evans

    2003-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is an increasingly utilized option for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, many questions remain as to the mechanism by which this operation prevents GERD in those without hiatal hernias or incompetent lower esophageal sphincters (LES). It is known that these patients experience reflux due to excess transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESR), inappropriate

  2. Prognostic Factors for Recurrence of Bile Duct Stones after Endoscopic Treatment by Sphincter Dilation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norio Ueno; Yoshifumi Ozawa; Toshiyuki Aizawa

    2003-01-01

    Background:The long-term outcome for patients after endoscopic sphincter of Oddi dilation is poorly documented. This study investigates the recurrence rate for bile duct stones in patients followed for 1 year or more after endoscopic sphincter dilation and stone extraction, and assessed prognostic factors associated with recurrence of ductal calculi.

  3. Surgery Insight: surgical management of postprostatectomy incontinence—the artificial urinary sphincter and male sling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig V Comiter

    2007-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence in men is usually a result of intrinsic sphincter deficiency following prostate cancer surgery. Active conservative management with fluid restriction, medication management and pelvic floor exercises is indicated for the first 12 months. If bothersome incontinence persists, urodynamic evaluation is indicated in order to assess detrusor storage function, contractility and sphincteric integrity. Standard surgical options include urethral

  4. Effect of modern analgesic drugs (tramadol, pentazocine, and buprenorphine) on the bile duct sphincter in man

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Staritz; T Poralla; M Manns; K H Meyer Zum Büschenfelde

    1986-01-01

    Modern narcotic analgesic drugs, such as tramadol, pentazocine, and buprenorphine share similarities of molecular structure with morphine which is widely believed to cause spasm of the bile duct sphincter and so impede bile flow. This study assessed the effects of intravenously administered analgesics on bile duct sphincter motor activity measured by ERCP manometry. Ten minutes after pentazocine injection the duration

  5. [Malignant tumors of the anal canal and the anal margin].

    PubMed

    Pellet, B; Saegesser, F; Ozzello, L; Vulliet, F

    1975-05-01

    81 patients with tumors of the anal canal and anal margin treated at the Cantonal Hospital, Lausanne, during the period January 1942 to June 1974 have been studied. The morbid anatomy of transitional zone and cloacogenic carcinomas, subdivided into basaloid types, is related to the anatomy and histology of the normal anal canal. The average age of the patients was 66.5 years. The incidence of canal tumors was highest in women (71% of cases), but tumors of the anal margin were most frequent in men (75% of cases). The main symptom of anal canal growths in this series of advanced cases was blood on the feces; marginal tumours were associated with anal aching. Cloacogenic carcinomas of the basaloid type have the best prognosis; this is also related to the volume and invasion rate of the tumor, which are features difficult to assess. Melanomas have the worst prognosis; leiomyomas may grow like sarcomas despite their benign histological appearance. 18 patients had inguinal metastases, and only 2 of these are alive 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 years after excision of the rectum; the volume and histological type of the tumor were unrelated to the poor rate of survival. In the light of this experience, rectal amputation is the most effective prodecure for all canal tumors and for most tumors of the margin. Radiotherapy by itself is associated with an unacceptably high risk of actinic proctitis. PMID:1079968

  6. Intraurethral ultrasound: diagnostic evaluation of the striated urethral sphincter in incontinent females.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, F; Helweg, G; Strasser, H; Enna, B; Klauser, A; Knapp, R; Colleselli, K; Bartsch, G; Zur Nedden, D

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the striated urethral sphincter (rhabdosphincter) in incontinent females by means of intraurethral ultrasound (IUUS). Thirty-four incontinent and 11 continent female patients were examined by means of 12.5-MHz endoluminal ultrasound (US). The distance between the inner contour of the sphincter muscle and the US catheter was measured in the contracted and the non-contracted condition. The US findings were correlated with those obtained by urodynamic studies. Partial or complete loss of sphincter function was detected in patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Reduced sphincter function was not observed in patients with urge incontinence and continent volunteers. The findings on US were found to correlate well with the grade of SUI. The IUUS technique offers the benefit of direct visualization of the sphincter mechanism. Therefore, endoluminal US may become an important adjunct in the diagnostic evaluation of SUI and will possibly provide new insights for a better therapeutic strategy. PMID:9442128

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa liver abscesses after diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in two patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Katsinelos; S. Dimiropoulos; D. Katsiba; M. Arvaniti; P. Tsolkas; I. Galanis; B. Papaziogas; V. Limenopoulos; S. Baltajiannis; I. Vasilladis

    Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction have a significantly increased rate of pancreatitis after manometry or sphincterotomy, but septic complications after diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type 2 have not been reported. We describe two patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type 2 in whom Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10 septicemia and multiple small

  8. Simultaneous penile prosthesis and male sling/artificial urinary sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dominic; Romero, Claudio; Alba, Frances; Westney, O Lenaine; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach. PMID:23202702

  9. Intrinsic neuronal control of the pyloric sphincter of the lamb.

    PubMed

    Mazzuoli, G; Lucherini, M C; Russo, D; Clavenzani, P; Chiocchetti, R

    2008-10-01

    To better understand the local neuronal network of the gastro-duodenal junction in ruminants, we identified the components of the enteric nervous system (ENS) innervating the pyloric sphincter (PS) of the lamb abomasum. The neurons were labelled after injecting the tracer Fast Blue (FB) into the wall of the PS, and the phenotype of the FB-labelled neurons was immunohistochemically investigated using antibodies against nitric oxide synthase (NOS), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tachykinin (substance P) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The FB-labelled abomasal myenteric plexus (MP) neurons, observed up to 14cm from the PS, were NOS-immunoreactive (IR) (82+/-12%), ChAT-IR (51+/-29%), SP-IR (61+/-33%), and also TH-IR (2%). The descending nitrergic neurons were also SP-IR (64%) and ChAT-IR (21%); the cholinergic descending neurons were SP-IR (3%). The FB-labelled duodenal neurons were located only in the MP, up to 8cm from the sphincter and were ChAT-IR (79+/-16%), SP-IR (32+/-18%), NOS-IR (from 0 to 2%), and also TH-IR (4+/-3%). The cholinergic ascending neurons were also SP-IR (60%) whereas no ChAT-IR cells were NOS-IR. The findings of this research indicate that the sheep PS is innervated by long-projecting neurons of the abomasal and duodenal ENS. PMID:18571894

  10. Anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma: report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ang; Mei, Zubing; Cui, Long

    2015-01-01

    Trichilemmoma is a rare type of benign cutaneous neoplasm, which derives from outer sheath of hair follicle. It barely develops malignant progression and has rarely been reported in anal cancer. In this article, we report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented to the outer-patient department with complaints of a ruptured and longstanding anal phyma. All the appearances were atypical. Blood routine examination showed that neutrophilic granulocyte percentage was elevated and suggest it was a simple inflammation response. No evidence of malignancy was detected upon the laboratory examinations. Then we performed an abscess incision drainage for the patient. A few days later, the biopsy pathological report suggested the specimen is a malignant proliferative trichilemmoma. We decided to perform a wide local excision instead of an extended radical operation in order to preserve anus. After the surgery, we chose not to give chemoradio-treatment for fear of side effects and complications. Careful follow-up indicates that peri-anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma may have a good prognosis and our treatment is a good choice for the patients with this tumor. Because of the low occurrence rate of anal cancer, especially malignant trichilemmoma, any clinical manifestation and experience are valuable. On one hand, our case may help to take the consideration of the diagnosis of malignant trichilemmoma in case of longtime-suffered peri-anal mass, on the other hand it propose a different treatment method from other anal cancers for clinical doctors.

  11. MEETING ABSTRACTS Open Access Persistence of anal squamous intraepithelial

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    MEETING ABSTRACTS Open Access Persistence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and anal HPV Background A high prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL) and HPV infection have been

  12. [HPV-induced anal lesions].

    PubMed

    Wieland, U; Kreuter, A

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections belong to the most common sexually transmitted infections. To date, more than 200 completely classified HPV-types have been reported, and those belonging to the genus alpha predominantly infect the anogenital region. Condylomata acuminata are caused by the two low-risk types HPV6 and HPV11 in more than 90?% of cases. Treatment of genital warts might be either ablative (e.g. electrocautery, surgical excision, or laser therapy) or topical (e.g. podophyllotoxine, trichloroacetic acid, or imiquimod), and depends on the size, location, morphology and anatomical region. Recurrences after treatment are frequent. Therefore, combination therapies (e.g. topical and ablative) play an important role in daily routine. HIV-infected individuals, especially HIV-positive MSM, have a strongly increased risk for anal dysplasia and anal cancer. Condylomata acuminata and a large proportion of anal dysplasia and anal carcinoma are preventable by prophylactic HPV-vaccination. PMID:25859930

  13. Low-Lying Rectal Cancer With Anal Canal Involvement: Abdominoperineal or Low Anterior Resection After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Nisar; Puthawala, Ajmel; Azawi, Samar; Shbeeb, Imad; Gong, I-yeh

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Rectal cancer with anal involvement is typically treated with abdominoperineal resection (APR). However, patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with good clinical response and tumor regression from the anus present a controversial management dilemma. This is a report of patients treated with low anterior resection (LAR) versus APR. Methods: Patients with T2–3N0–2M0 (IIA-IIIC) rectal cancer with anal canal involvement were eligible. Anal canal involvement was determined by sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy or endoscopic ultrasound. Patients were treated in the prone position with the three-field technique to 45–50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction given concurrently with 5-fluorouracil. Patients then underwent APR/LAR via total mesorectal excision 4–6 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. LAR was performed in patients with good sphincter function at presentation, in those with sufficient tumor regression away from anal canal to permit LAR, and in those compliant with close follow-up. Results: A total of 32 patients with rectal cancer with anal canal involvement were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Local control was 85% and 89% for patients treated with APR and LAR, respectively. Overall survival was 76% and 86% in patients treated with APR and LAR, respectively. Pathologic complete response was seen in 24% of patients who underwent APR and 27% of patients who underwent LAR. Conclusion: Rectal cancers with anal involvement with good clinical response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy are typically treated with APR. However, LAR may be a feasible alternative, particularly in those with excellent clinical response to neoadjuvant treatment with sufficient tumor regression away from the anal canal. In these patients close follow-up is necessary, and APR may be reserved as salvage when needed. PMID:22043324

  14. [Knee extensor mechanism ruptures].

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B; Fritschy, D

    2011-08-10

    Knee extensor mechanism is composed of the quadriceps and its tendon, patella and patellar tendon. Rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon, or of the patella itself, lead to a disruption of the knee extensor mechanism. Clinical examination reveals an inability to actively extend the knee. Standard radiographs of the knee show a suprapatellar swelling of the soft tissues in case of quadriceps tendon rupture, or a displaced patellar fracture, or a patella alta in case of patellar tendon rupture. Echography and MRI confirm the diagnosis and may reveal associated injuries. In case of knee extensor mechanism rupture, early surgical reconstruction of quadriceps or patellar tendon, or patella osteosynthesis, are mandatory to achieve early functional recovery. PMID:21919393

  15. Spontaneous rupture of uterus.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Meraj; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2002-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the uterus is a life-threatening obstetrical emergency. Diagnosis may be delayed because of the bizarre presentation or absence of significant pain and tenderness, which could have been masked by the analgesic medications used during labor. We present a case of spontaneous rupture in a multigravid female who was undergoing oxytocin-augmented labor while receiving epidural analgesia. She had had no previous cesarean deliveries or uterine surgery. Half an hour after an initial complaint of left inguinal pain, which was thought to be related to a patchy epidural block, she presented with changes in vital signs and significant fetal decelerations. At emergent cesarean section, a uterine rupture was noted. The uterine rupture extended down to the left vaginal angle, was not reparable and a hysterectomy was performed. The fetus survived. PMID:12208442

  16. New Empirical Relationships among Magnitude, Rupture Length, Rupture Width, Rupture Area, and Surface Displacement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald L. Wells; Kevin J. Coppersmith

    1994-01-01

    Source parameters for historical earthquakes worldwide are com- piled to develop a series of empirical relationships among moment magnitude (M), surface rupture length, subsurface rupture length, downdip rupture width, rupture area, and maximum and average displacement per event. The resulting data base is a significant update of previous compilations and includes the ad- ditional source parameters of seismic moment, moment

  17. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction: Updates from the Recent Literature.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Mohammad; Romagnuolo, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has long been a controversial topic, starting with whether it even exists, as a sphincterotomy-responsive entity to treat, for either: (1) post-cholecystectomy abdominal pain and/or (2) idiopathic recurrent acute pancreatitis (IRAP). Many of its aspects had required further research to better prove or refute its existence and to provide proper recommendations for physicians to diagnose and treat this condition. Fortunately, there has been major advancement in our knowledge in several areas over the past few years. New studies on challenging the classification, exploring alternative diagnostic methods, and quantifying the role of sphincterotomy in treatment of SOD for post-cholecystectomy pain and for IRAP were recently published, including a randomized trial in each of the two areas. The goal of this paper is to review recent literature on selected important questions and to summarize the results of major trials in this field. PMID:26143628

  18. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  19. A rare case of anal tumor: Anal carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Williams, Timothy; Munthali, Lamios; Summers, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis, otherwise known as carcinosarcoma. Gastrointestinal origin is very rare and only a limited number of anal carcinosarcomas have been reported in the literature. The management of this rare cancer type is controversial. The aim of this case report was to confirm that by combining treatment modalities we can achieve long disease free intervals. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy led to a good partial response and this was followed by a consolidation surgical endo-anal excision. PMID:21191539

  20. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  1. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan

    2014-05-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  2. Anal fistula. Past and present.

    PubMed

    Zubaidi, Ahmad M

    2014-09-01

    Anal fistula is a common benign condition that typically describes a miscommunication between the anorectum and the perianal skin, which may present de novo, or develop after acute anorectal abscess. Athough anal fistulae are benign, the condition can still negatively influence a patient's quality of life by causing minor pain, social hygienic embarrassment, and in severe cases, frank sepsis. Despite its long history and prevalence, anal fistula management remains one of the most challenging and controversial topics in colorectal surgery today. The end goals of treatment include draining the local infection, eradicating the fistulous tract, and minimizing recurrence and incontinence rates. The goal of this review is to ensure surgeons and physicians are aware of the different imaging and treatment choices available, and to report expected outcomes of the various surgical modalities so they may select the most suitable treatment.  PMID:25228174

  3. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  4. Hazards associated with anal erotic activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy Agnew

    1986-01-01

    The recent liberalization of attitudes towards sexuality has brought with it the desire by some individuals to seek alternate methods of sexual stimulation and gratification, among them an exploration of anal eroticism. Various practices associated with anal sexuality carry with them the potential for medical complications. In this paper some of the hazards associated with anal eroticism are outlined and

  5. Vaginal Wall Sling for Anatomical Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Dysfunction: Efficacy and Outcome Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shlomo Raz; Lynn Stothers; George P. H. Young; Julie Short; Barbara Marks; Ashok Chopra; Gregory R. Wahle

    1996-01-01

    PurposeA prospective cohort study was done to determine the efficacy and clinical outcome of a new technique for anterior vaginal wall sling construction to treat urinary incontinence due to intrinsic sphincter dysfunction or anatomical incontinence.

  6. Intraurethral ultrasound: diagnostic evaluation of the striated urethral sphincter in incontinent females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Frauscher; G. Helweg; H. Strasser; B. Enna; A. Klauser; R. Knapp; K. Colleselli; G. Bartsch; D. Zur Nedden

    1998-01-01

    .   The aim of our study was to evaluate the striated urethral sphincter (rhabdosphincter) in incontinent females by means of\\u000a intraurethral ultrasound (IUUS). Thirty-four incontinent and 11 continent female patients were examined by means of 12.5-MHz\\u000a endoluminal ultrasound (US). The distance between the inner contour of the sphincter muscle and the US catheter was measured\\u000a in the contracted and the

  7. The effect of pinaverium bromide (LA 1717) on the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wöltje, M; Huchzermeyer, H

    1982-01-01

    An acute, double-blind study was carried out in 8 healthy male volunteers to investigate any effect of a new antispasmodic, pinaverium bromide, compared with placebo on the lower oesophageal sphincter. Manometric measurements showed no significant differences in resting pressures either after placebo or a therapeutic dose (200 mg) of pinaverium bromide, suggesting that the active drug does not cause any impairment of function of the lower oesophageal sphincter. PMID:7128186

  8. Effect of Ovariectomy on External Urethral Sphincter Activity in Anesthetized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen-Li; de Groat, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The postmenopausal hypoestrogen condition is associated with various lower urinary tract dysfunctions, including frequency, urgency, stress urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary infection. We determined whether hypoestrogen induced lower urinary tract dysfunction after ovariectomy is also associated with an alteration in external urethral sphincter activity. Materials and Methods Bilateral ovariectomy was performed in female Sprague-Dawley® rats and sham operated rats served as controls. Transvesical cystometry and external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity were monitored 4, 6 and 12 weeks after sham operation or bilateral ovariectomy and at 6 weeks in bilaterally ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen. Results The micturition reflex was elicited in sham operated and bilaterally ovariectomized, urethane anesthetized animals. Post-void residual urine increased and voiding efficiency decreased in rats with 4 to 12 weeks of bilateral ovariectomy. The silent period of external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity was shortened significantly and progressively at increased times after bilateral ovariectomy. These effects were prevented by estradiol treatment. Conclusions As evidenced by shortening of the external urethral sphincter electromyogram silent period in ovariectomized rats, the disruption of coordination between the external urethral sphincter and the detrusor muscle could decrease urine outflow and in turn voiding efficiency. Estrogen replacement reverses these changes, suggesting that the central pathways responsible for detrusor-sphincter coordination are modulated by gonadal hormones. PMID:21600603

  9. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincteroplasty for anal fistula (FIPS): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ratto, C; Litta, F; Donisi, L; Parello, A

    2015-07-01

    There is still no clear consensus about surgical treatment of anal fistulas. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincter reconstruction is still regarded with skepticism. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence in the literature supporting the use of this technique in the treatment of complex anal fistulas. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched for the period between 1985 and 2015. The studies selected were peer-reviewed articles, with no limitations concerning the study cohort size, length of the follow-up or language. Technical notes, commentaries, letters and meeting abstracts were excluded. The major endpoints were the technique adopted, clinical efficacy, changes at anorectal manometry and assessment of quality of life after the procedure. Fourteen reports (666 patients) satisfied the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was low. Some differences about the surgical technique emerged; however, after a weighted average duration of follow-up of 28.9 months, the overall success rate was 93.2 %, with a low morbidity rate. The overall postoperative worsening continence rate was 12.4 % (mainly post-defecation soiling). In almost all cases, the anorectal manometry parameters remained unchanged. The quality of life, when evaluated, improved significantly. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincteroplasty could be a therapeutic option for complex anal fistula. Success rates were very high and the risk of postoperative fecal incontinence was lower than after simple fistulotomy. Well-designed trials are needed to support the inclusion of this technique in a treatment algorithm for the management of complex anal fistulas. PMID:26062740

  10. Bilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Holm

    1999-01-01

    Summary  Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare condition. In most cases the patients with bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture\\u000a have a general degenerative disease. This case story present a middle-aged male, who became a traumatic bilateral quadriceps\\u000a tendon rupture. Though treated acutely and trained intensively he did not achieve full range of motion.

  11. [Symphysis rupture during partus].

    PubMed

    Nouta, Klaas-Auke; Van Rhee, Marina; Van Langelaan, Evert J

    2011-01-01

    A few hours after the birth of her first child a 36-year-old woman developed anterior pelvic pain. The pain worsened on walking. It proved that during the birth the patient had felt something 'give'. On X-ray a diastasis of 50 mm was seen in the symphysis and symphysis rupture was diagnosed. The patient was treated conservatively with bed rest and pelvic stabilisation. After 17 weeks she was symptom-free. Symphysis rupture during partus is rare. It is characterised by pain around the symphysis and/or the sacro-iliac joints during the first 24 hours post partum. Diagnosis can be made by X-ray. Treatment is predominantly conservative comprising pelvic stabilisation and bed rest. PMID:21426597

  12. Thrombus rupture via cavitation.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2015-07-16

    Aneurysm growth is accompanied by formation of intraluminal thrombus. The onset of thrombus rupture via unstable void growth is studied in the present note. The experimentally calibrated constitutive model of thrombus developed by Wang et al. (2001) is enhanced with a failure description and used for analysis of cavitation. It is found that unstable cavity growth can start at hydrostatic tension of 0.18MPa which lies within the physiological range of stresses in the arterial wall. PMID:26001987

  13. [Anal cancer in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Quéro, Laurent; Duval, Xavier; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Despite effective highly active antiretroviral treatment, anal cancer incidence has recently strongly increased in HIV-infected population. Treatment strategy in HIV-infected patients does not differ from general population. HIV-infected patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy are exposed to high-grade toxicities and should be closely monitored to deliver the optimal treatment. Close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is highly recommended to adjust antiretroviral therapy if necessary. PMID:25418596

  14. Medication Effects on Periurethral Sensation and Urethral Sphincter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Greer, W. Jerod; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Kenton, Kimberly; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Goode, Patricia S; Richter, Holly E

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize urethral neuromuscular function before and 2 weeks after medication therapy. Methods Premenopausal women without lower urinary tract symptoms were randomly allocated to one of six medications for 2 weeks (pseudoephedrine ER 120mg, imipramine 25mg, cyclobenzaprine 10mg, tamsulosin 0.4mg, solifenacin 5mg or placebo). At baseline and after medication, participants underwent testing: quantitative concentric needle EMG (CNE) of the urethral sphincter using automated Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) software; current perception threshold (CPT) testing to measure periurethral sensation; and standard urodynamic pressure flow studies (PFS). Nonparametric tests were used to compare pre-post differences. Results 56 women had baseline testing; 48 (85.7%) completed follow-up CNE, and 49 (87.5%) completed follow-up CPT and PFS testing. Demographics showed no significant differences among medication groups with respect to age (mean 34.3 ± 10.1), BMI (mean 31.8 ± 7.5), parity (median 1, range 0–7), or race (14% Caucasian, 80% African American). PFS parameters were not significantly different within medication groups. No significant pre-post changes in CNE values were noted; however, trends in amplitudes were in a direction consistent with the expected physiologic effect of the medications. With CPT testing, a trend toward increased urethral sensation at the 5 Hz stimulation level, was observed following treatment with pseudoephedrine (0.15 to 0.09 mA at 5Hz; P=0.03). Conclusion In women without LUTS, pseudoephedrine improved urethral sensation, but not urethral neuromuscular function on CNE or pressure flow studies. Imipramine, cyclobenzaprine, tamsulosin, solifenacin, and placebo did not change urethral sensation or neuromuscular function. PMID:25185603

  15. Expression of serotonin receptors in human lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    LI, HE-FEI; LIU, JUN-FENG; ZHANG, KE; FENG, YONG

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter and vasoactive amine that is involved in the regulation of a large number of physiological functions. The wide variety of 5-HT-mediated functions is due to the existence of different classes of serotonergic receptors in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and nervous system. The aim of this study was to explore the expression of multiple types of 5-HT receptor (5-HT1AR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT3AR, 5-HT4R, 5-HT5AR, 5-HT6R and 5-HT7R) in sling and clasp fibers from the human lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Muscle strips of sling and clasp fibers from the LES were obtained from patients undergoing esophagogastrectomy, and circular muscle strips from the esophagus and stomach were used as controls. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the expression of the various 5-HT receptor types. Messenger RNA for all seven 5-HT receptor types was identified in the sling and clasp fibers of the LES. At the mRNA level, the expression levels were highest for 5-HT3AR and 5-HT4R, and lowest for 5-HT5AR, 5-HT6R and 5-HT7R. At the protein level, the expression levels were highest for 5-HT3AR and 5-HT4R, followed by 5-HT1AR and 5-HT2AR; 5-HT7R was also detected at a low level. The expression of 5-HT5AR and 5-HT6R proteins was not confirmed. The results indicate that a variety of 5-HT receptor types can be detected in the human LES and probably contribute to LES function. PMID:25452775

  16. Improvement of urethral sphincter deficiency in female rats following autologous skeletal muscle myoblasts grafting.

    PubMed

    Praud, Christophe; Sebe, Philippe; Biérinx, Anne-Sophie; Sebille, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Sphincteric deficiency is the most common cause of urinary incontinence in humans. Various treatments have lead to disappointing results due to a temporary benefit. Recent studies raised the possibility that sphincteric deficiency could be treated by implanting skeletal myoblasts. In the present study, we developed in the female rat a model of chronic sphincteric defect to assess the benefit of myoblast injection. Sphincter deficiency was induced by freezing, longitudinal sphincterotomy, and notexin injection, respectively, to obtain a reproducible and irreversible incontinence. Autologous tibialis anteriors were cultured to be injected in the best model. Functional results were evaluated by measuring the urethral pressure with an open catheter. Histology was performed in the excised urethras. Of the three techniques, only longitudinal sphincterotomy caused definitive incontinence by irreversibly destroying the striated sphincter muscle fibers: a 45% decrease of the closure pressure was observed 21 days after the sphincterotomy. At this time, we injected myoblasts at the sphincterotomy site. In the sham-injected group (n = 18), the closure pressure decrease was not significantly modified 21 days after injection. By comparison, a return to near normal value was observed after cell grafting (n = 21). These results and those obtained by others strongly suggest that the use of myoblasts could be a potential innovative therapy for urethral deficiencies leading to incontinence. PMID:18019363

  17. [Delayed splenic rupture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Alawneh, I

    1979-12-01

    Splenic rupture is a common injury associated with blunt abdominal trauma. In contrast, delayed splenic rupture is less frequent and comprises about 8--28% of cases of splenic rupture. The symptom free period can last for days or weeks. The mechanism is explained as follows. A rupture of the parenchyma occurs but the spleen capsula remains intact. A hematoma forms below the capsule and causes a strong overdistension of the capsule so that a bursting and release of blood into the abdominal cavity results. The mortality rate with splenic ruptures in 6--55% and with delayed splenic ruptures 14.6%. Our experiences are reviewed. After commencement of the hemorrhage therapy must consist of treatment for shock and immediate laparotomy and splenectomy. PMID:44648

  18. What Are the Key Statistics for Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors for anal cancer? What are the key statistics about anal cancer? Anal cancer is fairly rare – ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  19. Immediate effects of the endoscopic sphincterotomy on the motility of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Romanello, L M; de Oliveira, R B; Brunaldi, J E; Costa-Pereira, L C; Módena, J L

    1988-01-01

    An endoscopic manometric technique was used to determine the CBD-duodenum junction pressure profile before and immediately after endoscopic sphincterotomy in 13 patients with common bile duct stones. Premedication (meperidine, atropine, and diazepam) was given to all patients and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed before endoscopic sphincterotomy. In the patients with intact papilla the features of the sphincter of Oddi motility were similar to those previously described for patients not given premedication or submitted to cholangiography before endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic sphincterotomy which was successful for immediate stone removal in 9 of 13 patients caused an immediate reduction of sphincter of Oddi motility in all patients, but abolished it in only 2 of them. The present results show that successful common bile duct stone extraction by means of endoscopic sphincterotomy can be accomplished without total abolition of sphincter of Oddi motility. PMID:3268075

  20. Traumatic bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Hansen; Søren Larsen; Troels Laulund

    2001-01-01

    Bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture is a very rare event, with only an estimated 40 cases reported in the literature.\\u000a We report a case of bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture and review the literature. The reviewed literature recommends\\u000a early repair; therefore, early diagnosis is crucial. Reportedly, up to 50% of spontaneous bilateral quadriceps ruptures are\\u000a misdiagnosed at first, resulting in

  1. The Return of the Anal Character

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick Haslam

    2011-01-01

    The anal character is a central concept in the psychoanalytic theory of personality. It was originally described in the first decade of the 20th century, and quickly applied to the analysis of clinical cases, psychobiographies, and cultural phenomena. In midcentury a generation of psychoanalytically oriented psychologists found some evidence that anal traits cohere and that they are related to attitudes

  2. Outcomes following quadriceps tendon ruptures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K O'Shea; P Kenny; J Donovan; F Condon; J. P McElwain

    2002-01-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps femoris tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their ruptured quadriceps tendon at our institution over a seven year period-totalling 27 patients. Males were more commonly affected with

  3. Chronic rupture of tendo Achillis.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Ajis, Adam; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2007-12-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most commonly ruptured tendon in the human body. About 20% of complete ruptures of the Achilles tendon are diagnosed late. The management of chronic ruptures of tendo Achillis is usually different from that of acute rupture, as the tendon ends normally will have retracted. As clinical diagnosis of chronic ruptures can be problematic, imaging can be useful. Most investigators counsel operative management, and the possibility of undertaking a tendon transfer should be kept in mind. Local tendons, such as the flexor digitorum longus, the flexor hallucis longus, and the tendon of peroneus brevis, can be used, and some investigators have reported the use of a free gracilis tendon graft. Allografts and synthetic grafts are also employed. There are no comparative studies and no randomized controlled trials to guide clinicians toward an evidence-based approach to management. PMID:17996617

  4. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  5. Comparison of Cystographic Findings of Intrinsic Sphincteric Deficiency with Urethral Hypermobility Causing Urinary Incontinence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang Woo Park; Deuk Jae Sung; Eun Jung Choi; Min Woo Lee; Young Jun Kim; Jeong Geun Yi; Hae Jeong Jeon; Jeong Hee Park

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the usefulness of standing and lateral cystograms for differentiation of intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) from urethral hypermobility (UH) causing stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Materials and Methods: 67 female patients with urinary incontinence undergoing measurement of the Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) were included. 14 patients with VLPP <60 cm H2O were operated for ISD causing SUI while

  6. Lower Esophageal Sphincter Reacts Against Intraabdominal Pressure in Children with Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helena A. S. Goldani; MariaInez M. Fernandes; Yvone A. M. V. A. Vicente; Roberto O. Dantas

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the effect of increased intraabdominal pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are controversial. This study aimed to verify the LES competence against extrinsic abdominal compression in children with and without symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Eighteen children ages 6–20 months were evaluated, 11 of them with symptoms of GER (group I) and 7 without symptoms of GER

  7. Postcholecystectomy Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology of Abdominal Pain in Sphincter of Oddi Type III

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVEN G. DESAUTELS; ADAM SLIVKA; WILLIAM R. HUTSON; ANDREW CHUN; CARLOS MITRANI; CARLO DILORENZO; ARNOLD WALD

    1999-01-01

    Background & Aims: Persistent abdominal pain occurs in many patients after cholecystectomy, some of whom are described as having sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Pain in SOD type III is thought to be of biliary origin with little objective data, and treatment is often unsatisfactory. Chronic abdominal pain without a bio- logical disease marker is similar to irritable bowel syndrome,

  8. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  9. Development of a Novel Artificial Urinary Sphincter: A Versatile Automated Device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamid Lamraoui; Agnes Bonvilain; Gilberte Robain; Helene Combrisson; Skandar Basrour; Alexandre Moreau-Gaudry; Philippe Cinquin; Pierre Mozer

    2010-01-01

    Management of male severe stress urinary incontinence is currently achieved by the treatment of choice: an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS). This implantable system is designed to exert a constant circumferential force around the urethra. Although continence is totally or partially recovered in most of the patients, this method has some significant drawbacks. Besides the difficulty and discomfort of using the

  10. Assessing outcome after a modified vaginal wall sling for stress incontinence with intrinsic sphincter deficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabetta Costantini; Luigi Mearini; Ettore Mearini; Cinzia Pajoncini; Federico Guercini; Vittorio Bini; Massimo Porena

    2005-01-01

    Forty women with stress incontinence, intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD), associated or not with urethral hypermobility, a Valsalva leak point pressure (VLLP) 20 and a maximum urethral closure pressure 20 underwent in situ vaginal wall sling. The main modification to the technique was the use of two small Marlex meshes placed at the lateral edges of the sling. Outcome was assessed

  11. PUBOVAGINAL SLING USING CADAVERIC ALLOGRAFT FASCIA FOR THE TREATMENT OF INTRINSIC SPHINCTER DEFICIENCY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. JAMES WRIGHT; CHRISTOPHE E. ISELIN; LESLEY K. CARR; GEORGE D. WEBSTER

    1998-01-01

    PurposePubovaginal sling is the definitive management of female stress urinary incontinence due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Customarily, autologous fascia has been used, although synthetic material has its proponents. Harvesting autologous fascia at surgery is associated with postoperative discomfort, and synthetic material has a history of infection and erosion. To assess whether allograft fascia is free from these drawbacks, we retrospectively

  12. Effects of thienorphine on contraction of the guinea pig sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilan; Li, Tingting; Su, Ruibin; Gong, Zehui

    2014-08-15

    Opioid analgesics are widely believed to cause spasm of the bile duct sphincter and so impede bile flow. Thienorphine is a partial opioid agonist that is a good candidate for the treatment of opioid dependence; however, to date, no studies have reported the effects of thienorphine on the function of the biliary tract. This study examined the in vivo effects of thienorphine on the guinea pig isolated sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder and on bile flow. The area under the curve (AUC) of isolated sphincter of Oddi was not influenced by thienorphine or buprenorphine, whereas morphine increased the AUC of the isolated sphincter of Oddi in a concentration-dependent manner. Thienorphine and buprenorphine concentration-dependently decreased the AUC of isolated choledochus, while morphine increased the AUC of isolated choledochus. Thienorphine had no effect on the contractile amplitude or basal tension of isolated gall bladder muscle strips. In contrast, buprenorphine and morphine increased the contractile basal tension of isolated gall bladder muscle strips in a concentration-dependent manner. Thienorphine (0.01-1.0mg/kg) had no significant inhibitory effect on bile flow. However, morphine (1.0-10mg/kg) and buprenorphine (1.0mg/kg) significantly inhibited bile flow. The maximum inhibition of bile flow by buprenorphine was 63.9±12.9% and by morphine was 74.1±11.3%. In summary, thienorphine has little influence on the guinea pig isolated sphincter of Oddi, choledochus and gall bladder or on bile flow, which may result in a lack of adverse biliary colic effects. PMID:24830319

  13. A missing sphincteric component of the gastro-oesophageal junction in patients with GORD.

    PubMed

    Miller, L; Dai, Q; Vegesna, A; Korimilli, A; Ulerich, R; Schiffner, B; Brassuer, J

    2009-08-01

    It was recently shown that the tonic pressure contribution to the high-pressure zone of the oesophago-gastric segment (OGS) contains the contributions from three distinct components, two of which are smooth muscle intrinsic sphincter components, a proximal and a distal component [J Physiol 2007; 580.3: 961]. The aim of this study was to compare the pressure contributions from the three sphincteric components in normal subjects with those in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. A simultaneous endoluminal ultrasound and manometry catheter was pulled through the OGS in 15 healthy volunteers and seven patients with symptomatic GORD, before and after administration of atropine. Pre-atropine (complete muscle tone), postatropine (non-muscarinic muscle tone plus residual muscarinic tone) and subtracted (pure muscarinic muscle tone) pressure contributions to the sphincter were averaged after referencing spatially to the right crural diaphragm and the pull-through start position. In the normal group, the atropine-resistant and atropine-attenuated pressures identified the crural and two smooth muscle sphincteric components respectively. The subtraction pressure curve contained proximal and distal peaks. The proximal component moved with the crural sling between full inspiration and full expiration and the distal component coincided with the gastric sling-clasp fibre muscle complex. The subtraction curve in the GORD patients contained only a single pressure peak that moved with the crural sphincter, while the distal pressure peak of the intrinsic muscle component, which was previously recognized in the normal subjects, was absent. We hypothesize that the distal muscarinic smooth muscle pressure component (gastric sling/clasp muscle fibre component) is defective in GORD patients. PMID:19368661

  14. How the anal gland orifice could be found in anal abscess operations

    PubMed Central

    Paydar, Shahram; Izadpanah, Ahmad; Ghahramani, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Bananzadeh, Alimohammad; Rahimikazerooni, Salar; Bahrami, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Background: On an average 30-50% of patients who undergo incision and drainage (I and D) of anal abscess will develop recurrence or fistula formation. It is claimed that finding the internal orifice of anal abscess to distract the corresponding anal gland duct; will decline the rate of future anal fistula. Surgeons supporting I and D alone claim that finding the internal opening is hazardous. This study is conducted to assess short-term results of optional method to manage patients with anal abscess and fitula-in-ano at the same time. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study 49 from 77 patients with anal abscess whose internal orifice was not identified by pressing on the abscess, diluted hydrogen peroxide (2%) and methylene blue was injected into the abscess cavity and the anal canal was inspected to find out the internal opening. Once the opening was distinguished, an incision was given from the anal verge to the internal opening. Results: The internal orifice was identified in 44 out of 49 patients (90%) who underwent this new technique. Up to 18 months during follow-up, only 2.5% of patients with primary fistulotomy developed fistula on the site of a previous abscess. Conclusion: Conventional method to seek the internal orifice of anal abscesses is successful in about one-third of cases. By applying this new technique, surgeons would properly find the internal opening in >90% of patients. Needless to say, safe identification of the anal gland orifice in anal abscess disease best helps surgeons to do primary fistulotomy and in turn it would significantly decrease the rate of recurrence in anal abscess and fistula formation. PMID:25767517

  15. Steam generator tube rupture study

    E-print Network

    Free, Scott Thomas

    1986-01-01

    This report describes our investigation of steam generator behavior during a postulated tube rupture accident. Our study was performed using the steam generator, thermal-hydraulic analysis code THERMIT-UTSG. The purpose ...

  16. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  17. [Uterine rupture in modern obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Grio, R; Piacentino, R; Zaccheo, F; Giobbe, C; Caccuri, D; Tamburrano, F; Marchino, G L; Fuda, G

    1990-10-01

    The paper reports 18 cases of womb rupture observed in the Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the University of Turin from April 1978 to June 1988. Following an analysis of the data relating to the above cases, the paper concludes that in order to reduce the incidence of womb rupture it is important to hospitalize high-risk patients preferably before the start of labour so as to intervent using caesarian section. PMID:2290596

  18. Neoplasms of Anal Canal and Perianal Skin

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Daniel; Beddy, David; Dozois, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors of the anus and perianal skin are rare. Their presentation can vary and often mimics common benign anal pathology, thereby delaying diagnosis and appropriate and timely treatment. The anatomy of this region is complex because it represents the progressive transition from the digestive system to the skin with many different co-existing types of cells and tissues. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is the most frequent tumor found in the anal and perianal region. Less-frequent lesions include Bowen's and Paget's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and adenocarcinoma. This article aims to review the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for neoplasms of the anal canal and perianal skin. PMID:22379406

  19. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per David Trobisch; Matthias Bauman; Kuno Weise; Fabian Stuby; David J. Hak

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition\\u000a for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred\\u000a most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the\\u000a rupture-zone was

  20. The S ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol-Ann Vasilevsky; David A. Rothenberger; Stanley M. Goldberg

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine the results with the S ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, 116 consecutive patients who had undergone total abdominal colectomy with rectal mucosectomy and endorectal ileal pouch-anal anastomosis were assessed following ileostomy closure. In 11 patients (9.5%) pouch removal and\\/or conversion to permanent ileostomy was necessary because of Crohn's disease (3), pelvic sepsis (3), pouchitis (2), incontinence (2), or

  1. Spinal mechanisms contributing to urethral striated sphincter control during continence and micturition: "how good things might go bad".

    PubMed

    Shefchyk, Susan J

    2006-01-01

    The external urethral sphincter motoneurons in the sacral ventral horn control the striated external urethral sphincter muscles that circle the urethra. Activity in these motoneurons and muscle normally contribute to continence but during micturition, when urine must pass through the urethra, the motoneurons and striated muscle must be silenced. Following injury to descending pathways in the spinal cord, the ability to inhibit sphincter activity is disrupted or lost, resulting in bladder-sphincter dyssynergia and functional obstruction of the urethra during voiding. This chapter will first review the various reflex pathways and neuronal properties that contribute to continence, and which must be modulated during micturition in the spinal intact animal. A discussion about how the dyssynergia seen with spinal cord injury may be produced will then be presented. PMID:16198695

  2. Transurethral Implantation of Macroplastique® for the Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Secondary to Urethral Sphincter Deficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Radley; C. R. Chapple; I. C. Mitsogiannis; K. S. Glass

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results of transurethral implantation of Macroplastique® in women with stress incontinence secondary to urethral sphincter deficiency using subjective and objective outcome measures.Methods: A total of 60 women with genuine stress incontinence secondary to intrinsic urethral sphincter deficiency were treated with transurethral implantation of Macroplastique. The patients had undergone a mean of 1.9 (range 0–7) previous episodes

  3. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

  4. Improvement of nitrergic relaxation by farnesol of the sphincter of Oddi from hypercholesterolaemic rabbits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoltan Szilvassy; Reka Sari; Jozsef Nemeth; Istvan Nagy; Sandor Csati; Janos Lonovics

    1998-01-01

    Field stimulation relaxed the rabbit sphincter of Oddi muscle rings after incubation with atropine (1 ?M) and guanethidine (4 ?M) with a threefold increase in tissue cyclic cGMP content, a response previously shown to be essentially nitrergic. Preparations from hypercholesterolaemic rabbits (1.5% dietary cholesterol load over 8 weeks increasing serum total cholesterol from pre-diet 1.4±0.3 to 22.6±3.8 mmol\\/l) exhibited contractions

  5. The effect of sildenafil on lower esophageal sphincter and body motility in normal male adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Poong-Lyul Rhee; Jae Geun Hyun; Jun Haeng Lee; Young-Ho Kim; Hee Jung Son; Jae J Kim; Seung Woon Paik; Jong Chul Rhee; Kyoo Wan Choi

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Sildenafil relaxes smooth muscle by blocking type 5 phosphodiesterase, which destroys nitric oxide-stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The aim of this study is to investigate the change of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and body motility with the lapse of time after sildenafil infusion in normal male adults.METHODS:After basal esophageal manometry in eight healthy male adult volunteers, we infused a 50-mg tablet

  6. The Gore-tex sling procedure for female sphincteric incontinence: indications, technique, and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Staskin; Jong M. Choe; David S. Breslin

    1997-01-01

    We constructed a pubovaginal sling using the Gore-tex Soft Tissue Patch and 2-0 polytetrafluoroethlene (PTFE) suspension suture and placed it in 122 consecutive incontinent women with urethral hypermobility and\\/or intrinsic sphincter deficiency. We performed a retrospective outcome analysis using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. The mean follow-up period was 24.4 months. Stress incontinence was cured in 88% of patients (equally effective

  7. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. Methods Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. Results Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. Conclusion Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  8. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE: Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. METHODS: Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. RESULTS: Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. CONCLUSION: Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  9. Rectal eversion and double-stapled ileal pouch anal anastomosis in familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aygar, Muhittin; Yeti?ir, Fahri; Salman, Ebru; Y?ld?r?m, Murat Baki; Özdedeo?lu, Mesut; Durak, Do?ukan; Yalç?n, Abdussamet

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Surgery is the only treatment option for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Aim of surgery in FAP is to minimize colorectal cancer risk without need for permanent stoma. There are especially two operation options; Total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) and total proctocolectomy with ileo-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). We report here a patient with FAP who had resection via rectal eversion just over the dentate line under direct visualization and ileoanal-J pouch anastomosis by double-stapler technique. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 40 yr. old female patient with FAP underwent surgery. Firstly, colon and the rectum mobilized completely, and then from the 10 cm. proximal to the ileo-caecal valve to the recto-sigmoid junction total colectomy was performed. Rectum was everted by a grasping forceps which was introduced through the anus and then resection was performed by a linear stapler just over the dentate line. A stapled J-shaped ileal reservoir construction followed by intraluminal stapler-facilitated ileoanal anastomosis. Follow up at six months anal sphincter function was found normal. DISCUSSION There is only surgical management option for FAP patients up to now. Total colectomy with IRA and restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA is surgical options for FAP patients that avoid the need for a permanent stoma. Anorectal eversion may be used in the surgical treatment of FAP, chronic ulcerative colitis and early stage distal rectal cancer patients. CONCLUSION J-pouch ileoanal anastomosis can safely be performed by rectal eversion and double stapler technique in FAP patients. PMID:25305601

  10. Keeping score in rupture disks

    SciTech Connect

    Brazier, G.

    1993-09-01

    At first glance it may seem that the world of rupture disks isn't one bursting with innovation--after all, some of the first designs of more than 60 years ago are still in use today. But take a closer look: Rupture disk technology is hardly standing still. Over the years, the disks have evolved from simple calibrated foils to highly-specialized devices that employ advanced designs and manufacturing techniques to ensure safety in critical applications. The new disks generally feature high accuracy, zero leakage, long service life, and non-fragmentation. Recent products use special metals and alloys to withstand corrosive process conditions and offer a much wider range of operating conditions than these of early devices. Manufacturers are also introducing rupture disks that are intrinsically fail-safe--i.e., the units burst at or below their rated burst pressure even if they are damaged during installation or are improperly installed.

  11. Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

  12. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

  13. Sphincter preservation following preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: report of a randomised trial comparing short-term radiotherapy vs. conventionally fractionated radiochemotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Bujko; M. P. Nowacki; A. Nasierowska-Guttmejer; W. Michalski; M. B; M. Pude?ko; M. Kryj; J. Ol; J. Szmeja; J. S?uszniak; K. Serkies; J. K?adny; M. Pamucka; P. Kuko?owicz

    2004-01-01

    Background and purposeThe aim was to verify whether preoperative conventionally fractionated chemoradiation offers an advantage in sphincter preservation in comparison with preoperative short-term irradiation.

  14. [Management of locally advanced anal canal carcinoma with modulated arctherapy and concurrent chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Troussier, I; Huguet, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Benahim, C; Khalifa, J; Darmon, I; Ortholan, C; Krebs, L; Dejean, C; Fenoglietto, P; Vieillot, S; Bensadoun, R-J; Thariat, J

    2015-04-01

    The standard treatment of locally advanced (stage II and III) squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal consists of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (two cycles of 5-fluoro-uracil, mitomycin C, on a 28-day cycle), with a dose of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction in the prophylactic planning target volume and additional 14 to 20 Gy in the boost planning target volume (5 days per week) with a possibility of 15 days gap period between the two sequences. While conformal irradiation may only yield suboptimal tumor coverage using complex photon/electron field junctions (especially on nodal areas), intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques (segmented static, dynamic, volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy) allow better tumour coverage while sparing organs at risk from intermediate/high doses (small intestine, perineum/genitalia, bladder, pelvic bone, etc.). Such dosimetric advantages result in fewer severe acute toxicities and better potential to avoid a prolonged treatment break that increases risk of local failure. These techniques also allow a reduction in late gastrointestinal and skin toxicities of grade 3 or above, as well as better functional conservation of anorectal sphincter. The technical achievements (simulation, contouring, prescription dose, treatment planning, control quality) of volumetric modulated arctherapy are discussed. PMID:25770884

  15. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for anal cancer What’s new in anal cancer research and treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  16. Chordal rupture. I: aetiology and natural history.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, D B; Dawkins, K D; Kay, P H; Paneth, M

    1983-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1981, 12% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery were found to have chordal rupture. Spontaneous or primary rupture accounted for 74.6% of patients (primary group); in the remainder (secondary group) chordal rupture complicated chronic rheumatic valvular disease (8.9%), bacterial endocarditis on both normal (8.5%) and rheumatic valves (4.7%), ischaemic heart disease (2.3%), acute rheumatic fever (0.5%), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.5%). Isolated posterior rupture was seen most frequently (54%), with anterior rupture in 36% and rupture of both mitral cusps in 10% of patients. A short symptomatic history of acute mitral regurgitation was rare, occurring in only 4% of patients in either the primary or secondary groups, suggesting that mitral regurgitation due to ruptured chordae is a progressive disease. In contrast to previous reports the clinical presentation did not help to differentiate the aetiology of the chordal rupture. PMID:6626391

  17. Rupture of inferior thyroid artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Beal, S L; Dublin, A B; Stone, W K

    1987-08-01

    We report a case in which rupture of an aneurysm of the inferior thyroid artery caused respiratory arrest. The aneurysm was embolized successfully by an angiographic technique. Published reports of rupture of thyroid artery aneurysms are reviewed. PMID:3612969

  18. Introducing the operation method for curing anal fistula by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bingzhi

    1993-03-01

    The key to the treatment of anal fistula lies in scavenging the infected anal gland thoroughly, which is the source of anal fistula infection. The fistula tract at the internal orifice of the anal fistula is cut 1 cm using laser with the infectious source completely degenerated and the wound gassified and scanned. The residual distal fistula softens and disappears upon the action of organic fibrinolysin.

  19. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion.

    PubMed

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-06-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  20. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  1. Randomized prospective trial comparing ileal pouch-anal anastomosis performed by excising the anal mucosa to ileal pouch-anal anastomosis performed by preserving the anal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, W T; Pemberton, J H; Wolff, B G; Nivatvongs, S; Devine, R M; Litchy, W J; McIntyre, P B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study is to compare the results of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) in patients in whom the anal mucosa is excised by handsewn techniques to those in whom the mucosa is preserved using stapling techniques. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the operation of choice for patients with chronic ulcerative colitis requiring proctocolectomy. Controversy exists over whether preserving the transitional mucosa of the anal canal improves outcomes. METHODS: Forty-one patients (23 men, 18 women) were randomized to either endorectal mucosectomy and handsewn IPAA or to double-stapled IPAA, which spared the anal transition zone. All patients were diverted for 2 to 3 months. Nine patients were excluded. Preoperative functional status was assessed by questionnaire and anal manometry. Twenty-four patients underwent more extensive physiologic evaluation, including scintigraphic anopouch angle studies and pudendel never terminal motor latency a mean of 6 months after surgery. Quality of life similarly was estimated before surgery and after surgery. Univariate analysis using Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences between groups. RESULTS: The two groups were identical demographically. Overall outcomes in both groups were good. Thirty-three percent of patients who underwent the handsewn technique and 35% of patients who underwent the double-stapled technique experienced a postoperative complication. Resting anal canal pressures were higher in the patients who underwent the stapled technique, but other physiologic parameters were similar between groups. Night-time fecal incontinence occurred less frequently in the stapled group but not significantly. The number of stools per 24 hours decreased from preoperative values in both groups. After IPAA, quality of life improved promptly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Stapled IPAA, which preserves the mucosa of the anal transition zone, confers no apparent early advantage in terms of decreased stool frequency or fewer episodes of fecal incontinence compared to handsewn IPAA, which excises the mucosa. Higher resting pressures in the stapled group coupled with a trend toward less night-time incontinence, however, may portend better function in the stapled group over time. Both operations are safe and result in rapid and profound improvement in quality of life. PMID:9230807

  2. RBMK pressure tube rupture assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. E. Schmitt; G. V. Tsiklauri

    1994-01-01

    The Russian RBMK reactor core design consists of multiple parallel pressure tube channels that contain Zr clad, UOâ fuel pin bundles. These parallel channels are contained within graphite moderator blocks which are, in turn, contained within a sealed core cavity. Current safety evaluation efforts of the RBMK reactors have been concentrating in the area of tube ruptures within the core

  3. Numerical model of seismic rupture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan B. Nielsen; Albert Tarantola

    1992-01-01

    Simple numerical models of the cellular automaton type have been proposed recently, as an analogy for seismic faults. Those showed interesting features of spontaneous rupture evolution or even seismic recurrence. It is possible to incorporate realistic rheology and tensorial physics into this kind of model, to extend it to a portion of crust instead of a single fault-plane and to

  4. Anal fissure: the changing management of a surgical condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Acheson; J. H. Scholefield

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic anal fissure is a common benign disorder that causes severe, sharp anal pain during defaecation. Fissures are generally associated with raised resting anal pressures, and treatments are aimed at reduction of these pressures. Surgical sphincterotomy is very successful at healing fissures but is associated with significant morbidity. Much work has gone into the development of new pharmacological agents

  5. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  6. HPV infection, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal cancer: current issues

    E-print Network

    Stanley, Margaret A; Winder, David M; Sterling, Jane C; Goon, Peter K C

    2012-09-08

    by a spectrum of intra- epithelial changes, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN), of varying cytological and histological severity AIN 1 - mild, AIN 2 - moderate, AIN 3 - severe, similar to cer- vical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), that correspond...

  7. Resolving sphincter of Oddi incontinence for primary duodenal Crohn's disease with strictureplasty

    PubMed Central

    Alemanno, G.; Sturiale, A.; Bellucci, F.; Giudici, F.; Tonelli, F.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Crohn's involvement of duodenum is a rare event and may be associated to proteiform symptoms and uncommon pathological aspects which make diagnosis and treatment complex. PRESENTATION OF CASE The peculiar aspect of this case was a suspected duodeno-biliary fistula. The patient (female, 22 years old) was affected by duodenal Crohn's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a dilated common bile duct, whose final part linked to a formation containing fluid, and characterized by filling of the contrast medium in the excretory phase. Abdominal ultrasound showed intra-hepatic and intra-gallbladder aerobilia. At surgery, the duodenum was mobilized showing an inflammatory stricture and a slight dilatation of the common bile duct, with no signs of fistulas. The opened duodenum was anastomized side to side to a transmesocolic loop of the jejunum. After surgery, the general condition of the patient improved. DISCUSSION Only two cases of fistula between a narrow duodenal bulb and the common bile duct have been described in literature and the Authors were not be able to verify the occurrence of a duodenal biliary fistula at surgery. The association between duodenal Crohn's disease and Sphincter of Oddi incontinence is a very rare finding with different etiology: chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, common bile duct stones, progressive systemic sclerosis. CONCLUSION The treatment to resolve Sphincter of Oddi incontinence for primary duodenal Crohn's disease is not clear. Strictureplasty could be the treatment of choice, because, resolving the stricture, the duodenal pressure is likely to decrease and the reflux through the incontinent sphincter can be avoided. PMID:23276753

  8. [Simultaneous registration of rheographic and manometric parameters of the inferior esophageal sphincter in the cat].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, M; Giannazzo, E; Giuffrida, R; Sapienza, S

    1985-03-30

    The aim of the present study was to detect simultaneously hemodynamic parietal events and intraluminal pressure of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter (LES), with particular regards to cyclic changes due to systo-diastolic cardiac activity. A probe for combined Intraluminal Manometric Plethysmography (IMP) and Intraluminal Impedence Plethysmography (IIP) was used. It was a Swan Ganz bipolar pacing catheter, modified by removing the latex balloon from the tip. The exposed side-hole (diameter smaller than 0.5 mm) was utilized as a terminal orifice for an infused manometry system. It was preliminarly essayed in bench tests. A perfusion rate of 1.75 ml/min was chosen as it did not induce significant elevations of the pressure base-line and allowed detection of pressure rise rates up to 300 mm Hg/s. The two metallic rings, originally designed for intracardiac stimulation, were used as low resistance electrodes to record impedence variations. Since very small shifts of recording electrodes induce important artifacts, the present experiments were carried out on curarized cats. In these conditions, artificial ventilation could be temporarily stopped to avoid any artifact due to respiration mechanics. The proposed method seems to be satisfactory enough for simultaneous acquisition of IIP and IMP data at LES level. Recordings of IIP allow to reveal changes in parietal blood content which could chiefly be referred to lamina propria and submucosa districts. On the other hand, IMP cyclic fluctuations would signal variations of total sphincteric tension, likely depending on hemodynamic events in all vascular beds of the wall. In our opinion, a more extensive analysis of IMP and IIP waves, as well as of reciprocal relationships between rheografic and manometric parameters, may provide very useful knowledges on sphincteric physiology. PMID:4027028

  9. Contribution of ATP and nitric oxide to NANC inhibitory transmission in rat pyloric sphincter.

    PubMed Central

    Soediono, P; Burnstock, G

    1994-01-01

    1. Changes in isometric tension were recorded from circular muscle strips of rat pyloric sphincter in vitro, in response to electrical field stimulation and exogenously applied muscle relaxants. 2. Concentration-response relationships were studied for relaxation to exogenously applied adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and two analogues, 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) and alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-MeATP). These drugs evoked concentration-dependent relaxation of rat pyloric sphincter with an order of potency 2-MeSATP > ATP >> alpha,beta-MeATP, indicating the presence of P2y-purinoceptors. The IC50 value of each nucleotide was: 2-MeSATP, 5.0 x 10(-8); ATP, 7.9 x 10(-6) M; alpha,beta-MeATP showed only slight activity at a concentration of 0.1 mM. 3. Frequency-response relationships for relaxations evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were studied in the absence and presence of 10 microM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis) and 20 microM reactive blue 2 (a P2y-purinoceptor antagonist). It was found that these substances significantly reduced the relaxant response of rat pyloric sphincter to EFS by 40% and 50% respectively. In the presence of both L-NAME and reactive blue 2 the responses were reduced by 75%. 4. Concentration-response relationships were studied for ATP and 2-MeSATP in the presence of L-NAME. It was found that L-NAME did not significantly inhibit the relaxant responses to these drugs. 5. Concentration-response relationships for ATP and noradrenaline were studied in the presence of reactive blue 2 (20 microM); the P2y-antagonist significantly inhibited the relaxant response to ATP, but not that to noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 PMID:7532079

  10. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A…

  11. Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S31A0181T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Small Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tomic, J.; Houston, H.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of small earthquakes differs from those of large earthquakes has been a long- standing question in seismology. Recent proposals as to whether and how the physics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may change with earthquake size have sparked interest in the energy budget, which depends strongly on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (Vr). Small earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities have proved difficult to determine due to the strong attenuation of high-frequency waves. We analyze P and S waves of small earthquakes to detect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity and constrain Vr. We apply the projected Landweber deconvolution (PLD) method to a data set of 30 earthquakes 3.6<M<4.5 recorded by the HiNet seismic array. We use small aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGF) to deconvolve from the main shocks and obtain the relative source time functions (RSTF). The EGF approach removes the effects of complex structure between the earthquakes and the stations. Variation in RSTFs with azimuth yields estimates of Vr for 6 earthquakes from 0.4 to 0.9?. Our results are broadly consistent with those of Yamada and Mori (JGR, 2005) and McGuire (BSSA, 2004). We now explore the implications of the range in Vr for static stress drop (??), and the ratio of radiated energy to seismic moment, which are interrelated. Kanamori and Rivera (BSSA, 2004) discuss how Vr and ?? must change with earthquake moment, if the ratio of energy to moment ? increases with moment, as has been suggested by various studies. There is currently no consensus that such a change in this ratio truly occurs. The increase in the energy-to- moment ratio is controlled by the relation between moment and corner frequency, which has moment inversely proportional to corner frequency raised to the power (3 + ?). Data compiled in Kanamori and Rivera suggests ? of 0.5. Then Vr of 0.4 to 0.9? for M3 events require that ?? of M3 events range from 1 to 0.1 respectively, of that of M7 events. More constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of small earthquakes will help to resolve possible changes in the energy budget, and thus earthquake physics, with earthquake size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31763563"><span id="translatedtitle">A comparison of common bile duct pressures after botulinum toxin injection into the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi versus biliary stenting in a canine model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Jeffrey M Marks; Andrew L Bower; Marlene Goormastic; Janis L Malycky; Jeffrey L Ponsky</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Background: Botulinum toxin A (Botox) functionally paralyzes the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi in both animals and humans, resulting in reduced pressures. No study, however, has specifically addressed common bile duct (CBD) pressures after Botox injection into the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi with regard to treating biliary leaks and fistulae. The goals of this present study are to compare, versus biliary stenting, the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1727081"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of botulinum toxin A on the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi: an in vivo and in vitro study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sand, J; Nordback, I; Arvola, P; Porsti, I; Kalloo, A; Pasricha, P</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Background—Botulinum toxin A is a potent inhibitor of the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings. Local injection of botulinum toxin has recently been suggested to be helpful in <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi dyskinesia by decreasing <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi pressure. ?Aims—To explore the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin A on <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi (SO) muscle. ?Methods—Four piglets underwent duodenoscopy and SO manometry was performed. After obtaining a baseline pressure, the SO was injected with normal saline and the experiment repeated after one week. The SO was then injected endoscopically with botulinum toxin (40 U) with follow up manometry one week later. The <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi was removed from 10 pigs, cut into three rings, and placed in an organ bath. The force of contraction was measured and registered on a polygraph. Rings were stimulated by 70 V (10 Hz, 0.5 ms) electrical field stimulation for 20 seconds, exogenous acetylcholine (100 µM), and KCl (125 mM). Botulinum toxin (0.1 U/ml) or atropine (1 µM) was added to the incubation medium and the stimulation was repeated. ?Results—Mean basal SO pressure in the pigs remained unchanged after saline injection but decreased to about 50% of baseline value following botulinum toxin injection (p=0.04). The contractions induced by direct stimulation of SO smooth muscle with KCl were not significantly affected by either atropine or botulinum toxin. In all rings exogenous acetylcholine induced contractions, which were totally blocked by atropine, but not by botulinum toxin. Electrical field stimulation induced contractions that were inhibited by both atropine and botulinum toxin. ?Conclusion—Botulinum toxin inhibits pig <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi smooth muscle contractions by a presynaptic cholinergic mechanism, similar to that described in skeletal muscle. ?? Keywords: <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi; botulinum toxin; pig; ex vivo PMID:9616312</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24612509"><span id="translatedtitle">Safety analysis of first 1000 patients treated with magnetic <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> augmentation for gastroesophageal reflux disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lipham, J C; Taiganides, P A; Louie, B E; Ganz, R A; DeMeester, T R</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Antireflux surgery with a magnetic <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> augmentation device (MSAD) restores the competency of the lower esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> with a device rather than a tissue fundoplication. As a regulated device, safety information from the published clinical literature can be supplemented by tracking under the Safe Medical Devices Act. The aim of this study was to examine the safety profile of the MSAD in the first 1000 implanted patients. We compiled safety data from all available sources as of July 1, 2013. The analysis included intra/perioperative complications, hospital readmissions, procedure-related interventions, reoperations, and device malfunctions leading to injury or inability to complete the procedure. Over 1000 patients worldwide have been implanted with the MSAD at 82 institutions with median implant duration of 274 days. Event rates were 0.1% intra/perioperative complications, 1.3% hospital readmissions, 5.6% endoscopic dilations, and 3.4% reoperations. All reoperations were performed non-emergently for device removal, with no complications or conversion to laparotomy. The primary reason for device removal was dysphagia. No device migrations or malfunctions were reported. Erosion of the device occurred in one patient (0.1%). The safety analysis of the first 1000 patients treated with MSAD for gastroesophageal reflux disease confirms the safety of this device and the implantation technique. The overall event rates were low based on data from 82 institutions. The MSAD is a safe therapeutic option for patients with chronic, uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:24612509</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16281033"><span id="translatedtitle">The deterministic nature of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olson, Erik L; Allen, Richard M</p> <p>2005-11-10</p> <p>Understanding the earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is central to our understanding of fault systems and earthquake hazards. Multiple hypotheses concerning the nature of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been proposed but no unifying theory has emerged. The conceptual hypothesis most commonly cited is the cascade model for fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In the cascade model, slip initiates on a small fault patch and continues to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> further across a fault plane as long as the conditions are favourable. Two fundamental implications of this domino-like theory are that small earthquakes begin in the same manner as large earthquakes and that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is not deterministic--that is, the size of the earthquake cannot be determined until the cessation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here we show that the frequency content of radiated seismic energy within the first few seconds of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scales with the final magnitude of the event. We infer that the magnitude of an earthquake can therefore be estimated before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is complete. This finding implies that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is to some degree deterministic and has implications for the physics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. PMID:16281033</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201...70P"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of initial stress and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation parameters on forbidden zone <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Well established theoretical and numerical results of 2-D <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been accepted for years to limit the speed of mode II cracks to be below the Rayleigh velocity or above the shear wave speed. However, recent work has numerically produced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds in this so-called `forbidden zone', that is the region of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed, for 3-D simulations. We verify that finding here and further examine the dependence of that behaviour on initial stress and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation parameters. Using a 3-D finite element model for dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different initial stress conditions as well as different size initiation patches and forced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities. It is shown that the initial stress on the fault has a strong influence on the resulting <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, specifically with regards to the distance at which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> transitions to supershear speeds, the maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity attained on the fault, and how rapidly the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> passes through the forbidden zone. It is also demonstrated that for the same initial stress, increasing the size of the nucleation patch or the speed of forced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can artificially increase the gradient of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity within the forbidden zone. This suggests that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is uniquely predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault and surrounding medium in these models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57926256"><span id="translatedtitle">Medical and Surgical Risks in Handballing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Helen Navin</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Handballing (fist fucking) has long been practiced by male homosexual partners with few evident consequences of a medically serious nature. In recent years, however, medical and surgical risks have risen as handballing has come to a practiced in groups. The potential for physical harm (e.g., <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>, perforation of the colon, the spread of anorectal and colon</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30822950"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> — A case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>T. K. Kaar; M. O’Brien; P. Murray; G. B. Mullan</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Summary  The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon is made relatively infrequently and bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a\\u000a rarity. We report a case of spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with documented chronic renal\\u000a insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism. A predisposing cause to the condition as obtained in this case, has been\\u000a described in cases previously published</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014827&hterms=Patent+search&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D%2522Patent%2Bsearch%2522"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of cryogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1237870"><span id="translatedtitle">Tendon <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>In five patients, tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25208811"><span id="translatedtitle">Squamous cell carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> sacs in three dogs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mellett, S; Verganti, S; Murphy, S; Bowlt, K</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sac squamous cell carcinoma is rare in dogs. Five cases have been previously reported, treatment of which involved surgery alone. This report describes three further cases of canine <span class="hlt">anal</span> sac squamous cell carcinoma which underwent medical (meloxicam) management alone, resulting in survival of up to seven months. No metastases were identified. Squamous cell carcinoma, although extremely uncommon, should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis when a dog is presented for investigation of an <span class="hlt">anal</span> sac mass. PMID:25208811</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5377104"><span id="translatedtitle">Carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal: radiation or radiation plus chemotherapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cummings, B.J.</p> <p>1983-09-01</p> <p>An editorial is presented which discusses the treatment of carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal. Following the initial report of the successful preoperative use of combined chemotherapy and radiation by Nigro in 1974, several centers have confirmed the effectiveness of such combinations either as preoperative or as definitive treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinomas, and many patients are now being referred for radiation therapy. The article by Cantril in this issue describe the successful treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinomas by radiation alone, and raises the important issue of whether radiation plus chemotherapy is more effective treatment than radiation alone for squamous or cloacogenic carcinomas arising in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal or perianal area. Several studies are cited.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4177484"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma: An evolution in disease and management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Osborne, Marc C; Maykel, Justin; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer represents less than 1% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Yet, despite the relative paucity of cases, the incidence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer has seen a steady about 2% rise each year over the last decade. As such, all healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the evaluation and treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma. While chemoradiation remains the mainstay of therapy for most patients with <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, surgery may still be required in recurrent, recalcitrant and palliative disease. In this manuscript, we will explore the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. PMID:25278699</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4020912"><span id="translatedtitle">Pressing the nerve alters muscle fiber types of the peroneus longus in rats: Preliminary evidence for external <span class="hlt">anal</span> sphincteroplasty</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shi, Song; Liu, Hao; Bai, Xiaobin; Cao, Yongxiao</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Studies have demonstrated that <span class="hlt">anal</span> reconstruction with a gracilis graft pressing the dominant nerve could be used to treat fecal incontinence. However, the detailed mechanism by this remains unknown. Herein, we evaluated the alteration in muscle fiber types and contractility of the peroneus longus muscle in rats after pressing its dominant nerves. Material/Methods The rat soleus and peroneus longus were exposed during surgery. The superficial peroneal nerve was pressed so that the peroneus longus temporarily lost its innervation. The epimysium between the soleus and the peroneus longus was removed. The end point of the soleus was cut off and the epimysium of the contact surfaces of the soleus and the peroneus longus were sutured. Five months later, peroneus longus contractility was recorded by the myograph system, and types of muscle fibers were observed using the myosin ATPase staining method. Results The skeletal muscle fiber type underwent adaptive changes due to double innervations with both fast and slow muscle nerves. Compared with other groups, the percentage of type I fibers in the peroneus longus increased significantly in the group of rats with the pressure on the nerve and removal of the sarcolemma. The maximal contraction and relaxation time at the single twitch and complete tetanus of the peroneus longus were also increased. Conclusions Our results show that pressing dominant nerves alter the skeletal muscle fiber types of the peroneus longus, which lead to increased maximal contraction and relaxation time, and significantly improve the ability in resistance to fatigue in rats. This study provides a basis for future clinical studies for external <span class="hlt">anal</span> <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> reconstruction using gracilis grafts that are doubly innervated by pressing on its dominant nerve. PMID:24807024</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31327834"><span id="translatedtitle">Neoplasia intraepitelial <span class="hlt">anal</span>: resultados de la aplicación de un protocolo diagnóstico en pacientes de riesgo mediante el uso de citología <span class="hlt">anal</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Estela Membrilla-Fernández; David Parés; Francisco Alameda; Marta Pascual; Ricard Courtier; María José Gil; Gabriel Vallecillo; Pere Fusté; Miguel Pera; Luis Grande</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Introduction<span class="hlt">Anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia is a precursor condition of squamous <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma. The groups at risk of this lesion are patients with anogenital condylomata, cervical dysplasia, human immunodeficiency virus infection and, in general, patients with HPV infection. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of a diagnostics protocol of <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Intraepithelial Neoplasia in high risk population using <span class="hlt">anal</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23955186"><span id="translatedtitle">Quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair. PMID:23955186</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1861623"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneously hypertensive rats develop pulmonary hypertension and hypertrophy of pulmonary venous <span class="hlt">sphincters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Aharinejad, S.; Schraufnagel, D. E.; Böck, P.; MacKay, C. A.; Larson, E. K.; Miksovsky, A.; Marks, S. C.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>This study explored the spontaneously hypertensive rat as an animal model of pulmonary hypertension and sought to identify anatomic changes in its pulmonary microvasculature, especially focal constrictions of pulmonary veins (<span class="hlt">sphincters</span>). The average systemic and pulmonary artery blood pressures were 172/139 (+/- 9/9) and 36/14 (+/- 4/3), respectively, for spontaneously hypertensive Wistar Kyoto rats (SHR), and 134/83 (+/- 8/2) and 20/10 (+/- 2/2) for normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) (P < 0.01 for both). Light microscopy of the lungs in SHR showed muscularization of both arteries and veins, but this was more pronounced in the small pulmonary veins. Perivascular edema was also present. There were 20 (+/- 4) leukocytes per 100 microns of capillary length in SHR and 9 (+/- 2) in WKY (P < 0.001). Transmission electron microscopy showed focal venous smooth muscle was greater in SHR than in WKY. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts showed the average maximal focal venous contraction (<span class="hlt">sphincter</span>) was 54% (+/- 10) of its diameter in SHR, but was only 6% (+/- 4) in WKY (P < 0.01). Arterial contraction occurred in the hypertensive rats as bourglass narrowings of the casts, but was less conspicuous than venous constrictions. The mean alveolar capillary diameter was 8.1 microns (+/- 1.6) in SHR, compared with 6.3 microns (+/- 1.0) in WKY (P < 0.01). The central interspace between capillaries was 3.2 microns (+/- 1.6) in SHR and 6.0 microns (+/- 3.6) in WKY (P < 0.01). The venous contraction, capillary size, and capillary interspace distance correlated with the pulmonary blood pressure. The spontaneously hypertensive rat can be a model of pulmonary hypertension with its most notable structural change being increased muscularity in the small pulmonary veins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 and 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 to 13 Figure 14 and 15 PMID:8546217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3996744"><span id="translatedtitle">Single incision laparoscopic surgery - trans <span class="hlt">anal</span> endoscopic microsurgery: A technological innovation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shah, Neha; Sasikumar, Pattabi; Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Trans <span class="hlt">anal</span> endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then underwent a period of immersion. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. The advent of single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has made great inroads into various fields of general and gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. We decided to make use of the same technique in TEM for two patients who had large sessile villous adenomas of the rectum. We used this port and fixed it transanally to the edge of the anus. Carbon dioxide used for insufflation in laparoscopic surgery was used through one of the ports, and a telescope was inserted to the larger port. We made sure that the entire polyp was cut out completely until the circular muscle of the internal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> was clearly exposed. Next, the cut edges of the rectum were undermined between the mucosa and the circular muscles in order to bring the cut edges closer together. We were able to perform this SILS TEM in two cases. In both the cases, well differentiated villous adenoma (colonoscopically, biopsy proven before surgery) was confirmed after excision. The question has been raised whether TEM is the new laparoscopy for anorectal surgery. Increasingly, several reports are showing promise for treatment for early stage cancers and large rectal adenomas using TEM. Adoption of our technique using the SILS port that has not been previously described in medical literature, seems to be a promising tool for the future. TEM first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then under went a period of immersion. In recent years, with the onset of laparoscopic surgery, the thoughts and the ideas of using a laparoscopic surgical technique have invaded the area of colorectal cancer as well. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. PMID:24761088</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48588874"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of electrostimulation on the <span class="hlt">sphincteric</span> compound muscle action potential in fecal incontinence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>W. H. Jost</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Summary  Continence scores and <span class="hlt">anal</span> manometry are commonly used to assess the effect of electrostimulation in fecal incontinence. This\\u000a study determined the increase of muscular compound potentials in electroneurography of the pudendal nerve after 3 months of\\u000a electrostimulation treatment. Twenty–five women were tested, their average age being 46.7 years (SD 10.2). Electrostimulation\\u000a was applied twice daily for 15 min in each</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49567589"><span id="translatedtitle">Fatal lower extremity varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Garyfalia Ampanozi; Ulrich Preiss; Gary M. Hatch; Wolf Dieter Zech; Thomas Ketterer; Stephan Bolliger; Michael J. Thali; Thomas D. Ruder</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cause of death, although varicosities are a common pathology. We present three cases of sudden death due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After a review of the literature, the case circumstances and the findings of imaging examination, performed in two cases, are presented. One of them had undergone a post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA), and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/m8m84318h084v172.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Richard H. Daffner; Barry L. Riemer; Anthony R. Lupetin; Nilima Dash</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of acute tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561379"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Celik, Evrim Co?kun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that may be related to the long-term use of a statin. PMID:22561379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30371419"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrasound Diagnosis of Quadriceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Brian G. LaRocco; George Zlupko; Paul Sierzenski</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are an uncommon knee injury. The diagnosis is often complicated by a limited examination secondary to edema and pain, the insensitivity of radiographs, and the unavailability of non-emergent magnetic resonance imaging. A delay in diagnosis and treatment has been shown to cause significant morbidity. A case report of bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is presented demonstrating the utility</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25728450"><span id="translatedtitle">Aortic valve <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during isometric muscle contraction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Payne, Darrin M; Richards, Tammy; Hamilton, Andrew</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Aortic valve <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been previously reported in association with blunt chest trauma as well as spontaneously in the setting of abnormal valves. We present a case of a patient who required emergent aortic valve replacement following <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of his aortic valve during an isometric muscle contraction. PMID:25728450</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://ejcts.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/reprint/21/4/649.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Iatrogenic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tracheobronchial tree</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. S. Hofmann; G. Rettig; J. Radke; H. Neef; R. E Silber</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Iatrogenic tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are seldom but severe complications after intubation or bronchoscopy. Therefore, we evaluated the reasons, the subsequent therapy and the outcome of patients with tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, who were admitted to our hospital. Methods: In a retrospective study we examined 19 patients (15 women, four men; 43–87 years) treated for acute tracheobronchial lesions. Eleven (58%) patients had a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25468102"><span id="translatedtitle">Free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after arterial switch operation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Aroca, Ángel; Pérez-Caballero, Ramón; Pita, Ana</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>A neonate underwent arterial switch operation, supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for 3 days. Two weeks later, a pseudoaneurysm was seen on an echocardiogram, and a free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was suggested. Prompt surgery was performed, a free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> assessed, and a patch with BioGlue was applied successfully. One year later, the child is in good condition. PMID:25468102</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24812576"><span id="translatedtitle">Management of acute tendo Achillis <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Adam Ajis; Nicola Maffulli</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Acute <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tendo Achillis are increasingly frequent, and affect mainly middle-aged adults. The optimal management of acute <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the tendo Achillis is widely debated. The contentious issues can be summarised into conservative versus operative management, early versus late mobilisation and, if operative management is selected, percutaneous versus open repair. In general, rerupture is more common after non-operative</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26054172"><span id="translatedtitle">[Idiopathic bilateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Choufani, C; Barthélemy, R; Danis, J; Demoures, Th; Rigal, S</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In the absence of systemic disease, specific treatment or sport tendonitis, simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is rare. Often missed on the first glance, it represents a diagnostic difficulty that should not be overlooked at the initial medical visit. The loss of active extension of the lower limb and a radiographic patella alta, even in a bilateral context, should raise suspicion of this diagnosis. It is then necessary to search for predisposing causes and to evoke the differential, or frequently associated, diagnoses. The present report illustrates these diagnostic difficulties and summarizes some clinical considerations that might help to avoid neglecting these different elements at the first medical visit (positive diagnosis, associated lesions, favouring factors). PMID:26054172</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2938675"><span id="translatedtitle">[Differentiation of the effects of antispasmodic agents on the electromyogram of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi and the duodenum of the alert rabbit].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Achard, F; Denavit, M; Roche, M</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The electrical activity of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi and gastro-intestinal tract had been recorded on 21 negative atropineesterase conscious rabbits by means of chronically implanted electrodes located in the digestive wall. An analysis of the action of different spasmolytic and analgesic drugs was realized. Electromyograms of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi presented (a) isolated or in series spike potentials occurring independently of electrical activities of the duodenum (b) recurring spike potentials correlated with intestine spikes. The independent activity of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi was not controlled by the cholinergic system, contrary to the intestine-dependent activity (effect of the fempiverinium, atropine like drug). The pitofenone had inhibited the spike potentials of both the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> and intestine because its papaverinic effect. The noramidopyrine, analgesic drug without morphine-like effects, had induced activation and inhibition at low and high posology respectively. PMID:2938675</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.dartmouth.edu/~ahb/applied_roadmap.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">116/126 numerical <span class="hlt">anal</span>. computational PDEs, grad level topics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>. methods, PDE, FT 46 intro. applied core numerical methods, coding apps. to ecology, medicine apps116/126 numerical <span class="hlt">anal</span>. computational PDEs, grad level topics ?W 43 complex <span class="hlt">anal</span>. 20 prob. & stats AT DARTMOUTH (arrows show prerequisites, dotted are suggested; check ORC for details) dynamics, theory+numerical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4087955"><span id="translatedtitle">Controversies in the treatment of common <span class="hlt">anal</span> problems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sagap, Ismail; Remzi, Feza H</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Treating common benign <span class="hlt">anal</span> diseases has evolved towards more outpatient procedures with better outcome. However, minimizing post-procedure morbidities such as pain and the avoidance incontinence remain the most significant concerns. We introduce some controversies and highlight the developments in current surgical practice for the treatment of common <span class="hlt">anal</span> problems. PMID:16718832</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32923998"><span id="translatedtitle">Oral Nifedipine in the Treatment of Chronic <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Fissure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Salahattin Cengiz; Mithat Kerim Arslan</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Background: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effect of oral nifedipine on maximal resting <span class="hlt">anal</span> pressure (MRAP) in healthy volunteers and to evaluate its role in the treatment of chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure (CAF). Methods: MRAP was measured in 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with CAF before and after oral nifedipine (20 mg b.i.d.). Patients were assessed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29097470"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> function in geriatric patients with faecal incontinence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J A Barrett; J C Brocklehurst; E S Kiff; G Ferguson; E B Faragher</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The association of faecal incontinence with constipation and confusion in the elderly is well recognised but the <span class="hlt">anal</span> function of faecally incontinent geriatric patients is poorly understood. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> studies were therefore performed on 99 geriatric patients (49 with faecal incontinence, 19 continent patients with faecal impaction and 31 geriatric control patients with normal bowel habit) and 57 younger healthy control</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3266159"><span id="translatedtitle">Update on <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulae: Surgical perspectives for the gastroenterologist</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tabry, Helena; Farrands, Paul A</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> fistulae are common and debilitating; they are characterized by severe pain and discharge. They arise following infection near the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, or as a primary event from an abscess in the abdomen, fistulating into the vagina or perianal skin. The term ‘cryptoglandular’ is given to abscesses arising from the <span class="hlt">anal</span> glands. For many years, the treatment of choice was to lay open the fistula; however, this risks causing incontinence with potentially devastating consequences. Alternative surgical treatments include setons, fibrin glue, collagen plugs and flaps to cover the internal fistula opening. These have achieved varying degrees of success, as will be discussed. The present review also discusses <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulae in light of much recently published literature. Currently, <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulae remain challenging and require specialist expertise; however, new treatment options are on the horizon. PMID:22175058</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S13D..07U"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Interface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Extremely Heterogeneous Media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Uenishi, K.; Tsuji, K.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Fracture experiments of monolithic brittle materials usually show the maximum speed of smooth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at some 30 % of the relevant shear wave speed. This experimental maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is by far lower than those predicted by theories and inferred from inversions of seismograms, and some seismic inversions (e.g., the 1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit, 2001 the central Kunlunshan and 2002 Denali earthquakes) even suggest the existence of supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds (i.e., <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating faster than the relevant shear wave). Recently, Uenishi et al. ( SSJ Fall Meeting, 2004, 2005; AGU Fall Meeting, 2006) experimentally investigated dynamic fracture in monolithic hyperelastic materials under static mode-§ loading conditions with relatively high crack-parallel stresses. Using a high-speed digital video camera system, they showed that cracks may propagate supersonically even in homogeneous materials. However, the exact mechanism for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation and the transition of a nucleated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from sub-Rayleigh to super-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed has not been identified yet. In this contribution, we further develop our experimental system and investigate dynamic fracture in extremely heterogeneous media, consisting of thin fluid and solid films: Inside a wire frame (50mm high, 50mm wide), a flat soap film contacts a flat thin solid plastic film (20mm high, 20mm wide), under static tensile loading conditions. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (crack), initiated at a point, propagates subsonically in the linear elastic fluid film (see e.g., Uenishi et al., SSJ Fall Meeting, 2006, for the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in monolithic fluid films). When the circular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front reaches the interface, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> advances along the interface and then it is "diffracted" at the two corners of the interface. We record the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation process utilizing our high-speed digital video camera at a frame rate of 20 ?s (20×10-6s). The observed results show that interface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation may accelerate (or even decelerate) and the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior is very sensitive to the geometry of the interface between the two films: (1) When the subsonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front reaches the first rectangular corner, it accelerates around the corner and then advances supersonically along the interface; and (2) when the supersonic interface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front approaches the second corner (obtuse with respect to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front in fluid), it bifurcates for a short period (400 ?s): the first branch unexpectedly expands rather straight into the bulk and the second one propagates along the interface at a lower speed; At a later stage, again unexpectedly, the first branched crack decelerates significantly in the bulk and the two cracks eventually merge into a single crack. The overall behavior is - in some sense - similar to that of the oblique shock and Prandtl- Meyer expansion waves in fluid mechanics, and it might give new insights not only into the question of high <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds of natural earthquakes but also into the generation mechanism of tsunamis. u.ac.jp/~uenishi/</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25748805"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> tiny middle cerebral artery aneurysm].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kawahara, Ichiro; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Takashi; Hirose, Makoto; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Toba, Tamotsu</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>With new neuroimaging techniques, the detection rate of unruptured intracranial aneurysms has increased. While most detected aneurysms are small and left untreated because of the low risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, we still encounter many cases of small aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Middle cerebral artery(MCA)aneurysms have lower risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> compared to those in the anterior cerebral or internal carotid-posterior communicating arteries. Identification of small aneurysms with a high risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is important to improve management of these aneurysms. We report 10 cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tiny(<3mm)MCA aneurysms. All patients underwent clipping and nine had good outcomes. One patient had poor outcome due to the worsening of chronic heart failure and kidney failure. A tiny aneurysm can <span class="hlt">rupture</span> if the aneurysmal wall is fragile. Therefore, the fragility of the aneurysmal wall is an important predictive factor of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Presently, however, it is difficult to determine when an operation for an unruptured tiny aneurysm is indicated; new neuroimaging techniques that detect the fragility of the aneurysmal wall are needed. PMID:25748805</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25669735"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of renal angiomyolipoma during childbirth.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Orywal, Ann Kathrin; Zeile, Martin; Brüning, Roland; Gross, Andreas J; Netsch, Christopher</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor of the kidney, originating from perivascular epithelioid cells. Normally asymptomatic, symptoms that can occur are flank pain due to strong growth or spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with retroperitoneal hemorrhage and hypovolemic shock. The risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is higher during pregnancy and also growth can be enhanced, probably hormone mediated. We report a case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> renal angiomyolipoma during childbirth in a woman who presented with hypovolemic shock as a result of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. Emergency endovascular treatment was successful with sparing most of the affected kidney as demonstrated by angiography imaging and follow-up computed tomographic scan. PMID:25669735</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/Dalguer_etal_SurfSubsurf.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> and Buried Dynamic-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models Calibrated with Statistical Observations of Past Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Luis A. Dalguer; Hiroe Miyake; Steven M. Day; Kojiro Irikura</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In the context of the slip-weakening friction model and simplified asper- ity models for stress state, we calibrate dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models for buried and surface-<span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earthquakes constrained with statistical observations of past earth- quakes. These observations are the kinematic source models derived from source in- versions of ground-motion and empirical source models of seismic moment and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area. The calibrated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29285122"><span id="translatedtitle">Patella baja following chronic quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Michael Hockings; John C. Cameron</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Patella baja is a complication of chronic quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In this case we present the treatment of this problem by the proximal transfer of the tibial tubercle allowing an environment in which the quadriceps tendon can heal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6752786"><span id="translatedtitle">Pregnancy-related <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of arterial aneurysms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barrett, J M; Van Hooydonk, J E; Boehm, F H</p> <p>1982-09-01</p> <p>Over 50 per cent of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysms in women under the age of 40 are pregnancy-related. The hemodynamic and endocrine changes of pregnancy appear to be the cause of arterial alterations which may lead to new aneurysm formation and/or weakening of preexisting aneurysms. The most commonly reported arteries to have aneurysms <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy are the aorta, cerebral arteries, splenic artery, renal artery, coronary artery, and ovarian artery. In many instances, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an arterial aneurysm will initially simulate other less serious disease processes, thus delaying the correct diagnosis until a catastrophic event occurs. Early diagnosis and treatment of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm are imperative in order to give optimal chances of survival to the mother and fetus. PMID:6752786</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25697302"><span id="translatedtitle">Haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic simple cysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Simon, Tiarah; Bakker, Ilsalien S; Penninga, Luit; Nellensteijn, David R</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a life-threatening complication of a hepatic simple cyst. A 63-year-old man presented with severe acute abdominal pain and a massive haemoperitoneum resulting from haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a large hepatic cyst. The haemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was aggravated by an overdose of vitamin K-antagonist treatment. CT scans revealed a large hepatic simple cyst. The patient was successfully treated conservatively with resuscitation, transfusion therapy and administration of coagulation agents. To date, there is no clear evidence regarding optimal treatment of haemorrhagic hepatic cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The risk of recurrent bleeding from the haemorrhagic hepatic simple cyst, and the need for final treatment to avoid rebleeding either by percutaneous sclerotherapy, endovascular embolisation, surgical cyst resection, or surgical deroofing, is discussed. PMID:25697302</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.era.lib.ed.ac.uk/handle/1842/6246"><span id="translatedtitle">FRP <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains in FRP wrapped columns </span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Li, Shiqing</p> <p>2012-06-25</p> <p>Applying lateral confinement to concrete columns using fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is a very promising technique. FRP <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is the typical failure mode of FRP wrapped columns under axial compression. numerous ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4293509"><span id="translatedtitle">Spinal Cord Stimulation for Intractable Visceral Pain Due to <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> of Oddi Dysfunction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lee, Kang Hun; Lee, Sang Eun; Jung, Jae Wook</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) is a syndrome of chronic biliary pain or recurrent pancreatitis due to the functional obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary flow. We report a case of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic abdominal pain due to SOD. The patient had a history of cholecystectomy and had suffered from chronic right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The patient had been diagnosed as having SOD. The patient was treated with opioid analgesics and nerve blocks, including a splanchnic nerve block. However, two years later, the pain became intractable. We implanted percutaneous SCS at the T5-7 level for this patient. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain and the amount of opioid intake decreased. The patient was tracked for more than six months without significant complications. From our clinical case, SCS is an effective and alternative treatment option for SOD. Further studies and long-term follow-up are necessary to understand the effectiveness and the limitations of SCS on SOD. PMID:25589948</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2469860"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of substance P effects on <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi myoelectric activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Parodi, J E; Zenilman, M E; Becker, J M</p> <p>1989-05-01</p> <p>We examined the effects of substance P (SP) on the myoelectric activity of the opossum <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi (SO). Myoelectric data from the SO in five adult opossums were recorded using thin stainless steel electrodes and computer-assisted analog-to-digital conversion. In fully awake and conscious animals, baseline spikeburst activity during phase I of the MMC occurred at a frequency of 28.6 +/- 3.1 spikebursts (SB) per 20-min period. Intravenous infusion of graded doses of substance P (from 0.5 to 8.0 micrograms/kg) stimulated SO myoelectric activity in a dose-related manner (from 80 +/- 8 to 235 +/- 11 SB/20 min, respectively, P less than 0.05 when compared to baseline). The effect of substance P on SO myoelectric activity was antagonized by administration of the H2-blocker, cimetidine (92.0 +/- 6.1 vs 48.2 +/- 7.0, n = 5, P less than 0.05). Administration of the antimuscarinic drug atropine only slightly affected the SO spikeburst frequency when infused prior to SP (73.0 +/- 10.4 vs 70.8 +/- 8.2, P greater than 0.05). We conclude that SP stimulated the SO spikeburst frequency in a dose-dependent fashion. Cimetidine markedly inhibited the response of the SO to SP but atropine did not. The excitatory effect of substance P on the opossum SO is mediated at least in part by a histaminergic, noncholinergic pathway. PMID:2469860</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11447015"><span id="translatedtitle">Tachykinins mediate slow excitatory postsynaptic transmission in guinea pig <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi ganglia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Manning, B P; Mawe, G M</p> <p>2001-08-01</p> <p>Intracellular recording techniques were used to test whether tachykinins could be mediators of slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in guinea pig <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi (SO) ganglia. Application of the tachykinin substance P (SP) onto SO neurons caused a prolonged membrane depolarization that was reminiscent of the slow EPSP in these cells. Pressure ejection of the neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor-specific agonist senktide caused a similar depolarization; however, no responses were detected on application of NK1 or NK2 receptor agonists. The NK3 receptor antagonist SR-142801 (100 nM) significantly inhibited both SP-induced depolarization and the stimulation-evoked slow EPSP, as did NK3 receptor desensitization with senktide. Capsaicin, which causes the release of SP from small-diameter afferent fibers, induced a depolarization that was similar to the evoked slow EPSP in both amplitude and duration. The capsaicin-induced depolarization was significantly attenuated in the presence of SR-142801. These data indicate that tachykinins, released from extrinsic afferent fibers, act via NK3 receptors to provide slow excitatory synaptic input to SO neurons. PMID:11447015</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1564344"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of NK3 receptors in rabbit isolated iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Medhurst, Andrew D; Parsons, Andrew A; Roberts, Jennifer C; Hay, Douglas W P</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Tachykinin NK3 receptors were characterized in the rabbit isolated iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle by use of autoradiography and in vitro functional studies.[125I]-[MePhe7]-neurokinin B (NKB) (1?nM), a selective NK3 receptor agonist, specifically labelled a population of NK3 receptors that were uniformly distributed throughout the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle. This labelling was inhibited by unlabelled [MePhe7]-NKB (1??M) but not by the NK1 receptor antagonist CP 99994 (1??M).In the presence of CP 99994 (1??M), the selective NK3 receptor agonists senktide (n=14) and [Pro7]-NKB (n=4), and the natural preferred ligand for the NK3 receptor, NKB (n=8), were potent contractile agents in the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle. They all produced monophasic concentration-effect curves with pD2 values of 9.53±0.08, 8.56±0.09 and 9.75±0.09, and nH values of 0.93±0.03, 1.53±0.17 and 0.76±0.06, respectively. [MePhe7]-NKB (n=12) was also a potent agonist, but produced shallow concentration-effect curves which appeared biphasic (nH=0.45±0.04).Contractile responses to senktide were surmountably antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the selective non-peptide NK3 receptor antagonist, SR 142801 (3–30?nM; pA2= 8.9; slope = 0.99) and the non-peptide NK2/NK3 receptor antagonist, SR 48968 (3–30??M; pA2 =6.1; slope=1.5). These pA2 values were consistent with functional rabbit NK3 receptors more closely resembling guinea-pig and human NK3 receptors, than rat NK3 receptors. SR 142801 (10–100?nM) and SR 48968 (3 and 30??M) inhibited responses to low (?1?nM) but not higher (>1?nM) concentrations of [MePhe7]-NKB, and concentration-effect curves to [MePhe7]-NKB became steeper and monophasic in the presence of either antagonist.SR 142801 (3–30 nM) and SR 48968 (3–30??M) also surmountably antagonized concentration-effect curves to [Pro7]-NKB and NKB, although results were more difficult to interpret, since the relationship between log concentration-ratios and the concentration of antagonist used did not adhere to the Schild equation. However, analysis of data with the lowest concentration of SR 142801 (3?nM) tested against NKB, and SR 48968 (3??M) tested against [Pro7]-NKB and NKB, yielded apparent pA2 estimates of 9.3, 6.8 and 6.4, respectively, consistent with blockade of NK3 receptors.SR 142801 (100?nM) had no effect on contractions induced by transmural nerve stimulation (2?Hz, 0.3?ms, 20?V for 30?s), whereas CP 99994 (1??M) abolished these responses.Phenoxybenzamine pretreatment (20??M, 10?min) markedly reduced maximum responses to [MePhe7]-NKB (from 101±6.2% to 38±9.5% reference contraction, n=4) and induced a marked (10?fold) rightward shift in the concentration-effect curve. The residual responses to [MePhe7]-NKB after phenoxybenzamine pretreatment were unaffected by 1??M CP 99994 (maximum response=41±9.4%, n=4).These results demonstrate autoradiographically and functionally, the presence of NK3 receptors in rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle that mediate contractile responses to NK3 receptor agonists, but not to sensory trigeminal nerve stimulation. The present data with senktide and selective NK3 receptor antagonists suggest that functional rabbit NK3 receptors more closely resemble human and guinea-pig NK3 receptors than rat NK3 receptors. However, the pharmacological profiles of [MePhe7]-NKB, SR 142801 and SR 48968 suggest the presence of an ‘atypical' NK3 receptor or a heterogeneous population of NK3 receptors in this tissue. PMID:9117105</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1242646"><span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of tumors of the distal rectum with <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> preservation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Heimann, T M; Oh, C; Steinhagen, R M; Greenstein, A J; Perez, C; Aufses, A H</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>One hundred one patients with villous adenoma or invasive carcinoma of the distal rectum treated with local excision or coloanal anastomosis were studied. Twenty-three (45%) of the 51 patients with villous adenomas had transanal excision, another 23 (45%) had a posterior proctotomy, and five (10%) had a coloanal anastomosis. Only two patients with a villous adenoma developed a recurrence requiring repeat local excision. Fifteen (30%) of the 50 patients with invasive cancer were treated by transanal excision. All had tumors confined to the submucosa or superficial muscularis. Eighteen (85%) of 21 patients having posterior proctotomy also had tumors with similar depth of invasion. Six (43%) of the 14 patients having coloanal anastomosis had Dukes' B tumors, six (43%) were Dukes' C, and another two (14%) underwent palliative resection. The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 77%. Only four patients treated by transanal excision or posterior proctotomy died of metastatic disease. In the coloanal group, two of 12 patients undergoing curative resection died of recurrent cancer, and another has a pelvic recurrence. Villous adenomas of the distal rectum and selected carcinomas may be treated with local excision and coloanal anastomosis with preservation of <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> function with good results. PMID:1417192</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11837717"><span id="translatedtitle">A synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, relaxes <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi in humans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koshitani, Tatsuya; Kodama, Tadashi; Sato, Hideki; Takaaki, Junpei; Imamura, Yoichi; Kato, Keimei; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Tokita, Kazuhiko; Mitsufuji, Shoji</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>It is well established that prostaglandins (PGs) exert potent pharmacological actions on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle, although their effects on the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi (SO) remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PGE1 on motility of the human SO. Twenty patients appearing for routine endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) examination were studied. Each patient was randomly allocated to receive an intravenous infusion of normal saline (six patients), or alprostadil alfadex, a synthetic PGE1 analog, at a dose of either 0.05 or 0.1 microg/kg/min (seven patients for each condition). Endoscopic biliary manometry was done with a recording of basal SO pressure, amplitude of SO phasic contractions, and phasic contractile frequency before and 5 min after intravenous infusions, using a 4-French microtransducer catheter. There was no significant change in SO motor variables following application of normal saline. Alprostadil alfadex significantly decreased basal SO pressure at a dose of 0.05 microg/kg/min, and significantly decreased all parameters at a dose of 0.1 microg/kg/min. A synthetic PGE1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, effectively inhibits motility of the human SO. This drug may be of clinical application as a SO-relaxing agent. PMID:11837717</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13894242"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of bacteria by explosive decompression.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>FOSTER, J W; COWAN, R M; MAAG, T A</p> <p>1962-02-01</p> <p>Foster, John W. (University of Georgia, Athens), Robert M. Cowan, and Ted A. Maag. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of bacteria by explosive decompression. J. Bacteriol. 83:330-334. 1962.-A device is described for instantaneously <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> bacteria and other cells in a closed system under controlled conditions by explosive decompression. With this device, 31 to 59% of Serratia marcescens, ranging up to 20 mg (dry wt) of cells per ml, were <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> after nitrogen saturation at 1740 psi. Under similar conditions, 10 to 25% of Brucella abortus and Staphylococcus aureus were <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of these organisms produced readily separable cell walls. Centrifugation in linear glycerol gradients was applied to further separate cell walls from debris. Mycoplasma gallinarum, Leptospira pomona, and Eimeria tenella (avian coccidia) oöcysts were also broken up by the decompression chamber. Pressure and duration of saturation of cells with gas affected <span class="hlt">rupture</span> efficiency. Within the limits of this study, concentration of organisms and volume of suspensions did not have a definite effect. PMID:13894242</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30740694"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the patellar tendon in an otherwise healthy athlete</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>N I Munshi; C E Mbubaegbu</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A case of a healthy athlete with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendon and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the contralateral patella tendon is reported. Both tendons <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> in the same patient is rare and this is the first reported case in a previously healthy person. Different mechanisms are implicated in the different <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The rarity is because the simultaneous presence of contributory factors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NCI&redirectUrl=http://www.cancer.gov/types/anal/research/electrocautery"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrocautery Superior to Topical Treatments for Precancerous <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Lesions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous <span class="hlt">anal</span> lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/summary/2013/electrocautery-anal-precancer0413"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrocautery Superior to Topical Treatments for Precancerous <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Lesions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Electrocautery Superior to Topical Treatments for Precancerous <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Lesions Summary Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29069869"><span id="translatedtitle">Malignant transformation of <span class="hlt">anal</span> skin tags in Crohn's disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>K W Somerville; M J Langman; D J Da Cruz; T W Balfour; L Sully</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">anal</span> skin tags of a young man with ileal and perianal Crohn's disease underwent malignant transformation. This was not associated with immunosuppressive drug therapy and has not been previously described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26055584"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of unscarred uterus in a primigravida with preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mourad, Wael Sayed; Bersano, Debbra J; Greenspan, Peter B; Harper, Diane Medved</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Intrapartum uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a true obstetrical emergency. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is associated with severe maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. It is rare in the unscarred uterus of a primigravida. A 23-year-old primigravida with an unscarred uterus was admitted with preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes at 36(+4)?weeks of gestation. Abnormal fetal heart monitoring, associated with acute onset of severe abdominopelvic pain, developed on admission. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> occurred prior to onset of regular uterine contractions and in the absence of any interventional oxytocin. The neonate had evidence of severe acidosis despite emergency caesarean delivery. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, even in the unlikely setting of a primigravida with an unscarred uterus. PMID:26055584</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32777726"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> Incontinence after Childbirth: Incidence in the Korean Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Eui Jung; Chu Yeop Huh; Bong-Keun Choe</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Aims: To investigate the incidence and risk factors for <span class="hlt">anal</span> incontinence after childbirth in Korea. Methods: We retrospectively examined the records of 1,123 unselected women who delivered live infants at the KyungHee University Hospital between January 2006 and December 2006. Symptoms of <span class="hlt">anal</span> incontinence were assessed by telephone interview using standard questionnaires. Results: A total of 966 women (86%) responded</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42558560"><span id="translatedtitle">Perceptions of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex in rural South Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Catherine Ndinda; Chiweni Chimbwete; Nuala McGrath; Robert Pool</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>As part of the Microbicides Development Programme, we conducted formative research to explore perceptions of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex at a site in rural KwaZulu?Natal. We were interested in the practice of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex because of its potential role in HIV transmission. Eleven focus group discussions were conducted with men and women from rural areas and in a semi?urban township. Participants were</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4237852"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparing Argus sling and artificial urinary <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> in patients with moderate post-prostatectomy incontinence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lim, Bumjin; Kim, Aram; Song, Miho; Chun, Ji-Youn; Park, Junsoo; Choo, Myung-Soo</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) is a main complication of radical prostatectomy. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the Argus male sling (Argus) with that of artificial urinary <span class="hlt">sphincters</span> (AUS) in patients with moderate PPI. A total of 33 moderate PPI patients underwent AUS or Argus implantation from January 2009 to June 2013 (13 AUS, 20 Argus). We defined moderate PPI as the use of 2–4 pads per day. To compare efficacy, we assessed the success rate between the two groups. Success was defined as the daily need for no pads or one small safety pad that remained dry most of the day. The mean patient age was 73.5±6.3 yr in the AUS group and 70.9±5.1 yr in the Argus group, and the mean follow-up period was 29.8±14.9 months in the AUS group and 24.7±11.8 months in the Argus group. The success rate was 72.7% in the AUS group and 85.0% in the Argus group (P=0.557). Abnormal postoperative pain persisted in more patients in the Argus group (6/20, 30%) than in the AUS group (1/13, 7.7%) (P=0.126). However, the rate of other complications was not different between the two groups (7.7% and 15.0% for AUS and Argus, respectively, P=0.822). Argus surgery showed similar success and complication rates to those of AUS in moderate PPI patients, indicating that it could be an alternative surgical option for the treatment of moderate PPI. PMID:25426474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1910222"><span id="translatedtitle">Typical and atypical NK1 tachykinin receptor characteristics in the rabbit isolated iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hall, J. M.; Mitchell, D.; Morton, I. K.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>1. A contraction of the rabbit isolated iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> smooth muscle follows activation of either tachykinin NK1 or NK3 receptors. We have here characterized the pharmacological activity profiles of various tachykinin receptor agonists considered to have NK1-receptor-preferring activity in this preparation. 2. Two groups of NK1-receptor-preferring agonists could be distinguished in terms of a common pharmacological profile. The first group (Group 1) included [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) (septide), [Glp6]-SP (6-11), substance P methyl ester, delta-aminovaleryl-[L-Pro9, N-MeLeu10]-SP(7-11) (GR73632), and [Apa9-10]-SP. The second group (Group 2) included [Pro9]-SP, substance P, physalaemin and ranamargarin. 3. Under control conditions, the responses to Group 1 agonists were relatively fast in offset (time for reversal of maximal responses, 11.2-18.2 min), and were antagonized by NK1-receptor-selective antagonists (range of pKB estimates vs various agonists; GR82334, 7.1-8.2; (+/-)-CP-96,345, 8.9-9.5; RP67580, 7.0-7.4). Following incubation of the tissue with phenoxybenzamine (20 microM, 10 min), the affinity of GR82334, tested against the Group 1 agonists, substance P methyl ester and septide, was not significantly different (P < 0.05; n = 7-18) to that determined in untreated tissues (substance P methyl ester pKB 7.5 +/- 0.1 and 7.2 +/- 0.2, respectively; septide 7.7 +/- 0.2 and 7.9 +/- 0.2, respectively). Further, response offset times (5.0-8.5 min) were little reduced as compared to those observed in untreated tissues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7522864</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18924442"><span id="translatedtitle">New insights in the neural regulation of the lower oesophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blackshaw, L Ashley</p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is caused by disordered control of the gastro-oesophageal reflux barrier, comprised internally of the lower oesophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (LOS) and externally the crural diaphragm (CD). Both relax briefly to allow bolus passage during oesophageal peristalsis. Brief relaxation also occurs prior to gastro-oesophageal reflux, known as transient LOS relaxation (TLOSR), normally allowing venting of gas. TLOSRs also account for up to 90% of acid reflux episodes. The development of GORD therefore depends upon the rate of TLOSR and the physical and chemical nature of refluxate. We established an animal model of reflux in ferrets, in which similar patterns of TLOSR are seen to humans. TLOSRs are mediated via a vago-vagal pathway initiated by tension receptors in the gastric musculature. They have central terminals in the brainstem which provide input to a central program generator. The program has 3 simultaneous outputs: 1. brief activation of vagal motor neurones to the LOS, which activate inhibitory enteric motorneurones, leading to smooth muscle relaxation: 2. suppression of oesophageal peristalsis: 3. suppression of motor output to the CD. We have investigated several aspects of the TLOSR pathway in ferrets, and determined that the optimal site for therapeutic pharmacological intervention is at gastric vagal tension receptor endings. Their responses to distension are potently inhibited by gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonists and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptor (mGluR5) antagonists. These effects translate to inhibition of TLOSR and reflux in animal models and humans. Clinical studies indicate both types of drug may have potential in the treatment of GORD. PMID:18924442</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4102160"><span id="translatedtitle">Videofluoroscopic and Manometric Evaluation of Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> Function During Swallowing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yoon, Kyung Jae; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Jung Hwan; Jung, Il Seok</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to determine important manometric metrics for the analysis of pharyngeal and upper esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (UES) function and to investigate the effect of viscosity and other confounding factors on manometric results. Methods Manometric studies were performed on 26 asymptomatic volunteers (12 men and 14 women; age, 19–81 years). The manometric protocol included 5 water swallows (5 mL), 5 barium swallows (5 mL) and 5 yogurt swallows (5 mL). Evaluation of high-resolution manometry parameters including basal pressure of the UES, mesopharyngeal contractile integral (mesopharyngeal CI, mmHg · cm · sec), CI of the hypopharynx and UES (hypopharyngeal CI), relaxation interval of UES, median intrabolus pressure and nadir pressure at UES was performed using MATLAB. Results Mesopharyngeal CIs for barium and yogurt swallows were significantly lower than those for water swallows (both P < 0.05). Hypopharyngeal CIs for water swallows were significantly lower than those for barium swallows (P = 0.004), and median bolus pressure at UES for barium swallows was significantly higher than that for water and yogurt swallows (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, hypopharyngeal CI and median intrabolus pressure at UES were significantly related to age for 3 swallows (all P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). A significant negative correlation was also noted between nadir pressure at UES and age for water and yogurt swallows (all P < 0.05). Conclusions Manometric measurement of the pharynx and UES varies with respect to viscosity. Moreover, age could be a confounding variable in the interpretation of pharyngeal manometry. PMID:24847841</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15663050"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonoperative management of neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Driscoll, Karen; Benjamin, Louis C; Gilbert, James C; Chahine, A Alfred</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Neonatal injury of the spleen is an uncommon but serious condition. Although the standard management of children with splenic injury is nonoperative, there is scant evidence in the literature to support handling neonates in the same way. We report a case of neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that was managed nonoperatively. A 3.6-kg full-term female born vaginally became tachycardic and pale on the second day of life. She had a distended abdomen and a hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dL. Her blood pressure remained within normal limits. She was transfused 20 cc/kg packed red blood cells. CT scan showed a grade V splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Coagulopathy workup was negative. The assumption was that she had a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to a traumatic delivery. She remained stable after the transfusion. It took 32 weeks for a CT scan to show complete healing. Traditionally, neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been treated with splenectomy or splenorrhaphy. The first case of a neonate to be treated nonoperatively was reported in 2000. Our patient is only the second reported case. We chose to follow her with imaging to document healing and to rule out a tumor, as epidermoid cysts and hemangioendotheliomas can cause neonatal splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We also review the literature to try to gain some insight into the management of this rare problem. PMID:15663050</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25577259"><span id="translatedtitle">Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Imaging findings of breast silicone implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. PMID:25577259</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1195816"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cytological abnormalities and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection in men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Palefsky, J M; Holly, E A; Ralston, M L; Arthur, S P; Hogeboom, C J; Darragh, T M</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: To characterise risk factors for abnormal and cytology and <span class="hlt">anal</span> human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in homosexual/bisexual men with advanced HIV related immunosuppression. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease. SETTING: The University of California San Francisco, AIDS Clinic. PATIENTS: 129 homosexual or bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered detailing tobacco, alcohol and recreational drug use, medical history, and sexual practices. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> swabs for cytology and HPV studies were obtained, as was blood for CD4 levels. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection. RESULTS: Abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology was detected in 39% of subjects and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection in 93% as measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Risk factors for abnormal cytology in multivariate analysis included HPV 16/18 infection (measured by PCR, RR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.5) and intravenous drug use (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Infection with HPV 6/11 also had significantly elevated RRs in a separate model. Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, recreational drug use, and low CD4 level were associated with abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology in univariate analysis, as was infection with multiple HPV types and high levels of hybrid capture group B viral DNA. CONCLUSIONS: <span class="hlt">Anal</span> cytological abnormalities and HPV infection are common among homosexual/bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. In this study population, the main risk factors for abnormal cytology were HPV infection and intravenous drug use. Images PMID:9306896</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03207v1"><span id="translatedtitle">Capillary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of suspended polymer concentric rings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Zheng Zhang; G. C. Hilton; Ronggui Yang; Yifu Ding</p> <p>2015-02-11</p> <p>We present the first experimental study on the simultaneous capillary instability amongst viscous concentric rings suspended atop an immiscible medium. The rings <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> upon annealing, with three types of phase correlation between neighboring rings. In the case of weak substrate confinement, the rings <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> independently when they were sparsely distanced, but via an out-of-phase mode when packed closer. If the substrate confinement was strong, the rings would <span class="hlt">rupture</span> via an in-phase mode, resulting in radially aligned droplets. The concentric ring geometry caused a competition between the phase correlation of neighboring rings and the kinetically favorable wavelength, yielding an intriguing, recursive surface pattern. This frustrated pattern formation behavior was accounted for by a scaling analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JChPh.142q4910M"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mishra, R. K.; Modi, T.; Giri, D.; Kumar, S.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at 3' - 3' - ends or 5' - 5' - ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.00114v1"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>R. K. Mishra; T. Modi; D. Giri; S. Kumar</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Using Langevin Dynamic simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of the diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at $3'-3'-$ends or $5'-5'-$ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26139761"><span id="translatedtitle">Right ventricular hydatid cyst <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> to pericardium.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sabzi, Feridoun; Vaziri, Siavoosh; Faraji, Reza</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cardiac hydatidosis is rare presentation of body hydatidosis. Incidence of cardiac involvements range from 5% to 5% of patients with hydatid disease. Most common site of hydatid cyst in heart is interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. Right ventricular free wall involvement by cyst that <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> to pericardial cavity is very rare presentation of hydatid cyst. Cardiac involvement may have serious consequences such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to blood steam or pericardial cavity. Both the disease and its surgical treatment carry a high complication rate, including <span class="hlt">rupture</span> leading to cardiac tamponade, anaphylaxis and also death. In the present report, a 43-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis secondary to a pericardial hydatid cyst is described. PMID:26139761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10140552"><span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p>1991-11-01</p> <p>In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810030241&hterms=modeling+creep&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmodeling%2Bcreep"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of unidirectional advanced composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yeow, Y. T.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>A 'material modeling' methodology for predicting the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of unidirectional advanced composites is proposed. In this approach the parameters (obtained from short-term tests) required to make the predictions are the three principal creep compliance master curves and their corresponding quasi-static strengths tested at room temperature (22 C). Using these parameters in conjunction with a failure criterion, creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> envelopes can be generated for any combination of in-plane loading conditions and ambient temperature. The analysis was validated experimentally for one composite system, the T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. This was done by performing short-term creep tests (to generate the principal creep compliance master curves with the time-temperature superposition principle) and relatively long-term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tensile tests of off-axis specimens at 180 C. Good to reasonable agreement between experimental and analytical results is observed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25743861"><span id="translatedtitle">Patellar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in an adolescent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pires e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Sattamini; de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Labronici, Pedro José; Gameiro, Vinícius Schott</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the patellar tendon is a well-known injury in the orthopaedic literature. However, it is unusual and rarely reported in adolescent children. On the one hand, in the immature skeleton, the most frequent lesion above the kneecap is the sleeve fracture. On the other hand, in the distal region, avulsion of the tibial tuberosity is more common. Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in an adolescent is a rare lesion. We report a case in which an adolescent sustained a fall when jumping. No predisposing factors have been found. The injury was treated with surgical repair with transosseous suturing and reinforcement with semitendinosus tendon. The aim of this study is to present a case of traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the extensor mechanism of the knee in an adolescent and the therapy used. PMID:25743861</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25956123"><span id="translatedtitle">On the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of DNA molecule.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mishra, R K; Modi, T; Giri, D; Kumar, S</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we study effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a double stranded DNA molecule. The model studied here contains two single diblock copolymers interacting with each other. The elastic constants of individual segments of diblock copolymer are considered to be different. We showed that the magnitude of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force depends on whether the force is applied at 3' - 3' - ends or 5' - 5' - ends. Distributions of extension in hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds along the chain show the striking differences. Motivated by recent experiments, we have also calculated the variation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force for different chain lengths. Results obtained from simulations have been validated with the analytical calculation based on the ladder model of DNA. PMID:25956123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4481443"><span id="translatedtitle">Prognostic factors of spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular carcinoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Han, Xiang-Jun; Su, Hong-Ying; Shao, Hai-Bo; Xu, Ke</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>AIM: To evaluate the prognostic factors in patients with spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Seventy-nine patients experiencing spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of HCC between April 2004 and August 2014 were enrolled in this study. The clinical features, treatment modalities and outcomes were reviewed. The statistical methods used in this work included univariate analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank tests, and multivariate analysis using a Cox regression hazard model. RESULTS: Of the 79 patients with HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 17 (21.5%) underwent surgery, 32 (40.5%) underwent transarterial embolization (TAE), and 30 (38%) received conservative treatment. The median survival time was 125 d, and the mortality rate at 30 d was 27.8%. Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion length (HR = 1.46, P < 0.001), lesion number (HR = 1.37, P = 0.042), treatment before tumor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (HR = 4.36, P = 0.019), alanine transaminase levels (HR = 1.0, P = 0.011), bicarbonate levels (HR = 1.18, P < 0.001), age (HR = 0.96, P = 0.026), anti-tumor therapy during the follow-up period (HR = 0.21, P = 0.008), and albumin levels (HR = 0.89, P = 0.010) were independent prognostic factors of survival after HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage was also an important prognostic factor; the median survival times for BCLC stages A, B and C were 251, 175 and 40 d, respectively (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Anti-tumor therapy during the follow-up period, without a history of anti-tumor therapy prior to HCC <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, small tumor length and number, and early BCLC stage are the most crucial predictors associated with satisfactory overall survival. Other factors play only a small role in overall survival. PMID:26139994</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S53A0177S"><span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Processes Along the Philippine Trench</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sevilla, W. I.; Ammon, C. J.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Earthquakes along subduction zones exhibit spatial and temporal variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes. Recent studies have demonstrated a systematic decrease in the moment-normalized <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration of earthquakes with depth along the plate interface. Several shallow earthquakes were observed to exhibit anomalously long <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration, comparable with the durations of tsunami earthquakes. These observations were suggested to be manifestations of subduction faults with frictional properties capable of generating tsunami earthquakes. The cause of the duration variation was hypothesized to be related to physical changes in properties of subducted sediment. The Philippine trench is a setting where we can study the variations of earthquake source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes along the plate interface. The trench is young (< 5 Ma) with a poorly developed accretionary prism. Bathymetry, seismic reflection studies, and offshore drilling show little or no evidence of accretion of the materials from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. Eighty nine possible interplate earthquakes were selected from the Harvard CMT catalogue for the year 1989 to 2001. From these, about 30 events had adequate signal-to-noise ratios and well-constrained mechanisms to warrant further investigation. We used teleseismic broadband records of vertical component waveforms and applied multi-station deconvolution technique to extract the source time function and depth of each event. Our results showed no systematic trend of decreasing source duration with depth at the Philippine trench. The observed moment-normalized durations of all the shallow earthquakes are shorter than tsunami earthquakes. We observed a significant scatter in the relationship between source time and depth, which may reflect heterogeneity of the materials at the trench interface. The thickness of low-rigidity materials in the trench shallow region appears insufficient to affect the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations and produce anomalously slow <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. These null results for the sediment-starved Philippine Trench support the earlier hypothesis that the variations of earthquake duration with depth in other subduction zones is related to sediment properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47884627"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral synchronous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P. Ellanti; N. Davarinos; S. Morris; J. Rice</p> <p></p> <p>Background  Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon is a rare entity. They are often associated with degenerative changes\\u000a of the tendons and predisposing conditions such as diabetes or excessive steroid use. They most commonly tend to occur in\\u000a patients of 40 years of age or older.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  We describe a case of a 67-year-old man with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of both</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25878942"><span id="translatedtitle">Thoracic outlet syndrome following breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mistry, Raakhi; Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present a patient with bilateral breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19210943"><span id="translatedtitle">[Gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after ingestion of liquid nitrogen].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knudsen, Anders Riegels; Nielsen, Casper; Christensen, Peter</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>A 28-year-old male was admitted to hospital with severe abdominal distension and subcutaneous emphysema after ingesting 15 ml liquid nitrogen to produce an impressive burp. A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach at the lesser curvature was sutured by laparotomy. Peroperative gastroscopy showed no signs of cold-induced lesions. Liquid nitrogen boils at -196 degrees C. When heated to body temperature, it instantly expands 700 times, in this case predictably leading to gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Therefore, any oral intake of even small amounts of liquid nitrogen should be avoided. PMID:19210943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4387153"><span id="translatedtitle">Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24936961"><span id="translatedtitle">A state-of-the-art review on the evolution of urinary <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> devices for the treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: past, present and future innovations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chung, Eric</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>An artificial urinary <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (AUS) is the only mechanical device that closely simulates the function of a biological urinary <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. Over the past four decades, advances in mechanical design, applications of new technology and lessons learned from clinical experience have made AMS 800 device the standard of care in post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. While the current AMS 800 device provides an effective, safe and durable option, it is not without its limitations and complications. Newer and innovative AUS-like devices are designed to rectify some of AMS 800 device problems, but, like any mechanical device, they too have their own shortcomings. Emerging novel therapies such as nanotechnology-driven device and stem cell therapy are attractive, but are not commercially available or have no proven long-term outcome. The following article provides a critical review on the past, present and future innovations in designing the ideal urinary <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> to treat post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. PMID:24936961</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/485013"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Anal</span> symptoms of gastro-intestinal diseases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grosshans, E; Jenn, P; Baumann, R; Weill, J P; Basset, A</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>In most cases the ano-cutaneous clinical symptoms correlated to diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract are not specific (erythema, itching, wounds or scarring). However in the following diseases occasional dermatological lesions may directly contribute to their diagnosis: in Crohn's disease, tuberculosis of bowel, chronic entamoebiasis and bilharziosis, the skin lesions of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> area have the same histological structure as the gut lesions. Perianal fistulas and ulcers are frequent in Crohn's disease especially if there is a colonic and rectal spreading; they respond badly to steroid therapy and are often correlated with a worse prognosis. Perianal specific lesions occur often in oxyuriasis in children, in candidiasis of the digestive tract, in systemic aphthosis and in some malignancies. In other gastro-intestinal disturbances, the dermatological and features are less specific and can only be suggestive: iatrogenic and microbial diarrheas, side-effects of laxatives, proctological diseases. It has to be emphasized that pruritus ani is only induced by deeper lesions when they spread to the perianal skin. In proctological practice, contact dermatitis by sensitivity to anaesthetics or suppository balsams (Peruvian balsam), itching or burning atrophy by topical steroid abuse, non-diagnosed fungal (candidiasis), bacterial (erythrasma) or psoriatic intertrigos (flexural psoriasis) may sometimes explain the failure of therapy. PMID:485013</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3924766"><span id="translatedtitle">ACR Appropriateness Criteria®—<span class="hlt">Anal</span> Cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pretz, Jennifer L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Azad, Nilofer; Blackstock, A. William; Das, Prajnan; Goodman, Karyn A.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Jones, William E.; Konski, Andre A.; Koong, Albert C.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R.; Zook, Jennifer; Suh, W. Warren</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT The management of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer is driven by randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. However, trials may present conflicting conclusions. Furthermore, different clinical situations may not be addressed in certain trials because of eligibility inclusion criteria. Although prospective studies point to the use of definitive 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation as a standard, some areas remain that are not well defined. In particular, management of very early stage disease, radiation dose, and the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy remain unaddressed by phase III studies. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:24558509</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22951046"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex practices in heterosexual and male homosexual populations: a review of population-based data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heywood, Wendy; Smith, Anthony M A</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex is known to be an important risk factor for <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer. Yet compared with vaginal intercourse, little is known about <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex practices in either heterosexual or male homosexual populations. Of the data that are available, it appears a significant and increasing minority of heterosexuals have ever practised <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. Among homosexual men, most, but not all, report <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex, with large proportions of men engaging in both insertive and receptive <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. The most significant finding of the review was the dearth of population-based data, particularly relating to homosexual men. PMID:22951046</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://cancer.stanford.edu/pdf/coloRectal/bowelPreparationForSurgery.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">BOWEL PREPARATION FOR DR. A. SHELTON AND DR. M. WELTON 1) EUA/Seton Placement/Hemorrhoidectomy/<span class="hlt">Anal</span> Fistula, etc.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Kay, Mark A.</p> <p></p> <p>, mucosal advancement flap, <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> repair, rectocele repair, transanal excision of rectal tumor, etc. Follow manufacturer instructions. · Oral Fleet phospho-soda laxative available over the counter at any</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3684220"><span id="translatedtitle">Current treatment options for management of <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Weis, Stephen E</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for <span class="hlt">anal</span> dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of <span class="hlt">anal</span> stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic inflammatory response. Successful treatment requires adherence to a regime that is uncomfortable at best and at worst painful. Topical treatments can be successful in motivated adherent patients willing to accept these side effects. PMID:23788834</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25489894"><span id="translatedtitle">Intracranial venous hemodynamics and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Kwo-Whei; Tsai, Fong-Y; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Kuo, Chen-Ling</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Many uncertain and inconsistent etiologies of cerebral aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> including a wide spectrum of factors have been reported. Our recent observation discloses the potential new factor of cerebral aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with cerebral venous pressure gradient. We retrospectively reviewed 52 cases treated with coil embolization with or without cerebral aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Seventeen males and 30 females were recruited in this study. Quantitative color-coded cerebral angiography was performed during coil therapeutic procedures to measure cerebral venous circulation. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> cases had shorter and symmetrical cerebral venous circulation time (P <0.05). In addition, an asymmetrical venous outflow pattern was critical for aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cases tended to have slower and asymmetrical cerebral venous circulation compared with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases. Symmetrical and shorter cerebral venous circulation in the dysplasia venous outlet may be a potential new factor for cerebral aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25489894</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EP%26S...66..101T"><span id="translatedtitle">Source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults <span class="hlt">rupture</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> before the Yunodake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here, we estimated the source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starting point and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (?CFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in order to evaluate the effect of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the Yunodake fault. The ?CFF is positive at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was triggered by the Itozawa fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25763572"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of intra-esophageal air kinetics and esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincters</span> in patients with total laryngectomy during esophageal speech.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bozan, Aykut; Vardar, Rukiye; Akyildiz, Serdar; Kirazli, Tayfun; Ogut, Fatih; Yildirim, Esra; Bor, Serhat</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to evaluate the air kinetics of well- and poor-speaking patients and their upper (UES) and lower (LES) esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> pressures . The esophageal speech capability of 23 total laryngectomy patients was assessed with the Wepman scale. LES and UES points and pressures were measured, and air kinetics were compared. All patients were male, with an average age of 58 years. Both the LES and UES pressures were not statistically different between good-speaking and poor-speaking patients (p > 0.05). The ability to speak was estimated only by looking at tracings. Good speakers are able to retain air successfully and on a long-term basis between the upper and lower esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincters</span>. During short and/or rapid speech, these patients are able to rapidly suck and then expel the air from their upper esophagus. During long speeches, after sucking the air into their distal esophagus, they used the air in the upper part of the esophagus during the speech, only later seeming to fill the lower esophagus with the air as a possible reserve in the stomach. It has been shown that the basic requirement for speaking is the capacity to suck and store the air within the esophagus. For successful speech, the air should be stored inside the esophagus. MII technology contributes to our understanding of speech kinetics and occupies an important place in patient training as a biofeedback technique. PMID:25763572</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"><span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p>1987-08-03</p> <p>The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/09_28_2010_otk7Nay4LH_09_28_2010_1"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Northwest Saudi Arabia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1285246"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Young, T B</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A case is reported of simultaneous traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendons diagnosed in the accident and emergency department within 2 hours of injury. This is an extremely rare injury and diagnosis is often missed. Possible mechanism of the injury, predisposing factors, guidelines for diagnosis and results of surgical treatment are discussed, and the literature is reviewed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4015792</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425781"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal angiomyolipoma (hamartoma)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stavorovsky, M.; Irge, D.; Morag, B.; Schujman, E.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A 54-year-old woman with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of angiomyolipoma is presented. The literature on the 2 types of angiomyolipoma, without and with association of tuberose sclerosis, their rarity and the difficulties in their diagnoses, is reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:523379</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21675627"><span id="translatedtitle">Laparoscopic splenectomy for atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grossi, Ugo; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Amato, Gerardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Cavicchioni, Camillo; Bellantone, Rocco</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>A traumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (ASR) is a rare clinical entity. Several underlying benign and malignant conditions have been described as a leading cause. We report on a case of ASR in a 41-year-old man treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Considering ASR as a life-threatening condition, a prompt diagnosis can be life saving. PMID:21675627</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858563"><span id="translatedtitle">Earth science: microseismicity data forecast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schorlemmer, Danijel; Wiemer, Stefan</p> <p>2005-04-28</p> <p>On 28 September 2004 there was an earthquake of magnitude 6.0 at Parkfield, California. Here we show that the size distribution of the micro-earthquakes recorded in the decades before the main shock occurred allowed an accurate forecast of its eventual <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area. Applying this approach to other well monitored faults should improve earthquake hazard assessment in future. PMID:15858563</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29102331"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous intramural <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the oesophagus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>C Steadman; P Kerlin; F Crimmins; J Bell; D Robinson; L Dorrington; A McIntyre</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The clinical, endoscopic, and radiological features of seven patients with an uncommon oesophageal injury characterised by long lacerations of the oesophageal mucosa with haematoma formation but without perforation are reported. The injuries were not related to forceful vomiting or any other definable cause but were similar to those previously described as intramural oesophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy undertaken to identify</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.icf11.com/proceeding/extended/3110.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">RECENT ADVANCES IN MODELLING DUCTILE <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. A. Benzerga; J. Besson; A. Pineau</p> <p></p> <p>A brief account of recent advances in modelling ductile <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is given. The importance of the inhomogeneity in the distribution of cavity nucleation sites is firstly emphasized. Then some recent extensions of the Gurson model to account for non spherical void shape are presented. Finally recent progress in modelling cavity coalescence is highlighted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141p4907G"><span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25362341"><span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A</p> <p>2014-10-28</p> <p>In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks. PMID:25362341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2975082"><span id="translatedtitle">Penile Fracture with Associated Urethral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Boncher, Nicholas A.; Vricella, Gino J.; Jankowski, Jason T.; Ponsky, Lee E.; Cherullo, Edward E.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Penile fracture of the erect penis is an uncommon but emergent urological trauma. Potential outcomes include erectile dysfunction, penile curvature, and urethral injury. Treatment is emergent surgical repair. We present the case of a 42-year-old man with a penile fracture complicated by a urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and subsequent repair. A discussion of the key aspects of this condition is presented. PMID:21076536</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4268758"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD. PMID:25552833</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>John A. Kelleher</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/25138777"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon following Closed Injury</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. G. SIMPSON</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the extensor pollicis longus tendon is most often seen following lower radial fractures, but is uncommon in the absence of fracture. Redden has recently described <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following rotational injury of the forearm.I wish to record three cases of closed delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following direct injury to the area of the tendon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/Pitarka_et_al_2009_buried.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Study of Ground-Motion Differences between Buried-<span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> and Surface-<span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Arben Pitarka; Luis A. Dalguer; Steven M. Day; Paul G. Somerville; Kazuo Dan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Recent ground-motion observations suggest that surface-<span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earth- quakes generate weaker near-fault ground motion than buried earthquakes. This dif- ference is significant in the period range of 0.3-3 sec. Contributing factors to this phenomenon may include the effect of fault zone weakness at shallow depth on rup- ture dynamics and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity during earthquakes. We present results from numerical experiments of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://musserlab.medicine.tamhsc.edu/PDFs%20of%20papers/Hamai%20et%20al%28BJ2007%29.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Single Giant Vesicle <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Events Reveal Multiple Mechanisms of Glass-Supported Bilayer Formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Chiho Hamai; Paul S. Cremer; Siegfried M. Musser</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on glass from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) was studied using fluorescence microscopy. We show that GUV <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs by at least four mechanisms, including 1), spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of isolated GUVs yielding almost heart-shaped bilayer patches (asymmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>); 2), spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of isolated GUVs yielding circular bilayer patches (symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>); 3), induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4188878"><span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula in Crohn's disease</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn’s disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence. PMID:25309057</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1873146"><span id="translatedtitle">[Proctocolectomy and mechanical ileo-<span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis without mucosectomy].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Landi, E; Landa, L; Marmorale, C; Miconi, G</p> <p>1991-03-01</p> <p>The present study compared the outcome in a small series of patients (7 cases) who underwent total proctocolectomy without mucosal proctectomy and stapled ileal pouch-<span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis, constructed at the apex of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> transitional zone, with our previous experience (17 cases) in which the ileal pouch was anastomosed at the dentate line after mucosectomy. Though not statistically significant, our limited experience showed excellent clinical results with better continence and discriminating ability between gas and faeces in the former group. The resting <span class="hlt">anal</span> pressure profile showed no chances in the postoperative period. The operation time was significantly reduced compared with our previous approach which was a time-consuming procedure. Furthermore, a reduced risk of complications (pelvic sepsis, haemorrhage) was observed. PMID:1873146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25309057"><span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula in Crohn's disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-<span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence. PMID:25309057</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24139082"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild <span class="hlt">anal</span> symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of <span class="hlt">anal</span> warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the <span class="hlt">anal</span> margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented? PMID:24139082</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56475725"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> HPV Infection in HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men from China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lei Gao; Feng Zhou; Xiangwei Li; Yu Yang; Yuhua Ruan; Qi Jin; Rupert Kaul</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background<span class="hlt">Anal</span> HPV infection, which contributes to the development of <span class="hlt">anal</span> warts and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, is well known to be common among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially among those HIV positives. However, HIV and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV co-infection among MSM has not been addressed in China.MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing and Tianjin, China. Study participants were recruited</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2518019"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> Cancer Screening Behaviors and Intentions in Men Who Have Sex with Men</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cook, Robert L.; Ostrow, David; Johnson-Hill, Lisette M.; Wiley, Dorothy; Silvestre, Tony</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Background The incidence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer has increased in the past decade, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-infected individuals. There is controversy about whether to routinely screen for <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer in MSM. Objectives To determine whether current <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening behaviors, intention, and concern differ by HIV serostatus and to identify characteristics of men who intend to seek <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening. Design and Participants Cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 901 HIV-infected and 1,016 HIV-uninfected MSM from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) in 2005–2006. Measurements Self-reported <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening history, attitudes, and intentions. Results A history of <span class="hlt">anal</span> warts was relatively common in these men (39%), whereas having a recent <span class="hlt">anal</span> Pap test (5%), intention to seek <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening in the next 6 months (12%), and concern about <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer (8.5%) were less common. Intention to seek <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening was associated with enabling factors (screening availability, health insurance), need factors (HIV-infection, history of <span class="hlt">anal</span> warts), concern about <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, and recent sexual risk taking. Among four large US cities, there was significant regional variability in <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening behaviors, intention, and concern (all p<0.001). Most MSM (76%) indicated they would go to their primary care physician for an <span class="hlt">anal</span> health problem or question. Conclusions This study demonstrates a low rate of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening and intention to screen among MSM. As more evidence emerges regarding screening, primary care physicians should be prepared to discuss <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening with their patients. PMID:18618198</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4315557"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gandra, Sumanth; Azar, Aline; Wessolossky, Mireya</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Although <span class="hlt">anal</span> high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM) and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+) among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women). Methods A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening with <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013. Results Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology 48%) of MSM, 28% (abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology 28%) of HSM, and 27% (abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology 34%) of women. Among 117 (53%) individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above), 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM). HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49) and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=?0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09). Conclusion Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer screening among non-MSM. PMID:25670914</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25238933"><span id="translatedtitle">A new minimally invasive treatment for <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhu, Rui; Shen, Lin; Wang, Caoyuan; Yang, Yanping; Chen, Rui; Fang, Hen; Xu, Xiaojuan</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>In colorectal surgery, eradicating the fistula and maintaining continence are still complex challenges for a colorectal surgeon. A minimally invasive method using a novel device was performed to consecutively treat 14 patients with <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula from August 2008 to November 2009. After a follow-up period of 36 months, 13 patients achieved successful closure of their fistula tracts, and recurrence occurred only in one patient. Recurrence was due to the delay of dressing change. No patient had interference with continence, and no major intra- and postoperative complications were identified. Using the novel device with invasive methods can be a promising alternative for managing <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistulas. PMID:25238933</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1752-1947-4-67.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation therapy of recurrent <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma in-situ: a case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Filip Troicki; Alexandros Pappas; Robert Noone; Albert DeNittis</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>INTRODUCTION: High-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia, also referred to as <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous carcinoma in-situ, or Bowen's disease of the anus, make up less than 1% of all digestive system cancers in the United States. The treatment of choice is surgical resection with <span class="hlt">anal</span> mapping. However, this disease often recurs or persists, requiring additional surgery for these patients. This can compromise the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28783645"><span id="translatedtitle">Topical Nifedipine vs. Topical Glyceryl Trinitrate for Treatment of Chronic <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Fissure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Tiberiu Ezri; Sergio Susmallian</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>PURPOSE: Nifedipine (administered orally or applied topically) has been effective for nonsurgical treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure. We compared the efficacy of nifedipine vs. glyceryl trinitrate for chemical sphincterotomy of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure. METHODS: In a prospective, double-blind trial, 52 patients suffering from chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure were randomly and equally allocated to receive either glyceryl trinitrate or nifedipine, both applied topically to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4469860"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual presentation of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tan, Shu Qi; Thia, Edwin Wee Hong; Tee, Chee Seng John; Yeo, George Seow Heong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We describe a case of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the site of a previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient had a history of right interstitial pregnancy with spontaneous uterine fundal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 18 weeks of pregnancy. During her subsequent pregnancy, she was monitored closely by a senior consultant obstetrician. The patient presented at 34 weeks with right hypochondriac pain. She was clinically stable and fetal monitoring showed no signs of fetal distress. Ultrasonography revealed protrusion of the intact amniotic membranes in the abdominal cavity at the uterine fundus. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare but hazardous obstetric complication. High levels of caution should be exercised in patients with a history of prior uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as they may present with atypical symptoms. Ultrasonography could provide valuable information in such cases where there is an elevated risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26106245"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual presentation of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tan, Shu Qi; Thia, Edwin Wee Hong; Tee, Chee Seng John; Yeo, George Seow Heong</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We describe a case of recurrent uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the site of a previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient had a history of right interstitial pregnancy with spontaneous uterine fundal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at 18 weeks of pregnancy. During her subsequent pregnancy, she was monitored closely by a senior consultant obstetrician. The patient presented at 34 weeks with right hypochondriac pain. She was clinically stable and fetal monitoring showed no signs of fetal distress. Ultrasonography revealed protrusion of the intact amniotic membranes in the abdominal cavity at the uterine fundus. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare but hazardous obstetric complication. High levels of caution should be exercised in patients with a history of prior uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as they may present with atypical symptoms. Ultrasonography could provide valuable information in such cases where there is an elevated risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site. PMID:26106245</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2739847"><span id="translatedtitle">A review on delayed presentation of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rashid, Farhan; Chakrabarty, Mallicka M; Singh, Rajeev; Iftikhar, Syed Y</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a life-threatening condition. Diaphragmatic injuries are quite uncommon and often result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are usually associated with abdominal trauma however, it can occur in isolation. Acute traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm may go unnoticed and there is often a delay between the injury and the diagnosis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the terms "delayed presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>" and "delayed diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>". The diagnostic and management challenges encountered are discussed, together with strategies for dealing with them. We have focussed on mechanism of injury, duration, presentation and site of injury, visceral herniation, investigations and different approaches for repair. We intend to stress on the importance of delay in presentation of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and to provide a review on the available investigations and treatment methods. The enclosed case report also emphasizes on the delayed presentation, diagnostic challenges and the advantages of laparoscopic repair of delayed diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:19698091</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28768284"><span id="translatedtitle">Functional and quality-of-life outcomes in patients with rectal cancer after combined modality therapy, intraoperative radiation therapy, and <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> preservation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David Shibata; Jose G. Guillem; Nicole Lanouette; Phillip Paty; Bruce Minsky; Louis Harrison; W. Douglas Wong; Alfred Cohen</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>PURPOSE: Locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancers treated with external beam radiation therapy, intraoperative radiation therapy, and chemotherapy represent a complex group of patients in the setting of extensive pelvic surgery and <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> preservation. We sought to define functional outcome and quality of life in this subset of patients. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our experience with locally advanced primary</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860005910&hterms=Internal+Combustion+Engine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528Internal%2BCombustion%2529%2BEngine%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Stirling engine materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3277969"><span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> ICA during Transsphenoidal Surgery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghatge, S.B.; Modi, D.B.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Summary <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the internal carotid artery (ICA) during transsphenoidal surgery is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Direct surgical repair of the ICA may be difficult and time-consuming in an acute setting. Urgent endovascular treatments with vascular plug or stent-graft have been the feasible options to date. We desrcibe two cases of iatrogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ICA during transsphenoidal surgery. In the first case we occluded the ICA with a vascular plug at the site of tear where cross circulation was adequate. In the second case we had to preserve the ICA with stent-graft since there was no adequate cross circulation. These two strategies are discussed below. PMID:20377977</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000179&hterms=Burnout&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DBurnout"><span id="translatedtitle">Wrapped Wire Detects <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Of Pressure Vessel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hunt, James B.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201.1416H"><span id="translatedtitle">Transient gravity perturbations induced by earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harms, J.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Barsuglia, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Montagner, J.-P.; Somala, S. N.; Whiting, B. F.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The static and transient deformations produced by earthquakes cause density perturbations which, in turn, generate immediate, long-range perturbations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, an analytical solution is derived for gravity perturbations produced by a point double-couple source in homogeneous, infinite, non-self-gravitating elastic media. The solution features transient gravity perturbations that occur at any distance from the source between the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> onset time and the arrival time of seismic P waves, which are of potential interest for real-time earthquake source studies and early warning. An analytical solution for such prompt gravity perturbations is presented in compact form. We show that it approximates adequately the prompt gravity perturbations generated by strike-slip and dip-slip finite fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in a half-space obtained by numerical simulations based on the spectral element method. Based on the analytical solution, we estimate that the observability of prompt gravity perturbations within 10 s after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> onset by current instruments is severely challenged by the background microseism noise but may be achieved by high-precision gravity strainmeters currently under development. Our analytical results facilitate parametric studies of the expected prompt gravity signals that could be recorded by gravity strainmeters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3078002"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical evaluation of a single daily dose of phenylpropanolamine in the treatment of urethral <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> mechanism incompetence in the bitch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Claeys, Stéphanie; Rustichelli, Frederico; Noël, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the efficacy of a single daily oral dose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) in the treatment of urethral <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> mechanism incompetence (USMI) in bitches. Nine bitches diagnosed with USMI were treated with a single daily dose [1.5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] of PPA for at least 1 month. Urethral pressure profiles (UPP) were performed in 7 dogs before treatment and repeated in 4 of them after treatment. Treatment with PPA resulted in long-term continence in 8/9 bitches. One dog did not respond to PPA and was treated surgically later. Recheck UPPs showed a significant increase in maximal urethral closure pressure in the 4 bitches after treatment with PPA compared to before treatment. In conclusion, long-term continence can be achieved in bitches affected with USMI after administration of a single daily dose of PPA (1.5 mg/kg BW). PMID:22043069</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S33B4526W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Intermediate- and Deep-Focus Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Warren, L. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) of the earthquakes. As part of a global study of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes, I have used <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity to estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vector (speed and orientation) for 422 earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ?5.7 since 1990. I estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity relative to the local P-wave velocity (vr/?). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas --- Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Japan-Kurils-Kamchatka --- include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 193 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors, most earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors) to Mode III <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (i.e., perpendicular slip and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vectors). For this earthquake population, the mean <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is 0.43 vr/? ± 0.14 vr/?. The mean earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are similar between all subduction zones. Since the local seismic wavespeed is faster in colder subduction zones, absolute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are faster in colder subduction zones. Overall, the fastest <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities exceed the local S-wave speed. The supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III <span class="hlt">rupture</span> but the P-wave speed for Mode II <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/87/71/93/PDF/StructureTensorRiemannianFiltering_angulo_IASjournal.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Submitted to Image <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Stereol, 11 pages Original Research Paper</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p></p> <p>. Keywords: structure tensor, tensor-valued images, Riemannian center-of-mass, Riemannian averaging, tensorSubmitted to Image <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Stereol, 11 pages Original Research Paper STRUCTURE TENSOR IMAGE FILTERING Structure tensor images are obtained by a Gaussian smoothing of the dyadic product of gradient image</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3860016"><span id="translatedtitle">Reconstructive surgery in <span class="hlt">anal</span> giant condyloma: Report of two cases?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mingolla, Giuseppe Pietro; Potì, Oscar; Carbotta, Giuseppe; Marra, Claudio; Borgia, Gianluca; De Giorgi, Donato</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>INTRODUCTION Giant <span class="hlt">anal</span> condyloma also called Buschke–Löwenstein tumor is a rare sexually transmitted disease involving anogenital region with potential malignant degeneration into invasive squamous carcinoma. Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice and often wide wounds are necessary to reach clear margins and prevent recurrence. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present two cases treated with an S-plasty rotating and a bilateral house advancement flap respectively with good functional result. DISCUSSION Giant <span class="hlt">anal</span> condyloma also called Buschke–Löwenstein tumor is a large exophytic, cauliflower-like mass that is characterized by local aggressive behavior. Immunosuppression favors rapid growth of the condylomas and increases the risk of their malignant transformation. In limited lesions primary excision can be safely performed leaving wounds open to granulate while in more extensive lesions flap or skin graft coverage is preferable to decrease the length of recovery and minimize risk of severe <span class="hlt">anal</span> stricture. Abdominoperineal resection should be performed for more extensive lesions with deep invasion, malignant transformation or tumor recurrence. CONCLUSION Giant <span class="hlt">anal</span> condyloma also called Buschke–Löwenstein is a rare pathology with mainly sporadic single center experience reported in literature. Surgical complete excision remains the best treatment although elevate should be eventual recurrence. No sufficient data are available to recommend any medical treatment such as interferon, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. PMID:24240074</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5377242"><span id="translatedtitle">Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cantril, S.T. (Children's Hospital of San Francisco, CA); Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.</p> <p>1983-09-01</p> <p>From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe <span class="hlt">anal</span> stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k1w06760l3jr2362.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Volatile Compounds from <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Glands of the Wolverine, Gulo gulo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>William F. Wood; Miranda N. Terwilliger; Jeffrey P. Copeland</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Dichloromethane extracts of wolverine (Gulo gulo, Mustelinae, Mustelidae) <span class="hlt">anal</span> gland secretion were examined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The secretion composition was complex and variable for the six samples examined: 123 compounds were detected in total, with the number per animal ranging from 45 to 71 compounds. Only six compounds were common to all extracts: 3-methylbutanoic acid, 2-methylbutanoic acid, phenylacetic acid,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57357905"><span id="translatedtitle">Contact Sensitization in the <span class="hlt">Anal</span> and Genital Area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. Bauer; S. Oehme; J. Geier</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We analysed the patch test results in 1,374 patients suffering from dermatoses in the anogenital area (n = 561 genital dermatoses, n = 470 <span class="hlt">anal</span> dermatoses, n = 343 anogenital dermatoses) patch tested in 44 dermatological departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 2004 to 2008. All other patients patch tested during this time period without anogenital</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2175754"><span id="translatedtitle">Tachykinin receptors mediating responses to sensory nerve stimulation and exogenous tachykinins and analogues in the rabbit isolated iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hall, J. M.; Mitchell, D.; Morton, I. K.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>1. We have used selective tachykinin receptor agonists and antagonists to investigate the nature of the receptors mediating responses to endogenous and exogenous tachykinins in the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> preparation in vitro. 2. The NK1-selective agonist, substance P methyl ester, induced contraction with a pD2 of 9.16 indicating the presence of NK1 receptors. In confirmation, the NK1-selective antagonist, GR82334, competitively antagonized responses to substance P methyl ester with high affinity (pKB 7.46). 3. NK3 receptors also mediate contraction since NK3-selective agonists exhibited high potency, e.g. the pD2 of [Me-Phe7]-neurokinin B was 9.67, and their responses were not inhibited by GR82334 (10 microM). 4. NK2 receptor activation does not seem to contribute to contraction since the NK2-selective agonist [beta-Ala8]-neurokinin A(4-10) had relatively low potency (pD2 6.43), and the NK2-selective antagonists MEN10207 (1 microM) and L-659,877 (10 microM) were inactive or had low affinity, respectively. 5. GR82334 (1 microM) significantly inhibited responses to electrical field-stimulation of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic sensory nerves (3, 10 and 30 Hz), and caused a rightward shift of the log concentration-response curve to bradykinin (lateral shift ca. 1000 fold). Higher concentrations of GR82334 (10 microM) significantly attenuated responses to capsaicin (1-60 microM) whilst completely abolishing responses to field-stimulation (3, 10 and 30 Hz) and bradykinin (1 nM- 3 microM). 6. In conclusion, NK1 and NK3 receptor activation results in contraction of the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. The contractile response following sensory nerve stimulation by bradykinin, capsaicin and electrical field stimulation results from NK1 receptor activation. PMID:8401912</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2140196"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of anti-inflammatory drugs and lower esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> relaxing drugs and risk of esophageal and gastric cancers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fortuny, Joan; Johnson, Christine; Bohlke, Kari; Chow, Wong-Ho; Hart, Gene; Kucera, Gena; Mujumdar, Urvi; Ownby, Dennis; Wells, Karen; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Engel, Lawrence S.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Background and aims The incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma has increased in western countries in recent decades for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether use of lower esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (LES) relaxing drugs was related to an increased risk of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and whether use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a reduced risk of esophageal and gastric cancers. Methods We examined these associations using administrative databases in a case-control study in two integrated health care delivery systems. Cases were incident esophageal adenocarcinomas (n= 163) and squamous cell carcinomas (n= 114), and gastric cardia (n= 176) and non-cardia adenocarcinomas (n= 320), diagnosed between 1980 and 2002 in one health system and between 1993 and 2002 in the other. Matched controls (n= 3996) were selected. Complete prescription information was available for the study period. Results Prescription of corticosteroids was associated with a decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR= 0.6, 95% CI= 0.4-0.9), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI= 0.2-0.6) and gastric non-cardia carcinoma (OR= 0.4, 95% CI=0.3-0.6). Ever use of pharmacy-purchased aspirin was associated with 30-60% decreased risks of the studied cancers. As a group, LES-relaxing drugs showed little evidence of association with increased risk of any esophageal or gastric cancer. Conclusions Corticosteroid and aspirin use were associated with significantly decreased risks of esophageal and gastric cancer. Lower esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> relaxing drugs as a group did not affect these risks, although we had limited power to assess individual drugs. The possibility that corticosteroids and aspirin may reduce esophageal cancer risk warrants further consideration. PMID:17644046</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1571693"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular and pharmacological characterization of a functional tachykinin NK3 receptor cloned from the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Medhurst, Andrew D; Hirst, Warren D; Jerman, Jeffery C; Meakin, Jacqueline; Roberts, Jennifer C; Testa, Tania; Smart, Darren</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>A functional tachykinin NK3 receptor was cloned from the rabbit iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle and its distribution investigated in ocular tissues.Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to clone a full length rabbit NK3 receptor cDNA consisting of 1404 nucleotides. This cDNA encoded a protein of 467 amino acids with 91 and 87% homology to the human and rat NK3 receptors respectively.In CHO-K1 cells transiently expressing the recombinant rabbit NK3 receptor, the relative order of potency of NKB>>NKA?SP to displace [125I]-[MePhe7]-NKB binding and to increase intracellular calcium, together with the high affinity of NK3 selective agonists (e.g. senktide, [MePhe7]-NKB) and antagonists (e.g. SR?142801, SB?223412) in both assays was consistent with NK3 receptor pharmacology. In binding and functional experiments, agonist concentration response curves were shallow (0.7–0.8), suggesting the possibility of multiple affinity states of the receptor.Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed highest expression of rabbit NK3 receptor mRNA in iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> muscle, lower expression in retina and iris dilator muscle, and no expression in lens and cornea. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed discrete specific localization of NK3 receptor mRNA in the iris muscle and associated ciliary processes. Discrete specific labelling of NK3 receptors with the selective NK3 receptor agonist [125I]-[MePhe7]-NKB was also observed in the ciliary processes using autoradiography.Our study reveals a high molecular similarity between rabbit and human NK3 receptor mRNAs, as predicted from previous pharmacological studies, and provide the first evidence that NK3 receptors are precisely located on ciliary processes in the rabbit eye. In addition, there could be two affinity states of the receptor which may correspond to the typical and ‘atypical' NK3 receptor subtypes previously reported. PMID:10516642</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21083509"><span id="translatedtitle">Nitinol Stents for Palliative Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice: Should We Stent the <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> of Oddi in Every Case?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Tsetis, Dimitris; Chrysou, Evangelia [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion-Stavrakia, Crete (Greece); Sanidas, Elias [Clinic for Surgical Oncology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Petrakis, John [Clinic for General Surgery, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion-Stavrakia, Crete (Greece)</p> <p>2001-07-15</p> <p>Purpose: To evaluate the necessity of metallic stenting of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi in malignant obstructive jaundice when the tumor is more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater.Methods: Sixty-seven self-expandable biliary stents were used in 60 patients with extrahepatic lesions of the common hepatic or common bile duct and with the distal margin of the tumor located more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater. Stents were placed above the papilla in 30 cases (group A) and in another 30 with their distal part protruding into the duodenum (group B).Results: The 30-day mortality was 15%, due to the underlying disease. The stent occlusion rate was 17% after a mean period of 4.3 months. No major complications were noted. Average survival was 132 days for group A and 140 days for group B. In group A, 19 patients survived {<=} 90 days and in eight of these, cholangitis occurred at least once. Of 11 patients in group A with survival > 90 days, only two developed cholangitis. In group B, 13 patients who survived {<=} 90 days had no episodes of cholangitis and in 17 with survival > 90 days, cholangitis occurred in three. There is a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) regarding the incidence of cholangitis in favor of group A.Conclusions: In patients with extrahepatic lesions more than 2 cm from the papilla and with a relative poor prognosis ({<=} 3 months), due to more advanced disease or to a worse general condition, the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi should also be stented in order to reduce the postprocedural morbidity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.ams.ac.ir/AIM/08115/0013.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Oral Metronidazole on Wound Healing and Pain after <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Sphincterotomy and Fissurectomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Seyed Vahid Hosseini; Babak Sabet; Mohamoud Nouri; Shahram Bolandparvaz</p> <p></p> <p>Chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure is one of the most common causes of <span class="hlt">anal</span> pain and surgical therapy is the treatment of choice. There is scarce information regarding the prophylactic effects of oral metronidazole on postoperative complications of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of metronidazole as a prophylactic measure for postoperative <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure complications. In</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4400530"><span id="translatedtitle">Femoral pseudoaneurysm <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> into urinary bladder: A rare presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shrestha, Kajan Raj; Luitel, Bhoj Raj; Shrestha, Ujma; Shrestha, Uttam Krishna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Femoral pseudoaneurysm is a common occurrence in intravenous drug abuser due to repeated trauma to the femoral artery causing arterial leak contained by the surrounding tissue and does not contain all the layers of arterial wall. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of these aneurysm to exterior is a common presentation while <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into surrounding structure deemed an emergency surgical attention. Hence, we report an unusual case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of femoral pseudoaneurysm into urinary bladder who presented us with history of hematuria and was successfully managed. PMID:25887167</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4397006"><span id="translatedtitle">A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>An adductor longus muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25918663</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4448101"><span id="translatedtitle">Right Hemi-Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: An Injury Missed or Masked?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dhua, Anjan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Right sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in children is uncommon and may escape early detection. Missed injuries are associated with high mortality and morbidity due to incarceration and strangulation of abdominal viscera. We report a 15-month-old child with blunt trauma chest and abdomen, who presented with bilateral hemothoraces and liver laceration seven days after the incident. Diagnosis of right diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was confirmed after another week. The surgical repair of diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was undertaken successfully.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3981329"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed diagnosis of a right-sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ku?era, Alexandr; Rygl, Michal; Šnajdauf, Ji?í; Kavalcová, Lucie; Petr?, Ond?ej; Ritschelová, Vlasta; Kyn?l, Martin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Right-sided traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in childhood is a very rare injury. Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> often manifests itself later, after an organ progressively herniates into the pleural cavity. When the patient is tubed, the ventilation pressure does not allow herniation of an organ, which occurs when the patient is ex-tubed. We present a patient with a delayed diagnose of right sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a complicated post-operation state. PMID:24765402</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11881313"><span id="translatedtitle">[Pregnancy-related, rarely-seen spontaneous lumbar artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Iskender, Serkan; Ergün, Alper; Ipekçi, Fuat; Ekinci, Ozgür; Yener, Oktay</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Some arterial aneurysm <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can be seen during pregnancy. However, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lumbar artery in pregnancy are very rare. In that manuscript we present a 22 year old female who is 8 months pregnant, seen at a peripheral hospital for suspicion of placenta decolmant. When the fetal heart sounds were missed, the patient was transported to our hospital. We reoperated on her as an emergency. We found that a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lumbar artery. PMID:11881313</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25863875"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> anterior mediastinal teratoma with radiologic, pathologic, and bronchoscopic correlation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Escalon, Joanna G; Arkin, Jordan; Chaump, Michael; Harkin, Timothy J; Wolf, Andrea S; Legasto, Alan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>While most teratomas are asymptomatic, intrathoracic teratomas can rarely <span class="hlt">rupture</span> spontaneously causing more alarming symptoms. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> teratoma is a serious clinical entity, and early recognition is crucial for avoidance of further complications and preparation of proper surgical approach. We present a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> anterior mediastinal teratoma with radiologic, pathologic, and bronchoscopic correlation. This case uniquely illustrates a patient presenting with signs of infection and progressively worsening symptoms, thus emphasizing the need for early diagnosis and the importance of imaging. PMID:25863875</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S11C4351F"><span id="translatedtitle">Cohesive Zone Length of Gabbro at Supershear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The strain data was obtained during large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED in March 2013. We conducted friction experiments using a pair of meter-scale gabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5m x 0.1m. We applied 2.6MPa normal stress and loading velocity of 0.1mm/s. At the long side of the fault edge, which is parallel to the slip direction, 32 2-component semi-conductor strain gauges were installed at an interval of 50mm and 10mm off the fault. The data are conditioned by high frequency strain amplifiers (<0.5MHz) and continuously recorded at an interval of 1MHz with 16-bit resolution. Many stick slip events were observed and a unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event was chosen in this analysis that propagated with supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. One of the reasons for this selection was that the strain field ahead of the supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was not contaminated by elastic waves. Focusing on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We found that the stress concentration becomes mild as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates and length of the stress concentration area becomes longer. This observation is quite interesting because in this experiment the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagated at a constant speed close to root two times the shear wave velocity and thus a longer stress concentration region suggests more energy dissipation. We could speculate that such longer stress concentration area suggests longer plastic region ahead of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (or longer cohesive distance). I.e. the cohesive zone length becomes longer as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates to maintain constant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity propagation. We empirically obtained the relation Lc = 1.8x10^-5 L for 0.1<L<1.4[m] where Lc is cohesive zone length and L is <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> length.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NSDL&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act02.html"><span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Analogies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.199.1709C"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocity inferred from near-field shear strain analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Causse, M.; Cornou, C.; Bécasse, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We propose a new technique to determine the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of large strike slip earthquakes. By means of simple numerical ground motion simulations, we show that when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> penetrates a shallow layer of sediment or fractured rock, shock waves propagate along the surface fault trace in the forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. Such shock waves, which are insensitive to the complexity of slip over the fault plane, propagate at a phase velocity equal to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. We show that those shock waves can be easily isolated in the frequency domain, and that phase velocity can then be simply obtained from shear strain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4064095"><span id="translatedtitle">Complications after ileal pouch-<span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis in Korean patients with ulcerative colitis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Han, Eon Chul; Ha, Heon-Kyun; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Park, Kyu Joo</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>AIM: To investigate the outcomes of treatments for complications after ileal pouch-<span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis (IPAA) in Korean patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Between March 1998 and February 2013, 72 patients (28 male and 44 female, median age 43.0 years ± 14.0 years) underwent total proctocolectomy with IPAA. The study cohort was registered prospectively and analyzed retrospectively. Patient characteristics, medical management histories, operative findings, pathology reports and postoperative clinical courses, including early postoperative and late complications and their treatments, were reviewed from a medical record system. All of the ileal pouches were J-pouch and were performed with either the double-stapling technique (n = 69) or a hand-sewn (n = 3) technique. RESULTS: Thirty-one (43.1%) patients had early complications, with 12 (16.7%) patients with complications related to the pouch. Pouch bleeding, pelvic abscesses and anastomosis <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were managed conservatively. Patients with pelvic abscesses were treated with surgical drainage. Twenty-seven (38.0%) patients had late complications during the follow-up period (82.5 ± 50.8 mo), with 21 (29.6%) patients with complications related to the pouch. Treatment for pouchitis included antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs. Pouch-vaginal fistulas, perianal abscesses or fistulas and anastomosis strictures were treated surgically. Pouch failure developed in two patients (2.8%). Analyses showed that an emergency operation was a significant risk factor for early pouch-related complications compared to elective procedures (55.6% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05). Pouchitis was related to early (35.3%) and the other late pouch-related complications (41.2%) (P < 0.05). The complications did not have an effect on pouch failure nor pouch function. CONCLUSION: The complications following IPAA can be treated successfully. Favorable long-term outcomes were achieved with a lower pouch failure rate than reported in Western patients. PMID:24966620</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902970"><span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of plaque formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bentzon, Jacob Fog; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Virmani, Renu; Falk, Erling</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis causes clinical disease through luminal narrowing or by precipitating thrombi that obstruct blood flow to the heart (coronary heart disease), brain (ischemic stroke), or lower extremities (peripheral vascular disease). The most common of these manifestations is coronary heart disease, including stable angina pectoris and the acute coronary syndromes. Atherosclerosis is a lipoprotein-driven disease that leads to plaque formation at specific sites of the arterial tree through intimal inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and calcification. After decades of indolent progression, such plaques may suddenly cause life-threatening coronary thrombosis presenting as an acute coronary syndrome. Most often, the culprit morphology is plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with exposure of highly thrombogenic, red cell-rich necrotic core material. The permissive structural requirement for this to occur is an extremely thin fibrous cap, and thus, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur mainly among lesions defined as thin-cap fibroatheromas. Also common are thrombi forming on lesions without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (plaque erosion), most often on pathological intimal thickening or fibroatheromas. However, the mechanisms involved in plaque erosion remain largely unknown, although coronary spasm is suspected. The calcified nodule has been suggested as a rare cause of coronary thrombosis in highly calcified and tortious arteries in older individuals. To characterize the severity and prognosis of plaques, several terms are used. Plaque burden denotes the extent of disease, whereas plaque activity is an ambiguous term, which may refer to one of several processes that characterize progression. Plaque vulnerability describes the short-term risk of precipitating symptomatic thrombosis. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression; how plaques suddenly precipitate life-threatening thrombi; and the concepts of plaque burden, activity, and vulnerability. PMID:24902970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T43A2632D"><span id="translatedtitle">Forecasting the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Directivity of Large Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donovan, J. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Forecasting the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity of large earthquakes is an important problem in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), because directivity strongly influences ground motions. We cast this forecasting problem in terms of the conditional hypocenter distribution (CHD), defined to be the probability distribution of a hypocenter given the spatial distribution of fault slip (moment release). The simplest CHD is a uniform distribution for which the hypocenter probability density equals the moment-release probability density. We have compiled samples of CHDs from a global distribution of large earthquakes using three estimation methods: (a) location of hypocenters within the slip distribution from finite-fault inversions, (b) location of hypocenters within early aftershock distributions, and (c) direct inversion for the directivity parameter D, defined in terms of the degree-two polynomial moments of the source space-time function. The data from method (a) are statistically inconsistent with the uniform CHD suggested by McGuire et al. (2002) using method (c). Instead, the data indicate a 'centroid-biased' CHD, in which the expected distance between the hypocenter and the hypocentroid is less than that of a uniform CHD; i.e., the directivities inferred from finite-fault models appear to be closer to bilateral than predicted by the uniform CHD. One source of this discrepancy may be centroid bias in the second-order moments owing to poor localization of the slip in finite-fault inversions. We compare these observational results with CHDs computed from a large set of theoretical <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the Southern California fault system produced by the Rate-State Quake simulator (RSQSim) of Dieterich and Richards-Dinger (2010) and discuss the implications for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics and fault-zone heterogeneities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679079"><span id="translatedtitle">Isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2423576"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Bile Duct <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Pregnancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Piotrowski, Joseph J.; Liechty, R. Dale</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous bile duct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred in a 23-year-old who required emergency Cesarean section for fetal distress. This condition has not been reported in association with pregnancy. Only forty cases of spontaneous bile duct perforation in adults have been previously reported. Seventy percent of these perforations were related to biliary calculi. Sites of perforation were evenly distributed between common hepatic duct and common bile duct. Recommended treatment includes cholecystectomy, common bile duct exploration, T-tube placement, and Roux-En-Y ductal anastomosis if disruption is extensive. PMID:2152327</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024680"><span id="translatedtitle">Complex earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and local tsunamis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Geist, E.L.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/cond-mat/0602371v2"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> processes in fiber bundle models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Per C. Hemmer; Alex Hansen; Srutarshi Pradhan</p> <p>2006-03-23</p> <p>Fiber bundles with statistically distributed thresholds for breakdown of individual fibers are interesting models of the static and dynamics of failures in materials under stress. They can be analyzed to an extent that is not possible for more complex materials. During the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in a fiber bundle avalanches, in which several fibers fail simultaneously, occur. We study by analytic and numerical methods the statistics of such avalanches, and the breakdown process for several models of fiber bundles. The models differ primarily in the way the extra stress caused by a fiber failure is redistributed among the surviving fibers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31698592"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Study of Aortic Wall Stress Using Finite Element Analysis for <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and Non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. K Venkatasubramaniam; M. J Fagan; T Mehta; K. J Mylankal; B Ray; G Kuhan; I. C Chetter; P. T McCollum</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Background. The decision to repair an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently based on diameter (?5.5 cm) alone. However, aneurysms less than 5.5 cm do <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while some reach greater than 5.5 cm without <span class="hlt">rupturing</span>. Hence the need to predict the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on an individual patient basis is important. This study aims to calculate and compare wall</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4342904"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25741135"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer treatment: current status and future perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly</p> <p>2015-02-28</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/403440"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Anal</span> and perianal complications of Crohn's disease (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krieg, H; Brünner, H; Gamstätter, G; Grönniger, J</p> <p>1977-02-11</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> and perianal lesions in Crohn's disease such as fistulae, fissures, abscesses and proliferative ulcerous proctitis are often misinterpreted and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. They always indicate a florid intestinal attack or a relapse after previous intestinal resection. Out of 153 patients with Crohn's disease in the last 11 years we have had 59 cases (= 38.6%) with a history of <span class="hlt">anal</span> changes or such changes were demonstrable on admission to hospital. Only after subtle diagnosis in which the nature and extent of these complications and the location of the intestinal disease focus are determined, the most promising therapy, after all possibilities of conservative treatment have been exhausted, is intestinal resection. Local surgical measures which would often endanger continence, are reserved for the individual case. PMID:403440</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23118397"><span id="translatedtitle">Management of extensor mechanism <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after TKA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosenberg, A G</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Disruption of the extensor mechanism in total knee arthroplasty may occur by tubercle avulsion, patellar or quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, or patella fracture, and whether occurring intra-operatively or post-operatively can be difficult to manage and is associated with a significant rate of failure and associated complications. This surgery is frequently performed in compromised tissues, and repairs must frequently be protected with cerclage wiring and/or augmentation with local tendon (semi-tendinosis, gracilis) which may also be used to treat soft-tissue loss in the face of chronic disruption. Quadriceps <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be treated with conservative therapy if the patient retains active extension. Component loosening or loss of active extension of 20° or greater are clear indications for surgical treatment of patellar fracture. Acute patellar tendon disruption may be treated by primary repair. Chronic extensor failure is often complicated by tissue loss and retraction can be treated with medial gastrocnemius flaps, achilles tendon allografts, and complete extensor mechanism allografts. Attention to fixing the graft in full extension is mandatory to prevent severe extensor lag as the graft stretches out over time. PMID:23118397</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6188768"><span id="translatedtitle">TMI-2 lower head creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thinnes, G.L.</p> <p>1988-08-01</p> <p>The TMI-2 accident resulted in approximately 40% of the reactor's core melting and collecting on the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The severity of the accident has raised questions about the margin of safety against <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lower head in this accident since all evidence seems to indicate no major breach of the vessel occurred. Scoping heat transfer analyses of the relocated core debris and lower head have been made based upon assumed core melting scenarios and core material debris formations while in contact with the lower head. This report describes the structural finite element creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> analysis of the lower head using a temperature transient judged most likely to challenge the structural capacity of the vessel. This evaluation of vessel response to this transient has provided insight into the creep mechanisms of the vessel wall, a realistic mode of failure, and a means by which margin to failure can be evaluated once examination provides estimated maximum wall temperatures. Suggestions for more extensive research in this area are also provided. 6 refs., 15 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25279443"><span id="translatedtitle">False vs True <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cohain, J S</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>New medical nomenclature: False <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or False ROM and Double <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or Double ROM are being introduced into the English language. A single caregiver found about 1% of term births and 10% of term PROM involved False ROM, in which the chorion breaks while the amnion remains intact. Diagnostically, if meconium or vernix is observed, then both the chorionic and amniotic sacs have broken. In the absence of detection of vernix or meconium, an immediate accurate diagnostic test for False ROM is lacking and differentiating between True ROM from False ROM is possible only after leaking stops, which takes hours to days. The obvious benefit of differentiating between 'True' and 'False' ROM, is that in the case of False ROM, the amnion is intact and ascending infections are likely not at increased risk, although research is lacking as to whether False ROM is associated with an increased rate of ascending infection. Three cases of False ROM are presented and avenues for future research are enumerated. PMID:25279443</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4180267"><span id="translatedtitle">Poxvirus membrane biogenesis: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> not disruption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Locker, Jacomine Krijnse; Chlanda, Petr; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brügger, Britta</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Summary Enveloped viruses acquire their membrane from the host by budding at, or wrapping by, cellular membranes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, however, suggested that the prototype member of the poxviridae, vaccinia virus (VACV), may create its membrane ‘de novo’ with free open ends exposed in the cytosol. Within the frame of the German-wide priority programme we re-addressed the biogenesis and origin of the VACV membrane using electron tomography (ET), cryo-EM and lipid analysis of purified VACV using mass spectrometry (MS). This review discussed how our data led to a model of unconventional membrane biogenesis involving membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the generation of a single open membrane from open membrane intermediates. Lipid analyses of purified virus by MS suggest an ER origin with a relatively low cholesterol content compared with whole cells, confirming published data. Unlike previous reports using thin-layer chromatography, no depletion of phosphatidylethanolamine was detected. We did detect, however, an enrichment for phosphatidic acid, diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol in the virion. Our data are discussed in the light of other pathogens that may require cellular membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during their intracellular life cycle. PMID:23168015</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40209910"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> gland secretion codes for family membership in the beaver</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Lixing Sun; Dietland Müller-Schwarze</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>We investigated how information about family membership is coded by the individually specific <span class="hlt">anal</span> gland secretion (AGS)\\u000a in the beaver, Castor canadensis. Because beavers live in strict family units and relatives share more features in the AGS profile than non-relatives, family\\u000a members share more AGS features than non-family members. Therefore, family recognition seems to be a natural consequence of\\u000a the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3787627"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> Canal Duplication in an 11-Year-Old-Child</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Van Biervliet, S.; Maris, E.; Vande Velde, S.; Vande Putte, D.; Meerschaut, V.; Herregods, N.; De Bruyne, R.; Van Winckel, M.; Van Renterghem, K.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> canal duplication (ACD) is the least frequent digestive duplication. Symptoms are often absent but tend to increase with age. Recognition is, however, important as almost half of the patients with ACD have concomitant malformations. We present the clinical history of an eleven-year-old girl with ACD followed by a review of symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis based on all the reported cases in English literature. PMID:24151565</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28429033"><span id="translatedtitle">Oral lacidipine in the treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. Ansaloni; A. Bernabè; R. Ghetti; R. Riccardi; R. M. Tranchino; G. Gardini</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>.   The aim of this prospective study was to assess the effectiveness in healing <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure (AF) of lacidipine, a calcium channel\\u000a blocker with a better tolerability in comparison to other calcium antagonists. Twenty-one consecutive patients (16 women,\\u000a 76.2%) with AF (16 chronic, situated posteriorly in 17 patients (81.0%), anteriorly in 4) with a mean age of 37.1 years (SD,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/hg923866t25405p6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Combined therapy for cancer of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Norman D. Nigro; V. K. Vaitkevicius; T. Buroker; G. T. Bradley; B. Considine</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Nineteen patients with squamous-cell cancer of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal have been treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy,\\u000a followed by appropriate surgery. The authors are convinced that the combined therapy is effective enough to avoid abdominoperineal\\u000a resection if disappearance of the lesion is proven by adequate examination and biopsy. Although they believe cancers 5 cm\\u000a or less in maximum diameter</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21325848"><span id="translatedtitle">Contact sensitization in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> and genital area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bauer, A; Oehme, S; Geier, J</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We analysed the patch test results in 1,374 patients suffering from dermatoses in the anogenital area (n = 561 genital dermatoses, n = 470 <span class="hlt">anal</span> dermatoses, n = 343 anogenital dermatoses) patch tested in 44 dermatological departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 2004 to 2008. All other patients patch tested during this time period without anogenital dermatoses formed the control group (n = 49, 142). Of the total study group, 662 (48.2%) patients were male. 179 (13%) had a past or present atopic dermatitis. The vast majority of the patients was older than 40 years (n = 989, 72%). Suspected allergen sources were first of all topical medicaments, followed by cosmetics, cleansing agents, clothes, rubber products, systemic medicaments and disinfectants. Allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 409 (29.8%) of the tested patients. Patients with anogenital dermatoses were sensitized mainly to active agents of topical medicaments, in particular bufexamac (5.3%). Sensitization pattern and sensitization rates observed in patients with genital and <span class="hlt">anal</span> involvement differed significantly. Patients with <span class="hlt">anal</span> disease had significantly higher sensitization rates for bufexamac (9.4 vs. 1.1%), fragrance mix I (8.7 vs. 4.2%) and II (4.5 vs. 2.6%), propolis (5.4 vs. 1.9%) and methyldibromoglutaronitrile (6.3 vs. 4.1%). Patients with chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> dermatoses seem to have a higher risk to develop sensitizations to topically applied products and drugs than patients with genital dermatoses. Recommended patch test series (German Contact Dermatitis Research Group) are standard series, local anaesthetics series, topical antibiotics, antimycotics, steroids, ointment bases and preservative series as well as the patients' own products. PMID:21325848</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23934991"><span id="translatedtitle">Progression of <span class="hlt">anal</span> high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berry, J Michael; Jay, Naomi; Cranston, Ross D; Darragh, Teresa M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Welton, Mark L; Palefsky, Joel M</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>The incidence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer is elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) compared to the general population. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) are common in HIV-infected MSM and the presumed precursors to <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell cancer; however, direct progression of HSIL to <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer has not been previously demonstrated. The medical records were reviewed of 138 HIV-infected MSM followed up at the University of California, San Francisco, who developed <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal or perianal squamous cancer between 1997 and 2011. Men were followed up regularly with digital anorectal examination (DARE), high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and HRA-guided biopsy. Although treatment for HSIL and follow-up were recommended, not all were treated and some were lost to follow-up. Prevalent cancer was found in 66 men. Seventy-two HIV-infected MSM developed <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer while under observation. In 27 men, <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer developed at a previously biopsied site of HSIL. An additional 45 men were not analyzed in this analysis due to inadequate documentation of HSIL in relation to cancer location. Of the 27 men with documented progression to cancer at the site of biopsy-proven HSIL, 20 men progressed from prevalent HSIL identified when first examined and seven men from incident HSIL. Prevalent HSIL progressed to cancer over an average of 57 months compared to 64 months for incident HSIL. Most men were asymptomatic, and cancers were detected by DARE. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> HSIL has clear potential to progress to <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer in HIV-infected MSM. Early diagnosis is facilitated by careful follow-up. Carefully controlled studies evaluating efficacy of screening for and treatment of HSIL to prevent <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer are needed. PMID:23934991</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T33C2644F"><span id="translatedtitle">How is a stick slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fukuyama, E.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.; Kawakata, H.; Takizawa, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>We investigated the initiation process of stick slip events that occurred during large scale rock friction experiments conducted on the large scale shaking table at NIED (Fukuyama et al., 2012, AGU Fall meeting). We used a pair of Indian gabbro rock samples stacked vertically and applied normal and shear forces. The sliding area between the samples is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width. We conducted a sequence of experiments using the same rock sample, and before each experiment we removed gouge particles created during the previous experiment by a brush and a cleaner. Here, we show the experiments under constant slip velocity of 0.1mm/s with constant normal stress of 2.7MPa (LB04-003) or 6.7MPa (LB04-005); the final displacement reached 0.04m. We used 44 acoustic sensors (PZT, vertical mode, 0.5MHz resonance frequency), 32 2-comp strain gouges (SGs) for shear strain and 16 1-comp SGs for normal strain measurements, with 48 0.5MHz dynamic SG amplifiers. We also used a 2MN load cell for shear force measurement and three 0.4MN load cells for vertical forces. Data are recorded continuously at an interval of 10MHz for PZT and 1MHz for other sensors. Just after the shear force applied, many stick slip events (SEs) occurred at an interval of a few seconds. By looking carefully at the PZT and SG array data during an SE, we found that one SE consists of many micro stick slip events (MSEs), which can be grouped into two (the former and the latter). These two groups correspond to the acceleration and deceleration stage of the SE. In LB04-005 (6.7MPa normal stress), a clear nucleation phase can be detected that initiated at a narrow area, propagate slowly (~20m/s) and accelerated. Then, a seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> started to propagate at a velocity of ~3km/s (subshear) or ~6.5km/s (supershear). Detailed features are shown in Mizoguchi et al. (this meeting). It should be noted that this seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated at a narrow area inside the nucleation zone and sometimes after a certain amount of time; it does not seem a smooth transition process from the acceleration to the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as proposed in Ohnaka and Shen (1999, JGR). In contrast, under low normal stress case (LB04-003, 2.7MPa), there were no visible nucleation phases but a sequence of foreshocks was observed, which was not dominant in LB04-005. The foreshock slip area was typically around 10cm long. Again, we could not see any visible correlation between the location and preceding time of foreshocks and that of seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. By looking at the fault surface topography that was recorded as photograph images before and after the experiment, in the nucleation zone, grooves are not developed, while outside the nucleation area, grooves are well developed. Grooves are caused by the creation of gouge particles during the sliding. It could be interesting to note that outside the groove, the sliding surface looks very smooth and shiny, indicating that this area was polished but did not create gouge particles. Therefore, we might speculate that this shiny fault area is responsible for the initiation phase and when the stress state becomes critical, seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starts around one of the grooves. And in LB04-003, the shiny area might not support the shear stress so that the foreshock releases the strain around the grooves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/5pj9fdqjhlle2ahh.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) in Stress Incontinent Women with Intrinsic <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> Deficiency (ISD) - A Long-Term Follow-up</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. Rezapour; C. Falconer; U. Ulmsten</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>In a prospective long-term study 49 women with stress incontinence and ISD (intrinsic <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> deficiency) were followed for a mean of 4 years (range 3-5) after TVT operation. Preoperatively all patients underwent urodynamic investigations, quality of life evaluation, a 24-hour pad test and a gynecologic examination to properly verify the incontinence symptoms. The same protocol was used for postoperative evaluation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=ERIC&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Viscosity&pg=3&id=EJ826748"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (UES) pressures,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://web.gps.caltech.edu/~ampuero/docs/AmpBZ07.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Geophys. J. Int. (2007) 000, 000000 Cracks, pulses and macroscopic asymmetry of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Ampuero, Jean Paul</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>with a preferred propagation direction, that of slip of the more compliant material. Such <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have macroscopic, crack-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> show macroscopic asymmetry under restrictive conditions. The discussed mechanism ­ earthquake source mechanism ­ faulting ­ lateral heterogeneity ­ <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation 1 INTRODUCTION</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://rohan.sdsu.edu/~steveday/PUBLISHED/HarrisDay05GRL.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation Ruth A. Harris</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Day, Steven M.</p> <p></p> <p>Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction Ruth A. Harris U) earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake (2005), Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction, Geophys. Res. Lett</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6674982"><span id="translatedtitle">[Perineal topometry of male newborn infants in the surgical treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> and rectal defects].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stepie?, A; Dyja, A</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this work was to designate the place of the anus on the perineum with topometric method. The examinations were carried out on 100 healthy male newborns, born in time. Five basic diameters of perineum were determined: <span class="hlt">anal</span>-symphyseal distance, <span class="hlt">anal</span>-phallic, <span class="hlt">anal</span>-scrotal distance, <span class="hlt">anal</span>-coccygeal distance and transversal dimension of perineum. The material was examined taking into consideration body weight, body length and weight-growth index. Dimensions of perineum most useful to pointing out the location of the anus in case of impotency are: <span class="hlt">anal</span>-coccygeal distance and <span class="hlt">anal</span>-scrotal distance. The above dimensions show the greatest relation to male newborns weight. PMID:6674982</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4128397"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying Contributions of the Cricopharyngeus to Upper Esophageal <span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> Pressure Changes by Means of Intramuscular Electromyography and High-Resolution Manometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jones, Corinne A.; Hammer, Michael J.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objectives We sought to determine whether the association between cricopharyngeus muscle activity and upper esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> pressure may change in a task-dependent fashion. We hypothesized that more automated tasks related to swallow or airway protection would yield a stronger association than would more volitional tasks related to tidal breathing or voice production. Methods Six healthy adult subjects underwent simultaneous intramuscular electromyography of the cricopharyngeus muscle and high-resolution manometry of the upper esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. Correlation coefficients were calculated to characterize the association between the time-linked series. Results Cricopharyngeus muscle activity was most strongly associated with upper esophageal <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> pressure during swallow and effortful exhalation tasks (r = 0.77 and 0.79, respectively; P < .01). The association was also less variable during swallow and effortful exhalation. Conclusions These findings suggest a greater coupling for the more automatic tasks, and may suggest less coupling and more flexibility for the more volitional, voice-related tasks. These findings support the important role of central patterning for respiratory- and swallow-related tasks. PMID:24633943</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3780291"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of pinaverium bromide in the premedication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and on motor activity of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lamazza, A; Tofi, A; Bolognese, A; Fontana, B; De Masi, E; Frontespezi, S</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A double-blind study was carried out in 18 patients with biliary and pancreatic disease to assess the use of pinaverium bromide in premedication for endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and its effects on motor activity of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi. Patients were divided at random into three groups. One group received 100 mg pinaverium bromide twice daily for 3 days before and then 100 mg 1 hour before the examination, the second group received placebo, and the third had no medication. All patients received 10 to 20 mg diazepam intravenously 10 minutes before endoscopy. Assessments were made of the transit time of various endoscopic phases and patients' tolerance of the procedure. The effects of treatment on the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> of Oddi were estimated by means of endoscopic manometry. The results showed that pinaverium bromide allowed transit time reduction in endoscopic procedure, a greater tolerance on the part of the patient and marked reduction in the amplitude and duration of the phasic activity of the <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. PMID:3780291</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2967677"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> After Statin Use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nesselroade, Ryan D.; Nickels, Leslie Connor</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors. The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. PMID:21079697</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26023494"><span id="translatedtitle">An epigastric heteropagus twin with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocele.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dar, Sajid Hameed; Liaqat, Naeem; Iqbal, Javaid; Latif, Tariq; Iqbal, Asif</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of heteropagus twins attached to the epigastric region. The neonate also had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocoele with most of gut and liver lying outside the abdominal cavity. Patient had uneventful surgery for separation of twins and repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> omphalocoele. PMID:26023494</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4420321"><span id="translatedtitle">An Epigastric Heteropagus Twin with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Giant Omphalocele</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dar, Sajid Hameed; Iqbal, Javaid; Latif, Tariq; Iqbal, Asif</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of heteropagus twins attached to the epigastric region. The neonate also had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant omphalocoele with most of gut and liver lying outside the abdominal cavity. Patient had uneventful surgery for separation of twins and repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> omphalocoele. PMID:26023494</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2670885"><span id="translatedtitle">Pictorial essay. Roentgenologic appearance of traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horvath, M; Verschakelen, J; Ponette, E; Baert, A L</p> <p>1989-04-01</p> <p>The difficulties in recognizing a diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are well known and mostly due to a lack of typical clinical findings and an aspecific chest X-ray. This paper gives a brief review of the radiological techniques which can be helpful in the early diagnosis of traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm. PMID:2670885</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w585748305725427.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral synchronous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Varatharaj Mounasamy; Robert C. Chadderdon; Candice McDaniel; Mark C. Willis</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Bilateral spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendons is rare and is usually associated with predisposing comorbid conditions.\\u000a We report an uncommon case of bilateral synchronous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon after a ground level fall in a 51-year-old\\u000a male, 8 years after renal transplant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30505369"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon after arthroscopic lateral meniscectomy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Renato Viola; Nicola Marzano; Roberto Vianello</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We report a case of complete quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occured a few days after arthroscopic lateral meniscectomy. Complications following arthroscopy are rare; there have been many reports of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the literature, but none by this kind of mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30500642"><span id="translatedtitle">Achilles allograft reconstruction of a chronic patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>PD McNally; EA Marcelli</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Chronic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the patellar tendon are uncommon injuries. They are technically difficult to repair because of scar formation, poor quality of the remaining tendon, and quadriceps muscle atrophy and contracture. We report the reconstruction of a chronic patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with an interesting complication, a tibial stress fracture. The reconstruction was performed 3 months after the injury using an</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59275619"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while playing basketball</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M Shah; N Jooma</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49692160"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a uremic patient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Yu-Cheng Pei; Po-Ching Hsieh; Li-Zen Huang; Cheng-Kuen Chiang</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Quadriceps is a part of extensor mechanism, and it is a strong muscle bundle for knee joint movement. It rarely <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the general population. We present a case with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and discuss the causes. A 45-year-old man had a history of end stage renal disease and received regular hemodialysis treatment for more than 12 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30510857"><span id="translatedtitle">Repair of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> using suture anchors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>David P. Richards; F. Alan Barber</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2299153"><span id="translatedtitle">Dorsal dislocation of the lunate with multiple extensor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schwartz, M G; Green, S M; Coville, F A</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>An old dorsal lunate dislocation with associated multiple extensor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is described. Treatment consisted of proximal row carpectomy and transfer of the extensor indicis proprius to the distal stumps of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> extensor tendons to the long, ring, and small fingers. PMID:2299153</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23627342"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous posterior capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with lens dislocation in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takkar, Brijesh; Mahajan, Deepankur; Azad, Shorya; Sharma, Yog; Azad, Rajvardhan</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Spontaneous posterior capsule <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a very rare entity and its association with lens-nucleus dislocation even more. Herein we report such a case of spontaneous posterior capsule <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with lens dislocation in a case of Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome. PMID:23627342</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2490-6-22.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal artery aneurysm during pregnancy, a clinical dilemma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Khaled B Soliman; Yaser Shawky; Mohamed M Abbas; Mohamed Ammary; Allaa Shaaban</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) during pregnancy is a rare event, with a high mortality rate for both mother and fetus. Increased blood flow and intra-abdominal pressure, and vascular changes secondary to increased steroid production are postulated as contributory to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: We present here a case report of total</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52223894"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics With Energy Loss Outside the Slip Zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. J. Andrews</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone contributes to fracture energy. Because the thickness of the damage zone increases with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation distance, fracture energy increases with earthquake size. A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagating near its limiting velocity has a stress concentration with large shear components at orientations different from that of the slip zone. These components can</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ag8p5j9ajdgwc0xj.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Emergent endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>K. Sugiu; K. Tokunaga; K. Watanabe; W. Sasahara; S. Ono; T. Tamiya; I. Date</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of endovascular and surgical treatments for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) to determine which treatment is preferable. We evaluated the cases of 25 consecutive patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> VADAs treated in our institution. From 1992 to 1997, five patients were treated surgically. Since 1998, 20 patients with VADAs have been</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x308190202366250.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Peter D. Richardson</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/reports/reprints/Parsons_GRL39.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Paleoseismic interevent times interpreted for an unsegmented earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Paleoseismic interevent times interpreted for an unsegmented earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast Tom] Forecasters want to consider an increasingly rich variety of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Past occurrence is captured. This has not been a problem before, because forecasts have assumed that faults are segmented</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32875810"><span id="translatedtitle">Monochorionic Twins with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Vasa Previa: Double Trouble!</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>D. Papathanasiou; R. Witlox; D. Oepkes; F. J. Walther; K. W. M. Bloemenkamp; E. Lopriore</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Velamentous cord insertion and vasa previa occur more frequently in monochorionic twin pregnancies than in singleton pregnancies. Both have been linked with poor perinatal outcome due to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the velamentous vessels. We present a case of acute fetal distress in 2 fetuses in a monochorionic twin pregnancy caused by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vasa previa that was not</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S23D..02S"><span id="translatedtitle">Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Behavior?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schwartz, D. P.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Most faults have not <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ?5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity threshold in UCERF 3 but only 40% of historical <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have negotiated this distance. There are other controls of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation: frictional properties, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics, creep, and, as shown by the 2002 Denali-Totschunda <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the timing of the prior event and level of stress accumulation on adjacent fault sections. Time will be the tester.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9731493"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma in situ in relation to human papillomavirus type 16 variants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xi, L F; Critchlow, C W; Wheeler, C M; Koutsky, L A; Galloway, D A; Kuypers, J; Hughes, J P; Hawes, S E; Surawicz, C; Goldbaum, G; Holmes, K K; Kiviat, N B</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16, is central to the development of squamous anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions, termed "squamous intraepithelial neoplasias." Men who have sex with men, particularly those who are infected with HIV, are at a high risk for <span class="hlt">anal</span> infection with HPV16 and for low-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> neoplasia; however, only a subset of these men develop <span class="hlt">anal</span> invasive cancer or its immediate precursor lesion, <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma in situ (CIS). To examine the hypothesis that certain variants of HPV16 are most strongly associated with development of <span class="hlt">anal</span> CIS, we followed 589 men who have sex with men whose initial <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytological smears did not show <span class="hlt">anal</span> CIS. Anoscopy, <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology, and PCR-based assays for detection and classification of HPV types were performed every 4-6 months, with HPV16 further classified by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis as being a prototype-like (PL) or non-prototype-like (NPL) variant. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> CIS was histologically confirmed in 6 of 384 (1.6%) consistently HPV16-negative men, in 12 of 183 (6.6%) men with HPV16 PL variants, and in 4 of 22 (18.2%) men with HPV16 NPL variants. After adjustment for <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytological diagnoses at study entry, HIV status and CD4 count, and detection of HPV types other than type 16, men with HPV16 NPL variants were 3.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.0-10.3) more likely to develop <span class="hlt">anal</span> CIS than were those with PL variants. Neither detection of HPV16 DNA at high levels nor detection of HPV16 DNA for a prolonged period, factors that we previously demonstrated to be associated with risk of high-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, was significantly associated with HPV16 NPL variants. The biological mechanism relating to Ihis excess risk remains undetermined. PMID:9731493</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3408557"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk Factors for Abnormal <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Cytology over Time in HIV-infected Women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>BARANOSKI, Amy S; TANDON, Richa; WEINBERG, Janice; HUANG, Faye; STIER, Elizabeth A</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To assess incidence of, and risk factors for abnormal <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology and <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 2–3 in HIV-infected women. Study Design This prospective study assessed 100 HIV-infected women with <span class="hlt">anal</span> and cervical specimens for cytology and high risk HPV testing over three semi-annual visits. Results Thirty-three women were diagnosed with an <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytologic abnormality at least once. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> cytology abnormality was associated with current CD4 count <200 cells/mm3, <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection and history of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Twelve subjects were diagnosed with AIN2-3: four after AIN1 diagnosis and four after ?1 negative <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology. AIN2-3 trended towards an association with history of cervical cytologic abnormality and history of STI. Conclusions Repeated annual <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology screening for HIV-infected women, particularly for those with increased immunosuppression, <span class="hlt">anal</span> and/or cervical HPV, history of other STIs, or abnormal cervical cytology, will increase the likelihood of detecting AIN2-3. PMID:22520651</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40851860"><span id="translatedtitle">Subducted seafloor relief stops <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in South American great earthquakes: Implications for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviour in the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Robert Sparkes; Frederik Tilmann; Niels Hovius; John Hillier</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Great subduction earthquakes cause destructive surface deformation and ground shaking over hundreds of kilometres. Their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length is limited by the characteristic strength of the subduction plate interface, and by lateral variations in its mechanical properties. It has been proposed that subduction of topographic features such as ridges and seamounts can affect these properties and stop <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, but the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14499283"><span id="translatedtitle">New evidence on the mechanisms underlying bradykinin-mediated contraction of the pig iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> in vitro.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>El Sayah, Mariem; Calixto, João B</p> <p>2003-07-01</p> <p>We have reported previously that bradykinin (BK) induces potent and reproducible concentration-dependent contractions of the pig iris <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> (PIS) muscle in vitro through the activation of BK B(2) receptors. Here we attempted to investigate additional mechanisms by which BK induces contraction of the PIS in vitro. BK-mediated contraction of the PIS relied largely on the external Ca2+ influx by a mechanism sensitive to the L-, N- and P-type of Ca2+ channel selective blockers. Likewise, BK-induced contraction of the PIS was greatly inhibited by the CGRP-(8-37), NK(2) or NK(3) receptor antagonists (SR 48968, SR 142801), and to a lesser extent by the NK(1) antagonist (FK 888). Capsaicin desensitization of PIS or capsazepine pre-incubation also significantly reduced BK-mediated contraction in the PIS. Furthermore, KT 5720 or GF 109203X (the protein kinase A and C inhibitors, respectively) also significantly inhibited BK-mediated contraction. Taken together, these results indicate that BK-mediated contraction of the PIS seems to be mediated primarily by the release of CGRP and tachykinins from sensory nerve fibers, and relies largely on extracellular Ca2+ influx via activation of L-, N- and P-type of Ca2+ channels. Finally, these responses are mediated by activation of both protein kinase A- and C-dependent mechanisms. PMID:14499283</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15698332"><span id="translatedtitle">Multifractal scaling of thermally activated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sornette, D; Ouillon, G</p> <p>2005-01-28</p> <p>We propose a "multifractal stress activation" model combining thermally activated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and long memory stress relaxation, which predicts that seismic decay rates after mainshocks follow the Omori law approximately 1/t(p) with exponents p linearly increasing with the magnitude M(L) of the mainshock. We carefully test this prediction on earthquake sequences in the Southern California earthquake catalog: we find power law relaxations of seismic sequences triggered by mainshocks with exponents p increasing with the mainshock magnitude by approximately 0.1-0.15 for each magnitude unit increase, from p(M(L) = 3) approximately 0.6 to p(M(L) = 7) approximately 1.1, in good agreement with the prediction of the multifractal model. PMID:15698332</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23696292"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Rathke cleft cyst mimicking pituitary apoplexy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neidert, Marian Christoph; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Leske, Henning; Möller-Goede, Diane; Pangalu, Athina; Schmid, Christoph; Bernays, René-Ludwig</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are benign cystic lesions of the sellar and suprasellar region that are asymptomatic in most cases. Occasionally, compression of the optic pathway and hypothalamo-pituitary structures may cause clinical symptoms, such as headaches, visual deficits and endocrinopathies. Acute presentation caused by hemorrhage into an RCC have been described in the literature, and the term "Rathke cleft cyst apoplexy" has been coined. We present the case of a 32-year-old man with acute onset of meningitis-type symptoms and imaging findings resembling hemorrhagic pituitary tumor apoplexy. In retrospect, clinical symptoms, intraoperative appearance, and histologic examination were compatible with the diagnosis of nonhemorrhagic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an RCC. Thus, the clinical presentation of "Rathke cleft cyst apoplexy" is not necessarily caused by hemorrhage. PMID:23696292</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820056800&hterms=yttrium+oxide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dyttrium%2Boxide"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an ODS alloy with high stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S23D..04L"><span id="translatedtitle">The Nucleation and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Laboratory Earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Latour, S.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Madariaga, R. I.; Ampuero, J. P.; Vinciguerra, S.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We present the results of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments intended to mimic seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of faults.The experimental device consists of a plate of polycarbonate in which a fault is cut at a critical angle, such that it produces stick-slip when it is submitted to uniaxal stress loading. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are visualized by photo-elasticity recorded with a high velocity camera. The radiated wavefield is studied with a network of acoustic sensors. In a first part, we study the slow initiation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We show that this stage actually consists of two phases, a long exponential growth followed by a catastrophic acceleration. The critical length and critical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of the transition scale depend inversely on the normal stress; while the characteristic time is independent of the normal stress. We discuss these results with respect to recent observations of earthquake nucleation in natural faults. In a second part, we will show that this experiment can be used to study the effect of barriers on a fault, as well as the effect on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation of a kink on a fault. We provide detailed observation of the wavefield radiated by the barrier, and compare it to the wavefield radiated by a kink. We compare the observations with theoretical results for the radiation of a barrier in a 2D in-plane geometry, and with 2D numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics by the spectral element method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6261G"><span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Broadband ground motion simulations, with frequencies up to 10Hz, are important for engineering purposes, in particular for seismic hazard assessment for critical facilities. One problem in such simulations is the generation of high frequency radiation emitted during the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Ad-hoc kinematic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characterizations can be tweaked through empirical models to radiate over the desired frequency range, but their physical consistency remains questionable. In contrast, for physically self-consistent dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling, controlled by friction, material parameters and the adopted physical laws, the mechanism that may lead to appropriate high-frequency radiation require heterogeneity in friction, stress, or fault geometry (or even all three quantities) at unknown but small length scales. Dunham at al. (2011) studied dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on rough faults in 2D, and described how fault roughness excites high-frequency radiation. In our study, we focus on the interaction of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities on planar faults in 3D. We study effects of the interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with 1) small-scale heterogeneities in the medium (that is, randomized 3D wave speed and density variations), and 2) small-scale heterogeneities in the frictional parameters. Our numerical results show significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or peak slip velocity if small-scale heterogeneities are present. This indicates that the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is sensitive to both types of spatial inhomogeneity. At the same time we observe that the resulting near-source seismic wave fields are not very sensitive to these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> variations, indicating that wavefront healing effects may "simplify" the complex seismic radiation once the waves propagated several wave-lengths away from the fault.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9452378"><span id="translatedtitle">Frictional melting during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the 1994 bolivian earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kanamori; Anderson; Heaton</p> <p>1998-02-01</p> <p>The source parameters of the 1994 Bolivian earthquake (magnitude Mw = 8.3) suggest that the maximum seismic efficiency eta was 0.036 and the minimum frictional stress was 550 bars. Thus, the source process was dissipative, which is consistent with the observed slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, only 20% of the local S-wave velocity. The amount of nonradiated energy produced during the Bolivian <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was comparable to, or larger than, the thermal energy of the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and was sufficient to have melted a layer as thick as 31 centimeters. Once <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was initiated, melting could occur, which reduces friction and promotes fault slip. PMID:9452378</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24856574"><span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with primary CMV infection, AMSAN, and IVIG.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Havenon, Adam; Davis, Gary; Hoesch, Robert</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare complication of primary cytomegalovirus infection, but has not been reported after administration of intravenous immunoglobulin or in the setting of the Guillain-Barré syndrome and its many variants, which often lead to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. There is strong evidence that intravenous immunoglobulin causes sequestration of erythrocytes in the spleen and extravascular hemolytic anemia. This may result in a two-hit scenario that clinicians should be aware of, where a patient who is at risk for splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to primary cytomegalovirus infection receives intravenous immunoglobulin as treatment for the cytomegalovirus-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome, further increasing their risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:24856574</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3702928"><span id="translatedtitle">Prophylactic decompression of extensor pollicis longus to prevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Navaratnam, A V; Ball, S; Eckersley, R</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We present a case of a patient with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of right extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon, who had also developed left wrist pain and weakness in his left EPL that MRI studies confirmed to be caused by tendinosis. Subsequently, decompression of left EPL and reconstruction of right EPL with palmaris longus tendon graft was undertaken. In this case, decompression of the left EPL tendon led to resolution of the patient's symptoms as well as preventing tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We advocate the use of ultrasound imaging to evaluate EPL in these cases and prophylactic decompression of EPL tendon to avoid <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in those patients found to have tendinosis. PMID:23780776</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20842901"><span id="translatedtitle">FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cotter, Shane E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) and Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]. E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Siegel, Barry A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] (and others)</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved <span class="hlt">anal</span> carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922781"><span id="translatedtitle">Unexpected <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cells carcinoma after open hemorrhoidectomy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Luca, Navarra; Valentina, Abruzzese; Federico, Sista; Renato, Pietroletti</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We report a case of unexpected <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o'clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area. PMID:25922781</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25435826"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomaterials in the treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula: hope or hype?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Scoglio, Daniele; Walker, Avery S; Fichera, Alessandro</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> fistula (AF) presents a chronic problem for patients and colorectal surgeons alike. Surgical treatment may result in impairment of continence and long-term risk of recurrence. Treatment options for AFs vary according to their location and complexity. The ideal approach should result in low recurrence rates and minimal impact on continence. New technical approaches involving biologically derived products such as biological mesh, fibrin glue, fistula plug, and stem cells have been applied in the treatment of AF to improve outcomes and decrease recurrence rates and the risk of fecal incontinence. In this review, we will highlight the current evidence and describe our personal experience with these novel approaches. PMID:25435826</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S51B2375M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {?ij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ?kk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ? k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (? < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.dental.cam.ac.uk/downloads/chlamydia-leaflet.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Do not have any sex (oral, vaginal, <span class="hlt">anal</span> or using sex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Talbot, James P.</p> <p></p> <p>Do not have any sex (oral, vaginal, <span class="hlt">anal</span> or using sex toys) with a partner until their treatment has also been completed Prevention Preventing Chlamydia · Use condoms every time you have sex sex (oral, vaginal, <span class="hlt">anal</span> or using sex toys) with a partner until their treatment has also been</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652246"><span id="translatedtitle">Cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> human papillomavirus infection in adult women in American Samoa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hernandez, Brenda Y; Ka'opua, Lana S; Scanlan, Luana; Ching, John Ah; Kamemoto, Lori E; Thompson, Pamela J; Zhu, Xuemei; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Tofaeono, Jennifer; Williams, Victor Tofaeono</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The prevalence of cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> human papillomavirus (HPV) and risk factors associated with infections were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 211 adult women in American Samoa. Overall, 53% of women reported ever having a Pap smear. Cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV was detected in 10% and 16% of women, respectively; 4% of women had concurrent cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV. The most common cervical genotypes were HPV 6, HPV 16, and HPV 53. Cutaneous HPV types were detected in 40% of <span class="hlt">anal</span> infections. Cervical HPV infection was associated with <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV (age-adjusted odds ratio = 3.32, 1.10-10.00). After age adjustment, cervical HPV was associated with being unmarried, postsecondary education, hot running water at home, multiple sexual partners, nulliparity, condom use, and other contraceptive methods. In multivariate analyses, only age remained associated with cervical HPV and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV. Cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV was more prevalent among younger women; only <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV was detected in older women. PMID:22652246</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31733725"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in <span class="hlt">anal</span> scrapings from HIV-positive homosexual men</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. Näher; B. Lenhard; J. Wilms; P. Nickel</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect epithelial cells as well as B lymphocytes. Infection of the male and female genital tracts has recently been demonstrated, and it has been suggested that the virus may be sexually transmissible. In our study we investigated whether EBV can be found in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> region of sexually active homosexual men. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> scrapings from HIV-positive homosexual</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24862322"><span id="translatedtitle">A case of severe <span class="hlt">anal</span> injury in an adolescent male due to bestial sexual experimentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Roger O. Blevins</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This report delineates a case of <span class="hlt">anal</span> injury in a 12-year-old boy who gave a detailed history of bestial behavior with a male bulldog. The child described how he had seen this behavior modeled on the internet and subsequently initiated contact with his own dog, causing the dog to penetrate him <span class="hlt">anally</span>. This type of juvenile bestial behavior with injury</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.missouri.edu/~cli/NLS0.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">J. Math. <span class="hlt">Anal</span>. Appl. 315 (2006) 642655 www.elsevier.com/locate/jmaa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Li, Charles</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>J. Math. <span class="hlt">Anal</span>. Appl. 315 (2006) 642­655 www.elsevier.com/locate/jmaa Zero dispersion and viscosity.07.028 #12;Y.C. Li / J. Math. <span class="hlt">Anal</span>. Appl. 315 (2006) 642­655 643 1. Introduction The topic of zero viscosity</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/pdf/v15/i28/3560.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Infiltrating adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Marni Colvin; Aris Delis; Hugo Villar; Erika Bracamonte; Luis R Leon Jr; Walter E Longo; Steven D Wexner</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Primary neoplasms arising in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal are relatively unusual. In particular, adenomas and adenocarcinomas are distinctly rare entities in this region. We describe an infiltrating, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma from the distal <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, in an otherwise healthy patient at low risk for gastrointestinal malignancy. This is the case of an octogenarian man with a several</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42482436"><span id="translatedtitle">Sexual coercion and sexual desire: Ambivalent meanings of heterosexual <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex in Soweto, South Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. J. Stadler; S. Delany; M. Mntambo</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex within heterosexual relationships is usually underreported or not reported at all, yet is increasingly recognised as a potential mode of HIV transmission. Understanding the circumstances of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex is critical for trials that seek to assess the efficacy of microbicides. This article draws on qualitative data collected during a feasibility study for a clinical trial of microbicides in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28774776"><span id="translatedtitle">A randomized trial of oral vs. topical diltiazem for chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Marion Jonas; Keith R. Neal; John F. Abercrombie; John H. Scholefield</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>INTRODUCTION: Chemical sphincterotomy has proved effective in treating chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure. Glyceryl trinitrate is the most widely used agent, and topical 0.2 percent glyceryl trinitrate ointment heals up to two thirds of chronic <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissures. Unfortunately, however, many patients experience troublesome headaches as a side effect of this treatment. This study assessed the effectiveness of oral and topical diltiazem in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3113760"><span id="translatedtitle">A non-invasive technique for standing surgical repair of urinary bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a post-partum mare: a case report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>An 11-year-old mare presented 36 hours after foaling with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> bladder. Uroperitoneum was diagnosed on ultrasound and from the creatinine concentration of the peritoneal fluid. Bladder endoscopy demonstrated tissue necrosis and a rent in the dorsocranial aspect of the bladder. Following stabilisation, including abdominal drainage and lavage, the mare was taken to standing surgery. Under continuous sedation and epidural anaesthesia, and after surgical preparation, a Balfour retractor was placed in the vagina. Using sterile lubricant and moderate force, it was possible to insert a hand into the bladder. The tear was easily palpable on the dorsal portion of the bladder. Two fingers were inserted through the tear and used to provide traction to evert the bladder completely into the vagina where it could grasped with the surgeons other hand to prevent further trauma. A second surgeon could then visualise the entire tear and repaired this using a single layer of size zero PDS suture in a single continuous pattern. As soon as the bladder was repaired, it was replaced via the urethra. The mare did well after surgery and was discharged after 48 hours, apparently normal. This report is the first describing repair of the bladder without an abdominal incision or incision into the urethral <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. This greatly reduces the chance of possible complications such as urine pooling after surgery with the previously described standing technique or bladder trauma due to traction with abdominal surgery. PMID:21851726</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15650117"><span id="translatedtitle">New objective measures to quantify stress urinary incontinence in a novel durable animal model of intrinsic <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> deficiency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodríguez, Larissa V; Chen, Shinhong; Jack, Gregory S; de Almeida, Fernando; Lee, Kyo Won; Zhang, Rong</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>Existing animal models of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) are limited because of the low rate of incontinence seen in the animals and to their relatively low durability. In addition, most methods described to measure incontinence are operator-dependent. The aim of this study was to develop a new durable animal model of SUI and establish objective measures to quantify SUI. We subjected female rats to transabdominal urethrolysis. At baseline and at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 wk after intervention, animals underwent cystometry and evaluation with abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP). Urethral resistance was evaluated by retrograde urethral perfusion pressure (RUPP). Tissues were obtained for histology and immunohistochemistry. Normal female rats had an average ALPP of 19.4 cmH2O and RUPP of 22.6 cmH2O at baseline. More than 93% of the animals had significantly decreased ALPP and RUPP after the procedure. The mean ALPP and RUPP decreased to 9.8 cmH2O and 11.2 cmH2O, respectively, by 1 wk after urethrolysis. These changes were maintained for up to 24 wk. Changes seen in urethral resistance and ALPP appear to be mediated by apoptosis, decreased neuronal mass, and smooth muscle atrophy. These results indicate that transabdominal urethrolysis is a reliable method of achieving durable decreased urethral resistance in a SUI model. RUPP and ALPP are objective and reproducible methods of assessing urethral resistance. Changes in continence and urethral resistance appear to be mediated by denervation and smooth muscle atrophy, which are seen in both elderly incontinent patients and in patients with intrinsic <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> dysfunction. PMID:15650117</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29515033"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus: case report and review of the literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>I Potasman; H M Bassan</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare complication that appears to occur in patients receiving corticosteroid therapy. A case is presented with sequential bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon and unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a patellar tendon. Six more published cases are reviewed. Tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in SLE has affected both males and females between the ages of 24 and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~kbolsen/PUBL_dir/2012GL053005.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Small intermediate fault segments can either aid or hinder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation at stepovers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Olsen, Kim Bak</p> <p></p> <p>Small intermediate fault segments can either aid or hinder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation at stepovers Julian complexities along faults are known to be likely endpoints for coseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as sug- gested by analysis of historic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and corroborated by models of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on bent or discontinuous faults. However, natural</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60334882"><span id="translatedtitle">Analyses and correlations of HAPO <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experience with natural uranium material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>R. R. Bloomstrand; W. I. Neef</p> <p>1958-01-01</p> <p>One of the major factors restricting reactor power levels is the incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> slugs. The primary purpose in studying <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is to determine how reactor operating variables affect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rates. With this knowledge reactor operating conditions may be adjusted or controlled in the manner that will optimize reactor production. In addition, knowledge of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate relationships are useful in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28255624"><span id="translatedtitle">Cost-effectiveness of screening for <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous intraepithelial lesions and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer in human immunodeficiency virus–negative homosexual and bisexual men</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Sue J Goldie; Karen M Kuntz; Milton C Weinstein; Kenneth A Freedberg; Joel M Palefsky</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>PURPOSE: Homosexual and bisexual men are at an increased risk for human papillomavirus–induced squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer of the anus. Our objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of screening for <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous intraepithelial lesions in these high-risk patients.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A Markov model was developed to evaluate alternative screening strategies using <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology in a hypothetical cohort of homosexual</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30837843"><span id="translatedtitle">The value of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology and human papillomavirus typing in the detection of <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia: a review of cases from an anoscopy clinic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>P A Fox; J E Seet; J Stebbing; N Francis; S E Barton; S Strauss; T G Allen-Mersh; B G Gazzard; M Bower</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Background: Previous studies have reached differing conclusions about the utility of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cytology as a screening tool for <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). There is a need also to establish whether HPV typing offers a useful adjunct to screening.Methods: We analysed data from 99 consecutive homosexual\\/bisexual male patients (89 HIV-1 positive) who underwent high resolution anoscopy. Follow up visits for these</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30850227"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> squamous intraepithelial lesions among HIV positive and HIV negative men who have sex with men in Thailand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. H. Li; N. Phanuphak; V. V. Sahasrabuddhe; S. Chaithongwongwatthana; S. H. Vermund; C. A. Jenkins; B. E. Shepherd; N. Teeratakulpisarn; J. van der Lugt; A. Avihingsanon; K. Ruxrungtham; C. Shikuma; P. Phanuphak; J. Ananworanich</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL), the putative <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer precursor, in Asian HIV positive and HIV negative men who have sex with men (MSM).|Men who underwent <span class="hlt">anal</span> Pap smear reported clinical, sociodemographic and behavioural information collected through questionnaire and interview between January 2007 and April 2008. Chi(2) and logistic regression were used</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26060612"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute Patellar Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien; Suh, Jeung Tak</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, there are few reports on patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18345441"><span id="translatedtitle">Early surgery for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms: technical note.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sillero, Rafael de Oliveira; Sillero Filho, Valter José; Freire, Sylvio de Barros; Sillero, Valter José</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>We describe a collection of techniques to be considered in the early clipping of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms located in the anterior circulation when dealing with the swollen red and scaring brain many times found after craniotomy. PMID:18345441</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4304499"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed presentation of traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with complicated cholecystitis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chun, Jae Min</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The right-sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is often clinically occulted due to buffering effects of the liver and thus, erroneous diagnosis of such <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may result in life-threatening conditions. A 44-year-old female who had a history of car accident in 2006 was admitted to our hospital for pleuritic pain. On the chest computed tomography, she was diagnosed with diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> accompanied by herniation of hypertrophic left liver with complicated cholecystitis and we carried out cholecystectomy, reduction of the liver, pleural drainage, and primary closure of the diaphragm via thoracic approaches. Our case is presented in three unique aspects: herniation of left hemiliver, hypertrophic liver herniated up to the 4th rib level, and combination of complicated cholecystitis. Although the diagnosis of right-sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be challenging for the surgeon, an early diagnosis can prevent further complications on the clinical presentation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/59743"><span id="translatedtitle">Controls on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Llenos, Andrea Lesley</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Large earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4458483"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute Patellar Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, there are few reports on patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320801"><span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R.; Salzler, Gregory G.; Creasy, John M.; Robitsek, R. Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case. PMID:25688323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19680000344&hterms=tantalum+rhenium+alloy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtantalum%2Brhenium%2Balloy"><span id="translatedtitle">Nickel base alloy with improved stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Collins, H. E.; Quigg, R. J.</p> <p>1968-01-01</p> <p>Nickel base superalloy with improved stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties is used for jet aircraft turbine blades. This alloy is capable of maintaining its strength and its creep, oxidation, and thermal fatigue resistance at high temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22668529"><span id="translatedtitle">Delayed and occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a diagnostic puzzle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Poiasina, E; Battaglia, L; Leo, E; Muscarà, C; Rampa, M; Vannelli, A</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common complaint encountered in emergency surgery. Trauma is the most common cause of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while non-traumatic or occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (OSR) is a rare condition. The differential diagnosis weighs on treatment that ranges between close monitoring, splenorrhaphy, splenic conservation and splenectomy. We report a case of an 63-year-old man presenting with acute atraumatic left upper quadrant pain. Preliminary diagnosis was subsequently determined to be a hematoma secondary to OSR. More accurate detailed history revealed a previous trauma, which occurred more than one year before and mimicked an OSR. Delayed and occult splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are as different diagnosis as different treatment. Even in emergency surgery, the key for a target therapeutic strategy should consider an accurate diagnostic time. PMID:22668529</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25688323"><span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R; Salzler, Gregory G; Creasy, John M; Robitsek, R Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case. PMID:25688323</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25583375"><span id="translatedtitle">Individual, partner, and partnership level correlates of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex among youth in Baltimore City.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hebert, Luciana E; Lilleston, Pamela S; Jennings, Jacky M; Sherman, Susan G</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex is an efficient mode of STI transmission and studies indicate that <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex is common among heterosexuals, including adolescents. We examined the association between individual, partner, and sexual partnership-level characteristics with <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex among a household survey of 263 individuals aged 15-24 years in Baltimore City, Maryland. We used weighted multiple logistic regression to examine correlates of <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex in a heterosexual partnership by gender. Twenty-nine percent of males and 15% of females reported <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex in a partnership in the past 6 months. For males, <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex was associated with having two or more partners in the past 3 months (AOR = 13.93, 95% CI 3.87-50.12), having been tested for HIV (AOR = 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.72), and oral sex with a partner (AOR = 8.79, 95% CI 1.94-39.78). For females, <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex was associated with reporting having a main partner (AOR = 6.74, 95% CI 1.74-23.65), partner meeting place (AOR = 3.03, 95% CI 1.04-8.82), partner history of STI (AOR = 0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.85), and oral sex with a partner (AOR = 8.47, 95% CI 1.08-66.25). <span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex was associated with inconsistent condom use for both males (OR = 5.77, 95% CI 1.68-19.79) and females (OR = 5.16, 95% CI 1.46-18.30). We conclude that <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex is a prevalent risk behavior among heterosexual youth and is associated with a range of factors at the individual and partnership levels. These findings provide support for comprehensive sex education that includes information about <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex; findings from this study can inform public health campaigns targeting youth at risk for STIs. PMID:25583375</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3935503"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural History of <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Human Papillomavirus Infection in Heterosexual Women and Risks Associated With Persistence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Ma, Yifei; Farhat, Sepideh; Jay, Julie; Hanson, Evelyn; Benningfield, Susanna; Jonte, Janet; Godwin-Medina, Cheryl; Wilson, Robert; Shiboski, Stephen</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background.?<span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer is more common in women than in men, yet little is known about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) in women. The objective was to examine the natural history of <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV in heterosexual women. Methods.?Young women participating in an HPV cohort study were seen at 4-month intervals for cervical and <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV testing. Time to clearance was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier approach; risks for persistence were assessed using Cox regression models. Results.?Seventy-five women (mean age, 23.5 ± 4.1 years) who tested positive for <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV were followed for a mean of 84.5 ± 44.9 months. By 3 years, 82.5% of <span class="hlt">anal</span> non-16 high-risk (HR) HPV, 82.6% of low-risk (LR) HPV, and 76.2% of HPV-16 infections had cleared. By 3 years, only 36.4% of women had become negative for all HPV types. In the multivariable model, concurrent cervical HPV-16 (P < .001), weekly alcohol use (P = .015), <span class="hlt">anal</span> touching during sex (P = .045), recent <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex (P = .04), and no condom use during <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex (P = .04) were associated with HPV-16 persistence. Greater number of new sex partners (P = .024) and condom use during vaginal sex (P = .003) were associated with clearance. Similar associations were found for clearance in all HR-HPV infections. Only concomitant cervical HPV was associated with non-16 HR-HPV persistence. Conclusions.?The majority of <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infections cleared within 3 years. HPV-16 infections were slower to clear than other HR-HPV infections, consistent with its role in <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer. Specific sexual behaviors were associated with persistence, suggesting that education and behavioral interventions may decrease persistence. PMID:24368624</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/230715"><span id="translatedtitle">Stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength of alloy 718</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)</p> <p>1996-03-01</p> <p>Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/c167202v38488351.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Esophageal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: triage using the systemic inflammatory response syndrome score</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Kouichi Furugaki; Junichi Yoshida; Koji Hokazono; Takuya Emoto; Jo Nakashima; Mayumi Ohyama; Toshiyuki Ishimitsu; Masahiro Shinohara; Kenichi Matsuo</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Esophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare entity. Delay in the diagnosis and treatment may threaten the patient’s life. The decision for\\u000a surgical or nonsurgical treatment, however, remains controversial because advocates of both treatments have reported comparable\\u000a results. To quantify the decision making, we suggest the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score for triage of\\u000a an esophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Using this criterion for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49576098"><span id="translatedtitle">FRP <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains in the split-disk test</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>J. F. Chen; S. Q. Li; L. A. Bisby; J. Ai</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The strengthening of concrete and concrete-filled steel columns by applying externally-bonded fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite jackets has become a popular retrofit technique. Failure of such FRP-wrapped columns is usually governed by <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the FRP in the hoop direction. Two common material test methods have been used to obtain the hoop strength and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strain of FRP composites used in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6548382"><span id="translatedtitle">Acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: early stent-graft repair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M. Lachat; T. Pfammatter; H. Witzke; E. Bernard; U. Wolfensberger; A. Künzli; M. Turina</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Prospective evaluation of early stent-graft repair of acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Methods: Twelve patients with acute traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending aorta, out of a series of 337 endovascular aortic procedures, were treated by implantation of self-expanding stent-grafts. The procedures were performed within a mean post-injury time-period of 5±7 days (median: 1 day). The feasibility of stent-grafting was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31443453"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from blunt thoracic trauma in children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>M Ait Ali Slimane; F Becmeur; D Aubert; B Bachy; F Varlet; Y Chavrier; S Daoud; B Fremond; J. M Guys; P de Lagausie; Y Aigrain; O Reinberg; P Sauvage</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Background\\/Purpose: Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in blunt thoracic trauma in children are rare. The aim of this study was to suggest the means of an early diagnosis and a conservative management as often as possible.Methods: Sixteen cases of tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> by blunt thoracic trauma were observed over 26 years in 9 regional pediatric centers.Results: There were 12 boys and 4 girls, from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40031702"><span id="translatedtitle">Aqueous solvents for extracting glanded cottonseed protein without gland <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>L. L. Muller; T. J. Jacks; T. P. Hensarling</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The presence of pigment glands has thwarted attempts to extract edible cottonseed protein aqueously from glanded seeds or\\u000a gland-rich meals, probably because of the widely held belief that glands <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on contact with aqueous media. We found several\\u000a aqueous salt solutions in which glands did not <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Glands remained intact in saturated (2m) sodium sulfate, but not in saturated 2m</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoJI.188.1141B"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracking unilateral earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by P-wave polarization analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bayer, B.; Kind, R.; Hoffmann, M.; Yuan, X.; Meier, T.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Rapid estimation of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation is essential to declare an early warning for tsunami-generating earthquakes. An increasing number of seismological methods have been developed to determine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> parameters, such as length, velocity and propagation direction, especially since the occurrence of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake that resulted in a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean region. Here, we present a new method to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in near real time by a polarization analysis of local and regional P phases that permits a faster determination of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties than using teleseismic records. The new technique has the capability to provide detailed information in less than 10 min. Originally, the method stems from a single-station earthquake location method and is expanded here to monitor P-phase polarization variations through time. As the earthquake source moves away from the hypocentre, the backazimuth of an incoming P phase is expected to change accordingly. With polarization analysis we may be able to monitor the temporal change in P-wave backazimuth to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in near real time. Three component P phases are scanned to determine the azimuthal variation as a function of time. The backazimuth of a moving <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front is determined by the first eigenvector of the covariance matrix. The linearity of the particle motion is used as a measure of the quality of the data. Seismic stations at local and regional distances (?) are used. We tested the new method with a theoretical simulation and observed seismograms of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (2004 December 26, Mw= 9.3), and we were able to follow the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the first 200 s. For larger <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, stations at more than 30° epicentral distances would be required. The method is also successfully applied to the Wenchuan earthquake (2008 May 12, Mw= 8.0).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26015380"><span id="translatedtitle">[Analysis of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> during Follow-up of Unruptured Aneurysm].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koyama, Shinya; Inoue, Mizuho; Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p><i>Object</i>:To elucidate clinical aspects of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms, we retrospectively investigated associations between risk factors and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured cases during conservative management. <i>Methods</i>:Two hundred and twenty-nine patients with 291 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated between 2000 and 2012 were analyzed. Mean duration of observation was 62 months(1183.4 person-years). We investigated the following six risk factors: history of subarachnoid hemorrhage;multiplicity;location of aneurysms;aneurysm size ?5mm;bleb or irregular forms;and follow-up period <1 year. <i>Results</i>:Twenty-two aneurysms in 22 patients(19 women;86.4%)<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> during this study. The annual rate of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 1.86%. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cases, mean age was 66.7 years. According to univariate analysis, aneurysm size?5mm(<i>p</i>=0.000), bleb or irregular form(<i>p</i>=0.006)and duration of observation<1 year(<i>p</i>=0.000)were significantly associated with aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In multivariate analysis of these factors, aneurysm size?5mm(<i>p</i>=0.0188;odds ratio(OR), 3.4;95% confidence interval(CI), 1.2-9.7)and duration of observation<1 year(<i>p</i>=0.006;OR, 5.0;95% CI, 1.6-14.9)represented independent risk factors for aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. <i>Conclusions</i>:The results of this study were almost the same as those of the UCAS Japan study. In addition, duration of observation <1 year was a risk factor for aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. When we decide on surgical treatment after considering factors such as aneurysm size, form, and surgical risk, surgery should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:26015380</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24913124"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> warts (condylomata acuminata) - current issues and treatment modalities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Leszczyszyn, Jaros?aw; ?ebski, Igor; ?ysenko, Lidia; Hirnle, Lidia; Gerber, Hanna</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>HPV infections are currently the most frequent cause of genital infections in the USA. Risk factors are early onset of sexual activity, multiple sexual partners, a history STDs, an early age of first pregnancy and tobacco use. In the past, HPV viruses were thought to be STDs, but it is now known that penetration is not necessary. Skin-to-skin or mucosa-to-mucosa contact is enough to transmit the virus, which presents high tropism for those tissues. The Papillomaviridae family includes over 120 viruses, some of which have high malignant transformation rates. The most common malignancy connected to HPV is uterine cervix cancer and <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal cancer. The range of morphology of perianal lesions means that a thorough clinical examination is required, including an anoscopy. Therapeutic modalities often seek to eliminate macroscopic changes rather than focus on the cause of the infection, which leads to a high recurrence rate. Externally located changes can be eliminated with patient-applied treatments. Those located in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal and distal end of the rectal ampulla require treatment by a qualified medical provider. Due to the high recurrence rate after standard treatment, special attention has been given to vaccinations. The polyvalent vaccine includes HPV viruses with both low and high malignant transformation risk. This has led to a decrease in the rate of malignancies. PMID:24913124</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19265621"><span id="translatedtitle">Intra-<span class="hlt">anal</span> condyloma: surgical or topical treatment?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dianzani, Caterina; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Avola, Alessandra; Borzomati, Domenico; Persichetti, Paolo; Degener, Anna Marta</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Human Papillomavirus infections are the strongest risk factors for genital cancer and are the causative agents of anogenital warts. Although the viral types associated with condylomata usually do not cause carcinoma, in women with a history of these lesions there is an increased risk of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. Generally the lesions are not life-threatening, but they provoke significant morbidity, are difficult to treat, and are a source of psychosocial stress. Thus, condylomata represent not only a health problem for the patient but also an economic burden for the society. Considering the individual episodes of care, men experience a longer duration of the lesions and incur greater costs than women. We report a case of a male patient with external and intra-<span class="hlt">anal</span> condyloma resistant to laser therapy. Initially, surgical intervention appeared required because of florid and intra-<span class="hlt">anal</span> growth. HPV DNA testing and sequencing revealed the presence of HPV 6. After initial discomfort, the lesions were successfully cleared with topical imiquimod 5 percent cream therapy. PMID:19265621</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21766204"><span id="translatedtitle">[Ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremity in the elderly].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Herbort, M; Raschke, M J</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>There is an increasing incidence of ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremities in older patients. This higher incidence is caused by the typical current demographic changes in the population and the higher level of activity and athletic motivation of the older people in our society. In this review we address the most important ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the lower extremity in the old patient. Quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are mostly the result of degenerative and abrasion changes. The ACL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the other hand occurs spontaneously after adequate trauma and without former degenerative changes especially in highly active patients. For a differentiated treatment of the older patient with tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, secondary diseases, an increased risk and complication profile and a potentially decreased compliance during rehabilitation must be taken into consideration before indicating operative or conservative therapy. There are no strict age-related limitations for indication of an operative treatment of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the older patient. In this patient group a differentiated treatment decision is recommended. PMID:21766204</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005APS..MARW37001M"><span id="translatedtitle">Volume Fraction Dependence of Droplet <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span> in Concentrated Nanoemulsions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meleson, K.</p> <p>2005-03-01</p> <p>We investigate droplet <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> by extreme shear in concentrated silicone oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. According to Taylor's prediction for dilute emulsions, the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplet radius, a, varies inversely with the viscosity of the continuous phase. If one assumes that the emulsion's effective viscosity controls the average radius of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplets, then emulsions that have larger droplet volume fractions, ?s would be <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> by the same shear flow to smaller radii. In stark contrast to this, we find that the average droplet radius actually rises with as ? approaches the quiescent maximally random jammed value of 0.64. This is evidence that both droplet <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> and coalescence occur when concentrated emulsions are subjected to extreme shear. We have also observed phase inversion to an oil-continuous emulsion for ? > 0.64. This supports the idea that coalescence occurs as the driving shear breaks thin films between the concentrated oil droplets at high ?. In addition, we find that the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> droplet size is relatively insensitive to large changes in the oil viscosity inside the droplets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6394169"><span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for Tantalum alloy T-3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stephens, J.J.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTG's near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to {approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5814124"><span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stephens, J.J. (Division 1832 Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (US))</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to {similar to}2{times}10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.aboutconstipation.org/site/about-constipation/normal-function"><span id="translatedtitle">Normal Function of the Colon and Anorectal Area</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... promoted by contraction of the internal and external <span class="hlt">anal</span> <span class="hlt">sphincters</span>. Anatomy of the Rectum and <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Canal The urge to defecate is signaled by ... of the rectum causes relaxation of the internal <span class="hlt">anal</span> <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>. For defecation to proceed, the external <span class="hlt">anal</span> ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48048399"><span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: an unusual case and a review of the literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>A. Jalgaonkar; A. Rafee; O. Haddo; S. Sarkar</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon is very rare. There are only two case reports\\u000a in English literature. We report the case of a healthy 41-year-old female with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of her left quadriceps\\u000a tendon and right patellar tendon. There were no known precipitating factors for this injury. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation\\u000a achieved satisfactory outcome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40448876"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism of the October 1, 1995 ( M w=6.2) Dinar earthquake, SW Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>H. Koral</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>A moderate earthquake (Mw=6.2) caused substantial damage in the town of Dinar at 17:57 UT, on October 1, 1995. Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been observed to be discontinuous for 10km along the NW-trending Dinar fault segments. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has consisted of nearly vertical cracks up to several tens of meters long and a meter wide that display linear, sigmoidal and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2900591"><span id="translatedtitle">Carotid Atheroma <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Observed In Vivo and FSI-Predicted Stress Distribution Based on Pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Saloner, David</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation is a major risk factor for stroke. As mechanical forces may impact lesion stability, finite element studies have been conducted on models of diseased vessels to elucidate the effects of lesion characteristics on the stresses within plaque materials. It is hoped that patient-specific biomechanical analyses may serve clinically to assess the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential for any particular lesion, allowing better stratification of patients into the most appropriate treatments. Due to a sparsity of in vivo plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data, the relationship between various mechanical descriptors such as stresses or strains and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vulnerability is incompletely known, and the patient-specific utility of biomechanical analyses is unclear. In this article, we present a comparison between carotid atheroma <span class="hlt">rupture</span> observed in vivo and the plaque stress distribution from fluid–structure interaction analysis based on pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> medical imaging. The effects of image resolution are explored and the calculated stress fields are shown to vary by as much as 50% with sub-pixel geometric uncertainty. Within these bounds, we find a region of pronounced elevation in stress within the fibrous plaque layer of the lesion with a location and extent corresponding to that of the observed site of plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:20232151</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8880628"><span id="translatedtitle">Antepartum surveillance in preterm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vintzileos, A M</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this presentation is to describe noninvasive techniques of antepartum fetal assessment which allow the differentiation of fetuses who will benefit from remaining in-utero versus those who are at risk for intraamniotic infection and will benefit from your prompt delivery. The literature is reviewed in regard to the fetal biophysical profile, the effect of premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PROM), the usefulness of individual biophysical component in predicting intraamniotic infection (amniotic fluid volume, non-stress testing), the use of the fetal biophysical profile in improving pregnancy outcome, the relationships among umbilical artery velocimetry, fetal biophysical profile and intraamniotic infection and the mechanisms by which infection diminishes fetal biophysical activities in PROM. After reviewing our own as well as the published experience with the use of fetal biophysical assessment in patients with PROM, the following conclusions are suggested: a) most studies have shown strong correlation between abnormal biophysical assessment and infection outcome (maternal and/or neonatal infection) as well as intraamniotic infection, if there is frequent (i.e. daily) testing; and b) fetal biophysical tests (profiles, NSTs, amniotic fluid volume determinations) are quite reliable in predicting the well fetus who can safely remain in-utero and also the fetus who is at high risk for developing neonatal sepsis. A protocol for management of preterm PROM will be outlined based upon frequent (daily) fetal biophysical assessment. Although there are no controlled randomized trials to support that pregnancy outcome is improved by the use of frequent biophysical assessment, non-randomized studies as well as studies with historic controls suggest that the use of frequent biophysical assessment is beneficial in managing patients with PROM. PMID:8880628</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840020892&hterms=Richard+Unger&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DRichard%2BW.%2BUnger"><span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.hawaii.edu/hivandaids/Prevalence%20and%20Risk%20Factors%20for%20HPV%20Infection%20of%20the%20Anal%20Canal%20in%20HIV-Positive%20and%20HIV-Negative%20Homosexual%20Men%20.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Papillomavirus Infection of the <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Canal in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)?Positive and HIV?Negative Homosexual Men</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Naomi Jay</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>One of the groups at highest risk of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer is homosexual and bisexual men. Like cervical cancer, <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> HPV infection was characterized in a study of 346 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) - positive and 262 HIV- negative homosexual and bisexual men. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> HPV DNA was detected in 93% of HIV-positive</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4448049"><span id="translatedtitle">Early Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Canal Resected by Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tamaru, Yuzuru; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Ninomiya, Yuki; Asayama, Naoki; Shigita, Kenjiro; Nishiyama, Soki; Hayashi, Nana; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The standard treatment approach for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal includes abdominoperineal resection and chemoradiotherapy. However, there are currently very few reports of early SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). We report 2 rare cases of SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal resected by ESD. In case 1, a 66-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to blood in her stool, and an elevated lesion, 15 mm in size, was identified from the rectum to the dentate line of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal on internal hemorrhoids. The lesion was diagnosed as an early SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. In case 2, a 71-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to constipation, and an elevated lesion, 25 mm in size, was identified from the dentate line to the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal. The lesion was diagnosed as early-stage SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. No complications or recurrence after ESD occurred in either case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034474"><span id="translatedtitle">Early squamous cell carcinoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tamaru, Yuzuru; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Ninomiya, Yuki; Asayama, Naoki; Shigita, Kenjiro; Nishiyama, Soki; Hayashi, Nana; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The standard treatment approach for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal includes abdominoperineal resection and chemoradiotherapy. However, there are currently very few reports of early SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). We report 2 rare cases of SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal resected by ESD. In case 1, a 66-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to blood in her stool, and an elevated lesion, 15 mm in size, was identified from the rectum to the dentate line of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal on internal hemorrhoids. The lesion was diagnosed as an early SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. In case 2, a 71-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to constipation, and an elevated lesion, 25 mm in size, was identified from the dentate line to the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal. The lesion was diagnosed as early-stage SCC of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. No complications or recurrence after ESD occurred in either case. PMID:26034474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24750339"><span id="translatedtitle">Initial prevalence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> human papilloma virus infection in liver transplant recipients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gr?t, Micha?; Gr?t, Karolina; Ho?ówko, Wac?aw; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Walter de Walthoffen, Szymon; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Kobry?, Konrad; Patkowski, Waldemar; Majewski, S?awomir; M?ynarczyk, Gra?yna; Krawczyk, Marek</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Although liver transplant recipients are at increased risk of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, limited data are available regarding the initial prevalence of <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection in this population. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> swabs collected from 50 liver transplant recipients within the first three postoperative weeks were subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of the four HPV genotypes: 6, 11, 16, and 18. Predictors of any, low-risk, and high-risk <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection were evaluated. Overall, the prevalence of any <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection was 18.0%, with the corresponding rates for high- and low-risk HPV genotypes being 8.0% and 10.0%, respectively. Infection with any type of <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV was higher in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (P = 0.027), ?3 sexual partners (P = 0.031), and alcoholic liver disease (P = 0.063). HBV infection was the only factor significantly associated with high-risk HPV infection (P = 0.038). Male sex (P = 0.050), age ?52 years (P = 0.016), ?30 sexual partners (P = 0.003), age at first intercourse ?18 years (P = 0.045), and time since first intercourse ?38 years (P = 0.012) were identified as predictors of low-risk HPV infection. These results indicate that HPV vaccination of liver transplant candidates and screening for <span class="hlt">anal</span> HPV infection in high-risk groups should be considered. PMID:24750339</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3843245"><span id="translatedtitle">Intimate Partner Violence and <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Intercourse among Young Adult Heterosexual Relationships</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hess, Kristen L.; Javanbakht, Marjan; Brown, Joelle M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Hsu, Paul; Gorbach, Pamina M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Context The prevalence of intimate partner violence and <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse is high in young adult relationships, but few have looked the intersection of the two. This paper considers this association within multiple intimate partner violence contexts. Methods Using wave 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, an analysis was completed on the association of physical and sexual intimate partner violence and <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse in relationships reported by young women. This wave was collected from 2001–2002 when the women were between 18 and 28 years old. A hierarchical random effects model was used to control for the clustered survey design and multiple relationships reported per participant. This analysis included 10,462 relationships reported by 6,280 women. Results In multivariate analysis, relationships where women perpetrated physical violence (AOR 1.9) and relationships that were reciprocally physically violent (AOR 1.7) were more likely to include <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse than non-abusive relationships. Among those that included <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse, relationships where the woman was a victim of physical violence (AOR 0.2) were less likely to have ever used a condom during <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. There was no association between sexual violence and condom use. Conclusion These analyses demonstrate that women in violent relationships may be at increased risk of sexually transmitted infections due to unprotected <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. More information on the context surrounding <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse and intimate partner violence is needed in order to understand the nuances of this association. PMID:23489852</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25369888"><span id="translatedtitle">Inconsistencies on U.S. Departments of Health Websites Regarding <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Use of the Female Condom.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, Kristina; Ventura-DiPersia, Christina; LeVasseur, Michael T; Kelvin, Elizabeth A</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The female condom (FC) is FDA approved to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections during vaginal intercourse, but not for use during <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. Studies suggest that a sizeable proportion of men who have sex with men use the FC for <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse despite lack of safety and efficacy information. We reviewed Department of Health (DOH) websites for U.S. states (n = 50) and major municipalities (population >500,000; n = 29) regarding <span class="hlt">anal</span> use of the FC. Forty-eight (60.8 %) websites mentioned the FC, of which only 21 (45.8 %) mentioned <span class="hlt">anal</span> use. Of those that mention <span class="hlt">anal</span> use, 8 (38.1 %) supported, 13 (61.9 %) were neutral, and 1 (4.8 %) discouraged this use. Ten websites (47.6 %) provided instructions for <span class="hlt">anal</span> use of the FC-ranging from removal of the inner ring, leaving the inner ring in place, and either option. In the absence of safety and efficacy data, U.S. DOH websites are providing different and often contradictory messages about the FC for <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex. PMID:25369888</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24264727"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anal</span> sex, vaginal sex and HIV risk among female sex workers in Papua New Guinea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Rawstorne, Patrick; Kupul, Martha; Worth, Heather; Shih, Patti; Man, Wing Young Nicola</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Female sex workers (FSW) are considered one of the key affected populations in Papua New Guinea at risk of acquiring HIV. An integrated bio-behavioral survey of sex workers in Port Moresby was conducted to determine the nature and extent of this risk. About half (51.1 %) of the 411 FSW who reported having any sexual intercourse with clients had engaged in both <span class="hlt">anal</span> and vaginal intercourse with clients in the last 6 months. In spite of having poorer HIV knowledge (OR95 % CI = 0.14-0.34), FSW who had <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse with clients were significantly more likely to have used a condom at the last vaginal intercourse with a client (OR95 % CI = 1.04-2.87). Similarly, FSW who had <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse with regular and casual partners were significantly more likely to have used a condom at the last vaginal intercourse. Those who engaged in both <span class="hlt">anal</span> and vaginal intercourse with clients had similar condom use for both vaginal and <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse, with the majority (78.1 %) using a condom at the last occasion for both vaginal and <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. These FSW may have different risk and protective factors that affect their use of condom during sexual intercourse. Further research is needed to investigate this difference between those who practice <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse and those who do not in order to provide evidence for better programming. PMID:24264727</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2679800"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlates of Heterosexual <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Intercourse Among At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Houck, Christopher D.; Brown, Larry K.; Doherty, Glenn; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Fernandez, M. Isabel; Pugatch, David; Schlenger, William E.; Silver, Barbara J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objectives. We sought to learn what factors are associated with <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse among adolescents and young adults. We examined demographic, behavioral, relationship context, attitudinal, substance use, and mental health correlates of recent heterosexual <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse among adolescents and young adults who reported engaging in recent unprotected sex. Methods. Among 1348 at-risk adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 21 years in 3 US cities, we assessed sexual risk behavior with each sexual partner in the past 90 days. Data were collected from 2000 to 2001. Results. Recent heterosexual <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse was reported by 16% of respondents. Females who engaged in <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse were more likely to be living with a sexual partner, to have had 2 or more partners, and to have experienced coerced intercourse. For males, only a sexual orientation other than heterosexual was a significant predictor of engaging in heterosexual <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse. Conclusions. Our findings document the prevalence of heterosexual <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse among adolescents and young adults who had recent unprotected sex. Among females, the variables associated with <span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse relate to the context and power balance of sexual relationships. Different influences for males and females suggest different foci for interventions. PMID:19008522</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1251324"><span id="translatedtitle">An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wolmark, N; Fisher, B</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that <span class="hlt">sphincter</span> preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resections. A patient undergoing <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing <span class="hlt">sphincter</span>-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection margins were less than 2 cm, 2-2.9 cm, or greater than or equal to 3 cm. If any trend was observed, it appeared that patients with smaller resection margins had a slightly prolonged survival (p = 0.10). This observation was present in spite of the fact that local recurrence as a first site of treatment failure was greater in the group with less than 2 cm that it was in the greater than or equal to 3 cm category, 22% versus 12%. This increased local recurrence rate in the population with smaller margins was not translated into an in crease in overall treatment failure and had absolutely no influence on survival. It is suggested that local recurrence serves as a marker of distant disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3532972</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3021316"><span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic-Morphologic Discriminants for Intracranial Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Tremmel, Markus; Ma, Ding; Mocco, J; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background and Purpose To identify significant morphologic and hemodynamic parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status using 3D angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods 119 IAs (38 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 81 unruptured) were analyzed from 3D angiographic images and CFD. Six morphologic and seven hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis identified area under the curve (AUC) and optimal thresholds separating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from unruptured aneurysms for each parameter. Significant parameters were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis in 3 predictive models—morphology only, hemodynamics only, and combined—to identify independent discriminants, and the AUC-ROC of the predicted probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status was compared among these models. Results Morphologic parameters (Size Ratio [SR], Undulation Index, Ellipticity Index, and Nonsphericity Index) and hemodynamic parameters (Average Wall Shear Stress [WSS], Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS, Low WSS Area, Average Oscillatory Shear Index [OSI], Number of Vortices, and Relative Resident Time) achieved statistical significance (p<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated SR to be the only independently significant factor in the morphology model (AUC=0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–0.91), whereas WSS and OSI were the only independently significant variables in the hemodynamics model (AUC=0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.93). The combined model retained all three variables, SR, WSS, and OSI (AUC=0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96). Conclusion All three models—morphological (based on SR), hemodynamic (based on WSS and OSI), and combined—discriminate IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status with high AUC values. Hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. PMID:21106956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090034483&hterms=Mechanics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DMechanics"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Lifting Philosophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASA-TRS&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070022369&hterms=Mechanics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DMechanics"><span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Lifing Philosophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/738173"><span id="translatedtitle">Conservative treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure: an unselected, retrospective and continuous study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shub, H A; Salvati, E P; Rubin, R J</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Three hundred and ninety-three patients who had <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissures were followed continuously for approximately five years. More than 44 per cent of them were cured nonsurgically within a four-to-eight-week period. There was an 8 per cent complication rate, consisting of abscesses and fistulas, necessitating surgical treatment. The recurrence rate following healing was 27 per cent, but a third of these patients had recurrent fistulas that healed in response to further conservative treatment. The authors feel that conservative treatment of <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure is justified unless there is advanced <span class="hlt">anal</span> stenosis. PMID:738173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/b4k2g8l36ju30574.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Modesty and recognition—a qualitative study of the lived experience of recovery from <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Julie Midtgaard; Mette Juel Hansen; Birgitte Grandjean</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background  <span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer is a rare disease within the cancer spectrum. Long-term disabilities are notable and place increased demands on\\u000a rehabilitation.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aim  The objective of this study was to describe the lived experiences of recovery from <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer, including which and how resources\\u000a may help survivors of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer to resist and to manage potentially complex stressors encountered in the recovery from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MARB19006B"><span id="translatedtitle">Planar spin-transfer device with dynamical polarizer and <span class="hlt">analizer</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Kravchenko, Anton</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>The behavior of the planar spin-transfer devices with monodomain magnetic layers can be described by the macrospin Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with spin-transfer terms. The LLG description of a device with two layers is simplified after applying the overdamped, large easy-plane anisotropy approximation. A decrease of the magnetic layer thickness asymmetry creates a transition from the conventional polarizer-<span class="hlt">analizer</span> (``fixed layer -- free layer'') operation regime to the regime of the nearly identical magnets. Here electric current leads to a ``Slonczewski windmill'' dynamic state, rather than producing the magnetic switching. The ``windmill'' precession state of a device with two free layers was investigated by numerical solution of the LLG equation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19329920"><span id="translatedtitle">An unusual late complication after SFA stenting: the artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chisci, E; De Donato, G; Setacci, F; Raucci, A; Giubbolini, M; Setacci, C</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>Peripheral artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a late complication of an endovascular stenting, due to the protrusion of a stent, has never been described in the literature in thigh arteries. Here we describe two anecdotic cases of artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting. In both cases the endovascular procedure was performed as a reintervention at 2 and 27 months after a failed surgical or hybrid procedure for limb revascularization. The stent had been delivered in the first part of the SFA and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred at the junction between the common femoral artery and SFA, which is one of the most flexible parts of the femoral artery. The cause of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was probably caused by an ulcer of the stent against the artery wall concomitant with a status of local or systemic infection. A huge pseudoaneurysm developed in both cases. The massive bleeding was stopped by an emergency surgical bypass, with the removal of the stented artery. These two cases show the possibility of SFA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after stenting. Previous surgical treatment, the site of stenting (first part of the SFA) and an active infection could predispose patients to this life-threatening complication. PMID:19329920</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495864"><span id="translatedtitle">Collagen type V polymorphism in spontaneous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galasso, Olimpio; Iaccino, Enrico; Gallelli, Luca; Perrotta, Ida; Conforti, Francesco; Donato, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Giorgio</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Spontaneous simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is associated with multiple medical conditions and pharmacological treatments; however, identifying prior risk factors is impossible in most cases. Achilles tendon and anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are associated with collagen, type V, alpha 1 (COL5A1) polymorphism. This genetic variant may be implicated quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The COL5A1 encodes the protein for pro-?1 chains of the low-abundance heterotrimeric type V collagen. In most noncartilaginous tissues, type V collagen is a quantitatively minor component of type I collagen that has been implicated in the regulation of the size and configuration of type I collagen fibrils. The functional significance of COL5A1 polymorphism in relation to type V collagen expression or activity has not been determined.This article describes a patient with COL5A1 polymorphism and spontaneous simultaneous quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. However, genetic and histologic studies performed on blood and tendon tissues and 3 consecutive sex- and age-matched controls showed a statistically significant reduction in collagen type V expression and an alteration in collagen structure in the tendon. These findings might explain the pathomechanisms of spontaneous tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> associated with COL5A1 polymorphism. PMID:22495864</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11381504"><span id="translatedtitle">Midcalf ultrasonography for the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sato, O; Kondoh, K; Iyori, K; Kimura, H</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Clinically significant and palpable enlargement of the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa is known as a Baker's cyst. Baker's cysts may <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, resulting in a swollen, painful leg that is clinically indistinguishable from acute deep vein thrombosis. For this reason, <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts are sometimes called pseudothrombophlebitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cysts, and to evaluate the role of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of this condition. The hospital records of 106 patients (43 men and 63 women) who were referred to the vascular surgical department at Saitama Medical Center with unilateral or bilateral swollen legs between June 1997 and June 2000 were reviewed retrospectively. The total number of affected limbs was 125, being 52 right legs and 73 left legs. Deep vein thrombosis was the most common cause of swollen legs, being diagnosed in 44.8%. No specific anatomical derangement was found in 39 limbs (31.2%), and these were defined as idiopathic. Lymphedema was also common, being diagnosed in 16 limbs. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Baker's cysts were observed in three limbs, with an incidence of 2.4%. In all of these patients, a large hypoechoic space was seen behind the calf muscles and this sonolucent area was easily detected by a conventional scanner, being pathognomonic of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Baker's cyst. PMID:11381504</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2443772"><span id="translatedtitle">Two Cases of Spontaneous Liver <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Literature Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cozzi, P. J.; Morris, D. L.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is uncommon, difficult to diagnose and carries a universally high mortality. It has been well documented to occur as a complication of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy. Similarly, there are 28 cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangiomata described in the world literature. It is also well described in severe pregnancy-induced hypertension and is said to carry a mortality of 18% for patients treated by packing and drainage of the haematoma and 75% for patients treated with liver resection. Two female patients aged 60 and 61 presented to our accident and emergency department. One had a history of hypertension only and the other a history of a bleeding diathesis from the lupus anticoagulant. Both presented with hypotension and abdominal pain and both were diagnosed by abdominal CT scan. One was treated with hepatic artery ligation and tamponade and the other with liver resection and correction of the coagulopathy. Neither had any evidence of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangioma or tumour at laparotomy or on histological examination, and both are alive and well. The conclusions to be drawn from this review and our own recent experience is that the treatment of choice for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> haemangiomata is liver resection and, for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy, is tamponade with packs and evacuation of the haematoma. Hepatic arteriography and embolisation, if possible, is a useful adjunct. Correction ofany coagulopathy is essential. We can only speculate that the aetiology in our patients was uncontrolled hypertension in one and coagulopathy in the other. PMID:8809590</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSeis..19..695A"><span id="translatedtitle">Maximum magnitude estimation considering the regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anbazhagan P.; Bajaj, Ketan; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The main objective of the paper is to develop a new method to estimate the maximum magnitude ( M max) considering the regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character. The proposed method has been explained in detail and examined for both intraplate and active regions. Seismotectonic data has been collected for both the regions, and seismic study area (SSA) map was generated for radii of 150, 300, and 500 km. The regional <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character was established by considering percentage fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (PFR), which is the ratio of subsurface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length (RLD) to total fault length (TFL). PFR is used to arrive RLD and is further used for the estimation of maximum magnitude for each seismic source. Maximum magnitude for both the regions was estimated and compared with the existing methods for determining M max values. The proposed method gives similar M max value irrespective of SSA radius and seismicity. Further seismicity parameters such as magnitude of completeness ( M c ), " a" and " b " parameters and maximum observed magnitude ( M {max/obs}) were determined for each SSA and used to estimate M max by considering all the existing methods. It is observed from the study that existing deterministic and probabilistic M max estimation methods are sensitive to SSA radius, M c , a and b parameters and M {max/obs} values. However, M max determined from the proposed method is a function of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> character instead of the seismicity parameters. It was also observed that intraplate region has less PFR when compared to active seismic region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003983.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Inflatable artificial <span class="hlt">sphincter</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... perineal sling. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap ... in children. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NIH-MEDLINEPLUS&redirectUrl=http://www.iffgd.org/site/gi-disorders/functional-gi-disorders/sod"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sphincter</span> of Oddi Dysfunction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Advocacy Activities, Legislative & Regulatory Research Leadership Code of Ethics Funding IFFGD Standards For Collaboration Industry Council GI ... x-rays and an endoscope that is passed down to the duodenum, where the bile duct and ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25741921"><span id="translatedtitle">[Neglected ipsilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of patellar and quadriceps tendon].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karahasano?lu, ?lker; Yolo?lu, Osman; Kerimo?lu, Servet; Turhan, Ahmet U?ur</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Neglected patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury, but ipsilateral simultaneous patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was not described in the literature to our knowledge. In this article, we report a 40-year-old healthy male patient with neglected ipsilateral patellar and quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> treated by peroneus longus tendon autograft. Patient had received some conservative and surgical treatments for patellar fracture before applying to our clinic. After our treatment using peroneus longus autograft and interference nails, patient was immobilized for six weeks in cylindrical cast. Flexion exercises and full weight bearing were started after cast removal. Patient had no complaint at postoperative second year. Patient was a neglected case. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation enabled us to achieve a satisfactory outcome. PMID:25741921</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986JNuM..141..486Y"><span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural observation on helium injected and creep <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> JPCA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yamamoto, N.; Shiraishi, H.; Kamitsubo, H.; Kohno, I.; Shikata, T.; Hishinuma, A.</p> <p>1986-11-01</p> <p>Detailed and quantitative TEM observation was performed on high temperature helium injected and creep <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> JPCA to seek the prominent TiC distribution developed for suppression of helium embrittlement. Three different preinjection treatments were adopted for changing the TiC distribution. Considerable degradation in creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength by helium occurred in solution-annealed specimens, although there was much less effect of other treatments which included aging prior to injection. The concentration of helium at grain boundaries and the promotion of precipitation by helium during injection were responsible for the degradation. Therefore, the presence of TiC precipitates before helium introduction will help prevent degradation. On the other hand, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> elongation was reduced by helium after all treatments, although helium trapping by TiC precipitates in the matrix was successfully achieved. Consequently, the combined use of several methods may be necessary for further suppression of helium embrittlement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4173840"><span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: An Uncommon Presentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mallon, Peter; Ganachaud, François; Malhaire, Caroline; Brunel, Raphael; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation. PMID:25289223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-STC&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10181223"><span id="translatedtitle">Engineering evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> strainer in Building 309</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Papenfuss, J.N.</p> <p>1982-10-01</p> <p>This report deals with the consequences of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer and is divided into two sections. Section 1 evaluates the engineering aspects of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer, investigates the events that culminated in the damage and considers factors that may have contributed to the incident. Recommendations are presented to upgrade the system in Building 309 by incorporating hardware changes and proposes a change in operating procedures. Section 2 utilizes the findings presented in Section 1 as a basis for conducting a review on the remainder of the 300 Area steam system, in order to identify similar problem areas. Corrective action recommendations to reduce the risk of repeating component <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from water hammer conditions were developed out of the survey and the associated review.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001APS..DFD.JJ013D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modes of Wetting-Suppression Lubricating Films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>dell'Aversana, Pasquale; Vetrano, Maria Rosaria; Neitzel, G. Paul</p> <p>2001-11-01</p> <p>The use of both thermocapillarity and forced convection to generate lubricating gas films capable of suppressing wetting of a solid by a liquid are now well known. The possibility of utilizing this phenomenon in potential applications such as bearings requires a knowledge of the mechanisms of film failure under load. Employing interferometry and high-speed digital photography, we have investigated film <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in various circumstances. Contrary to the chance behavior sometimes reported, the present observations indicate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode in many situations to be quite repeatable. In an attempt to explain the observed results, it is speculated that convective transport of surface electric charge increases the electrostatic attraction between the solid and some portions of the liquid surface, initiating film <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at these locations; previous work by Taylor and recent results seem to substantiate such a hypothesis. This, in turn, points to the possibility of managing the surface-charge distribution to control film stability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026333"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, Tim; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11828558"><span id="translatedtitle">Gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a diver due to rapid ascent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Petri, Nadan M; Vranjkovi?-Petri, Lena; Aras, Nebojsa; Druzijani?, Nikica</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>A 37-year-old, experienced female diver developed gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to rapid ascent from a depth of 37 meters. The incident was preceded by a heavy meal, intake of soda beverages, swallowing of air and water under water, and panic. Sharp abdominal pain was present immediately after surfacing and afterwards. Full abdominal distension developed within two hours after the ascent. No other diving-related pathology was found. Surgery was performed around three hours after the accident and revealed pneumoperitoneum, gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, gastric content in the abdomen cavity, and signs of acute peritonitis. On surgery, a 4-cm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the lesser curvature was found and sutured. The patient was discharged eight days after the event. PMID:11828558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2229970"><span id="translatedtitle">Flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> secondary to hamate hook fractures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Milek, M A; Boulas, H J</p> <p>1990-09-01</p> <p>Four patients with flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> secondary to hook of the hamate fracture are described. None of the patients had the diagnosis of fracture made before tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All patients were treated with excision of the fractured hook and tendon repair. The tendon repair was usually an end-to-side (Y junction) of the profundus of the small to the profundus of the ring finger. After operation, all patients were free of pain and returned to their preinjury activity levels, but most had some limitation of motion in the digit with the tendon repair. The complication of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> not uncommonly follows basilar hook of the hamate fractures. Treatment by excision of the fracture and end-to-side tendon repair produces satisfactory results. Range of motion after tendon repair seems to depend more on the patient's age and the amount of inflammation at the site of repair rather than on the method of tendon repair. PMID:2229970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2589064"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in infectious mononucleosis: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Asgari, M. M.; Begos, D. G.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM) occurring in 0.1-0.5 percent of patients with proven IM [1]. Although splenectomy has been advocated as the definitive therapy in the past, numerous recent reports have documented favorable outcomes with non-operative management. A review of the literature suggests that non-operative management can be successful if appropriate criteria, such as hemodynamic stability and transfusion requirements are applied in patient selection. We report the case of a 36 year old man with infectious mononucleosis who had a spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and who was successfully managed by splenectomy. Based on review of the literature, an approach to management of a spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to IM is suggested. PMID:9493849</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026874"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and comparison with other strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Haeussler, P.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Dawson, T.E.; Stenner, H.D.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Cinti, F.; Montone, P.; Sherrod, B.; Craw, P.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>On 3 November 2002, an M7.9 earthquake produced 340 km of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the Denali and two related faults in Alaska. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> proceeded from west to east and began with a 40-km-long break on a previously unknown thrust fault. Estimates of surface slip on this thrust are 3-6 m. Next came the principal surface break along ???218 km of the Denali fault. Right-lateral offsets averaged around 5 m and increased eastward to a maximum of nearly 9 m. The fault also <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> beneath the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, which withstood almost 6 m of lateral offset. Finally, slip turned southeastward onto the Totschunda fault. Right-lateral offsets are up to 3 m, and the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is about 76 km long. This three-part <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ranks among the longest strike-slip events of the past two centuries. The earthquake is typical when compared to other large earthquakes on major intracontinental strike-slip faults. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19630115"><span id="translatedtitle">Infiltrating adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Colvin, Marni; Delis, Aris; Bracamonte, Erika; Villar, Hugo; Leon, Luis R</p> <p>2009-07-28</p> <p>Primary neoplasms arising in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal are relatively unusual. In particular, adenomas and adenocarcinomas are distinctly rare entities in this region. We describe an infiltrating, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma from the distal <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, in an otherwise healthy patient at low risk for gastrointestinal malignancy. This is the case of an octogenarian man with a several year history of hemorrhoids and intermittent rectal bleeding, more recently complaining of continuous hematochezia. Examination revealed a blood-covered pedunculated mass with a long stalk protruding from the anus. The lesion was amputated at the bedside. Microscopic evaluation revealed an infiltrating well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, arising from a villous adenoma. This was further evaluated under anesthesia and complete excision of distal <span class="hlt">anal</span> tissue was performed. Our report is the first describing the possible malignant degeneration of a villous adenoma in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal. PMID:19630115</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2715986"><span id="translatedtitle">Infiltrating adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Colvin, Marni; Delis, Aris; Bracamonte, Erika; Villar, Hugo; Jr, Luis R Leon</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Primary neoplasms arising in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal are relatively unusual. In particular, adenomas and adenocarcinomas are distinctly rare entities in this region. We describe an infiltrating, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma arising in a villous adenoma from the distal <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal, in an otherwise healthy patient at low risk for gastrointestinal malignancy. This is the case of an octogenarian man with a several year history of hemorrhoids and intermittent rectal bleeding, more recently complaining of continuous hematochezia. Examination revealed a blood-covered pedunculated mass with a long stalk protruding from the anus. The lesion was amputated at the bedside. Microscopic evaluation revealed an infiltrating well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, arising from a villous adenoma. This was further evaluated under anesthesia and complete excision of distal <span class="hlt">anal</span> tissue was performed. Our report is the first describing the possible malignant degeneration of a villous adenoma in the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal. PMID:19630115</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=EPRINT&redirectUrl=http://www.stanford.edu/group/Zarelab/publinks/460.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">476 <span class="hlt">Anal</span>. Chem. 1883, 65, 476-481 Determination of Carbohydrates by Capillary Zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p>Zare, Richard N.</p> <p></p> <p>476 <span class="hlt">Anal</span>. Chem. 1883, 65, 476-481 Determination of Carbohydrates by Capillary Zone concernto manyresearchers.'-5 Carbohydrates are significant compounds that are difficult to analyzeby; however, the characteristic response signal is also low in sensitivity. Furthermore, carbohydrates</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4354600"><span id="translatedtitle">A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L.; Yang, Changhuei</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 ?m, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the <span class="hlt">anal</span> canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer. PMID:25780750</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4310132"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms. PMID:25657862</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S54C..06S"><span id="translatedtitle">3D Simulations of Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on Rough Faults</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Natural faults during their evolution stages manifest varying degrees of geometric complexities over a broad range of scales spanning from larger-scale features such as branching and segmentation to smaller-scale features such as topographic variations on the slip surface. At a microscopic scale, surface roughness affects the frictional properties through its role in the distribution and evolution of contact areas of the sliding surface. At a larger scale, the geometric irregularities of the fault affects the inter-seismic and post-seismic static stress distribution that is responsible for earthquake nucleation. Our study, however, focuses on the fundamental role that surface roughness plays in the dynamic processes of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and resultant ground motion using numerical simulations of 3D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. As have been shown in several previous 2D numerical studies, dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along rough fault surface can excite high-frequency radiation as they accelerate and decelerate from interaction with geometric irregularities. Also perturbation of local dynamic stress due to roughness contributes to the heterogeneous distributions of slip rate and slip over the entire fault. With the goal of producing more realistic physics-based dynamic ground motion, we perform 3D numerical simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along faults with self-similar roughness distribution of wavelength scales spanning three orders of magnitude (10^2 -10^5 m). We examine the influence of fault roughness characteristics (shortest wavelength and amplitude-to-wavelength ratio) on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior, the resultant ground motion pattern and the final slip pattern. The fault is governed by a rate-and-state friction with strongly velocity-weakening feature and the inelastic yielding of off-fault bulk material is subject to Drucker-Prager viscoplasticity. Initial investigations clearly indicate that the amount of high-frequency radiation generated and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties are heavily influenced by the roughness properties. Detailed analyses of our simulation results will be presented at the conference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S51D1765X"><span id="translatedtitle">Interaction Between Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> And Off-fault Brittle Damage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, S.; Ampuero, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Lyakhovsky, V.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The high stress concentration at the front of a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is expected to produce rock damage (reduction of elastic moduli) in the material surrounding the main fault plane. Off-fault yielding and energy absorption in the damage process should reduce the amplitude of the ground motion. However, the reduced elastic moduli in the damaged zone can amplify locally the motion and create a waveguide that may allow the motion to propagate with little geometric attenuation. In addition, the asymmetric damage generated in the in- plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode may produce bimaterial interfaces that can reduce the frictional dissipation and increase the radiation efficiency. Previous studies incorporated plastic yielding in simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (Andrews, 1975, 2005; Ben- Zion and Shi, 2005; Templeton et al., 2008) while keeping the elastic moduli unchanged. In this work we examine the dynamics of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and generated motion in a model consisting of a frictional fault in a medium governed by a continuum damage rheology that accounts for the evolution of elastic moduli (e.g. Lyakhovsky and Ben-Zion, 2008). We perform numerical simulations based on the Spectral Element Method to study how the parameters of the friction law, damage rheology and background stress control the rate of growth of the off-fault damage zone, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, the energy partition to various components, and the maximum slip rate and ground motion. We compare the peak motion generated with our damage model to results of analogous simulations using Coulomb plastic yielding. Off-fault damage is of special importance for <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along faults that separate rocks of different elastic properties, because they can generate asymmetric patterns of material degradation that might be observable in the field. We plan to perform simulations involving velocity-weakening friction and off-fault damage associated with pre-existing bimaterial faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3070915"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of Hemodynamic Characteristics and Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Weir, Jane; Putman, Christopher M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background and purpose Hemodynamic factors are thought to play an important role in the initiation, growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysms. This report describes a study of the associations between qualitative intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cerebral aneurysms. Methods 210 consecutive aneurysms were analyzed using patient-specific CFD simulations under pulsatile flow conditions. The aneurysms were classified into categories depending on the complexity and stability of the flow pattern, size of the impingement region, and inflow concentration by two blinded observers. A statistical analysis was then performed with respect to history of previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Inter-observer variability analysis was performed. Results <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> aneurysms were more likely to have complex flow patterns (83%, p<0.001), stable flow patterns (75%, p=0.0018), 66% concentrated inflow (66%, p=<0.0001), and small impingement regions (76%, p=0.0006) compared to unruptured aneurysms. Inter-observer variability analyses indicate that all the classifications performed are in very good agreement, i.e. well within the 95% confidence interval. Conclusions A qualitative hemodynamic analysis of cerebral aneurysms using image based patient-specific geometries has shown that concentrated inflow jets, small impingement regions, complex flow patterns, and unstable flow patterns are correlated with a clinical history of prior aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These qualitative measures provide a starting point for more sophisticated quantitative analysis aimed at assigning aneurysm risk of future <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These analyses highlight the potential for CFD to play an important role in the clinical determination of aneurysm risks. PMID:21051508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27..619A"><span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid Simulation of Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Seismic Wave Propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aochi, H.; Olsen, K. B.; Fukuyama, E.; Madariaga, R.</p> <p></p> <p>We have developed a hybrid method for flexible and efficient modeling of the entire earthquake process, from dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to the radiation in a hetero- geneous three-dimensional medium. The dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation is computed using the boundary integral equation method (BIEM), and the wave propagation out- side the fault is carried out by a fourth-order finite-difference method (FDM). Thus, our method combines the flexibility of the BIEM to compute spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on non-planar or multi-segmented fault geometries using a wide range of friction laws with the efficiency of the FDM to compute wave propagation in arbitrar- ily heterogeneous crustal models. The method has several important applications. The effects of fault segmentation and curvature on dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and its dynamic radiation can be analyzed in detail. The presence of any significant signature in ground motion patterns from dynamic effects for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on non-planar fault geometries can be used to develop guidelines to improve future kinematic (prescribed) simulations. In addition, the statistics of recurrent <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on multiple, arbitrarily-shaped fault systems can be computed and used to increase our knowledge of earthquake occurrence. Here, we present details of the implementation of the hybrid method and the interface between the BIEM and FDM. We also show preliminary results for hybrid simulations of the 1992 M7.3 Landers, California, and the 1999 M7.4 Izmit, Turkey, earthquakes. Both earthquakes were associated with complex fault geometry on vertical fault sys- tem in the simulations. For the two events, we compute the ground motion for different fault geometry models and compare synthetic seismograms to strong motion data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25529944"><span id="translatedtitle">[Pay attention to the functional protection during operation for benign <span class="hlt">anal</span> diseases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ding, Shuqing</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Benign anorectal diseases are common. Hemorrhoids, <span class="hlt">anal</span> fissure and <span class="hlt">anal</span> fistula are the top three of colorectal surgery for benign anrorectal clinical practice. Postoperative fecal incontinence or stool seepage has not yet got enough attention by specialists. This article elaborates on the clinical status, evaluation process, functional protection and treatment strategies etc. Following the continence protection principle requires specialists to focus on not only the disease itself but the patient-centered quality of life. PMID:25529944</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=SCIGOV-MAS&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28793772"><span id="translatedtitle">Mental Disorder and Psychologic Distress in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis After Ileal Pouch-<span class="hlt">Anal</span> Anastomosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p>Winfried Häuser; Karl-Heinz Janke; Andreas Stallmach</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>PURPOSE  The aim of this study was to determine if ileal pouch-<span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis in patients with ulcerative colitis is a psychologic burden for patients, the frequency of mental disorders, the amount of psychologic distress, and their possible disease-related determinants. These factors were studied in patients with ulcerative colitis after ileal pouch <span class="hlt">anal</span> anastomosis and were compared with ulcerative colitis patients without</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4462307"><span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arcagök, Baran Cengiz; Özdemir, Nihal; Tekin, Ay?e; Özcan, Rah?an; Eliçevik, Mehmet; ?enyüz, Osman Faruk; Çam, Halit; Celkan, Tiraje</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Afibrinogenemia is a rare bleeding disorder which is observed with an incidence of 1:1 000 000. It is an autosomal recessive disease and occurs as a result of mutation in one of the three genes which code the three polypeptide chains of fibrinogen. Basic clinical findings include spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma or due to surgery. Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in afibrinogenemia has been reported only in 6 cases so far. In this article, we present a 15-year old congenital afibrinogenemia patient with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25086901"><span id="translatedtitle">Prepatellar continuation <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Report of an unusual case.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Majeed, Haroon; dos Remedios, Ian; Datta, Praveen; Griffiths, David</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>In anatomical studies the deepest soft tissue layer, related to the deep rectus femoris tendinous fibers, has been described as the "prepatellar quadriceps continuation". We present an unusual case of an isolated prepatellar continuation <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which to our knowledge is the first described case in the literature. Injuries to the extensor mechanism may include isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the prepatellar continuation with intact quadriceps and patellar tendons. Diagnosis may be difficult with ultrasound scan and requires MRI scan for confirmation. Appropriate clinical assessment and regular physiotherapy lead to a full functional recovery. PMID:25086901</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25245048"><span id="translatedtitle">Diagnosis and management of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal mycotic pseudoaneurysm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dua, Anahita; Kuy, SreyRam; Desai, Sapan S; Kumar, Naveen; Heller, Jennifer; Lee, Cheong J</p> <p>2014-09-22</p> <p>Infected popliteal aneurysms are a rare but high-risk pathology that may present as a surgical emergency with acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and sepsis. Management of acute ischemia in the presence of systemic sepsis is challenging and requires timely diagnosis, rapid intervention, and multidisciplinary communication to ensure an optimum outcome for both life and limb in these patients. We report on a case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> mycotic popliteal artery aneurysm as a consequence of septic embolization from infective endocarditis managed by reverse saphenous vein bypass. The clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and approach to management along with a literature review on mycotic popliteal aneurysm are presented in this case report. PMID:25245048</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4127872"><span id="translatedtitle">Renal allograft transplant recipient with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hydatid native kidney</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965915"><span id="translatedtitle">Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Entrapment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jahollari, Artan; Sarac, Atilla; Ozal, Ertugrul</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Intra-aortic balloon pump is used frequently to support a failing myocardium in cardiac patients. Due to the invasive nature of this device, usage is accompanied by consistent risk of complications. Balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, although it occurs rarely, may lead to entrapment if diagnosis delays. A 78-year male who underwent cardiac surgery experienced balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and entrapment in the right femoral artery during the postoperative follow-up. Surgical extraction under local anesthesia was performed and the patient had an uneventful course. Fast and gentle solution of the problem is necessary to prevent further morbidity or mortality related to a retained balloon catheter in these delicate patients. PMID:24707435</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S41A0949I"><span id="translatedtitle">Multi-scale dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation on fractal patch model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ide, S.; Aochi, H.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>We carried out multi-scale full-dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations, using our new calculation scheme (Aochi and Ide, GRL, 2004) and a fractal patch model as an approximation of realistic heterogeneity. A basic assumption of this model is that a local slip weakening distance (or fracture energy) at a point is proportional to the size of the minimum asperity which includes that point. Since typical topography of fault surface obeys self-affine fractal statistics, we assumed that the asperity distribution is also represented by a power law. For simplicity we prepared seven different sizes of circular patches as discretized representation of asperities. When the patch radius increases by two, the number of patches decreases by four, where the fractal dimension is 2. The whole model space is a fault plane of 4096x4096 square grids, on which the circular patches are distributed randomly. This space is represented by four 64x64 subspaces on different scales and each subspace is connected to the subspaces on the larger and/or smaller scales by renormalization. The assumed values of initial, yield, and residual stresses are homogeneous across the fault plane. We begin each dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation with breaking one of the patches of the minimum level. In most cases, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> stops immediately after the initiation. Sometimes, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> coalesces with adjacent patches, propagates into a patch of next level. Frequency-size distribution of these events is approximated by a power law, which is explained by the probability of interaction between asperities. The probability of triggering of dense patch distribution is high and resultant slope of the power law is less steep. Whole <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is spontaneous based on exact elasto-dynamics and slip-weakening law except for the nucleation in the minimum level. Thus we observed very heterogeneous process during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front shape, slip distribution, and moment release functions. Some moment rate functions increase irregularly, which resemble to so-called initial phases observed in real seismic waves. We cannot distinguish small and large events from the initial rise of moment rate functions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=USGSPUBS&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20071437"><span id="translatedtitle">The Uniform California Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>California?s 35 million people live among some of the most active earthquake faults in the United States. Public safety demands credible assessments of the earthquake hazard to maintain appropriate building codes for safe construction and earthquake insurance for loss protection. Seismic hazard analysis begins with an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast?a model of probabilities that earthquakes of specified magnitudes, locations, and faulting types will occur during a specified time interval. This report describes a new earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forecast for California developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP 2007).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S31G..01T"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid Mapping of Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> from the South Napa Earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Rapid documentation (<1 day) of co-seismic surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location and slip is essential for scientific and emergency response. We demonstrate how social media (text messaging and Twitter) and the emerging 3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Preliminary observations of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> map to adjust their field deployment plans in an effort to capture rapidly-decaying postseismic movement. With social media and rapid, inexpensive data collection methods like SfM in mind, scientific response to future events has the potential to be more efficient and coordinated than ever before.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=NASAADS&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApSS..238...47A"><span id="translatedtitle">Force spectroscopy of covalent bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> versus protein extraction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Afrin, Rehana; Okazaki, Susumu; Ikai, Atsushi</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>Development of protein extraction and identification methods from a live cell surface using minimally invasive technology has an important implication as a possible tool to study time-dependent changes of the distribution of intrinsic membrane proteins in specific locals on the cell membrane. We have approached to this problem using an atomic force microscope mounted with a chemically modified probe with amino reactive covalent crosslinkers against amino groups on the membrane proteins. We discuss the probability of protein extraction versus covalent bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the experimentally observed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force in protein extraction. Possibility of protein unfolding by mechanical stretching during extraction from the cell surface is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3118014"><span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: A Case of Massive Hemoperitoneum Following Therapeutic Colonoscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Takekawa, Sarah; Furumoto, Nancy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Colonoscopies are usually regarded as safe procedures with low complication rates and are recommended for anyone over the age of fifty for colon cancer screening. Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare complication of colonoscopy with few reported cases in the English literature. We present the only reported case of such a complication in the state of Hawai‘i and the 44th reported case in the English literature. Physicians need to be more aware of the possibility of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following colonoscopy to avoid delay of diagnosis and treatment of this life-threatening complication. PMID:20535686</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4431401"><span id="translatedtitle">Human papillomavirus in <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT–RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT–RT for stage I–III <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PMC&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3975591"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of Saliva as a Lubricant in <span class="hlt">Anal</span> Sexual Practices Among Homosexual Men</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Butler, Lisa M.; Osmond, Dennis H.; Graves Jones, Alison; Martin, Jeffrey N.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objectives Compared with other sexually active adults, men who have sex with men (MSM) are more frequently infected with several pathogens including cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B virus, and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Because one common element between these organisms is their presence in saliva, we evaluated saliva exposure among MSM in a heretofore relatively unrecognized route—via use of saliva as a lubricant in <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex. Methods MSM in a San Francisco population–based cohort were interviewed regarding use of saliva by the insertive partner as a lubricant in various <span class="hlt">anal</span> sexual practices. Results Among 283 MSM, 87% used saliva as a lubricant in insertive or receptive penile–<span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse or fingering/fisting at some point during their lifetime; 31%–47% did so, depending upon the act, in the prior 6 months. Saliva use as a lubricant was more common among younger men and among HIV-infected men when with HIV-infected partners. Even among MSM following safe sex guidelines by avoiding unprotected penile–<span class="hlt">anal</span> intercourse, 26% had <span class="hlt">anal</span> exposure to saliva via use as a lubricant. Conclusions Among MSM, use of saliva as a lubricant is a common, but not ubiquitous, practice in <span class="hlt">anal</span> sex. The findings provide the rationale for formal investigation of whether saliva use in this way contributes to transmission of saliva-borne pathogens in MSM. PMID:19131893</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25987898"><span id="translatedtitle">Human papillomavirus in <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Anal</span> cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT-RT for stage I-III <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://www.science.gov/scigov/desktop/en/ostiblue/service/link/track?type=RESULT&searchId=topic-pages&collectionCode=PUBMED&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990810"><span id="translatedtitle">HPV and <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer in HIV-infected individuals: a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Mooij, Sofie H; Richel, Oliver; de Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>HIV infection is one of the strongest risk factors for <span class="hlt">anal</span> squamous cell cancer (ASCC). Most ASCC are caused by HPV, and most HPV-associated ASCC are caused by HPV-16. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> HPV infections are very common in men who have sex with men (MSM), and nearly universal among HIV-infected MSM. High-grade <span class="hlt">anal</span> intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor for ASCC, is present in about 30 % of HIV+ MSM, but neither the progression rate to ASCC nor the regression rate are known. The incidence rate of ASCC among HIV-infected people has risen in the first decade after cART became available, but appears to be plateauing recently. <span class="hlt">Anal</span> cytology has poor sensitivity and specificity. High resolution anoscopy (HRA) is advocated by some as a screening tool in high-risk groups, but is cumbersome and time-consuming and it is unknown whether HRA followed by treatment of HGAIN prevents ASCC. More research is needed on progression and regression rates of HGAIN, on effective therapy of HGAIN, and on biomarkers that predict HGAIN or <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancer. HPV vaccination and earlier start of cART may prevent most <span class="hlt">anal</span> cancers in the long run. 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