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Sample records for anal sphincter rupture

  1. Colorectal neurovasculature and anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, P; Ravo, B

    1988-12-01

    The varied blood supply of the colon and rectum has been described. It may be stated that the efficiency of any surgeon's hand is primarily dependent on the knowledge that guides it. Significant anatomic facts are described herein. An important blood supply to the terminal ileum comes from the generally unknown ileal artery, which, when absent, creates a critical, poorly vascularized area and thus an inappropriate area for an anastomosis. This right colic artery may be absent in 2 per cent. It may arise in common with the middle colic trunk (52 per cent). The middle colic artery is absent in 3 per cent. It occurs as a separate branch in 44 per cent and may be derived from celiac artery rarely. The inferior mesenteric artery divides into the left colic, which ascends to the splenic flexure, and a descending branch that continues downward as the superior rectal artery. The left colic artery may not reach the splenic flexure. The marginal artery may be interrupted or weakly represented at the splenic flexure. Therefore, one should perform a ligation of the left colic vessel before its bifurcation if the splenic flexure is to be preserved. The superior rectal artery is the main blood supply of the rectum. Its branching on the rectum is varied, but it has a rich anastomosis with the other rectal arteries, namely, the middle rectal and inferior rectal arteries. Sudeck's point is not critical. The middle rectal artery varies in number and origin and is not essential provided the inferior rectal artery is intact. The anatomy of the anal canal is described. The rectum is for a short distance surrounded by the anal canal with the external sphincter. The internal sphincter is the end of circular muscle of the rectum. The external sphincter can be thought of as one continuous muscle divided by longitudinal bands into three main parts: subcutaneous, superficial, and deep. Below the pectinate line in the anal canal, the nerve supply, lymphatic drainage, blood supply, and epithelium are different from that in the rectum. PMID:3194816

  2. [Study of the anal sphincter in children].

    PubMed

    Salov, P P; Zakharova, N S

    1991-01-01

    In dynamic study of the distal colon in children, the functional and electrophysiological methods of diagnosis developed and introduced by the authors: determination of anal reflex, electrosensitivity of the anal canal, musculocutaneous electrosensitivity, state of the genital nerve and its branches were used. The new methods of investigation permit to determine by the objective indices of the strength of the current and changes in pressure in the anal canal a state of the "sacral reflex arch" and neuromuscular apparatus of the external anal sphincter. In patients with constipation, a decrease in electrosensitivity and attenuation of reflex interconnection between the rectum and anal canal were noted. PMID:1942789

  3. Quantitative anal sphincter electromyography in primiparous women with anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, W. Thomas; Lou, Jau-Shin; Simmons, Kimberly; Clark, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether evidence of denervation/reinnervation of the external anal sphincter is associated with anal incontinence symptoms immediately after delivery. STUDY DESIGN After a first vaginal delivery, 42 women completed an anal incontinence questionnaire. They also underwent concentric needle electromyography of the external anal sphincter. For each subject, motor unit action potential and interference pattern parameters were determined. RESULTS For the motor unit action potential, no difference was observed between patients with and without anal incontinence symptoms (t-test). For the interference pattern, the amplitude/turn was greater in subjects with fecal urgency (318 48 [SD] ?V) and fecal incontinence (332 48 ?V), compared with those without fecal urgency (282 38 ?V) and fecal incontinence (286 41 ?V; P = .02, t-test). CONCLUSION In this group of postpartum women with mild anal incontinence symptoms, interference pattern analysis shows evidence of denervation and subsequent reinnervation. PMID:18455531

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells can improve anal pressures after anal sphincter injury?

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Levilester; Mayorga, Maritza; Damaser, Margot; Balog, Brian; Butler, Robert; Penn, Marc; Zutshi, Massarat

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fecal incontinence reduces the quality of life of many women but has no long-term cure. Research on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies has shown promising results. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate functional recovery after treatment with MSCs in two animal models of anal sphincter injury. Methods Seventy virgin female rats received a sphincterotomy (SP) to model episiotomy, a pudendal nerve crush (PNC) to model the nerve injuries of childbirth, a sham SP, or a sham PNC. Anal sphincter pressures and electromyography (EMG) were recorded after injury but before treatment and 10 days after injury. Twenty-four hours after injury, each animal received either 0.2 ml saline or 2 million MSCs labelled with green fluorescing protein (GFP) suspended in 0.2 ml saline, either intravenously (IV) into the tail vein or intramuscularly (IM) into the anal sphincter. Results MSCs delivered IV after SP resulted in a significant increase in resting anal sphincter pressure and peak pressure, as well as anal sphincter EMG amplitude and frequency 10 days after injury. MSCs delivered IM after SP resulted in a significant increase in resting anal sphincter pressure and anal sphincter EMG frequency but not amplitude. There was no improvement in anal sphincter pressure or EMG with in animals receiving MSCs after PNC. GFP-labelled cells were not found near the external anal sphincter in MSC-treated animals after SP. Conclusion MSC treatment resulted in significant improvement in anal pressures after SP but not after PNC, suggesting that MSCs could be utilized to facilitate recovery after anal sphincter injury. PMID:23147650

  5. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  6. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  7. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  8. [Preservation of the anal sphincter in low rectal lesions].

    PubMed

    Arthur, K E; Guerra, M

    1997-01-01

    We have discussed the surgical options to save the anorectal sphincter in lesions within the lower 2/3 of the rectum. We presented four clinical cases: two villous adenomas, one adenocarcinoma and one benign tumor, probably of embryonic origin. We discussed the surgical options in order to avoid a permanent colostomy. There is not a single surgical procedure that we can count on to preserve the anal sphincter, either in benign or malignant lesions. The surgeons treating this pathology should consider all options and be able to select the most adequate, the less complicated and yet be able to preserve continence. The surgeons should remember that in treating malignant lesions "a curative resection is worth a colostomy". PMID:9805095

  9. A rare case of leiomyoma of the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Fabiani, Bernardina; Naldini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leiomyoma is a benign tumour which derives from the smooth muscle fibres and it may occurs in every site in which this type of muscle is present. Among all benign soft tissue tumours it represents almost 3.8% and its pathogenesis remains still unknown. Presentation of case The present case is about a 62 year old woman referred to our centre complaining anal and perineal pain which increase after defecation in association with the appearance of a nodule in the perianal region fixed to the anal sphincter. A 360° tridimensional transanal ultrasound was performed and it showed an anterior nodular thickening of the internal anal sphincter. After an inconclusive preoperative biopsy and a counselling with the patient, the surgeons decided to proceed with the surgical excision. The immunohistochemical examination confirmed the preoperative suspicion of leiomyoma. At 1 year follow-up the patient had not tumour-related symptoms or fecal incontinence and any signs of local recurrence at ultrasound imaging were demonstrated. Discussion Leiomyomas are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy whereby surgery is the treatment of choice and it should be adequate to the site and dimension of the lesion achieving a complete resection with free margins. A further close follow-up is needed too. Conclusion Nowadays there is not a gold standard technique to treat such kind of lesions and the decision of the best surgical approach should depend on the dimension and site. In fact, surgery aims to the oncological outcome trying also to minimize the possible post-operative functional complications. PMID:27078867

  10. Fetal surgery for repair of myelomeningocele allows normal development of anal sphincter muscles in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Jyoji; Sbragia, Lourenco; Paek, Bettina W; Sydorak, Roman M; Yamazaki, Yoji; Harrison, Michael R; Farmer, Diana L

    2004-01-01

    One major problem for patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) is fecal incontinence. To prevent this problem, fetal surgery for repair of MMC has been recently undertaken. The strategy behind this surgery is to allow normal development of anal sphincter muscles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fetal surgery for repair of MMC allows normal development of anal sphincter muscles. Myelomeningocele was surgically created in fetal sheep at 75 days of gestation. At 100 days of gestation, fetal surgery for repair of the MMC lesion was performed. Three repair methods were used: standard neurosurgical repair (4 fetal sheep), covering the MMC lesion with Alloderm (2 fetal sheep), and covering the MMC lesion with Gore-Tex (2 fetal sheep). After the sheep were delivered (140 days of gestation), external and internal anal sphincter muscles were analyzed histopathologically. In control fetal sheep (not repaired) anal sphincter muscles did not develop normally. In contrast, in fetal sheep that underwent repair of the MMC, the external and internal anal sphincter muscles developed normally. Histopathologically, in the external sphincter muscles, muscle fibers were dense. In the internal sphincter muscles, endomysial spaces were small, myofibrils were numerous, and fascicular units were larger than those in unrepaired fetal sheep. There was no difference in muscle development for the repair methods. Fetal surgery for repair of MMC allows normal development of anal sphincter muscles. PMID:14689212

  11. Reinnervation of Urethral and Anal Sphincters With Femoral Motor Nerve to Pudendal Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Bernal, Raymond M.; Lamarre, Neil S.; Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lower motor neuron damage to sacral roots or nerves can result in incontinence and a flaccid urinary bladder. We showed bladder reinnervation after transfer of coccygeal to sacral ventral roots, and genitofemoral nerves (L1, 2 origin) to pelvic nerves. This study assesses the feasibility of urethral and anal sphincter reinnervation using transfer of motor branches of the femoral nerve (L2–4 origin) to pudendal nerves (S1, 2 origin) that innervate the urethral and anal sphincters in a canine model. Methods Sacral ventral roots were selected by their ability to stimulate bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter contraction and transected. Bilaterally, branches of the femoral nerve, specifically, nervus saphenous pars muscularis [Evans HE. Miller’s anatomy of the dog. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders; 1993], were transferred and end-to-end anastomosed to transected pudendal nerve branches in the perineum, then enclosed in unipolar nerve cuff electrodes with leads to implanted RF micro-stimulators. Results Nerve stimulation induced increased anal and urethral sphincter pressures in five of six transferred nerves. Retrograde neurotracing from the bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter using fluorogold, fast blue, and fluororuby, demonstrated urethral and anal sphincter labeled neurons in L2–4 cord segments (but not S1–3) in nerve transfer canines, consistent with rein-nervation by the transferred femoral nerve motor branches. Controls had labeled neurons only in S1–3 segments. Postmortem DiI and DiO labeling confirmed axonal regrowth across the nerve repair site. Conclusions These results show spinal cord reinnervation of urethral and anal sphincter targets after sacral ventral root transection and femoral nerve transfer (NT) to the denervated pudendal nerve. These surgical procedures may allow patients to regain continence. PMID:21953679

  12. Uninhibited anal sphincter relaxation syndrome. A new syndrome with report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1992-07-01

    I report a new syndrome, in four patients, all male. Patients ranged from 36 to 43 years of age. The main complaint was fecal urgency with occasional fecal soiling. Physical examination as well as pressure and EMG studies of anal sphincters and levator ani muscle were all normal. The only positive finding was an abnormal rectoinhibitory reflex. The external anal sphincter did not contract either reflexively or voluntarily on rectal distension, leaving the relaxing internal sphincter unprotected and uncontrolled. The patients could not oppose the urge to defecate if conditions are inopportune, with resulting urgency and occasional fecal soiling. The cause is unknown, but biofeedback effected improvement in all four cases. PMID:1500658

  13. Injectable silicone biomaterial for faecal incontinence due to internal anal sphincter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kenefick, N J; Vaizey, C J; Malouf, A J; Norton, C S; Marshall, M; Kamm, M A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A weak or disrupted internal anal sphincter can cause passive faecal incontinence. Conservative measures may help some patients but there is no simple surgical solution for those who fail conservative treatment. A successful technique using trans-sphincteric injection of a bulking agent to augment the internal anal sphincter was developed in a previous pilot study. Aim: To determine the clinical results and underlying physiological effects of biomaterial injection. Patients: Six patients (four males, median age 53 years (range 36–65)) with faecal incontinence to solid or liquid stool related to poor internal anal sphincter function, of varied aetiology, were recruited. Methods: Silicone based biomaterial injections were performed, under local anaesthesia, with antibiotic cover. Three injections were placed circumferentially, trans-sphincterically, entering away from the anal margin and injecting at or just above the dentate line. Anorectal physiological studies, endoanal ultrasound, a bowel symptom diary, a validated incontinence score, and quality of life questionnaires were completed before treatment and on completion of follow up. Results: At a median follow up of 18 months (range 15–19), five of six patients had marked symptom improvement. Faecal incontinence scores improved from a median of 14/24 (range 11–20) before to 8/24 (6–15) after injection. Short form-36 quality of life physical and social function scores improved from a median of 26/100 (5–33) to 79/100 (25–100) and from 10/100 (5–37) to 100/100 (50–100), respectively. There was a corresponding physiological increase in maximum anal resting and squeeze pressures. Ultrasound showed the Bioplastique to be retained in the correct position in the improved patients without migration. There were no complications. Conclusion: Trans-sphincteric injection of silicone biomaterial can provide a marked improvement in faecal incontinence related to a weak or disrupted internal anal sphincter. This is associated with improved sphincter function and quality of life. PMID:12117884

  14. Submucosal versus ligation excision haemorrhoidectomy: a comparison of anal sensation, anal sphincter manometry and postoperative pain and function.

    PubMed

    Roe, A M; Bartolo, D C; Vellacott, K D; Locke-Edmunds, J; Mortensen, N J

    1987-10-01

    Submucosal (SM) and ligation excision (LE) haemorrhoidectomy were compared to establish whether SM is a less painful procedure and whether anal sensation is better preserved by SM, and, if so, how this relates to postoperative function. There were 18 SM and 22 LE patients. Anal sphincter manometry and anal mucosal electrosensitivity were measured pre-operatively and 6 weeks after surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed by linear analogue scale. Anal sphincter pressures which were high pre-operatively fell to normal after surgery. Neither operation affected functional sphincter length or the recto-anal inhibitory reflex. Forty per cent of patients showed ultraslow waves on sphincter motility studies. These were associated with the highest pressures and in all but three cases disappeared after surgery. There were no differences in postoperative pain scores between the two techniques but there was a wide range from no pain to very severe pain in both groups. Submucosal haemorrhoidectomy preserved anal sensation better than ligation excision but this was not reflected in improved function. There was minor leakage and soiling in 50 per cent of patients from both groups and two SM and LE patients had initial faecal incontinence. All these symptoms had resolved by 6 weeks. PMID:3664229

  15. Thermal control of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters for complete implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Okuyama, Takeshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kamiyama, Takamichi; Nishi, Kotaro; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for the thermal control of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys. An artificial anal sphincter has been proposed by the authors to resolve problems of severe fecal incontinence in patients. The basic design of the artificial sphincter consists of two all-round shape memory alloy plates as the main functional parts, and heaters that are attached to the SMA plates for generating the thermal cycles required for the phase transformation accompanied shape changes of the plates. The SMA artificial sphincter could be fitted around intestines, performing an occlusion function at body temperature and a release function upon heating. Thermal compatibility of such prostheses is most important and is critical for practical use. Since a temperature rise of approximately 20 °C from body temperature is needed to activate a complete transformation of SMA plates, an earlier model of ours allowed only a short period of heating, resulting in incomplete evacuation. In this work, a thermal control approach using a temperature-responsive reed switch has been incorporated into the device to prevent the SMA plates from overheating. Then, with thermal insulation the artificial anal sphincter is expected to allow a long enough opening period for fecal continence; without any thermal impact to the surrounding tissues that would be in contact with the artificial sphincter. Thermal control was confirmed in both in vitro and in vivo experiments, suggesting the effectiveness of the present approach. The modified SMA artificial anal sphincter has been implanted into animal models for chronic experiments of up to 4 weeks, and has exhibited good performance by maintaining occlusion and release functions. At autopsy, no anomaly due to thermal impact was found on the surfaces of intestines that had been in contact with the artificial anal sphincter.

  16. Complete anal sphincter complex disruption from intercourse: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, S.O.; Samuels, L.; Bambury, I.; Cherian, C.J.; Christie, L.; Kulkarni, S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anal sphincter injuries are uncommon injuries outside of obstetric practice – but they may cause disastrous complications. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of complete anal sphincter disruption from anal intercourse in a 25 year old woman. Clinical management is presented and technical details of the repair are discussed. She had an uneventful post-operative course and good continence after 154 days of follow up. DISCUSSION This is one of a handful of reported cases of anal sphincter disruption secondary to anal intercourse. The established risk factors in this case included receptive anal intercourse coupled with alcohol use. We review the pertinent surgical principles that should be observed when repairing these injuries, including anatomically correct repair and appropriate suture choice. There is little evidence to support simultaneous faecal diversion for primary repair of acute perineal lacerations. CONCLUSION Acute post-coital sphincter injuries should be treated operatively on an emergent basis, without diversion because they are low energy injuries with minimal tissue loss and excellent blood supply. Although repair of each injury should be individualized, the majority of these injuries do not require concomitant protective colostomy creation. PMID:22940697

  17. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  18. Early effect of external beam radiation therapy on the anal sphincter: A study using anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.H.; Dreznik, Z.; Myerson, R.J.; Lacey, D.L.; Fry, R.D.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W. )

    1992-08-01

    The early of pelvic irradiation on the anal sphincter has not been previously investigated. This study prospectively evaluated the acute effect of preoperative radiation on anal function. Twenty patients with rectal carcinoma received 4,500 cGy of preoperative external beam radiation. The field of radiation included the sphincter in 10 patients and was delivered above the anorectal ring in 10 patients. Anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound were performed before and four weeks after radiotherapy. No significant difference in mean maximal squeeze or resting pressure was found after radiation therapy. An increase in mean minimal sensory threshold was significant. Histologic examination revealed minimal radiation changes at the distal margin in 8 of 10 patients who underwent low anterior resection and in 1 of 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection. The authors conclude that preoperative radiation therapy has minimal immediate effect on the anal sphincter and is not a major contributing factor to postoperative incontinence in patients after sphincter-saving operations for rectal cancer.

  19. Local transdermal delivery of phenylephrine to the anal sphincter muscle using microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Changyoon; Han, MeeRee; Min, Junghong; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jungho

    2014-01-01

    We propose pretreatment using microneedles to increase perianal skin permeability for locally targeted delivery of phenylephrine (PE), a drug that increases resting anal sphincter pressure to treat fecal incontinence. Microneedle patches were fabricated by micromolding poly-lactic-acid. Pre-treatment of human cadaver skin with microneedles increased PE delivery across the skin by up to 10-fold in vitro. In vivo delivery was assessed in rats receiving treatment with or without use of microneedles and with or without PE. Resting anal sphincter pressure was then measured over time using water-perfused anorectal manometry. For rats pretreated with microneedles, topical application of 30% PE gel rapidly increased the mean resting anal sphincter pressure from 7 ± 2 cm H2O to a peak value of 43 ± 17 cm H2O after 1 h, which was significantly greater than rats receiving PE gel without microneedle pretreatment. Additional safety studies showed that topically applied green fluorescent protein–expressing E. coli penetrated skin pierced with 23- and 26-gauge hypodermic needles, but E. coli was not detected in skin pretreated with microneedles, which suggests that microneedle-treated skin may not be especially susceptible to infection. In conclusion, this study demonstrates local transdermal delivery of PE to the anal sphincter muscle using microneedles, which may provide a novel treatment for fecal incontinence. PMID:21586307

  20. A concept of the anatomy of the anal sphincter mechanism and the physiology of defecation.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1987-12-01

    A review of the new concepts of the anatomy of the anal sphincter mechanism and the physiology of defecation is presented. The external sphincter is a triple-loop system; each loop can function as a separate sphincter through voluntary inhibition action and mechanical compression. Stress defecation resulting from internal sphincter damage is described. A new technique for repair of rectal incontinence is presented, which depends on inducing continence not only by mechanical compression, but also by voluntary inhibition. The mechanism of defecation and rectal continence is described and four types of incontinence presented. Also, the mechanism of both the levator dysfunction syndrome and prolapse is demonstrated and a technique of repair is presented. The study defines two types of rectal anomalies; suprahiatal and infrahiatal. The role of the embryonic anorectal sinus, anorectal band, and epithelial debris in the genesis of perirectal suppuration, chronic anal fissure, pruritus ani, and hemorrhoids is described. The communicating veins, identified between the hemorrhoidal and vesical plexuses, offer an explanation for the vague pathologic aspects of recurrent bacteriuria, urethral discharge, cervicitis, and vaginitis, and provide a proper line for their treatment. They also serve to perform a new radiographic technique--anal cystography--and to administer drugs, including chemotherapeutics, in the treatment of pelvic malignancies. PMID:3319451

  1. Experience with a new prosthetic anal sphincter in three coloproctological centres

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence is a common and severely disabling disorder. For patients with severe fecal incontinence, surgery may prove to be the only adequate treatment option. Methods This study reports on 43 patients that were treated with a prosthetic sphincter system between 2005 and 2009 in three coloproctological centres. Main Outcome Measures: complications, anal pressures before and after surgery, fecal continence score. Results The new artificial sphincter system significantly improves continence but leads to some complications in clinical practice. After implantation of the device, continence improved significantly (Keller & Jostarndt continence score 2.6 to 14.3 (P < 0.01)). With the band activated, resting pressure improved significantly as compared to baseline (10.7 mmHg vs. 66.1 mm Hg, P < 0.01). The same holds for anal sphincter squeeze pressure (32.2 mmHg versus 85.9 mm Hg, P < 0.01). Complications occurred in 21 patients (48.8%): 10 surgical and 13 technical. Two patients were affected by both technical and surgical problems. The median time of the occurrence was 3 months postop. In five patients difficulties arose within the first postoperative month leading to explantation of the device in three patients. 90% of complications occurred in the first year. Conclusions The soft anal band of AMI (AAS), a new artificial anal sphincter, improves severe anal incontinence, but it must be regarded as a last treatment option to avoid a stoma. PMID:24502440

  2. Biomechanical modeling of the rectum for the design of a novel artificial anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yan, Guozheng; Liu, Hua; Yang, Banghua; Zhao, Yujuan; Luo, Nianting

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses biomechanical issues that are related to the option of a novel artificial anal sphincter around the human rectum. The prosthesis consists of a compression cuff system inside and a reservoir cuff system outside, which is placed around the debilitated sphincter muscle. The micropump shifts fluid between the cuffs and thus takes over the expansion and compression function of the sphincter muscle. However, the human rectum is not a rigid pipe, and motion in it is further complicated by the fact that the bowel is susceptible to damage. With the goal of engineering a safe and reliable machine, the biomechanical properties of the in-vivo porcine rectum are studied and the tissue ischemia is analyzed. PMID:20715360

  3. Determining the shape of the turnsamplitude cloud during anal sphincter quantitative EMG

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, W. Thomas; Clark, Amanda L.; Simmons, Kimberly; Lou, Jau-Shin

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to compare our normative data for quantitative interference pattern (IP) analysis of the anal sphincter to previously published data. In 28 nulliparous women, we performed IP analysis during quantitative concentric needle electromyography (QEMG) of the anal sphincter. At each sampling site, a 500-ms epoch was analyzed. The data were log transformed. Linear regression lines (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated from the log transformed variables turnssecond and amplitudeturn. These confidence intervals were then transformed back into the original parameters to yield scatterplots with confidence curves. The mean turnssecond were 203 (SD 174). The mean amplitude (mcv)turn was 266 (SD 87). The regression coefficients for the log-transformed variables are constant=1.5, slope=0.3, and resultant cloud of raw data has a convex upper boundary. These appear slightly different than previously published reports, potentially influencing the determination of normal and abnormal studies. PMID:18250946

  4. Progressive systemic sclerosis of the internal anal sphincter leading to passive faecal incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, A F; Kamm, M A; Talbot, I C

    1994-01-01

    Two female patients aged 62 and 44 years with progressive systemic sclerosis and passive faecal incontinence are described. Both had the typical gut motility disorders of dysphagia, heartburn, and constipation. Anorectal physiology tests showed a low resting pressure in both and an absent rectoanal inhibitory reflex in one. In both patients anal endosonography showed a thin internal anal sphincter with changed reflectivity suggestive of fibrosis. In both patients anorectal sensation and pudendal nerve function were normal. Histological examination of the rectum in one patient showed collagenous replacement of the rectal muscularis propria with prominent atrophy of the musculature. This study suggests that the internal sphincter may be selectively affected by progressive systemic sclerosis, which may lead to passive faecal incontinence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8020821

  5. Incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries after training to protect the perineum: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Katariina; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Sandvik, Leiv; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in two time periods, before and after implementing a training programme for improved perineal support aimed at reducing the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. The secondary aim was to study incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in subgroups defined by risk factors for OASIS. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting University hospital setting in Oslo, Norway. Participants Two cohorts of all delivering women in the largest hospital in Norway during two time periods (2003–2005 and 2008–2010) were studied. After excluding caesarean sections and preterm deliveries (< week 32), the study population consisted of 31 709 deliveries, among which 907 women were identified with obstetric anal sphincter injury. Primary and secondary outcome measures Incidence of OASIS in two time periods. Maternal, obstetrical and foetal risk factors for OASIS were collected from the hospital obstetric database. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses, presenting adjusted ODs for OASIS, were performed. Results The OASIS incidence was significantly reduced by 50%, from 4% (591/14787) in the first time period to 1.9% (316/16 922) in the second. This reduction could not be explained by changes in population characteristics or OASIS risk factors during the study years. The reduction of incidence of OASIS between the two study periods was consistent across subgroups of women; regardless of parity, delivery method and infant birth weight. Conclusions A marked reduction in the incidence of OASIS was observed in all studied subgroups of women after implementing the training programme for perineal protection. Further, this reduction could not be explained by the differences in patient characteristics across the study period. These findings indicate that the training programme with improved perineal protection markedly reduced the risk of OASIS. PMID:23075573

  6. A novel artificial anal sphincter system in an in vitro and in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guo-Zheng; Liu, Hua; Jiang, Ping-Ping; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Yong-Bing; Ding, Zai-Xian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents some of the latest progress in the development of a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) to treat severe fecal incontinence. We have redesigned and integrated an intelligent, remote-controlled artificial anal sphincter based on biological signal feedback mechanisms. The device consists of an external telemetry unit, an internal artificial anal sphincter (IAAS), and a transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS). The mechanical medical micropump of the IAAS can realize bidirectional flow with a maximum flow rate of 8.5 ml/min and can build backpressure up to 170 kPa. The design of the prosthesis reduces occlusion pressure and allows for low inflation volumes (9 mL-10.5 mL); operating pressures between 4.05 kPa and 7.16 kPa indicate that the risk of ischemic injury to the bowel is minimal. Furthermore, the rechargeable battery based on TETS puts the operation time at an estimated 2 days. The performance characteristics of the AASS and its efficiency in achieving continence and sensing the stool inside the anorectum were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a pig model. Experimental results confirm that the system can maintain continence and build the sense of defecation successfully. Moreover, this innovation can be integrated into not only severe fecal incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and therapy-resistant reflux disease, but also morbid adiposity therapeutic AASS applications. PMID:24744170

  7. Electrical activity of the external anal sphincter at different ages in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Molander, M L; Frenckner, B

    1983-01-01

    In EMG recordings of the external anal sphincter there is a brief contraction in response to rapid rectal distension, and a preserved or increased activity during a prolonged substantial rectal distension in healthy adults. In order to determine if this activity develops during childhood 30 healthy children, aged 2 months to 15 years, were examined with their parents' consent. EMG of the external anal sphincter during rest and during rectal distension was performed. All those children who had gained voluntary anal control showed an EMG recording similar to the adults. The 10 youngest children who had not gained voluntary control showed another EMG pattern. Instead of a brief contraction they had a brief loss of activity in response to rectal distension. During a prolonged rectal distension the external sphincter activity decreased and finally ceased. An intermediate state was found in the two youngest children who had gained voluntary control. The EMG pattern showed a good correlation with the maturation and gain of voluntary control of defaecation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6826105

  8. Characterization of the α1-adrenoceptor subtype mediating contractions of the pig internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K A; Hausman, N; Chess-Williams, R

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The internal anal sphincter has been shown to contract in response to α1-adrenoceptor stimulation and therefore α1-adrenoceptor agonists may be useful in treating faecal incontinence. This study characterizes the α1-adrenoceptor subtype responsible for mediating contraction of the internal anal sphincter of the pig. Experimental approach: The potency of agonists and the affinities of several receptor subtype selective antagonists were determined on smooth muscle strips for the pig internal anal sphincter. Cumulative concentration–response curves were performed using phenylephrine and noradrenaline. Key results: The potency of the α1A-adrenoceptor selective agonist A61603 (pEC50=7.79±0.04) was 158-fold greater than that for noradrenaline (pEC50=5.59±0.02). Phenylephrine (pEC50=5.99±0.05) was 2.5-fold more potent than noradrenaline. The α1D-adrenoceptor selective antagonist BMY7378 caused rightward shifts of the concentration–response curves to phenylephrine and noradrenaline, yielding low affinity estimates of 6.59±0.15 and 6.33±0.13, respectively. Relatively high affinity estimates were obtained for the α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, RS100329 (9.01±0.14 and 9.06±0.22 with phenylephrine and noradrenaline, respectively) and 5-methylurapidil (8.51±0.10 and 8.31±0.10, respectively). Prazosin antagonized responses of the sphincter to phenylephrine and noradrenaline, yielding mean affinity estimates of 8.58±0.10 and 8.15±0.08, respectively. The Schild slope for prazosin with phenylephrine was equal to unity (1.01±0.24), however the Schild slope using noradrenaline was significantly less than unity (0.50±0.11, P<0.05). Conclusion and implications: The results suggest that contraction of circular smooth muscle from the pig internal anal sphincter is mediated via a population of adrenoceptors with the pharmacological characteristics of the α1A/L-adrenoceptor, most probably the α1L-adrenoceptor form of this receptor. PMID:18516067

  9. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied. PMID:24362899

  10. Urge incontinence of faeces is a marker of severe external anal sphincter dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gee, A S; Durdey, P

    1995-09-01

    A proportion of patients with faecal incontinence experience debilitating urgency of defaecation and urge incontinence. This study prospectively assessed 56 faecally incontinent patients by means of standard interview, physical examination and anorectal physiology. Patients with urge incontinence, when compared with those without urge incontinence, were symptomatically worse, had had more vaginal deliveries and had more bowel actions each day. Physiological tests included anal manometry, anal electrosensitivity, pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and a standard proctometrogram. The only physiological differences between the groups were a reduction in voluntary squeeze pressure (median (interquartile range (i.q.r.)) 43 (26-67) versus 67 (45-122) mmHg, P = 0.01) and a smaller percentage change in pressure-volume, an integral of sphincter length and squeeze (median (i.q.r.) 43.5 (0-289) versus 247 (71-455), P = 0.02), in those with urgency. The authors conclude that urge incontinence is associated with impairment of the striated musculature of the anal sphincter complex. PMID:7551990

  11. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm ; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar; Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  12. Automatic detection of motor unit innervation zones of the external anal sphincter by multichannel surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Khalil; Cescon, Corrado; Afsharipour, Babak; Merletti, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    A method to detect automatically the location of innervation zones (IZs) from 16-channel surface EMG (sEMG) recordings from the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle is presented in order to guide episiotomy during child delivery. The new algorithm (2DCorr) is applied to individual motor unit action potential (MUAP) templates and is based on bidimensional cross correlation between the interpolated image of each MUAP template and two images obtained by flipping upside-down (around a horizontal axis) and left-right (around a vertical axis) the original one. The method was tested on 640 simulated MUAP templates of the sphincter muscle and compared with previously developed algorithms (Radon Transform, RT; Template Match, TM). Experimental signals were detected from the EAS of 150 subjects using an intra-anal probe with 16 equally spaced circumferential electrodes. The results of the three algorithms were compared with the actual IZ location (simulated signal) and with IZ location provided by visual analysis (VA) (experimental signals). For simulated signals, the inter quartile error range (IQR) between the estimated and the actual locations of the IZ was 0.20, 0.23, 0.42, and 2.32 interelectrode distances (IED) for the VA, 2DCorr, RT and TM methods respectively. PMID:24948528

  13. Membrane hyperpolarization, cyclic nucleotide levels and relaxation in the guinea-pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, A. A.; Muir, T. C.

    1990-01-01

    1. Changes in membrane potential (measured with an intracellular microelectrode) and in cyclic nucleotide (adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate, cyclic AMP and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate, cyclic GMP) levels (measured by radioimmunoassay) in response to inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) field stimulation and drugs were investigated in the guinea-pig internal and anal sphincter (gpIAS) in the presence of phentolamine and atropine (each 10(-6) M). 2. Inhibitory NANC nerve stimulation (single pulse, 5 pulses at 5, 10 and 20 Hz, 0.5 ms supramaximal voltage) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP, 10(-7)-10(-3) M) inhibited spike discharge, hyperpolarized the membrane and relaxed the sphincter. The effects of inhibitory nerve stimulation were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10(-6) M) and, with those of ATP, were blocked by apamin (5 x 10(-6) M). 3. Isoprenaline (10(-9)-10(-4) M), cromakalim (10(-9)-10(-5) M), sodium nitroprusside (NaNP 10(-5) M), M&B 22948 (10(-4) M) and 8-bromocyclic GMP (8-Br-cyclic GMP, 10(-4) M) also inhibited spike discharge, hyperpolarized the membrane and relaxed the sphincter. The effects of isoprenaline were blocked by propranolol (10(-6) M). However, forskolin (10(-9)-10(-7) M), M&B 22948 (10(-9)-10(-5) M) and lower concentrations of NaNP (10(-9)-10(-6) M) relaxed the sphincter without affecting the membrane potential. 4. The characteristics of the membrane potential changes in response to different inhibitory stimuli in the gpIAS differed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1974160

  14. The Relationship of 3D Translabial Ultrasound Anal Sphincter Complex Measurements to Postpartum Anal and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine whether ASC measurements on translabial ultrasound (TL-US) were related to anal incontinence (AI) or fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms six months postpartum. Methods A prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent TL-US six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). Muscle thickness was measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions of the external sphincter (EAS), the same four quadrants of the internal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels, and at the bilateral pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Measurements were correlated to AI and FI on the Wexner Fecal Incontinence Scale, with sub-analyses by mode of delivery. The odds ratio (OR) of symptoms was calculated for every one millimeter increase in muscle thickness (E1MIT). Results 423 women (299 VB, 124 CD) had TL-US six months postpartum. Decreased AI risk was associated with thicker measurements at the 6 o’clock (OR 0.74 E1MIT) and 9 o’clock proximal IAS (OR 0.71 E1MIT) in the entire cohort. For CD women, thicker measurements of the 9 o’clock proximal IAS were associated with decreased risk of AI (OR 0.56 E1MIT) and thicker distal 6 o’clock IAS measurements were related to a decreased risk of FI (OR 0.37 E1MIT). For VB women, no sphincter measurements were significantly related to symptoms, but thicker PVM measurements were associated with increased risk of AI (right side OR 1.32 E1MIT; left side OR 1.21 E1MIT). Conclusions ASC anatomy is associated with AI and FI in certain locations; these locations varybased on the patient’s mode of delivery. PMID:26085463

  15. Influence of the duration of the second stage of labor on the likelihood of obstetric anal sphincter injury

    PubMed Central

    AIKEN, Catherine E.; AIKEN, Abigail R.; PRENTICE, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Duration of the second stage of labor has been suggested as an independent risk factor for clinically detectable obstetric anal sphincter injury in low-risk nulliparous women. Methods A retrospective 5-year cohort study in a UK obstetrics center including high-risk delivery unit and low-risk birthing center. 4831 nulliparous women with vertex-presenting, single, live-born infants at term were included. The cohort was stratified according to spontaneous or instrumental delivery. Binary logistic regression models were used to examine the association between duration of second stage and sphincter injury. Results 325 of 4831 women (6.7%) sustained sphincter injuries. In spontaneously delivering women, there was no association between duration of the second stage and the likelihood of sustaining sphincter injuries. Factors associated with increased likelihood of sustaining sphincter injury included older maternal age, higher birthweight and Southeast Asian ethnicity. By contrast, for women undergoing instrumental delivery, a longer second stage was associated with an increased sphincter injury risk of 6% per 15 minutes in the second stage of labor prior to delivery. Conclusions For spontaneous vaginal deliveries, duration of the second stage of labor is not an independent risk factor for obstetric anal sphincter injuries. The association between prolonged second stage and sphincter injury for instrumental deliveries is likely explained by the risk posed by the use of the instruments themselves or by delay in initiating instrumental assistance. Attempts to modify the duration of the second stage for prevention of sphincter injuries are unlikely to be beneficial and may be detrimental. PMID:25439012

  16. Automatic localisation of innervation zones: a simulation study of the external anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Gazzoni, Marco; Merletti, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Traumas of the innervation zone (IZ) of the external anal sphincter (EAS), e.g. during delivery, can promote the development of faecal incontinence. Recently developed probes allow high-resolution detection of EMG signals from the EAS. The analysis of pelvic floor muscles by surface EMG (in particular, the estimation of the location of the IZ) has potential applications in the diagnosis and investigation of the mechanisms of incontinence. An automatic method (based on matched filter approach) for the estimation of the IZ distribution of EAS from surface EMG is discussed and tested using an analytical model of generation of EMG signals from sphincter muscles. Simulations are performed varying length of the fibres, thickness of the mucosa, position of the motor units, and force level. Different distributions of IZs are simulated. The performance of the proposed method in the estimation of the IZ distribution is affected by surface MUAP amplitude (as the estimation made by visual inspection), by mucosa thickness (performance decreases when fibre length is higher) and by different MU distributions. However, in general the method is able to identify the position of two IZ locations and can measure asymmetry of the IZ distribution. This strengthens the potential applications of high density surface EMG in the prevention and investigation of incontinence. PMID:19269857

  17. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  18. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  19. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  20. Myoarchitectural and functional alterations in rabbit external anal sphincter muscle following experimental surgical trauma.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, M Raj; Sinha, Shantanu; Seo, Youngjin; Salehi, Mitra; Bhargava, Valmik; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2014-08-15

    Obstetrical trauma to external anal sphincter (EAS) is extremely common; however, its role in the development of anal incontinence is not clear. We examined the regenerative process and functional impact of experimental surgical trauma to EAS muscle in an animal model. Surgical myotomy, a craniocaudal incision extending along the entire length and thickness of the EAS, was performed in rabbits. Animals were allowed to recover, and anal pressures were recorded at weekly intervals for 12 wk using a custom-designed probe system to determine the length-tension property of EAS muscle. Animals were killed at predetermined time intervals, and the anal canal was harvested for histochemical studies (for determination of muscle/connective tissue/collagen) and sarcomere length measurement. In addition, magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) and fiber tracking was performed to determine myoarchitectural changes in the EAS. Myotomy of the EAS muscle resulted in significant impairment of its length-tension property that showed only partial recovery during the 12-wk study period. Histology revealed marked increase in the fibrosis (connective tissue = 69% following myotomy vs. 28% in controls) at 3 wk, which persisted at 12 wk. Immunostaining studies confirmed deposition of collagen in the fibrotic tissue. There was no change in the sarcomere length following myotomy. MR-DTI studies revealed disorganized muscle fiber orientation in the regenerating muscle. We conclude that, following experimental injury, the EAS muscle heals with an increase in the collagen content and loss of normal myoarchitecture, which we suspect is the cause of impaired EAS function. PMID:24994856

  1. Neurotransmitter interactions in smooth muscles from cat internal anal sphincter (in vitro experiments).

    PubMed

    Todorov, L; Papasova, M

    1984-01-01

    The contractile activity of strips (15 X 2 mm) isolated from cat internal anal sphincter (IAS) has been studied under isometric conditions. Noradrenaline (above 10(-10) mol/l) induces contraction of IAS, antagonized by phentolamine. Isoprenaline (10(-8)-10(-5) mol/l) has no effect on IAS. Acetylcholine and carbachol (above 10(-6) mol/l) result in relaxation of the IAS preparations, which is blocked only by simultaneous administration of atropin (10(-6) mol/l) and hexamethonium (10(-4) mol/l). The acetylcholine-induced relaxation is not influenced by guanetidine and reserpine, but it is antagonized by tetrodotoxin (TTX) (10(-7) g/ml). Nicotine (10(-6)-10(-4) mol/l) also causes IAS relaxation which is not influenced by atropin, being blocked by hexamethonium and antagonized by TTX. The IAS relaxation induced by acetylcholine and nicotine is not associated with adrenergic mechanisms; it is assumed to be the result of a release of noncholinergic, nonadrenergic inhibitory neurotransmitter by means of presynaptic postganglionic cholinergic receptors. Data are also presented concerning the release of noradrenaline through presynaptic N-cholinergic receptors, when nicotine and high acetylcholine concentrations are applied after treatment of the preparations with scorpion venom or after increasing the K+-concentration in the nutrient solution to 16-20 mmol/l. The complex neurotransmitter interactions at IAS level are discussed. PMID:6146240

  2. Power flow control of TET system for a novel artificial anal sphincter system.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Yan, Sheng; Li, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) integrated with a novel elastic scaling artificial anal sphincter system (ES-AASS) for treating severe faecal incontinence (FI). The ES-AASS is based on a novel executive mechanism that uses a spring scalable structure to clamp the rectum. To deliver the correct amount of power (i.e. to match the load demand under variable coupling conditions or different operation stages of the implanted device) for internal battery charging and ensure safety for the human body, theoretical analysis was conducted as a control rule with respect to the relationship between the phase of driver signals and output voltage. An easy regulating procedure to stabilize output voltage with a phase shift controller is also presented. To validate the phase control rules, a prototype of the TETS was constructed and its performance was validated across the whole coupling coefficient range (0.09 ∼ 0.29) as well as load resistance (50 ∼ 120 Ω). The results show that the output voltage of the secondary side can be maintained at a constant 7 V with a phase regulation range of 78.7-178.2° and the proposed controller has reached a maximal end-to-end power efficiency of 74.2% at 1 W. PMID:25350041

  3. Design and assessment of novel artificial anal sphincter with adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Yan, Sheng; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the in vitro assessment of a novel elastic scaling artificial anal sphincter system (ES-AASS) with an adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) for treatment of severe faecal incontinence (FI). The proposed adaptive TETS has a phase control, which can maintain the output voltage at ∼7 V across the full range of the coupling coefficient variation (from 0.09-0.31) during the whole process of charging with a phase shift of 177.5° to 79.1°. A maximum surface temperature of 42.2 °C was measured above the secondary coil during an energy transmission of 3.5 W in air. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density analysis of the biological three-layers structure, including the skin, fat and muscle) surrounding the coil pair were analysed and the results of simulation analysis showed that the value of SAR and current density were very small at any given transmission condition compared with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In conclusion, in vitro experimental results showed that the ES-AASS can control simulated faecal behaviour effectively and the performance of TETS was validated. PMID:25626127

  4. Postpartum translabial 2D and 3D ultrasound measurements of the anal sphincter complex in primiparous women delivering by vaginal birth versus Cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rebecca J.; Leeman, Lawrence M.; Migliaccio, Laura; Qualls, Clifford; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Consensus on normal translabial ultrasound (TL-US) anal sphincter complex measurements for postpartum women is lacking. We aimed to evaluate normative measurements in 2D and 3D TL-US for the anal sphincter complex (ASC) at 6 months postpartum and compare these measurements in women who had a vaginal birth (VB) and in those who had a Cesarean delivery (CD). Methods A large, prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US 6 months after their first delivery. For normative sphincter measurements, we excluded women with third- or fourth-degree lacerations or with sphincter interruption on TL-US. Measurements included the sphincter thickness at the 3, 6, 9, and 12 o'clock positions of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and the internal anal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels. We also measured the mean coronal diameter of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 696 women consented to participate, and 433 women presented for ultrasound imaging 6 months later. Women who sustained a third- or fourth-degree laceration had significantly thicker EAS measurements at 12 o'clock. Sphincter asymmetry was common (69 %), but was not related to mode of delivery. Only IAS measurements at the proximal and distal 12 o'clock position were significantly thicker for CD patients. There were no significant differences in the EAS or PVM measurements between VB and CD women. Conclusions There appear to be few differences in normative sphincter ultrasound measurements between primiparous patients who had VB or CD. PMID:24105408

  5. Immunoglobulins from scleroderma patients inhibit the muscarinic receptor activation in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Mehendiratta, Vaibhav; Del Galdo, Francesco; Jimenez, Sergio A.; Cohen, Sidney; DiMarino, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) IgGs affecting the M3-muscarinic receptor (M3-R) have been proposed to be responsible for the gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility in this disease. However, the effect of SSc IgGs on smooth muscle cell (SMC) function has not been studied. We determined the effect of SSc IgGs on the muscarinic receptor activation by bethanechol (BeCh; methyl derivate of carbachol) in SMC and smooth muscle strips from rat internal anal sphincter. IgGs were purified from GI-symptomatic SSc patients and normal volunteers, with protein G-Sepharose columns. SMC lengths were determined via computerized digital micrometry. The presence of M3-R and IgG-M3-R complex was determined by Western blot. IgGs from SSc patients but not from normal volunteers caused significant and concentration-dependent inhibition of BeCh response (P < 0.05). The maximal shortening of 22.2 ± 1.2% caused by 10−4 M BeCh was significantly attenuated to 8.3 ± 1.2% by 1 mg/ml of SSc IgGs (P < 0.05). Experiments performed in smooth muscle strips revealed a similar effect of SSc IgG that was fully reversible. In contrast to the effect on BeCh, the SSc IgGs caused no significant effect (P > 0.05) on K+ depolarization and α1-adrenoceptor activation by phenylephrine. Western blot studies revealed the specific presence of SSc IgG-M3-R complex. SSc IgGs attenuated M3-R activation, which was reversible with antibody removal. These data suggest that SSc GI dysmotility may be caused by autoantibodies that inhibit the muscarinic neurotransmission. Future treatment of SSc patients may be directed at the removal or neutralization of these antibodies. PMID:19779020

  6. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process. PMID:25808086

  7. Does the Finnish intervention prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Mette Østergaard; Madsen, Mia Lund; Skriver-Møller, Anne-Cathrine; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A rise in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) has been observed and a preventive approach, originating in Finland, has been introduced in several European hospitals. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate the evidence behind the ‘Finnish intervention’. Design A systematic review of the literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Outcome measures The primary outcome was OASIS. Secondary outcomes were (perinatal): Apgar scores, pH and standard base excess in the umbilical cord, and (maternal): episiotomy, intact perineum, first and second-degree perineal lacerations, duration of second stage, birth position and women's perceptions/birth experiences. Methods Multiple databases (Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed and SveMed) were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2014. Both randomised controlled trials and observational studies were eligible for inclusion. Studies were excluded if a full-text article was not available. Studies were evaluated by use of international reporting guidelines (eg, STROBE). Results Overall, 1042 articles were screened and 65 retrieved for full-text evaluation. Seven studies, all observational and with a level of evidence at 2c or lower, were included and consistently reported a significant reduction in OASIS. All evaluated episiotomy and found a significant increase. Three studies evaluated perinatal outcomes and reported conflicting results. No study reported on other perineal outcomes, duration of the second stage, birth positions or women's perceptions. Conclusions A reduction in OASIS has been contributed to the Finnish intervention in seven observational studies, all with a low level of evidence. Knowledge about the potential perinatal and maternal side effects and women's perceptions of the intervention is extremely limited and the biological mechanisms underlying the Finnish intervention are not well documented. Studies with a high level of evidence are needed to assess the effects of the intervention before implementation in clinical settings can be recommended. PMID:26369797

  8. Can the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) be predicted using a risk-scoring system?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Perineal trauma involving the anal sphincter is an important complication of vaginal delivery. Prediction of anal sphincter injuries may improve the prevention of anal sphincter injuries. Our aim was to construct a risk scoring model to assist in both prediction and prevention of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIs). We carried out an analysis of factors involved with OASIs, and tested the constructed model on new patient data. Methods Data on all vaginal deliveries over a 5 year period (2004–2008) was obtained from the electronic maternity record system of one institution in the UK. All risk factors were analysed using logistic regression analysis. Odds ratios for independent variables were then used to construct a risk scoring algorithm. This algorithm was then tested on subsequent vaginal deliveries from the same institution to predict the incidence of OASIs. Results Data on 16,920 births were analysed. OASIs occurred in 616 (3.6%) of all vaginal deliveries between 2004 and 2008. Significant (p < 0.05) variables that increased the risk of OASIs on multivariate analysis were: African-Caribbean descent, water immersion in labour, water birth, ventouse delivery, forceps delivery. The following variables remained independently significant in decreasing the risk of OASIs: South Asian descent, vaginal multiparity, current smoker, home delivery. The subsequent odds ratios were then used to construct a risk-scoring algorithm that was tested on a separate cohort of patients, showing a sensitivity of 52.7% and specificity of 71.1%. Conclusions We have confirmed known risk factors previously associated with OASIs, namely parity, birth weight and use of instrumentation during delivery. We have also identified several previously unknown factors, namely smoking status, ethnicity and water immersion. This paper identifies a risk scoring system that fulfils the criteria of a reasonable predictor of the risk of OASIs. This supersedes current practice where no screening is implemented other than examination at the time of delivery by a single examiner. Further prospective studies are required to assess the clinical impact of this scoring system on the identification and prevention of third degree tears. PMID:25056485

  9. Cellular regulation of basal tone in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle by RhoA/ROCK.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag A; Rattan, Satish

    2007-06-01

    Sustained contractions of smooth muscle cells (SMC) maintain basal tone in the internal anal sphincter (IAS). To examine the molecular bases for the myogenic tone in the IAS, the present studies focused on the role of RhoA/ROCK in the SMC isolated from the IAS vs. the adjoining phasic tissues of the rectal smooth muscle (RSM) and anococcygeus smooth muscle (ASM) of rat. We also compared cellular distribution of RhoA/ROCK, levels of RhoA-GTP, RhoA-Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex formation, levels of p(Thr696)-MYPT1, and SMC relaxation caused by RhoA inhibition. Levels of RhoA/ROCK were higher at the cell membrane in the IAS SMC compared with those from the RSM and ASM. C3 exoenzyme (RhoA inhibitor) and Y 27632 (ROCK inhibitor) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the IAS SMC. In addition, active ROCK-II (primary isoform of ROCK in SMC) caused further shortening in the IAS SMC. C3 exoenzyme increased RhoA-RhoGDI binding and reduced the levels of RhoA-GTP and p(Thr696)-MYPT1. ROCK inhibitor attenuated PKC-induced contractions in IAS SMC. Conversely, a PKC inhibitor (Gö 6850, which causes partial relaxation of the SMC) had no significant effect on ROCK-II-induced contractions. Further experiments showed the highest levels of RhoA, active form of RhoA (RhoA-GTP), ROCK-II, 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain (MLC(20)), phospho-MYPT1, and phospho-MLC(20) in the IAS vs. RSM and ASM SMC. However, the trend was the reverse with the levels of inactive RhoA (GDP-RhoA-RhoGDI complex) and MYPT1. We conclude that RhoA/ROCK play a critical role in maintenance of spontaneous tone in the IAS SMC via inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase. PMID:17379756

  10. Preservation of complete anal sphincteric proprioception in restorative proctocolectomy: the inhibitory reflex and fine control of continence need not be impaired.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, W G; Williamson, M E; Miller, A S; Sagar, P M; Holdsworth, P J; Johnston, D

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates whether reflux function of the anal sphincter remains unchanged after restorative proctocolectomy, provided that the sphincter remaining is kept intact, without mucosal stripping or endo-anal anastomosis. Paired tests of anorectal function were performed before, and a median of 6 (range 2-12) months after restorative proctocolectomy with stapled, end to end pouch-anal anastomosis. Beforehand, distension of the rectum with 50 ml of air produced a median (interquartile range) increase in pressure within the rectum of 22 (15-29) cm H2O and reflex inhibition of the anal sphincter from a pressure of 76 (62-106) cm H2O to a pressure of 34 (15-52) cm H2O. After the procedure, distension of the ileal pouch with 50 ml of air produced an increase in pressure within the pouch of only 5 (4-8) cm H2O (p < 0.001 compared with beforehand) and reflex inhibition of the anal sphincter from a pressure of 62 (25-79) cm H2O to 37 (17-68) cm H2O. Maximal reflex inhibition of the upper third if the anal sphincter to a pressure of 26 (15-48) cm H2O was observed when pressure within the pouch increased by 16 (11-22) cm H2O. After restorative proctocolectomy, all patients were continent (two experienced minor nocturnal leakage of mucus) and 25 could discriminate between flatus and faeces. Thus, reflux function was preserved in response to changes in pressure, ensuring that the subtler aspects of anal continence were preserved. PMID:7615281

  11. Tissue-Engineered External Anal Sphincter Using Autologous Myogenic Satellite Cells and Extracellular Matrix: Functional and Histological Studies.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Kajbafzadeh, Majid; Sabetkish, Shabnam; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Tavangar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the regaining histological characteristics of bioengineered external anal sphincters (EAS) in rabbit fecal incontinence model. The EAS of 16 rabbits were resected and decellularized. The decellularized scaffolds were transplanted to the terminal rectum following a period of 6 months of fecal incontinency (5 days after sterilization). The rabbits were divided into two groups: in group 1 (n = 8), myogenic satellite cells were injected into the transplanted sphincters. In group 2 (n = 8), the transplanted scaffolds remained in situ without cellular injection. The histological evaluation was performed with desmin, myosin, smooth muscle actin, CD31, and CD34 at 3-month intervals. The rabbits were followed for 2 years. Electromyography (EMG) with needle and electrical stimulation, pudendal and muscle electrical stimulation were also performed after 2 years of transplantation. At the time of biopsy, no evidence of inflammation or rejection was observed and the transplanted EAS appeared histologically and anatomically normal. The immunohistochemistry staining validated that the histological features of EAS was more satisfactory in group 1 in short-term follow-up. However, no statistically significant difference was detected between two groups in long-term follow-ups (p value > 0.05). In both groups, grafted EAS contracted in response to electrical signals delivered to the muscle and the pudendal nerve. However, more signals were detected in group 1 in EMG evaluation. In conclusion, bioengineered EAS with myogenic satellite cells can gain more satisfactory histological outcomes in short-term follow-ups with better muscle electrical stimulation outcomes. PMID:26424474

  12. Correlation between gross anatomical topography, sectional sheet plastination, microscopic anatomy and endoanal sonography of the anal sphincter complex in human males.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, S; Blyth, P; Beatty, S; Duang, A; Parry, B; Bissett, I P

    2009-08-01

    This study elucidates the structure of the anal sphincter complex (ASC) and correlates the individual layers, namely the external anal sphincter (EAS), conjoint longitudinal muscle (CLM) and internal anal sphincter (IAS), with their ultrasonographic images. Eighteen male cadavers, with an average age of 72 years (range 62-82 years), were used in this study. Multiple methods were used including gross dissection, coronal and axial sheet plastination, different histological staining techniques and endoanal sonography. The EAS was a continuous layer but with different relations, an upper part (corresponding to the deep and superficial parts in the traditional description) and a lower (subcutaneous) part that was located distal to the IAS, and was the only muscle encircling the anal orifice below the IAS. The CLM was a fibro-fatty-muscular layer occupying the intersphincteric space and was continuous superiorly with the longitudinal muscle layer of the rectum. In its middle and lower parts it consisted of collagen and elastic fibres with fatty tissue filling the spaces between the fibrous septa. The IAS was a markedly thickened extension of the terminal circular smooth muscle layer of the rectum and it terminated proximal to the lower part of the EAS. On endoanal sonography, the EAS appeared as an irregular hyperechoic band; CLM was poorly represented by a thin irregular hyperechoic line and IAS was represented by a hypoechoic band. Data on the measurements of the thickness of the ASC layers are presented and vary between dissection and sonographic imaging. The layers of the ASC were precisely identified in situ, in sections, in isolated dissected specimens and the same structures were correlated with their sonographic appearance. The results of the measurements of ASC components in this study on male cadavers were variable, suggesting that these should be used with caution in diagnostic and management settings. PMID:19486204

  13. Smoking during Pregnancy Is Associated with a Decreased Incidence of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries in Nulliparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Räisänen, Sari; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Gissler, Mika; Heinonen, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking is a modifiable lifestyle factor that has been shown to be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and to have adverse health and dose-dependent connective tissue effects. The objective of this study was to examine whether smoking during pregnancy was associated with the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) among six birthweight groups in singleton vaginal deliveries, considering nulliparous and multiparous women separately between 1997 and 2007 in Finland. Methodology A retrospective population-based register study. Populations included women with spontaneous singleton vaginal deliveries, consisting of all 213,059 nulliparous and all 288,391 multiparous women. Incidence of OASIS (n = 2,787) between smoking status groups was adjusted using logistic regression analyses. Principal Findings Of the nulliparous women, 13.1% were smokers, 3.6% had given up smoking during the first trimester of their pregnancy and 81.1% were non-smokers. Among these groups 0.7%, 0.9% and 1.1%, respectively suffered OASIS (p≤0.001). Nulliparous women who smoked had a 28% (95% CI 16–38%, p≤0.001) lower risk of OASIS compared to non-smokers, when adjusting for background variables. In multiparous women, the overall frequencies of OASIS were much lower (0.0–0.2%). A similar inverse relationship between OASIS rates and smoking was significant in pooled univariate analysis of multiparous women, but multivariate analysis revealed statistically insignificant results between non-smokers and smokers. Conclusions Nulliparous women who were smokers had a 28% lower incidence of OASIS. However, smoking during pregnancy cannot be recommended since it has shown to be associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes and adverse health effects. The observed association warrants clinical repetition studies and, if confirmed, also in vitro studies focusing on connective tissue properties at a molecular and cellular level. PMID:22815899

  14. Incidence and Risk Factors of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries after Various Modes of Vaginal Deliveries in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Chi Wai, Tung; Cecilia, Cheon Willy; Anny, Tong Wai Mei; Hau Yee, Leung

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) can cause an adverse impact on women's physical and mental health. There was lack of published data in Chinese population particularly on studying the risk of OASIS for nonrotational outlet forceps. This study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of OASIS. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary referral hospital in Hong Kong. The control group was selected randomly. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of potential risk factors on OASIS. This study reviewed the obstetric records of OASIS women and random control from January 2011 to June 2014. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of potential risk factors on OASIS. Results: Of 15,446 women delivered, 49 had OASIS. The percentage of OASIS increased from 0.3% (2011) to 0.38% (2014). There was an increasing trend of OASIS in attempted spontaneous vaginal delivery without episiotomy (P < 0.01), but it did not increase the OASIS risk (P = 0.46). Univariate analysis of 49 cases and 438 control subjects showed that forceps delivery (odds ratio [OR] =8.73, P < 0.01), prolong second stage of labor (OR = 1.43, P < 0.01) increased the risk for OASIS. In multivariate regression models, only forceps delivery (OR = 6.28, P < 0.01) proved to be independent risk factor. Conclusions: The incidence of OASIS in Chinese women was increased after 2012, but still lower than the reported figures in the literature. Outlet forceps delivery could be a possible associated risk factor. PMID:26365956

  15. Anal fissure - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Anal fissures are tears in the skin overlying the anal sphincter, usually due to increased tone of the ... and a failure of these muscle to relax. Anal fissures cause pain during defecation and bleeding from the ...

  16. Surgical Reconstruction of the Urinary Sphincter after Traumatic Longitudinal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Peter; Schillfahrt, Florian; Skradski, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    The question is whether the urethral sphincter may be reconstructed after longitudinal injury similar to anal sphincter injuries. Analogue to obstetric, anal sphincter repair, an approximation repair of the sphincter may be feasible. An overlap repair is possible in anal sphincter repair, but because of the little tissue available in the urethral sphincter this is not an option. We describe three cases of urethral sphincter injury of different aetiologies. All resulted in a total longitudinal disruption of the muscular components of the urethral sphincter complex. After making the diagnosis of urethral sphincter injury, a primary approximation repair was done. Follow-up of at least two and up to three years is promising with one male patient being completely continent and the two female patients needing one safety pad per day. Longitudinal disruption of the muscular elements of the sphincteric urethra may be primarily reconstructed with good success using an approximation technique with simple interrupted sutures. PMID:25258694

  17. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Methods Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Results Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P < 0.01) following desensitisation of purinergic receptors with α,β-methylene-ATP (10 μM). In the presence of guanethidine, atropine, and α,β-methylene-ATP, the remaining relaxatory responses to EFS were examined. These responses were not altered by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5 μM), the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor antagonist, [d-p-Cl-Phe6,Leu17]-vasoactive intestinal peptide (PheLeu-VIP; 100 nM), or the purinoceptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophyline (P1 receptors) or suramin (P2 receptors). However, relaxation responses were reduced by Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (40–50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20–40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15–20% reduction). Conclusions Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide > hydrogen sulfide. PMID:26486177

  18. Defensive anality and anal narcissism.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1985-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating a currently beleaguered assumption: the central importance, the continuing vitality, and the appropriate complexity of Freud's theory of the drives and of his idea of the primacy of the body ego. It is not enough to consider man a thinking machine or a social being; his animal nature must be given a central place in psychology. The paper postulates that 'anal or sphincter defensiveness' is one of the precursors of the repression barrier. Anality has been comparatively neglected in recent psychoanalytic literature, and so has its explorer, Karl Abraham. The paper's thesis is that there is a special defensive importance to anal erogeneity and libido, and to those aspects of ego and superego that are functionally operative (as the 'sadistic-anal organization' (Freud, 1917)) during the so-called 'sadistic-anal' developmental phase. Any of the psychic danger situations can evoke regression to manifestations of 'anal narcissim'--an attempt to master overwhelming feeling by a kind of emotional sphincter action, narrowing down the world to the controllable and the predictable. The basic assumption here is Fliess's idea that the attainment of anal sphincter control functions--with, as-it-were, 'psychic resonance'--as a means to master primal (murderous, cannibalistic) affect. For optimal psychic development, a proper balance must be attained between anal control of, and anal expression of, instinctual derivatives--especially of affect laden with aggression. PMID:4066168

  19. Anal Fissure.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Jennifer Sam; Shashidharan, M

    2016-03-01

    Anal fissure (fissure-in-ano) is a very common anorectal condition. The exact etiology of this condition is debated; however, there is a clear association with elevated internal anal sphincter pressures. Though hard bowel movements are implicated in fissure etiology, they are not universally present in patients with anal fissures. Half of all patients with fissures heal with nonoperative management such as high fiber diet, sitz baths, and pharmacological agents. When nonoperative management fails, surgical treatment with lateral internal sphincterotomy has a high success rate. In this chapter, we will review the symptoms, pathophysiology, and management of anal fissures. PMID:26929749

  20. Comparison of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in nulliparous women before and after introduction of the EPISCISSORS-60® at two hospitals in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    van Roon, Yves; Kirwin, Ciara; Rahman, Nadia; Vinayakarao, Latha; Melson, Louise; Kester, Nikki; Pathak, Sangeeta; Pradhan, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess whether the introduction of episiotomy scissors specially designed to achieve a cutting angle of 60°, EPISCISSORS-60®, in two hospitals in the UK would result in a reduction in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in nulliparous women. Methods A structured training program for all doctors and midwives provided a theoretical framework around OASIS including risk factors and the role of episiotomies and a practical hands-on training element to use EPISCISSORS-60® correctly and to measure perineal body length and post-suturing angles. Data for perineal body length, post-suturing angles, user feedback, episiotomy use, and incidence of OASIS were collected through specifically designed forms and the general hospital data collection system. Results Data were available for 838 nulliparous vaginal deliveries. Mean perineal body length was 37 mm in spontaneous vaginal delivery group (standard deviation [SD] =8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =34–39) and 38 mm in the operative vaginal delivery group (SD=8, 95% CI=35–40). Post-suturing episiotomy angles were 53° (SD=6.5, 95% CI=50.7–55.8) in spontaneous vaginal deliveries and 52° (SD=9.6, 95% CI=49–54) in operative vaginal deliveries. EPISCISSORS-60® were rated as “good” to “very good” by 84% of users. There was a 47% increase in the number of episiotomies in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries at Poole (P=0.007) and a 16.5% increase in the number of episiotomies in nulliparous operative vaginal deliveries in Hinchingbrooke (P=0.003). There was an overall 11% increase in episiotomy numbers in nulliparous vaginal deliveries (P=0.08). There was a statistically significant OASIS reduction of 84% in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries in women who received an episiotomy (P=0.003). Conclusion Initial results after introduction of EPISCISSORS-60® show that the majority of health care professionals achieve post-suturing episiotomy angles between 40° and 60°. The results also show a significant increase in the use of episiotomies in the delivery of nulliparous women. There has been a statistically significant reduction in OASIS in nulliparous spontaneous vaginal deliveries. PMID:26677344

  1. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  2. Anal Ultrasound Predicts the Response to Nonoperative Treatment of Fecal Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Herbert; Humphreys, M. Smilgin; Kettlewell, Michael G. W.; Bulkley , Gregory B.; Mortensen, Neil; George, Bruce D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To assess the etiology, treatment, and utility of anal ultrasound in men with fecal incontinence and to review the outcomes of conservative (nonoperative) treatment. Summary Background Data The etiology of fecal incontinence in women is almost exclusively from obstetric or iatrogenic surgical injuries resulting in damage to the anal sphincters and/or pudendal nerves. Corresponding data on men with fecal incontinence are sparse. Methods Between January 1995 and January 1998, 37 men with fecal incontinence were evaluated in the John Radcliffe Hospital anorectal ultrasound unit. Their clinical histories, anal ultrasound results, anorectal physiology studies, and responses to conservative therapy were reviewed. Results Median age was 57 years. Major incontinence was present in 27% of the patients. Anal ultrasound localized anal sphincter damage in nine patients, and the characteristics of these nine patients with sphincter damage were then compared with the remaining 28 without sphincter damage. Prior anal surgery was more common in patients with sphincter damage. Hemorrhoids were more common in patients without sphincter damage. Anorectal physiology studies revealed significantly lower mean maximum resting and squeeze pressures in patients with sphincter damage, confirming poor sphincter function. With 92% follow-up, patients without sphincter damage were more likely to improve with nonoperative therapy. Conclusions Anal ultrasound is extremely useful in the evaluation of fecal incontinence in men. Unlike women, the majority of men do not have a sphincter defect by anal ultrasound, and conservative management is usually successful in these patients. In contrast, in men with anal sphincter damage, almost all of these defects resulted from previous anal surgery. Conservative management rarely is successful in these cases, and surgical repair of the anal sphincter may be indicated. Therefore, because the presence or absence of sphincter damage on anal ultrasound usually predicts the response to nonoperative treatment, anal ultrasound should be used to guide the initial management of men with fecal incontinence. PMID:10235533

  3. Modern management of anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques. PMID:25574077

  4. [Acute anal pain].

    PubMed

    Pittet, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    Acute anal pain is a common proctological problem. A detailed history together with the clinical examination are crucial for the diagnosis. An acute perianal vein thrombosis can be successfully excised within the first 72 hours. Acute anal fissures are best treated conservatively using stool regulation and topical medications reducing the sphincter spasm. A chronic anal fissure needs surgery. Perianal abscesses can very often be incised and drained in local anesthesia. Proctalgia fugax and the levator ani syndrome are exclusion diagnoses and are treated symptomatically. PMID:23798022

  5. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Corazziari, E

    2003-07-01

    Biliary-like pain alone, or associated with a transient increase in liver or pancreatic enzyme, may be the clinical manifestations of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. Since it is not always possible to dissociate functional conditions from subtle structural changes, the term sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is used to define motility abnormalities caused by 'sphincter of Oddi stenosis' and 'sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia'. Both sphincter of Oddi stenosis and sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia may account for obstruction to flow through the sphincter of Oddi and may thus induce retention of bile in the biliary tree and pancreatic juice in the pancreatic duct. Most of the clinical information concerning sphincter of Oddi dysfunction refers to post-cholecystectomy patients who have been arbitrarily classified according to clinical presentation, laboratory results and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography findings in: (a) biliary type I, (b) biliary type II, and (c) biliary type III. Prevalence of biliary-type of pain has been reported to vary from 1 to 1.5% in unselected postcholecystectomy people, to 14% in a selected group of patients complaining of postcholecystectomy symptoms. The frequency of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, as shown by manometry, differs in the different clinical subgroups: 65-95% in biliary group I, mainly due to sphincter of Oddi stenosis; 50-63% in biliary type II, and 12-28% in biliary type III. In patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction varies from 39 to 90%. Diagnostic work-up of postcholecystectomy patients for suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction includes liver biochemistry and pancreatic enzymes, plus negative findings of structural abnormalities. Usually, this would include transabdominal ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Depending on the available resources, endoscopic ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography may precede endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in specific clinical conditions. Quantitative evaluation of bile transit from the hepatic hilum to the duodenum at choledochoscintigraphy appears valuable in the decision to undertake sphincter of Oddi manometry or to treat. Sphincterotomy is the standard treatment for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In biliary type I patients, the indication for endoscopic sphincterotomy is straightforward without the need of any additional investigation. Slow bile transit in biliary type II is an indication to undergo endoscopic sphincterotomy without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Slow bile transit in biliary type III patients is an indication to perform sphincter of Oddi manometry. Diagnostic work-up of patients with gallbladder in situ is part of the same diagnostic algorithm that has initially excluded the presence of a gallbladder dysfunction. PMID:12974506

  6. Anorectal conditions: anal fissure and anorectal fistula.

    PubMed

    Fox, Audralan; Tietze, Pamela H; Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Anal fissures are linear splits in the anal mucosa. Acute fissures typically resolve within a few weeks; chronic fissures persist longer than 8 to 12 weeks. Most fissures are posterior and midline and are related to constipation or anal trauma. Painful defecation and rectal bleeding are common symptoms. The diagnosis typically is clinical. High-fiber diet, stool softeners, and medicated ointments relieve symptoms and speed healing of acute fissures but offer limited benefit in chronic fissures. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical management of choice for chronic and refractory acute fissures. Anorectal fistula is an abnormal tract connecting the anorectal mucosa to the exterior skin. Fistulas typically develop after rupture or drainage of a perianal abscess. Fistulas are classified as simple or complex; low or high; and intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric, or extrasphincteric. Inspection of the perianal area identifies the skin opening, and anoscopy visualizes internal openings. The goal of management is to obliterate the tract and openings with negligible sphincter disruption to minimize incontinence. Fistulotomy is effective for simple fistulas; patients with complex fistulas may require fistulectomy. Other procedures that are used include injection of fibrin glue or insertion of a bioprosthetic plug into the fistula opening. PMID:24742084

  7. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  8. Inflatable artificial sphincter - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An artificial urinary sphincter is used to treat stress incontinence in men that is caused by urethral dysfunction such ... An artificial sphincter consists of three parts: a cuff that fits around the bladder neck a pressure regulating balloon ...

  9. Sphincter saving surgery is the standard procedure for treatment of low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M S; Khair, M A; Khanam, F; Haque, S; Alam, M K; Haque, M M; Salam, M A; Sikder, A H

    2013-04-01

    Carcinoma rectum is a challenging problem both for the developed and underdeveloped countries. Colorectal cancer accounts for 9% of all cancer deaths (49,920) in 2009 in USA. Carcinoma involving the lower part of the rectum is now successfully managed by sphincter saving surgery with less morbidity and uneventful recovery. To observe the objective, subjective and functional outcome of the patients suffering from cancer of the lower third of the rectum managed by surgical intervention with preservation of sphincter. A comparative study was carried out on 54 patients with low rectal cancer who underwent ultra-low anterior resection in the department of surgery, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka from January 2009 to December 2010. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the tumor distance from anal verge. Thirty one (57%) patients were in Group A (Experimental) where tumor distance was 5cm from anal verge and upper 1cm of anal sphincter was sacrificed during surgical intervention. Twenty three (43%) patients were in Group B (Control) where tumor distance was 6cm from anal verge and whole length (4cm) of anal sphincter was preserved during surgical intervention. Functional integrity of anal sphincter was assessed between these two groups of patients following surgery. The mean age of the patients was 45.96±14.41 years. During surgery, ultra low anterior resection was performed to remove the tumor in all patients and for anastomosis double stapling technique was performed in 52(96%) patients and hand sewn technique was performed in 2(4%) patients irrespective of tumor distance from anal verge. Covering ileostomy was fashioned in all but one patient. During post-operative follow up anal sphincter muscle tone, anal sphincter function (Anal continence, p = 0.54), Quality of life (Social life, p = 0.54; Professional life, p = 0.23; House work and Need a diaper, p = 0.54) were not significantly impaired in both groups. Functional outcome of anal sphincter muscle and quality of life was not impaired in comparison to general population after low rectal cancer surgery. PMID:23715349

  10. Update on the management of anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Higuero, T

    2015-04-01

    Anal fissure is an ulceration of the anoderm in the anal canal. Its pathogenesis is due to multiple factors: mechanical trauma, sphincter spasm, and ischemia. Treatment must address these causative factors. While American and British scientific societies have published recommendations, there is no formal treatment consensus in France. Medical treatment is non-specific, aimed at softening the stool and facilitating regular bowel movements; this results in healing of almost 50% of acute anal fissures. The risk of recurrent fissure remains high if the causative factors persist. If non-specific medical treatment fails, specific medical treatment can be offered to reversibly decrease hypertonic sphincter spasm. Surgery remains the most effective long-term treatment and should be offered for cases of chronic or complicated anal fissure but also for acute anal fissure with severe pain or for recurrent fissure despite optimal medical treatment. Surgical treatment is based on two principles that may be combined: decreasing sphincter tone and excision of the anal fissure. Lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) is the best-evaluated technique and remains the gold standard in English-speaking countries. Since LIS is associated with some risk of irreversible anal incontinence, its use is controversial in France where fissurectomy combined with anoplasty is preferred. Other techniques have been described to reduce the risk of incontinence (calibrated sphincterotomy, sphincteroplasty). The technique of forcible uncalibrated anal dilatation is no longer recommended. PMID:25305752

  11. New Techniques for Treating an Anal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Surgery for an anal fistula may result in recurrence or impairment of continence. The ideal treatment for an anal fistula should be associated with low recurrence rates, minimal incontinence and good quality of life. Because of the risk of a change in continence with conventional techniques, sphincter-preserving techniques for the management complex anal fistulae have been evaluated. First, the anal fistula plug is made of lyophilized porcine intestinal submucosa. The anal fistula plug is expected to provide a collagen scaffold to promote tissue in growth and fistula healing. Another addition to the sphincter-preserving options is the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure. This technique is based on the concept of secure closure of the internal opening and concomitant removal of infected cryptoglandular tissue in the intersphincteric plane. Recently, cell therapy for an anal fistula has been described. Adipose-derived stem cells have two biologic properties, namely, ability to suppress inflammation and differentiation potential. These properties are useful for the regeneration or the repair of damaged tissues. This article discusses the rationales for, the estimated efficacies of, and the limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques for the treatment of anal fistulae. PMID:22413076

  12. Conservative management of anal leiomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Hajdu, S.I. )

    1991-10-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the large intestine are unusual neoplasms, comprising less than 0.1% of all malignancies of the colon and rectum. Six cases of leiomyosarcoma of the anus have been reported. The optimal treatment for this neoplasm is not known. The standard surgical approach is abdominoperineal resection. The authors report the seventh case of this rare neoplasm and outline its treatment using local excision and iridium 192 brachytherapy in an attempt to preserve the anal sphincter. In selected patients, conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy may be an alternative to radical surgery, with the goals of local control of the disease and anal sphincter preservation. However, more experience is needed before this approach could be recommended routinely.

  13. The influence of sphincter control and genital sensation on body image and gender identity in women.

    PubMed

    Richards, A K

    1992-07-01

    The development of one aspect of feeling female is hypothesized to account for certain phenomena in the treatment of young women patients. Fear of loss of genital pleasure experienced as contractions of the anal and genital-urinary sphincters is seen as the central issue in conflicts manifested in genital, oral, and anal modalities. It is suggested that the female's awareness of her genital arises from the generalization of sphincter sensation in the little girl, which is then represented in the body image. The body image is postulated as a link between genital pleasure and the valuing of femininity. PMID:1509017

  14. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  15. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - anus; Squamous cell carcinoma - anal; HPV - anal cancer ... is unclear. However, there is a link between anal cancer and the human papillomavirus or HPV infection. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that ...

  16. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » View Overview Guide » ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  17. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  18. Sphincter-preserving surgery after preoperative radiochemotherapy for T3 low rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    BAI, XUE; LI, SHIYONG; YU, BO; SU, HONG; JIN, WEISEN; CHEN, GANG; DU, JUNFENG; ZUO, FUYI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of preoperative radiochemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) and sphincter-preserving procedures for T3 low rectal cancer. Patients with rectal cancer and T3 tumors located within 1–6 cm of the dentate line received preoperative radiochemotherapy. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based radiochemotherapy was used. Radical resection with TME and sphincter-preserving procedures were performed during the six to eight weeks following radiotherapy. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The anal function was evaluated using the Wexner score. The clinical response rate was 83.5%, overall downstaging of T classification was 75.3% and pathological complete response was 15.3%. The anastomotic fistula rate was 4.7%. A median follow-up of 30 months showed the local recurrence rate to be 4.7% and the distant metastasis rate to be 5.9%. The three-year overall survival rate was 87%. The degree of anal incontinence as measured using the Wexner score decreased over time, and the anal sphincter function in the majority of patients gradually improved. Preoperative radiochemotherapy was found to improve tumor downstaging, reduces local recurrence, increase the sphincter preservation rate, and is therefore of benefit to patients with T3 low rectal cancer. PMID:22783445

  19. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  20. [Anal fissure].

    PubMed

    Adamová, Zuzana; Slováček, Radim; Bár, Tomáš; Sankot, Jaroslav; Vlček, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Anal fissure is one of the very frequent and painful proctologic diseases. Linear ulcer is situated in the anal canal and extending from the dentate line to the margin of the anus. Fissure can cause pain and bleeding. Diagnosis is made from the history and local inspection. Acute anal fissure should be treated conservatively - increased fibre and fluid intake, warm baths, local anaesthetic ointment, alternatively with nitrates and if all else fails by botulinum toxin. Treatment of chronic fissure will start conservatively but operative options are necessary in many cases. PMID:25994822

  1. The cardiac sphincter in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C. G.; Vane, J. R.

    1961-01-01

    A study of the function of the lower end of the oesophagus in the cat confirms that it behaves as a true physiological sphincter, even though histological evidence for such a structure is absent. Sphincteric action is a function of the circular muscle fibres in the lowest 2 cm. of the oesophagus. Reflex changes in tone of the sphincter are mediated through the autonomic nervous system. The effects of possible neurohumoral transmitters, nerve stimulation, and antagonists have been studied. PMID:13879670

  2. Changes in anal canal sensation after childbirth.

    PubMed

    Cornes, H; Bartolo, D C; Stirrat, G M

    1991-01-01

    Obstetic trauma predisposes to faecal incontinence. Anal canal sensation is impaired in incontinent patients. To assess the effect of childbirth on anal canal sensation anal mucosal electrosensitivity was measured in 122 primiparous patients in the immediate postnatal period and in 74 at 6 months postpartum. There were 35 normal vaginal deliveries, 36 forceps deliveries, 20 ventouse extractions, ten vaginal breech deliveries and 21 caesarean sections. Sensation was impaired in the lower, mid and upper anal canal immediately after delivery in those patients who had a normal vaginal delivery or a forceps delivery when compared with controls or with those delivered by caesarean section. Women who had ventouse deliveries had impaired sensation immediately after delivery in the mid anal canal compared with controls and those undergoing caesarean section. By 6 months there were no differences between any group. Patients who sustained a division of the external anal sphincter at delivery had impaired sensation which persisted in the upper anal canal at 6 months. PMID:1998871

  3. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anal fissures are also common in women after childbirth and in persons with Crohn's disease . ... and constipation by: Making dietary changes -- eating more fiber or bulk , such as fruits, vegetables, and grains ...

  4. AMS 742 sphincter: UCLA experience.

    PubMed

    Bruskewitz, R; Raz, S; Smith, R B; Kaufman, J J

    1980-12-01

    Between December 1977 and November 1978 artificial sphincters were implanted in 2 female and 19 male patients for the treatment of urinary incontinence. Etiologies for incontinence varied, including post-prostatectomy incontinence, myelodysplasia and female incontinence after unsuccessful bladder neck suspension. Over-all, 38 per cent of the patients were excellent or improved postoperatively, while 24 per cent experienced continuing unabated urinary incontinence and 24 per cent experienced urethral erosion at the site of cuff placement. The device was removed in 14 per cent of the patients when it became infected. PMID:7441829

  5. Cost considerations in the treatment of anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Bianco, Giuseppe; Silvestrini, Nicola; Maria, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Anal fissure is a split in the lining of the distal anal canal. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treatment of anal fissure. Although technique is simple and effective, a drawback of this surgical procedure is its potential to cause minor but some times permanent alteration in rectal continence. Conservative approaches (such as topical application of ointment or botulinum toxin injections) have been proposed in order to treat this condition without any risk of permanent injury of the internal anal sphincter. These treatments are effective in a large number of patients. Furthermore, with the ready availability of medical therapies to induce healing of anal fissure, the risk of a first-line surgical approach is difficult to justify. The conservative treatments have a lower cost than surgery. Moreover, evaluation of the actual costs of each therapeutic option is important especially in times of economic crisis and downsizing of health spending. PMID:24867398

  6. Anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  7. Anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  8. Anal erogeneity: the goose and the rat.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1982-01-01

    A case is presented in which the patient's traumatically derived intense anal erogeneity (associated with traumatic anxiety as well as with castration anxiety) inhibited his phallic sensations and potency and also his power to sustain productive thought. His passive cravings were disguised and reacted against in his compulsive-exhibitionistically phallic role of a Don Juan. He described at least two levels of anal feelings: a dangerous but exciting, tolerable or even pleasurable tension associated with the imago of the goose; and an unbearable, terrifying overcharged level embodied in the imago of the rat. (He had read of, and had felt himself identified with, Freud's Rat Man.) Contrasts are presented with François Rabelais' account of the instinctual development and anal training of Gargantua, in which the connotations of the goose lead to a happy anal, phallic and intellectual control. Generalizations are ventured about the crucial attainment of command over the anal sphincter for the taming of 'primal affect'(Fliess). With early psychopathology there is a defensive overcathexis of anal control (and of anal mechanisms and character traits) to try to contain over-stimulation. In contrast true anal mastery contributes to the acquisition of optimal genital feelings and functioning and to the capacity for sustaining integrative thinking so necessary for 'owning' one's affects and impulses, and therefore for a feeling of identity. Finally, some remarks of Freud on Rabelais are reviewed in relation to levels of urethral erogeneity, seen as developmental way stations between the anal and the phallic, and partaking of both. PMID:6752066

  9. What Is Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cancer can start in the anal region: Squamous cell carcinomas: Most anal cancers in the United States are ... rest of this document focuses mainly on anal squamous cell carcinomas, which account for the vast majority of anal ...

  10. Factors affecting sphincter-preserving resection treatment for patients with low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENQIANG; YU, XIANBO; WANG, HAIJIANG; MA, MING; ZHAO, ZELIANG; WANG, QISAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the factors associated with the use of sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) surgery for the treatment of low rectal cancer. A total of 330 patients with histopathologically confirmed low rectal cancer were divided into two groups, namely the abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving (SP) groups. For SPR factor analysis, the χ2 test was performed as the univariate analysis, while a logistic regression test was conducted as the multivariate analysis. Of the 330 patients, 192 cases (58.18%) received SPR surgery and 138 cases (41.82%) underwent an APR. Univariate analysis results revealed that the sphincter-preserving factor was significantly associated with age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), total infiltrated circumference, distance of the tumor from the anal verge (DTAV), depth of invasion and tumor grade (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant associations with family medical history, diabetes history, venous tumor embolism, growth type, tumor length, lymphatic metastasis and level of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that the sphincter-preserving factor was strongly associated with DTAV and the depth of invasion, with significant statistical difference (P<0.05). Therefore, selecting SPR surgery for patients with low rectal cancer is dependent on age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, the total infiltrated circumference, DTAV, depth of invasion and tumor grade. In addition, DTAV and the depth of invasion are independent risk factors for the selection of SPR surgery. PMID:26622341

  11. [Anal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fesneau, M; Champeaux-Orange, E; Hennequin, C

    2010-11-01

    Anal canal epidermoid carcinomas represent 1.2% of digestive cancers and 6% of ano-rectal cancers. For localized diseases, the treatment is based on radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy (5-FU and cisplatin or mitomycin), according to tumour and nodal extension. The recommended treatment dose is 45 Gy in the anal canal, the mesorectum, pararectal lymph nodes, and inguinal lymph nodes. An additional dose of 15 to 20 Gy is delivered in the initial tumour for good responders. Salvage surgery is necessary in case of poor response. The organs at risk to be considered are bladder, femur heads, small intestine and vulva. The objective of this work is to summarize the epidemiological and radio-anatomic and prognostic characteristics of this tumour. The conformal radiotherapy technique is illustrated by a case report. PMID:21129654

  12. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  13. Electromagnetic assessment of embedded micro antenna for a novel sphincter in the human body.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Ai, Yutao; Jiang, Enyu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless, miniaturized, bi-directional telemetric artificial anal sphincter system that can be used for controlling patients' anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is mainly composed of an executive mechanism, a wireless power supply system and a wireless communication system. The wireless communication system consists of an internal RF transceiver, an internal RF antenna, a data transmission pathway, an external RF antenna and an external RF control transceiver. A micro NMHA (Normal Mode Helical Antenna) has been used for the transceiver of the internal wireless communication system and a quarter wave-length whip antenna of 7.75 cm has been used for the external wireless communication system. The RF carrier frequency of wireless communication is located in a license-free 433.1 MHz ISM (Industry, Science, and Medical) band. The radiation characteristics and SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) are evaluated using the finite difference time-domain method and 3D human body model. Results show that the SAR values of the antenna satisfy the ICNIRP (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection) limitations. PMID:23706019

  14. Anal lesions presenting in a cohort of child gastroenterological examinations. Implications for sexual traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde; Houdu, Sora; Darviot, Estelle; Buchaillet, Céline; Baron, Céline

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anal lesions found in children during a pediatric gastroenterology consultation when the reason for the complaint was related to a digestive disease. This prospective descriptive study included 100 children under 15 years of age over a 13-month period, consulting due to digestive symptoms. The children were under 8 years old (90%) and 25% were under 3.1 years old. Constipation was the most frequent reason for consultation (69%). Fifty-one anal lesions were observed, of which 58.8% were anal fissures, 15.7% were skin tags and 5.8% were venous congestions related to straining. Anal fissures and skin tags were located at the median line, according to the clock-face method in supine position. No child had more than two anal lesions. No anal dilatation, sphincter hypotonia, anal scars, anal lacerations or bruises were found. The two most common anal lesions were anal fissures and skin tags. These anal lesions were mainly observed at the median line and were due to constipation. No cases of multiple anal lesions were found in terms of common digestive diseases. PMID:25882145

  15. Factors affecting continence after surgery for anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lunniss, P J; Kamm, M A; Phillips, R K

    1994-09-01

    Anorectal physiology and continence were assessed prospectively before and after surgery in 50 patients with chronic perianal sepsis. Functional and physiological parameters were unchanged after surgery in 13 control patients who had sepsis but who did not undergo division of the anal sphincter. Group 1 comprised 22 patients with internal sphincter division alone (15 intersphincteric, seven trans-sphincteric treated by a loose seton technique) and group 2 consisted of 15 patients with a trans-sphincteric fistula laid completely open. In group 1 the median (interquartile range (i.q.r.)) resting pressure in the distal 1 cm of the anal canal was reduced from 68 (60-90) cmH2O before surgery to 44 (35-60) cmH2O after operation (P < 0.001); squeeze pressure was less affected, but function deteriorated in 11 of the 22 patients. The median (i.q.r.) resting pressure in group 2 patients also fell, from 68 (34-84) cmH2O before operation to 28 (20-54) cmH2O afterwards (P = 0.003); median (i.q.r.) maximum squeeze pressure decreased more, from 124 (76-170) cmH2O to 72 (48-112) cmH2O (P = 0.002). Functional deficit occurred in eight of the 15 patients. Incontinence was related to low resting pressure, reflecting internal sphincter integrity, and to local epithelial electrosensitivity (reflecting scarring), but not to squeeze pressure, fistula type or surgical treatment. PMID:7953425

  16. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  17. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single “Calponin Family Member” Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of “sphincter proteome.” Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled “idiopathic” and facilitating practice of precision medicine. PMID:26151053

  18. Common anal problems.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jared Wilson

    2014-05-01

    Anal problems are pervasive, embarrassing and vexing to patients. Primary care providers should be well versed in addressing these concerns, which uncommonly require referral for specialty care. Additionally, anal symptoms and findings may herald previously undiagnosed underlying illness. PMID:24758964

  19. Clinical significance of sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Allescher, Hans-Dieter

    2003-04-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) is a functional disorder of the papilla region that can lead to clinical symptoms and functional obstruction of biliary and pancreatic outflow. Based on the severity of the clinical symptoms, the disorder is classified as one of three types (biliary or pancreatic type I-III). Diagnosis of SOD is hampered by the relative risk of endoscopic sphincter manometry to cause pancreatitis. Manometrically, SOD is characterized by increased pressure in the biliary or pancreatic sphincter segment and can be treated with endoscopic papillotomy. This review is an attempt to balance the arguments for invasive diagnosis with a pragmatic clinical approach in which papillotomy is performed if clinical suspicion and patient presentation support a dysfunction of the papilla. For patients with biliary or pancreatic type I, endoscopic papillotomy is the treatment of choice. In biliary type II, SO manometry may be helpful for clinical decision making; however, the ratio of risks to benefits is difficult to assess based on the present data. In type III SOD, patient selection and the low predictive value of manometry for treatment success raise questions about the clinical usefulness of SO manometry. PMID:12631459

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells for sphincter regeneration.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gerd; Hart, Melanie L; Brinchmann, Jan E; Rolauffs, Bernd; Stenzl, Arnulf; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2015-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), defined as the involuntary loss of considerable amounts of urine during increased abdominal pressure (exertion, effort, sneezing, coughing, etc.), is a severe problem to the individuals affected and a significant medical, social and economic challenge. SUI is associated with pelvic floor debility, absence of detrusor contraction, or a loss of control over the sphincter muscle apparatus. The pathology includes an increasing loss of muscle cells, replacement of muscular tissue with fibrous tissue, and general aging associated processes of the sphincter complex. When current therapies fail to cure or improve SUI, application of regeneration-competent cells may be an alternative therapeutic option. Here we discuss different aspects of the biology of mesenchymal stromal cells, which are relevant to their clinical applications and for regenerating the sphincter complex. However, there are reports in favor of and against cell-based therapies. We therefore summarize the potential and the risks of cell-based therapies for the treatment of SUI. PMID:25451135

  1. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barišić, Goran; Krivokapić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  2. Effects of pinaverium bromide on Oddi's sphincter.

    PubMed

    DiSomma, C; Reboa, G; Patrone, M G; Mortola, G P; Sala, G; Ciampini, M

    1986-01-01

    Twelve to 15 days after cholecystectomy, endocholedochal pressure was measured in ten patients before and one hour after oral administration of 15 mg of pinaverium bromide (six patients) or placebo. The mean endocholedochal pressure was 7.1 +/- 0.25 mmHg before and 3.1 +/- 0.2 mmHg after pinaverium (P less than 0.01), and 7.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg in the placebo-treated patients. The results suggest that pinaverium bromide has a specific effect on the common bile duct and probably on Oddi's sphincter. PMID:3815457

  3. Intramural distribution of regulatory peptides in the sigmoid-recto-anal region of the human gut.

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, G L; Adrian, T E; Allen, J M; Soimero, L; Cancellieri, A; Yeats, J C; Blank, M; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of regulatory peptides was studied in the separated mucosa, submucosa and muscularis externa taken at 10 sampling sites encompassing the whole human sigmoid colon (five sites), rectum (two sites), and anal canal (three sites). Consistently high concentrations of VIP were measured in the muscle layer at most sites (proximal sigmoid: 286 (16) pmol/g, upper rectum: 269 (17), a moderate decrease being found in the distal smooth sphincter (151 (30) pmol/g). Values are expressed as mean (SE). Conversely, substance P concentrations showed an obvious decline in the recto-anal muscle (mid sigmoid: 19 (2.0) pmol/g, distal rectum: 7.1 (1.3), upper anal canal: 1.6 (0.6)). Somatostatin was mainly present in the sigmoid mucosa and submucosa (37 (9.3) and 15 (3.5) pmol/g, respectively) and showed low, but consistent concentrations in the muscle (mid sigmoid: 2.2 (0.7) pmol/g, upper anal canal: 1.5 (0.8]. Starting in the distal sigmoid colon, a distinct peak of tissue NPY was revealed, which was most striking in the muscle (of mid sigmoid: 16 (3.9) pmol/g, upper rectum: 47 (7.8), anal sphincter: 58 (14)). Peptide YY was confined to the mucosa and showed an earlier peak (upper sigmoid: 709 (186) pmol/g, mid-distal sigmoid: 1965 (484)). A clear differential distribution of regulatory peptides was thus shown in the region studied. A possible role is suggested for NPY and VIP containing nerves in the effector control of the human internal anal sphincter. PMID:2454876

  4. Application of YAG laser technique in the treatment of anal fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-xun; Zhang, Xinrong

    1993-03-01

    The method of treating anal fistula with YAG laser technique is described in this essay. One-hundred-twenty patients have been treated successfully with this method and no recurrence was found in our series. Anal fistula is a common disorder in the anus and rectum. The tunnel of fistula zigzags around the external or internal sphincters. If the drainage is poor, and the skin around the external opening grows rapidly, false healing may occur and cause recurrent abscess. In this case, a fistula can not be cured except by operation.

  5. Current and emerging treatment strategies for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher; Czito, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-C) is established as a sphincter-preserving treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. However, there is room for improvement in rates of tumor control as well as a need to reduce treatment-induced toxicity. Efforts are underway to test the value of newer radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic and molecular targeted agents, as well as to establish the value of advances in radiation therapy planning and delivery. This review discusses the evolution of therapy for anal cancer, from early clinical trials establishing the current standard to more recent studies evaluating cisplatin, capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab. Early clinical results from studies incorporating intensity-modulated radiation therapy are also discussed. PMID:20425076

  6. Can Anal Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » View Overview Guide » ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  7. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  8. Velopharyngeal sphincter physiology in deaf individuals.

    PubMed

    Ysunza, A; Vazquez, M C

    1993-03-01

    Fifty-three deaf subjects with a history of prelingual profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, similar language habilitation with hearing aids, and normal velopharyngeal structures underwent a study protocol including speech evaluation, behavioral pure-tone audiometry, videonasopharyngoscopy, multiview videofluoroscopy, and electromyography of the velopharyngeal muscles. Subjects were divided into two groups: the first group included 13 subjects with normal nasal resonance or mild hypernasality (four normals and nine with mild hypernasality); the second group had subjects with severe hypernasality and severe articulation deficits. Pure-tone thresholds, velopharyngeal closure patterns, and electromyographic activity of velopharyngeal muscles were similar for both groups of subjects. However, in subjects with severe hypernasality, despite normal muscle activity as observed by electromyography, velopharyngeal valving activity lacked rhythm and strength during speech. It is concluded that deaf subjects may present a functional disorder of the velopharyngeal sphincter related to absence of auditory regulation during phonation. Visual biofeedback using videonasopharyngoscopy may be useful for treating this disorder. PMID:8452833

  9. A novel method of anal fissure laser surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mehran Nasr; Madani, Golnoush; Madhkhan, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    Anal fissure is a common painful problem, affecting all age groups. Its pathophysiology is based on high sphincter pressures and reduced blood supplying and treatments which means that it generally reduces anal pressures and increases anodermal blood flow. Since each of the anal fissure's routine therapies has some limitations such as definite risk of permanent fecal incontinence and high recurrence rate, we tried to find a more effective and less invasive procedure. In this pilot study which was implemented on 25 male and female patients aged 20-75 years, diagnosed clinically with chronic anal fissure, the Carbon Dioxide Laser Fractional was used to treat patients. In order to first remove fibrotic and granulation tissues, the base and the edges of the fissure were laser beamed. Eight spots were made on the sphincter by the laser on its continuous mode; somehow, they were passed through the full thickness of sphincter without interrupting its continuance. Afterwards, the area around the fissure ulcer was irradiated by deep fractional mode of the laser to stimulate the submucosa to regenerate and rejuvenate. After going through this procedure, patients were followed up within 6 months to 1 year. Pain, bleeding, and constipation were significantly improved. None of the patients had recurrence after a 1-year follow-up, and none of them had fecal incontinence and/or inability to control the passage of gas too. This study revealed that this new laser-based surgery is a simple, safe, and effective procedure to treat the anal fissure that can be performed with local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic with minimal postoperative morbidity. PMID:26067925

  10. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  11. Rectal atresia and anal stenosis: the difference in the operative technique for these two distinct congenital anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Lane, V A; Wood, R J; Reck, C; Skerritt, C; Levitt, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rectal atresia and anal stenosis are rare forms of anorectal malformations. The aim of the definitive surgical repair in such cases is to preserve the anal canal, the dentate line, and the sphincter complex. We present a case of rectal atresia and anal stenosis to demonstrate the differences in the operative repair. The techniques described leave the anterior wall of the very distal anal canal untouched in both rectal stenosis and anal atresia; however, the dissection of the rectum differs. The atretic rectum in rectal atresia is mobilized and sutured to the anal canal circumferentially. In anal stenosis, the posterior rectum is mobilized in the form of rectal advancement, and the posterior 180° is anastomosed directly to the skin (as in a standard PSARP) with preservation of the anal canal as the anterior 180° of the final anoplasty. These patients have an excellent prognosis for bowel control and fecal continence, and therefore, complete mobilization and resection of the anal canal must be avoided. PMID:26902368

  12. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  13. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in dermatological practice.

    PubMed

    Herat, Asoka; Whitfeld, Margot; Hillman, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is considered to be a precursor lesion of invasive anal cancer. It is now increasingly recognized in high-risk groups, such as men who have sex with men and HIV-infected patients. Human papillomaviruses are considered to be an important aetiological agent in both anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer. Dermatologists are likely to encounter these conditions among the differential diagnoses to be considered in high-risk patients presenting with perianal and anal lesions. Anal cancer rates are also increasing among the HIV-infected and HIV-non-infected population. The successful treatment of anal intraepithelial neoplasia may reduce the risk of subsequent development of anal cancer. However, current therapies for anal intraepithelial neoplasia may be associated with treatment-related morbidity and are not well validated. It is currently not proven that they reduce the likelihood of the development of anal cancer. Nevertheless, screening for anal intraepithelial neoplasia is being advocated for high-risk groups and may become standard dermatological care for these patients. In view of recent developments in the understanding of this condition, this article reviews the current understanding of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and its treatment from a dermatological perspective. PMID:17680964

  14. Upper esophageal sphincter during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation: effects of reflux content and posture

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik

    2010-01-01

    Although some studies show that the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contracts during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR), others show that it relaxes. We hypothesized that the posture of the subject and constituents of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may determine the type of UES response during the TLESR. High-resolution manometry and esophageal pH/impedance recording were performed in 10 healthy volunteers in the right recumbent (1 h) and upright (1 h) positions following the ingestion of a 1,000-Kcal meal. The UES pressure response during TLESR and constituents of GER (liquid, air, and pH) were determined. 109 TLESRs (58 upright and 51 recumbent) were analyzed. The majority of TLESRs were associated with GER (91% upright and 88% recumbent) events. UES relaxation was the predominant response during upright position (81% of TLESRs), and it was characteristically associated with presence of air in the reflux (92%). On the other hand, UES contraction was the predominant response during recumbent position (82% of TLESRs), and it was mainly associated with liquid reflux (71%). The rate of esophageal pressure increase (dP/dt) during the GER, but not the pH, had major influence on the type of UES response during TLESR. The dP/dt during air reflux (127 ± 39 mmHg/s) was significantly higher than liquid reflux (31 ± 6 mmHg/s, P < 0.0001). We concluded that the nature of UES response during TLESR, relaxation or contraction, is related to the posture and the constituents of GER. We propose that the rapid rate of esophageal pressure increase associated with air reflux determines the UES relaxation response to GER. PMID:20167874

  15. The epidemiology of anal incontinence and symptom severity scoring

    PubMed Central

    Nevler, Avinoam

    2014-01-01

    For many patients, anal incontinence (AI) is a devastating condition that can lead to social isolation and loss of independence, contributing to a substantial economic health burden, not only for the individual but also for the allocation of healthcare resources. Its prevalence is underestimated because of poor patient reporting, with many unrecorded but symptomatic cases residing in nursing homes. Endosonography has improved our understanding of the incidence of post-obstetric sphincter tears that are potentially suitable for repair and those cases resulting from anorectal surgery, most notably after fistula and hemorrhoid operations. The clinical scoring systems assessing the severity of AI are discussed in this review, along with their limitations. Improvements in the standardization of these scales will advance our understanding of treatment response in an era where the therapeutic options have multiplied and will permit a better comparison between specific therapies. PMID:24759339

  16. Epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. A series of 276 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    During the past ten years, substantial progress has been made in the knowledge of the natural history of epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal and of the response of the disease to radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. At the present time, the main problem in the management of this tumor concerns identification of the best modalities to achieve local control and preservation of anal function. From a series of 276 cases, followed for more than three years, the necessity for a careful pretreatment evaluation was stressed. This included a systematic search for pelvic metastatic lymph nodes by palpation and CT scan. All patients were treated initially by irradiation except those who underwent groin dissection for inguinal node metastasis or colostomy for complete anal obstruction. Three groups of patients have been identified: unresectable or disseminated tumors (33 cases), resectable tumors but not suitable for sphincter conservation (21 cases) treated by radiochemotherapy and delayed surgery, and resectable tumors suitable for sphincter conservation (222 cases) which were treated by a split-course regimen combining a short course of carefully planned external beam irradiation (19 days) followed by an iridium 192 implant after a two-month rest. In this group, which represents 80 percent of the whole series, 80 percent of patients have had their cancer controlled and 90 percent of controlled patients have retained normal anal function. The use of chemotherapy during the first days of irradiation is advisable in all cases to reinforce the efficacy of treatment and increase the chance of anal preservation. Results of the split-course regimen, combining external beam and interstitial irradiation, demonstrate a clear superiority over external beam irradiation alone, especially for large infiltrating tumors, which represent the majority of cases.

  17. The epidemiology of anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Grulich, Andrew E; Poynten, I Mary; Machalek, Dorothy A; Jin, Fengyi; Templeton, David J; Hillman, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Anal cancer comprises malignancies of the anal canal principally of two morphologic variants: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma. In most settings, SCC compromises more than 70% of cases. In the general population, anal cancer is uncommon, with age-standardised incidence rates mostly between 1 and 2 per 100000 per year. However, incidence of anal SCC is increasing by 1-3% per year in developed country settings. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types can be detected in 80-90% of all anal SCC cases, making it second only to cervical cancer in the closeness of its association with this virus. HPV-16 can be detected in ~90% of HPV-positive cases of anal SCC. Case-control studies have demonstrated that sexual risk factors (homosexuality in men and multiple sexual partners in women) are strongly associated with anal cancer risk. Other risk factors include immune deficiency and tobacco exposure. Anal cancer rates are highest in homosexual men, particularly in those who are HIV-positive, in whom anal cancer is among the most common of all cancers. Vaccination against HPV holds great promise for anal cancer prevention for those not already HPV-infected. For the current generation of adult high-risk populations, screening programs to allow early detection and treatment are under investigation. PMID:22958581

  18. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of anal cancer, but the exact cause of anal cancer is not known. HPV infection Most anal cancers seem to be linked ... cell carcinoma and is also found in some anal warts. Another subtype, HPV-18, is found less often. Most anal warts ...

  19. Surgical treatment of anal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Vanella, Serafino; Cadeddu, Federica; Marniga, Gaia; Mazzeo, Pasquale; Brandara, Francesco; Maria, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Anal stenosis is a rare but serious complication of anorectal surgery, most commonly seen after hemorrhoidectomy. Anal stenosis represents a technical challenge in terms of surgical management. A Medline search of studies relevant to the management of anal stenosis was undertaken. The etiology, pathophysiology and classification of anal stenosis were reviewed. An overview of surgical and non-surgical therapeutic options was developed. Ninety percent of anal stenosis is caused by overzealous hemorrhoidectomy. Treatment, both medical and surgical, should be modulated based on stenosis severity. Mild stenosis can be managed conservatively with stool softeners or fiber supplements. Sphincterotomy may be quite adequate for a patient with a mild degree of narrowing. For more severe stenosis, a formal anoplasty should be performed to treat the loss of anal canal tissue. Anal stenosis may be anatomic or functional. Anal stricture is most often a preventable complication. Many techniques have been used for the treatment of anal stenosis with variable healing rates. It is extremely difficult to interpret the results of the various anaplastic procedures described in the literature as prospective trials have not been performed. However, almost any approach will at least improve patient symptoms. PMID:19399922

  20. Restorative proctocolectomy with end to end pouch-anal anastomosis in patients over the age of fifty.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, W G; Sagar, P M; Holdsworth, P J; Axon, A T; Johnston, D

    1993-01-01

    This study was to examine whether 'fit' patients over the age of 50 who require elective surgery for ulcerative colitis are suitable candidates for restorative proctocolectomy, providing that they are continent before operation and that the anal sphincter is preserved in its entirety without stripping of the mucosa or endoanal anastomosis. Between 1986 and 1991, 18 patients 50 to 66 years old (median 55 years: nine men) underwent restorative proctocolectomy with end to end ileoanal anastomosis without mucosal stripping (12 quadruplicated (W), four duplicated (J), two no reservoir). The results were compared 12 (range three to 24) months later with those of 18 matched patients who were less than 50 years of age (median 34 years). In patients over 50, median resting anal pressure was 88 (range 44-131) cm water before and 80 (47-138) cm water after the operation (NS). In patients under 50, median resting anal pressure was 76 (51-128) cm water before and 77 (36-137) cm water after operation (NS). Resting anal pressure in older patients did not differ significantly from that in younger patients either before or after the operation. Both sensory and reflex anal functions were preserved as well after operation in the older patients as in the younger ones. The clinical results in patients over 50 were slightly inferior to the results for the younger patients, but the difference was small and not significant. Hence age alone is not a contraindication to restorative surgery provided that the anal sphincter is preserved in its entirety. PMID:8344583

  1. Ambulatory High Resolution Manometry, Lower Esophageal Sphincter Lift and Transient Lower Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravinder K.; Karstens, Anna; Leslie, Eric; Babaei, Arash; Bhargava, Valmik

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) lift seen on high resolution manometry (HRM) is a possible surrogate marker of the longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus. Recent studies suggest that longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation. Aim Our goal was to determine, 1) the feasibility of prolonged ambulatory HRM and 2) to detect LES lift with LES relaxation using ambulatory HRM color isobaric contour plots. Methods In vitro validation studies were performed to determine the accuracy of HRM technique in detecting axial movement of the LES. Eight healthy normal volunteers were studied using a custom designed HRM catheter and a 16 channel data recorder, in the ambulatory setting of subject’s home environment. Color HRM plots were analyzed to determine the LES lift during swallow-induced LES relaxation as well as during complete and incomplete transient LES relaxations. Results Satisfactory recordings were obtained for 16 hours in all subjects. LES lift was small (2 mm) in association with swallow-induced LES relaxation. LES lift could not be measured during complete transient LES relaxations (TLESR) because the LES is not identified on the HRM color isobaric contour plot once it is fully relaxed. On the other hand, LES lift, mean 7.6 ± 1.4 mm, range 6–12 mm was seen with incomplete TLESRs (n = 80). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the feasibility of prolonged ambulatory HRM recordings. Similar to a complete TLESR, longitudinal muscle contraction of the distal esophagus occurs during incomplete TLESRs, which can be detected by the HRM. Using prolonged ambulatory HRM, future studies may investigate the temporal correlation between abnormal longitudinal muscle contraction and esophageal symptoms. PMID:22074595

  2. [A case of Wernicke's encephalopathy with detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia].

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Masamitsu; Yaguchi, Hisa; Nagaura, Chikara

    2015-03-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old man with alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy. Neurological examination showed unconsciousness, absence of the oculocephalic reflex, generalized hyporeflexia, and urinary retention. The patient immediately regained consciousness after the administration of thiamine, but amnesia and cerebellar ataxia became apparent. The urinary retention persisted, and an urodynamic study showed detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Three months after the treatment, the urinary retention resolved, and a second urodynamic study showed disappearance of the detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Wernicke's encephalopathy involves the periaqueductal gray matter and the floor of the fourth ventricle. For the voiding reflex, the periaqueductal gray matter neurons project to the pontine micturition center, which seems to be located adjacent to the locus coeruleus. We concluded that lesions of the periaqueductal gray matter and/or the dorsolateral portion of the pons were responsible for the micturitional disturbance in the patient. PMID:25846447

  3. Assessing Upper Esophageal Sphincter Function in Clinical Practice: a Primer.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitin K; Chan, Walter W

    2016-01-01

    The upper esophageal sphincter constitutes an important anatomic and functional landmark in the physiology of pharyngeal swallowing. A variety of clinical circumstances may call for a dedicated evaluation of this mechanism, from the etiologic evaluation of indeterminate symptoms to the generation of complex locoregional therapeutic strategies. Multiple diagnostic tools exist for the assessment of pharyngeal swallowing generally and of upper esophageal sphincter function specifically, some well established and others not yet settled into routine practice. This report reviews five specific modalities for use in making this assessment, outlining the strengths, weaknesses, and logistical considerations of each with respect to its potential use in clinical settings. In many cases, these studies will provide complementary information regarding pharyngeal function, suggesting the relative advantage of a multimodal evaluation. PMID:26768897

  4. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  5. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeremy B; Mayer, Erik N; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  6. The Artificial Urinary Sphincter in the Management of Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Oscar A; McCammon, Kurt A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the emergence of different devices in the treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence, the AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN) remains the gold standard for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in men. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes, and complications of artificial urinary sphincter placement for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. Despite all the available information, heterogeneous data, different success definitions, and the lack of high-quality prospective studies with long-term follow-up, it is difficult to compare outcomes between studies. In spite of these, the perineal implantation of a single cuff artificial urinary sphincter has withstood the test of time. PMID:26845050

  7. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  8. Laparoscopic transcystic duct balloon dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B J; Phillips, E H; Chandra, M; Fallas, M

    1993-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi has been performed via a laparoscopic transcystic duct technique. Small common duct stones and stone debris have been successfully lavaged into the duodenum in 17 of 20 cases (85%) by this method. Postoperative hyperamylasemia was noted in four patients. Mild clinical pancreatitis was observed in three patients (15%). Further evaluation of this technique as an adjunct to laparoscopic common bile duct stone extraction is warranted. PMID:8272998

  9. Oddi: the paradox of the man and the sphincter.

    PubMed

    Modlin, I M; Ahlman, H

    1994-05-01

    Ruggero Oddi was born of a modest family in the small town of Perugia, Italy, in 1866. While still a young medical student, he identified the sphincter and in addition characterized its physiological properties. At the early age of 29 years, he was appointed as the director of the Physiological Institute at Genoa, but a dalliance with drugs and fiscal improprieties resulted in his being relieved of this eminent position in Italian Physiology. He subsequently sought employment as a physician in the Belgian colonial medical service and briefly spent time in the Congo. The deterioration of his physical status and his use of Vitaline, a homeopathic preparation, led to the demise of his medical career. For reasons that are unclear, he then traveled to Africa where he died in Tunisia. In the last 50 years, the use of sophisticated methodology has allowed delineation of aspects of the neural and hormonal regulatory mechanisms of the sphincter. Its exact role in disease has not been determined, although its relationship to the putative entity of biliary dyskinesia has been suggested. The paradox of both the sphincter and its original discoverer remain to be resolved. PMID:8185478

  10. Management of Complex Anal Fistulas.

    PubMed

    Bubbers, Emily J; Cologne, Kyle G

    2016-03-01

    Complex anal fistulas require careful evaluation. Prior to any attempts at definitive repair, the anatomy must be well defined and the sepsis resolved. Several muscle-sparing approaches to anal fistula are appropriate, and are often catered to the patient based on their presentation and previous repairs. Emerging technologies show promise for fistula repair, but lack long-term data. PMID:26929751

  11. Local generation and action of angiotensin II in dog iris sphincter muscle.

    PubMed

    Okamura, T; Wang, Y; Toda, N

    1992-10-01

    Existence of the renin-angiotensin system was pharmacologically investigated in the dog isolated iris sphincter muscle. The sphincter muscle contracted in response to tetradecapeptide, a synthetic renin substrate, angiotensin (ANG) I and ANG II dose-dependently. The contractions induced by these peptides were suppressed by treatment with saralasin, indomethacin and aspirin. Contractile responses to tetradecapeptide and ANG I were also reduced by KRI-1314, a renin inhibitor, and captopril, respectively. ANG II stimulated the release of prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha from the sphincter muscle. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity was measurable in the sphincter muscle. Miosis was observed by intracameral injection of ANG I and ANG II into the anterior chamber. These results strongly suggest that angiotensin generating enzymes function in the sphincter muscle and ANG II produced by these enzymes contracts the sphincter muscle via the formation of PG (s), possibly PG F2 alpha. PMID:1336465

  12. [Double sphincterostomy of pancreatic and choledochal sphincters in the treatment of chronic recurrent pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Plaz, J; Mujica, V

    1991-01-01

    The treatment of recurrent chronic pancreatitis is controversial. Some patients may have sphincter of Oddi motor abnormalities. Although widely used in the biliary tree, little data is available on endoscopic sphincterotomy of the pancreatic sphincter. This report describes 5 patients with recurrent chronic pancreatitis, who had pancreatic sphincterotomy for hypertensive sphincter of Oddi. Four patients continue long-term follow-up with marked reduction of chronic pain of attacks of recurrent pancreatitis. It is concluded that endoscopic sphincterotomy of the pancreatic sphincter may improve pain in chronic pancreatitis and may obviate the need for surgery. PMID:1688212

  13. New approach to anal cancer: Individualized therapy based on sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    De Nardi, Paola; Carvello, Michele; Staudacher, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Oncological treatment is currently directed toward a tailored therapy concept. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal could be considered a suitable platform to test new therapeutic strategies to minimize treatment morbidity. Standard of care for patients with anal canal cancer consists of a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This treatment has led to a high rate of local control and a 60% cure rate with preservation of the anal sphincter, thus replacing surgical abdominoperineal resection. Lymph node metastases represent a critical independent prognostic factor for local recurrence and survival. Mesorectal and iliac lymph nodes are usually included in the radiation field, whereas the inclusion of inguinal regions still remains controversial because of the subsequent adverse side effects. Sentinel lymph node biopsies could clearly identify inguinal node-positive patients eligible for therapeutic groin irradiation. A sentinel lymph node navigation procedure is reported here to be a feasible and effective method for establishing the true inguinal node status in patients suffering from anal canal cancer. Based on the results of sentinel node biopsies, a selective approach could be proposed where node-positive patients could be selected for inguinal node irradiation while node-negative patients could take advantage of inguinal sparing irradiation, thus avoiding toxic side effects. PMID:23197880

  14. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  15. Anal cushion lifting method is a novel radical management strategy for hemorrhoids that does not involve excision or cause postoperative anal complications

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Gentaro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji; Nishio, Akihiko; Tarumi, Ken; Kawamura, Maiko; Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Fujimiya, Mineko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the anal cushion lifting (ACL) method with preliminary clinical results. METHODS: Between January to September 2007, 127 patients who received ACL method for hemorrhoid was investigated with informed consent. In this study, three surgeons who specialized in anorectal surgery performed the procedures. Patients with grade two or more severe hemorrhoids according to Goligher’s classification were considered to be indicated for surgery. The patients were given the choice to undergo either the ACL method or the ligation and excision method. ACL method is an original technique for managing hemorrhoids without excision. After dissecting the anal cushion from the internal sphincter muscle, the anal cushion was lifted to oral side and ligated at the proper position. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were recorded including complications after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Their median age was 42 (19-84) years, and 74.8% were female. In addition, more than 99% of the patients had grade 3 or worse hemorrhoids. The median follow-up period was 26 (0-88) mo, and the median operative time was 15 (4-30) min. After surgery, analgesics were used for a median period of three days (0-21). Pain control was achieved using extra-oral analgesic drugs, although some patients required intravenous injections of analgesic drugs. The median duration of the patients’ postoperative hospital stay was 7 (2-13) d. A total of 10 complications (7.9%) occurred. Bleeding was observed in one patient and was successfully controlled with manual compression. Urinary retention occurred in 6 patients, but it disappeared spontaneously in all cases. Recurrent hemorrhoids developed in 3 patients after 36, 47, and 61 mo, respectively. No anal stenosis or persistent anal pain occurred. CONCLUSION: We consider that the ACL method might be better than all other current methods for managing hemorrhoids. PMID:26525139

  16. PERFACT procedure to treat supralevator fistula-in-ano: A novel single stage sphincter sparing procedure

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively perform the PERFACT procedure in supralevator anal fistula/abscess. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively in all the patients. Proximal cauterization around the internal opening, emptying regularly of fistula tracts and curettage of tracts (PERFACT) was done in all patients with supralevator fistula or abscess. All types of anal fistula and/or abscess with supralevator extension, whether intersphincteric or transsphincteric, were included in the study. The internal opening along with the adjacent mucosa was electrocauterized. The resulting wound was left open to heal by secondary intention so as to heal (close) the internal opening by granulation tissue. The supralevator tract/abscess was drained and thoroughly curetted. It was regularly cleaned and kept empty in the postoperative period. The primary outcome parameter was complete fistula healing. The secondary outcome parameters were return to work and change in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system) assessed preoperatively and at 3 mo after surgery. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled and followed for a median of 13 mo (range 5-21 mo). Mean age was 41.1 ± 13.4 years, M:F - 15:2. Fourteen (82.4%) had a recurrent fistula, 8 (47.1%) had an associated abscess, 14 (82.4%) had multiple tracts and 5 (29.4%) had horseshoe fistulae. Infralevator part of fistula was intersphincteric in 4 and transsphincteric in 13 patients. Two patients were excluded. Eleven out of fifteen (73.3%) were cured and 26.7% (4/15) had a recurrence. Two patients with recurrence were reoperated on with the same procedure and one was cured. Thus, the overall healing rate was 80% (12/15). All the patients could resume normal work within 48 h of surgery. There was no deterioration in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system). This is the largest series of supralevator fistula-in-ano (SLF) published to date. CONCLUSION: PERFACT procedure is an effective single step sphincter saving procedure to treat SLF with minimal risk of incontinence. PMID:27152140

  17. Anal Pap smears and anal cancer: what dermatologists should know.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, Walter; Ananth, Amy T; Ploch, Lauren E; Rogers, Nicole E

    2014-11-01

    Squamous epithelial cells are susceptible to infection by the human papillomavirus. Infection of squamous epithelium with oncogenic human papillomavirus types is associated with development of dysplasia and potential malignant transformation. Historically, cervical cancer has been the most prevalent human papillomavirus-induced squamous neoplasia. However, because of widespread screening via Pap smear testing, rates of cervical cancer in the United States have decreased dramatically during the past 50 years. Rates of anal cancer, in contrast, have doubled during the past 30 years. The groups at highest risk for development of anal cancer are men who have sex with men, HIV-positive patients, and patients immunosuppressed as a result of solid-organ transplantation. By detecting dysplasia before it develops into invasive cancer, anal Pap smears may be a potentially useful screening tool for anal cancer, particularly in individuals known to be at increased risk. However, at this time, sufficient data supporting the benefit of anal Pap smear screening are lacking. With insufficient evidence, no national health care organizations currently recommend the use of anal Pap smears as a routine screening test, even among high-risk groups. PMID:25088812

  18. Function and dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    In this review, the function of the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is detailed in terms of normal motility, neural and hormonal control of SO function, coordination between gallbladder and SO motility, and correlation of motility of the SO and the duodenum. In addition, SO function tests, such as the morphine Prostigmin test (Nardi test), perfusion manometry, microtransducer manometry, and cholescintigraphy, are explained. Subsequently, the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of SO dysfunction, including SO stenosis and dyskinesia, are described and discussed in detail. SO manometry and endoscopic sphincterotomy are effective to treat SO dysfunction, but symptoms of the patient must be severe enough to justify these invasive procedures for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20551650

  19. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  20. [HPV-induced anal lesions].

    PubMed

    Wieland, U; Kreuter, A

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections belong to the most common sexually transmitted infections. To date, more than 200 completely classified HPV-types have been reported, and those belonging to the genus alpha predominantly infect the anogenital region. Condylomata acuminata are caused by the two low-risk types HPV6 and HPV11 in more than 90 % of cases. Treatment of genital warts might be either ablative (e.g. electrocautery, surgical excision, or laser therapy) or topical (e.g. podophyllotoxine, trichloroacetic acid, or imiquimod), and depends on the size, location, morphology and anatomical region. Recurrences after treatment are frequent. Therefore, combination therapies (e.g. topical and ablative) play an important role in daily routine. HIV-infected individuals, especially HIV-positive MSM, have a strongly increased risk for anal dysplasia and anal cancer. Condylomata acuminata and a large proportion of anal dysplasia and anal carcinoma are preventable by prophylactic HPV-vaccination. PMID:25859930

  1. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals. PMID:16494055

  2. Simultaneous penile prosthesis and male sling/artificial urinary sphincter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dominic; Romero, Claudio; Alba, Frances; Westney, O Lenaine; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach. PMID:23202702

  3. Simultaneous penile prosthesis and male sling/artificial urinary sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dominic; Romero, Claudio; Alba, Frances; Westney, O Lenaine; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach. PMID:23202702

  4. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  5. Anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma: report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ang; Mei, Zubing; Cui, Long

    2015-01-01

    Trichilemmoma is a rare type of benign cutaneous neoplasm, which derives from outer sheath of hair follicle. It barely develops malignant progression and has rarely been reported in anal cancer. In this article, we report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented to the outer-patient department with complaints of a ruptured and longstanding anal phyma. All the appearances were atypical. Blood routine examination showed that neutrophilic granulocyte percentage was elevated and suggest it was a simple inflammation response. No evidence of malignancy was detected upon the laboratory examinations. Then we performed an abscess incision drainage for the patient. A few days later, the biopsy pathological report suggested the specimen is a malignant proliferative trichilemmoma. We decided to perform a wide local excision instead of an extended radical operation in order to preserve anus. After the surgery, we chose not to give chemoradio-treatment for fear of side effects and complications. Careful follow-up indicates that peri-anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma may have a good prognosis and our treatment is a good choice for the patients with this tumor. Because of the low occurrence rate of anal cancer, especially malignant trichilemmoma, any clinical manifestation and experience are valuable. On one hand, our case may help to take the consideration of the diagnosis of malignant trichilemmoma in case of longtime-suffered peri-anal mass, on the other hand it propose a different treatment method from other anal cancers for clinical doctors. PMID:26045866

  6. Anal avulsion caused by abdominal crush injury.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, G; Rossetto, A; Kocjancic, E; Rossitti, P; Bresadola, V

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a pelvic and lower abdomen crushing trauma in 37-year-old male patient. The patient had an open lumbar wound, laceration of the psoas muscle, pelvic fracture, a ruptured urogenital diaphragm, and extensive urogenital lacerations. An emergency laparotomy was performed with debridment, urethral reconstruction, and osteosynthesis of the pubic bone. The mobilization of the patient revealed a deep gap, about 8 × 8 cm, in the perineum, with the anus and rectum displaced from their original site. Anal reimplantation was performed, suturing the median raphe, inserting two pelvic drainage tubes, and fashioning a loop transverse colostomy. Closed rectal traumas account for only 4-11% of all rectal traumas. Crushing of the pelvis causes a sudden reduction in its anteroposterior diameter and a corresponding increase in its latero-lateral diameter, together with an abrupt rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The anus is pushed out of the perineal plane due to the divarication of the levator muscles. As suggested in the literature, the standard treatment is wound debridement with immediate or deferred repair, fashioning a diversion colostomy, and repair of the rectum, wherever possible. PMID:21556880

  7. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    El-Bahy, K; Kotb, A; Galal, A; El-Hakim, A

    2006-04-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts (RICDC) is a rare phenomenon. The mechanism of rupture, pathophysiology of fat in the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces, possible complications, and proper management of such conditions are proposed on the basis of a review of the literature and experience with two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts (One was in the pineal region, while another was in the fourth ventricle). It is concluded that rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is usually spontaneous and non-fatal. Persistence of fat in the subarachnoid spaces postoperatively may last asymptomatically for years. Surgery is the only way to deal with these benign lesions. If the capsule is adherent to vital areas, incomplete removal is advised as recurrence and malignant transformation are unlikely to occur. PMID:16437187

  8. Tectonics: Rupture exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    Great Himalayan earthquakes were thought to rarely rupture the surface. Field analyses in Nepal, however, reveal large surface displacements along the main fault bounding India and Asia during at least two historical earthquakes, in 1255 and 1934.

  9. Effects of Larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) on Heart Rate and Electrically Evoked Electromyographic Response of the External Anal Sphincter in Cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) are competitive antagonists of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and poison cattle with, high mortality. Of the norditerpenoids, the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) alkaloids are most toxic. This study tested the hyp...

  10. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  11. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  12. Gracilis muscle as neoanal sphincter for faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Zailani, M H M; Azmi, M N; Deen, K I

    2010-03-01

    Faecal incontinence is a debilitating chronic clinical condition which may affect the patient and care givers. Modality of treatment is based on severity of the symptoms as well as the anatomical defect itself, availability of resources and expertise. We describe a modified technique of dynamic graciloplasty as neoanal sphincter for the treatment severe faecal incontinence who has failed previous over lapping sphincteroplasty. In our modified version, instead of using implanted intramuscular electrodes and subcutaneous neurostimulator to provide continuous stimulation, the patient will undergo an external stimulation on the nerve of transplanted gracilis periodically and concurrent biofeedback therapy. We believe the technique is relatively easy to learn and very cost effective without any electrodes or neurostimulator related complications. PMID:21265253

  13. [Reconstruction of velopharyngeal sphincter in secondary Cleft Palate: surgical alternative].

    PubMed

    Recamán, M; Bonet, B; Leitão, J; Mesquita, A

    2006-04-01

    There are numerous surgical procedures for the repair of Cleft Palate (CP). Since 1998, in children with CP we use a modified Wardill-Kilner technique, with a large section of the nasal mucous layer at the level of the muscular insertion on the hard palate and lateral nasopharingeal wall, obtaining a push-back and reorientation of the muscular fibres without dissection, diminishing this way the risks of haemorrhages and fibrosis, simplifying the intervention. It allows a lower operative time and a short internment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the results of this operative procedure specially in the development of the speech in 73 children operated on from 1998 until 2000 in our hospital. We verify a competence of the velopharingeal sphincter with ideal results in speech in 88,8% of the cases. PMID:16846134

  14. Treatment of gastrointestinal sphincters spasms with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  15. Can Anal Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... experts recommend screening with regular DREs and anal cytology testing (also known as an anal Pap test ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  16. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  17. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  18. New Artificial Urinary Sphincter Devices in the Treatment of Male Iatrogenic Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Vakalopoulos, Ioannis; Kampantais, Spyridon; Laskaridis, Leonidas; Chachopoulos, Vasileios; Koptsis, Michail; Toutziaris, Chrysovalantis

    2012-01-01

    Severe persistent stress incontinence following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer treatment, although not very common, remains the most annoying complication affecting patient's quality of life, despite good surgical oncological results. When severe incontinence persists after the first postoperative year and conservative treatment has been failed, surgical treatment has to be considered. In these cases it is generally accepted that artificial urinary sphincter is the gold standard treatment. AUS 800 by American Medical Systems has been successfully used for more than 35 years. Recently three more sphincter devices, the Flow-Secure, the Periurethral Constrictor, and the ZSI 375, have been developed and presented in the market. A novel type of artificial urinary sphincter, the Tape Mechanical Occlusive Device, has been inserted in live canines as well as in human cadavers. These new sphincter devices are discussed in this paper focusing on safety and clinical results. PMID:22567002

  19. [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal carcinoma: an increasing problem in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Kreuter, A; Brockmeyer, N H; Wieland, U

    2010-01-01

    Anal dysplasia is common in HIV patients, especially in HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). High-grade anal dysplasia can progress to invasive anal cancer. As in cervical carcinoma, there is a cause and effect relationship between anal cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, especially with high-risk types such as HPV16. Several experts have recommended screening programs for anal cancer, including anal cytology along the lines of the Pap smear in women. Such screenings should only be performed if pathological findings result in further diagnostic steps and, if necessary, appropriate treatment. Clinical inspection, lesion biopsy, and treatment of anal dysplasia are performed under high-resolution anoscopy. Anal cancer is divided into cancer of the anal margin and cancer of the anal canal. This classification is important because of the difference in treatment regimens. Early cancer of the anal margin is excised akin to squamous cell cancer of the exposed skin, whereas cancer of the anal canal is treated by radiochemotherapy. HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients have similar response rates to combined radiochemotherapy. However, side effects, especially acute post-irradiation skin toxicity, early local recurrences, and abdominoperineal rectal excision are more common in HIV-positive patients. Physicians working in the field of HIV/AIDS should regularly screen their patients for the presence of anal dysplasia and anal cancer. Basic diagnostic workup includes clinical inspection of the perianal area, digital rectal examination, and anal cytology. PMID:19967333

  20. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  1. The effect of pinaverium bromide (LA 1717) on the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wöltje, M; Huchzermeyer, H

    1982-01-01

    An acute, double-blind study was carried out in 8 healthy male volunteers to investigate any effect of a new antispasmodic, pinaverium bromide, compared with placebo on the lower oesophageal sphincter. Manometric measurements showed no significant differences in resting pressures either after placebo or a therapeutic dose (200 mg) of pinaverium bromide, suggesting that the active drug does not cause any impairment of function of the lower oesophageal sphincter. PMID:7128186

  2. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor. PMID:10817391

  3. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincteroplasty for anal fistula (FIPS): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ratto, C; Litta, F; Donisi, L; Parello, A

    2015-07-01

    There is still no clear consensus about surgical treatment of anal fistulas. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincter reconstruction is still regarded with skepticism. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence in the literature supporting the use of this technique in the treatment of complex anal fistulas. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched for the period between 1985 and 2015. The studies selected were peer-reviewed articles, with no limitations concerning the study cohort size, length of the follow-up or language. Technical notes, commentaries, letters and meeting abstracts were excluded. The major endpoints were the technique adopted, clinical efficacy, changes at anorectal manometry and assessment of quality of life after the procedure. Fourteen reports (666 patients) satisfied the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was low. Some differences about the surgical technique emerged; however, after a weighted average duration of follow-up of 28.9months, the overall success rate was 93.2%, with a low morbidity rate. The overall postoperative worsening continence rate was 12.4% (mainly post-defecation soiling). In almost all cases, the anorectal manometry parameters remained unchanged. The quality of life, when evaluated, improved significantly. Fistulotomy or fistulectomy and primary sphincteroplasty could be a therapeutic option for complex anal fistula. Success rates were very high and the risk of postoperative fecal incontinence was lower than after simple fistulotomy. Well-designed trials are needed to support the inclusion of this technique in a treatment algorithm for the management of complex anal fistulas. PMID:26062740

  4. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  5. Normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdong; Liu, Tieyan; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Jingyi; Chen, Yuefeng; Sun, Pengyu; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this research, the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males has been studied. Methods: The sagittal, coronal, and axial T2-weighted non-fat suppressed fast spin-echo images of pelvic cavities of 86 Chinese young males were studied. Result: Urethral sphincter complex threaded through the prostate and divided it into 2 parts: transition zone (TZ), periurethral glands internal to the urethral sphincter and peripheral zone (PZ), central zone (CZ), anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFS) zone external to the urethral sphincter. The length of urethral striated sphincter is 12.26-20.94 mm (mean 16.59 mm) at membranous urethra. Conclusions: In this paper, we summarized the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males with no urinary control problems. PMID:26629244

  6. [Anal cancer in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Quéro, Laurent; Duval, Xavier; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Despite effective highly active antiretroviral treatment, anal cancer incidence has recently strongly increased in HIV-infected population. Treatment strategy in HIV-infected patients does not differ from general population. HIV-infected patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy are exposed to high-grade toxicities and should be closely monitored to deliver the optimal treatment. Close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is highly recommended to adjust antiretroviral therapy if necessary. PMID:25418596

  7. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure...

  8. Elements of an anal dysplasia screening program.

    PubMed

    Jay, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is highly elevated compared to the general population, as is the incidence of its precursor lesion, high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN). MSM in general and other immunocompromised populations are also at higher risk. Treatment of HGAIN may prevent development of cancer, similar to the decrease in cervical cancers that has occurred since the advent of cervical cancer screening programs in women. Cervical cancer screening tools have been adapted and validated for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of anal HGAIN. Anal cancer screening programs have now been available for more than a decade, although they are not yet standards of care. Incorporating screening procedures into practice depends on the available resources in a particular community. This article discusses the procedures for anal cancer screening including cytology, digital anal rectal examinations, high-resolution anoscopy, and biopsy. PMID:22035526

  9. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  10. [Symphysis rupture during partus].

    PubMed

    Nouta, Klaas-Auke; Van Rhee, Marina; Van Langelaan, Evert J

    2011-01-01

    A few hours after the birth of her first child a 36-year-old woman developed anterior pelvic pain. The pain worsened on walking. It proved that during the birth the patient had felt something 'give'. On X-ray a diastasis of 50 mm was seen in the symphysis and symphysis rupture was diagnosed. The patient was treated conservatively with bed rest and pelvic stabilisation. After 17 weeks she was symptom-free. Symphysis rupture during partus is rare. It is characterised by pain around the symphysis and/or the sacro-iliac joints during the first 24 hours post partum. Diagnosis can be made by X-ray. Treatment is predominantly conservative comprising pelvic stabilisation and bed rest. PMID:21426597

  11. Inter-Rater Agreement of Anal Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Darragh, Teresa M.; Tokugawa, Diane; Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; LaMere, Brandon J.; Schwartz, Lauren; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Lorey, Thomas; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Most anal cancers are caused by persistent infections with carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV). Similar to cervical carcinogenesis, the progression from HPV infection to anal cancer goes through precancerous lesions that can be treated to prevent invasion. In analogy to cervical cytology, anal cytology has been proposed as a screening tool for anal cancer precursors in high-risk populations. We analyzed the inter-observer reproducibility of anal cytology in a population of 363 HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Liquid-based cytology (LBC) specimens were collected in the anal dysplasia clinic before performing high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) on all subjects. Papanicolaou-stained, LBC slides were evaluated by two cytopathologists, blinded to clinical outcome and the other pathologist's results, using the revised Bethesda terminology. Overall agreement between two observers was 66% (kappa 0.54, linear weighted kappa 0.69). Using dichotomizing cytology results (ASC-US or worse vs. less than ASC-US), the agreement increased to 86% (kappa 0.69). We observed an increasing likelihood of testing positive for markers associated with HPV-related transformation, p16/Ki-67 and HPV oncogene mRNA, with increasing severity of cytology results both for individual cytologists and for consensus cytology interpretation (ptrend < 0.0001 for all). In summary, we observed moderate to good agreement between two cytopathologists evaluating anal cytology samples collected in HIV-positive MSM. A higher severity of anal cytology was associated with biomarkers of anal precancers. Anal cytology may be used for anal cancer screening in high-risk populations, and biomarkers of HPV-related transformation can serve for quality control of anal cytology. PMID:22811048

  12. Medication Effects on Periurethral Sensation and Urethral Sphincter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Greer, W. Jerod; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Kenton, Kimberly; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Goode, Patricia S; Richter, Holly E

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize urethral neuromuscular function before and 2 weeks after medication therapy. Methods Premenopausal women without lower urinary tract symptoms were randomly allocated to one of six medications for 2 weeks (pseudoephedrine ER 120mg, imipramine 25mg, cyclobenzaprine 10mg, tamsulosin 0.4mg, solifenacin 5mg or placebo). At baseline and after medication, participants underwent testing: quantitative concentric needle EMG (CNE) of the urethral sphincter using automated Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) software; current perception threshold (CPT) testing to measure periurethral sensation; and standard urodynamic pressure flow studies (PFS). Nonparametric tests were used to compare pre-post differences. Results 56 women had baseline testing; 48 (85.7%) completed follow-up CNE, and 49 (87.5%) completed follow-up CPT and PFS testing. Demographics showed no significant differences among medication groups with respect to age (mean 34.3 ± 10.1), BMI (mean 31.8 ± 7.5), parity (median 1, range 0–7), or race (14% Caucasian, 80% African American). PFS parameters were not significantly different within medication groups. No significant pre-post changes in CNE values were noted; however, trends in amplitudes were in a direction consistent with the expected physiologic effect of the medications. With CPT testing, a trend toward increased urethral sensation at the 5 Hz stimulation level, was observed following treatment with pseudoephedrine (0.15 to 0.09 mA at 5Hz; P=0.03). Conclusion In women without LUTS, pseudoephedrine improved urethral sensation, but not urethral neuromuscular function on CNE or pressure flow studies. Imipramine, cyclobenzaprine, tamsulosin, solifenacin, and placebo did not change urethral sensation or neuromuscular function. PMID:25185603

  13. Expression of serotonin receptors in human lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Li, He-Fei; Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Ke; Feng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter and vasoactive amine that is involved in the regulation of a large number of physiological functions. The wide variety of 5-HT-mediated functions is due to the existence of different classes of serotonergic receptors in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and nervous system. The aim of this study was to explore the expression of multiple types of 5-HT receptor (5-HT1AR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT3AR, 5-HT4R, 5-HT5AR, 5-HT6R and 5-HT7R) in sling and clasp fibers from the human lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Muscle strips of sling and clasp fibers from the LES were obtained from patients undergoing esophagogastrectomy, and circular muscle strips from the esophagus and stomach were used as controls. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the expression of the various 5-HT receptor types. Messenger RNA for all seven 5-HT receptor types was identified in the sling and clasp fibers of the LES. At the mRNA level, the expression levels were highest for 5-HT3AR and 5-HT4R, and lowest for 5-HT5AR, 5-HT6R and 5-HT7R. At the protein level, the expression levels were highest for 5-HT3AR and 5-HT4R, followed by 5-HT1AR and 5-HT2AR; 5-HT7R was also detected at a low level. The expression of 5-HT5AR and 5-HT6R proteins was not confirmed. The results indicate that a variety of 5-HT receptor types can be detected in the human LES and probably contribute to LES function. PMID:25452775

  14. Anality: a theory of erotism and characterology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R E; Juni, S

    1981-01-01

    The psychogenesis of anality is in the psychosexual events of the second year of life. An analysis of that phase of development centers on the biological determinants of psychological development, specifically on the erotization of the excretory functions. The social structures interfering with this process are examined. The interrelationship of feces, child, and penis are analyzed within the context of the total libidinal spectrum of development and object relations. Bipolarity is seen as an integral facet of the anal character, manifested in the retentive-eliminative continuum and in the aggressive-erotic divergences. These trends are examined in detail vis-à-vis the ultimate ossification of the anal adult. In this context, the percept of anal-sadism is introduced and alternate interpretations of the phenomenon are suggested. Various characteristics frequently associated with anal characterology are discussed and an attempt is made to demarcate the status (as integral or peripheral) of these traits. Sociocultural contingencies of anality are also considered, particularly with regard to Western institutions. The major pathological maladaptions related to anality are detailed. These include the obsessions and rigid superego development, paranoia, and homosexuality. The status of anality is then evaluated from the ego-psychological perspective, and interpersonal and societal factors are considered. What emerges is a unitary construct of anality which incorporates both erotism and characterology. PMID:7282978

  15. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhashis; Crane, Lawrence

    2012-02-01

    Rare in the general population, anal cancer has reached epidemic proportions among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). These cancers are human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated, usually HPV type16, and are analogous to cervical cancer. At present, the rates of anal cancer in this group are 10-fold higher than that of cervical cancer occurring in women in the general population. Although there are no national guidelines for screening for anal intraepithelial dysplasia (AIN), many large HIV clinics are now performing anal cytologic screening in their at-risk patients. This paper outlines the current approach to screening for AIN and its management. PMID:22125048

  16. Effects of ethanol on the sphincter of Oddi: an endoscopic manometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, G

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ethanol, given either intragastrically or intravenously, on the sphincter of Oddi was evaluated by endoscopic manometry. In 12 subjects intragastric ethanol (150 ml of 32%) was given over 10 minutes. In five control subjects saline solution (150 ml of 0.9%) was given intragastrically instead of ethanol. In five other subjects ethanol was infused intravenously (6 ml/kg of 10%) for 36 minutes. Ethanol given intragastrically produced a significant inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure. Peak pressure fell from a control value of 75.7 +/- 26.35 mmHg to 39 +/- 15.39 mmHg (p less than 0.001) at 35 minutes. Basal pressure fell from a control value of 30.17 +/- 19.47 mmHg to 11.83 +/- 6.35 mmHg (p less than 0.01) at 35 minutes. Wave height fell from a control value of 41.33 +/- 15.4 mmHg to 27.16 +/- 11.25 mmHg (p less than 0.02) at 35 minutes. No effects on sphincter of Oddi wave frequency were observed. No significant modifications of sphincter motor activity were observed after intragastric saline infusion. Ethanol given intravenously also produced an appreciable inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure, without affecting its wave frequency. PMID:6848429

  17. Gallbladder ejection fraction. Nondiagnostic for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction in patients with intact gallbladders.

    PubMed

    Kalloo, A N; Sostre, S; Meyerrose, G E; Pasricha, P J; Szabo, Z

    1994-08-01

    Thirty consecutive patients with intact gallbladders and biliary pain were evaluated to determine whether gallbladder ejection fraction could identify sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. The mean gallbladder ejection fraction was 45% in patients with abdominal pain and 72% in normal controls. Gallbladder ejection fractions were then correlated with endoscopically measured sphincter of Oddi pressures in patients with abdominal pain. The mean gallbladder ejection fraction was 41% in 7 patients with elevated sphincter pressures and 46% in 23 patients with normal pressures (P = NS). Thirty-six percent of patients with elevated pressures and 33% of patients with normal pressures had abnormal gallbladder ejection fractions. Gallbladder ejection fraction had a sensitivity of 33%, a specificity of 63%, and a positive predictive value of 25% for detection of elevated pressures. Regression analysis revealed a poor correlation between sphincter pressure and gallbladder ejection fraction (r2 = 0.02). These findings suggest that gallbladder ejection fraction cannot be used to diagnose sphincter of Oddi dysfunction in patients before they undergo cholecystectomy. PMID:7955753

  18. Psychological aspect of qualification to implant an artificial urethral sphincter AMS 800

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Zbigniew; Szabela-Polak, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Implantation of the AMS 800 artificial urethral sphincter is a “gold standard” in the treatment of total urinary incontinence in men. Appropriate qualification of patients to urinary incontinence treatment determines the higher effectiveness of this method. Service of this device requires physical fitness and mental efficiency from a patient. Material and methods The Urological Clinic hospitalized 16 patients, aged from 60 to 80 years, after first qualification for artificial urethral sphincter implantation. Psychological assessment was carried out during anamnesis and medical examination using the MMSE and the GDS. Results Psychological deviations were found in 7 out of 16 examined patients, but finally 2 patients were disqualified because of their cognitive function disorders with elements of low level depressive syndrome (1) and benign cognitive and member function disorders (1). Among the patients who were examined by a psychologist: four of them showed mild (3) and temperate (1) features of depressive syndrome and one patient showed benign cognitive disorder without dementia. However, none of these findings were contraindications to incontinence treatment with an artificial urethral sphincter. Conclusions 1. Mild and temperate features of depression syndrome are not absolute contraindications for a sphincter AMS 800 implantation. These patients need only pharmacological treatment. 2. Cognitive and other memory disorders are contraindications to this method. 3. The qualification to implantation an artificial urethral sphincter should include a psychological assessment, especially in older patients in whom mental disorders are suspected. PMID:24578917

  19. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: treatment by external beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Eschwege, F; Lasser, P; Chavy, A; Wibault, P; Kac, J; Rougier, P; Bognel, C

    1985-02-01

    External beam radiation therapy alone or in combination with curietherapy is the recommended treatment for anal canal carcinoma in some countries. In others, surgery is the sole accepted treatment. The results for 64 patients treated by external radiotherapy alone show excellent survival for stage T1T2 tumors but results are poor for large tumors (stage T4). The overall 5 year crude survival rate is 46%. The 5-year results are better for stage T1T2 (72%) than for stage T3T4 (35%). The presence of inguinal node involvement at first examination is a very poor prognostic sign. Local recurrences and metastases are infrequent for stage T1T2, but are more common for stage T3 and T4. Complications follow radiotherapy more frequently in those with stage T3 and T4 tumors. The analysis of local recurrences, complications and survival shows that radiation therapy may be sufficient treatment for stage T1 and T2 and for some stage T3 tumors. The importance of anal sphincter involvement and the poor quality of life for patients who are cured but develop complications, shows the need for combined treatment with surgery and perhaps with chemotherapy. For small tumors the results obtained by external radiotherapy alone are comparable with those obtained by external radiotherapy and curietherapy in terms of survival and complications. PMID:3920734

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV types, can eventually cause certain cancers, including anal cancer. HPV in men For men, the 2 main factors ... more information about HPV and HPV vaccines, see HPV Vaccines . Anal warts Anal warts (also known as condyloma acuminata ) ...

  2. Intersphincteric anal lipofilling with micro-fragmented fat tissue for the treatment of faecal incontinence: preliminary results of three patients

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Michele; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno; Gentile, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Faecal incontinence is a very debilitating problem. Many techniques have been proposed to treat this condition, with controversial results. Autologous transplant of fat tissue is an established procedure used for the repair of tissue damage, and recent studies revealed the potentiality of tissue regeneration by human adipose-derived stem cells. We treated this condition with the injection, in the intersphincteric anal groove, of lipoaspirate processed by an innovative technology (Lipogems). The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Lipogems injection for the treatment of faecal incontinence. In February 2014 we treated 3 patients with faecal incontinence. The surgical procedure required three phases: lipoaspiration, processing of lipoaspirate with the Lipogems system, and injection of the obtained product in the intersphincteric anal groove. An accurate proctological examination followed at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Each patient reported an improved Wexner incontinence score at 1 month after the procedure. We observed an increase of resting pressure (by at least 10 mm Hg) and thickness of the internal anal sphincter respectively at ano-rectal manometry and by ultrasound (US) evaluation at the sixth month of follow-up. Our preliminary results are encouraging, but multicentric studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate this novel technique for treatment of faecal incontinence. PMID:26240640

  3. Intersphincteric anal lipofilling with micro-fragmented fat tissue for the treatment of faecal incontinence: preliminary results of three patients.

    PubMed

    Cestaro, Giovanni; De Rosa, Michele; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno; Gentile, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Faecal incontinence is a very debilitating problem. Many techniques have been proposed to treat this condition, with controversial results. Autologous transplant of fat tissue is an established procedure used for the repair of tissue damage, and recent studies revealed the potentiality of tissue regeneration by human adipose-derived stem cells. We treated this condition with the injection, in the intersphincteric anal groove, of lipoaspirate processed by an innovative technology (Lipogems). The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Lipogems injection for the treatment of faecal incontinence. In February 2014 we treated 3 patients with faecal incontinence. The surgical procedure required three phases: lipoaspiration, processing of lipoaspirate with the Lipogems system, and injection of the obtained product in the intersphincteric anal groove. An accurate proctological examination followed at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Each patient reported an improved Wexner incontinence score at 1 month after the procedure. We observed an increase of resting pressure (by at least 10 mm Hg) and thickness of the internal anal sphincter respectively at ano-rectal manometry and by ultrasound (US) evaluation at the sixth month of follow-up. Our preliminary results are encouraging, but multicentric studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate this novel technique for treatment of faecal incontinence. PMID:26240640

  4. Nocturnal faecal soiling and anal masturbation.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A F; Tayler, P J; Bhate, S R

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of late onset faecal soiling as a result of anal masturbation in children who were neither mentally handicapped nor psychotic were studied. The role of soiling in aiding the young person and his family to avoid separating and maturing is highlighted. We suggest that the association of anal masturbation and resistant nocturnal soiling may be unrecognised. PMID:2270946

  5. Motor function of the opossum sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed Central

    Toouli, J; Dodds, W J; Honda, R; Sarna, S; Hogan, W J; Komarowski, R A; Linehan, J H; Arndorfer, R C

    1983-01-01

    We studied the opossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) because in this species the SO is approximately 3 cm in length and its extraduodenal location permits recording of motor activity with negligible interference from duodenal motor activity. The SO segment of 120 animals was evaluated by one or more of the following: (a) intraluminal manometry; (b) electromyography; (c) common bile duct (CBD) flow monitored by a drop counter; (d) cineradiography of intraductal contrast medium; and (e) histologic examination. SO pull-throughs using an infused catheter of 0.6-mm o.d. invariably showed a high pressure zone (HPZ) of 18 +/- 3 SE mm Hg in the terminal 4-5 mm of the SO segment. This HPZ had a narrow lumen, 0.5-0.7 mm in diam, and prominent circular muscle. The HPZ in the terminal SO had both active and passive components. HPZ with minimal amplitude and a paucity of underlying smooth muscle were present inconstantly at the junction of the SO segment with the CBD and pancreatic duct, respectively. The dominant feature of the SO segment was rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originated in the proximal SO and propagated toward the duodenum. These contractions occurred spontaneously at a rate of 2-8/min, ranged up to 200 mm Hg in magnitude, had a duration of approximately 5 s and were not abolished by tetrodotoxin. Concurrent myoelectric and manometric recordings showed that each phasic contraction was immediately preceded by an electrical spike burst. Simultaneous recordings of cineradiography, CBD inflow of contrast medium, SO manometry, and SO electromyography indicated that rhythmic peristaltic contractions stripped contrast medium from the SO into the duodenum. During SO systole, CBD emptying was transiently interrupted, whereas SO filling occurred during the diastolic interval between SO peristaltic contractions. SO distention increased the frequency of SO peristalsis. We conclude that (a) the dominant feature of the opossum SO is rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originate in the proximal SO and propagate toward the duodenum; (b) these forceful SO peristaltic contractions are myogenic in origin and serve as a peristaltic pump that actively empties the SO segment; (c) CBD outflow occurs passively during SO diastole, but is interrupted transiently during each SO peristaltic contraction; and (d) a short HPZ with active as well as passive components exists in the distal SO segment and acts as a variable resistor to SO outflow. Images PMID:6822661

  6. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques. PMID:10798233

  7. Spontaneous rupture of renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Bhatia, Anmol; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-04-01

    Spontaneous urine extravasation from the pelvicalyceal system into the perinephric space is an uncommon condition. It is most commonly seen in the setting of obstructive ureteric calculus. Other rare causes include neoplasms, trauma, and iatrogenic procedures. Most commonly described phenomenon is forniceal rupture, but renal pelvis rupture without forniceal rupture is extremely rare. We present a short series of 3 cases of spontaneous pelvis rupture, each with a different etiology. Diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography. The follow-up and therapeutic approaches are discussed with a short review of literature. PMID:23380093

  8. The recto-anal inhibitory reflex: abnormal response in diabetics suggests an intrinsic neuroenteropathy.

    PubMed

    Deen, K I; Premaratna, R; Fonseka, M M; De Silva, H J

    1998-11-01

    As electrical stimulation of the rectum has been shown to result in reflex internal sphincter inhibition mediated by intrinsic nerves, we aimed to evaluate the integrity of these nerves in the rectum of diabetic patients. Anal canal pressure, recto-anal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) and continence were evaluated in 30 diabetic patients (male:female 13:17, median age 57 years, range 37-70) and these data were compared with similar data obtained from 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (male:female 9:13, median age 51 years, range 19-65 years). Median duration of diabetes was 8 years (range 3-30). Twelve (40%) of the 30 diabetics had impaired continence for gas (n = 12) and liquid faeces (n = 3). None of the controls had incontinence. Median maximum resting anal canal pressure (MRP) was: patients 30 mmHg (range 20-75 mmHg) versus controls 40 mmHg (range 20-105 mmHg, P = 0.61). Median maximum squeeze pressure (MSP) was 65 mmHg (range 30-150 mmHg) in patients versus 84mmHg (range 35-230 mm Hg) in controls (P = 0.59). Median threshold rectal mucosal electrosensation (RMES-T) was 27mA (5-40 mA) in patients versus 13 mA (5-28 mA) in controls (P = 0.03). Maximum tolerable rectal mucosal electrosensation was 40 mA (20-60) in patients versus 20 mA (10-30), in controls (P = 0.042, all comparisons using the Wilcoxon rank test). Recto-anal inhibitory reflex was present in eight, abnormal in five (one incontinent) and absent in 17 (11 incontinent) diabetics, while it was present in 18 and abnormal in four controls (test of proportion, P = 0.031). Blood glucose in diabetics on the day of the procedure was 98 mg/dL (70-165 mg/dL). Rectal mucosal electrosensitivity and RAIR were impaired in significantly more patients with diabetes than controls, implying impairment of intrinsic neuronal function. The recto-anal inhibitory reflex was either impaired or absent in all diabetic patients with incontinence. PMID:9870796

  9. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  10. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: review and recommendations for screening and management.

    PubMed

    Smyczek, Petra; Singh, Ameeta E; Romanowski, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Anal cancer is a rare malignancy of the distal gastrointestinal tract, often associated with human papillomavirus, the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Currently available screening methods for anal intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor for anal cancer, combine anal Papanicolaou cytology and high resolution anoscopy with biopsy of suspicious lesions. Significant barriers to establishing anal cancer screening programmes include the small number of healthcare professionals performing high resolution anoscopy and the lack of data showing that anal cancer screening can reduce morbidity and mortality related to anal carcinoma. Despite several controversies surrounding anal cancer screening, the rising incidence of this disease in some groups supports routine screening programmes in high-risk populations, especially in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. This review outlines the epidemiology of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer and summarizes issues related to the introduction of anal cancer screening programmes. PMID:23970583

  11. On the etiology of anal squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Morten

    2002-08-01

    The thesis is based on 13 publications in English and a review of the literature. The underlying work was done with the overall aim to describe incidence patterns for anal squamous carcinoma (anal SC) and to contribute new insight into the causes of this neoplasm. The work, supported by the Danish Cancer Society, was carried out in the period 1991-2000 while I was employed at 1) the Danish Cancer Registry, 2) Statens Serum Institute, Department of Epidemiology Research, and 3) the National Cancer Institute, Viral Epidemiology Branch, Maryland. Study designs employed include a ) population-based incidence studies in Denmark and the United States, b) register-based case-control studies and cohort studies for the scrutiny of multiple cancer patterns among patients with anal SC and for the study of anal SC risk among individuals with certain non-malignant diseases of the anal region as well as among persons with the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), c) a nationwide interview-based case-control study of risk factors for anal SC and in Denmark and Sweden, and d) a combined molecular biological and histological analysis examining the association of human papillomavirus (HPV) status with histopathological and anatomical characteristics in anal SC tissues. The epidemiology of anal SC has changed remarkably during the second half of the 20th century. In Denmark, age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 person-years increased during the period 1943-1997 from around 0.2 among both men an women to 0.5 among men and 1.0 among women. Where systematically studied, incidence rates of anal SC have also been found to increase in a few other countries (Sweden and the United States). Register-based multiple cancer studies have shown an excess of previous and subsequent genital cancers of squamous histology among women with anal SC. This is likely to reflect common susceptibility toward infection with cancer-associated HPV types shared by all anogenital organs covered by squamous epithelium. A study based on data from the United States supports the possible role of anogenital SC-associated HPV types in the development of some tonsillar cancers. Observations in other register-based investigations and in the Danish-Swedish case-control study challenge the long held belief that benign anal lesions (e.g. hemorrhoids) and anal inflammation (e.g. in association with Crohn's disease) are linked to an increased risk of anal SC. The work documents strong links between a variety of sexual behavior measures and the risk of anal SC. The previously observed excess of anal SC among homosexual men is confirmed. Unlike in previous studies, an increased risk of anal SC associated with promiscuous heterosexual activity is also documented among both men and women. Measures of sexual extroversion, rather than sexual preference, are linked to the risk of anal SC presumably by means of higher rates of anal HPV infection in people with such behaviors. A new hypothesis is proposed to explain how smoking, the only consistently observed non-sexual risk factor in previous studies, might be associated with anal SC risk. A study of the short-term cancer profile among 309.365 AIDS patients in the United States provided no evidence to support immunosuppression as a major risk factor for anal SC in the first two years after the AIDS diagnosis. With the introduction around 1996 of highly active anti-retroviral therapy regimens, however, the future may hold a para-doxical increase in the incidence of anal SC along with the increased life expectancy in this population. Examination of tumor tissues from patients in Denmark and Sweden by the polymerase chain reaction techique showed a high proportion of anal SCs to be positive for types of HPV that are associated with high risk of cervical cancer (90%, 100%, and 58% among women, homosexual men, and heterosexual men, respectively). Tumor tissues from control subjects with adenocarcinoma of the rectum were consistently HPV-negative. A combined molecular biological and histological analysis showed that anal SCs with likely origin in the anal canal are 7.5 times more likely to be HPV-positive than anal SCs with likely origin in the perianal skin. Additionally, cancer of the anal canal are more likely than those of the perianal skin to be characterized histologically by small or medium-sized tumor cells, basaloid features, and little or no keratinization. Epidemiological studies from the past two decades have contributed imprtantly to our current understanding of anal SC and its causes. Most cases of this neoplasm can now be considered as a consequence of sexually or otherwise acquired infection in the anal mucosa with types of HPV already known to be involved in cancers of the uterine cervix. Expectedly, the upward trend in the incidence of anal SC seen over the past half century will continue in many years to come. However, there is currently widespread, yet cautious, optimism regarding the prospects for a prophylactic HPV vaccine. It this optimism is justified, the future may bring drastic reductions in the incidence of HPV-associated morbidities, including SC. PMID:12238281

  12. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  13. [Is sphincter-plasty for treatment of fecal incontinence in patients older than 60 justified?].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, J; Rabl, H; Uranüs, S; Wexner, S D

    1996-01-01

    Overlapping sphincteroplasty is the method of choice for isolated anterior sphincter defects. Patients over 60 years of age can undergo this operation with similar good results as in younger patients. However, preoperative physiologic assessment of the pelvic floor is necessary for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:9101903

  14. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  15. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  16. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  17. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of rupture from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  18. Morphometric Development of Sphincter of Oddi in Human Fetuses During Fetal Period: Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Desdicio?lu, Kadir; Bozkurt, Kemal K.; U?uz, Ceren; Evcil, E. Hilal; Malas, Mehmet A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In this study, morphometric developments of the sphincter of Oddi in human fetuses were observed. Material and Methods: We observed 113 human fetuses consisting of 67 male and 46 female subjects, whose ages varied between 14 to 40 weeks who showed no signs of any pathology or anomaly externally. The common external measurements of fetuses were carried out, followed by abdominal dissection to determine where the sphincters of Oddi were localized within the duodenum and pancreas. Histological specimens of tissue samples were gathered from the inner wall of the duodenum where it was assumed that the sphincters of Oddi had been localized. The parameters of total external diameters, lumen diameters, wall thickness, diameters of ductus choledochus and ductus pancreaticus, and the distance between these two structures, which are also known as the origins of the sphincter of Oddi, were measured by using a light microscope. The standard deviations of the measurements were calculated for each gestational week and trimester. Results: The calculations suggested that there were statistically significant correlations between gestational age and all of the other parameters with the exception of the ductus choledochus (p<0.001). It was observed that the wall thickness of the ductus choledochus increased at the first half of the fetal stage and decreased at the second half, as the lumen diameter increased through the 40th week. The gender difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: The data we collected in our study were considered as useful for the evaluation of the development of the sphincter of Oddi area and fetal stage. PMID:25207017

  19. Anal Cancer: What Happens After Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this phase of your treatment. For patients with colostomies Most people treated for anal cancer don’t ... APR, you will need to have a permanent colostomy. If you have a colostomy, follow-up is ...

  20. Anal cytology as a predictor of anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive men and women.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Eve M; Wahbah, Mary M; Been, Laura C; Chiao, Elizabeth Y; Citron, Deborah R; Laucirica, Rodolfo

    2013-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Cytologic screening is invaluable in the detection of cervical neoplasia, therefore many clinicians have adopted anal cytology as part of anal cancer screening in patients at high-risk for anal neoplasia. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anal cytology is a valuable screening test for identifying AIN in HIV+ patients. The cohort included 228 HIV+ patients who underwent anal cancer screening with collection of 318 anal cytology specimens between January 2006 and December 2009. Of this group, 74 (32.5%) patients had associated anal biopsies within a 6-month period, with a total of 89 comparison cases. The anal cytology samples were classified using the 2001 Bethesda System terminology. The sensitivity of anal cytology in detecting ASC-US, AIN 1-3 or SCC was 93%. Cytology was 88% sensitive for detecting low-grade AIN (AIN 1), but only 20% sensitive for detecting high-grade AIN (AIN 2-3) or SCC. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance cases were distributed evenly between low- and high-grade AIN, with two cases having normal histology. Only six cases had negative cytology, all of which were associated with AIN on biopsy, for a false negative rate of 7%. Anal cytology is a good predictor of AIN, as confirmed by the high degree of sensitivity. However, there is poor correlation between the cytological and histological grade of AIN. Cytology underestimates the grade of dysplasia compared to the corresponding biopsy. PMID:23288861

  1. The expression of tachykinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Que T; Li, Jing H; Geng, Xian; Liu, Jun F; Li, He F; Feng, Yong; Li, Jia L; Drew, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides which are potent modulators of smooth muscle function with a significant contractile effect on human smooth muscle preparations. Tachykinins act via three distinct G protein-coupled neurokinin (NK) receptors, NK1, NK2 and NK3, coded by the genes TACR1, TACR2 and TACR3 respectively. The purpose of this paper was to measure the mRNA and protein expression of these receptors and their isoforms in the clasp and sling fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex and circular muscle from the adjacent distal esophagus and proximal stomach. We found differences in expression between the different receptors within these muscle types, but the rank order of the receptor expression did not differ between the different muscle types. The rank order of the mRNA expression was TACR2 (α isoform)>TACR2 (β isoform)>TACR1 (short isoform)>TACR1 (long isoform)>TACR3. The rank order of the protein expression was NK2>NK1>NK3. This is the first report of the measurement of the transcript and protein expression of the tachykinin receptors and their isoforms in the muscles of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex. The results provide evidence that the tachykinin receptors could contribute to the regulation of the human lower esophageal sphincter, particularly the TACR2 α isoform which encodes the functional isoform of the tachykinin NK2 receptor was the most highly expressed of the tachykinin receptors in the muscles associated with the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:26852958

  2. Detrusor-External Sphincter Dyssynergia: Review of Minimally Invasive and Endoscopic Management.

    PubMed

    Barbalat, Yanina; Rutman, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is a debilitating problem in patients with spinal cord injury. DSD carries a high risk of complications, and even life expectancy can be affected. Management of this condition includes the use of antimuscarinic agents in combination with intermittent catheterization, indwelling urethral catheterization, suprapubic catheterization, and a variety of surgical options, depending on patient and physician preference. This paper will review the current literature and data on minimally invasive and endoscopic management of DSD. PMID:26826587

  3. Bioengineered Human Pyloric Sphincters Using Autologous Smooth Muscle and Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen Lee; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-01-01

    Gastroparesis leads to inadequate emptying of the stomach resulting in severe negative health impacts. Appropriate long-term treatments for these diseases may require pyloric sphincter tissue replacements that possess functional smooth muscle cell (SMC) and neural components. This study aims to bioengineer, for the first time, innervated human pylorus constructs utilizing autologous human pyloric sphincter SMCs and human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Autologous SMCs and NPCs were cocultured in dual-layered hydrogels and formed concentrically aligned pylorus constructs. Innervated autologous human pylorus constructs were characterized through biochemical and physiologic assays to assess the phenotype and functionality of SMCs and neurons. SMCs within bioengineered human pylorus constructs displayed a tonic contractile phenotype and maintained circumferential alignment. Neural differentiation within bioengineered constructs was verified by positive expression of βIII-tubulin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Autologous bioengineered innervated human pylorus constructs generated a robust spontaneous basal tone and contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl). Contraction in response to exogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), relaxation in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also observed. Neural network integrity was demonstrated by inhibition of EFS-induced relaxation in the presence of a neurotoxin or nNOS inhibitors. Partial inhibition of ACh-induced contraction and VIP-induced relaxation following neurotoxin treatment was observed. These studies provide a proof of concept for bioengineering functional innervated autologous human pyloric sphincter constructs that generate a robust basal tone and contain circumferentially aligned SMCs, which display a tonic contractile phenotype and functional differentiated neurons. These autologous constructs have the potential to be used as (1) functional replacement organs and (2) physiologically relevant models to investigate human pyloric sphincter disorders. PMID:26563426

  4. [Achilles tendon ruptures and tibialis anterior tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Pagenstert, G; Leumann, A; Frigg, A; Valderrabano, V

    2010-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures (ATR) are becoming the most frequent tendon rupture of the lower extremity, whereas less than 100 cases of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures (TATR) have been reported. Common in both tendons are the degenerative causes of ruptures in a susceptible tendon segment, whereas traumatic transections occur at each level. Triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles are responsible for the main sagittal ankle range of motion and ruptures lead to a distinctive functional deficit. However, diagnosis is delayed in up to 25% of ATR and even more frequently in TATR. Early primary repair provides the best functional results. With progressive retraction and muscle atrophy delayed tendon reconstruction has less favourable functional results. But not all patients need full capacity, power and endurance of these muscles and non-surgical treatment should not be forgotten. Inactive patients with significant comorbidities and little disability should be informed that surgical treatment of TATR is complicated by high rates of rerupture and surgical treatment of ATR can result in wound healing problems rarely necessitating some kind of transplantation. PMID:21110002

  5. The Current Role of the Artificial Urinary Sphincter in Male and Female Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Islah, MAR; Cho, Sung Yong

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the artificial urinary sphincter has affected the current surgical options for urinary incontinence. With its unique features, the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) has been an attractive option for the treatment of urinary incontinence regardless of gender. The current paper discusses the indications, contraindications, types of devices, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS in the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence. A PubMed review of the available literature was performed and articles reporting implantation of artificial urinary sphincters for urinary incontinence in both male and female patients were evaluated. There was a comparable satisfactory continence rate after the implantation of an AUS (59~97% in males vs. 60~92% in females). In comparison, there were some differences in the indications, contraindications, surgical approaches, outcomes, and complications of the AUS implanted for urinary incontinence in male and female patients. AUS implantation is a safe and effective surgical option for the treatment of urinary incontinence of various etiologies. Continuous evolution of the device has made it an attractive option for the treatment of both male and female urinary incontinence. PMID:23658862

  6. Prostaglandin E1 effects on resting and cholinergically stimulated lower esophageal sphincter pressure in cats.

    PubMed

    Sinar, D R; Fletcher, J R; Castell, D O

    1981-04-01

    Intraluminal esophageal manometry with a sleeve catheter was used to compare the magnitude of decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure produced by an arterial or venous infusion of prostaglandin E1 in cats. Arterial PGE1 produced significantly lower LES pressures than venous PGE1 (p less than 0.05). Maximal decrease of 75% in basal LES pressure occurred with an associated 15% decrease in systolic blood pressure. The site of action of PGE1 in producing LES hypotension was studied by injection of either edrophonium, or bethanechol during the maximal PGE1 effect. Bethanechol, which acts directly on sphincteric smooth muscle, produced an increase in LES pressure during both saline and PGE1 infusion, while the increases in LES pressure seen with edrophonium during saline infusion were blocked during the PGE1 infusion. From these studies, we conclude that PGE1 produces LES hypotension in the cat by an inhibitory effect on the cholinergic pathway responsible for maintaining LES tone. These studies pharmacologically reproduce the LES pressure abnormality previously reported in the cat during acid-induced esophagitis and support the hypothesis that PGE1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of acute acid-induced lower esophageal sphincter abnormalities. PMID:6114513

  7. Nerve conduction studies, skeletal muscle EMG, and sphincter EMG in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Pramstaller, P P; Wenning, G K; Smith, S J; Beck, R O; Quinn, N P; Fowler, C J

    1995-01-01

    Although autonomic failure, parkinsonism, and cerebellar and pyramidal signs are well documented in multiple system atrophy, much less is known about the frequency and severity of involvement of the peripheral nervous system. The frequency and nature of peripheral nerve involvement has therefore been determined in 74 patients with multiple system atrophy using nerve conduction studies and skeletal muscle EMG. These findings were compared with those on sphincter EMG. Ninety per cent of the patients had an abnormal sphincter EMG, indicating denervation and reinnervation consistent with anterior horn cell loss in Onuf's nucleus, but only 40% had either abnormal nerve conduction studies (mixed sensorimotor axonal neuropathy in 17.5%) or abnormal skeletal muscle EMG (suggesting partial denervation in 22.5%). These data indicate a remarkable selective vulnerability of the anterior horn cells of Onuf's nucleus innervating external sphincter muscles relative to those supplying skeletal muscle in patients with multiple system atrophy. If this selective pattern of involvement can be explained it may be a clue to pathogenetic mechanisms in multiple system atrophy. PMID:7745413

  8. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  9. Anal-rectal cytology: a review.

    PubMed

    Bean, Sarah M; Chhieng, David C

    2010-07-01

    The incidence of invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma, a human papilloma virus (HPV) related cancer, is on the rise, especially in HIV positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Like cervical cancer, anal cancer is associated with precursor lesions detectable on exfoliative cytology as squamous intraepithelial lesions and on biopsy as intraepithelial neoplasia. Anal-rectal cytology screening programs, similar to cervical cytology screening programs, have been developed in an effort to detect and to eradicate precursor lesions prior to progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Either conventional or liquid-based anal-rectal cytology specimens are acceptable, but liquid-based specimens are preferred. Specimens may be collected by health care professionals or by patients. A minimum of 2,000-3,000 nucleate squamous cells should comprise adequate specimens. Diagnostic terminology as defined by the Bethesda System for Reporting Cervical Cytology (TBS 2001) should be used. Sensitivity and specificity of a single anal-rectal cytology specimen is comparable with that of a single cervical cytology test, but cytological interpretations do not always correlate with lesion severity. Patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or worse should be referred for anoscopy. PMID:19941374

  10. Rectal eversion and double-stapled ileal pouch anal anastomosis in familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aygar, Muhittin; Yetişir, Fahri; Salman, Ebru; Yıldırım, Murat Baki; Özdedeoğlu, Mesut; Durak, Doğukan; Yalçın, Abdussamet

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Surgery is the only treatment option for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Aim of surgery in FAP is to minimize colorectal cancer risk without need for permanent stoma. There are especially two operation options; Total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) and total proctocolectomy with ileo-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). We report here a patient with FAP who had resection via rectal eversion just over the dentate line under direct visualization and ileoanal-J pouch anastomosis by double-stapler technique. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 40 yr. old female patient with FAP underwent surgery. Firstly, colon and the rectum mobilized completely, and then from the 10 cm. proximal to the ileo-caecal valve to the recto-sigmoid junction total colectomy was performed. Rectum was everted by a grasping forceps which was introduced through the anus and then resection was performed by a linear stapler just over the dentate line. A stapled J-shaped ileal reservoir construction followed by intraluminal stapler-facilitated ileoanal anastomosis. Follow up at six months anal sphincter function was found normal. DISCUSSION There is only surgical management option for FAP patients up to now. Total colectomy with IRA and restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA is surgical options for FAP patients that avoid the need for a permanent stoma. Anorectal eversion may be used in the surgical treatment of FAP, chronic ulcerative colitis and early stage distal rectal cancer patients. CONCLUSION J-pouch ileoanal anastomosis can safely be performed by rectal eversion and double stapler technique in FAP patients. PMID:25305601

  11. Proctology - diseases of the anal region.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Proctology is a medical subspecialty that encompasses diseases of the perianal region, anal canal, and rectum. Dermatologists play a pivotal role in this realm, as inflammatory perianal disorders, infectious and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as perianal tumors and their precursor lesions fall within the core competency of dermatology. In a concise manner, the present article highlights all relevant disease groups in the field of proctology. With a particular focus on aspects pertinent to dermatologists, this includes inflammatory disorders, "classic" proctologic diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, malignancies of the anal region, as well as pathogen-induced diseases. Despite the wide variety of disorders, there are only five key symptoms prompting patients to consult a proctologist, including anal pruritus and burning, discharge, bleeding, pain, and foreign body sensation. A simple algorithm, which incorporates these symptoms as well as key clinical features, may assist in quickly establishing the correct diagnosis in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27027745

  12. Diagnosis and management of anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gervaz, Pascal; Buchs, Nicolas; Morel, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    During the past three decades, anal cancer has served as a paradigm for the successful application of chemoradiation to solid tumors. Since the early 1990s, the increasing incidence of anal cancer in homosexual men has highlighted the causative role of oncogenic human papilloma-virus infection. This review focuses on significant trends and developments in the management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, emphasizing three major aspects of diagnosis and treatment: routine screening and eradication of premalignant lesions in high-risk individuals; outcome of chemoradiation therapy in HIV-positive individuals in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy; and potential improvements in chemoradiation protocols through improved radiation delivery technique and the combination of mitomycin with cisplatin in current prospective randomized trials. PMID:18799127

  13. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. Methods Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. Results Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. Conclusion Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  14. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE: Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. METHODS: Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. RESULTS: Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. CONCLUSION: Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  15. HPV infection, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal cancer: current issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is well known as the major etiological agent for ano-genital cancer. In contrast to cervical cancer, anal cancer is uncommon, but is increasing steadily in the community over the last few decades. However, it has undergone an exponential rise in the men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV + groups. HIV + MSM in particular, have anal cancer incidences about three times that of the highest worldwide reported cervical cancer incidences. Discussion There has therefore traditionally been a lack of data from studies focused on heterosexual men and non-HIV + women. There is also less evidence reporting on the putative precursor lesion to anal cancer (AIN – anal intraepithelial neoplasia), when compared to cervical cancer and CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia). This review summarises the available biological and epidemiological evidence for HPV in the anal site and the pathogenesis of AIN and anal cancer amongst traditionally non-high risk groups. Summary There is strong evidence to conclude that high-grade AIN is a precursor to anal cancer, and some data on the progression of AIN to invasive cancer. PMID:22958276

  16. [Management of locally advanced anal canal carcinoma with modulated arctherapy and concurrent chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Troussier, I; Huguet, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Benahim, C; Khalifa, J; Darmon, I; Ortholan, C; Krebs, L; Dejean, C; Fenoglietto, P; Vieillot, S; Bensadoun, R-J; Thariat, J

    2015-04-01

    The standard treatment of locally advanced (stage II and III) squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal consists of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (two cycles of 5-fluoro-uracil, mitomycin C, on a 28-day cycle), with a dose of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction in the prophylactic planning target volume and additional 14 to 20 Gy in the boost planning target volume (5 days per week) with a possibility of 15 days gap period between the two sequences. While conformal irradiation may only yield suboptimal tumor coverage using complex photon/electron field junctions (especially on nodal areas), intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques (segmented static, dynamic, volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy) allow better tumour coverage while sparing organs at risk from intermediate/high doses (small intestine, perineum/genitalia, bladder, pelvic bone, etc.). Such dosimetric advantages result in fewer severe acute toxicities and better potential to avoid a prolonged treatment break that increases risk of local failure. These techniques also allow a reduction in late gastrointestinal and skin toxicities of grade 3 or above, as well as better functional conservation of anorectal sphincter. The technical achievements (simulation, contouring, prescription dose, treatment planning, control quality) of volumetric modulated arctherapy are discussed. PMID:25770884

  17. VAAFT: Video Assisted Anal Fistula Treatment; Bringing revolution in Fistula treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zarin, Mohammad; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To share our findings that the new treatment modality Video Assisted Anal Fistula Treatment (VAAFT) is a better alternate to the conventional treatments of Fistula in Ano in our setup with minor changes in the initial method described by Meinero. Methods: Karl Storz Video equipment including Meinero Fistuloscope was used. Key steps are visualization of the fistula tract, correct localization of the internal fistula opening under direct vision and endoscopic treatment of the fistula. This is followed by an operative phase of fulguration of the fistula tract using glycine solution mixed with manitol, curetting the tract with curette and fistula brush. Internal opening is closed with a Vicryl 1 suture. Result: Total of 40 patients were operated using VAAFT from October 2013 to March 2014. Three were re-operated. The other 37 cases were followed up at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months. Primary healing took place in 20 (50%) cases at 6 weeks. In the remaining 17 (42.5%) cases, minor discharge occurred with itching which resolved till the next visit at 8 weeks and 12 weeks. Conclusion: As the main aim in treating fistula is proper identification of the internal opening, excision of the tract and sparing the sphincter function, VAAFT achieves all aims with additional benefits of patients’ satisfaction and negligible scaring. PMID:26649020

  18. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for anal cancer What’s new in anal cancer research and treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  19. Spontaneous splenic rupture in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Elghanmi, Adil; Mohamed, Jou; Khabouz, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Splenic rupture during pregnancy is a rare and can frequently be a misdiagnosed pathology. This rupture is associated with a high maternal and fetal mortality rate. A 26 years old Moroccan woman para II gravida II presented at the third stage of pregnancy with acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She developed immediately a hypovolemic shock. After both a physical and sonographical exam, it was revealed that it was due to a massive hemoperitoneum. Therefore, an emergent laparotomy and cesarean delivery with abdominal exploration were performed; also, an active bleeding was identified at the splenic hilum consistent with splenic rupture. Through this case report, we want to raise awareness of this surgical emergency that requires immediate recognition because any delay can lead to catastrophic consequences PMID:26587160

  20. Introducing the operation method for curing anal fistula by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bingzhi

    1993-03-01

    The key to the treatment of anal fistula lies in scavenging the infected anal gland thoroughly, which is the source of anal fistula infection. The fistula tract at the internal orifice of the anal fistula is cut 1 cm using laser with the infectious source completely degenerated and the wound gassified and scanned. The residual distal fistula softens and disappears upon the action of organic fibrinolysin.

  1. Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

  2. Ruptures of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Ha'eri, G B

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

  3. Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Park, Seung Chul; Reed, Ellen H; Dooley, Kevin P; Wheeler, Samuel F; Lee, Daeyeon; Hammer, Daniel A

    2016-01-20

    Polymersomes are robust vesicles made from amphiphilic block co-polymers. Large populations of uniform giant polymersomes with defined, entrapped species can be made by templating of double-emulsions using microfluidics. In the present study, a series of two enzymatic reactions, one inside and the other outside of the polymersome, were designed to induce rupture of polymersomes. We measured how the kinetics of rupture were affected by altering enzyme concentration. These results suggest that protocells with entrapped enzymes can be engineered to secrete contents on cue. PMID:26616557

  4. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

  5. Teaching Men's Anal Pleasure: Challenging Gender Norms with "Prostage" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branfman, Jonathan; Ekberg Stiritz, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To help students critique sex/gender norms, sexuality educators should address men's anal pleasure. Men's anal receptivity blurs accepted binaries like male/female, masculine/feminine, and straight/queer. By suppressing men's receptivity, the taboo against men's anal pleasure helps legitimize hegemonic sex/gender beliefs--and the sexism,

  6. Teaching Men's Anal Pleasure: Challenging Gender Norms with "Prostage" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branfman, Jonathan; Ekberg Stiritz, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To help students critique sex/gender norms, sexuality educators should address men's anal pleasure. Men's anal receptivity blurs accepted binaries like male/female, masculine/feminine, and straight/queer. By suppressing men's receptivity, the taboo against men's anal pleasure helps legitimize hegemonic sex/gender beliefs--and the sexism,…

  7. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A…

  8. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A

  9. Quality of life with anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Owen, H A; Buchanan, G N; Schizas, A; Cohen, R; Williams, A B

    2016-05-01

    Introduction Anal fistula affects people of working age. Symptoms include abscess, pain, discharge of pus and blood. Treatment of this benign disease can affect faecal continence, which may, in turn, impair quality of life (QOL). We assessed the QOL of patients with cryptoglandular anal fistula. Methods Newly referred patients with anal fistula completed the St Mark's Incontinence Score, which ranges from 0 (perfect continence) to 24 (totally incontinent), and Short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire at two institutions with an interest in anal fistula. The data were examined to identify factors affecting QOL. Results Data were available for 146 patients (47 women), with a median age of 44 years (range 18-82 years) and a median continence score of 0 (range 0-23). Versus population norms, patients had an overall reduction in QOL. While those with recurrent disease had no difference on continence scores, QOL was worse on two of eight SF-36 domains (p<0.05). Patients with secondary extensions had reduced QOL in two domains (p<0.05), while urgency was associated with reduced QOL on five domains (p<0.05). Patients with loose seton had the same QOL as those without seton. No difference in urgency was found between patients with and without loose seton. In primary fistula patients, 19.4% of patients experienced urgency versus 36.3% of those with recurrent fistulas. Conclusions Patients with anal fistula had a reduced QOL, which was worse in those with recurrent disease, secondary extensions and urgency. Loose seton had no impact on QOL. PMID:27087327

  10. Distal biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Ballas, Efstathios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2013-03-01

    Biceps and triceps tendon ruptures are rather uncommon injuries and are most commonly diagnosed clinically. Magnetic resonance imaging can help the clinician to differentiate an incomplete tear and define any degeneration of the tendon. Surgical anatomical repair is typically performed in acute complete ruptures whereas nonoperative treatment can be used for partial ruptures, as well as for patients unfit for surgery. Single incision techniques are associated with a higher rate of nerve injuries, while double incision repairs have a higher prevalence of heterotopic ossification. Although various fixation methods have been applied including bone tunnels, interference screws, suture anchors, cortical button fixation, the current evidence does not support the superiority of one method over the other. A well-planned postoperative rehabilitation programme is essential for a good final outcome. As better fixation devices are being used, more aggressive rehabilitation programmes have been applied. Epidemiology, clinical evaluation, diagnosis, surgical and conservative management of these injuries are presented in this review along with the authors' preferred technique for the anatomical repair of acute complete ruptures. PMID:23352149

  11. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  12. Lidocaine inhibition of esophageal peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter pressure in baboons.

    PubMed

    Sinar, D R; Carey, L C; Cordova, C; Fletcher, J R; Castell, D O

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous lidocaine was infused at 0.82 ml/min in a concentration of 1.2 mg/ml (2.3 mg/kg) for 120 min in awake chair-restrained baboons (Papio anubis), and measurements of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure were compared before and after lidocaine or control infusions. Lidocaine produced a progressive and significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in amplitude in the peristaltic wave in the smooth muscle portion of the distal esophagus during the 120-min infusion. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was similarly significantly lower than control after the infusion of lidocaine (P less than 0.05). Velocity and duration of the peristaltic wave were unchanged during the infusion. The decreased amplitude occurred during therapeutic and stable serum concentrations of lidocaine. It did not appear that the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was due to an induction of prostaglandin synthesis, because pretreatment of animals with indomethacin did not change the inhibitory effect of lidocaine, and serum metabolites of prostacyclin decreased during the infusion. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of lidocaine was not topical. The response to the muscarinic agonist, bethanechol was similar in lidocaine-treated animals and control animals. The preservation of a bethanechol response after lidocaine inhibition of LES pressure and distal esophageal amplitude suggests that lidocaine acts proximal to the muscarinic receptor in the esophageal body and smooth muscle portion of the lower esophageal sphincter. This study suggests that lidocaine produces an inhibitory effect on the peristaltic wave and lower esophageal sphincter pressure that is similar to inhibitory effects described after anticholinergic agents and calcium channel blocking drugs, but intravenous lidocaine infusion requires a longer period of time to produce inhibition of muscle function. PMID:2865090

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  16. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  17. Ligation of Intersphincteric Fistula Tract: a Sphincter-Sparing Option for Complex Fistula-in-Ano.

    PubMed

    Lange, Erin O; Ferrari, Linda; Krane, Mukta; Fichera, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Fistulae-in-ano represent one of the more challenging anorectal diseases faced by surgeons, as appropriate management requires careful balance between the need for local sepsis control and patients' desire to maintain fecal continence. The ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) procedure, first described by Rojanasakul and colleagues in 2007, represents a sphincter-sparing technique for fistula management which has become our method of choice for transsphincteric fistulas. With this technique, patients frequently enjoy successful fistula healing., or, at worst, conversion to a less complex fistula tract. Here, we describe and illustrate our surgical approach and review success and recurrence rates presented in the published literature. PMID:26394877

  18. Anal cancer and screening guidelines for human papillomavirus in men.

    PubMed

    Ortoski, Richard A; Kell, Christine S

    2011-03-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and anal cancer and the similarities between the "transitional zones" within the cervix and anus have raised questions regarding the medical biology of anal cancer. In recent years, increased rates of HPV infection and anal cancer among men have encouraged the medical community to search for causes and ways to identify the less insidious precursor, anal intraepithelial neoplasia. The "alphabet soup" terminology describing anal cytologic findings obtained by Papanicolaou (Pap) tests and the anal histologic findings obtained from biopsy specimens need to be better understood as distinct entities. Risk factors for the development of anal cancer have been identified and should be discussed with patients--especially those infected with human immunodeficiency virus--who have a much higher than normal risk of anal cancer. The anal Pap test has been used by the Northwest Pennsylvania Rural AIDS Alliance to detect potential precursors to cancer and degrees of anal dyplasia in patients with HIV infection. The Alliance has been instrumental in creating guidelines for anal Pap testing and encouraging other medical professionals and clinics to do the same, and these guidelines are provided herein. PMID:21415379

  19. Anal cancer and cervical cancer screening: key differences.

    PubMed

    Darragh, Teresa M; Winkler, Barbara

    2011-02-25

    Cervical cancer and anal cancer share many similarities including causation by oncogenic human papillomaviruses; however, significant differences exist in their epidemiology, risk factors, biologic behavior, management, and treatment. Although rare, the incidence of anal cancer is alarmingly high and continues to increase in high-risk populations, particularly men who have sex with men regardless of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. There are no national screening guidelines for anal cancer. Using the success of cervical cancer screening as a model, anal cancer screening approaches apply anal cytology, high-resolution anoscopy, and directed biopsy to guide treatment and management strategies. Although much has been learned about the natural history and epidemiology of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN), the rate of progression of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) to invasive squamous cell carcinomas is not known. The impact of screening and treatment of HGAIN on morbidity and mortality from anal cancer are also unknown. Because the incidence of HGAIN and anal squamous cell carcinoma continue to increase, it is imperative to find pathways for effective screening, early detection, and therapeutic intervention. This article provides an overview of anal cancer screening while highlighting its differences from cervical cancer screening and the remaining obstacles and controversies to implementation of a successful anal cancer screening program. PMID:21319310

  20. [Uterine rupture. A case of spontaneous rupture in a thirty week primiparous gestation ].

    PubMed

    Bretones, S; Cousin, C; Gualandi, M; Mellier, G

    1997-01-01

    Uterine rupture is one of the major complications of pregnancy. Most spontaneous uterine ruptures occur during labor in parturients with a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture where the uterus is unscarred are more rare and occur more frequently in older multiparous patients. Starting from a case of uterine rupture occurring in a 40 year-old primiparous women, we will present a review of the literature concerning cases of rupture in healthy uteri with no obvious cause. PMID:9265057

  1. Lack of effect of a 5-HT3 antagonist, pancopride, on lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Grande, L; Lacima, G; Pérez, A; Zayas, J M

    1995-01-01

    Effects of pancopride (5 and 10 mg, intravenously), on lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LOESP), were assessed in healthy volunteers by means of oesophageal manometry. After pancopride 10 mg, the LOESP was higher than placebo and 5 mg pancopride but there were no differences among the three treatments (P = 0.42). The areas under the curve were similar without differences, neither with absolute measurements (P = 0.53) nor after a baseline correction (P = 0.16). In conclusion, pancopride has no clinically relevant effect on lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. PMID:8554943

  2. Oesophageal rupture masquerading as STEMI.

    PubMed

    Skaug, Brian; Taylor, Kenneth R; Chandrasekaran, Somya

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with acute onset of chest pain. Based on ECG changes suggestive of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), he was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for coronary angiography. There he was found to have only non-obstructive coronary disease. Subsequent physical examination and review of his chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema, and CT scan revealed a distal oesophageal rupture and pneumomediastinum. After stabilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU), he was taken to the operating room for thoracotomy, chest tube placement and stenting of his oesophagus. He survived the incident and, after several weeks of ICU stay, recovered to a large extent. His case highlights the importance of considering oesophageal rupture in the differential diagnosis for acute onset of chest pain. PMID:27068730

  3. Spontaneous rupture of the ureter

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Alper; Akbas, Tugana; Arpaci, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the ureter is a very rare condition and usually results from ureteral obstruction by a calculus. Only theoretical mechanisms have been proposed and no possible explanation has yet been reported in the literature. Intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the most informative study with high sensitivity. Treatment should be individualised, and depends on the state of the patient. Minimally invasive endourological procedures with double-J catheter placement and percutaneous drainage offer excellent results. Conservative management with analgesics and antibiotic coverage may be an alternative to surgery. Herein, we present a case of spontaneous rupture of the proximal ureter with no evidence of an underlying pathological condition. PMID:25715862

  4. Spontaneous hepatic rupture in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E W; Archibald, L; Albo, D

    1977-12-01

    Hepatic rupture as a late complication of toxemic pregnancy is a rare yet lethal condition requiring rapid recognition and surgical management. The clinical triad of toxemia, right upper quadrant pain, and sudden hypotension is the diagnostic hallmark of presentation. Most patients present near the time of delivery and are found to have subcapsular hematomas of the right hepatic lobe with free rupture into the peritoneal cavity and resultant exsanguinating hemorrhage. The association of toxemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation with secondary microembolic damage to the liver and other organs has been discussed. Basic surgical principles in the managment of hepatic subcapsular hematomas, and the prolonged postoperative course and frequent complications in these patients have been stressed. PMID:596550

  5. Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: a review of physiology, diagnosis, and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is the urodynamic description of bladder outlet obstruction from detrusor muscle contraction with concomitant involuntary urethral sphincter activation. DSD is associated with neurologic conditions such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and spina bifida and some of these neurogenic bladder patients with DSD may be at risk for autonomic dysreflexia, recurrent urinary tract infections, or upper tract compromise if the condition is not followed and treated appropriately. It is diagnosed most commonly during the voiding phase of urodynamic studies using EMG recordings and voiding cystourethrograms, although urethral pressure monitoring could also potentially be used. DSD can be sub-classified as either continuous or intermittent, although adoption of this terminology is not widespread. There are few validated oral pharmacologic treatment options for this condition but transurethral botulinum toxin injection have shown temporary efficacy in reducing bladder outlet obstruction. Urinary sphincterotomy has also demonstrated reproducible long term benefits in several studies, but the morbidity associated with this procedure can be high. PMID:26904418

  6. On-line computer analysis of human lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    Castell, J A; Dalton, C B; Castell, D O

    1988-12-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation is usually interpreted by a subjective, mostly qualitative analysis. We studied sphincter relaxation in humans using a computer program for on-line analysis that provides objective measures of gastric pressure, resting LES pressure, percent of relaxation, residual pressure during relaxation, duration of relaxation, and area of relaxation. The program was validated by comparing computer-analyzed values to mean values obtained from manual readings by five individuals. Excellent correlation was obtained for all standard parameters. The parameters of LES relaxation for both wet and dry swallows were similar using either a carefully placed single recording orifice or a Dent sleeve. The one exception was the duration of LES relaxation, which was significantly shorter with the sleeve. All relaxation parameters and peristaltic velocity were then studied in 10 volunteers during 5 dry and 5 wet swallows under base-line conditions and after both atropine (10 micrograms/kg iv) and bethanechol (40 micrograms/kg sc). These studies showed that LES relaxation is affected by type of swallow (dry vs. wet). Percent of relaxation may not be the best measure of relaxation because it is too dependent on resting pressure. Residual pressure is not dependent on base-line pressure and may better define relaxation. Duration of the relaxation is dependent on the velocity of the peristaltic wave. PMID:3202172

  7. Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: a review of physiology, diagnosis, and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, John T

    2016-02-01

    Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is the urodynamic description of bladder outlet obstruction from detrusor muscle contraction with concomitant involuntary urethral sphincter activation. DSD is associated with neurologic conditions such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and spina bifida and some of these neurogenic bladder patients with DSD may be at risk for autonomic dysreflexia, recurrent urinary tract infections, or upper tract compromise if the condition is not followed and treated appropriately. It is diagnosed most commonly during the voiding phase of urodynamic studies using EMG recordings and voiding cystourethrograms, although urethral pressure monitoring could also potentially be used. DSD can be sub-classified as either continuous or intermittent, although adoption of this terminology is not widespread. There are few validated oral pharmacologic treatment options for this condition but transurethral botulinum toxin injection have shown temporary efficacy in reducing bladder outlet obstruction. Urinary sphincterotomy has also demonstrated reproducible long term benefits in several studies, but the morbidity associated with this procedure can be high. PMID:26904418

  8. Electrical and mechanical activity in the human lower esophageal sphincter during diaphragmatic contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, R K; Rochester, D F; McCallum, R W

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effect of contraction of the diaphragm on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, we studied eight healthy volunteers during spontaneous breathing, maximal inspiration, and graded inspiratory efforts against a closed airway (Muller's maneuver). Electrical activity of the crural diaphragm (DEMG) was recorded from bipolar esophageal electrodes, transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) was calculated as the difference between gastric and esophageal pressures, and LES pressure was recorded using a sleeve device. During spontaneous breathing, phasic inspiratory DEMG was accompanied by phasic increases in Pdi and LES pressure. With maximal inspiration, DEMG increased 15-20-fold compared with spontaneous inspiration, and LES pressure rose from an end-expiratory pressure of 21 to 90 mmHg. Similar values were obtained during maximal Muller's maneuvers. LES pressure fell promptly when the diaphragm relaxed. Graded Muller's maneuver resulted in proportional increases in the Pdi, LES pressure, and DEMG. The LES pressure was always greater than Pdi and correlated with it in a linear fashion (P less than 0.001). We conclude that the contraction of the diaphragm exerts a sphincteric action at the LES, and that this effect is an important component of the antireflux barrier. PMID:3350968

  9. A catheter-based acoustic interrogation device for monitoring motility dynamics of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Sadowski, Daniel C; Mintchev, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents novel minimally-invasive, catheter-based acoustic interrogation device for monitoring motility dynamics of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A micro-oscillator actively emitting sound wave at 16 kHz is located at one side of the LES, and a miniature microphone is located at the other side of the sphincter to capture the sound generated from the oscillator. Thus, the dynamics of the opening and closing of the LES can be quantitatively assessed. In this paper, experiments are conducted utilizing an LES motility dynamics simulator. The sound strength is captured by the microphone and is correlated to the level of LES opening and closing controlled by the simulator. Measurements from the simulator model show statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.905 on the average in quiet environment and 0.736 on the average in noisy environment, D.O.F. = 9). Measuring the level of LES opening and closing has the potential to become a valuable diagnostic technique for understanding LES dysfunction and the disorders associated with it. PMID:25120160

  10. A Catheter-Based Acoustic Interrogation Device for Monitoring Motility Dynamics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qian; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Sadowski, Daniel C.; Mintchev, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents novel minimally-invasive, catheter-based acoustic interrogation device for monitoring motility dynamics of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A micro-oscillator actively emitting sound wave at 16 kHz is located at one side of the LES, and a miniature microphone is located at the other side of the sphincter to capture the sound generated from the oscillator. Thus, the dynamics of the opening and closing of the LES can be quantitatively assessed. In this paper, experiments are conducted utilizing an LES motility dynamics simulator. The sound strength is captured by the microphone and is correlated to the level of LES opening and closing controlled by the simulator. Measurements from the simulator model show statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.905 on the average in quiet environment and 0.736 on the average in noisy environment, D.O.F. = 9). Measuring the level of LES opening and closing has the potential to become a valuable diagnostic technique for understanding LES dysfunction and the disorders associated with it. PMID:25120160

  11. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Altmeyer, Peter; Wieland, Ulrike

    2008-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections belong to the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. While the immune system eliminates most HPV infections over time in immunocompetent individuals, HPV infections tend to persist in immunodeficient individuals. In HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), anal HPV prevalence is more than 90% and infections with multiple HPV types are common. Consequently, HPV-associated anogenital malignancies occur with high frequency in patients with HIV infection. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a potential precursor lesion of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. Like its cervical counterpart, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), AIN is causally linked to persistent infections with high-risk HPV types such as HPV16 or HPV18. As AIN and CIN share distinct biological similar-ities, AIN screenings analogous to Pap smear programs for CIN have been recommended in high-risk populations to reduce the incidence of anal carcinoma. These screenings include cytological analysis followed by high resolution anoscopy in case of anal dysplasia. Treatment guidelines for AIN are not yet available. Therapeutic strategies can be divided into topical (e.g. trichloroacetic acid, podophyllotoxin, imiquimod, photodynamic therapy) and ablative (e. g. surgical excision, laser ablation, infrared coagulation, electrocautery) measures. However, controlled studies on AIN treatment have not been performed. The impact of HPV vaccination on AIN development will also need to be assessed. Long-term follow-up of these patients is essential to gain more insight into the natural history of anogenital HPV infection in HIV-positive MSM. PMID:18410393

  12. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Hgsaa, B; Nhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  13. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  14. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  15. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  16. Anal intraepitelial neoplasia: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elorza, Garazi; Saralegui, Yolanda; Enríquez-Navascués, Jose María; Placer, Carlos; Velaz, Leyre

    2016-01-01

    Anal intraepitelial neoplasia (AIN) constitutes a major health problem in certain risk groups, such as patients with immunosuppression of varied origin, males who have sexual relations with other males, and females with a previous history of vaginal or cervical abnormalities in cytology. Its relationship with the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been well documented; however, many of the factors involved in the progression and regression of the viral infection to dysplasia and anal carcinoma are unknown. AIN can be diagnosed through cytology of the anal canal or biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy. However, the need for these techniques in high-risk groups remains controversial. Treatment depends on the risk factors and given the high morbidity and high recurrence rates the utility of the different local treatments is still a subject of debate. Surgical biopsy is justified only in the case of progression suggesting lesions. The role of the vaccination in high-risk patients as primary prevention has been debated by different groups. However, there is no general consensus on its use or on the need for screening this population. PMID:26765233

  17. The dose-effect safety profile of skeletal muscle precursor cell therapy in a dog model of intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Koudy; Eckman, Delrae; Dean, Ashley; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Allickson, Julie; Cline, J Mark; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Locally injected skeletal muscle precursor cells (skMPCs) integrate into and restore the muscle layers, innervation, vasculature, and function of the sphincter complex in animal models of intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD). The goal of the present study was to test the dose-effect safety profile of skMPC therapy in a dog model of ISD. Sphincter deficiency was created in 20 adult female dogs by surgically removing the skeletal muscle layer of the urinary sphincter complex. skMPCs isolated from the hind leg were expanded in culture and injected 4 weeks later into the sphincter complex at a dose of 25 million cells (n = 5), 50 million cells (n = 5), or 100 million cells (n = 5) per milliliter in a 2-ml volume. Five dogs received no sphincter injection. The measures of maximal sphincter pressure, complete blood count, and blood chemistry were performed monthly until their sacrifice at 9 months. At that point, full necropsy was performed to assess the safety of the skMPC injections. Injection of different doses of cells had no effects on the body weight, blood cell count, or kidney or liver function test results (p > .05 among the skMPC doses). Some incidental pathologic features were found in the lower urinary tract in all groups and were most likely associated with repeat catheterization. The maximal urinary sphincter pressure was higher in the 50 million cells per milliliter treatment group than in the other experimental groups (p < .05). The findings of the present study have confirmed that urinary sphincter injection of skMPCs results in no significant local or systemic pathologic features within the dose range that improves sphincter pressures. PMID:25637189

  18. The Dose-Effect Safety Profile of Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cell Therapy in a Dog Model of Intrinsic Urinary Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eckman, Delrae; Dean, Ashley; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Allickson, Julie; Cline, J. Mark; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Locally injected skeletal muscle precursor cells (skMPCs) integrate into and restore the muscle layers, innervation, vasculature, and function of the sphincter complex in animal models of intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD). The goal of the present study was to test the dose-effect safety profile of skMPC therapy in a dog model of ISD. Sphincter deficiency was created in 20 adult female dogs by surgically removing the skeletal muscle layer of the urinary sphincter complex. skMPCs isolated from the hind leg were expanded in culture and injected 4 weeks later into the sphincter complex at a dose of 25 million cells (n = 5), 50 million cells (n = 5), or 100 million cells (n = 5) per milliliter in a 2-ml volume. Five dogs received no sphincter injection. The measures of maximal sphincter pressure, complete blood count, and blood chemistry were performed monthly until their sacrifice at 9 months. At that point, full necropsy was performed to assess the safety of the skMPC injections. Injection of different doses of cells had no effects on the body weight, blood cell count, or kidney or liver function test results (p > .05 among the skMPC doses). Some incidental pathologic features were found in the lower urinary tract in all groups and were most likely associated with repeat catheterization. The maximal urinary sphincter pressure was higher in the 50 million cells per milliliter treatment group than in the other experimental groups (p < .05). The findings of the present study have confirmed that urinary sphincter injection of skMPCs results in no significant local or systemic pathologic features within the dose range that improves sphincter pressures. PMID:25637189

  19. Risk Factors for Anal HPV Infection and Anal Precancer in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lauren M.; Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Fetterman, Barbara; Tokugawa, Diane; Lorey, Thomas S.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Luhn, Patricia; Gage, Julia C.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a large proportion of anal cancers. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of HPV infection and anal cancer compared with HIV-negative men. We evaluated risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer in a population of HIV-infected MSM. Methods. Our study included 305 MSM at an HIV/AIDS clinic in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Health Maintenance Organization. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of risk factors comparing men without anal HPV infection; men with anal HPV infection, but no precancer; and men with anal precancer. Results. Low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) and previous chlamydia infection were associated with an increased risk of carcinogenic HPV infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–10.40 and OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.16–15.51, respectively). History of smoking (OR, 2.71 95% CI, 1.43–5.14), duration, recency, and dose of smoking increased the risk of anal precancer among carcinogenic HPV-positive men but had no association with HPV infection. Conclusions. We found distinct risk factors for anal HPV infection and anal precancer. Risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer are similar to established risk factors for cervical cancer progression. PMID:23908478

  20. The use of a simple anal sling in the management of anal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Devesa, Jos Manuel; Vicente, Rosana

    2014-05-01

    BACKGROUND. Many patients presenting with anal incontinence (AI) are frail, with attendant comorbidities precluding the use of complicated, expensive reconstructive techniques. In these cases, revisiting a simple approach-designed to provide some sort of effective barrier to stool-is worthwhile where the options include a customized peri-anal sling or the use of an anal plug. METHODS. Analysis of an unselected cohort of 33 patients (mean age 54 years; range 27-86 years) with AI is presented, these patients having undergone insertion of an elastic band peri-anal sling between December 2004 and December 2009. Pre- and post-operative assessment included the Jorge-Wexner score of incontinence, anorectal manometry and the Rockwood Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQoL) score. RESULTS. The follow-up period ranged from 50 to 108 months with a mean of 65 months. Early post-operative complications included spontaneous disruption of the sling at the fourth and seventh post-operative day in two patients and local infection in a further two cases. Late complications included skin erosion in two patients, (one occurring 3 years post-operatively) and breakage of the sling in a further seven patients. Explantation was performed in 13 cases, and re-implantation in 10 patients. No differences were noted in resting or squeeze manometry, with significant improvement in the Jorge-Wexner scores in 32 cases and in all of the four Rockwood quality of life scales. CONCLUSIONS. An anal sling is an effective and simple surgical option for the management of selected cases presenting with anal incontinence. Longer-term data are awaited comparing this technique with other standard surgical alternatives. PMID:24759346

  1. Screening for anal dysplasia associated with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Anal dysplasia associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection occurs in substantial proportions of HIV-infected men and women and poses risk for anal carcinoma. Whether to routinely screen for HPV-associated anal dysplasia in this population, however, remains a debated question. Anal dysplasia is detectable by Pap screening and colposcopic biopsy; as Pap testing results have relatively low reproducibility, 2 baseline tests may be prudent. Screening should also ascertain risk factors for dysplasia, degree of immunosuppression, and history of prior anal disease. Although treatment options for anal dysplasia are limited by morbidity and high recurrence rates, early detection may permit better tolerance of therapy, and current estimates indicate that routine screening for the condition would be cost-effective. In addition, emerging immunologic therapies offer hope of more effective future treatment. This article summarizes a presentation given by Wm. Christopher Mathews, MD, MSPH, at the November 2002 International AIDS Society-USA course in San Diego. PMID:12717041

  2. Structure, innervation, mechanical properties and reflex activation of a striated sphincter in the vestibule of the cat vagina.

    PubMed

    Lagunes-Córdoba, Roberto; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Muñoz-Martínez, E J

    2009-02-01

    Vaginal constriction might be important for reproduction in mammals, but existing information is both limited and controversial. This paper shows the structure, mechanical properties, innervation and reflex response of a striated sphincter in the vestibule of the cat vagina. A Foley catheter coupled to a pressure transducer detected in the lumen of the vestibule a pressure wave that was induced by stimulation of the external branch of the motor pudendal nerve. The peak pressure of the wave induced by bilateral stimulation (30.6 cm H(2)O) was about double of the peak pressure wave induced unilaterally. The tetanus/twitch amplitude ratio was 4.5. The sphincter that produces the increase in vaginal pressure fatigues slowly. Digital, point-to-point summation of unilateral waves was greater than the wave induced bilaterally. Summation of the pressure wave induced by the separate stimulation of the terminal motor branches was also greater than the wave induced by the entire motor nerve. This might reflect multiple innervation of muscle fibres. Single, controlled probing of the vaginal vestibule induced a reflex discharge in the motor nerve. Repetitive probing (10 Hz) induced a motor nerve post-discharge lasting >1 min. The vaginal sphincter is two-half rings of striated muscle fibres in the wall of the vaginal vestibule; the fibres end freely in the dorsal and ventral midlines. Penetration of the vestibule by the penis might trigger sustained contraction of the vaginal sphincter. PMID:19029344

  3. Heterosexual Anal Intercourse: A Neglected Risk Factor for HIV?

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Rebecca F.; Dimitrov, Dobromir; Owen, Branwen N.; Pickles, Michael; Butler, Ailsa R.; Masse, Ben; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Heterosexual anal intercourse confers a much greater risk of HIV transmission than vaginal intercourse, yet its contribution to heterosexual HIV epidemics has been under researched. In this article we review the current state of knowledge of heterosexual anal intercourse practice worldwide and identify the information required to assess its role in HIV transmission within heterosexual populations, including input measures required to inform mathematical models. We then discuss the evidence relating anal intercourse and HIV with sexual violence. PMID:23279040

  4. Influence of initial stress and rupture initiation parameters on forbidden zone rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2015-04-01

    Well established theoretical and numerical results of 2-D ruptures have been accepted for years to limit the speed of mode II cracks to be below the Rayleigh velocity or above the shear wave speed. However, recent work has numerically produced rupture speeds in this so-called `forbidden zone', that is the region of rupture velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed, for 3-D simulations. We verify that finding here and further examine the dependence of that behaviour on initial stress and rupture initiation parameters. Using a 3-D finite element model for dynamic rupture propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different initial stress conditions as well as different size initiation patches and forced rupture velocities. It is shown that the initial stress on the fault has a strong influence on the resulting rupture, specifically with regards to the distance at which the rupture transitions to supershear speeds, the maximum rupture velocity attained on the fault, and how rapidly the rupture passes through the forbidden zone. It is also demonstrated that for the same initial stress, increasing the size of the nucleation patch or the speed of forced rupture can artificially increase the gradient of the rupture velocity within the forbidden zone. This suggests that the rupture is uniquely predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault and surrounding medium in these models.

  5. Anal squamous cell carcinoma: An evolution in disease and management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Marc C; Maykel, Justin; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer represents less than 1% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Yet, despite the relative paucity of cases, the incidence of anal cancer has seen a steady about 2% rise each year over the last decade. As such, all healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the evaluation and treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma. While chemoradiation remains the mainstay of therapy for most patients with anal cancer, surgery may still be required in recurrent, recalcitrant and palliative disease. In this manuscript, we will explore the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. PMID:25278699

  6. Environmental scan of anal cancer screening practices: worldwide survey results

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jigisha; Salit, Irving E; Berry, Michael J; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Nathan, Mayura; Fishman, Fred; Palefsky, Joel; Tinmouth, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is rare in the general population but certain populations, such as persons with HIV, are at increased risk. High-risk populations can be screened for anal cancer using strategies similar to those used for cervical cancer. However, little is known about the use of such screening practices across jurisdictions. Data were collected using an online survey. Health care professionals currently providing anal cancer screening services were invited to complete the survey via email and/or fax. Information was collected on populations screened, services and treatments offered, and personnel. Over 300 invitations were sent; 82 providers from 80 clinics around the world completed the survey. Fourteen clinics have each examined more than 1000 patients. Over a third of clinics do not restrict access to screening; in the rest, eligibility is most commonly based on HIV status and abnormal anal cytology results. Fifty-three percent of clinics require abnormal anal cytology prior to performing high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) in asymptomatic patients. Almost all clinics offer both anal cytology and HRA. Internal high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is most often treated with infrared coagulation (61%), whereas external high-grade AIN is most commonly treated with imiquimod (49%). Most procedures are performed by physicians, followed by nurse practitioners. Our study is the first description of global anal cancer screening practices. Our findings may be used to inform practice and health policy in jurisdictions considering anal cancer screening. PMID:24740973

  7. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture

    PubMed Central

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; G, Shyamala

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19?weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  8. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture.

    PubMed

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; Shyamala, G

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19 weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  9. Efficacy of nifedipine therapy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross over trial.

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, M S; Zargar, S A; Yattoo, G N

    1992-01-01

    1. Twenty-eight patients who fulfilled entry criteria for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were randomly allocated to receive nifedipine and placebo in a cross over design with 12 week treatment periods separated by a 2 week wash-out. 2. All patients had episodic pain resembling biliary pain, had previously undergone cholecystectomy, had elevated alkaline phosphatase during episodes of pain and had elevated basal pressure on sphincter of Oddi manometry. 3. Compared with placebo, significant decreases in cumulative pain score, number of pain episodes, oral analgesic tablets consumed and emergency room visits were observed during nifedipine treatment. 4. Overall 21 patients improved during nifedipine therapy while seven patients did not. None of the following predicted response to nifedipine therapy: enzyme levels, morphine-Prostigmine test, fatty meal sonography, common duct diameter and pressure, sphincter of Oddi phasic pressure, frequency and duration of phasic waves and maximal fall in the basal pressure at sphincter of Oddi manometry after sublingual administration of nifedipine. However patients with predominant antegrade propagation of phasic contractions of sphincter of Oddi did significantly better on nifedipine than those with abnormal propagation of phasic contractions. 5. Nifedipine therapy orally in maximal tolerated doses relieves pain in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction who have elevated basal pressure and sphincter of Oddi phasic contractions of predominantly antegrade nature. PMID:1524959

  10. Ruptured "giant" supratentorial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Stemper, S J; Withers, T K

    2005-02-01

    Intracranial dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare lesions formed from the inclusion of ectodermal elements during neural tube closure. Although not entirely consistent, imaging characteristics on CT and MRI can aid differentiation of dermoids and epidermoids, as can age at presentation, location and tendency to rupture. The distinction between dermoid and epidermoid lesions is important prognostically and may impact on surgical management as a subtotally resected dermoid is less likely to recur than its epidermoid counterpart. The distinction of large dermoid lesions as "giant" adds little to information regarding the natural history or prognosis of these lesions and should be abandoned. PMID:15749433

  11. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  12. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  13. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, G L; Braverman, L E; White, E M; Vander Salm, T J

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with 131I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism. PMID:7119407

  14. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  15. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  16. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the first case in which an intracranial dermoid cyst that underwent traumatic rupture was treated surgically and discusses the importance of the preoperative radiological identification and management of the rupture. For adequate management of a ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst, in addition to early surgery, we emphasize the importance of expeditious identification of the rupture with MRI, including an additional fat-suppression sequence, and prompt management of the accompanying chemical meningitis with intravenous steroid therapy beginning from the pre-operative period. PMID:18258431

  17. Rupture dynamics in model polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Borah, Rupam; Debnath, Pallavi

    2016-05-11

    In this paper we explore the rupture dynamics of a model polymer system to capture the microscopic mechanism during relative motion of surfaces at the single polymer level. Our model is similar to the model for friction introduced by Filippov, Klafter, and Urbakh [Filippov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 92, 135503]; but with an important generalization to a flexible transducer (modelled as a bead spring polymer) which is attached to a fixed rigid planar substrate by interconnecting bonds (modelled as harmonic springs), and pulled by a constant force FT. Bonds are allowed to rupture stochastically. The model is simulated, and the results for a certain set of parameters exhibit a sequential rupture mechanism resulting in rupture fronts. A mean field formalism is developed to study these rupture fronts and the possible propagating solutions for the coupled bead and bond dynamics, where the coupling excludes an exact analytical treatment. Numerical solutions to mean field equations are obtained by standard numerical techniques, and they agree well with the simulation results which show sequential rupture. Within a travelling wave formalism based on the Tanh method, we show that the velocity of the rupture front can be obtained in closed form. The derived expression for the rupture front velocity gives good agreement with the stochastic and mean field results, when the rupture is sequential, while propagating solutions for bead and bond dynamics are shown to agree under certain conditions. PMID:27087684

  18. Single incision laparoscopic surgery - trans anal endoscopic microsurgery: A technological innovation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha; Sasikumar, Pattabi; Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran

    2014-04-01

    Trans anal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then underwent a period of immersion. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. The advent of single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has made great inroads into various fields of general and gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. We decided to make use of the same technique in TEM for two patients who had large sessile villous adenomas of the rectum. We used this port and fixed it transanally to the edge of the anus. Carbon dioxide used for insufflation in laparoscopic surgery was used through one of the ports, and a telescope was inserted to the larger port. We made sure that the entire polyp was cut out completely until the circular muscle of the internal sphincter was clearly exposed. Next, the cut edges of the rectum were undermined between the mucosa and the circular muscles in order to bring the cut edges closer together. We were able to perform this SILS TEM in two cases. In both the cases, well differentiated villous adenoma (colonoscopically, biopsy proven before surgery) was confirmed after excision. The question has been raised whether TEM is the new laparoscopy for anorectal surgery. Increasingly, several reports are showing promise for treatment for early stage cancers and large rectal adenomas using TEM. Adoption of our technique using the SILS port that has not been previously described in medical literature, seems to be a promising tool for the future. TEM first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then under went a period of immersion. In recent years, with the onset of laparoscopic surgery, the thoughts and the ideas of using a laparoscopic surgical technique have invaded the area of colorectal cancer as well. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. PMID:24761088

  19. [Pelvic floor and anal incontinence. Conservative therapy].

    PubMed

    Kroesen, A J

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of fecal incontinence and obstructive defecation can be treated by many conservative treatment modalities. This article presents the options of medication therapy, spincter exercises, electric stimulation, transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, anal irrigation and injection of bulking agents. These methods are presented with reference to the currently available literature but the evidence-based data level for all methods is low. For minor disorders of anorectal function these conservative methods can lead to an improvement of anorectal function and should be individually adapted. PMID:23329310

  20. Urethral sphincter EMG-controlled dorsal penile/clitoral nerve stimulation to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opisso, E.; Borau, A.; Rijkhoff, N. J. M.

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether real-time external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG-controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation can suppress undesired detrusor bladder contractions in patients with both neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). Detrusor pressure (Pdet) and EUS EMG were recorded in 12 neurogenic patients who underwent two filling cystometries. The first one was without stimulation and was intended to confirm the NDO and DSD and to set the EMG detection threshold. The second one was with real-time EMG-controlled stimulation of DGNs. Two detection methods were analyzed to detect bladder contractions. The first method was a Kurtosis-scaled root mean square (RMS) detector and was used on-line. The second was a simple RMS detector and was used off-line. Of 12 patients included, 10 patients showed both NDO and DSD. In nine of these ten patients relevant EMG concomitant to detrusor activity was detected and stimulation could suppress at least one detrusor contraction. The second filling compared to the first one showed an increase of 84% in bladder capacity (p = 0.002) and a decrease of 106% in Pdet (p = 0.002). Nine false-positive detections occurred during the ten fillings with electrical stimulation. The mean increases of both time and Pdet between stimulation and bladder contraction onsets for method 1 were 1.8 s and 4 cmH2O and for method 2 were 0.9 s and 2 cmH2O, respectively. This study shows that EUS EMG can be used in real time to detect the onset of a bladder contraction. In combination with DGN stimulation has been shown to be feasible to suppress undesired bladder contractions and in turn to increase bladder capacity in subjects with both NDO and DSD.

  1. Oddi sphincter preserved cholangioplasty with hepatico-subcutaneous stoma for hepatolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yu-Gui; Zhang, Wei-Tao; Xu, Zhi; Ling, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Li-Xin; Hou, Chun-Sheng; Wang, Gang; Cui, Long; Zhou, Xiao-Si

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term outcomes of Oddi sphincter preserved cholangioplasty with hepatico-subcutaneous stoma (OSPCHS) and risk factors for recurrence in hepatolithiasis. METHODS: From March 1993 to December 2012, 202 consecutive patients with hepatolithiasis underwent OSPCHS at our department. The Oddi sphincter preserved procedure consisted of common hepatic duct exploration, stone extraction, hilar bile duct plasty, establishment of subcutaneous stoma to the bile duct. Patients with recurrent stones can undergo stone extraction and/or biliary drainage via the subcutaneous stoma which can be incised under local anesthesia. The long-term results were reviewed. Cox regression model was employed to analyze the risk factors for stone recurrence. RESULTS: Ninety-seven (48.0%) OSPCHS patients underwent hepatic resection concomitantly. The rate of surgical complications was 10.4%. There was no perioperative death. The immediate stone clearance rate was 72.8%. Postoperative cholangioscopic lithotomy raised the clearance rate to 97.0%. With a median follow-up period of 78.5 mo (range: 2-233 mo), 24.8% of patients had recurrent stones, 2.5% had late development of cholangiocarcinoma, and the mortality rate was 5.4%. Removal of recurrent stones and/or drainage of inflammatory bile via subcutaneous stoma were conducted in 44 (21.8%) patients. The clearance rate of recurrent stones was 84.0% after subsequent choledochoscopic lithotripsy via subcutaneous stoma. Cox regression analysis showed that residual stone was an independent prognostic factor for stone recurrence. CONCLUSION: In selected patients with hepatolithiasis, OSPCHS achieves excellent long-term outcomes, and residual stone is an independent prognostic factor for stone recurrence. PMID:26668511

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells. PMID:26406476

  3. Anal sensation after restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, P J; Johnston, D

    1988-10-01

    The hypothesis that anal sensation might be better after restorative proctocolectomy with end-to-end ileoanal anastomosis than after mucosal proctectomy with endo-anal anastomosis was tested in this study. Anal sensation was measured in 14 patients before operation, 16 patients after restorative proctocolectomy with end-to-end anastomosis (RP + EEA) and 13 patients after mucosal proctectomy with endo-anal anastomosis 1 cm above the dentate line (MP + EAA). Threshold electrosensitivity was measured in the upper, mid and lower anal canal by means of a bipolar constant current stimulator probe. The 'recto'-anal inhibitory reflex was tested, and the patients' ability to discriminate between flatus and faeces and to release flatus 'safely' was assessed by interview. In the upper anal canal, threshold sensitivity was significantly greater in patients who had undergone MP + EAA than in patients who had undergone RP + EEA (P less than 0.05). In the mid and lower anal canal, electrosensitivity in the three groups of patients did not differ significantly. Twelve patients (75 per cent) regained the 'recto'-anal reflex after RP + EEA, but after MP + EAA only three patients (23 per cent) did so (P less than 0.02). Thirteen patients after RP + EEA could release flatus safely without fear of faecal leakage, compared with only four after MP + EAA (P less than 0.02). The proportions of patients in these two groups who said they were able to discriminate flatus from faeces did not differ significantly. Anal sensation and discriminatory function are significantly better after end-to-end ileoanal anastomosis than after mucosal proctectomy with endo-anal anastomosis. PMID:3219548

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the anal wall in a Nigerian

    PubMed Central

    Oluyemi, Aderemi; Keshinro, Samuel; Jimoh, Abimbola; Oshun, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Documented reports of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are relatively few in the sub-Saharan continent. The body of evidence points towards anal wall involvement being a rarity indeed. In this article we document a 61 year old Nigerian man who presented with bleeding per rectum and in whom the histological features (including immunohistochemistry) of the biopsied anal lesion was GIST. PMID:26893795

  5. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-27

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  6. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  7. Second-Trimester Uterine Rupture: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    F. ABDULWAHAB, Dalia; ISMAIL, Hamizah; NUSEE, Zalina

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a rare life-threatening complication. It mainly occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy and is rarely seen during the first or second trimesters. Our centre experienced three important cases of uterine rupture. First case: spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks of pregnancy, which was diagnosed at autopsy. It was misled by the ultrasound finding of an intrauterine pregnancy, and searching for other non-gynaecological causes delayed the urgent obstetric surgical management. Second case: ruptured uterus at 24 weeks following medical termination due to foetal anomaly. It was diagnosed only at laparotomy indicated for failed medical termination and chorioamnionitis. Third case: uterine rupture at 21 weeks of pregnancy in a patient with gastroenterology symptoms. In these reports, we have discussed the various risk factors, presentations, course of events and difficulties in diagnosing uterine rupture. The study concludes that the clinical presentation of uterine ruptures varies. It occurs regardless of gestational age. Ultrasound findings of intrauterine pregnancy with free fluid do not exclude uterine rupture or ectopic pregnancy. Searching for non-gynaecological causes in such clinical presentations might delay crucial surgical intervention, which leads to unnecessary morbidity, mortality or loss of obstetrics function. PMID:25977625

  8. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  9. Papillary muscle rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Cordovil, Adriana; Fischer, Claudio H; Rodrigues, Ana Clara T; Lira Filho, Edgar B; Vieira, Marcelo L C; Cury, Alexandre F; Naccarato, Gustavo A F; Valente, Carmen; Brandão, Carlos M; Pommerantzeff, Pablo M; Morhy, Samira S

    2006-04-01

    We report a case of anterolateral papillary muscle rupture in a 22-year-old man who had blunt chest trauma caused by a car accident. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe mitral regurgitation caused by the rupture. He successfully underwent emergency mitral valve replacement and was discharged 9 days after the surgical correction. PMID:16581491

  10. Ruptured intracranial dermoids: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Patkar, D; Krishnan, A; Patankar, T; Prasad, S; Shah, J; Limdi, J

    1999-01-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoids tumour is rare and carries with it the risk of significant morbidity as well as fatality. Three cases that presented with varying symptoms ranging from headache to chiasmatic compression and suspected to have rupture of dermoid tumour are described. The importance of MR imaging in their diagnosis is discussed. PMID:10734333

  11. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  12. [Screening and therapy of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal carcinoma in patients with HIV-infection].

    PubMed

    Kreuter, A; Reimann, G; Esser, S; Rasokat, H; Hartmann, M; Swoboda, J; Conant, M A; Tschachler, E; Arasteh, K; Altmeyer, P; Brockmeyer, N H

    2003-09-19

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a potential precursor of invasive anal carcinoma. Introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the treatment of HIV infection substantially reduced the incidence of some diseases associated with opportunistic viral infections. However, the incidence of AIN is reported to increase and HAART seems to have only little impact on the regression or progression of AIN. Paradoxically, improvement of survival in the HAART era results in an increased risk of anal cancer. The incidence of anal carcinoma amongst homosexual men is substantially higher compared to the normal population (35/100.000). This incidence is similar to the incidence of cervical cancer before screening for CIN with cervical cytology. Recent data suggest that the incidence of AIN and anal cancer is even higher among HIV-infected individuals. Both cancer entities share biologic similarities, including the association with human papillomavirus infection (HPV). Screening for CIN with cervical cytology and early treatment has resulted in a significant decline in the incidence of cervical carcinoma. Like cervical cancer, anal carcinoma may be preventable through identification and treatment of its precursors. Future efforts should focus on a screening protocol, training of clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of AIN and anal carcinoma, and novel approaches to treatment of these lesions. This screening protocol could help to reduce anal cancer in HIV-infection as well as save limited resources in health care system. PMID:14502448

  13. Changes in wall shear stress magnitude after aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Yoshimura, Ryo; Terada, Tomoaki

    2013-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies on cerebral aneurysms have attempted to identify surrogate hemodynamic parameters to predict rupture risk. We present a case of bilateral mirror image aneurysms, one of which ruptured soon after imaging. Wall shear stress values of the ruptured aneurysm changed by 20-30% after rupture because of change in the aneurysm shape. Findings from our case suggest that CFD studies comparing unruptured and ruptured aneurysms may not yield valid estimation on aneurysm rupture risk because of changes in aneurysm shape after rupture. Changes in aneurysm shape after rupture should be considered in CFD research. PMID:23715949

  14. Vesico-sphincter dysfunctions in Pure Cerebellar Syndrome (PCS): a possible basis for the study of anatomo-functional correlations.

    PubMed

    Pea, U; Zago, T; Areta, L; Marzorati, G

    2008-01-01

    The neurological polymorphism of Pure Cerebellar Syndromes (not including the heredodegenerative patterns) led the Authors to try to verify the possible correlations between neurological damages and urodynamic findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS. From 2001 to 2006 thirty patients affected by PCS were studied. They underwent several neurological and urological investigations, including videourodynamics. RESULTS. Sixteen cases (76%) showed urinary incontinence due to non-inhibited detrusor contractions, with no evidence of vesico-sphincter dyssynergia; the remaining patients showed a moderate degree of incoordination. CONCLUSIONS. The authors highlight the basic role of cerebellum in modulating the motor activities and the coordination of the bladder-sphincter structures, also in the light of the outcomes gathered in these patients, who were not suffering from other superior structure deficiencies. PMID:21086374

  15. Resolution of Fundic Gland Polyposis following Laparoscopic Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation and Subsequent Cessation of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Joel R.; Connolly, Erin E.; Wittchow, Richard J.; Kothari, Shanu N.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur from a variety of sources and are found commonly on upper endoscopy. We present the case of a 49-year-old female who presented for evaluation for antireflux surgery with a history of fundic gland polyposis who required twice-daily proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for control of her gastric reflux. After verifying that she met criteria for surgery, she underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation placement. With the cessation of PPIs following surgery, the fundic gland polyposis resolved. Fundic gland polyps may occur sporadically or within certain syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis. Multiple possible inciting factors exist, including the use of PPIs. This is the first reported case of the resolution of numerous fundic gland polyps following the completion of laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation. PMID:26600954

  16. Advances in the Management of Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Julie, Diana R; Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-03-01

    Although anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is an uncommon malignancy, its incidence has been increasing markedly in recent decades due to its association with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The well-established standard of care for localized ASCC consists of the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin (MMC) chemotherapy, concurrent with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). However, newer techniques are being actively pursued, including the use of newer radiation therapy (RT) technologies, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The areas of debate and development include the dosing and timing of MMC delivery, the role of cisplatin chemotherapy as an alternative to MMC, the replacement of the standard 96-h infusion of 5FU with oral capecitabine, the use of targeted chemotherapy agents, and the duration and dose of RT. PMID:26905274

  17. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  18. Somatostatin prevents acute pancreatitis after pancreatic duct sphincter hydrostatic balloon dilation in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Viera, L; Gelrud, D

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prophylactic somatostatin infusion can prevent pancreatitis after hydrostatic balloon dilation of the pancreatic duct sphincter segment in 16 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. This study demonstrated that prophylactic administration of somatostatin before, during, and after the procedure diminished the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis. We recommend consideration of such prophylaxis in patients undergoing this procedure. PMID:1672278

  19. Viability and MR detectability of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells used for endoscopic injection into the porcine urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Will, Susanne; Martirosian, Petros; Eibofner, Frank; Schick, Fritz; Bantleon, Rüdiger; Vaegler, Martin; Grözinger, Gerd; Claussen, Claus D; Kramer, Ulrich; Schmehl, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Direct stem cell therapies for functionally impaired tissue require a sufficient number of cells in the target region and a method for verifying the fate of the cells in the subsequent time course. In vivo MRI of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells has been suggested to comply with these requirements. The study was conducted to evaluate proliferation, migration, differentiation and adhesion effects as well as the obtained iron load of an iron labeling strategy for mesenchymal stem cells. After injection into the porcine urethral sphincter, the labeled cells were monitored for up to six months using MRI. Mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with ferucarbotran (60/100/200 µg/mL) and ferumoxide (200 µg/mL) for the analysis of migration and viability. Phantom MR measurements were made to evaluate effects of iron labeling. For short and long term studies, the iron labeled cells were injected into the porcine urethral sphincter and monitored by MRI. High resolution anatomical images of the porcine urethral sphincter were applied for detection of the iron particles with a turbo-spin-echo sequence and a gradient-echo sequence with multiple TE values. The MR images were then compared with histological staining. The analysis of cell function after iron labeling showed no effects on proliferation or differentiation of the cells. Although the adherence increases with higher iron dose, the ability to migrate decreases as a presumed effect of iron labeling. The iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells were detectable in vivo in MRI and histological staining even six months after injection. Labeling with iron particles and subsequent evaluation with highly resolved three dimensional data acquisition allows sensitive tracking of cells injected into the porcine urethral sphincter for several months without substantial biological effects on mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:26147577

  20. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities are strongly predictive of treatment response in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Simon C; Ciarleglio, Maria; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Clarke, John O; Stein, Ellen; Chander Roland, Bani

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities achalasia treatment METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive patients referred for high resolution esophageal manometry with a final manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients were sub-divided by presence or absence of Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) abnormality, and clinical and manometric profiles were compared. Correlation between UES abnormality and sub-type (i.e., hypertensive, hypotensive or impaired relaxation) and a number of variables, including qualitative treatment response, achalasia sub-type, co-morbid medical illness, psychiatric illness, surgical history, dominant presenting symptom, treatment type, age and gender were also evaluated. RESULTS: Among all 41 patients, 24 (58.54%) had a UES abnormality present. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender or any other clinical or demographic profiles. Among those with UES abnormalities, the majority were either hypertensive (41.67%) or had impaired relaxation (37.5%) as compared to hypotensive (20.83%), although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.42). There was no specific association between treatment response and treatment type received; however, there was a significant association between UES abnormalities and treatment response. In patients with achalasia and concomitant UES abnormalities, 87.5% had poor treatment response, while only 12.5% had favorable response. In contrast, in patients with achalasia and no UES abnormalities, the majority (78.57%) had good treatment response, as compared to 21.43% with poor treatment response (P = 0.0001). After controlling for achalasia sub-type, those with UES abnormality had 26 times greater odds of poor treatment response than those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.009). Similarly, after controlling for treatment type, those with UES abnormality had 13.9 times greater odds of poor treatment response compared to those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: The presence of UES abnormalities in patients with achalasia significantly predicted poorer treatment response as compared to those with normal UES function. PMID:25232548

  1. AB200. Treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao; Jiang, Hai; Shen, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction. Methods Sixteen cases of male neurogenic bladder dysfunction patients. Age from 50 to 68 years old. Average 56 years old. All patients have dysuria symptom with normal bladder capacity. Detrusor underactivity 15 cases. Normal detrusor contractility 1 case. Reasons for neurogenic bladder: spinal cord injury 8 cases, spinal cord tumor 3 cases, postencephalitic 1 case, unknown reasons 4 cases, re-injection 1 case. Residual urine from 80 to 220 mL. Different degrees of prostatic hyperplasia were verified by ultrasound in 15 cases. Routine TURP were administrated under plasma cystoscopy. 100u botox A was injected into urethral sphincter muscle in 10 spots evenly. Symptom scores and ultrasound residual urine were recorded before and 4 weeks after surgery. Results were analyzed for treatment effect estimation. Results The average residual urine volume reduced from 154.8sidua to 57.3erage mL (P<0.01). Three cases stress urinary incontinence were observed, and reduced or recovered after 2–3 months pelvic floor muscle training. All patients were satisfied with the treatment results. The treatment effect lasted more than 15 months. Conclusions TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection is an effective and economic treatment on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction.

  2. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus infection in Mexico City. Rectal bleeding and anal warts as risk factors among men reporting sex with men.

    PubMed

    Coplan, P M; Gortmaker, S; Hernandez-Avila, M; Spiegelman, D; Uribe-Zuñiga, P; Mueller, N E

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency and determinants of rectal bleeding and the association between rectal bleeding and risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among homosexual/ bisexual men in Mexico City. Men who requested anonymous HIV testing at a public clinic in Mexico City and who reported engaging in any homosexual behavior were eligible to participate in this study. Trained staff collected information on demographic factors, sexual behavior, psychological states, and HIV serostatus from all consenting, eligible clients. Logistic regression modeling was used to investigate the independent effect of risk factors among 2,758 men who were tested between June 1991 and December 1992. Bleeding during anal intercourse was a common occurrence: More than one third of the men in the study reported some bleeding, and 8% reported bleeding in half or more of their intercourse episodes. The prevalence of HIV infection among bleeders was 42% as compared with 28% in nonbleeders (p < 0.0001), and the adjusted odds ratio was 1.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.8) for men who bled in more than half of their anal intercourse episodes relative to nonbleeders. There was a trend of increasing HIV seroprevalence with increasing frequency of rectal bleeding (p = 0.001). Nine percent of all HIV infections and 42% of infections among frequent bleeders were attributable to rectal bleeding. Men who reported both rectal bleeding and anal warts were 3.5 (95% CI 2.1-5.8) times more likely to be HIV-infected in multivariate analysis than men reporting neither rectal bleeding nor anal warts. Determinants of rectal bleeding included older age, more education, more receptive anal intercourse than insertive intercourse, receptive digital-anal contact, anal warts, and genital ulcers. Among men reporting sex with men in Mexico City, rectal bleeding is common. It is an independent risk factor for HIV infection, and warrants attention in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome prevention efforts. Rectal bleeding that results from rupture of anal warts may be an especially effective portal of HIV transmission. PMID:8890660

  4. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  5. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Rupture Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Singh Bhinder, Nimarta; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of primary and metastatic liver cancer increases, minimally invasive treatment methods such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) have gained momentum as their efficacy and safety profile have been validated. Complications of TACE are rare and typically well tolerated. A unique complication is tumor rupture with hemorrhage. Reports of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) rupture after TACE are limited. It is critical to recognize this complication and understand the treatment options, which range from conservative to surgical management. This report describes a case of HCC rupture following TACE successfully managed with coil embolization. PMID:25762848

  6. Ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy at sixteen weeks.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Fehmi; Paçarada, Myrvete; Kongjeli, Niltene; Zeqiri, Vlora; Kongjeli, Gyltene; Krasniqi, Burim

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures, leading to life -threatening intraperitoneal hemorrhage. A 22-year-old second gravida patient presented at the Emergency Center of the University Clinical Center of Kosova with a 16-week history of amenorrhea and acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She was resuscitated and taken for an emergency laparotomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, there was a massive hemoperitoneum with a ruptured right rudimentary horn Given their rarity, ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancies are of interest. PMID:24591927

  7. Thyroid rupture secondary to blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Sow, Yih-Liang; Aziz, Nora Abdul; Ng, Khoon-Leong

    2013-04-01

    Rupture of the thyroid gland is uncommon in cases of blunt neck trauma. We report a case of thyroid rupture after a motor vehicle accident in a patient without a preexisting goiter. He presented with a painful anterior neck swelling associated with dysphagia and hoarseness of voice. Computed tomographic scans showed lacerations of the right thyroid lobe and isthmus with features suggestive of slow active bleeding. Neck exploration was subsequently performed, and a ruptured right thyroid lobe was found with ongoing venous hemorrhage. A right hemithyroidectomy was performed, and the patient recovered without complications. PMID:23399341

  8. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction Type III: New studies suggest new approaches are needed

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C Mel

    2015-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has been classified into three types based upon the presence or absence of objective findings including liver test abnormalities and bile duct dilatation. Type III is the most controversial and is classified as biliary type pain in the absence of any these objective findings. Many prior studies have shown that the clinical response to endoscopic therapy is higher based upon the presence of these objective criteria. However, there has been variable correlation of the manometry findings to outcome after endoscopic therapy. Nevertheless, manometry and sphincterotomy has been recommended for Type III patients given the overall response rate of 33%, although the reported response rates are highly variable. However, all of the prior data was non-blinded and non-randomized with variable follow-up. The evaluating predictors in SOD study - a prospective randomized blinded sham controlled one year outcome study showed no correlation between manometric findings and outcome after sphincterotomy. Furthermore, patients receiving sham therapy had a statistically significantly better outcome than those undergoing biliary or dual sphincterotomy. This study calls into question the whole concept of SOD Type III and, based upon prior physiologic studies, one can suggest that SOD Type III likely represents a right upper quadrant functional abdominal pain syndrome and should be treated as such. PMID:26019439

  9. Long-Term Results of External Upper Esophageal Sphincter Myotomy for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    David, Eric F.; Klinkenberg-Knol, Elly C.; Mahieu, Hans F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy of external myotomy of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) for oropharyngeal dysphagia. In the period 1991–2006, 28 patients with longstanding dysphagia and/or aspiration problems of different etiologies underwent UES myotomy as a single surgical treatment. The main symptoms were difficulties in swallowing of a solid-food bolus, aspiration, and recurrent incidents of solid-food blockages. Pre- and postoperative manometry and videofluoroscopy were used to assess deglutition and aspiration. Outcome was defined as success in the case of complete relief or marked improvement of dysphagia and aspiration and as failure in the case of partial improvement or no improvement. Initial results showed success in 21 and failure in 7 patients. The best outcomes were observed in patients with dysphagia of unknown origin, noncancer-related iatrogenic etiology, and neuromuscular disease. No correlation was found between preoperative constrictor pharyngeal muscle activity and success rate. After follow-up of more than 1 year, 20 patients were marked as success and 3 as failure. All successful patients had full oral intake with a normal bolus consistency without clinically significant aspiration. We conclude that in select cases of oropharyngeal dysphagia success may be achieved by UES myotomy with restoration of oral intake of normal bolus consistency. PMID:19760460

  10. Mechanism of bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the porcine lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Tey, Shu-Leei; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that is related to an incompetent lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Previous studies showed that bombesin could increase LES pressure in humans and opossums. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of bombesin on porcine LES contraction. We used the selective agonists, neuromedin B (NMB), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and [D-Tyr(6),Apa-4Cl(11),Phe(13),Nle(14)]bombesin-(6-14) (DTACPN-BN), as well as receptor antagonists of bombesin receptor subtype 2 (BB2), and 3 (BB3) for ex vivo contraction studies. Atropine, nifedipine, tetrodotoxin, and ω-conotoxin GVIA were used to explore the agonist-induced LES contraction mechanism. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were applied to detect bombesin receptor expression. Our results indicate that GRP and DTACPN-BN, but not NMB, induced tonic contractions of the porcine LES in a dose-dependent manner, and the contractions were inhibited with selective BB2 and BB3 antagonists. The GRP-induced contraction is mainly caused by L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx. However, DTACPN-BN-induced contractions are associated with neuronal conduction. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that BB2 and BB3 were expressed in the porcine LES. Bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the LES is mediated through BB2 and BB3. Bombesin, BB2, and BB3 agonists might have the potential to treat GERD. PMID:26522854

  11. Risk Factors for Erosion of Artificial Urinary Sphincters: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.; Erickson, Bradley A.; Elliott, Sean P.; Powell, Christopher; Alsikafi, Nejd; McClung, Christopher; Myers, Jeremy B.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Smith, Thomas G.; Broghammer, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the short- to medium-term outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) placement from a large, multi-institutional, prospective, follow-up study. We hypothesize that along with radiation, patients with any history of a direct surgery to the urethra will have higher rates of eventual AUS explantation for erosion and/or infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective outcome analysis was performed on 386 patients treated with AUS placement from April 2009 to December 2012 at 8 institutions with at least 3 months of follow-up. Charts were analyzed for preoperative risk factors and postoperative complications requiring explantation. RESULTS Approximately 50% of patients were considered high risk. High risk was defined as patients having undergone radiation therapy, urethroplasty, multiple treatments for bladder neck contracture or urethral stricture, urethral stent placement, or a history of erosion or infection in a previous AUS. A total of 31 explantations (8.03%) were performed during the follow-up period. Overall explantation rates were higher in those with prior radiation and prior UroLume. Men with prior AUS infection or erosion also had a trend for higher rates of subsequent explantation. Men receiving 3.5-cm cuffs had significantly higher explantation rates than those receiving larger cuffs. CONCLUSION This outcomes study confirms that urethral risk factors, including radiation history, prior AUS erosion, and a history of urethral stent placement, increase the risk of AUS explantation in short-term follow-up. PMID:25109562

  12. Mechanism of bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the porcine lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Tey, Shu-Leei; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that is related to an incompetent lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Previous studies showed that bombesin could increase LES pressure in humans and opossums. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of bombesin on porcine LES contraction. We used the selective agonists, neuromedin B (NMB), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and [D-Tyr6,Apa-4Cl11,Phe13,Nle14]bombesin-(6-14) (DTACPN-BN), as well as receptor antagonists of bombesin receptor subtype 2 (BB2), and 3 (BB3) for ex vivo contraction studies. Atropine, nifedipine, tetrodotoxin, and ω-conotoxin GVIA were used to explore the agonist-induced LES contraction mechanism. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were applied to detect bombesin receptor expression. Our results indicate that GRP and DTACPN-BN, but not NMB, induced tonic contractions of the porcine LES in a dose-dependent manner, and the contractions were inhibited with selective BB2 and BB3 antagonists. The GRP-induced contraction is mainly caused by L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated Ca2+ influx. However, DTACPN-BN-induced contractions are associated with neuronal conduction. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that BB2 and BB3 were expressed in the porcine LES. Bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the LES is mediated through BB2 and BB3. Bombesin, BB2, and BB3 agonists might have the potential to treat GERD. PMID:26522854

  13. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  14. Achalasia in Pregnancy: Botulinum Toxin A Injection of Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Hooft, Nicole; Schmidt, Emily S.; Bremner, Ross M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Achalasia, a rare esophageal motility disorder that may cause malnutrition during pregnancy, can result in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Many medical treatment regimens are contraindicated or not tolerated during pregnancy, and surgery is generally avoided due to potential risks to the fetus. Case Report. Severe, medically refractory achalasia in a 23-year-old pregnant woman that caused malnutrition was successfully managed by administering a botulinum toxin A injection to the lower esophageal sphincter. The injection was performed at approximately 14 weeks' gestation and the patient reported clinically significant relief from dysphagia. She gained weight and ultimately delivered a healthy baby girl at term, but her symptoms returned a few months postpartum. She underwent a second treatment of botulinum toxin A injection, but it offered only one month of relief. Roughly eight months after delivery, the patient underwent a laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The patient resumed a normal diet one week postoperatively, and her baby has had no complications. Conclusion. This is only the second reported case of botulinum toxin A injection being used to treat achalasia in pregnancy. This treatment proved to be a safe temporary alternative without the risks of surgery and anesthesia during pregnancy. PMID:26229704

  15. Urethropexy for the management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch.

    PubMed

    White, R N

    2001-10-01

    Urethropexy was performed on 100 bitches for the management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (SMI). The dogs ranged in age from 12 months to nine years (mean 4.5 years). Diagnosis of the condition was based upon clinical, laboratory and contrast radiographic examinations, and clinical response to medical management. In all bitches, incontinence developed in the adult individual and in the majority (89 bitches) after spaying. Radiographic findings were unremarkable in 22 bitches, apart from the presence of an intrapelvic bladder neck. Follow-up periods ranged from 12 months to seven years (mean 2.9 years). Fifty-six bitches were completely cured by surgery, 27 became less incontinent and 17 either failed to respond (nine animals) or showed an initial improvement in urinary function, but then relapsed (eight animals). Nine of these 17 animals underwent a second urethropexy procedure, resulting in a cure in six and an improvement in three cases (follow-up 12 to 41 months, mean 22.2 months). A deterioration in the response rate was observed over time. Postoperative complications were seen in 21 bitches and included an increased frequency of micturition (14 bitches), dysuria (six bitches) and anuria (three bitches). PMID:11688522

  16. Surgical treatment of tumors of the distal rectum with sphincter preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, T M; Oh, C; Steinhagen, R M; Greenstein, A J; Perez, C; Aufses, A H

    1992-01-01

    One hundred one patients with villous adenoma or invasive carcinoma of the distal rectum treated with local excision or coloanal anastomosis were studied. Twenty-three (45%) of the 51 patients with villous adenomas had transanal excision, another 23 (45%) had a posterior proctotomy, and five (10%) had a coloanal anastomosis. Only two patients with a villous adenoma developed a recurrence requiring repeat local excision. Fifteen (30%) of the 50 patients with invasive cancer were treated by transanal excision. All had tumors confined to the submucosa or superficial muscularis. Eighteen (85%) of 21 patients having posterior proctotomy also had tumors with similar depth of invasion. Six (43%) of the 14 patients having coloanal anastomosis had Dukes' B tumors, six (43%) were Dukes' C, and another two (14%) underwent palliative resection. The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 77%. Only four patients treated by transanal excision or posterior proctotomy died of metastatic disease. In the coloanal group, two of 12 patients undergoing curative resection died of recurrent cancer, and another has a pelvic recurrence. Villous adenomas of the distal rectum and selected carcinomas may be treated with local excision and coloanal anastomosis with preservation of sphincter function with good results. PMID:1417192

  17. Medical treatment for sphincter of oddi dysfunction: Can it replace endoscopic sphincterotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Vitton, Véronique; Ezzedine, Salah; Gonzalez, Jean-Michel; Gasmi, Mohamed; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Barthet, Marc

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of a medical management of sphincter of oddi dysfunction (SOD) after an intermediate follow-up period. METHODS: A total of 59 patients with SOD (2 men and 57 women, mean age 51 years old) were included in this prospective study. After medical treatment for one year, the patients were clinically re-evaluated after an average period of 30 mo. RESULTS: The distribution of the patients according to the Milwaukee’s classification was the following: 11 patients were type 1, 34 were type 2 and 14 were type 3. Fourteen patients underwent an endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) after one year of medical treatment. The median intermediate follow-up period was 29.8 ± 3 mo (3-72 mo). The initial effectiveness of the medical treatment was complete, partial and poor among 50.8%, 13.5% and 35%, respectively, of the patients. At the end of the follow-up period, 37 patients (62.7%) showed more than 50% improvement. The rate of improvement in patients who required ES was not significantly different compared with the patients treated conservatively (64.2% vs 62.2%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study confirms that conservative medical treatment could be an alternative to endoscopic sphincterotomy because, after an intermediate follow-up period, the two treatments show the same success rates. PMID:22529689

  18. Three-dimensional MRI of the male urethrae with implanted artificial sphincters: initial results.

    PubMed

    Deng, J; Hall-Craggs, M A; Craggs, M D; Richards, R; Knight, S L; Linney, A D; Mundy, A R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for simultaneous 3D visualization of a new type of artificial urethral sphincter (AUS) and adjacent urinary structures. Serial MR tomograms were acquired from seven men after AUS implantation. 3D reconstruction was performed by thresholding original (positive) and inverted (negative) image intensity and by subsequently fusing positive and negative images. Results show that the bladder, cuff and balloons of the AUS of originally high intensity were imaged in 3D by thresholding the positive datasets. The urethrae and corpora cavernosa penis of originally low intensity were displayed in 3D by thresholding the negative datasets. Fusion of the positive and negative datasets allowed simultaneous visualization of the AUS complex and adjacent urinary structures. All the structures of interest were also clearly seen by interactive multiplanar reformatting. Coronal tomographic datasets provided better 3D and reformatted 2D images than sagittal and transverse datasets. This technique offers a simple means for evaluating the complex urethral anatomy and the AUS, and has potential for improved 3D visualization of many other complex morphological and pathological conditions. PMID:16714745

  19. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of stress urinary incontinence in women: Parameters differentiating urethral hypermobility and intrinsic sphincter deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Macura, Katarzyna Jadwiga; Thompson, Richard Eugene; Bluemke, David Alan; Genadry, Rene

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To define the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters differentiating urethral hypermobility (UH) and intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: The static and dynamic MR images of 21 patients with SUI were correlated to urodynamic (UD) findings and compared to those of 10 continent controls. For the assessment of the urethra and integrity of the urethral support structures, we applied the high-resolution endocavitary MRI, such as intraurethral MRI, endovaginal or endorectal MRI. For the functional imaging of the urethral support, we performed dynamic MRI with the pelvic phased array coil. We assessed the following MRI parameters in both the patient and the volunteer groups: (1) urethral angle; (2) bladder neck descent; (3) status of the periurethral ligaments, (4) vaginal shape; (5) urethral sphincter integrity, length and muscle thickness at mid urethra; (6) bladder neck funneling; (7) status of the puborectalis muscle; (8) pubo-vaginal distance. UDs parameters were assessed in the patient study group as follows: (1) urethral mobility angle on Q-tip test; (2) Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) measured at 250 cc bladder volume; and (3) maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP). The UH type of SUI was defined with the Q-tip test angle over 30 degrees, and VLPP pressure over 60 cm H2O. The ISD incontinence was defined with MUCP pressure below 20 cm H2O, and VLPP pressure less or equal to 60 cm H2O. We considered the associations between the MRI and clinical data and UDs using a variety of statistical tools to include linear regression, multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. All statistical analyses were performed using STATA version 9.0 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). RESULTS: In the incontinent group, 52% have history of vaginal delivery trauma as compared to none in control group (P < 0.001). There was no difference between the continent volunteers and incontinent patients in body habitus as assessed by the body mass index. Pubovaginal distance and periurethral ligament disruption are significantly associated with incontinence; periurethral ligament symmetricity reduces the odds of incontinence by 87%. Bladder neck funneling and length of the suprapubic urethral sphincter are significantly associated with the type of incontinence on UDs; funneling reduced the odds of pure UH by almost 95%; increasing suprapubic urethral sphincter length at rest is highly associated with UH. Both MRI variables result in a predictive model for UDs diagnosis (area under the ROC = 0.944). CONCLUSION: MRI may play an important role in assessing the contribution of hypermobility and sphincteric dysfunction to the SUI in women when considering treatment options. PMID:26644825

  1. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations. PMID:26948227

  2. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  3. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, A B; Cummins, B H

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a spontaneous asymptomatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst with CT and MR images. The literature on the subject is reviewed. The potential associated complications are discussed. PMID:2818854

  4. Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm mimicking Boerhaave syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Yu; Yang, Kai-Wei; Chen, Wei-Kung; Huang, Chen-Hsiung

    2013-09-01

    Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is a rare cause for epigastric pain and is usually detected incidentally. Atypical presentation with postemetic epigastralgia and pleural effusion usually leads physicians to make the diagnosis of Boerhaave syndrome. Herein, we report a 32-year-old woman who was diagnosed with Boerhaave syndrome initially after presenting with acute postemetic epigastralgia and predominant left side pleural effusion. Diagnostic left thoracentesis yielded bloody fluid with similar amylase level to serum. The chest computed tomographic scan showed no evidence of esophageal rupture. However, a ruptured celiac artery aneurysm with retroperitoneal hematoma extending to the posterior mediastinum and bilateral pleural space was found incidentally. Although ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is an uncommon cause for postemetic epigastralgia, acute vascular events such as the previously stated cause should be the first impression rather than Boerhaave syndrome if the patient also presents with isolated pleural effusion containing unelevated amylase. PMID:23773770

  5. The prevalence, and predictive value, of abnormal anal cytology to diagnose anal dysplasia in a population of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Cranston, R D; Hart, S D; Gornbein, J A; Hirschowitz, S L; Cortina, G; Moe, A A

    2007-02-01

    Due to the increasing incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive men who have sex with men, and the potential to detect and treat high-grade anal dysplasia--the putative anal cancer precursor--we have introduced an anal cytology screening service. Patients with abnormal anal cytology have follow-up high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsy of lesions clinically suspicious for high-grade dysplasia. In total, 244 men were screened and 235 (96%) of the samples were adequate for cytological interpretation using the Bethesda 2001 system. One hundred and sixty-four (67%) men had abnormal anal cytology, and 93 of them had follow-up HRA and anal biopsy. The positive predictive value for any anal cytological abnormality to predict any degree of anal dysplasia was 95.7+/-2.1%, and for any anal cytological abnormality to predict high-grade anal dysplasia was 55.9+/-5.1%. Abnormal anal cytology was highly predicative of anal dysplasia on biopsy. PMID:17331275

  6. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  7. Anal duplication in a one-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lily S.; Courtier, Jesse; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with anal duplication discovered incidentally at 1 year of age. Pre-operative evaluation excluded any complications or associated anomalies. She underwent surgical excision with an excellent outcome. PMID:25774340

  8. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  9. MR and CT appearance of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T F; Spitzer, R M

    1987-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid tumors have characteristic MR and CT appearances. Rupture of an intracranial dermoid produces a dramatic MR and CT appearance. Two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors are presented, one with rupture into the subarachnoid space, another with rupture into the ventricles. MR and CT findings are included. PMID:3436130

  10. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and

  11. Yield Stress Effects on Mucus Plug Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John C.; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2012-11-01

    Mucus plugs can obstruct airways, resulting in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Yield stress, one of the significant rheological properties of mucus, plays a significant role in plug rupture. We use carbopol 940 gels as mucus simulants to study dynamics of mucus plug rupture in experiments. Yield stress increases with gel concentration increasing (0.1% ~0.3%). The yield stress of the 0.2% gel is about 530 dyn/cm2, which can simulate normal mucus. A 2D PDMS channel is used to simulate a collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung. Plug rupture is driven by a pressure drop of 1.6 104 ~ 2.0 104 dyn/cm2. Initial plug length varies from half to two times the half channel width. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during rupture, from which wall shear stress is derived. Plug shortening velocity increases with the pressure drop, but decreases with yield stress or the initial plug length. Wall shear stress increases with yield stress, which indicates more potential damage may occur to epithelial cells when pathologic mucus has a high yield stress. Near the rupture moment, a wall shear stress peak appears at the front of the film deposited by the plug during rupture. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  12. Anal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Suárez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer is a rare tumor that is associated with oncogenic HPV genotypes. This study aims to compare the age-standardized rates (ASRs) of anal cancer incidence and mortality in men and women living in Puerto Rico (PR) with those of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanics (USH) living in the continental United States (US). Methods ASRs were calculated based on cancer data that came from the PR Cancer Central Registry and from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The age-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Results Comparing the period of 2001 to 2004 to that of 1992 to 1996, the incidence of anal cancer increased among NHW, NHB, and PR men. In females, an increase in the incidence was observed for all racial groups except for Puerto Rican women. When evaluating findings by age groups, Puerto Rican men younger than 60 years old had a 20% higher incidence of anal cancer than did USH men of the same age strata (RR: 2.20; 95% CI = 1.48–3.29). However, Puerto Rican females had a lower incidence of anal cancer than NHW and NHB women. An increased percent change in mortality was observed only in NHW and NHB men. A decreasing trend was observed in all racial/ethnic groups except for NHW women. Conclusion Our results support the notion that there are racial/ethnic differences in anal cancer incidence and mortality, with potential disparities among men and women in PR compared with USH men and women. Given the increasing incidence trends in anal cancer, particularly among PR, NHW, and NHB men, further investigation is needed to better elucidate screening practices that can aid in the prevention of anal cancer. PMID:23781623

  13. Is screening for anal cancer warranted in homosexual men?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan StC; Vajdic, Claire; Grulich, Andrew E

    2004-01-01

    Some investigators have proposed screening homosexual men for anal cancer and its probable precursor, high grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Using widely accepted criteria for the introduction of screening programmes, this paper reviews the current evidence for screening for this condition in this high risk population and highlights areas where additional research is required. While it is accepted that the incidence of anal cancer is at least 20 times higher in homosexual men than the general population, the natural history of anal cancer and its precise relationship with AIN is not clearly understood. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is a very highly prevalent disease among homosexual men, but little is known about what predicts progression to invasive disease. The screening tests, exfoliate cytology and high resolution anoscopy, have a sensitivity of between 45 and 70%. Treatment options for AIN are limited by morbidity and high recurrence rates and there are no randomised controlled trials studying the efficacy of therapeutic agents or surgery for high grade AIN, although immunotherapies show very early promise. Theoretically, early detection may lead to better treatment outcomes. Studies of the potential negative consequences of screening programmes on the homosexual population are needed. The currently available data does not support the implementation of a screening programme for AIN and anal cancer in homosexual men in Australia. PMID:16335300

  14. Anal cytological abnormalities and anal HPV infection in men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease.

    PubMed Central

    Palefsky, J M; Holly, E A; Ralston, M L; Arthur, S P; Hogeboom, C J; Darragh, T M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise risk factors for abnormal and cytology and anal human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in homosexual/bisexual men with advanced HIV related immunosuppression. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of men with Centers for Disease Control group IV HIV disease. SETTING: The University of California San Francisco, AIDS Clinic. PATIENTS: 129 homosexual or bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered detailing tobacco, alcohol and recreational drug use, medical history, and sexual practices. Anal swabs for cytology and HPV studies were obtained, as was blood for CD4 levels. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Abnormal anal cytology and anal HPV infection. RESULTS: Abnormal anal cytology was detected in 39% of subjects and anal HPV infection in 93% as measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Risk factors for abnormal cytology in multivariate analysis included HPV 16/18 infection (measured by PCR, RR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.5) and intravenous drug use (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7). Infection with HPV 6/11 also had significantly elevated RRs in a separate model. Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, recreational drug use, and low CD4 level were associated with abnormal anal cytology in univariate analysis, as was infection with multiple HPV types and high levels of hybrid capture group B viral DNA. CONCLUSIONS: Anal cytological abnormalities and HPV infection are common among homosexual/bisexual men with group IV HIV disease. In this study population, the main risk factors for abnormal cytology were HPV infection and intravenous drug use. Images PMID:9306896

  15. Prevention of Esophagopharyngeal Reflux by Augmenting the Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Reza; Babaei, Arash; Naini, Sohrab R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Incompetence of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is fundamental to the occurrence of esophagopharyngeal reflux (EPR), and development of supraesophageal manifestations of reflux disease (SERD). However, therapeutic approaches to SERD have not been directed to strengthening of the UES barrier function. Our aims were to demonstrate that EPR events can be experimentally induced in SERD patients and not in healthy controls, and ascertain if these events can be prevented by application of a modest external cricoid pressure. Study Design Individual case control study. Methods We studied 14 SERD patients (57±13 years, 8 females) and 12 healthy controls (26±3 years, 7 females) by concurrent intraesophageal slow infusion and pharyngoscopic and manometric technique without and with the application of a sustained predetermined cricoid pressure to induce, detect, and prevent EPR, respectively. Results Slow esophageal infusion (1 mL/s) of 60 mL of HCl resulted in a total of 16 objectively confirmed EPR events in none patients and none in healthy controls. All patients developed subjective sensation of regurgitation. Sustained cricoid pressure resulted in a significant UES pressure augmentation in all participants. During application of sustained cricoid pressure, slow intraesophageal infusion resulted in only one EPR event (P<.01). Conclusions Slow esophageal liquid infusion unmasks UES incompetence evidenced as the occurrence of EPR. Application of 20 to 30 mm Hg cricoid pressure significantly increases the UES intraluminal pressure and prevents pharyngeal reflux induced by esophageal slow liquid infusion. These techniques can be useful in diagnosis and management of UES incompetence in patients suffering from supraesophageal manifestations of reflux disease. PMID:24782387

  16. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  17. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats

    PubMed Central

    LaPallo, Brandon K.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2–8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions. PMID:24990895

  18. Videofluoroscopic and Manometric Evaluation of Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Function During Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyung Jae; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Jung Hwan; Jung, Il Seok

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to determine important manometric metrics for the analysis of pharyngeal and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) function and to investigate the effect of viscosity and other confounding factors on manometric results. Methods Manometric studies were performed on 26 asymptomatic volunteers (12 men and 14 women; age, 1981 years). The manometric protocol included 5 water swallows (5 mL), 5 barium swallows (5 mL) and 5 yogurt swallows (5 mL). Evaluation of high-resolution manometry parameters including basal pressure of the UES, mesopharyngeal contractile integral (mesopharyngeal CI, mmHg cm sec), CI of the hypopharynx and UES (hypopharyngeal CI), relaxation interval of UES, median intrabolus pressure and nadir pressure at UES was performed using MATLAB. Results Mesopharyngeal CIs for barium and yogurt swallows were significantly lower than those for water swallows (both P < 0.05). Hypopharyngeal CIs for water swallows were significantly lower than those for barium swallows (P = 0.004), and median bolus pressure at UES for barium swallows was significantly higher than that for water and yogurt swallows (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, hypopharyngeal CI and median intrabolus pressure at UES were significantly related to age for 3 swallows (all P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). A significant negative correlation was also noted between nadir pressure at UES and age for water and yogurt swallows (all P < 0.05). Conclusions Manometric measurement of the pharynx and UES varies with respect to viscosity. Moreover, age could be a confounding variable in the interpretation of pharyngeal manometry. PMID:24847841

  19. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  20. Castanea sativa Mill. extract contracts gallbladder and relaxes sphincter of Oddi in guinea pig: a natural approach to biliary tract motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Micucci, Matteo; Ioan, Pierfranco; Aldini, Rita; Cevenini, Monica; Alvisi, Vittorio; Ruffilli, Corrado; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Impaired gallbladder motility is a contributing factor to gallstone formation. Since many drugs delaying intestinal motility inhibit gallbladder emptying, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility of a Natural Chestnut Wood Extract (NEC) that reduces intestinal motility. In order to evaluate the effect of the extract in normal- and high-risk gallstone conditions, the investigation was performed using tissues from animals fed normal and lithogenic diet. Fifty guinea pigs were administered either control or lithogenic diet. The spontaneous motility of the gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi were recorded on isolated gallbladder tissues; thereafter, the effect of NEC on motility was tested and compared with carbachol (CCh), potassium chloride (KCl), noradrenaline (NA), and A71623. Compared to controls, the lithogenic diet induced an irregular and disordered motor pattern in both the gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi. NEC increased gallbladder and decreased sphincter of Oddi spontaneous motility independently of cholinergic, adrenergic, and CCK-1 receptor-mediated pathways both in controls and in lithogenic diet-fed animals, although the effect was lower in the latter group. The effect was reversible and mediated by calcium channels. The natural extract of chestnut increasing gallbladder contraction and inducing the relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi can be of benefit in pathological conditions associated with increased transit time at risk of gallstones. PMID:24654975

  1. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic inflammatory response. Successful treatment requires adherence to a regime that is uncomfortable at best and at worst painful. Topical treatments can be successful in motivated adherent patients willing to accept these side effects. PMID:23788834

  2. JC Virus T-Antigen Expression in Anal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Deveraj, Bikash; Miyai, Katsumi; Luo, Linda; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay; Carethers, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Anal carcinoma is thought driven by HPV infection through interrupting function of cell regulatory proteins such as p53 and pRb. JCV expresses a T-antigen (T-Ag) that causes malignant transformation through development of aneuploidy and interaction with some of the same regulatory proteins as HPV. JCV T-Ag is present in brain, gastric and colon malignancies, but has not been evaluated in anal cancers. We examined a cohort of anal cancers for JCV T-Ag and correlated this with clinicopathologic data. Methods Archived anal carcinomas were analyzed for JCV T-Ag expression. DNA from tumor and normal tissue was sequenced for JCV with viral copies determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. HPV and MSI status was correlated with JCV T-Ag expression. Results Of 21 cases of anal cancer (mean age 49 years, 38% female), 12 (57%) were in HIV-positive individuals. All 21 cancers expressed JCV T-Ag, including 9 HPV-negative specimens. More JCV copies were present in cancer vs. surrounding normal tissue (mean 32.54 copies/μg DNA vs. 2.98 copies/μg DNA, P=0.0267). There was no correlation between disease stage and viral copies, nor between viral copies and HIV-positive or -negative status (28.7 vs. 36.34 copies/μg DNA, respectively, P=0.7804). In subset analysis, we found no association between JCV T-Ag expression and HPV or MSI status. Conclusions Anal carcinomas uniformly express JCV T-Ag and contain more viral copies compared to surrounding normal tissue. JCV and its T-Ag oncogenic protein, presumably through interruption of cell regulatory proteins, may play a role in anal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24048785

  3. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  4. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  5. Repair of Chronic Tibialis Anterior Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Funk, Shawn S; Gallagher, Bethany; Thomson, A Brian

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique for repair of chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. All chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures reviewed were treated with this technique. Patients with chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures presenting to the authors' institution from 2006 to 2012 had preoperative and postoperative Foot and Ankle Ability Measure scores. The average follow-up time was 2.1 years. The average Foot and Ankle Ability Measure score was 66.1% preoperatively and 87.1% postoperatively (P=.002). This technique offers theoretical improved strength and may help avoid the need for tendon graft often required by other techniques. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e386-e390.]. PMID:26966943

  6. Postmyomectomic Uterine Rupture Despite Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Kacperczyk, Joanna; Bartnik, Paweł; Romejko-Wolniewicz, Ewa; Dobrowolska-Redo, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. Fibroids can develop anywhere within the muscular wall. Leiomyomas may be associated with infertility. Laparoscopic myomectomy is often used to remove symptomatic intramural or subserosal fibroids. Advantages of the procedure include short recovery time and minimal perioperative morbidity. At the same time, the multilayer suture technique is more complicated during laparoscopy. A rare but serious complication of laparoscopic myomectomies is uterine rupture. A brief review of the literature and a clinical example of a 33-year-old woman with history of infertility, laparoscopic myomectomies and uterine rupture followed by peripartum hemorrhage is presented. The treatment of leiomyomas is a challenge not only because of possible recurrence but also due to long-term consequences following successful myomectomy. Management of patients with uterine scars should include careful planning of the route of delivery, as the risk of rupture may be increased. PMID:26976991

  7. Why a special issue on anal cancer and what is in it?

    PubMed

    Fairley, Christopher K; Brotherton, Julia M L; Hillman, Richard; Grulich, Andrew E

    2012-12-01

    This editorial describes the contents of this special issue of Sexual Health devoted to anal cancer. The aim of the issue is to provide readers with information to assist them in making decisions about what to do about detecting anal cancer early in men who have sex with men with HIV. Should they be advocating screening? It discusses the epidemiology of HPV infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in MSM, heterosexual men and women; anal cancer screening and treatment of anal cancer. And most importantly, what should be done about vaccinating boys with the HPV vaccine. PMID:23380233

  8. The Anal Pap Smear: Cytomorphology of squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Arain, Shehla; Walts, Ann E; Thomas, Premi; Bose, Shikha

    2005-02-16

    BACKGROUND: Anal smears are increasingly being used as a screening test for anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASILs). This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness and limitations of anal smears in screening for ASILs. METHODS: The cytomorphological features of 200 consecutive anal smears collected in liquid medium from 198 patients were studied and findings were correlated with results of surgical biopsies and/or repeat smears that became available for 71 patients within six months. RESULTS: Adequate cellularity was defined as an average of 6 or more nucleated squamous cells/hpf. A glandular/transitional component was not required for adequacy. Dysplastic cells, atypical parakeratotic cells and bi/multinucleated cells were frequent findings in ASIL while koilocytes were infrequent. Smears from LSIL cases most frequently showed mildly dysplastic and bi/multinucleate squamous cells followed by parakeratotic cells (PK), atypical parakeratotic cells (APK), and koilocytes. HSIL smears contained squamous cells with features of moderate/severe dysplasia and many APKs. Features of LSIL were also found in most HSIL smears. CONCLUSIONS: In this study liquid based anal smears had a high sensitivity (98%) for detection of ASIL but a low specificity (50%) for predicting the severity of the abnormality in subsequent biopsy. Patients with cytologic diagnoses of ASC-US and LSIL had a significant risk (46-56%) of HSIL at biopsy. We suggest that all patients with a diagnosis of ASC-US and above be recommended for high resolution anoscopy with biopsy. PMID:15715910

  9. All's Well That Ends Well: Shakespeare's treatment of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Cosman, B C

    1998-07-01

    Textual and contextual evidence suggests that the French king's fistula, a central plot device in Shakespeare's play All's Well That Ends Well, is a fistula-in-ano. Anal fistula was known to the lay public in Shakespeare's time. In addition, Shakespeare may have known of the anal fistula treatise of John Arderne, an ancestor on Shakespeare's mother's side. Shakespeare's use of anal fistula differs from all previous versions of the story, which first appeared in Boccaccio's Decameron and from its possible historical antecedent, the fistula of Charles V of France. This difference makes sense given the conventions of Elizabethan comedy, which included anal humor. It is also understandable when one looks at what wounds in different locations mean in European legend. In this light, it is not surprising that subsequent expurgations treat Boccaccio's and Shakespeare's fistulas differently, censoring only Shakespeare's. This reading has implications for the staging of All's Well That Ends Well, and for our view of the place of anal fistulas in cultural history. PMID:9678380

  10. [A case of primary carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old man with no history of anal fistula was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of perianal pain. Computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed perianal abscess. Incision and drainage were performed under spinal anesthesia. Ten months after drainage, magnetic resonance imaging revealed anal fistula on the left side of the anus. Subsequently, core-out and seton procedures were performed for ischiorectalis type III anal fistula. Pathological examination of the resected specimen of anal fistula revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, leading to the diagnosis of carcinoma associated with anal fistula. No distant metastases or enlarged lymph nodes were observed on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. We performed abdominoperineal resection with wide resection of ischiorectalis fat tissue. The pathology results were tub2, A, ly0, v0, n0, PM0, DM0, RM0, H0, P0, M0, Stage II. Negative pressure wound therapy was performed for perineum deficiency, after which rapid wound healing was observed. Left inguinal lymph node recurrence was detected 8 months after surgery, for which radiotherapy was administered. Distant metastasis was detected 11 months after surgery. The patient died 21 months after surgery. PMID:25731359

  11. Anal canal gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Nuno; Albergaria, Diogo; Lebre, Rui; Giria, João; Fernandes, Vitor; Vidal, Helena; Brito, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are an uncommon group of tumors of mesenchymal origin. GIST of the anal canal is extremely rare. At present, only 10 cases of c-kit positive anal GIST have been reported in the literature. There is no widely accepted treatment approach for this neoplasia. Literature is sparse on imaging evaluation of anal canal GIST, usually described as a lesion in the intersphincteric space. We describe the case of a 73-year-old man with a mass in the anal canal, and no other symptoms. Endoanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed a well circumscribed solid nodule in the intersphincteric space. The patient was treated by local excision. Gross pathological examination showed a 7 cm × 3.5 cm × 3 cm mass, and histological examination showed a proliferation of spindle cells, with prominent nuclear palisading. The mitotic count was of 12 mitoses/50 HPF. The tumor was positive for KIT protein, CD34 and vimentin in the majority of cells, and negative for desmin and S100. A diagnosis of GIST, with high risk aggressive behavior was made. An abdomino-perineal resection was discussed, but refused. The follow-up included clinical evaluation and anal ultrasound. After 5 years the patient is well, with maintained continence and no evidence of local recurrence. PMID:24415888

  12. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. PMID:25577259

  13. Gastric rupture after bag-mask-ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Stephan; Filipovic, Miodrag; Schoch, Otto; Mauermann, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A 42 year old woman underwent bronchoscopy with procedural propofol sedation. During the procedure, the patient suffered respiratory arrest, and bag-mask ventilation was initiated. During forced mask ventilation, abdominal distention occurred. Even after correct placement of an endotracheal and a nasogastric tube, high inspiratory pressures persisted. The abdominal CT scan revealed a high amount of intraperitoneal free air. An emergent laparotomy confirmed a stomach rupture. Immediately after opening of the peritoneal cavity, peak ventilatory pressures decreased. In this case forceful bag-mask ventilation led to air insufflation into the stomach, increasing gastric pressure, and consecutive stomach rupture. PMID:26744639

  14. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Alajoulin, Omar A; Alsbou, Mohammed S; Ja'afreh, Somayya O; Kalbouneh, Heba M

    2015-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  15. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Jaafreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  16. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  17. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. PMID:22883898

  18. Ruptured rudimentary horn at 22 weeks.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2012-07-01

    Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of rupture in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421

  19. Modeling rupture segmentations on the Cascadia megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has produced a series of large to great earthquakes, most recently in 1700 AD. Paleoseismological studies of submarine turbidites suggest a significant difference in recurrence interval between Northern (~500 year) and Southern (~200-300 year) Cascadia. Whether future large ruptures are segmented is very important for estimating hazard in Pacific Northwest, but remains enigmatic from the interpretations of current locking maps. Our approach is to develop rupture scenarios of Cascadia earthquakes by performing numerical simulations using the finite element software, PyLith. Based on the USGS plate interface model of Cascadia, we have constructed a realistic three-dimensional subduction fault model that stretches from Northern California to Central Vancouver Island. We have performed a number of dynamic rupture simulations using a set of artificial friction parameters and uniform stress distributions on the fault governed by a slip-weakening friction law. Preliminary results show that ruptures have initiated from the nucleation zone with higher shear stress than the ambient fault and have propagated on the realistic three-dimensional fault surface. The increase of dip angle with depth has little effect on the rupture propagation because that is governed mostly by the fault strength. The along-strike bend of the fault beneath Washington state and Vancouver Island has not impeded the rupture propagation given the uniform fault strength. To estimate the possible rupture segmentation, we have converted a slip-deficit rate model derived from GPS data into stress change distributions on the fault assuming the entire slip deficit would be released in the next great earthquake. We are also constructing another initial stress map derived from tidal and leveling data, which shows a significant difference in the locking depth beneath Central Oregon. The other important variable, the spatial variation of frictional parameters, however, has to be determined under certain assumptions. We assume the critical distance, Dc, is proportional to the final slip, thus will be obtained from the slip deficit distribution. By combining the estimated stresses and Dc for the slip-weakening relation, we will investigate how the different interseismic locking profiles could influence possible segmentation for future ruptures on the Cascadia megathrust. This work is supported by FM Global.

  20. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening

    PubMed Central

    Omari, Taher I.; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the mechanical states of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight different mechanical states were almost always seen during healthy swallowing and some of these calculated changes in muscle function were consistent with the known neurally dependent phasic discharge patterns of cricopharyngeus muscle activity during swallowing. Clearly defined changes in the mechanical states were observed in motor neuron disease when compared to age matched healthy controls. Our data indicate that mechanical state predictions were simple to apply and revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. PMID:25610376

  1. Cannabinoid1 receptor in the dorsal vagal complex modulates lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Partosoedarso, E R; Abrahams, T P; Scullion, R T; Moerschbaecher, J M; Hornby, P J

    2003-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) is an effective anti-emetic; however, other potential gastrointestinal therapeutic effects of Δ9-THC are less well-known. Here, we report a role of Δ9-THC in a vago-vagal reflex that can result in gastro-oesophageal reflux, that is, gastric distension-evoked lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxation. Oesophageal, LOS and gastric pressures were measured using a miniaturized, manometric assembly in decerebrate, unanaesthetized ferrets. Gastric distension (30 ml) evoked LOS relaxation (70 ± 8 % decrease from baseline). Δ9-THC administered systemically (0.2 mg kg−1, I.V.) or directly to the dorsal hindbrain surface (0.002 mg), significantly attenuated the nadir of the gastric distention-evoked LOS relaxation, and time to reach maximal response. Similar increases to maximal effect were observed after treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212–2 (0.2 mg kg−1, I.V.). The effect of systemic Δ9-THC on gastric distention-evoked LOS relaxation was reversed by a selective cannabinoid1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, SR141617A (1 mg kg−1, I.V.). Since this reflex is vagally mediated, we used a CB1 receptor antiserum and immunocytochemistry to determine its distribution in ferret vagal circuitry. CB1 receptor staining was present in cell bodies within the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and nodose ganglion. Intense terminal-like staining was noted within the NTS and dorsal motor vagal nucleus (DMN). Neither nodose ganglionectomy nor vagotomy altered the CB1 receptor terminal-like staining in the dorsal vagal complex. Retrogradely labelled gastric- or LOS-projecting DMN neurones did not express CB1 receptors within their soma. Therefore, CB1 receptor staining in the NTS and DMN is not due to primary vagal afferents or preganglionic neurones. These novel findings suggest that Δ9-THC can modulate reflex LOS function and that the most likely site of action is via the CB1 receptor within the NTS. This effect of Δ9-THC may have implications in treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux and other upper gut disorders. PMID:12879865

  2. Earthquake Stress Drop in Rupture Patches and Rupture Barriers on Gofar Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, P. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquakes on mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) exhibit the most systematic behaviors known in seismology. On the fast slipping Gofar transform fault on the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mw ~6.0 earthquakes occur every ~5 years and repeatedly rupture the same asperities (fault patches), suggesting that the intervening fault segments (rupture barriers) stop the propagation of the largest earthquakes. In 2008, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle on Gofar transform fault [McGuire et al., 2012]. We determine stress drop for earthquakes recorded during this experiment to investigate how the source properties of moderate sized earthquakes (3.0 < Mw < 5.5) differ between the rupture patch and rupture barrier fault segments. The OBS experiment on Gofar transform fault recorded an extensive foreshock sequence localized within a 10 km rupture barrier, the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershocks that occurred in a ~10 km rupture patch, and an earthquake swarm that was located in a second rupture barrier adjacent to the ridge-transform intersection. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on the OBS accelerometers, we calculate stress drop using the Madariaga [1976] circular crack model, with the corner frequency derived from an empirical Green's function (EGF) method, and seismic moment obtained by fitting an omega-squared source model to the low frequency amplitude of individual event spectra. Results for ~300 earthquakes in the foreshock, aftershock, and swarm zones have a range of stress drops from 0.2 to 50 MPa. Values for the best constrained 10% of earthquakes show a weighted average stress drop in the aftershock zone that is more than twice the weighted average stress drop in the foreshock zone (3.5 MPa and 1.1 MPa, respectively). These variations in earthquake stress drop reflect systematic differences in along strike fault zone properties between rupture patches and rupture barriers on Gofar transform fault.

  3. Anal Cancer debuting as Cancer of Unknown Primary

    PubMed Central

    Sveistrup, Joen; Loft, Annika; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    Anal cancer usually presents with a visible or palpable tumour. In this case we describe a 54-year old man diagnosed with Cancer of Unknown Primary (CUP) with a single inguinal node as the only finding. Thorough examination failed to identify any primary tumour. The patient was treated with lymph node dissection and not until nearly two years after initial diagnosis, was the primary tumour found, and the patient was diagnosed with anal cancer. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and 45 months after initial diagnosis there is still no sign of relapse. This case illustrates, that anal cancer can metastasise before the primary tumour is detectable. Furthermore, it demonstrates the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up after treatment of CUP since the primary tumour was found later. Finally this is a case of a long-term survivor following treatment for metastatic inguinal lymph nodes from an initially unknown primary cancer. PMID:21769317

  4. Brain metastasis in basaloid undifferentiated anal carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HERNANDO-CUBERO, JORGE; ALONSO-ORDUÑA, VICENTE; HERNANDEZ-GARCIA, ALBA; DE MIGUEL, ANA CEBOLLERO; ALVAREZ-GARCIA, NATALIA; ANTON-TORRES, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare tumor that accounts for 2% of all colorectal neoplasms. The brain is a rarely affected organ. The aim of the present study was to the review the only four cases of anal cancer brain metastases previously published in the literature. In addition, the current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male diagnosed with basaloid undifferentiated carcinoma of the anal canal (stage IV with liver, lung and bone metastasis). Despite the patient’s good response to chemotherapy and the achievement of a partial response that was maintained for 14 months, brain metastases developed. Although radiotherapy was administered, the patient succumbed to the condition 12 weeks after the diagnosis of brain metastasis. PMID:24944707

  5. Brain metastasis in basaloid undifferentiated anal carcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Cubero, Jorge; Alonso-Orduña, Vicente; Hernandez-Garcia, Alba; DE Miguel, Ana Cebollero; Alvarez-Garcia, Natalia; Anton-Torres, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Anal cancer is a rare tumor that accounts for 2% of all colorectal neoplasms. The brain is a rarely affected organ. The aim of the present study was to the review the only four cases of anal cancer brain metastases previously published in the literature. In addition, the current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male diagnosed with basaloid undifferentiated carcinoma of the anal canal (stage IV with liver, lung and bone metastasis). Despite the patient's good response to chemotherapy and the achievement of a partial response that was maintained for 14 months, brain metastases developed. Although radiotherapy was administered, the patient succumbed to the condition 12 weeks after the diagnosis of brain metastasis. PMID:24944707

  6. Anal carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?

    PubMed

    Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild anal symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of anal warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the anal margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented? PMID:24139082

  7. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  8. The role of viruses and sexual transmission in anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dunleavey, Ruth

    Research has focused on the link between sexual activity, viral infection and cervical cancer. However, a parallel situation can be seen with anal cancer. Although less common than cervical cancer, anal cancer is a significant problem among certain groups. In the male homosexual population it occurs in 35 out of every 100,000 men, a figure comparable with the rate of cervical cancer in women before cervical screening programmes were instigated (Klenke and Palefsky, 2003). This article discusses the pathology, incidence and management of the disease and considers the role of viruses in its development, specifically human papilloma virus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PMID:15783159

  9. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  10. In vitro analysis of localized aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Romo, Aaron; Badel, Pierre; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Avril, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    In this study, bulge inflation tests were used to characterize the failure response of 15 layers of human ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAA). Full field displacement data were collected during each of the mechanical tests using a digital image stereo-correlation (DIS-C) system. Using the collected displacement data, the local stress fields at burst were derived and the thickness evolution was estimated during the inflation tests. It was shown that rupture of the ATAA does not systematically occur at the location of maximum stress, but in a weakened zone of the tissue where the measured fields show strain localization and localized thinning of the wall. Our results are the first to show the existence of weakened zones in the aneurysmal tissue when rupture is imminent. An understanding these local rupture mechanics is necessary to improve clinical assessments of aneurysm rupture risk. Further studies must be performed to determine if these weakened zones can be detected in vivo using non-invasive techniques. PMID:24406100

  11. Primary obstructive megaureter with ruptured kidney.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Yang, Den-Kai; Liao, Chun-Hou

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with ruptured kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy. PMID:19041564

  12. Surface Rupture in Northwest Saudi Arabia

    Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault rupture caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...

  13. Laparoscopic splenectomy for atraumatic splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Ugo; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Amato, Gerardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Cavicchioni, Camillo; Bellantone, Rocco

    2011-01-01

    A traumatic splenic rupture (ASR) is a rare clinical entity. Several underlying benign and malignant conditions have been described as a leading cause. We report on a case of ASR in a 41-year-old man treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Considering ASR as a life-threatening condition, a prompt diagnosis can be life saving. PMID:21675627

  14. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids.

    PubMed

    Wilms, G; Casselman, J; Demaerel, P; Plets, C; De Haene, I; Baert, A L

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. PMID:2046900

  15. [Ruptured intracranial dermoid as an incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Funke, M

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a case of a ruptured intracranial dermoid accidentally found in a 51-year old patient. The tumour appears as a large lesion located in the posterior fossa. The CT and MRI studies identify fatty material into the CSF spaces providing intraventricular fat-fluid levels. These characteristic findings are indicative of the diagnosis. PMID:7548248

  16. Bond-rupture immunosensors--a review.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Evan R; Yuan, Yong J; Xu, W L; Bronlund, J E

    2008-07-15

    It has long been the goal of researchers to develop fast and reliable point-of-care alternatives to existing lab-based tests. A viable point-of-care biosensor is fast, reliable, simple, cost-effective, and detects low concentrations of the target analyte. The target of biosensors is biological such as bacteria or virus and as such, the antibody-antigen bond derived from the real immune response is used. Biosensor applications include lab-based tests for the purposes of diagnostics, drug discovery, and research. Additional applications include environmental, food, and agricultural monitoring. The main merits of the bond-rupture method are quick, simple, and capable of discriminating between specific and non-specific interactions. The separation of specific and non-specific bonds is important for working in real-life complex serums such as blood. The bond-rupture technique can provide both qualitative results, the detection of a target, and quantitative results, the concentration of target. Bond-rupture achieves this by a label-free method requiring no pre-processing of the analyte. A piezoelectric transducer such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) shakes the bound particles free from the surface. Other transducers such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) are also considered. The rupture of the bonds is detected as electronic noise. This review article links diverse research areas to build a picture of a field still in development. PMID:18343101

  17. [Splenic rupture--a skateboard accident].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P

    1990-03-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with persisting abdominal pain after a skateboard accident. Primary clinical and laboratory findings disclosed no signs of intra abdominal bleeding. Ultrasound scanning indicated rupture of the spleen which was confirmed by acute exploratory laparotomy. PMID:2321288

  18. Primary gastric rupture in 47 horses (1995–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Laramie S.; Dechant, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify factors associated with primary gastric rupture and to investigate if there were differences between etiologies of primary gastric rupture. Compared to the general colic population, Quarter horses were under-represented and Friesians and draft breeds were over-represented in 47 cases of primary gastric ruptures. Horses with primary gastric rupture typically presented with severe clinical and clinicopathological derangements. There were 24 idiopathic gastric ruptures, 20 gastric impaction associated ruptures, and 3 perforating gastric ulcers. Thoroughbred horses were over-represented in the idiopathic gastric rupture group compared to other breeds and etiologies. This study suggests the presence of important breed predispositions for development of gastric rupture. Further study is necessary to identify if these predispositions are associated with management factors or breed-specific disorders. PMID:26345205

  19. Source rupture process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault ruptured before the Yunodake fault rupture. Here, we estimated the source rupture process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The rupture starting point and rupture delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to rupture from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (ΔCFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault rupture in order to evaluate the effect of the rupture on the Yunodake fault. The ΔCFF is positive at the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault rupture was triggered by the Itozawa fault rupture.

  20. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  1. Photo-piezometric study of supershear rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Schubnel, A. J.; Taddeucci, J.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rao, S.

    2009-12-01

    We combine acoustic emission acquisition and high speed photography in order to characterize the radiation from spontaneous dynamic rupture propagation on laboratory faults in a transparent, hard resin slab. A number of previous photographic experiments document fracture propagation at supershear velocity and the radiation of a mach cone wavefront. Supershear rupture propagation has been also inferred in several large natural earthquakes. However, failure to observe any strong shock wave in the natural events has fired a debate on the amplitude and attenuation expected for the mach wavefront. Here we attempt to characterize the mach front experimentally. In our spontaneously nucleating laboratory faults, transducers detect the wavefield both close and at a distance from the fault, allowing to characterize the amplitude and the decay of (1) mach wavefronts radiated from the supershear fractures and (2) diffractions emitted by stop-and-go jerks in fracture propagation. In the relatively low frequency range, piezoelectric transducers behave essentially like accelerometers. In the high frequency range, the passage of the rupture front (both sub- and supershear) strongly dominates the acoustic emission in the immediate vicinity of the fault, as expected from the theoretically predicted strain fields in 1/√r close to the fracture tip. Thus simple piezoelectric transducers can be used both to track the passage of the rupture front and as miniature accelerometers. By correlating the fracture photographic sequences to the piezograms recorded at some distance from the fault, we find that the signature of the mach wavefront is visible but not dominant. Our interpretation is that the supershear rupture front is weakely coherent in events, as in our case, where fracture is spontaneously nucleated.

  2. Anal high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Sumanth; Azar, Aline; Wessolossky, Mireya

    2015-01-01

    Background Although anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM) and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of anal HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+) among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women). Methods A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent anal cancer screening with anal cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013. Results Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and anal cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal anal cytology 48%) of MSM, 28% (abnormal anal cytology 28%) of HSM, and 27% (abnormal anal cytology 34%) of women. Among 117 (53%) individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above), 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM). HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with anal cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49) and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=−0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09). Conclusion Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine anal cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for anal cancer screening among non-MSM. PMID:25670914

  3. Ruptured rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal rupture of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a ruptured RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of ruptured RD. PMID:25552833

  4. [Functional status of the bile ducts and their sphincters in short- and long-term period after resection of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Omorov, R A; Beĭshenbaev, R K

    2005-01-01

    Morphofunctional state of the gall bladder and Oddi's sphincter was studied in 188 patients with stomach ulcer treated surgically for different complications of this disease. It is demonstrated that patients with stomach ulcer have dysfunction of the gall bladder before surgery, and in long-term period after stomach resection (especially by Bilrot-II technique) functional disorders transform in organic ones. PMID:16007021

  5. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  6. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE STRICTURE OF ANAL CHANNELL].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Sadoviy, I Ya; Novytskiy, O V

    2015-09-01

    The results of treatment of 50 patients, suffering postoperative stricture of anal channell (SACH), who were treated in Proctology Department of Ivano-Frankivskiy Rural Clinical Hospital in 2006-2014 yrs, were analyzed. After conduction of hemorrhoidectomy in accordance to Milligan-Morgan method for chronic hemorrhoids grades III-IV a SACH have occurred in 46 (92%) patients, excision of a chronic anal fissura was performed in 3 (6%) and excision of perianal pointed condylomas--in 1 patient. In 2006-2007 yrs 11 (22%) patients were operated in accordance to approaches, which were conventional at that time (comparison group). In 2008 - 2014 yrs 39 (78%) patients were admitted to hospital (main group), in whom new approaches for diagnosis, conservative and surgical treatment were applied, 30 (76.9%) of them were operated. The proposed method on isolated roentgen contrast investigation of anal channell have permitted to determine objectively a form, diameter and grade of the anal channel stricture, and it may be applied as a screening procedure, as additional objective criterion while choosing a surgical tactic. Application of the improved operative technique for SACH have permitted to lower its occurrence rate from 45.4 to 6.7%. PMID:26817078

  7. The Influence of Antral Ulcers on Intramural Gastric Nerve Projections Supplying the Pyloric Sphincter in the Pig (Sus scrofa domestica)—Neuronal Tracing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric ulcerations in the region of antrum pylori represent a serious medical problem in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers can influence the intrinsic descending nerve supply to the pyloric sphincter. The pyloric function is precisely regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Impaired neural regulation could result in pyloric sphincter dysfunction and gastric emptying malfunction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of gastric antral ulcerations on the density and distribution of intramural gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiment was performed on 2 groups of pigs: healthy gilts (n=6) and gilts with experimentally induced peptic ulcers in the region of antrum pylori (n=6). Gastric neurons supplying pyloric sphincter were labeled using the retrograde neuronal tracing technique (20μl of Fast Blue tracer injected into the pyloric sphincter muscle). After a week survival period the animals were sacrificed and the stomachs were collected. Then, the stomach wall was cross-cut into 0.5cm thick sections taken in specified intervals (section I - 1.5cm; section II - 3.5cm; section III - 5.5cm; section IV – 7.5cm) starting from the sphincter. Consecutive microscopic slices prepared from each section were analyzed under fluorescent microscope to count traced neurons. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. The total number of FB-positive perikarya observed within all studied sections significantly decreased from 903.3 ± 130.7 in control to 243.8 ± 67.3 in experimental animals. In healthy pigs 76.1 ± 6.7% of labeled neurons were observed within the section I, 23.53 ± 6.5% in section II and only occasional cells in section III. In experimental animals, as many as 93.8 ± 2.1% of labeled cells were observed within the section I and only 6.2 ± 2.2% in section II, while section III was devoid of such neurons. There were no traced perikarya in section IV observed in both groups of pigs. Conclusions/Significance Obtained results revealed for the first time significant impact of antral ulcerations on intramural descending nerve pathways supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs, animals of increasing value in biomedical research and great economic importance. PMID:25962176

  8. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of −3 to −4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5 mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for an early surgical intervention. PMID:26426604

  9. Megathrust Properties and Large Earthquake Rupture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, T.; Ye, L.; Kanamori, H.

    2014-12-01

    Constraining physical controls on seismic rupture of plate boundary megathrust faults is challenging due to observational limitations, but seismic, geodetic, tsunami, electromagnetic, geologic and hydrologic studies are steadily accumulating data that hold potential of advancing our understanding of subduction fault zones. Very shallow (< 15 km deep) megathrust earthquakes are rare, but intermittently occur as large tsunami earthquakes such as the 2010 Mentawai Mw 7.8 event. This rupture occurred up-dip of prior large interplate ruptures in the Sumatra subduction zone in 2007, and rupture extended all the way to the trench, but with patchy large-slip regions that can only be confidently resolved using tsunami observations. The seismic wave radiation from tsunami earthquakes is now established to be distinct from that of ruptures deeper on the megathrust, but the controlling factors are not well-resolved. Smaller events at shallow depths tend to have diverse rupture processes, but some are also anomalously depleted in short-period radiation, suggesting that the shallow environment has variable scale-lengths of frictional heterogeneity. At the other end of the megathrust, large events deeper than about 35 km tend to have modest enhancement of short-period seismic wave radiation, with somewhat lower slope to their short-period source spectra than typical of shallower events. The controlling process are also not well-resolved for this behavior. These depth-variations of megathrust earthquake source spectra are one class of observations that may relate to pressure- and temperature-dependent evolution of the megathrust from the trench to decoupling depths near 45-50 km. Other attributes of seismic sources, such as static stress drop and moment-scaled radiated energy have large variability, but do not show systematic variations with depth on the megathrust, so some attributes of earthquake processes are not strongly influenced by evolving conditions of the plate boundary. We explore these issues based on a recent seismological study of all large interplate earthquakes from 1990-2014 combined with detailed investigations of several recent large and great earthquakes for which we have unprecedented geophysical data sets.

  10. Dynamic Rupture Processes during Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Bhat Suresh, H.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Since the proposal by Brace and Byerlee [1966] that the mechanism of stick-slip is similar to earthquakes, many experimental studies have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of rupture mechanics. Here, we report the results of macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial laoding (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency monitoring array recorded the microseismicity during stick-slip sequences and the particle accelerations during macroscopic instabilities. While strain, stress and axial shortening were measured until 10 Hz sampling rate, we also recorded for the first time the dynamic stress changes during macroscopic rupture using dynamic strain gages located close to the fault plane (10 MHz sampling rate). We show that increasing the normal stress acting on the fault plane (i) increases the intensity of foreshock activity prior to the main rupture, (ii) increases the friction along the fault plane, (iii) increases the seismic slip, and (iv) induces the transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear ruptures [Passelègue et al., 2013]. In addition, after demonstrating that our stick-slip instabilities exhibit a purely slip weakening behavior, we estimated the rupture processes parameters including the size of the breakdown zone (R), the slip-weakening distance (Dc), the energy rate (F) and the fracture energy (G). We compare our results with linear elastic fracture mechanics and previous experimental studies. Finally, the dynamic stress drop is almost complete at high normal stresses with dynamic friction drop ranging from 0.4 to 0.6. These results are consistent with the onset of melting, which was confirmed by our post mortem microstructural analysis (XRD, SEM, TEM). These results show that weakening mechanisms are activated after only 80 μm of slip, suggesting that, at least at the scale of asperities, the resulting dynamic stress drop could be much larger than current seismological estimates. In addition, we demonstrate that the radiation efficiency decreases with the dynamic friction coefficient, suggesting that rupture processes become more dispersive under high normal stress conditions.

  11. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  12. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  13. A review on delayed presentation of diaphragmatic rupture

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Farhan; Chakrabarty, Mallicka M; Singh, Rajeev; Iftikhar, Syed Y

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragmatic rupture is a life-threatening condition. Diaphragmatic injuries are quite uncommon and often result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Diaphragmatic ruptures are usually associated with abdominal trauma however, it can occur in isolation. Acute traumatic rupture of the diaphragm may go unnoticed and there is often a delay between the injury and the diagnosis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the terms "delayed presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic rupture" and "delayed diaphragmatic rupture". The diagnostic and management challenges encountered are discussed, together with strategies for dealing with them. We have focussed on mechanism of injury, duration, presentation and site of injury, visceral herniation, investigations and different approaches for repair. We intend to stress on the importance of delay in presentation of diaphragmatic rupture and to provide a review on the available investigations and treatment methods. The enclosed case report also emphasizes on the delayed presentation, diagnostic challenges and the advantages of laparoscopic repair of delayed diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:19698091

  14. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Seismic ruptures are akin to opening a zipper—a gap in the crust starts in one location and travels along the fault in a particular direction. When a strained fault ruptures in an earthquake, seismic waves also spread out from the epicenter. In some cases, the waves' passage can trigger the initiation of a new rupture ahead of the initial expanding rupture in locked portions of the fault. If the triggered rupture grows successfully, the overall rupture front can then outpace the passage of the shear waves, secondary seismic waves that travel slowly after the earthquake begins and are responsible for the bulk of violent shaking. These earthquakes display what is known as supershear rupture; only seven such earthquakes have previously been recorded.

  15. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  16. Spontaneous splenic rupture in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Min; Bae, Byung Koo

    2014-01-01

    Malaria can present with various clinical symptoms and complications. While a tertian malaria form that is especially prevalent in Korea is characterized by mild clinical progression, occasional splenic complications are known to occur. A 26-year-old Korean male soldier without prior medical history visited The Armed Forces Capital Hospital with left upper quadrant abdominal pain one day ago. Hemostasis under laparoscopic approach was attempted. The operation was converted into laparotomy due to friable splenic tissue and consequently poor hemostasis. Splenectomy was performed. The patient was discharged at postoperative day 17 without complication. While numerous diseases can result in splenic complications, such as splenic rupture, malarial infection is known as the most common cause. The incidence of malarial infection in Korea is increasing annually, and there are occasional reports of splenic rupture due to the infection, which requires attention. PMID:25025027

  17. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  18. Spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipoma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mariana Mouraz Lopes; Proena, Sara Marques Soares; Reis, Maria Ins Nunes Pereira de Almeida; Viana, Rui Miguel Almeida Lopes; Martins, Lusa Maria Bernardo; Colao, Joo Manuel dos Reis; Nunes, Filomena Maria Pinheiro

    2014-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor, composed of adipocytes, smooth muscle cells and blood vessels. The association with pregnancy is rare and related with an increased risk of complications, including rupture with massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage. The follow-up is controversial because of the lack of known cases, but the priorities are: timely diagnosis in urgent cases and a conservative treatment when possible. The mode of delivery is not consensual and should be individualized to each case. We report a case of a pregnant woman with 18 weeks of gestation admitted in the emergency room with an acute right low back pain with no other symptoms. The diagnosis of rupture of renal angiomyolipoma was established by ultrasound and, due to hemodynamically stability, conservative treatment with imaging and clinical monitoring was chosen. At 35 weeks of gestation, it was performed elective cesarean section without complications for both mother and fetus. PMID:25184352

  19. [Spontaneous rupture of an intracerebral dermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    el Quessar, A; Chakir, N; Bouyaakoub, F; el Hassani, M R; Jiddane, M; Boukhrissi, N

    1996-01-01

    Dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare benign tumors arising from ectopic epiblastic inclusions. Dermoid cyst accounts for 0.4 to 1.5% of all tumors. We report the case of a 43-year-old man, who presented with a 6-month history of disturbances of balance and behavioral disorders. X-ray showed two fat-fluid levels in the ventricles. CT scan showed a left frontal mass with fat density, communicating with the left frontal horn. Histological examination after surgical excision confirmed the diagnosis of dermoid cyst. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst is based on the finding of an intraventricular and/or subarachnoid space fat-fluid level. MRI and CT scan facilitates the diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid. PMID:9687621

  20. Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.

  1. Recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture in Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Kiranmaye; Senthil, Sirisha; Jalali, Subhadra

    2016-01-01

    The ocular manifestations of Marfan's syndrome (MS) range from ectopia lentis, microspherophakia, myopia, glaucoma and retinal detachment. Spontaneous scleral rupture is a rare complication and recurrent scleral perforation is extremely rare. We report a rare case of a 26-year-old male with MS who had sequential recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture which required surgical repair. He suffered from a similar problem 4 years later in both eyes in a different location, with overlying thin cystic blebs and hypotony maculopathy. Surgical repair with preserved scleral donor patch graft and conjunctival autograft in one eye, and conjunctival advancement in the other eye was performed. This helped stabilise the eyes, and resulted in complete visual recovery in both eyes. PMID:27199441

  2. An unusual diagnosis of splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Roche, Matthew; Maloku, Fatmir; Abdel-Aziz, Tarek Ezzat

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of worsening epigastric pain, non-productive cough and vomiting. On examination she was pale and had abdominal tenderness predominant in the right upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasound excluded the presence of gall stones, but was unable to rule out free fluid in the abdomen. CT demonstrated extensive high-density ascites; however, no source of bleeding could be demonstrated. Clinically the patient's condition deteriorated, and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. In theatre the splenic capsule was found to have detached from the splenic body and emergency splenectomy was performed. Virology serology later demonstrated acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, although tissue microscopy and CMV staining were negative. No other cause of rupture was found. The interesting aspects of this case include the poor correlation between initial presenting symptoms and subsequent diagnosis, the difficulty encountered in making a firm diagnosis and the atypical cause of rupture. PMID:25293683

  3. [A surgical treatment of ruptured arch aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Nakayama, Y; Naitoh, K; Hotta, K; Ueno, T; Minato, N; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T; Kuchiki, H

    1994-04-01

    A 83-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of back pain and shock. Her chest X-ray and CT scan demonstrated a large arch aneurysm and hemothorax, suggesting ruptured aortic arch aneurysm. The ruptured aortic arch aneurysm was replaced with a woven Dacron graft under selective cerebral perfusion (SCP). Her postoperative course was uneventful without any neurological deficits. For the past three years, we have utilized SCP in 12 cases of arch aneurysms. There were three early deaths in this series. The cause of death were bleeding in one patient and cerebral accident in two patients. The latter two patients had severe atheromatous changes in the aortic wall. The SCP technique was a useful method of cerebral protection, especially for elderly patient with aortic arch aneurysm. PMID:8152170

  4. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI. PMID:25453264

  5. Clinical evaluation of a single daily dose of phenylpropanolamine in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Stéphanie; Rustichelli, Frederico; Noël, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the efficacy of a single daily oral dose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) in bitches. Nine bitches diagnosed with USMI were treated with a single daily dose [1.5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] of PPA for at least 1 month. Urethral pressure profiles (UPP) were performed in 7 dogs before treatment and repeated in 4 of them after treatment. Treatment with PPA resulted in long-term continence in 8/9 bitches. One dog did not respond to PPA and was treated surgically later. Recheck UPPs showed a significant increase in maximal urethral closure pressure in the 4 bitches after treatment with PPA compared to before treatment. In conclusion, long-term continence can be achieved in bitches affected with USMI after administration of a single daily dose of PPA (1.5 mg/kg BW). PMID:22043069

  6. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  7. Functional orthosis post pectoralis muscle rupture.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    This author described her success at fabricating a chest compression orthosis for a patient who underwent repair of a pectoralis major muscle rupture. The repair occurred nine months prior to orthotic fabrication, but the patient continued to experience weakness and pain which limited motion. The design of the orthotic allowed him increased mobility and functional use. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26043967

  8. Unsuspected paperboard-endophthalmitis in ruptured eye.

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R; Pavilack, M A

    1990-05-01

    The eye of a 3-year-old boy was directly exposed to the explosion of an M-80 firecracker which he had been holding in his hand. The cornea and lens were ruptured. Although not evident on an initial CT scan, pathologic examination revealed a paperboard foreign body lodged in the vitreous. This paperboard, rather than the burnt powder, was likely the central focus of the subacute endophthalmitis that developed. PMID:2381660

  9. Cyclophilin A in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cyclophilin A (CyPA), an oxidative stress-induced factor, was found to play an important role in the aneurysm formation. Our working hypothesis was that the plasma level of CyPA in ruptured intracranial aneurysm could predict the neurological outcome. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 36 patients with ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm were recruited in our study. Before coil embolization, we draw blood samples at the orifice of a culprit aneurysm and in the remote peripheral vein for measurements of the CyPA levels. We utilized the modified Rankin scale 30 days after aneurysm rupture as the outcome measure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios of the poor neurological outcome given the presence of high plasma level of CyPA. The aneurysmal and venous CyPA levels were significantly associated with the initial clinical severity (P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively) and 30-day outcome (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels modestly correlated with age and high Fisher grade (ρ = 0.39 and 0.41; P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels strongly correlated with the venous counterpart (ρ = 0.89; P < 0.001). Patients with high levels of aneurysmal CyPA were 15.66 times (95% CI, 1.48–166.24; P = 0.02) more likely to have worse neurological outcome than those with the low levels after adjustment of the age, gender, and the documented confounding factors. High plasma level of CyPA is a significant prognostic biomarker for poor neurological outcome in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26426668

  10. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-11-01

    To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst.Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy.Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated.The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts.Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:26632721

  11. Response of the Upper Esophageal Sphincter to Esophageal Distension is Affected by Posture, Velocity, Volume, and Composition of the Infusate

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Dua, Kulwinder; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Lee, Justin; Katib, Omar; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond; Shaker, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Studies of the pressure response of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to simulated or spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux have shown conflicting results. These discrepancies could result from uncontrolled influence of variables such as posture, volume, and velocity of distension. We characterized in humans the effects of these variables on UES pressure response to esophageal distension. Methods We studied 12 healthy volunteers (average 27±5 years old, 6 male) using concurrent esophageal infusion and high-resolution manometry to determine UES, lower esophageal sphincter, and intraesophageal pressure values. Reflux events were simulated by distal esophageal injections of room-temperature air and water (5, 10, 20, and 50 ml) in individuals in 3 positions (upright, supine and semi-supine). Frequencies of various UES responses were compared using χ2 analysis. Multinomial logistical regression analysis was used to identify factors that determine the UES response. Results UES contraction and relaxation were the overriding responses to esophageal water and air distension, respectively, in a volume-dependent fashion (P<.001). Water-induced UES contraction and air-induced UES relaxation were the predominant responses among individuals in supine and upright positions, respectively (P<.001). The prevalence of their respective predominant response significantly decreased in the opposite position. Proximal esophageal dp/dt significantly and independently differentiated the UES response to infusion with water or air. Conclusions The UES response to esophageal distension is affected by combined effects of posture (spatial orientation of the esophagus), physical properties, and volume of refluxate, as well as the magnitude and rate of increase in intraesophageal pressure. The UES response to esophageal distension can be predicted using a model that incorporates these factors. PMID:22248662

  12. The efficacy of balloon dilation in achalasia is the result of stretching of the lower esophageal sphincter, not muscular disruption.

    PubMed

    Borhan-Manesh, F; Kaviani, M J; Taghavi, A R

    2016-04-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia is a major palliative treatment. It is generally believed, although never substantiated, that therapeutic efficacy of ballooning in achalasia is the result of the disruption and tearing of the muscular layers of the LES. To clarify this issue, we investigated the frequency of muscular disruption at the LES, 24 hours after PD, by employing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), in a group of 43 consented patients with achalasia. Between July 2009 and March2012, 51 consecutive adult patients with tentative diagnosis of achalasia, some with recurrence of symptoms after an earlier treatment with balloon dilation, were evaluated and underwent PD, using Rigiflex balloon without major adverse effect. Out of the 51 evaluated, 43 eligible and consenting patients who underwent EUS, 24 hours after PD, using Olympus GF-UE 160 echoendoscope and an Aloka Prosound probe at 7.5 MHZ, are the subjects of this study. The EUS in 43 eligible patients revealed an intact LES in 36 (83.7%), small area of muscular disruption in 5 (11.6%) and small hematoma in 2 patients (4.6%). Our data convincingly demonstrate that the clinical effectiveness of balloon dilation in achalasia is not the result of muscular disruption, but of circumferential stretching of the LES. Our findings on the mechanism of action of PD in achalasia could result in modifying the current method of dilation for a safer procedure, by slowing the rate of inflation and allowing the sphincter to slowly stretch itself to the distending balloon. PMID:25765473

  13. Plateau pattern of detrusor contraction: A surrogate indicator of presence of external sphincter dysfunction during micturitional phase of urodynamic study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Jain, Saurabh; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Singh, Shrawan K.; Mandal, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dysfunctional voiding results from a disturbance in the coordination between sphincter relaxation and detrusor contraction. Video urodynamic studies with electromyography (EMG) are used for diagnosis but have limitations of availability and interpretation. We identified a plateau type voiding detrusor pressure tracing pattern in these patients with a potential of helping diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Urodynamic data and tracings of adult patients having been diagnosed with external urethral sphincter dysfunction (EUSD) were retrospectively analyzed. The urodynamic studies comprised of pressure flow studies, micturitional urethral pressure profilometry, and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). Diagnosis of EUSD was based on the presence of intermittent or continuous narrowing in the region of EUS on VCUG along with a urethral-vesical pressure gradient of >20 cm H2O in males and >5 cm H2O in females. Results: A total of 25 patients (14 men and 11 women) with a mean age 36.6 ± 16.5 years, presented with lower urinary tract symptoms (international prostate symptom score 18 ± 5) and were diagnosed with EUSD on urodynamics/cystourethrography. The cause of EUSD was neurogenic DESD in four, dysfunctional voiding in 20 and voluntary pelvic floor squeeze in one. Resting maximum urethral closure pressure at EUS was 142.2 ± 38.3 cmH2O in both sexes. Three patients had detrusor overactivity. EMG activity during voiding was high in 10 patients, low in three, inconclusive in seven, and not performed in three. A plateau type pattern of detrusor contraction was observed in all the patients. This was qualitatively different from the roughly bell-shaped curve of detrusor contraction in men with prostatic obstruction (n = 14) and women with stress urinary incontinence (n = 11). Conclusions: Patients with EUSD have a characteristic plateau pattern of detrusor contraction on urodynamics which can be used as a surrogate for urodynamic diagnosis of nonrelaxing EUSD. PMID:27127357

  14. Rupture directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John

    2010-01-01

    We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate rupture direction and rupture velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5≥M≥5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55–125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source–receiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The rupture direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The rupture velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30° of the rupture direction. Rupture velocities are generally subsonic (0.5β–0.9β); for stability, we limit the rupture velocity at v=0.92β, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the rupture direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have rupture directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 rupture partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes rupture updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes rupture predominantly updip. We compare the rupture directions for 10 M≥4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the rupture directivity calculated for the mainshock.

  15. [Muscular rupture of the extensor pollicis longus].

    PubMed

    Towfigh, H

    1984-12-01

    Closed ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon usually appear as a consequence of fractures of the wrist joint or the carpal bones or ensue from polyarthritic changes or result from a process of degeneration. Mechanical injury of the tendon is quite rare but can be observed after direct trauma or after operative treatment of a distal fracture of the radius. Closed traumatic ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon in the absence of pathological changes are--in spite of the frequency of rotation injuries of the forearm--very rare. The patient in the case described is a 45-year-old locksmith whose forearm and hand had been caught in a lathe. This led to sudden, extreme rotation and pronation of the hand. Clinically distinct signs of a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon could be seen. During operation a tear of the muscular portion of the long extensor tendon of the thumb was found. The function of extension was restored by transfer of the extensor indicis tendon. PMID:6392038

  16. Gas pipeline rupture detection and control

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, E.B.; Morrow, T.B.; Sparks, C.R.; Gregor, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic and remotely controlled main line valves are used in natural gas transmission pipelines to provide early shutoff of gas flow in the event of a pipeline rupture. Operating experience, however, shows that these valves and their associated rupture detection and valve operator systems are not always reliable in sensing a line break and in achieving valve closure. Under sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), a technology assessment program was conducted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to define the present state of the art of automatic and remotely controlled main line valves, to evaluate their effectiveness in achieving isolation of a ruptured line, and to identify technology improvements that are needed to improve valve reliability. This study was based on a survey of the US natural gas industry`s experience with line break control equipment, and upon computational modeling of typical pipeline systems to simulate the generation and propagation of pressure and flow transients created by a line break. Line break transients were also compared to the transient levels generated by normal pipeline operations (start-up and shutdown of compressors, branch load changes, etc.). Also during this study, a semi-empirical computer mode was developed to calculate pipeline blowdown time as a function of break size, pipeline configuration, and operating conditions, even in cases where valve closure is delayed for some period after the line break occurs. This information can be of value to pipeline engineers and emergency response planners.

  17. Transient gravity perturbations induced by earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, J.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Barsuglia, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Montagner, J.-P.; Somala, S. N.; Whiting, B. F.

    2015-06-01

    The static and transient deformations produced by earthquakes cause density perturbations which, in turn, generate immediate, long-range perturbations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, an analytical solution is derived for gravity perturbations produced by a point double-couple source in homogeneous, infinite, non-self-gravitating elastic media. The solution features transient gravity perturbations that occur at any distance from the source between the rupture onset time and the arrival time of seismic P waves, which are of potential interest for real-time earthquake source studies and early warning. An analytical solution for such prompt gravity perturbations is presented in compact form. We show that it approximates adequately the prompt gravity perturbations generated by strike-slip and dip-slip finite fault ruptures in a half-space obtained by numerical simulations based on the spectral element method. Based on the analytical solution, we estimate that the observability of prompt gravity perturbations within 10 s after rupture onset by current instruments is severely challenged by the background microseism noise but may be achieved by high-precision gravity strainmeters currently under development. Our analytical results facilitate parametric studies of the expected prompt gravity signals that could be recorded by gravity strainmeters.

  18. Operative intra-aortic balloon rupture.

    PubMed

    Finegan, B A; Comm, D G

    1988-05-01

    Rupture of an intra-aortic balloon (IAB), inserted to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, occurred during attempted intra-aortic administration of protamine in a 71-year-old male who later died. Intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABC) is most commonly utilized to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or to augment low-flow states following CPB. In-hospital survival following IAB insertion in these circumstances in patients with coronary artery disease is approximately 60 per cent. Patients with valvular disease have a lower in-hospital survival rate (50 per cent). Complications of IABC are usually of vascular or infectious origin. Balloon rupture is a rare though potentially lethal complication. The effects of balloon rupture may be compounded by the use of helium as a driving gas to inflate the balloon. Intra-aortic administration of protamine has not been shown to be superior to peripheral administration and should be avoided if an IAB is in place. PMID:3383321

  19. Intersonic and Supersonic ruptures in a model of dynamic rupture in a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The velocity structure in the lithosphere is quite complex and is rarely homogeneous. Wave reflection, transmission, and diffraction from the boundaries of the different layers and inclusions are expected to lead to a rich dynamic response and significantly affect rupture propagation on embedded faults. Here, we report our work on modeling dynamic rupture in an elastic domain with an embedded soft (stiff) layer as a first step towards modeling rupture propagation in realistic velocity structures. We use the Finite Element method (Pylith) to simulate rupture on a 2D in-plane fault embedded in an elastic full space. The simulated domain is 30 km wide and 100km long. Absorbing boundary conditions are used around the edges of the domain to simulate an infinite extension in all directions. The fault operates under linear slip-weakening friction law. We initiate the rupture by artificially overstressing a localized region near the left edge of the fault. We consider embedded soft/stiff layers with 20% to 60% reduction/increase of wave velocity respectively. The embedded layers are placed at different distances from the fault surface. We observed that the existence of a soft layer significantly shortens the transition length to supershear propagation through the Burridge-Andrews mechanism. The higher the material contrast, the shorter the transition length to supershear propagation becomes. We also observe that supershear rupture could be generated at pretress values that are lower than what is theoretically predicted for a homogeneous medium. We find that the distance from the lower boundary of the soft layer to the fault surface has a stronger influence on the supershear transition length as opposed to the thickness of the soft layer. In the existence of an embedded stiffer layer we found that rupture could propagate faster than the fault zone P-wave speed. In this case, the propagating rupture generate two Mach cones; one is associated with the shear wave, and the other is associated with the local P-wave speed. This is a signature of supersonic crack tips. We also noted a smooth transition into supershear, with the rupture speed increasing continuously through the so-called 'energetically forbidden zone' (between Rayleigh wave speed and shear wave speed) corresponding to the wave speeds of the background medium.

  20. Human papillomavirus, anal cancer, and screening considerations among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, William Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Invasive anal cancer has become an important cause of non AIDS-related cancer among HIV-infected individuals. Human papillomavirus is the main etiological agent. This review explains the pathophysiologic role of human papillomavirus in the development of invasive anal cancer, summarizes recent epidemiological trends of invasive anal cancer, and reviews the evidence to address common clinical questions posed when screening for anal cancer in HIV-infected patients. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on human papillomavirus oncogenesis is still unclear, but given the increased clinical burden of invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients, many clinics have implemented screening programs for anal cancer and its precursors. Despite the availability of several modalities for treatment of precursors of anal cancer, evidence that current treatment modalities favorably alter the natural history of human papillomavirus oncogenesis in the anal and perianal regions is still inconclusive. However, there is sufficient evidence to state that the accuracy of anal cancer screening procedures (cytology and high-resolution anoscopy directed biopsy) is comparable to the accuracy of those used in screening for cervical cancer precursors. Studies that systematically assess the efficacy of these anal cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients are needed. PMID:23681437

  1. Abnormal anal cytology risk in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    do Socorro Nobre, Maria; Jacyntho, Claudia Marcia; Eleutério, José; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of abnormal anal cytology in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion. This study evaluated 200 women with and without genital squamous intraepithelial lesion who were recruited for anal Pap smears. Women who had abnormal results on equally or over atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance were classified as having abnormal anal cytology. A multiple logistic regression analysis (stepwise) was performed to identify the risk for developing abnormal anal cytology. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20.0 program. The average age was 41.09 (±12.64). Of the total participants, 75.5% did not practice anal sex, 91% did not have HPV-infected partners, 92% did not have any anal pathology, and 68.5% did not have anal bleeding. More than half (57.5%) had genital SIL and a significant number developed abnormal anal cytology: 13% in the total sample and 17.4% in women with genital SIL. A significant association was observed between genital squamous intraepithelial lesion and anal squamous intraepithelial lesion (PR=2.46; p=0.03). In the logistic regression model, women having genital intraepithelial lesion were more likely to have abnormal anal Pap smear (aPR=2.81; p=0.02). This report shows that women with genital squamous intraepithelial lesion must be more closely screened for anal cancer. PMID:27037113

  2. Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space

    SciTech Connect

    Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri Dingil, Guerbuez; Koeroglu, Mert; Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

  3. Association Between Smoking and Size of Anal Warts in HIV-infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Luu, HN; Amirian, ES; Beasley, RP; Piller, L; Chan, W; Scheurer, ME

    2015-01-01

    While the association between smoking and HPV infection, cervical cancer, and anal cancer has been well studied, evidence on the association between cigarette smoking and anal warts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cigarette smoking status influences the size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women in a sample of 976 HIV-infected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A linear mixed model was used to determine the effect of smoking on anal wart size. Even though women who were currently smokers had larger anal warts at baseline and slower growth rate of anal wart size after each visit than women who were not current smokers, there was no association between size of anal wart and current smoking status over time. Further studies on the role of smoking and interaction between smoking and other risk factors, however, should be explored. PMID:23155099

  4. Prevalence of and risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection in heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Nyitray, Alan; Nielson, Carrie M; Harris, Robin B; Flores, Roberto; Abrahamsen, Martha; Dunne, Eileen F; Giuliano, Anna R

    2008-06-15

    In US men, the incidence of anal cancer, the primary cause of which is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, has increased almost 3-fold in 3 decades; however, little is known about the epidemiology of anal HPV infection, especially in heterosexual men. In 2 US cities, behavioral data and anal biological specimens were collected from 253 men who acknowledged having engaged in sexual intercourse with a woman during the preceding year. On the basis of DNA analysis, overall prevalence of anal HPV infection was found to be 24.8% in 222 men who acknowledged having had no prior sexual intercourse with men. Of the men with anal HPV infection, 33.3% had an oncogenic HPV type. Risk factors independently associated with anal HPV were lifetime number of female sex partners and frequency of sex with females during the preceding month. These results suggest that anal HPV infection may be common in heterosexual men. PMID:18426367

  5. [Rupture of the pes anserinus superficialis and partial rupture of the patellar ligament. Rare concomitant injures in complex knee injuries].

    PubMed

    Pointinger, H; Munk, P; Poeschl, G P

    1999-01-01

    We present a rare case of combined knee joint lesions in a 25 year old patient. Besides the commonly reported injuries of the knee joint due to directly applied valgus force, forceful quadriceps muscle contraction, external rotation at flexed knee causing combined lesions such as rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament and rupture of the medial collateral ligament, a rare combination of the above mentioned lesions and a rupture of the lateral meniscus, an osteochondral fracture of the lateral femur condylus, a rupture of the medial patellofemoral retinacula as well as a complete rupture of the superficial pes anserinus and a partial rupture of the patellar ligament was encountered. PMID:10095409

  6. Testing for and the role of anal and rectal sensation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J

    1992-03-01

    The rectum is insensitive to stimuli capable of causing pain and other sensations when applied to a somatic cutaneous surface. It is, however, sensitive to distension by an experimental balloon introduced through the anus, though it is not known whether it is the stretching or reflex contraction of the gut wall, or the distortion of the mesentery and adjacent structures which induces the sensation. No specific sensory receptors are seen on careful histological examination of the rectum in humans. However, myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibres are seen adjacent to the rectal mucosa, but no intraepithelial fibres arise from these. The sensation of rectal distension travels with the parasympathetic system to S2, S3 and S4. The two main methods for quantifying rectal sensation are rectal balloon distension and mucosal electrosensitivity. The balloon is progressively distended until particular sensations are perceived by the patient. The volumes at which these sensations are perceived are recorded. Three sensory thresholds are usually defined: constant sensation of fullness, urge to defecate, and maximum tolerated volume. The modalities of anal sensation can be precisely defined. Touch, pain and temperature sensation exist in normal subjects. There is profuse innervation of the anal canal with a variety of specialized sensory nerve endings: Meissner's corpuscles which record touch sensation, Krause end-bulbs which respond to thermal stimuli, Golgi-Mazzoni bodies and pacinian corpuscles which respond to changes in tension and pressure, and genital corpuscles which respond to friction. In addition, there are large diameter free nerve endings within the epithelium. The nerve pathway for anal canal sensation is via the inferior haemorrhoidal branches of the pudendal nerve to the sacral roots of S2, S3 and S4. Anal sensation may be quantitatively measured in response to electrical stimulation. The technique involves the use of a specialized constant current generator and bipolar electrode probe inserted in the anal canal. The equipment is generally available and the technique has been shown to be an accurate and repeatable quantitative test of anal sensation. PMID:1586768

  7. [Treatment of complex cryptoglandular anal fistulas. Does it still require an experienced surgeon?].

    PubMed

    Roig, Jos V; Garca-Armengol, Juan

    2013-02-01

    There is still controversy on the management of complex cryptoglandular fistulas, even after employing the newest, theoretically simple, techniques. A critical review of the literature was performed, in order to clarify the role of the surgeon, where the precarious balance between eradicating sepsis and maintaining anorectal influences the choice. Techniques, such as fistulotomy, immediate sphincter repair or ligature of the inter-sphincter trajectory, are discussed. The new sphincter preserving techniques, such as sealing, use of plugs and cell therapy are also analysed. However, with a few exceptions, the scientific evidence is low or zero, due to the lack of clinical trials and to the large variation in the presentations and technical details that could influence the results. For this reason, experience in treating complex cryptoglandular fistulas is still essential. PMID:22425511

  8. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-05-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  9. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  10. Psychosocial aspects of anal cancer screening: a review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Landstra, J M B; Ciarrochi, J; Deane, F P

    2012-12-01

    Cancer screening programs have the potential to decrease psychosocial wellbeing. This review investigates the evidence that anal cancer screening has an impact on psychosocial functioning and outlines considerations for supporting participants. The review suggested that screening has no significant effect on general mental health but may increase cancer-specific worry. Having worse anal or HIV symptoms, being younger, higher baseline distress or worse histology results were predictive of greater worry. The findings suggest the need to increase education campaigns, particularly targeting those with HIV infection and men who have sex with men. There is a need to develop a consensus on measuring the psychosocial impact of screening and stepped care approaches for responding to any resulting distress. PMID:22958553

  11. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  12. The Energy Budget of Earthquake Rupture: a View From Spontaneous Rupture Modeling and Finite-Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Guatteri, M.

    2003-12-01

    It is a common and frustrating experience of many dynamic modelers to initiate spontaneous rupture calculations that subsequently abort before rupturing to the desired earthquake size [Nielsen and Olsen, 2000; Oglesby and Day, 2002]. Source parameters in such dynamic source models are strongly correlated, but stress drop is the main factor affecting the distribution of the other dynamic rupture parameters. Additionally, the position of the hypocenter exerts a strong influence on the dynamic properties of the earthquake, and certain hypocenter positions are not plausible as those would not lead to spontaneous rupture propagation. To further investigate this last statement, we analyze the energy budget during earthquake rupture using spontaneous dynamic rupture calculations and finite-source rupture models. In describing the energy budget during earthquake rupture, we follow Favreau and Archuleta [2003]. Each point on the fault contributes to the radiated seismic energy Ers = Eel - Efr - Erx, where Eel denotes the elasto-static energy and Efr the fracture energy. In this study we neglect for simplicity the relaxation work Erx spent during the stopping of the earthquake. A rupture can be characterized by locally negative seismic energy density values, but its integral over the fault plane must be positive. The fundamental condition for rupture growth is therefore that the integral of Ers on the rupture area remains always positive during rupture propagation. Based on a simple energy budget calculation, we focus on identifying those target slip/stress distribution in dynamic rupture modeling that for a given hypocenter location fail to rupture spontaneously. Additionally, we study the energy budget of finite-source rupture models by analyzing the integrated seismic energy for the inferred slip maps using also hypocenter positions other than the network location. These results indicate how rupture was promoted for the true hypocenter while randomized hypocenters may not have been able to sustain a large earthquake. Our approach helped us both to speed up the computation of successful spontaneous rupture models, as well as to construct dynamically consistent rupture models for strong motion prediction.

  13. Increased HIV-1 activity in anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions compared with unaffected anal mucosa in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Pollakis, Georgios; Richel, Olivier; Vis, Joost D; Prins, Jan M; Paxton, William A; de Vries, Henry J C

    2014-06-01

    We studied 3 patients with focal intra-anal tissue high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). All had increased human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA in lesions compared with that in healthy mucosa. HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 episomal DNA were indicative of ongoing viral replication, more so in anal HSILs. PMID:24604897

  14. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:26446683

  15. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Long, Kevin C; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost-effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  16. Heterosexual anal intercourse among men in Long Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Hess, Kristen L; Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Anal intercourse poses a greater risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission than vaginal intercourse, and in recent years there has been a growing understanding that heterosexual anal intercourse (HAI) is not uncommon. However, the majority of the anal intercourse literature has focused on men who have sex with men. The little research on HAI has mostly looked at women, with limited work among men. This analysis examined the association between HAI and high-risk behaviors (N = 1,622) and sexual sensation seeking (N = 239) in a sample of men recruited from 2001 to 2012 in Long Beach, California. Almost half of the sample was non-Hispanic Black. The median age was 42 years, 42% were homeless, and 20% reported recent HAI. Men who reported HAI were likely to be Hispanic, were likely to be homeless, had a male partner, engaged in sex exchange, and used cocaine or amphetamines during sex. Men who reported HAI scored higher on the Sexual Sensation Seeking scale. This research supports other work showing the relationship between HAI and high-risk behaviors. More important, it contributes new knowledge by demonstrating the association between HAI and sexual sensation seeking. This research highlights the importance of personality traits when trying to understand sexual behavior and when developing HIV prevention interventions. PMID:24024565

  17. Long-Term Outcomes of Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Jin; Kim, Chang Hyun; Lim, Sang Woo; Nam, Taek-Keun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term oncologic outcomes after concurrent chemoradiation treatment for anal cancer. Materials and Methods Between January 1979 and December 2008, the records of 50 consecutive patients with anal cancer and who were treated by chemoradiation or radiation only with a curative intent were retrospectively reviewed. The oncologic outcomes and the risk factors for recurrence were analyzed. Results Of the 50 patients, 49 underwent concurrent chemoradiation and one underwent radiation only. After these definitive treatments, 43 (86.0%) achieved a clinical complete response. During the median follow-up of 60 months (range: 2-202 months), the 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional recurrence-free survival were 84.2%, 72.7%, and 69.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the performance status (p=0.031) and a clinical complete response (p=0.039) were the independent predictors for overall survival; lymph node involvement (p=0.031) was the only independent predictor for disease-free survival. Conclusion The performance status and a clinical complete response may be reliable predictors of survival after chemoradiation for anal cancer. The addition of irradiation to the inguinal area may not be significantly associated with the outcomes. PMID:23225806

  18. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia--is treatment better than observation?

    PubMed

    Orchard, M; Roman, A; Parvaiz, A C

    2013-01-01

    Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is an increasingly common condition for which the best treatment has not been well established. Traditional management was based on a 'watch and wait' strategy, but as the natural history of AIN and its progression to anal cancer is becoming better understood, more active treatment strategies are warranted. A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol to address the question whether treatment is indicated in patients with AIN. A total of 169 papers were identified using the defined search criteria. This included only one randomised controlled trial. Case series were therefore also included to help answer the question. The details of the papers were tabulated including relevant outcomes and study weaknesses. We conclude that treatment of high grade AIN, particularly in high risk groups is recommended to try to avoid progression to anal cancer. Treatment options that have shown some benefit include topical use of imiquimod cream or ablation directed by high resolution anoscopy. PMID:23643642

  19. Addressing Anal Health in the HIV Primary Care Setting: A Disappointing Reality

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Gabriel A.; Dickinson, Gordon; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The increased risk of anal cancer among individuals living with HIV suggests that anal health (e.g., anal symptoms, anal practices, examination of the anus) should be an issue of priority for HIV care providers to discuss with their HIV-infected patients. We investigated the prevalence of HIV-infected individuals discussing anal health with their HIV primary care provider and factors associated with this discussion. We surveyed 518 adult patients from 5 HIV primary care clinics in Miami, Florida, from May 2004 to May 2005. Overall, only 22% of women, 32% of heterosexual men, and 54% of men who have sex with men (MSM) reported discussing anal health with their HIV providers in the prior 12 months. In a multivariable logistic regression, when adjusting for other factors, heterosexual men and MSM were 2.31 and 5.56 times, respectively, more likely to discuss anal health with their HIV providers compared to their women counterparts. Other factors associated with anal health discussion were the patients' better perception of engagement with HIV providers and having had a sexually transmitted disease exam in the past 12 months. Reporting of unprotected sex with HIV-negative or unknown HIV status was inversely related to discussion of anal health with primary care providers (odds ratio [OR] = 0.53). Efforts are greatly needed to increase the focus on anal health in the HIV primary care setting for both men and women. PMID:20731611

  20. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  1. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Wagaskar, Vinayak G; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-10-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  2. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-01-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  3. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Marie C; Singh, Vinay K

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  4. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  5. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079

  6. Surgical Treatment of Distal Biceps Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Laura E; Huang, Jerry I

    2016-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur from eccentric loading of a flexed elbow. Patients treated nonoperatively have substantial loss of strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination. Surgical approaches include 1-incision and 2-incision techniques. Advances in surgical technology have facilitated the popularity of single-incision techniques through a small anterior incision. Recently, there is increased focus on the detailed anatomy of the distal biceps insertion and the importance of anatomic repair in restoring forearm supination strength. Excellent outcomes are expected with early repair of the distal biceps, with restoration of strength and endurance to near-normal levels with minimal to no loss of motion. PMID:26614933

  7. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake rupture processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.

  8. Aortic aneurysm rupture in infantile Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knirsch, W; Hillebrand, D; Horke, A; Lewin, M A; Rein, J; Uhlemann, F

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with early rupture of an aortic aneurysm due to infantile Marfan's syndrome is presented. In an emergency operation we prepared a composite graft using a 17-mm St. Jude prosthesis with an 18-mm vascular conduit. The postoperative period was complicated by pneumothoraces, transient bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis, cerebral convulsion, and supraventricular tachycardia. Four months postop the composite graft was replaced with an aortic homograft due to severe stenosis. His condition after 12 months is excellent. PMID:11178676

  9. Cohesive Zone Length of Gabbro at Supershear Rupture Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear rupture. The strain data was obtained during large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED in March 2013. We conducted friction experiments using a pair of meter-scale gabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5m x 0.1m. We applied 2.6MPa normal stress and loading velocity of 0.1mm/s. At the long side of the fault edge, which is parallel to the slip direction, 32 2-component semi-conductor strain gauges were installed at an interval of 50mm and 10mm off the fault. The data are conditioned by high frequency strain amplifiers (<0.5MHz) and continuously recorded at an interval of 1MHz with 16-bit resolution. Many stick slip events were observed and a unilateral rupture event was chosen in this analysis that propagated with supershear rupture velocity. One of the reasons for this selection was that the strain field ahead of the supershear rupture was not contaminated by elastic waves. Focusing on the rupture front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the rupture. We found that the stress concentration becomes mild as the rupture propagates and length of the stress concentration area becomes longer. This observation is quite interesting because in this experiment the rupture propagated at a constant speed close to root two times the shear wave velocity and thus a longer stress concentration region suggests more energy dissipation. We could speculate that such longer stress concentration area suggests longer plastic region ahead of the rupture (or longer cohesive distance). I.e. the cohesive zone length becomes longer as the rupture propagates to maintain constant rupture velocity propagation. We empirically obtained the relation Lc = 1.8x10^-5 L for 0.1ruptured length.

  10. Ruptured spinal dermoid cyst with disseminated intracranial fat droplets.

    PubMed

    Cha, J G; Paik, S-H; Park, J-S; Park, S-J; Kim, D-H; Lee, H-K

    2006-02-01

    Fat droplets in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a well-known complication of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumours. We report an unusual case of a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour. MR images showed a tethered spinal cord and an intramedullary fat-containing mass. Fat droplets were revealed in the ventricles and the cisternal spaces on brain CT and brain MR. In the English literature, a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour accompanying a tethered spinal cord is extremely rare. PMID:16489200

  11. Spontaneous Tricuspid Valve Chordal Rupture in Idiopathic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Clara Tude; Afonso, Jos E; Cordovil, Adriana; Monaco, Claudia; Piveta, Rafael; Cordovil, Rodrigo; Fischer, Claudio H; Vieira, Marcelo; Lira-Filho, Edgar; Morhy, Samira S

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of tricuspid valve is unusual, occurring mainly in the setting of blunt trauma or endomyocardial biopsy. Spontaneous tricuspid valve chordal rupture is particularly rare. We report herein a case of a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension, on the lung transplantation waiting list, who presented with spontaneous chordal rupture, exacerbation of tricuspid insufficiency and worsening of clinical status. Diagnosis and treatment, along with possible mechanisms for this complication, are discussed. PMID:26660848

  12. A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.

    2015-01-01

    An adductor longus muscle rupture is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus rupture. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus rupture. PMID:25918663

  13. Rupture of non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2008-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is a rare type of uterine malformation associated with obstetrical complications. Rupture of pregnant rudimentary horn is the usual presentation resulting in severe haemoperitoneum with increased maternal morbidity, and at times, mortality. A case of ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy in a 24-year-old, second gravida, is reported. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy of 14 weeks gestation with haemoperitoneum. Excision of the rudimentary horn was done and an uneventful recovery followed. PMID:18452672

  14. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. PMID:25716033

  15. Progression of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Berry, J Michael; Jay, Naomi; Cranston, Ross D; Darragh, Teresa M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Welton, Mark L; Palefsky, Joel M

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) compared to the general population. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) are common in HIV-infected MSM and the presumed precursors to anal squamous cell cancer; however, direct progression of HSIL to anal cancer has not been previously demonstrated. The medical records were reviewed of 138 HIV-infected MSM followed up at the University of California, San Francisco, who developed anal canal or perianal squamous cancer between 1997 and 2011. Men were followed up regularly with digital anorectal examination (DARE), high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and HRA-guided biopsy. Although treatment for HSIL and follow-up were recommended, not all were treated and some were lost to follow-up. Prevalent cancer was found in 66 men. Seventy-two HIV-infected MSM developed anal cancer while under observation. In 27 men, anal cancer developed at a previously biopsied site of HSIL. An additional 45 men were not analyzed in this analysis due to inadequate documentation of HSIL in relation to cancer location. Of the 27 men with documented progression to cancer at the site of biopsy-proven HSIL, 20 men progressed from prevalent HSIL identified when first examined and seven men from incident HSIL. Prevalent HSIL progressed to cancer over an average of 57 months compared to 64 months for incident HSIL. Most men were asymptomatic, and cancers were detected by DARE. Anal HSIL has clear potential to progress to anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM. Early diagnosis is facilitated by careful follow-up. Carefully controlled studies evaluating efficacy of screening for and treatment of HSIL to prevent anal cancer are needed. PMID:23934991

  16. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  17. Asymptomatic rupture of the uterus: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M. M.; Dudley, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Rupture of the gravid uterus is a serious obstetric emergency that threatens maternal and fetal life. In certain cases the classic clinical picture may be absent. Most asymptomatic ruptures are in the lower segment and of minor extent or are really dehiscences of scars. This paper presents a case of massive spontaneous rupture involving the entire corpus diagnosed at elective postpartum sterilization. This unusual event stimulated a review of the causes and clinical presentations of uterine rupture. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6692194

  18. The prognostic value of ventricular rupture in cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Constantinovici, A; Savu, C; Ciubotaru, V; Simionescu, N; Carp, N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 41 cerebral hemorrhage cases associated or not with intraparenchymatous hematoma and ventricular rupture shows the role played by these associated phenomena in the evaluation and prognosis of these patients. The death rate was 56.25% in simple cerebral hemorrhage, 100% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma, 30.76% in hemorrhage associated with ventricular rupture and 80% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma and ventricular rupture. The authors point out that the mere presence of ventricular rupture is not a really aggravating factor. A particular severity resulting from association of hemorrhage with hematoma seems to be due to the extension of the cerebral lesion produced by the two conditions associated. PMID:2781234

  19. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,…

  20. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,

  1. [Aneurysmal rupture complicating aortitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, A; Mercier, O; Messas, E; Safar, M E; Blacher, J

    2014-05-01

    Tropical aortitis is a rare and poorly described aortic disease, sometimes confounded with Takayasu's disease, mainly in people from Africa. In this case report, the panaortic aneurysmal disease in a young woman from Haiti, first diagnosed after a work-up on renovascular hypertension, would appear to approach this particular arterial disease with no clinical, radiological or biological argument for an infectious etiology. The initially suspected diagnosis of Takayasu's disease had to be rethought because of the presence of several saccular aneurysms extending from the aortic arch to the infrarenal aorta, rarely described in Takayasu's aortitis. Expert opinions from vascular surgeons and clinicians tagged this aortic disease as similar to tropical aortitis which remained asymptomatic for more than a decade. Hypertension was managed with successful balloon angioplasty of the left renal artery stenosis and anti-hypertensive combination therapy. Surgical management of the extended aortic aneurysms was not proposed because of the stability and asymptomatic nature of the aneurysmal disease and the high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. More than ten years after diagnosis, the course was marked with inaugural and sudden-onset chest pain concomitant with contained rupture of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. This case report underlines the persistent risk of aneurysmal rupture and the importance of an anatomopathological study for the diagnosis of complex aortic disease. PMID:24637031

  2. The repetition of large-earthquake ruptures.

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, K

    1996-01-01

    This survey of well-documented repeated fault rupture confirms that some faults have exhibited a "characteristic" behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault lengths contrast markedly for two consecutive ruptures, but the amount of offset at individual sites was similar. Adjacent individual patches, 10 km or more in length, failed singly during one event and in tandem during the other. More complex cases of repetition may also represent the failure of several distinct patches. The faults of the 1992 Landers earthquake provide an instructive example of such complexity. Together, these examples suggest that large earthquakes commonly result from the failure of one or more patches, each characterized by a slip function that is roughly invariant through consecutive earthquake cycles. The persistence of these slip-patches through two or more large earthquakes indicates that some quasi-invariant physical property controls the pattern and magnitude of slip. These data seem incompatible with theoretical models that produce slip distributions that are highly variable in consecutive large events. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:11607662

  3. Acute Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players.

    PubMed

    Fahlstrm, M; Bjrnstig, U; Lorentzon, R

    1998-01-01

    All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon ruptures registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Ume were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:9617415

  4. Ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jeyamalar, R; Kannan, P

    1991-12-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are uncommon disorders and are usually congenital in origin. When these aneurysms rupture into an intracardiac chamber, they may be silent initially but later give rise to progressive heart failure due to left or right shunting and aortic regurgitation. The mortality and morbidity in untreated cases is high. We report 13 patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva who underwent surgical repair. There were seven males and six females with a mean age of 24.5 years. Three patients were asymptomatic and five were in congestive cardiac failure. The majority of patients (61.5%) had insidious onset of symptoms, only 2 cases presenting acutely. The connection was between the right aortic sinus and the right ventricle in 11 cases and the non coronary sinus and the right ventricle in 2 cases. Associated cardiac anomalies included a ventricular septal defect (8 patients) and aortic regurgitation (6 patients). There was 1 post operative death and 1 patient required re-operation three months later for a recurrence of the fistula. All 6 patients with aortic regurgitation required aortic valve replacement. All patients remained well and asymptomatic during follow up ranging from 2 to 19 years. PMID:1840448

  5. Evidence for the secondary sexual development of the anal fin in female kokanee salmon Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Thorn, M W; Morbey, Y E

    2016-02-01

    This study examines whether the anal fin undergoes secondary sexual development similar to other reproductive traits in salmonids. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the anal-fin size of female kokanee salmon Oncorhynchus nerka that were in the early and late stages of sexual development. Females in an advanced stage of maturation had significantly larger anal fins relative to females in an early state of maturation (+4-7%), indicating that the anal fin undergoes secondary sexual development. The magnitude of this secondary growth was comparable with snout length (+9-10%), which is known to undergo secondary sexual development in female salmonids. When morphological trait dimensions were compared between the sexes, the anal fin was the only morphological trait found to have a female-biased sexual size dimorphism. This is the first study to show that the anal fin of female salmonids undergoes secondary sexual development. PMID:26506902

  6. Effects of pinaverium bromide in the premedication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Lamazza, A; Tofi, A; Bolognese, A; Fontana, B; De Masi, E; Frontespezi, S

    1986-01-01

    A double-blind study was carried out in 18 patients with biliary and pancreatic disease to assess the use of pinaverium bromide in premedication for endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and its effects on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi. Patients were divided at random into three groups. One group received 100 mg pinaverium bromide twice daily for 3 days before and then 100 mg 1 hour before the examination, the second group received placebo, and the third had no medication. All patients received 10 to 20 mg diazepam intravenously 10 minutes before endoscopy. Assessments were made of the transit time of various endoscopic phases and patients' tolerance of the procedure. The effects of treatment on the sphincter of Oddi were estimated by means of endoscopic manometry. The results showed that pinaverium bromide allowed transit time reduction in endoscopic procedure, a greater tolerance on the part of the patient and marked reduction in the amplitude and duration of the phasic activity of the sphincter. PMID:3780291

  7. The impact of anaemia on treatment outcome in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal and anal margin

    PubMed Central

    Cesnjevar, Monika; Anzic, Mitja; Hadzic, Jasna But; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; Jeromen, Ana; Korosec, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiochemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Anaemia is reported to have adverse effect on survival in cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of anaemia on radiochemotherapy treatment outcome in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Patients and methods One hundred consecutive patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal were treated radically with 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy boost and with concurrent mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. The influence on survival of pre-treatment, mean on-treatment and end-of-treatment haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations was studied. Results The 5-year locoregional control, disease free survival, disease specific survival and overall survival rates for all patients were 72%, 71%, 77% and 62%, respectively. In univariate analysis, patients with pre-treatment and end-of-treatment Hb > 120 g/L survived statistically significantly better compared to patients with Hb ≤ 120 g/L. Patients with mean on-treatment Hb > 120 g/L only had statistically significant better locoregional control and overall survival than patients with Hb ≤ 120 g/L. In multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors were pre-treatment Hb (> 120 g/L vs. ≤ 120 g/L) for overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.419, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.190–0.927, p = 0.032) and stage (I & II vs. III) for disease specific (HR = 3.523, 95% CI = 1.375–9.026, p = 0.009) and overall survival (HR = 2.230, 95% CI = 1.167–4.264, p = 0.015). Conclusions The pre-treatment, mean on-treatment and end-of-treatment Hb concentration > 120 g/L carried better prognosis for patients for with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal treated with radiochemotherapy. The pre-treatment Hb > 120 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of patients with anal canal cancer. PMID:27069457

  8. [Screening for anal intra-epithelial neoplasia among men, who have sex with men].

    PubMed

    Kiellberg Larsen, Helle

    2013-02-01

    Anal intra-epithelial neoplasia is of high incidence in the post-highly active antiretroviral treatment era especially among men, who have sex with men (MSM). This article focuses on the relation between infection with oncogenic HPV types and anal intra-epithelial neoplasia, and the potential progression to anal cancer. Vaccine studies with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in HIV-negative MSM shows promising results regarding preventing development of HGAIN. PMID:23402240

  9. Bougie dilators: simple, safe and cost-effective treatment for Crohn's-related fibrotic anal strictures.

    PubMed

    Kashkooli, Soleiman B; Samanta, Sujon; Rouhani, Mehrdad; Akbarzadeh, Shoaleh; Saibil, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Anal strictures with fibrotic induration have been shown to develop in up to 50% of all patients with Crohn's disease (CD) with anal ulceration. We evaluate the technical feasibility, safety and long-term efficacy of bougie dilation for a subgroup of patients with symptomatic Crohn's-related fibrotic anal strictures. Bougie dilation is simple to perform, relatively inexpensive and has a low risk of complications. PMID:26204140

  10. [Patients with a therapy-resistant anal fissure: beware of malignancies].

    PubMed

    Marres, Carla C M; Drillenburg, Paul; Verbeek, Paul C M

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe three patients aged 53, 39 and 70 with a therapy-resistant anal fissure. Each patient was inspected under anaesthesia. In all three cases a suspicious lesion or swelling was observed and all biopsies taken showed anal malignancies. Although anal malignancies are rare, their incidence has increased significantly over the past 22 years in the Netherlands (from 71 patients in 1989 to 215 in 2012). It is important to be aware of the possibility of malignancies among patients with a therapy-resistant anal fissure. Therefore, we recommend performing an inspection under anaesthesia in these patients to obtain tissue for histological analysis. PMID:25308220

  11. Anal Pap Screening for HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex With Men: Practice Improvement.

    PubMed

    Welbeck, Monique

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) have the highest rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer when compared to HIV-uninfected MSM and when compared to HIV-infected heterosexual men and women. Despite significantly increasing rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM, in many settings, no standard protocol is in place to screen for anal dysplasia in this high-risk group. A practice improvement project was conducted at a primary care health center to educate the HIV health care team about anal Pap screening in an effort to increase provider knowledge and rates of anal Pap screening performed as part of primary comprehensive care for HIV-infected MSM. Increased health care provider knowledge of anal Pap screening within this setting resulted in increased anal Pap screening for HIV-infected MSM. Routine screening leads to improved surveillance and treatment of precancerous lesions, decreasing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected MSM. PMID:26427364

  12. Risk Factors for Abnormal Anal Cytology over Time in HIV-infected Women

    PubMed Central

    BARANOSKI, Amy S; TANDON, Richa; WEINBERG, Janice; HUANG, Faye; STIER, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess incidence of, and risk factors for abnormal anal cytology and anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 2–3 in HIV-infected women. Study Design This prospective study assessed 100 HIV-infected women with anal and cervical specimens for cytology and high risk HPV testing over three semi-annual visits. Results Thirty-three women were diagnosed with an anal cytologic abnormality at least once. Anal cytology abnormality was associated with current CD4 count <200 cells/mm3, anal HPV infection and history of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Twelve subjects were diagnosed with AIN2-3: four after AIN1 diagnosis and four after ≥1 negative anal cytology. AIN2-3 trended towards an association with history of cervical cytologic abnormality and history of STI. Conclusions Repeated annual anal cytology screening for HIV-infected women, particularly for those with increased immunosuppression, anal and/or cervical HPV, history of other STIs, or abnormal cervical cytology, will increase the likelihood of detecting AIN2-3. PMID:22520651

  13. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance. PMID:22676647

  14. Magnetic sphincter augmentation with the LINX device for gastroesophageal reflux disease after U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Zehetner, Joerg; Bildzukewicz, Nikolai; Katkhouda, Namir; Dandekar, Giovanni; Lipham, John C

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) of the gastroesophageal junction with the LINX Reflux Management System is an alternative to fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) that was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 2012. This is a prospective observational study of all patients who underwent placement of the LINX at two institutions from April 2012 to December 2013 to evaluate our clinical experience with the LINX device after FDA approval. There were no intraoperative complications and only four mild postoperative morbidities: three urinary retentions and one readmission for dehydration. The mean operative time was 60 minutes (range, 31 to 159 minutes) and mean length of stay was 11 hours (range, 5 to 35 hours). GERD health-related quality-of-life scores were available for 83 per cent of patients with a median follow-up of five months (range, 3 to 14 months) and a median score of four (range, 0 to 26). A total of 76.9 per cent of patients were no longer taking proton pump inhibitors. The most common postoperative complaint was dysphagia, which resolved in 79.1 per cent of patients with a median time to resolution of eight weeks. There were eight patients with persistent dysphagia that required balloon dilation with improvement in symptoms. MSA with LINX is a safe and effective alternative to fundoplication for treatment of GERD. The most common postoperative complaint is mild to moderate dysphagia, which usually resolves within 12 weeks. PMID:25264655

  15. The association between acquired urinary sphincter mechanism incompetence in bitches and early spaying: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Bleser, B; Brodbelt, D C; Gregory, N G; Martinez, T A

    2011-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted between December 2005 and August 2006 in London (1) to estimate the strength of association between early ovariohysterectomy (spaying) and urinary incontinence (sphincter mechanism incompetence), (2) to identify other risk factors for incontinence, and (3) to assess any implications of incontinence on the owner-pet relationship. Cases were defined as bitches that developed incontinence after spaying and were treated, and the controls comprised continent spayed bitches. Questionnaires from 202 cases were compared to 168 controls, and analysed using multivariable logistic regression. No significant association between early spaying and incontinence was detected although there was a tendency that early spayed bitches were less likely to be incontinent. Docked bitches were 3.8 times more likely to be incontinent than undocked bitches; bitches weighing over 10 kg were 3.7 times more likely to be incontinent than smaller dogs; and older bitches were more likely to be incontinent (OR=3.1-23.8) than younger animals. Some owners were found to have a negative attitude towards incontinence. PMID:20004121

  16. Material properties for modeling traumatic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Bass, C R; Darvish, K; Bush, B; Crandall, J R; Srinivasan, S C; Tribble, C; Fiser, S; Tourret, L; Evans, J C; Patrie, J; Wang, C

    2001-11-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is a significant cause of fatalities in frontal automobile crashes. However, such ruptures are difficult to reproduce experimentally in cadaveric surrogates, and it is difficult to observe dynamic aortic response in situ. So, the aortic injury mechanism or mechanisms remains in dispute. This study is a staged investigation of the physical parameters and mechanisms of human aortic rupture. The investigation includes both experimental study of local and global viscoelastic properties and failure properties of aortas using aortic tissue samples, excised aortas in vitro, and whole human aortas in situ in cadaver thoraxes. This study is the first phase in a staged programme to develop a finite element computer model of aorta injury to examine the mechanisms of aorta injury in automobile crashes. The high-rate local biaxial properties of porcine aorta tissue are determined from samples taken from the isthmus region, the most common area of failure in traumatic aorta injury. Using porcine aortas, similar in structure and physical characteristics to human aortic tissue, biaxial oscillatory response is determined at large strains and high strain rates. From this data, a hyperelastic material model with a failure threshold is developed that is in good agreement with local property data determined from oscillatory tests at 20 Hz and 65 Hz. Further, whole aorta tests are performed using pressure application with aortic pressure time histories similar in onset rate to those seen in cadaveric sled testing. These tests establish the ultimate stretch ratio and strain to failure for human aorta specimens. The specimens show no significant difference in response between the in situ tests and the in vitro tests. This indicates either that the internal thoracic boundary conditions may not be important in the stress and strain level of aorta failure or that the number of in situ tests (3) was too small to establish a difference. A Weibull survival analysis of the whole aorta failure tests shows significant dependence of aortic ultimate stretch ratio on age. A 50% risk of failure is 852 kPa in the circumferential direction and 426 kPa in the longitudinal direction. For pressure, the 50% risk of failure for all the tests is approximately 101 kPa. This increases to greater than 120 kPa for subjects below 68 years. PMID:17458743

  17. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  18. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2004-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  19. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome. PMID:11916903

  20. Ruptured intradiploic dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Salih; Yilmaz, Cem; Serhat, Comert; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    We present a 22-month-old boy with a ruptured dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili. The cyst had caused scalp erosion and a lytic bone lesion and was successfully excised surgically. The general features of these cysts are discussed, along with the surgical procedure and implications of cyst rupture. PMID:20625968

  1. Isolated rupture of teres major in a goalkeeper.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Zogaib, Rodrigo Kallas; Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A complete rupture of the teres major is an extremely rare injury and rarely described in the literature. We report the first case of an isolated rupture of the teres major in a professional football goalkeeper. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion and complementation by image examinations. Conservative treatment has a high success rate with early return to sport. PMID:26701915

  2. Ruptured bicornuate uterus mimicking ectopic pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Singh, Uma; Verma, Manju Lata

    2013-01-01

    Ruptured uterus presenting in first trimester of pregnancy is extremely uncommon and should raise the suspicion of uterine malformations. We report a case of a 24-year-old primigravida with 10 weeks of gestation presenting with acute abdomen and hemoperitoneum. Laparotomy revealed bicornuate uterus with ruptured rudimentary horn. The incidence, diagnosis and management of such cases is discussed. PMID:22691311

  3. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-02-29

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque rupture. Several animal models for the study of atherosclerosis are available. Plaque rupture in these models only occurs following severe surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. In the process of plaque rupture, composition, biology and mechanics each play a role, but the latter has been disregarded in many animal studies. The biomechanical environment for atherosclerotic plaques is comprised of two parts, the pressure-induced stress distribution, mainly - but not exclusively - influenced by plaque composition, and the strength distribution throughout the plaque, largely determined by the inflammatory state. This environment differs considerably between humans and most animals, resulting in suboptimal conditions for plaque rupture. In this review we describe the role of the biomechanical environment in plaque rupture and assess this environment in animal models that present with plaque rupture. PMID:26607378

  4. Changing Patterns of Anal Canal Carcinoma in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Rebecca A.; Levine, Alexandra M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Smith, David D.; Lai, Lily L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Persistent human papillomavirus infection is associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA). With changing sexual behaviors, SCCA incidence and patient demographics may also have changed in recent years. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results public-use data set from 1973 to 2009 was analyzed to determine incidence trends for and demographic factors characterizing SCCA. Joinpoint analyses identified time points when incidence rates changed. For comparison, similar analyses were conducted for anal adenocarcinoma. Results Joinpoint analyses identified 1997 as the single inflection point among 11,231 patients with SCCA, at which the slope of incidence rates statistically increased (1997 to 2009 v 1973 to 1996: risk ratio [RR], 2.2; 95% CI, 2.1 to 2.3). Annual percent change (APC) increased for all SCCA stages and was the greatest for anal carcinoma in situ (CIS; APC, 14.2; 95% CI, 10.2 to 18.4). Demographic changes characterizing later versus earlier time period included younger age at diagnosis and rising incidence rates in all stage, sex, and racial groups. During 1997 to 2009, women were less likely to present with CIS (RR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.3) but more likely to present with localized (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.3) and regional SCCA (RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 1.7). In contrast, adenocarcinoma APCs among 1,791 patients remained stable during this time period. Conclusion CIS and SCCA incidence increased dramatically after 1997 for men and women, although men were more likely to be diagnosed with CIS. These changes likely resulted from available screening in men and argue for efforts to identify high-risk individuals who may benefit from screening. PMID:23509304

  5. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.

  6. Do All Large Strike-slip Earthquakes Have Supershear Ruptures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Mori, J. J.; Koketsu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Studying the rupture speeds of earthquakes is of broad interesting for earthquake research because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes. Also rupture speed is a key observation for understanding the controlling stresses and friction during an earthquake, yet the speed and its variations are usually difficult to determine. Using only far-field seismic waveforms, which is the only data available for many large earthquakes, there are problems for estimating the rupture speed with standard waveform inversions, due to trade-off between the rupture speed and the slip location. Here we applied a back projection method to estimate the rupture speeds of Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes since 2001 which could be analyzed using Hi-net in Japan. We found that all events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-6.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s. Considering the depth-dependent shear-wave velocity, the average propagation speeds for all of the strike-slip events are closer to or greater than the shear wave velocity (Figure 1). For large strike-slip events, transition from subshear to supershear usually occurs within distances of 15 to 30 km from the initiation, which is probably the reason for the scarcity of observed supershear earthquakes for smaller magnitudes. Earthquakes with supershear ruptures can cause more damage than events with subshear ruptures because of the concentration of energy in the forward direction of the rupture. Numerical modeling shows strong focusing and other effects of energy at the rupture front which can intensify the ground motions. A recent example is the April 13, 2010 Qinghai, China earthquake (Mw 6.9), where a moderate-size event caused extensive damage in the Yushu region at the southeastern end of the fault. Careful evaluation of long and straight strike-slip faults should be emphasized for predicting strong ground motions due to supershear rupture. a: Average rupture speeds for Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes. For comparison, dip-slip earthquakes are also shown. The blue dashed line presents the S wave velocity model of PREM for comparison. b: Rupture velocities are shown as ratio to the local S wave velocity, as a function of depth.

  7. A Three Year Clinicopathological Study of Cases of Rupture Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Setu; Swain, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rupture uterus is a life threatening obstetric complication with serious maternal and fetal side-effects. We report a 3 year (2010-2013) retrospective clinical study of pregnancy with rupture uterus cases attending a tertiary care hospital. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of rupture uterus, incidence as per age, parity, clinical presentations, risk factors, complications and management. Materials and Methods Retrospective data of 74 cases of rupture uterus in SCB Medical college, Cuttack was collected from case records of 26,547 deliveries during a 3 year span (2010-2013). Parameters like cause of rupture, type, site of rupture and outcome were recorded. The collected data was analysed by SPSS software v19. Results Out of 26,547 deliveries during the three year period, there were 74 cases of rupture uterus with an incidence of rupture 1 in 359 (0.28%). The mean age of rupture uterus was 27.4 years. 95.8% were multigravida and majority were referred cases from low socioeconomic status. Only 40.5% had the required minimum of four antenatal visits as recommended by WHO (World Health Organisation). A total of 48.6% of cases with rupture uterus had history of previous Caesarean section. Prolonged labour was present in 75.6% of the cases. Only 12.2% of the cases had history of oxytocin use whereas 9.5% had undergone an operative vaginal delivery. Obstructed labour was the cause in 24.3% of cases, 85.1% had complete rupture. Majority had a rupture in the anterior wall (69%) and 81.1% had rupture in lower segment of uterus. Only 17.6% had broad ligament haematoma, 10.8% colporrhexis and 6.8% had associated bladder injury. Repair was possible in only 39.2% of cases, whereas majority landed up in hysterectomy. Internal iliac ligation was done in 2.7% of cases. Perinatal mortality was 90.5% whereas maternal death was seen in 13.5% cases. One patient developed VVF (vesicovaginal fistula). Duration of hospital stay was upto 14 days in 81.1% cases. Conclusion Education and proper care especially of high risk patients like previous caesarean by competent personnal, proper use of oxytocin and early referral may help to reduce the incidence of “rupture uterus”. PMID:26673858

  8. Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault Rupture Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Most faults have not ruptured once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future rupture length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ≤5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K ruptures ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long ruptures have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault ruptures? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface ruptures worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface ruptures. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip ruptures are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in ruptures that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity threshold in UCERF 3 but only 40% of historical ruptures have negotiated this distance. There are other controls of rupture propagation: frictional properties, rupture dynamics, creep, and, as shown by the 2002 Denali-Totschunda rupture, the timing of the prior event and level of stress accumulation on adjacent fault sections. Time will be the tester.

  9. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon: CT and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Z S; Jahss, M H; Noto, A M; Shereff, M J; Cheung, Y; Frey, C C; Norman, A

    1988-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 42 patients with 49 clinically suspected tears of the posterior tibial tendon. Twenty-eight of the 49 suspected tears were subsequently surgically explored and repaired. Three patterns of tendon abnormalities were recognized on CT scans: type I-intact, hypertrophied, heterogeneous tendon; type II-attenuated tendon; and type III-absence of a portion of a tendon. Types I and II correlated with partial rupture seen during surgery, and type III correlated with complete rupture of the tendon. CT findings were accurate in 96% of the patients who underwent surgery. In four cases (14%), tendon rupture was seen on CT scans, but the extent of the injury was underestimated and the rupture was misclassified. Reactive periostitis of the distal tibia was seen in 71% of diseased tendons and may represent an important factor in the diagnosis of tendon rupture. PMID:3357960

  10. Material contrast does not predict earthquake rupture propagation direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is rupture behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake rupture propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake rupture propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake rupture propagation direction cannot be predicted from the material contrast. In this paper we provide observational evidence from 70 years of earthquakes at Parkfield, CA, and new 3D numerical simulations. Both the observations and the numerical simulations demonstrate that earthquake rupture propagation direction is unlikely to be predictable on the basis of a material contrast. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Intagliata, E; Fiumara, P F; Villari, L; Marchese, S; Cacciola, E

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  12. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FIUMARA, P.F.; VILLARI, L.; MARCHESE, S.; CACCIOLA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  13. Unexpected Anal Squamous Cells Carcinoma after Open Hemorrhoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Navarra; Valentina, Abruzzese; Federico, Sista; Renato, Pietroletti

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o'clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area. PMID:25922781

  14. Biomaterials in the Treatment of Anal Fistula: Hope or Hype?

    PubMed Central

    Scoglio, Daniele; Walker, Avery S.; Fichera, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (AF) presents a chronic problem for patients and colorectal surgeons alike. Surgical treatment may result in impairment of continence and long-term risk of recurrence. Treatment options for AFs vary according to their location and complexity. The ideal approach should result in low recurrence rates and minimal impact on continence. New technical approaches involving biologically derived products such as biological mesh, fibrin glue, fistula plug, and stem cells have been applied in the treatment of AF to improve outcomes and decrease recurrence rates and the risk of fecal incontinence. In this review, we will highlight the current evidence and describe our personal experience with these novel approaches. PMID:25435826

  15. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100,000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission. PMID:25883261

  16. Imaging Atherosclerosis and Risk of Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis imaging strategies can delineate characteristics of plaques at risk of rupture and thrombosis. Structural plaque imaging identifies high-risk plaque features including lipid pools, thin fibrous caps, and intraplaque hemorrhage, among others. New molecular imaging techniques complement structural imaging approaches by illuminating important features of plaque biology, with a prominent focus on detecting inflammation as a high-risk phenotype. As we unravel the molecular and structural characteristics underlying thrombosis-prone plaques, there is significant promise for eventual early identification and prediction of atherosclerotic plaque complications before they occur. Here we focus on recent imaging insights into high-risk arterial plaques, the etiologic agent of acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and sudden cardiac death. PMID:23982263

  17. Multifractal scaling of thermally activated rupture processes.

    PubMed

    Sornette, D; Ouillon, G

    2005-01-28

    We propose a "multifractal stress activation" model combining thermally activated rupture and long memory stress relaxation, which predicts that seismic decay rates after mainshocks follow the Omori law approximately 1/t(p) with exponents p linearly increasing with the magnitude M(L) of the mainshock. We carefully test this prediction on earthquake sequences in the Southern California earthquake catalog: we find power law relaxations of seismic sequences triggered by mainshocks with exponents p increasing with the mainshock magnitude by approximately 0.1-0.15 for each magnitude unit increase, from p(M(L) = 3) approximately 0.6 to p(M(L) = 7) approximately 1.1, in good agreement with the prediction of the multifractal model. PMID:15698332

  18. Uterine rupture during pregnancy after laparoscopic myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, J B; Chavet, X; Chapron, C; Gregorakis, S S; Morice, P

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old patient presenting with primary infertility underwent an operative laparoscopy for the treatment of bilateral hydrosalpinges, during which a myomectomy was also performed. The uterus was repaired using interrupted sutures. At follow-up laparoscopy seven weeks later, a uterine fistula was diagnosed and was oversewn using a single 'figure of eight' suture. One year later the patient became pregnant through in-vitro fertilization. At 34 weeks gestation, she required an emergency laparotomy for acute abdominal pain and the presence of fetal bradycardia. The operative findings revealed a uterine rupture at the site of the previous myomectomy scar. This was then enlarged with a scalpel and a live baby was delivered. The uterus was repaired in two layers. The postoperative period for both mother and baby was satisfactory. This complication raises the problem of the quality of uterine repair following laparoscopic myomectomy, together with the question of how to prevent this type of life-threatening situation. PMID:7593518

  19. Acute coronary syndromes without coronary plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Siddak S; Stone, Gregg W; Singh, Mandeep; Virmani, Renu; Olin, Jeffrey; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat

    2016-05-01

    The latest advances in plaque imaging have provided clinicians with opportunities to treat acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and provide individualized treatment recommendations based not only on clinical manifestations, angiographic characteristics, and biomarker data, but also on the findings of plaque morphology. Although a substantial proportion of ACS events originate from plaques with an intact fibrous cap (IFC), clinicians predominantly equate ACS with plaque rupture arising from thin-cap fibroatheromas. In this Review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of plaque morphology in ACS with IFC, reviewing contemporary data from intravascular imaging. We also explore whether use of such imaging might provide a roadmap for more effective management of patients with ACS. PMID:26911330

  20. Bacterial DNA findings in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Mikko J; Pyysalo, Liisa M; Pessi, Tanja; Karhunen, Pekka J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Öhman, Juha E

    2016-05-01

    Objective Chronic inflammation has earlier been detected in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. A previous study detected both dental bacterial DNA and bacterial-driven inflammation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm walls. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of oral and pharyngeal bacterial DNA in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The hypothesis was that oral bacterial DNA findings would be more common and the amount of bacterial DNA would be higher in ruptured aneurysm walls than in unruptured aneurysm walls. Materials and methods A total of 70 ruptured (n = 42) and unruptured (n = 28) intracranial aneurysm specimens were obtained perioperatively in aneurysm clipping operations. Aneurysmal sac tissue was analysed using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial DNA from several oral species. Both histologically non-atherosclerotic healthy vessel wall obtained from cardiac by-pass operations (LITA) and arterial blood samples obtained from each aneurysm patient were used as control samples. Results Bacterial DNA was detected in 49/70 (70%) of the specimens. A total of 29/42 (69%) of the ruptured and 20/28 (71%) of the unruptured aneurysm samples contained bacterial DNA of oral origin. Both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue samples contained significantly more bacterial DNA than the LITA control samples (p-values 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the amount of bacterial DNA between the ruptured and unruptured samples. Conclusion Dental bacterial DNA can be found using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm walls, suggesting that bacterial DNA plays a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms in general, rather than only in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:26777430