Science.gov

Sample records for analog ic designed

  1. A reuse-based framework for the design of analog and mixed-signal ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Lopez, Rafael; Fernandez, Francisco V.; Rodriguez Vazquez, Angel

    2005-06-01

    Despite the spectacular breakthroughs of the semiconductor industry, the ability to design integrated circuits (ICs) under stringent time-to-market (TTM) requirements is lagging behind integration capacity, so far keeping pace with still valid Moore"s Law. The resulting gap is threatening with slowing down such a phenomenal growth. The design community believes that it is only by means of powerful CAD tools and design methodologies - and, possibly, a design paradigm shift - that this design gap can be bridged. In this sense, reuse-based design is seen as a promising solution, and concepts such as IP Block, Virtual Component, and Design Reuse have become commonplace thanks to the significant advances in the digital arena. Unfortunately, the very nature of analog and mixed-signal (AMS) design has hindered a similar level of consensus and development. This paper presents a framework for the reuse-based design of AMS circuits. The framework is founded on three key elements: (1) a CAD-supported hierarchical design flow that facilitates the incorporation of AMS reusable blocks, reduces the overall design time, and expedites the management of increasing AMS design complexity; (2) a complete, clear definition of the AMS reusable block, structured into three separate facets or views: the behavioral, structural, and layout facets, the two first for top-down electrical synthesis and bottom-up verification, the latter used during bottom-up physical synthesis; (3) the design for reusability set of tools, methods, and guidelines that, relying on intensive parameterization as well as on design knowledge capture and encapsulation, allows to produce fully reusable AMS blocks. A case study and a functional silicon prototype demonstrate the validity of the paper"s proposals.

  2. Geometrically constrained parasitic-aware synthesis of analog ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Lopez, Rafael; Fernandez, Francisco V.; Rodriguez Vazquez, Angel

    2005-06-01

    In order to speed up the design process of analog ICs, iterations between different design stages should be avoided as much as possible. More specifically, spins between electrical and physical synthesis should be reduced for this is a very time-consuming task: if circuit performance including layout-induced degradations proves unacceptable, a re-design cycle must be entered, and electrical, physical, or both synthesis processes, would have to be repeated. It is also worth noting that if geometric optimization (e.g., area minimization) is undertaken after electrical synthesis, it may add up as another source of unexpected degradation of the circuit performance due to the impact of the geometric variables (e.g., transistor folds) on the device and the routing parasitic values. This awkward scenario is caused by the complete separation of said electrical and physical synthesis, a design practice commonly followed so far. Parasitic-aware synthesis, consisting in including parasitic estimates to the circuit netlist directly during electrical synthesis, has been proposed as solution. While most of the reported contributions either tackle parasitic-aware synthesis without paying special attention to geometric optimization or approach both issues only partially, this paper addresses the problem in a unified way. In what has been called layout-aware electrical synthesis, a simulation-based optimization algorithm explores the design space with geometric variables constrained to meet certain user-defined goals, which provides reliable estimates of layout-induced parasitics at each iteration, and, thereby, accurate evaluation of the circuit ultimate performance. This technique, demonstrated here through several design examples, requires knowing layout details beforehand; to facilitate this, procedural layout generation is used as physical synthesis approach due to its rapidness and ability to capture analog layout know-how.

  3. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 µm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm2. A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 µVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions. PMID:26437404

  4. Fully Integrated Biopotential Acquisition Analog Front-End IC.

    PubMed

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    A biopotential acquisition analog front-end (AFE) integrated circuit (IC) is presented. The biopotential AFE includes a capacitively coupled chopper instrumentation amplifier (CCIA) to achieve low input referred noise (IRN) and to block unwanted DC potential signals. A DC servo loop (DSL) is designed to minimize the offset voltage in the chopper amplifier and low frequency respiration artifacts. An AC coupled ripple rejection loop (RRL) is employed to reduce ripple due to chopper stabilization. A capacitive impedance boosting loop (CIBL) is designed to enhance the input impedance and common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) without additional power consumption, even under an external electrode mismatch. The AFE IC consists of two-stage CCIA that include three compensation loops (DSL, RRL, and CIBL) at each CCIA stage. The biopotential AFE is fabricated using a 0.18 μm one polysilicon and six metal layers (1P6M) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The core chip size of the AFE without input/output (I/O) pads is 10.5 mm². A fourth-order band-pass filter (BPF) with a pass-band in the band-width from 1 Hz to 100 Hz was integrated to attenuate unwanted signal and noise. The overall gain and band-width are reconfigurable by using programmable capacitors. The IRN is measured to be 0.94 μVRMS in the pass band. The maximum amplifying gain of the pass-band was measured as 71.9 dB. The CIBL enhances the CMRR from 57.9 dB to 67 dB at 60 Hz under electrode mismatch conditions. PMID:26437404

  5. Insights Gained for Updating an Analog I&C System to a Digital System

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.; Carte, N.; Hardesty, Duane; Hardin, LeRoy A; Wilson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Licensees at both Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) and Non-Power Reactors (NPRs) are increasing their use of state-of-the-art digital technology in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems because digital systems offer improved reactor control, information processing, and information storage over analog. Digital I&C systems can range from experimental systems for reactor control research (at NPRs), to measurement and display systems, to complete reactor console replacements. Because of the increasing difficulty in finding spare parts for their original analog I&C systems, many licensees have begun or have plans to upgrade, refurbish, or replace their old analog I&C systems with digital systems. The perception is that upgrading to a digital I&C system will solve all of a facility s obsolescence problems. However, licensees need to be aware of several issues associated with upgrading to a digital system including obsolescence of the digital system (hardware and software) because of the short product life cycle and the associated cost to acquire, store, and maintain a long-term supply of spare parts. Configuration management and cyber security are also vitally important for any upgrade. Further, it must be recognized that the introduction of software and microprocessors could create new failure mechanisms, such as software errors and increased susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. In fact, experience has shown that these failure mechanisms may cause the reactor to malfunction in a way not previously considered. Thus, a conversion from analog to digital I&C systems solves some problems while potentially introducing others. Recognition of the additional risks coupled with good design, engineering, review, and testing can identify and minimize these risks.

  6. Study of proton radiation effects on analog IC designed for high energy physics in a BICMOS-JFET radhard SOI technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, L.; Delpierre, P.; Habrard, M.C.

    1994-12-01

    The authors present experimental results from a fast charge amplifier and a wideband analog buffer processed in the DMILL BiCMOS-JFET radhard SOI technology and irradiated up to 4.5 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. In parallel, they have irradiated elementary transistors. These components were biased and electrical measurements were done 30 min after beam stop. By evaluating variations of main SPICE parameters, i.e., threshold voltage shift for CMOS and current gain variation for bipolar transistors, they have simulated the wideband analog buffer at different doses. These SPICE simulations are in good agreement with measured circuit degradations. The behavior of the charge amplifier is consistent with extraction of transconductance and pinch-off voltage shift of the PJFET.

  7. Analog/digital pH meter system I.C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Paul; Park, Jea

    1992-01-01

    The project utilizes design automation software tools to design, simulate, and fabricate a pH meter integrated circuit (IC) system including a successive approximation type seven-bit analog to digital converter circuits using a 1.25 micron N-Well CMOS MOSIS process. The input voltage ranges from 0.5 to 1.0 V derived from a special type pH sensor, and the output is a three-digit decimal number display of pH with one decimal point.

  8. S-IC Test Stand Design Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo is of the S-IC test stand design model created prior to construction.

  9. S-IC Test Stand Design Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo is of the S-IC test stand design model.

  10. A Way to End the IC Designer Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the shortage of engineers capable of designing advanced integrated circuits (IC) and presents some suggestions for increasing the number of IC designers in universities and semiconductor companies. (HM)

  11. Photonic IC design software and process design kits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korthorst, Twan; Stoffer, Remco; Bakker, Arjen

    2015-04-01

    This review discusses photonic IC design software tools, examines existing design flows for photonics design and how these fit different design styles and describes the activities in collaboration and standardization within the silicon photonics group from Si2 and by members of the PDAFlow Foundation to improve design flows. Moreover, it will address the lowering of access barriers to the technology by providing qualified process design kits (PDKs) and improved integration of photonic integrated circuit simulations, physical simulations, mask layout, and verification.

  12. Design of high speed LVDS transceiver ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaokang, Niu

    2010-07-01

    The design of low-power LVDS (low voltage differential signaling) transceiver ICs is presented. The LVDS transmitter integrates a common-mode feedback control on chip, while a specially designed pre-charge circuit is proposed to improve the speed of the circuit, making the highest data rate up to 622 Mb/s. For the LVDS receiver design, the performance degradation issues are solved when handling the large input common mode voltages of the conventional LVDS receivers. In addition, the LVDS receiver also supports the failsafe function. The transceiver chips were verified with the CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS process. The measured results showed that, for the LVDS transmitter with the pre-charge technique proposed, the maximum data rate is higher than 622 Mb/s. The power consumption is 6 mA with a 5-V power supply. The LVDS receiver can work properly with a larger input common mode voltage (0.1-2.4 V) but a differential input voltage as low as 100 mV. The power consumption is only 1.2 mA with a 5-V supply at the highest data rate of 400 Mb/s. The chip set meets the TIA/EIA-644-A standards and shows its potential prospects in LVDS transmission systems.

  13. A Novel Analog Integrated Circuit Design Course Covering Design, Layout, and Resulting Chip Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wei-Liang; Cheng, Wang-Chuan; Wu, Chen-Hao; Wu, Hai-Ming; Wu, Chang-Yu; Ho, Kuan-Hsuan; Chan, Chueh-An

    2010-01-01

    This work describes a novel, first-year graduate-level analog integrated circuit (IC) design course. The course teaches students analog circuit design; an external manufacturer then produces their designs in three different silicon chips. The students, working in pairs, then test these chips to verify their success. All work is completed within…

  14. Automating analog design: Taming the shrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, A.

    1990-01-01

    The pace of progress in the design of integrated circuits continues to amaze observers inside and outside of the industry. Three decades ago, a 50 transistor chip was a technological wonder. Fifteen year later, a 5000 transistor device would 'wow' the crowds. Today, 50,000 transistor chips will earn a 'not too bad' assessment, but it takes 500,000 to really leave an impression. In 1975 a typical ASIC device had 1000 transistors, took one year to first samples (and two years to production) and sold for about 5 cents per transistor. Today's 50,000 transistor gate array takes about 4 months from spec to silicon, works the first time, and sells for about 0.02 cents per transistor. Fifteen years ago, the single most laborious and error prone step in IC design was the physical layout. Today, most IC's never see the hand of a layout designer: and automatic place and route tool converts the engineer's computer captured schematic to a complete physical design using a gate array or a library of standard cells also created by software rather than by designers. CAD has also been a generous benefactor to the digital design process. The architect of today's digital systems creates the design using an RTL or other high level simulator. Then the designer pushes a button to invoke the logic synthesizer-optimizer tool. A fault analyzer checks the result for testability and suggests where scan based cells will improve test coverage. One obstinate holdout amidst this parade of progress is the automation of analog design and its reduction to semi-custom techniques. This paper investigates the application of CAD techniques to analog design.

  15. A multi-channel analog IC for in vitro neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü

    2016-02-01

    Recent work in the field of neurophysiology has demonstrated that, by observing the firing characteristic of action potentials (AP) and the exchange pattern of signals between neurons, it is possible to reveal the nature of “memory” and “thinking” and help humans to understand how the brain works. To address these needs, we developed a prototype fully integrated circuit (IC) with micro-electrode array (MEA) for neural recording. In this scheme, the microelectrode array is composed by 64 detection electrodes and 2 reference electrodes. The proposed IC consists of 8 recording channels with an area of 5 × 5 mm2. Each channel can operate independently to process the neural signal by amplifying, filtering, etc. The chip is fabricated in 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The simulated and measured results show the system provides an effective device for recording feeble signal such as neural signals. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076118).

  16. Impact of Analog IC Impairments in SiPM Interface Electronics.

    PubMed

    Dey, Samrat; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S; Rudell, Jacques C

    2012-01-01

    The recent realization of Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) devices as solid-state detectors for Positron Emission Tomography holds the promise of improving image resolution, integrating a significant portion of the interface electronics, and potentially lowering the power consumption. Our lab has previously reported on novel board-level readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array featuring row/column summation technique to reduce the hardware requirements for signal processing and is currently working on taking the next step by implementing a monolithic CMOS chip which is based on the row-column architecture. To date, relatively little modeling has been done to understand the impact of analog non-idealities associated with the front-end electronics, on SiPM-based PET systems. This paper focuses on various analog impairments associated with PET scanner readout electronics. Matlab was used as a simulation platform to model the noise, linearity and signal bandwidth of the frontend electronics with the measured SiPM pulses as the input. PMID:24817765

  17. A Wireless FSCV Monitoring IC With Analog Background Subtraction and UWB Telemetry.

    PubMed

    Dorta-Quiñones, Carlos I; Wang, Xiao Y; Dokania, Rajeev K; Gailey, Alycia; Lindau, Manfred; Apsel, Alyssa B

    2016-04-01

    A 30-μW wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry monitoring integrated circuit for ultra-wideband (UWB) transmission of dopamine release events in freely-behaving small animals is presented. On-chip integration of analog background subtraction and UWB telemetry yields a 32-fold increase in resolution versus standard Nyquist-rate conversion alone, near a four-fold decrease in the volume of uplink data versus single-bit, third-order, delta-sigma modulation, and more than a 20-fold reduction in transmit power versus narrowband transmission for low data rates. The 1.5- mm(2) chip, which was fabricated in 65-nm CMOS technology, consists of a low-noise potentiostat frontend, a two-step analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and an impulse-radio UWB transmitter (TX). The duty-cycled frontend and ADC/UWB-TX blocks draw 4 μA and 15 μA from 3-V and 1.2-V supplies, respectively. The chip achieves an input-referred current noise of 92 pA(rms) and an input current range of ±430 nA at a conversion rate of 10 kHz. The packaged device operates from a 3-V coin-cell battery, measures 4.7 × 1.9 cm(2), weighs 4.3 g (including the battery and antenna), and can be carried by small animals. The system was validated by wirelessly recording flow-injection of dopamine with concentrations in the range of 250 nM to 1 μM with a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) using 300-V/s FSCV. PMID:26057983

  18. A Wireless FSCV Monitoring IC with Analog Background Subtraction and UWB Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Dorta-Quiñones, Carlos I.; Wang, Xiao Y.; Dokania, Rajeev K.; Gailey, Alycia; Lindau, Manfred; Apsel, Alyssa B.

    2015-01-01

    A 30-μW wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry monitoring integrated circuit for ultra-wideband (UWB) transmission of dopamine release events in freely-behaving small animals is presented. On-chip integration of analog background subtraction and UWB telemetry yields a 32-fold increase in resolution versus standard Nyquist-rate conversion alone, near a four-fold decrease in the volume of uplink data versus single-bit, third-order, delta-sigma modulation, and more than a 20-fold reduction in transmit power versus narrowband transmission for low data rates. The 1.5-mm2 chip, which was fabricated in 65-nm CMOS technology, consists of a low-noise potentiostat frontend, a two-step analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and an impulse-radio UWB transmitter (TX). The duty-cycled frontend and ADC/UWB-TX blocks draw 4 μA and 15 μA from 3-V and 1.2-V supplies, respectively. The chip achieves an input-referred current noise of 92 pArms and an input current range of ±430 nA at a conversion rate of 10 kHz. The packaged device operates from a 3-V coin-cell battery, measures 4.7 × 1.9 cm2, weighs 4.3 g (including the battery and antenna), and can be carried by small animals. The system was validated by wirelessly recording flow-injection of dopamine with concentrations in the range of 250 nM to 1 μM with a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) using 300-V/s FSCV. PMID:26057983

  19. Innovative Teaching of IC Design and Manufacture Using the Superchip Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, P. R.; Wilcock, R.; McNally, I.; Swabey, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how an intelligent chip architecture has allowed a large cohort of undergraduate (UG) students to be given effective practical insight into integrated circuit (IC) design by designing and manufacturing their own ICs. To achieve this, an efficient chip architecture, the "Superchip," was developed, which allows multiple student…

  20. AFEII Analog Front End Board Design Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinov, Paul; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This document describes the design of the 2nd iteration of the Analog Front End Board (AFEII), which has the function of receiving charge signals from the Central Fiber Tracker (CFT) and providing digital hit pattern and charge amplitude information from those charge signals. This second iteration is intended to address limitations of the current AFE (referred to as AFEI in this document). These limitations become increasingly deleterious to the performance of the Central Fiber Tracker as instantaneous luminosity increases. The limitations are inherent in the design of the key front end chips on the AFEI board (the SVXIIe and the SIFT) and the architecture of the board itself. The key limitations of the AFEI are: (1) SVX saturation; (2) Discriminator to analog readout cross talk; (3) Tick to tick pedestal variation; and (4) Channel to channel pedestal variation. The new version of the AFE board, AFEII, addresses these limitations by use of a new chip, the TriP-t and by architectural changes, while retaining the well understood and desirable features of the AFEI board.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFUR CONTAINING ANALOGS OF MONOMETHYLARSONIC ACID IN AQUEOUS PHASE STANDARDS AND CARROT EXTRACTS BY IC-ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, sulfur analogs of well known arsenicals have been identified, generating a need for stable species-specific standards. This presentation will focus on the identification and characterization of a novel species, monomethylthioarsonic acid (MMTA), in carrots. A standard...

  2. Novel contact hole reticle design for enhanced lithography process window in IC manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chung-Hsing

    2004-10-01

    For 90nm node generation, 65nm, and beyond, dark field mask types such as contact-hole, via, and trench patterns that all are very challenging to print with satisfactory process windows for day-to-day lithography manufacturing. Resolution enhancement technology (RET) masks together with ArF high numerical aperture (NA) scanners have been recognized as the inevitable choice of method for 65nm node manufacturing. Among RET mask types, the alternating phase shifting mask (AltPSM) is one of the well-known strong enhancement techniques. However, AltPSM can have a very strong optical proximity effect that comes with the use of small on-axis illumination sigma setting. For very dense contact features, it may be possible for AltPSM to overcome the phase conflict by limiting the mask design rules. But it is not feasible to resolve the inherent phase conflict for the semi-dense, semi-isolated and isolated contact areas. Hence the adoption of this strong enhancement technique for dark filed mask types in today"s IC manufacturing has been very limited. In this paper, we report a novel yet a very powerful design method to achieve contact and via masks printing for 90nm, 65nm, and beyond. We name our new mask design as: Novel Improved Contact-hole pattern Exposure PSM (NICE PSM) with off-axis illumination, such as QUASAR. This RET masks design can enhance the process window of isolated, semi-isolated contact hole and via hole patterns. The main concepts of NICE PSM with QUASAR off-axis illumination are analogous to the Super-FLEX pupil filter technology.

  3. Novel contact hole reticle design for enhanced lithography process window in IC manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chung-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    For 90nm node generation, 65nm, and beyond, dark field mask types such as contact-hole, via, and trench patterns that all are very challenging to print with satisfactory process windows for day-to-day lithography manufacturing. Resolution enhancement technology (RET) masks together with ArF high numerical aperture (NA) scanners have been recognized as the inevitable choice of method for 65nm node manufacturing. Among RET mask types, the alternating phase shifting mask (AltPSM) is one of the well-known strong enhancement techniques. However AltPSM can have a very strong optical proximity effect that comes with the use of small on-axis illumination sigma setting. For very dense contact features, it may be possible for AltPSM to overcome the phase conflict by limiting the mask design rules. But it is not feasible to resolve the inherent phase conflict for the semi-dense, semi-isolated and isolated contact areas. Hence the adoption of this strong enhancement technique for dark filed mask types in today"s IC manufacturing has been very limited. In this paper, we present a novel yet a very powerful design method to achieve contact and via masks printing for 90nm, 65nm, and beyond. We name our new mask design as: Novel Improved Contact-hole pattern Exposure PSM (NICE PSM) with off-axis illumination, such as QUASAR. This RET masks design can enhance the process window of isolated, semi-isolated contact hole and via hole patterns. The main concepts of NICE PSM with QUASAR off-axis illumination are analogous to the Super-FLEX pupil filter technology.

  4. A 1-Dimensional Chaotic IC Designed by SI Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Kei; Zhu, Hongbing; Tabata, Toru; Ueno, Fumio; Inoue, Takahiro

    In this paper, a VLSI chip of a discrete-time chaos circuit realizing a tent map is reported. The VLSI chip is fabricated in the chip fabrication program of VLSI Design and Education Center (VDEC). A simple structure enables us to realize the circuit with 10 MOSFET’s and 2 capacitors. Furthermore, the circuit which is designed by switched-current (SI) techniques can operate at 3V power supply. The experiment concerning the VLSI chip shows that the proposed circuit is integrable by a standard 1.2 μm CMOS technology.

  5. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  6. Using Tablet PCs and Interactive Software in IC Design Courses to Improve Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an initial study of using tablet PCs and interactive course software in integrated circuit (IC) design courses. A rapidly growing community is demonstrating how this technology can improve learning and retention of material by facilitating interaction between faculty and students via cognitive exercises during lectures. While…

  7. Digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants. Risk-screening of environmental stressors and a comparison of hardware unavailability with an existing analog system

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present a screening study to identify environmental stressors for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP) which can be potentially risk-significant, and compare the hardware unavailability of such a system with that of its existing analog counterpart. The stressors evaluated are temperature, humidity, vibration, radiation, electro-magnetic interference (EMI), and smoke. The results of risk-screening for an example plant, subject to some bounding assumptions and based on relative changes in plant risk (core damage frequency impacts of the stressors), indicate that humidity, EMI from lightning, and smoke can be potentially risk-significant. Risk from other sources of EMI could not be evaluated for a lack of data. Risk from temperature appears to be insignificant as that from the assumed levels of vibrations. A comparison of the hardware unavailability of the existing analog Safety Injection Actuation System (SIAS) in the example plant with that of an assumed digital upgrade of the system indicates that system unavailability may be more sensitive to the level of redundancy in elements of the digital system than to the environmental and operational variations involved. The findings of this study can be used to focus activities relating to the regulatory basis for digital I&C upgrades in NPPs, including identification of dominant stressors, data-gathering, equipment qualification, and requirements to limit the effects of environmental stressors. 30 refs., 8 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Design of a focal plane array with analog neural preprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ivo; Dohndorf, Juergen; Schluessler, Jens-Uwe; Werner, Joerg; Kroenig, Arndt; Ramacher, Ulrich

    1996-12-01

    The design of a CMOS focal plane array with 128 by 128 pixels and analog neural preprocessing is presented. Optical input to the array is provided by substrate-well photodiodes. A two-dimensional neural grid wIth next- neighbor connectivity, implemented as differential current- mode circuit, is capable of spatial low-pass filtering combined with contrast enhancement or binarization. The gain, spatial filter and nonlinearity parameters of the neural network are controlled externally using analog currents. This allows the multipliers and sigmoid transducers to be operated in weak inversion for a wide parameter sweep range as well as in moderate or strong inversion for a larger signal to pattern-noise ratio. The cell outputs are sequentially read out by an offset compensated differential switched-capacitor multiplexer with column preamplifiers. The analog output buffer is designed for pixel rates up to 1 pixel/microsecond and 2 by 100 pF load capacitance. All digital clocks controlling the analog data path are generated on-chip. The clock timing is programmable via a serial computer interface. Using 1 micrometer double-poly double-metal CMOS process, one pixel cell occupies 96 by 96 micrometer2 and the total chip size is about 2.3 cm2. Operating the neural network in weak inversion, the power dissipation of the analog circuitry is less than 100 mW.

  9. Design, synthesis and pharmacological characterization of coumarin-based fluorescent analogs of excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 selective inhibitors, UCPH-101 and UCPH-102.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tri H V; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Madsen, Karsten K; Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Jensen, Anders A; Bunch, Lennart

    2012-12-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play a pivotal role in regulating the synaptic concentration of glutamate in the mammalian central nervous system. To date, five different subtypes have been identified, named EAAT15 in humans (and GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC1, EAAT4, and EAAT5, respectively, in rodents). Recently, we have published and presented a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of a novel class of selective inhibitors of EAAT1 (and GLAST), with the analogs UCPH-101 (IC(50)=0.66μM) and UCPH-102 (IC(50)=0.43μM) being the most potent inhibitors in the series. In this paper, we present the design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of six coumarin-based fluorescent analogs of UCPH-101/102 as subtype-selective inhibitors at EAAT1. Analogs 1114 failed to inhibit EAAT1 function (IC(50) values >300μM), whereas analogs 15 and UCPH-102F inhibited EAAT1 with IC(50) values in the medium micromolar range (17μM and 14μM, respectively). Under physiological pH no fluorescence was observed for analog 15, while a bright blue fluorescence emission was observed for analog UCPH-102F. Regrettably, under confocal laser scanning microscopy selective visualization of expression of EAAT1 over EAAT3 was not possible due to nonspecific binding of UCPH-102F. PMID:23072958

  10. Custom IC/Embedded IP design for histogram in video processing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj; Chaturvedi, Richa; Rai, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Histogram is an integral part of video processing applications. Either of the design methods ASIC or Embedded, histogram computation is an important functional block. This paper proposes the custom Integrated Circuit (IC) as an ASIC and an embedded IP to compute the colored histogram function. Histogram computation has two features: color and spatial. Color feature has been calculated using find_bin and spatial feature is calculated using kernel function. The design is verified using NCSIM Cadence tool, while it is synthesized using RTL compiler. Finally, the embedded IP has interfaced with Kernel based mean shift algorithm in tracking a moving object and implemented on Xilinx Spartan 6 LX150T FPGA.

  11. Design of a Multi-Level/Analog Ferroelectric Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the memory density and utilizing the dove1 characteristics of ferroelectric devices is important in making ferroelectric memory devices more desirable to the consumer. This paper describes a design that allows multiple levels to be stored in a ferroelectric based memory cell. It can be used to store multiple bits or analog values in a high speed nonvolatile memory. The design utilizes the hysteresis characteristic of ferroelectric transistors to store an analog value in the memory cell. The design also compensates for the decay of the polarization of the ferroelectric material over time. This is done by utilizing a pair of ferroelectric transistors to store the data. One transistor is used as a reference to determine the amount of decay that has occurred since the pair was programmed. The second transistor stores the analog value as a polarization value between zero and saturated. The design allows digital data to be stored as multiple bits in each memory cell. The number of bits per cell that can be stored will vary with the decay rate of the ferroelectric transistors and the repeatability of polarization between transistors. It is predicted that each memory cell may be able to store 8 bits or more. The design is based on data taken from actual ferroelectric transistors. Although the circuit has not been fabricated, a prototype circuit is now under construction. The design of this circuit is different than multi-level FLASH or silicon transistor circuits. The differences between these types of circuits are described in this paper. This memory design will be useful because it allows higher memory density, compensates for the environmental and ferroelectric aging processes, allows analog values to be directly stored in memory, compensates for the thermal and radiation environments associated with space operations, and relies only on existing technologies.

  12. Design, synthesis, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and larvicidal activity of girgensohnine analogs on Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Carreño Otero, Aurora L; Vargas Méndez, Leonor Y; Duque L, Jonny E; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V

    2014-05-01

    Girgensohnine alkaloid was used as a natural model in the design and generation of new alkaloid-like α-aminonitrile series that was completed by the use of SSA-catalyzed Strecker reaction between commercial and inexpensive substituted benzaldehydes, piperidine (pyrrolidine, morpholine and N-methylpiperazine) and acetone cyanohydrin. Calculated ADMETox parameters of the designed analogs revealed their good pharmacokinetic profiles indicating lipophilic characteristics. In vitro AChE enzyme test showed that obtained α-aminonitriles could be considered as AChEIs with micromolar IC50 values ranging from 42.0 to 478.0 μM (10.3-124.0 μg/mL). Among this series, the best AChE inhibitor was the pyrrolidine α-aminonitrile 3 (IC50 = 42 μM), followed by the piperidine α-aminonitriles 2 and 6 (IC50 = 45 μM and IC50 = 51 μM, respectively), and the compound 7 (IC50 = 51 μM). In vivo insecticidal activity of more active AChEIs against Aedes aegypti larvae was also performed showing a good larvicidal activity at concentrations less than 140 ppm, highlighting products 2 and 7 that could serve as lead compounds to develop new potent and selective insecticides. PMID:24704612

  13. Analogical Reasoning in the Engineering Design Process and Technology Education Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Jenny; Mentzer, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    This synthesis paper discusses the research exploring analogical reasoning, the role of analogies in the engineering design process, and educational applications for analogical reasoning. Researchers have discovered that analogical reasoning is often a fundamental cognitive tool in design problem solving. Regarding the possible role of analogical…

  14. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics. PMID:26792983

  15. Analog Design for Digital Deployment of a Serious Leadership Game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Nicholas; Lang, Tristan; Herman, Jeffrey L.; Phares, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development, and user testing of a leadership development simulation. The authors share lessons learned from using a design process for a board game to allow for quick and inexpensive revision cycles during the development of a serious leadership development game. The goal of this leadership simulation is to accelerate the development of leadership capacity in high-potential mid-level managers (GS-15 level) in a federal government agency. Simulation design included a mixed-method needs analysis, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches to determine organizational leadership needs. Eight design iterations were conducted, including three user testing phases. Three re-design iterations followed initial development, enabling game testing as part of comprehensive instructional events. Subsequent design, development and testing processes targeted digital application to a computer- and tablet-based environment. Recommendations include pros and cons of development and learner testing of an initial analog simulation prior to full digital simulation development.

  16. Planar CMOS analog SiPMs: design, modeling, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are large area detectors consisting of an array of single-photon-sensitive microcells, which make SiPMs extremely attractive to substitute the photomultiplier tubes in many applications. We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of analog SiPMs in standard planar 0.35 μm CMOS technology, with about 1 mm × 1 mm total area and different kinds of microcells, based on single-photon avalanche diodes with 30 μm diameter reaching 21.0% fill-factor (FF), 50 μm diameter (FF = 58.3%) or 50 μm square active area with rounded corner of 5 μm radius (FF = 73.7%). We also developed the electrical SPICE model for CMOS SiPMs. Our CMOS SiPMs have 25 V breakdown voltage, in line with most commercial SiPMs and higher gain (8.8 × 106, 13.2 × 106, and 15.0 × 106, respectively). Although dark count rate density is slightly higher than state-of-the-art analog SiPMs, the proposed standard CMOS processing opens the feasibility of integration with active electronics, for switching hot pixels off, drastically reducing the overall dark count rate, or for further on-chip processing.

  17. Circuit Design Approaches for Implementation of a Subtrellis IC for a Reed-Muller Subcode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Uehara, Gregory T.; Nakamura, Eric B.; Chu, Cecilia W. P.

    1996-01-01

    In his research, we have proposed the (64, 40, 8) subcode of the third-order Reed-Muller (RM) code to NASA for high-speed satellite communications. This RM subcode can be used either alone or as an inner code of a concatenated coding system with the NASA standard (255, 233, 33) Reed-Solomon (RS) code as the outer code to achieve high performance (or low bit-error rate) with reduced decoding complexity. It can also be used as a component code in a multilevel bandwidth efficient coded modulation system to achieve reliable bandwidth efficient data transmission. This report will summarize the key progress we have made toward achieving our eventual goal of implementing a decoder system based upon this code. In the first phase of study, we investigated the complexities of various sectionalized trellis diagrams for the proposed (64, 40, 8) RM subcode. We found a specific 8-trellis diagram for this code which requires the least decoding complexity with a high possibility of achieving a decoding speed of 600 M bits per second(Mbps). The combination of a large number of states and a high data rate will be made possible due to the utilization of a high degree of parallelism throughout the architecture. This trellis diagram will be presented and briefly described. In the second phase of study which was carried out through the past year, we investigated circuit architectures to determine the feasibility of VLSI implementation of a high- speed Viterbi decoder based on this 8-section trellis diagram. We began to examine specific design and implementation approaches to implement a fully custom integrated circuit (IC) which will be a key building block for a decoder system implementation. The key results will be presented in this report. This report will be divided into three primary sections. First, we will briefly describe the system block diagram in which the proposed decoder is assumed to be operating and present some of the key architectural approaches being used to implement

  18. Circuit Design Approaches for Implementation of a Subtrellis IC for a Reed-Muller Subcode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Uehara, Gregory T.; Nakamura, Eric B.; Chu, Cecilia W. P.

    1996-01-01

    In this research, we have proposed the (64, 40, 8) subcode of the third-order Reed-Muller (RM) code to NASA for high-speed satellite communications. This RM subcode can be used either alone or as an inner code of a concatenated coding system with the NASA standard (255, 233, 33) Reed-Solomon (RS) code as the outer code to achieve high performance (or low bit-error rate) with reduced decoding complexity. It can also be used as a component code in a multilevel bandwidth efficient coded modulation system to achieve reliable bandwidth efficient data transmission. This report will summarize the key progress we have made toward achieving our eventual goal of implementing a decoder system based upon this code. In the first phase of study, we investigated the complexities of various sectionalized trellis diagrams for the proposed (64, 40, 8) RM subcode. We found a specific 8-trellis diagram for this code which requires the least decoding complexity with a high possibility of achieving a decoding speed of 600 M bits per second (Mbps). The combination of a large number of states and a high data rate will be made possible due to the utilization of a high degree of parallelism throughout the architecture. This trellis diagram will be presented and briefly described. In the second phase of study which was carried out through the past year, we investigated circuit architectures to determine the feasibility of VLSI implementation of a high-speed Viterbi decoder based on this 8-section trellis diagram. We began to examine specific design and implementation approaches to implement a fully custom integrated circuit (IC) which will be a key building block for a decoder system implementation. The key results will be presented in this report. This report will be divided into three primary sections. First, we will briefly describe the system block diagram in which the proposed decoder is assumed to be operating and present some of the key architectural approaches being used to implement

  19. Electrical Characterization of 4H-SiC JFET Wafer: DC Parameter Variations for Extreme Temperature IC Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Chang, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports DC electrical characterization of a 76 mm diameter 4H-SiC JFET test wafer fabricated as part of NASA's on-going efforts to realize medium-scale ICs with prolonged and stable circuit operation at temperatures as high as 500 degC. In particular, these measurements provide quantitative parameter ranges for use in JFET IC design and simulation. Larger than expected parameter variations were observed both as a function of position across the wafer as well as a function of ambient testing temperature from 23 degC to 500 degC.

  20. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  1. Design of A 5-Bit Fully Parallel Analog to Digital Converter Using Common Gate Differrential Mos Pair-Based Comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytar, Oktay

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a novel comparator structure based on the common gate differential MOS pair. The proposed comparator has been applied to fully parallel analog to digital converter (A/D converter). Furthermore, this article presents 5 bit fully parallel A/D Converter design using the cadence IC5141 design platform and NCSU(North Carolina State University) design kit with 0.18 μm CMOS technology library. The proposed fully parallel A/D converter consist of resistor array block, comparator block, 1-n decoder block and programmable logic array. The 1-n decoder block includes latch block and thermometer code circuit that is implemented using transmission gate based multiplexer circuit. Thus, sampling frequency and analog bandwidth are increased. The INL and DNL of the proposed fully parallel A/D converter are (0/ + 0.63) LSB and (-0.26/ + 0.31) LSB at a sampling frequency of 5 GS/s with an input signal of 50 MHz, respectively. The proposed fully parallel A/D Converter consumes 340 mW from 1.8 V supply.

  2. Design and synthesis of simplified taxol analogs based on the T-Taxol bioactive conformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jielu; Bane, Susan; Snyder, James P.; Hu, Haipeng; Mukherjee, Kamalika; Slebodnick, Carla; Kingston, David G. I.

    2011-01-01

    A series of compounds designed to adopt a conformation similar to the tubulin-binding T-Taxol conformation of the anticancer drug paclitaxel has been synthesized. Both the internally bridged analogs 37-39, 41 and the open-chain analogs 27-29 and 43 were prepared. The bridged analogs 37-39 and 41 were synthesized by Grubbs' metatheses of compounds 30-32 and 33, which, in turn, were prepared by coupling β-lactams 24-26 with alcohols 22 and 23. Both the bridged and the open-chain analogs showed moderate to good cytotoxicity. PMID:22071526

  3. FPGA Design Practices for I&C in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrek, Miljko; Wood, Richard Thomas; Bouldin, Donald; Waterman, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Safe FPGA design practices can be classified into three major groups covering board-level and FPGA logic-level design practices, FPGA design entry methods, and FPGA design methodology. This paper is presenting the most common hardware and software design practices that are acceptable in safety-critical FPGA systems. It also proposes an FPGA-specific design life cycle including design entry, FPGA synthesis, place and route, and validation and verification.

  4. Design and analysis of a chip-scale photonic analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawy, Ahmed; Chen, Caihua; Miao, BingLin; Shi, Shouyuan; Prather, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we present novel designs for all optical analog-to-digital converters simulated and realized in photonic crystal platforms. The designs presented were implemented on both photonic bandgap based structures as well as self collimation based structures. Numerical simulation results as well as fabrication results are also included. Characterization results validate the designs presented for a functional all optical two bit analog to digital converters in photonic crystals. The design presented can be further scaled to higher resolution conversion as well as to no optical frequencies if necessary.

  5. An investigation of fluid flow during induction stroke of a water analog model of an IC engine using an innovative optical velocimetry concept: LIPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Bernd; Falco, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Optical measurements on an axisymmetrical quartz component engine research model were made to evaluate the flow field encountered during induction. The measurement technique is LIPA (Laser Induced Photochemical Anemometry), a non-intrusive velocimetry concept that provides an investigator of fluid flow with a tool to attain planar information about three-dimensional velocity and vorticity vectors in a single measurement step. The goal of this investigation is to further develop this measurement technique and apply it to study the induction stroke of a water analog model of a four-stroke internal combustion engine. The research conducted in the water analog model is a fundamental scientific inquiry into the flow fields that develop in the induction stroke of an engine at idling engine speeds. As this is the first investigation of its kind using LIPA technique, our goal has been to quantify, in a preliminary manner, the flow field features that develop during the intake stroke. In the process a more comprehensive understanding of the flow field features was developed, and tied to the quantification. The study evaluated the flow field of the intake stroke by estimating fields of velocity and vorticity. On the basis of these data, information about fluid dynamics during induction at engine speeds of 10, 20, and 30 RPM (corresponding to 170, 340, and 510 RPM respectively, when air is the flowing medium) for three different valve lifts was obtained. The overall development of the flow field, its energy content (kinetic, fluctuation) for the different settings of the engine parameters, vorticity information, and cyclic variations have been quantified. These have been discussed in terms of mixing performance.

  6. Analog electronic cochlea design using multiplexing switched-capacitor circuits.

    PubMed

    Bor, J C; Wu, C Y

    1996-01-01

    A new design methodology is proposed to realize a real cochlea using the multiplexing switched-capacitor circuits. The proposed technique is based upon the transmission-line model proposed by Zwislocki (1950). At the cost of the increase in the number of clock phases, the decay rate in the transition region of the filter section can be increased by adding only a few components. Therefore, the components and chip area of the designed silicon cochlea can be small. An experimental chip containing four filter sections has been designed and fabricated. The measured frequency responses from the 32-section cochlea formed by cascading nine fabricated chips are consistent with both theoretical calculation results and observed behavior of a real cochlea. Moreover, the designed silicon cochlea has the dynamic range of 67 dB in each section and a low sensitivity to process variations. Thus it is suitable for VLSI implementation with the associated neural network. PMID:18255566

  7. Surface potential compact model for embedded flash devices oriented to IC memory design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Davide; Rideau, Denis; Gilibert, Fabien; Schmid, Alexandre; Jaouen, Hervé; Leblebici, Yusuf

    2013-10-01

    A surface potential-based model for embedded flash memory cells has been developed with the purpose of providing a comprehensive physical understanding of the device operation suitable for performance optimization in memory circuit design. The device equations account for charge balance effects on the isolated floating gate node and parasitic couplings between the terminals of the memory cell. The compact model supports DC, AC and transient analyses, including program/erase bias scalability, drain disturb and memory endurance degradation due to oxide aging. After validation, the model has been applied to parametric analysis and used to evaluate critical trade-offs in memory design.

  8. Intrinsic Hardware Evolution for the Design and Reconfiguration of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a second generation Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA2). The performance of an evolved controller is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller. It is shown that hardware evolution is able to create a compact design that provides good performance, while using considerably less functional electronic components than the conventional design. Additionally, the use of hardware evolution to provide fault tolerance by reconfiguring the design is explored. Experimental results are presented showing that significant recovery of capability can be made in the face of damaging induced faults.

  9. IC Treatment: Surgical Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & IC La Cistitis Intersticial IC in Other Languages Associated Conditions Allergies and Sensitivities Celiac Disease Chronic ... Call to Action Stamp Out IC How to Schedule an IC Advocacy District Visit IC Advocates in ...

  10. Design, synthesis, and docking studies of afatinib analogs bearing cinnamamide moiety as potent EGFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuanbiao; OuYang, Yiqiang; Xu, Shan; Zhu, Yan; Li, Gen; Sun, Chao; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhu, Wufu

    2016-04-01

    Two series of afatinib derivatives bearing cinnamamide moiety (10a-n and 11a-h) were designed, synthesized and evaluated for the IC50 values against four cancer cell lines (A549, PC-3, MCF-7 and Hela). Two selected compounds (10e, 10k) were further evaluated for the inhibitory activity against EGFR and VEGFR2/KDR kinases. Seven of the compounds showed excellent cytotoxicity activity and selectivity with the IC50 values in single-digit μM to nanomole range. Three of them are equal to more active than positive control afatinib against one or more cell lines. The most promising compound 10k showed the best activity against A549, PC-3, MCF-7 and Hela cancer cell lines and EGFR kinase, with the IC50 values of 0.07±0.02μM, 7.67±0.97μM, 4.65±0.90μM and 4.83±1.28μM, which were equal to more active than afatinib (0.05±0.01μM, 4.1±2.47μM, 5.83±1.89μM and 6.81±1.77μM), respectively. Activity of compounds 10e (IC50 9.1nM) and 10k (IC50 3.6nM) against EGFR kinase were equal to the reference compound afatinib (IC50 1.6nM). Structure-activity relationships (SARs) and docking studies indicated that replacement of the aqueous solubility 4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enamide group by cinnamamide moiety didn't decrease the antitumor activity. The results suggested that methoxy substitution had a significant impact on the activity and methoxy substituted on C-4 or C-2,3,4 position was benefit for the activity. PMID:26906472

  11. Design, synthesis and aphicidal activity of N-terminal modified insect kinin analogs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanliang; Qu, Yanyan; Wu, Xiaoqing; Song, Dunlun; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling

    2015-06-01

    The insect kinins are a class of multifunctional insect neuropeptides present in a diverse variety of insects. Insect kinin analogs showed multiple bioactivities, especially, the aphicidal activity. To find a biostable and bioactive insecticide candidate with simplified structure, a series of N-terminal modified insect kinin analogs was designed and synthesized based on the lead compound [Aib]-Phe-Phe-[Aib]-Trp-Gly-NH2. Their aphicidal activity against the soybean aphid Aphis glycines was evaluated. The results showed that all the analogs maintained the aphicidal activity. In particular, the aphicidal activity of the pentapeptide analog X Phe-Phe-[Aib]-Trp-Gly-NH2 (LC50=0.045mmol/L) was similar to the lead compound (LC50=0.048mmol/L). This indicated that the N-terminal protective group may not play an important role in the activity and the analogs structure could be simplified to pentapeptide analogs while retaining good aphicidal activity. The core pentapeptide analog X can be used as the lead compound for further chemical modifications to discover potential insecticides. PMID:25116632

  12. Design of the readout IC for the CDF SVX-II silicon strip detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, B.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-08-16

    Future colliding beam runs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will involve bunch spacings of protons and antiprotons at 132 ns intervals. Due to finite processing time, a pipelined architecture is needed to store events until a trigger decision can reach the detector. A single ported pipeline design has been implemented in a 1.2 micron rad soft CMOS technology and partially tested. Results are presented of the performance of that design. The chip supports a level 1 accept rate of 5 kHz. Because high statistics B physics experiments will require level 1 accept rates of 50 kHz, a new dual ported pipeline device has been proposed which would make the readout virtually deadtimeless for trigger rates approaching 50 kHz. The operation of the proposed deadtimeless device is explained.

  13. IC design of low power, wide tuning range VCO in 90 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li; Zhigong, Wang; Zhiqun, Li; Qin, Li; Faen, Liu

    2014-12-01

    A low power VCO with a wide tuning range and low phase noise has been designed and realized in a standard 90 nm CMOS technology. A newly proposed current-reuse cross-connected pair is utilized as a negative conductance generator to compensate the energy loss of the resonator. The supply current is reduced by half compared to that of the conventional LC-VCO. An improved inversion-mode MOSFET (IMOS) varactor is introduced to extend the capacitance tuning range from 32.8% to 66%. A detailed analysis of the proposed varactor is provided. The VCO achieves a tuning range of 27-32.5 GHz, exhibiting a frequency tuning range (FTR) of 18.4% and a phase noise of -101.38 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from a 30 GHz carrier, and shows an excellent FOM of -185 dBc/Hz. With the voltage supply of 1.5 V, the core circuit of VCO draws only 2.1 mA DC current.

  14. Significance of analog instrumentation - design philosophy of replacement dump arrest unit at Pickering Station Candu Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.F.; McDowell, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the differences of opinion concerning power plant instrumentation, including safety systems. One popular view point is that modem instrumentation must be microprocessor-based to be acceptable. An alternative view point is that properly designed analog instrumentation is recommended in some applications and has proven to be viable based upon performance and experience. A practical example is discussed in detail, explaining how a combination of discrete analog circuitry, combined with discrete digital circuitry provides a robust solution to a complex instrumentation replacement problem. In this application, a microprocessor-based instrument was designed as a replacement for an obsolete analog instrument. Due to severe licensing difficulties, the instrument was redesigned as a combination of discrete analog and digital circuitry. In the implementation of this circuitry, all complex testing functions of the improved microprocessor-based instrument were accommodated and system accuracy and performance were not compromised over the micro-processor-based instrument. The instrument has met all requirements for reliability and EMI/RFI susceptibility, as well as isolation of analog outputs and the ability to withstand severe transient noise on inputs and outputs without adversely affecting performance.

  15. Design, Synthesis, Activity and Docking Study of Sorafenib Analogs Bearing Sulfonylurea Unit.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunjiang; Wang, Min; Tang, Qidong; Luo, Rong; Chen, Le; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhu, Wufu

    2015-01-01

    Two series of novel sorafenib analogs containing a sulfonylurea unit were synthesized and their chemical structures were confirmed by ¹H-NMR, ¹³C-NMR, MS spectrum and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for the cytotoxicity against A549, Hela, MCF-7, and PC-3 cancer cell lines. Some of the compounds showed moderate cytotoxic activity, especially compounds 1-(2,4-difluorophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(2-(methylcarbamoyl)pyridin-4-yloxy)phenyl)urea (6c) and 1-(4-bromophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(2-(methylcarbamoyl)pyridin-4-yloxy)phenyl)urea (6f) with the IC50 values against four cancer cell lines ranging from 16.54±1.22 to 63.92±1.81 μM, respectively. Inhibitory rates against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/KDR) kinase at 10 μM of target compounds were further carried out in this paper in order to investigate the target of these compounds. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) and docking studies indicated that the sulfonylurea unit was important to these kinds of compounds. None of the substitutions in the phenoxy group and small halogen atoms such as 2,4-difluoro substitution of the aryl group contributed to the activity. The results suggested that sulfonylurea sorafenib analogs are worthy of further study. PMID:26512636

  16. Design and synthesis of constrained analogs of LCRF-0004 as potent RON tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raeppel, Stéphane L; Therrien, Eric; Raeppel, Franck

    2015-09-01

    New fused bicyclic lactam head groups as rigidified analogs of thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-based kinase inhibitor LCRF-0004 were designed and synthesized. Depending on the functionalities and the size of these bicyclic head groups, potent inhibitors of RON tyrosine kinase with various level of selectivity against c-Met tyrosine kinase were obtained. PMID:26112445

  17. The impact of analogies on creative concept generation: lessons from an in vivo study in engineering design.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joel; Schunn, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Research on innovation often highlights analogies from sources outside the current problem domain as a major source of novel concepts; however, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are not well understood. We analyzed the temporal interplay between far analogy use and creative concept generation in a professional design team's brainstorming conversations, investigating the hypothesis that far analogies lead directly to very novel concepts via large steps in conceptual spaces (jumps). Surprisingly, we found that concepts were more similar to their preceding concepts after far analogy use compared to baseline situations (i.e., without far analogy use). Yet far analogies increased the team's concept generation rate compared to baseline conditions. Overall, these results challenge the view that far analogies primarily lead to novel concepts via jumps in conceptual spaces and suggest alternative pathways from far analogies to novel concepts (e.g., iterative, deep exploration within a functional space). PMID:24835377

  18. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & IC La Cistitis Intersticial IC in Other Languages Associated Conditions Allergies and Sensitivities Celiac Disease Chronic ... Children & IC La Cistitis Intersticial IC in Other Languages Associated Conditions Allergies and Sensitivities Celiac Disease Chronic ...

  19. Design of a fiber-optic transmitter for microwave analog transmission with high phase stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, R. T., Jr.; Lutes, G. F.; Primas, L. E.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    The principal considerations in the design of fiber-optic transmitters for highly phase-stable radio frequency and microwave analog transmission are discussed. Criteria for a fiber-optic transmitter design with improved amplitude and phase-noise performance are developed through consideration of factors affecting the phase noise, including low-frequency laser-bias supply noise, the magnitude and proximity of external reflections into the laser, and temperature excursions of the laser-transmitter package.

  20. Design and Synthesis of 2-(3-Benzo[b]thienyl)-6,7-methylenedioxyquinolin-4-one Analogs as Potent Antitumor Agents that Inhibit Tubulin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Huang, Li-Jiau; Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Hamel, Ernest; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    As part of our continuing investigation of azo-flavonoid derivatives as potential anticancer drug candidates, a series of 2-aryl-6,7-methylenedioxyquinolin-4-one analogs was designed and synthesized. The design combined structural features of 2-(2-fluorophenyl)-6,7-methylenedioxyquinolin-4-one (CHM-1), a previously discovered compound with potent in vivo antitumor activity, and 2-arylquinolin-4-ones identified by CoMFA models. The newly synthesized analogs were evaluated for cytotoxicity against seven human cancer cell lines, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations were established. Analogs 1, 37, and 39 showed potent cytotoxicity against different cancer cell lines. Compound 1 demonstrated selective cytotoxicity against Hep 3B (hepatoma) cells. Compound 37 was cytotoxic against HL-60 (leukemia), HCT-116 (colon cancer), Hep 3B (hepatoma), and SK-MEL-5 (melanoma) cells. Compound 39 exhibited broad cytotoxicity against all seven cancer cell lines, with IC50 values between 0.07–0.19 µM. Results from mechanism of action studies revealed that these new quinolone derivatives function as antitubulin agents. PMID:19719238

  1. Continuous-time analog filter in CMOS nanoscale era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baschirotto, A.; De Matteis, M.; Pezzotta, A.; D'Amico, S.

    2014-04-01

    Analog filters are key blocks in analog signal processing. They are widely employed in many systems, like wireless transceivers, detectors read-out, sensors interfaces, etc. The IC technology choice for such systems is mainly dictated by the requirements of high speed and low power consumption of digital circuits. This pushed an impressive movement towards scaled technology and this has important consequences on the analog circuits design. The impact of technology scaling down to nanometre scale on analog filters design is here investigated. For instance, supply voltage reduction in analog filters limits circuits design solutions and could result in higher power consumption. Moreover, at the same time, innovative systems push analog filters to get higher and higher operation frequencies, due to the increasing bandwidth/speed requirements. Recent solutions for efficient low-voltage and high frequency analog filters in nanometre technology are described.

  2. Performance Measurement of a Multi-Level/Analog Ferroelectric Memory Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the memory density and utilizing the unique characteristics of ferroelectric devices is important in making ferroelectric memory devices more desirable to the consumer. This paper describes the characterization of a design that allows multiple levels to be stored in a ferroelectric based memory cell. It can be used to store multiple bits or analog values in a high speed nonvolatile memory. The design utilizes the hysteresis characteristic of ferroelectric transistors to store an analog value in the memory cell. The design also compensates for the decay of the polarization of the ferroelectric material over time. This is done by utilizing a pair of ferroelectric transistors to store the data. One transistor is used a reference to determinethe amount of decay that has occurred since the pair was programmed. The second transistor stores the analog value as a polarization value between zero and saturated. The design allows digital data to be stored as multiple bits in each memory cell. The number of bits per cell that can be stored will vary with the decay rate of the ferroelectric transistors and the repeatability of polarization between transistors. This paper presents measurements of an actual prototype memory cell. This prototype is not a complete implementation of a device, but instead, a prototype of the storage and retrieval portion of an actual device. The performance of this prototype is presented with the projected performance of the overall device. This memory design will be useful because it allows higher memory density, compensates for the environmental and ferroelectric aging processes, allows analog values to be directly stored in memory, compensates for the thermal and radiation environments associated with space operations, and relies only on existing technologies.

  3. The design, fabrication, and test of a new VLSI hybrid analog-digital neural processing element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyong, Mark R.; Findley, Randall L.; Fields, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid analog-digital neural processing element with the time-dependent behavior of biological neurons has been developed. The hybrid processing element is designed for VLSI implementation and offers the best attributes of both analog and digital computation. Custom VLSI layout reduces the layout area of the processing element, which in turn increases the expected network density. The hybrid processing element operates at the nanosecond time scale, which enables it to produce real-time solutions to complex spatiotemporal problems found in high-speed signal processing applications. VLSI prototype chips have been designed, fabricated, and tested with encouraging results. Systems utilizing the time-dependent behavior of the hybrid processing element have been simulated and are currently in the fabrication process. Future applications are also discussed.

  4. 1,2,3,4,6-Pentakis[-O-(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoyl)]-α,β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) analogs: design, synthesis, anti-tumor and anti-oxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Qurat-Ul-Ain; Yang, Meiting; Memon, Khadim Hussain; Lateef, Mehreen; Na, Du; Wan, Shengbiao; Eric, Deslandes; Zhang, Lijuan; Jiang, Tao

    2016-07-22

    1,2,3,4,6-Pentakis[-O-(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoyl)]-α,β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) 12 has been reported for its antioxidant activities, where the free OH groups in PGG seem to be critical for activities. To explore PGG-based compounds as chemotherapeutic agents and to analyze the contribution of specific OH groups in PGG for anti-cancer activities, we designed and synthesized a series of 27 benzoic and cinnamic acid analogs of PGG. These analogs were tested for cytotoxicities against two human lung (A549 and H1299) and two human colon (HCT116 and HT29) cancer cell lines. Compound 12 (PGG) had highest cytotoxicities against HCT116 and A549 cells with IC50 of 1.61 µM and 3.02 µM, respectively. In contrast, the compound 16 (1,2,3,4,6-pentakis[-O-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoyl)]-α,β-D-glucopyranose, PVG) was most effective at killing HT29 and H1299 cells with IC50 of 1.76 µM and 3.65 µM, respectively, indicating the mutual contribution of m-methoxy and p-hydroxy groups to the observed cytotoxicities. Moreover, cinnamic acid analogs were less active than the benzoic acid analogs evidenced by higher IC50 values. Furthermore, in cinnamic acid analogs the hydrogenation of double bond to saturated 2-C side chain enhance the cytotoxicities in all four cell lines. Compounds also possess good anti-oxidant and reducing activities. Compound 12 and 26 show the highest antioxidant and reducing activities. PMID:27196315

  5. Emergent features and perceptual objects: re-examining fundamental principles in analogical display design.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jerred; Bennett, Kevin B; Flach, John M

    2015-01-01

    Two sets of design principles for analogical visual displays, based on the concepts of emergent features and perceptual objects, are described. An interpretation of previous empirical findings for three displays (bar graph, polar graphic, alphanumeric) is provided from both perspectives. A fourth display (configural coordinate) was designed using principles of ecological interface design (i.e. direct perception). An experiment was conducted to evaluate performance (accuracy and latency of state identification) with these four displays. Numerous significant effects were obtained and a clear rank ordering of performance emerged (from best to worst): configural coordinate, bar graph, alphanumeric and polar graphic. These findings are consistent with principles of design based on emergent features; they are inconsistent with principles based on perceptual objects. Some limitations of the configural coordinate display are discussed and a redesign is provided. Practitioner Summary: Principles of ecological interface design, which emphasise the quality of very specific mappings between domain, display and observer constraints, are described; these principles are applicable to the design of all analogical graphical displays. PMID:26218496

  6. Design, development, and fabrication of a electronic analog microminiaturized electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Schuegraf, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    The microminiaturization of an electronic analog signal to discrete time interval converter is presented. Discrete components and integrated circuits comprising the converter were assembled on a thin-film ceramic substrate containing nichrome resistors with gold interconnections. The finished assembly is enclosed in a flat package measuring 3.30 by 4.57 centimeters. The module can be used whenever conversion of analog to digital signals is required, in particular for the purpose of regulation by means of pulse modulation. In conjunction with a precision voltage reference, the module was applied to control the duty cycle of a switching regulator within a temperature range of -55 C to +125 C, and an input voltage range of 10V to 35V. The output-voltage variation was less than + or - 300 parts per million, i.e., less than + or - 3mV for a 10V output.

  7. Design, synthesis, and in vitro biological evaluation of novel 6-methyl-7-substituted-7-deaza purine nucleoside analogs as anti-influenza A agents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cai; Sun, Chenghai; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yiqian; Hussain, Muzammal; Wan, Junting; Li, Minke; Li, Xue; Jin, Ruiliang; Tu, Zhengchao; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-05-01

    Among many subtypes of influenza A viruses, influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) subtypes are currently circulating among humans (WHO report 2014-15). Therapeutically, the emergence of viral resistance to currently available drugs (adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors) has heightened alarms for developing novel drugs that could address diverse targets in the viral replication cycle in order to improve treatment outcomes. To this regard, the design and synthesis of nucleoside analog inhibitors as potential anti-influenza A agents is a very active field of research nowadays. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of hitherto unknown 6-methyl-7-substituted-7-deaza purine nucleoside analogs, and evaluated for their biological activities against influenza A virus strains, H1N1 and H3N2. From the viral inhibition assay, we identified some effective compounds, among which, compounds 5x (IC50 = 5.88 μM and 6.95 μM for H1N1 and H3N2, respectively) and 5z (IC50 = 3.95 μM and 3.61 μM for H1N1 and H3N2, respectively) demonstrated potent anti-influenza A activity. On the basis of selectivity index, we conceive that compound 5x may serve as a chemical probe of interest for further lead optimization studies with a general aim of developing novel and effective anti-influenza A virus agents. PMID:26802557

  8. Application of direct inverse analogy method (DIVA) and viscous design optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greff, E.; Forbrich, D.; Schwarten, H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct-inverse approach to the transonic design problem was presented in its initial state at the First International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES-1). Further applications of the direct inverse analogy (DIVA) method to the design of airfoils and incremental wing improvements and experimental verification are reported. First results of a new viscous design code also from the residual correction type with semi-inverse boundary layer coupling are compared with DIVA which may enhance the accuracy of trailing edge design for highly loaded airfoils. Finally, the capabilities of an optimization routine coupled with the two viscous full potential solvers are investigated in comparison to the inverse method.

  9. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. PMID:27356208

  10. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 analogs featuring aromatic and heteroaromatic rings: design, synthesis, and preliminary biological testing.

    PubMed

    Posner, G H; Li, Z; White, M C; Vinader, V; Takeuchi, K; Guggino, S E; Dolan, P; Kensler, T W

    1995-10-27

    Aromatic compounds 2a-c, analogs of 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin (calcitriol, 1), and heteroaromatic compounds 4a-c and 5a-c, analogs of 19-nor-1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (3), were designed to simulate the topology of their biologically potent parent compounds while avoiding previtamin D equilibrium. Convergent and facile total syntheses of the analogs (+)-2b, (+)-2c, (-)-4b, and (-)-5b were achieved via carbonyl addition of regiospecifically formed organolithium nucleophiles to the enantiomerically pure C,D-ring ketone (+)-17, characteristic of natural calcitriol (1). Likewise, hybrid analogs 20a-c were prepared to determine whether incorporation of a known potentiating side chain would lead to increased biological activity. Preliminary in vitro biological testing showed that aromatic analogs (+)-2b, (+)-2c, and 20a-c as well as heteroaromatic analogs (-)-4b and (-)-5b have very low affinities for the calf thymus vitamin D receptor but considerable antiproliferative activities in murine keratinocytes at micromolar concentration. No biological advantage was observed in this keratinocyte assay for the doubly modified hybrid analogs 20a-c over the singly modified parent (+)-2b. Analog (+)-2b, but surprisingly not the corresponding analog 20b differing from (+)-2b only in the side chain, showed considerable activity in nongenomic opening of calcium channels in rat osteosarcoma cells. PMID:7473581

  11. IC handling robot

    SciTech Connect

    Law, D.O.

    1986-09-01

    Allied Corporation, Bendix Kansas City Division uses many integrated circuits (ICs) which are 100% tested by receiving inspection prior to installation into the next assemblies. Testing includes functional testing followed by a burn-in cycle then additional functional testing. Before an IC can be functionally tested, it must be inserted into a custom plastic carrier which is placed into a metal magazine that fits the functional tester. The ICs are removed from both tester magazines and carriers prior to being placed into connectors mounted on a printed wiring board for burn-in. Then they are removed from the burn-in board and re-inserted into carriers and magazines for additional functional testing. Each device is handled manually a minimum of 12 times before it is accepted. This project established a robotic workcell which automatically prepares a dual in-line packaged (DIP) integrated circuit for several types of inspection operations performed by Receiving Inspection. Specific activities required to accomplish this goal included definition of the work cell, preparation of the robot and other equipment specifications, installation planning, establishment of programming routines and logic, design of operator safeguards, and development of the work cell concept into an operational unit capable of supporting production.

  12. The Designer Methcathinone Analogs, Mephedrone and Methylone, are Substrates for Monoamine Transporters in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-01-01

    The nonmedical use of ‘designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study. PMID:22169943

  13. The designer methcathinone analogs, mephedrone and methylone, are substrates for monoamine transporters in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-04-01

    The nonmedical use of 'designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study. PMID:22169943

  14. Path programmable logic: A structured design method for digital and/or mixed analog integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B.

    1990-01-01

    The design of Integrated Circuits has evolved past the black art practiced by a few semiconductor companies to a world wide community of users. This was basically accomplished by the development of computer aided design tools which were made available to this community. As the tools matured into different components of the design task they were accepted into the community at large. However, the next step in this evolution is being ignored by the large tool vendors hindering the continuation of this process. With system level definition and simulation through the logic specification well understood, why is the physical generation so blatantly ignored. This portion of the development is still treated as an isolated task with information being passed from the designer to the layout function. Some form of result given back but it severely lacks full definition of what has transpired. The level of integration in I.C.'s for tomorrow, whether through new processes or applications will require higher speeds, increased transistor density, and non-digital performance which can only be achieved through attention to the physical implementation.

  15. Design and activity of a cyclic mini-β-defensin analog: a novel antimicrobial tool

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Olga; Nigro, Ersilia; Cantisani, Marco; Colavita, Irene; Leone, Marilisa; Mercurio, Flavia Anna; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Pessi, Antonello; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a cyclic 17-amino acid β-defensin analog featuring a single disulfide bond. This analog, designated “AMC” (ie, antimicrobial cyclic peptide), combines the internal hydrophobic domain of hBD1 and the C-terminal charged region of hBD3. The novel peptide was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria as well as against herpes simplex virus type 1 were analyzed. The cytotoxicity and serum stability were assessed. Nuclear magnetic resonance of AMC in aqueous solution suggests that the structure of the hBD1 region, although not identical, is preserved. Like the parent defensins, AMC is not cytotoxic for CaCo-2 cells. Interestingly, AMC retains the antibacterial activity of the parent hBD1 and hBD3 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli, and exerts dose-dependent activity against herpes simplex virus type 1. Moreover, while the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the oxidized and reduced forms of the parent defensins are similar, those of AMC are significantly different, and oxidized AMC is also considerably more stable in human serum. Taken together, our data also suggest that this novel peptide may be added to the arsenal of tools available to combat antibiotic-resistant infectious diseases, particularly because of its potential for encapsulation in a nanomedicine vector. PMID:26508857

  16. Design and activity of a cyclic mini-β-defensin analog: a novel antimicrobial tool.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Olga; Nigro, Ersilia; Cantisani, Marco; Colavita, Irene; Leone, Marilisa; Mercurio, Flavia Anna; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Pessi, Antonello; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a cyclic 17-amino acid β-defensin analog featuring a single disulfide bond. This analog, designated "AMC" (ie, antimicrobial cyclic peptide), combines the internal hydrophobic domain of hBD1 and the C-terminal charged region of hBD3. The novel peptide was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria as well as against herpes simplex virus type 1 were analyzed. The cytotoxicity and serum stability were assessed. Nuclear magnetic resonance of AMC in aqueous solution suggests that the structure of the hBD1 region, although not identical, is preserved. Like the parent defensins, AMC is not cytotoxic for CaCo-2 cells. Interestingly, AMC retains the antibacterial activity of the parent hBD1 and hBD3 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, and Escherichia coli, and exerts dose-dependent activity against herpes simplex virus type 1. Moreover, while the antibacterial and antiviral activities of the oxidized and reduced forms of the parent defensins are similar, those of AMC are significantly different, and oxidized AMC is also considerably more stable in human serum. Taken together, our data also suggest that this novel peptide may be added to the arsenal of tools available to combat antibiotic-resistant infectious diseases, particularly because of its potential for encapsulation in a nanomedicine vector. PMID:26508857

  17. Designed abscisic acid analogs as antagonists of PYL-PP2C receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Jun; Okamoto, Masanori; Akiyama, Tomonori; Muto, Takuya; Yajima, Shunsuke; Sue, Masayuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Kanno, Yuri; Kamo, Tsunashi; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Hirai, Nobuhiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2014-06-01

    The plant stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical for several abiotic stress responses. ABA signaling is normally repressed by group-A protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), but stress-induced ABA binds Arabidopsis PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) receptors, which then bind and inhibit PP2Cs. X-ray structures of several receptor-ABA complexes revealed a tunnel above ABA's 3' ring CH that opens at the PP2C binding interface. Here, ABA analogs with sufficiently long 3' alkyl chains were predicted to traverse this tunnel and block PYL-PP2C interactions. To test this, a series of 3'-alkylsulfanyl ABAs were synthesized with different alkyl chain lengths. Physiological, biochemical and structural analyses revealed that a six-carbon alkyl substitution produced a potent ABA antagonist that was sufficiently active to block multiple stress-induced ABA responses in vivo. This study provides a new approach for the design of ABA analogs, and the results validated structure-based design for this target class. PMID:24792952

  18. Macromodeling for analog design and robustness boosting in bio-inspired computing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadri, J.; Linan, G.; Roca, E.; Rodriguez-Vazquez, A.

    2005-06-01

    Setting specifications for the electronic implementation of biological neural-network-like vision systems on-chip is not straightforward, neither it is to simulate the resulting circuit. The structure of these systems leads to a netlist of more than 100.000 nodes for a small array of 100x150 pixels. Moreover, introducing an optical input in the low level simulation is nowadays not feasible with standard electrical simulation environments. Given that, to accomplish the task of integrating those systems in silicon to build compact, low power consuming, and reliable systems, a previous step in the standard analog electronic design flux should be introduced. Here a methodology to make the translation from the biological model to circuit-level specifications for electronic design is proposed. The purpose is to include non ideal effects as mismatching, noise, leakages, supply degradation, feedthrough, and temperature of operation in a high level description of the implementation, in order to accomplish behavioural simulations that require less computational effort and resources. A particular case study is presented, the analog electronic implementation of the locust"s Lobula Giant Movement Detector (LGMD), a neural structure that fires a collision alarm based on visual information. The final goal is a collision threat detection vision system on-chip for automotive applications.

  19. Using an Analogical Thinking Model as an Instructional Tool to Improve Student Cognitive Ability in Architecture Design Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yun-Wu; Weng, Kuo-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lack of creativity is a problem often plaguing students from design-related departments. Therefore, this study is intended to incorporate analogical thinking in the education of architecture design to enhance students' learning and their future career performance. First, this study explores the three aspects of architecture design curricula,…

  20. Design of a wideband CMOS impedance spectroscopy ASIC analog front-end for multichannel biosensor interfaces.

    PubMed

    Valente, Virgilio; Dai Jiang; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design and simulation of a flexible and programmable analog front-end (AFE) circuit with current and voltage readout capabilities for electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The AFE is part of a fully integrated multifrequency EIS platform. The current readout comprises of a transimpedance stage and an automatic gain control (AGC) unit designed to accommodate impedance changes larger than 3 order of magnitude. The AGC is based on a dynamic peak detector that tracks changes in the input current over time and regulates the gain of a programmable gain amplifier in order to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio. The system works up to 1 MHz. The voltage readout consists of a 2 stages of fully differential current-feedback instrumentation amplifier which provide 100 dB of CMRR and a programmable gain up to 20 V/V per stage with a bandwidth in excess of 10MHz. PMID:26736404

  1. Effective low-power wearable wireless surface EMG sensor design based on analog-compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process. PMID:25526357

  2. Effective Low-Power Wearable Wireless Surface EMG Sensor Design Based on Analog-Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1) they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2) they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3) they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS) architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL) framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR). In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD) to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for the reconstruction process. PMID:25526357

  3. Antitumor Agents 250.† Design and Synthesis of New Curcumin Analogs as Potential Anti-Prostate Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Shi, Qian; Nyarko, Alexander K.; Bastow, Kenneth F.; Wu, Chin-Chung; Su, Ching-Yuan; Shih, Charles C.-Y; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    In a continuing study of curcumin analogs as potential drug candidates to treat prostate cancer at both androgen-dependent and androgen-refractory stages, we designed and synthesized over 40 new analogs classified into four series: monophenyl analogs (series A), heterocycle-containing analogs (series B), analogs bearing various substituents on the phenyl rings (series C) and analogs with various linkers (series D). These new compounds were tested for cytotoxicity against two human prostate cancer cell lines, androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3. Antiandrogenic activity was also evaluated in LNCaP cells and PC-3 cells transfected with wild-type androgen receptor. Ten compounds possessed potent cytotoxicity against both LNCaP and PC-3 cells; seven only against LNCaP; and one solely against PC-3. This study established an advanced structure-activity relationship (SAR), and these correlations will guide the further design of new curcumin analogs with better anti-prostate cancer activity. PMID:16789753

  4. Guidelines for Design and Test of a Built-In Self Test (BIST) Circuit For Space Radiation Studies of High-Speed IC Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carts, M. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R.; Curie, S.; Randall, B.; LaBel, K.; Gilbert, B.; Daniel, E.

    2006-01-01

    Serial Bit Error Rate Testing under radiation to characterize single particle induced errors in high-speed IC technologies generally involves specialized test equipment common to the telecommunications industry. As bit rates increase, testing is complicated by the rapidly increasing cost of equipment able to test at-speed. Furthermore as rates extend into the tens of billions of bits per second test equipment ceases to be broadband, a distinct disadvantage for exploring SEE mechanisms in the target technologies. In this presentation the authors detail the testing accomplished in the CREST project and apply the knowledge gained to establish a set of guidelines suitable for designing arbitrarily high speed radiation effects tests.

  5. SPROC: A multiple-processor DSP IC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R.

    1991-01-01

    A large, single-chip, multiple-processor, digital signal processing (DSP) integrated circuit (IC) fabricated in HP-Cmos34 is presented. The innovative architecture is best suited for analog and real-time systems characterized by both parallel signal data flows and concurrent logic processing. The IC is supported by a powerful development system that transforms graphical signal flow graphs into production-ready systems in minutes. Automatic compiler partitioning of tasks among four on-chip processors gives the IC the signal processing power of several conventional DSP chips.

  6. Analog circuit design and implementation of an adaptive resonance theory (ART) neural network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching S.; Liou, Juin J.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Heileman, Gregory L.; Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents an analog circuit implementation for an adaptive resonance theory neural network architecture, called the augmented ART-1 neural network (AART1-NN). The AART1-NN is a modification of the popular ART1-NN, developed by Carpenter and Grossberg, and it exhibits the same behavior as the ART1-NN. The AART1-NN is a real-time model, and has the ability to classify an arbitrary set of binary input patterns into different clusters. The design of the AART1-NN model. The circuit is implemented by utilizing analog electronic components, such as, operational amplifiers, transistors, capacitors, and resistors. The implemented circuit is verified using the PSpice circuit simulator, running on Sun workstations. Results obtained from the PSpice circuit simulation compare favorably with simulation results produced by solving the differential equations numerically. The prototype system developed here can be used as a building block for larger AART1-NN architectures, as well as for other types of ART architectures that involve the AART1-NN model.

  7. Intimacy and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management of IC Pain Complementary Therapies Complementary vs. Alternative Herbs, Dietary Supplements, & Biologicals Mind-body Medicine Massage, Manipulation, & Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider ...

  8. Design and synthesis of novel benzoxazole analogs as Aurora B kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    An, Ying; Lee, Eun; Yu, Yeongji; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Myeong Youl; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Woo-Young; Jeon, Raok

    2016-07-01

    A novel series of benzoxazole analogs was designed and synthesized, and their inhibitory activities against Aurora kinases were evaluated. Some of the tested compounds exhibited a promising activity with respect to the inhibition of Aurora B kinase. A structure-activity relationship study indicated that linker length, regiochemistry, and halogen substitution play important roles in kinase inhibitory potency. The binding modes between representative compounds and Aurora kinases were interpreted through a molecular docking study to explain the inhibitory activity and selectivity for Aurora A and B kinases. Compounds 13l and 13q also show an antiproliferative effect on the human tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The most potent 13q demonstrated good efficacy in the prostate cancer PC-3 tumor xenograft model. PMID:27209235

  9. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented. PMID:18269983

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel azaspiro analogs of linezolid as antibacterial and antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Gadekar, Pradip K; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Kharkar, Prashant S; Khedkar, Vijay M; Arkile, Manisha; Manek, Hardik; Sarkar, Dhiman; Sharma, Rajiv; Vijayakumar, V; Sarveswari, S

    2016-10-21

    The design, synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of a novel series of azaspiro analogues of linezolid (1) have been described. Linezolid comprises of a morpholine ring which is known for its metabolism-related liabilities. Therefore, the key modification made in the linezolid structure was the replacement of morpholine moiety with its bioisostere, 2-oxa-6-azaspiro[3.3]heptane. Furthermore, the replacement of N-acetyl terminal of 1 with various aromatic or aliphatic functionalities was carried out. The title compounds were evaluated against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Subsequent structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies identified several compounds with mixed antibacterial and antitubercular profiles. Compound 22 (IC50 0.72, 0.51, 0.88, 0.49 μg/mL for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, respectively) exhibited similar antibacterial profile as 1. The N-acetyl derivative 18 was similar to 1 in antitubercular profile. Thus, the present study successfully demonstrated the use of azaspiro substructure in the medicinal chemistry of antibacterial and antitubercular agents. PMID:27423637

  11. Expediting analog design retargeting by design knowledge re-use and circuit synthesis: a practical example on a Delta-Sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Matthew; Tang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    In the past decade or two, due to constant and rapid technology changes, analog design re-use or design retargeting to newer technologies has been brought to the table in order to expedite the design process and improve time-to-market. If properly conducted, analog design retargeting could significantly cut down design cycle compared to designs starting from the scratch. In this article, we present an empirical and general method for efficient analog design retargeting by design knowledge re-use and circuit synthesis (CS). The method first identifies circuit blocks that compose the source system and extracts the performance parameter specifications of each circuit block. Then, for each circuit block, it scales the values of design variables (DV) from the source design to derive an initial design in the target technology. Depending on the performance of this initial target design, a design space is defined for synthesis. Subsequently, each circuit block is automatically synthesised using state-of-art analog synthesis tools based on a combination of global and local optimisation techniques to achieve comparable performance specifications to those extracted from the source system. Finally, the overall system is composed of those synthesised circuit blocks in the target technology. We illustrate the method using a practical example of a complex Delta-Sigma modulator (DSM) circuit.

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of dinucleotide mRNA cap analog containing propargyl moiety.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Charles, Irudaya; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-03-15

    The first example of the synthesis of new dinucleotide cap analog containing propargyl group such as m(7,3'-)(O)(-propargyl)G[5']ppp[5']G is reported. The effect of propargyl cap analog with standard cap was evaluated with respect to their capping efficiency, in vitro T7 RNA polymerase transcription efficiency, and translation activity using cultured HeLa cells. It is noteworthy that propargyl cap analog outperforms standard cap by 3.1 fold in terms of translational properties. The propargyl cap analog forms a more stable complex with translation initiation factor eIF4E based on the molecular modeling studies. PMID:26899596

  13. Design of a high linearity and high gain accuracy analog baseband circuit for DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ma; Zhigong, Wang; Jian, Xu; Yiqiang, Wu; Junliang, Wang; Mi, Tian; Jianping, Chen

    2015-02-01

    An analog baseband circuit of high linearity and high gain accuracy for a digital audio broadcasting receiver is implemented in a 0.18-μm RFCMOS process. The circuit comprises a 3rd-order active-RC complex filter (CF) and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA). An automatic tuning circuit is also designed to tune the CF's pass band. Instead of the class-A fully differential operational amplifier (FDOPA) adopted in the conventional CF and PGA design, a class-AB FDOPA is specially employed in this circuit to achieve a higher linearity and gain accuracy for its large current swing capability with lower static current consumption. In the PGA circuit, a novel DC offset cancellation technique based on the MOS resistor is introduced to reduce the settling time significantly. A reformative switching network is proposed, which can eliminate the switch resistor's influence on the gain accuracy of the PGA. The measurement result shows the gain range of the circuit is 10-50 dB with a 1-dB step size, and the gain accuracy is less than ±0.3 dB. The OIP3 is 23.3 dBm at the gain of 10 dB. Simulation results show that the settling time is reduced from 100 to 1 ms. The image band rejection is about 40 dB. It only draws 4.5 mA current from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  14. Design of a VLSI charge-coupled device analog delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedra, David R.

    1995-03-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCD's) are semiconductor devices which can transfer information, represented by a quantity of electrical charge, from one physical location of the semiconductor substrate to another in a controlled manner with the use of properly sequenced clock pulses. These devices can be applied to imaging, signal processing, logic, and digital storage applications. In this thesis, the design of an electrically stimulated CCD analog delay line, using the design tools currently available at the Naval Postgraduate School, is reported on. The major issues addressed are the electrode gate structure and composition, charge confinement techniques, and clocking schemes. Additionally, techniques for inpuning and detecting charge packets from the CCD register are examined. The Metal Oxide Semiconductor Integration Service (MOSIS) design rules only permit Bulk Channel Charge Couple Devices (BCCD's) to be lald out, and not Surface Channel Charge Coupled Devices (SCCD's). Restricted to a die size of 2.24 mm length, the electrode gates were chosen to be polysilicon polysilicon 8 micron length with 2 micron overlap and 20 micron width, giving the BCCD 64 stages. An on chip four phase clocking circuit with output drivers on each phase provides the control voltage for the gate electrodes. The small width of the BCCD delay line utilizes only a small portion of the available 2.22 mm die width. Therefore, four different BCCD's were designed in the layout. Two of the BCCD's have a p-diffusion stop to contain the charge laterally as it propagates along the channel while two BCCD's do not. Additionally, two of the BCCD's utilize the charge partition input technique with three control gates and two BCCD's use the dynamic current injection with one control gate.

  15. Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Docking Studies of Pterostilbene Analogs Inside PPARa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pterostilbene, a naturally occurring analog of resveratrol, has previously shown PPARa activation in H4IIEC3 cells and was found to decrease cholesterol levels in animals. In this study, analogs of pterostilbene were synthesized and their ability to activate PPARa was investigated. Among the analo...

  16. Pioneering an on-the-fly simulation technique for the detection of layout-dependent effects during IC design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossen, Amr M. S.; Ramadan, Ahmed; Salem, Rami Fathy

    2013-03-01

    As semiconductor manufacturing migrates to more advanced technology nodes, the performance improvement anticipated from scaling has failed to match expectations. This failure is due to the emergence of layout-dependent effects (LDEs) not encountered in the design flow prior 65nm process node. We propose a novel methodology that allows the early detection of LDEs during schematic creation. Different from all previous works, this methodology accurately calculates LDEs by interfacing interactively with a simulator tool. Our research indicates that no previous works suggested the use of "on-the-fly" simulation, using Eldo Interactive, to study LDEs. In fact, the use of Calibre tools [2] has been suggested to help the designer check certain basic electrical constraints (like matching) under the existence of LDEs, by specifying the matching condition as a comment added to the original Pyxis schematic netlist. [1] These comments are then transformed into verification rules that are added and checked by Calibre. The proposed flow is tested on a 40nm OTA design, with results not only as accurate as those previously obtained from post-layout analysis, but also equal to or better speed of execution, demonstrating the practicality of using "on-the-fly" simulation to detect and resolve LDEs early in the design flow.

  17. Centrally truncated and stabilized porcine neuropeptide Y analogs: design, synthesis, and mouse brain receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Krstenansky, J L; Owen, T J; Buck, S H; Hagaman, K A; McLean, L R

    1989-01-01

    Porcine neuropeptide Y (pNPY) has been proposed to form an intramolecularly stabilized structure characterized by N- and C-terminal helical regions arranged antiparallel due to a central turn region. Analogs based on this structural model that have the central turn region and various amounts of the helical regions removed, yet retain the N and C termini in a similar spatial orientation were designed. The gap formed by removal of the central residues (residues 8-17 or 7-20) was spanned with a single 8-aminooctanoic acid residue (Aoc) and the structure was further stabilized by the introduction of a disulfide bridge. [D-Cys7,Aoc8-17,Cys20]pNPY and [Cys5,Aoc7-20,D-Cys24]pNPY were synthesized and found to have receptor binding affinities of 2.3 nM and 150 nM, respectively, in mouse brain membranes (pNPY affinity is 3.6 nM in this assay). It is proposed that the central region (residues 7-17) of pNPY serves a structural role in the peptide and is not involved in direct receptor interaction. PMID:2543973

  18. Toward smart aerospace structures: design of a piezoelectric sensor and its analog interface for flaw detection.

    PubMed

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  19. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Some Hybridized Pyrazolone Pharmacophore Analogs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnasamy, Sivakumar Kullampalayam; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Mathew, Sincy; Eakambaram, Ragavendran S; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A; Natarajan, Adhirajan; Palaniappan, Senthilkumar

    2016-05-01

    Twenty-seven hybridized pyrazolone analogs were designed, docked, synthesized in two series and evaluated for their in vitro antimycobacterial properties. In the first series, four Schiff base derivatives, 6b, 7b, 7h, and 7i, show good antitubercular activity with minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values in the range of 32.56-42.55 µM. In the second series, two compounds, 8b and 8c, possessed significant antitubercular activity with MIC <0.37 and <0.44 μM, respectively; they were even more potent than the standards pyrazinamide (12.99 μM), ciprofloxacin (4.82 μM), and streptomycin (5.36 μM), with a selectivity index of >630. Compounds 8b and 8c showed shikimate kinase inhibition activity at 5.84 and 6.93 µM, respectively. The activity and docking results lead to the conclusion that the compounds without double bond in the imine side chain and hydrophobic clashes at the pyrazolone end are necessary for good accommodation in the binding pocket and for imparting flexibility. All the compounds were also tested for antimicrobial activity (antibacterial and antifungal) and show highly significant activities against all the microorganisms tested. PMID:27135906

  20. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    PubMed Central

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  1. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of JDTic analogs to examine the significance of the 3- and 4-methyl substituents.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F Ivy; Gichinga, Moses G; Kormos, Chad M; Maitra, Rangan; Runyon, Scott P; Thomas, James B; Mascarella, S Wayne; Decker, Ann M; Navarro, Hernán A

    2015-10-01

    The design and discovery of JDTic as a potent and selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist used the N-substituted trans-3,4-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine pharmacophore as the lead structure. In order to determine if the 3-methyl or 4-methyl groups were necessary in JDTic and JDTic analogs for antagonistic activity, compounds 4a-c, and 4d-f which have either the 3-methyl or both the 3- and 4-methyl groups removed, respectively, from JDTic and analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro opioid receptor antagonist activities using a [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay. Other ADME properties were also assessed for selected compounds. These studies demonstrated that neither the 3-methyl or 3,4-dimethyl groups present in JDTic and analogs are required to produce potent and selective κ opioid receptor antagonists. PMID:26342544

  2. Men and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... benign prostatic hyperplasia, or prostate enlargement. Is it CP/CPPS or IC? CP/CPPS is a relatively new term used to ... or chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. Some researchers believe that CP/CPPS and IC may really be the same ...

  3. Analog design optimization methodology for ultralow-power circuits using intuitive inversion-level and saturation-level parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimori, Takahisa; Anami, Kenji; Yoshimatsu, Norifumi; Hasebe, Tetsuya; Murakami, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive design optimization methodology using intuitive nondimensional parameters of inversion-level and saturation-level is proposed, especially for ultralow-power, low-voltage, and high-performance analog circuits with mixed strong, moderate, and weak inversion metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor (MOST) operations. This methodology is based on the synthesized charge-based MOST model composed of Enz-Krummenacher-Vittoz (EKV) basic concepts and advanced-compact-model (ACM) physics-based equations. The key concept of this methodology is that all circuit and system characteristics are described as some multivariate functions of inversion-level parameters, where the inversion level is used as an independent variable representative of each MOST. The analog circuit design starts from the first step of inversion-level design using universal characteristics expressed by circuit currents and inversion-level parameters without process-dependent parameters, followed by the second step of foundry-process-dependent design and the last step of verification using saturation-level criteria. This methodology also paves the way to an intuitive and comprehensive design approach for many kinds of analog circuit specifications by optimization using inversion-level log-scale diagrams and saturation-level criteria. In this paper, we introduce an example of our design methodology for a two-stage Miller amplifier.

  4. PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study Report: Engineering for Complex Systems Program (formerly Design for Safety), DFS-IC-0006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsmeyer, David; Schreiner, John

    2002-01-01

    This technology evaluation report documents the findings and recommendations of the Engineering for Complex Systems Program (formerly Design for Safety) PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study of the Space Shuttle Program's (SSP's) Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) System. A team at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) performed this Study. This Study was initiated as a follow-on to the NASA chartered Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) review (performed in the Fall of 1999) which identified deficiencies in the current PRACA implementation. The Pilot Study was launched with an initial qualitative assessment and technical review performed during January 2000 with the quantitative formal Study (the subject of this report) started in March 2000. The goal of the PRACA Enhancement Pilot Study is to evaluate and quantify the technical aspects of the SSP PRACA systems and recommend enhancements to address deficiencies and in preparation for future system upgrades.

  5. High performance MPEG-audio decoder IC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, M.; Benbassat, G.; Cyr, K.; Li, S.; Gill, M.; Kam, D.; Walker, K.; Look, P.; Eldridge, C.; Ng, P.

    1993-01-01

    The emerging digital audio and video compression technology brings both an opportunity and a new challenge to IC design. The pervasive application of compression technology to consumer electronics will require high volume, low cost IC's and fast time to market of the prototypes and production units. At the same time, the algorithms used in the compression technology result in complex VLSI IC's. The conflicting challenges of algorithm complexity, low cost, and fast time to market have an impact on device architecture and design methodology. The work presented in this paper is about the design of a dedicated, high precision, Motion Picture Expert Group (MPEG) audio decoder.

  6. Design and Synthesis of an Inositol Phosphate Analog Based on Computational Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David; Sun, Duoli; Ying, Yunming; Schuber, Paul T.; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Gelovani, Juri; Yung, Wai-Kwan Alfred; Bornmann, William G.

    2014-01-01

    A virtual library of 54 inositol analog mimics of In(1,4,5)P3 has been docked, scored, and ranked within the binding site of human inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase A (IP3-3KA). Chemical synthesis of the best scoring structure that also met distance criteria for 3′-OH to -P in Phosphate has been attempted along with the synthesis of (1S,2R,3S,4S)-3-fluoro-2,4-dihydroxycyclohexanecarboxylic acid as an inositol analog, useful for non-invasive visualization and quantitation of IP3-3KA enzymatic activity PMID:25110363

  7. Pregnancy and IC

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of deformities and premature labor. Fitness and Physical Therapy to Keep You Comfortable Along with diet, a ... and relaxation, IC and pregnancy-friendly exercise, and physical therapy. During pregnancy, there’s a lot of weight on ...

  8. Interstitial Cystitis (IC) Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain Complementary Therapies Complementary vs. Alternative Herbs, Dietary Supplements, & Biologicals Mind-body Medicine Massage, Manipulation, & Body-based Practices Energy Medicine Bringing Treatments to Market IC Healthcare Provider ...

  9. Coupling molecular dynamics simulations with experiments for the rational design of indolicidin-analogous antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Wei; Hsu, Ning-Yi; Wang, Chang-Hsu; Lu, Chia-Yu; Chang, Yung; Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Ruaan, Rouh-Chyu

    2009-09-25

    of the erythrocyte membrane. In addition, through simulations, we identified the amino acids that are most responsible for the adsorption onto or insertion into the two model membranes. Positive charges are critical to the peptide's adsorption, whereas the presence of hydrophobic Trp8 and Trp9 leads to its deeper insertion. Combining the hypothetical relationships between the membrane disordering and the antimicrobial and hemolytical activities with the simulated results, we designed three new IL-analogous peptides: IL-K7 (Pro7-->Lys), IL-F89 (Trp8 and Trp9-->Phe), and IL-K7F89 (Pro7-->Lys; Trp8 and Trp9-->Phe). The hemolytic activity of IL-F89 is considerably lower than that of IL, whereas the antimicrobial activity of IL-K7 is greatly enhanced. In particular, the de novo peptide IL-K7F89 exhibits higher antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli; its hemolytic activity decreased to only 10% of that of IL. Our simulated and experimental results correlated well. This approach-coupling MD simulations with experimental design-is a useful strategy toward the rational design of AMPs for potential therapeutic use. PMID:19576903

  10. Low-voltage analog front-end processor design for ISFET-based sensor and H+ sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wen-Yaw; Yang, Chung-Huang; Peng, Kang-Chu; Yeh, M. H.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a modular-based low-voltage analog-front-end processor design in a 0.5mm double-poly double-metal CMOS technology for Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET)-based sensor and H+ sensing applications. To meet the potentiometric response of the ISFET that is proportional to various H+ concentrations, the constant-voltage and constant current (CVCS) testing configuration has been used. Low-voltage design skills such as bulk-driven input pair, folded-cascode amplifier, bootstrap switch control circuits have been designed and integrated for 1.5V supply and nearly rail-to-rail analog to digital signal processing. Core modules consist of an 8-bit two-step analog-digital converter and bulk-driven pre-amplifiers have been developed in this research. The experimental results show that the proposed circuitry has an acceptable linearity to 0.1 pH-H+ sensing conversions with the buffer solution in the range of pH2 to pH12. The processor has a potential usage in battery-operated and portable healthcare devices and environmental monitoring applications.

  11. Design, synthesis, and fungicidal activities of imino diacid analogs of valine amide fungicides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Man; Yang, Hui-Hui; Tian, Lei; Li, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Guang

    2015-12-15

    The novel imino diacid analogs of valine amides were synthesized via several steps, including the protection, amidation, deprotection, and amino alkylation of valine, with the resulting structures confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR and HRMS. Bioassays showed that some of these compounds exhibited good fungicidal activity. Notably, isopropyl 2-((1-((1-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)propanoate 5i displayed significant levels of control, at 50%, against Erysiphe graminis at 3.9μM as well as a level of potency very similar to the reference azoxystrobin, which gave 60% activity at this concentration. The present work demonstrates that imino diacid analogs of valine amides could be potentially useful key compounds for the development of novel fungicides against wheat powdery mildew. PMID:26546215

  12. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Mavric, Uros; Vidmar, Matjaz; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance.

  13. Design of transmission line driven slot waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometers and application to analog optical links.

    PubMed

    Witzens, Jeremy; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Slot waveguides allow joint confinement of the driving electrical radio frequency field and of the optical waveguide mode in a narrow slot, allowing for highly efficient polymer based interferometers. We show that the optical confinement can be simply explained by a perturbation theoretical approach taking into account the continuity of the electric displacement field. We design phase matched transmission lines and show that their impedance and RF losses can be modeled by an equivalent circuit and linked to slot waveguide properties by a simple set of equations, thus allowing optimization of the device without iterative simulations. We optimize the interferometers for analog optical links and predict record performance metrics (V(pi) = 200 mV @ 10 GHz in push-pull configuration) assuming a modest second order nonlinear coefficient (r(33) = 50 pm/V) and slot width (100 nm). Using high performance optical polymers (r(33) = 150 pm/V), noise figures of state of the art analog optical links can be matched while reducing optical power levels by approximately 30 times. With required optical laser power levels predicted at 50 mW, this could be a game changing improvement by bringing high performance optical analog link power requirements in the reach of laser diodes. A modified transmitter architecture allows shot noise limited performance, while reducing power levels in the slot waveguides and enhancing reliability. PMID:20721082

  14. Design and evaluation of a 2D array PIN photodiode bump bonded to readout IC for the low energy x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Park, Shin-Woong; Yi, Yun

    2006-01-01

    A 2D array radiation sensor, consisting of an array of PIN photodiodes bump bonded to readout integrated circuit (IC), has been developed for operation with low energy X-rays. The PIN photodiode array and readout IC for this system have been fabricated. The main performance measurements are the following: a few pA-scale leakage current, 350 pF junction capacitance, 30 microm-depth depletion layer and a 250 microm intrinsic layer at zero bias. This PIN photodiode array and readout IC were fabricated using a PIN photodiode process and standard 0.35 microm CMOS technology, respectively. The readout circuit is operated from a 3.3 V single power supply. Finally, a 2D array radiation sensor has been developed using bump bonding between the PIN photodiode and the readout electronics. PMID:17946079

  15. Automatic Synthesis of CMOS Algorithmic Analog To-Digital Converter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusuf, Gani

    The steady decrease in technological feature size is allowing increasing levels of integration in analog/digital interface functions. These functions consist of analog as well as digital circuits. While the turn around time for an all digital IC chip is very short due to the maturity of digital IC computer-aided design (CAD) tools over the last ten years, most analog circuits have to be designed manually due to the lack of analog IC CAD tools. As a result, analog circuit design becomes the bottleneck in the design of mixed signal processing chips. One common analog function in a mixed signal processing chip is an analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) function. This function recurs frequently but with varying performance requirements. The objective of this research is to study the design methodology of a compilation program capable of synthesizing ADC's with a broad range of sampling rates and resolution, and silicon area and performance comparable with the manual approach. The automatic compilation of the ADC function is a difficult problem mainly because ADC techniques span such a wide spectrum of performance, with radically different implementations being optimum for different ranges of conversion range, resolution, and power dissipation. We will show that a proper choice of the ADC architectures and the incorporation of many analog circuit design techniques will simplify the synthesis procedure tremendously. Moreover, in order to speed up the device sizing, hierarchical optimization procedure and behavioral simulation are implemented into the ADC module generation steps. As a result of this study, a new improved algorithmic ADC without the need of high precision comparators has been developed. This type of ADC lends itself to automatic generation due to its modularity, simplicity, small area consumption, moderate speed, low power dissipation, and single parameter trim capability that can be added at high resolution. Furthermore, a performance-driven CMOS ADC module

  16. Design and Operation of a 9-bit Single-flux-quantum Pulse-frequency Modulation Digital-to-analog Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, Yoshinao; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Maezawa, Masaaki

    We designed and operated a 9-bit single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital-to-analog converter (DAC). SFQ pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) was employed for generation of variable quantum output voltage, where a 9-bit variable pulse number multiplier and a 100-fold voltage multiplier were the key components. Test chips were fabricated using a Nb Josephson integration technology. Arbitrary voltage waveforms were synthesized with the maximum voltage of 2.54 mV. For ac voltage standard applications, relationships between the DAC resolution and the synthesized waveform frequency are discussed.

  17. Computer-Guided Design, Synthesis, and Protein Kinase C Affinity of a New Salicylate-Based Class of Bryostatin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer and Alzheimer’s disease and is a candidate for a first-in-class approach to HIV/AIDS eradication. It is neither readily available nor optimally suited for clinical use. Using a function oriented synthesis strategy, a new class of bryostatin-inspired analogs was designed with a simplified salicylate-derived subunit, enabling step-economical synthesis (23 total steps) of agents exhibiting bryostatin-like affinity to protein kinase C (PKC). PMID:25238583

  18. Antitumor Agents 295. E-ring Hydroxylated Antofine and Cryptopleurine Analogs as Antiproliferative Agents: Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Shi, Qian; Lai, Chin Yu; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Ohkoshi, Emika; Yang, Shuenn-Chen; Wang, Chih-Ya; Bastow, Kenneth F.; Wu, Tian-Shung; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Teng, Che-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    Various E-ring hydroxylated antofine and cryptopleurine analogs were designed, synthesized, and tested against five human cancer cell lines. Interesting structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations were found among these new compounds. The most potent compound 13b was further tested against a series of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, in which it showed impressive antiproliferative activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that 13b is able to down-regulate HSP90 and β-catenin in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a potential use for treating Hedgehog pathway-driven tumorigenesis. PMID:22823514

  19. Structure-based design of eugenol analogs as potential estrogen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Anita, Yulia; Radifar, Muhammad; Kardono, Leonardus Bs; Hanafi, Muhammad; Istyastono, Enade P

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol is an essential oil mainly found in the buds and leaves of clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill and Perry), which has been reported to have activity on inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This biological activity is correlated to its activity as an estrogen receptor antagonist. In this article, we present the construction and validation of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) protocols to identify the potent estrogen receptor α (ER) antagonists. The selected protocol, which gave acceptable enrichment factors as a virtual screening protocol, subsequently used to virtually screen eugenol, its analogs and their dimers. Based on the virtual screening results, dimer eugenol of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(prop-2-en-1- yl)phenyl]-2-(prop-2-en-1-yl)phenol is recommended to be developed further in order to discover novel and potent ER antagonists. PMID:23144548

  20. Design, synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of short-chain C12-sphinganine and its 1,2,3-triazole analogs as potential antimicrobial and anti-biofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Vijai Kumar Reddy, T; Jyotsna, A; Prabhavathi Devi, B L A; Prasad, R B N; Poornachandra, Y; Ganesh Kumar, C

    2016-08-01

    A conceptual synthetic approach of short-chain C12-sphinganine 1 and a small library of its 1,2,3-triazole analogs 2(a-f) has been accomplished using the commercially available and inexpensive 10-undecenoic acid as a starting material. Miyashita's C-2 selective endo mode azidolysis and Huisgen click reaction was employed for the synthesis of the designed analogs. Based on biological evaluation studies of all the synthesized compounds, it was observed that, (2S,3R)-2-(4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)dodecan-1,3-diol (2b) exhibited promising antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Furthermore, compound 2b was able to inhibit the biofilm formation of Candida albicans MTCC 227, Micrococcus luteus MTCC 2470 and Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 with IC50 values of 1.9, 2.1 and 2.9 μg/mL, respectively. Compound 2b increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. albicans MTCC 227. PMID:27128176

  1. Application of Adaptive Design Methodology in Development of a Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog (Dulaglutide): Statistical Design and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanek, Zachary; Berry, Scott; Berry, Don; Chien, Jenny; Geiger, Mary Jane; Anderson, James H.; Gaydos, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is being developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods To foster the development of dula, we designed a two-stage adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study. The Bayesian theoretical framework is used to adaptively randomize patients in stage 1 to 7 dula doses and, at the decision point, to either stop for futility or to select up to 2 dula doses for stage 2. After dose selection, patients continue to be randomized to the selected dula doses or comparator arms. Data from patients assigned the selected doses will be pooled across both stages and analyzed with an analysis of covariance model, using baseline hemoglobin A1c and country as covariates. The operating characteristics of the trial were assessed by extensive simulation studies. Results Simulations demonstrated that the adaptive design would identify the correct doses 88% of the time, compared to as low as 6% for a fixed-dose design (the latter value based on frequentist decision rules analogous to the Bayesian decision rules for adaptive design). Conclusions This article discusses the decision rules used to select the dula dose(s); the mathematical details of the adaptive algorithm—including a description of the clinical utility index used to mathematically quantify the desirability of a dose based on safety and efficacy measurements; and a description of the simulation process and results that quantify the operating characteristics of the design. PMID:23294775

  2. Computer-assisted combinatorial design of bicyclic thymidine analogs as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis thymidine monophosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Frecer, Vladimir; Seneci, Pierfausto; Miertus, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Thymidine monophosphate kinase (TMPK(mt)) is an essential enzyme for nucleotide metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thus an attractive target for novel antituberculosis agents. In this work, we have explored the chemical space around the 2',3'-bicyclic thymidine nucleus by designing and in silico screening of a virtual focused library selected via structure based methods to identify more potent analogs endowed with favorable ADME-related properties. In all the library members we have exchanged the ribose ring of the template with a cyclopentane moiety that is less prone to enzymatic degradation. In addition, we have replaced the six-membered 2',3'-ring by a number of five-membered and six-membered heterocyclic rings containing alternative proton donor and acceptor groups, to exploit the interaction with the carboxylate groups of Asp9 and Asp163 as well as with several cationic residues present in the vicinity of the TMPK(mt) binding site. The three-dimensional structure of the TMPK(mt) complexed with 5-hydroxymethyl-dUMP, an analog of dTMP, was employed to develop a QSAR model, to parameterize a scoring function specific for the TMPK(mt) target and to select analogues which display the highest predicted binding to the target. As a result, we identified a small highly focused combinatorial subset of bicyclic thymidine analogues as virtual hits that are predicted to inhibit the mycobacterial TMPK in the submicromolar concentration range and to display favorable ADME-related properties. PMID:21082329

  3. Comparing Binding Modes of Analogous Fragments Using NMR in Fragment-Based Drug Design: Application to PRDX5

    PubMed Central

    Guichou, Jean-François; Cala, Olivier; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design is one of the most promising approaches for discovering novel and potent inhibitors against therapeutic targets. The first step of the process consists of identifying fragments that bind the protein target. The determination of the fragment binding mode plays a major role in the selection of the fragment hits that will be processed into drug-like compounds. Comparing the binding modes of analogous fragments is a critical task, not only to identify specific interactions between the protein target and the fragment, but also to verify whether the binding mode is conserved or differs according to the fragment modification. While X-ray crystallography is the technique of choice, NMR methods are helpful when this fails. We show here how the ligand-observed saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment and the protein-observed 15N-HSQC experiment, two popular NMR screening experiments, can be used to compare the binding modes of analogous fragments. We discuss the application and limitations of these approaches based on STD-epitope mapping, chemical shift perturbation (CSP) calculation and comparative CSP sign analysis, using the human peroxiredoxin 5 as a protein model. PMID:25025339

  4. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R).

    PubMed

    Hao, Lili; Zhang, Huiyong; Zhang, Zhang; Hu, Songnian; Xue, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  5. Information Commons for Rice (IC4R)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the most important staple food for a large part of the world's human population and also a key model organism for plant research. Here, we present Information Commons for Rice (IC4R; http://ic4r.org), a rice knowledgebase featuring adoption of an extensible and sustainable architecture that integrates multiple omics data through community-contributed modules. Each module is developed and maintained by different committed groups, deals with data collection, processing and visualization, and delivers data on-demand via web services. In the current version, IC4R incorporates a variety of rice data through multiple committed modules, including genome-wide expression profiles derived entirely from RNA-Seq data, resequencing-based genomic variations obtained from re-sequencing data of thousands of rice varieties, plant homologous genes covering multiple diverse plant species, post-translational modifications, rice-related literatures and gene annotations contributed by the rice research community. Unlike extant related databases, IC4R is designed for scalability and sustainability and thus also features collaborative integration of rice data and low costs for database update and maintenance. Future directions of IC4R include incorporation of other omics data and association of multiple omics data with agronomically important traits, dedicating to build IC4R into a valuable knowledgebase for both basic and translational researches in rice. PMID:26519466

  6. Design and optimization of polymer ring resonator modulators for analog microwave photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, Arash; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2016-02-01

    Efficient modulation of electrical signals onto an optical carrier remains the main challenge in full implementation of microwave photonic links (MPLs) for applications such as antenna remoting and wireless access networks. Current MPLs utilize Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZI) with sinusoidal transfer function as electro-optic modulators causing nonlinear distortions in the link. Recently ring resonator modulators (RRM) consisting of a ring resonator coupled to a base waveguide attracted interest to enhance linearity, reduce the size and power consumption in MPLs. Fabrication of a RRM is more challenging than the MZI not only in fabrication process but also in designing and optimization steps. Although RRM can be analyzed theoretically for MPLs, physical structures need to be designed and optimized utilizing simulation techniques in both optical and microwave regimes with consideration of specific material properties. Designing and optimization steps are conducted utilizing full-wave simulation software package and RRM function analyzed in both passive and active forms and confirmed through theoretical analysis. It is shown that RRM can be completely designed and analyzed utilizing full-wave simulation techniques and as a result linearity effect of the modulator on MPLs can be studied and optimized. The material nonlinearity response can be determined computationally and included in modulator design and readily adaptable for analyzing other materials such as silicon or structures where theoretical analysis is not easily achieved.

  7. Functional Recovery of Analog Circuits at Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Neff, Joseph; Katkoori, Srinivas

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a new reconfigurable analog array (RAA) architecture and integrated circuit (IC) used to map analog circuits that can adapt to extreme temperatures under programmable control. Algorithm-driven adaptation takes place on the RAA IC. The algorithms are implemented in a separate Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) IC, co-located with the RAA in the extreme temperature environment. The experiments demonstrate circuit adaptation over a wide temperature range, from extremely low temperature of -180 C to high 120 C.

  8. Temperature-adaptive Circuits on Reconfigurable Analog Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Keymeulen, Didier; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Neff, Joseph; Katkoori, Srinivas

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a new reconfigurable analog array (MA) architecture and integrated circuit (IC) used to map analog circuits that can adapt to extreme temperatures under programmable control. Algorithm-driven adaptation takes place on the RAA IC. The algorithms are implemented in a separate Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) IC, co-located with the RAA in the extreme temperature environment. The experiments demonstrate circuit adaptation over a wide temperature range, from extremely low temperature of -180 C to high 120 C.

  9. Building Digital Libraries for Analog People: Ten Common Design Pitfalls and How To Avoid Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2000-01-01

    Reviews design factors to consider when planning library media centers. Highlights include planning teams; planning for more than one kind of learning; considering community as well as school use; planning for existing technology rather than future possibilities; considering ease of supervision; traffic patterns; lighting and sound damping; and…

  10. Design and longitudinal dynamic stability analysis of a slender delta kite for high altitudes using leading edge suction analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madduri, Bharath

    In this thesis, the longitudinal dynamic stability modes, namely Phugoid and Short-period of delta kite with single tether are examined, for different aspect ratios (A) and flow conditions. The equations of motion, of kite are solved in polar-inertial wind frame and the tether is approximated by straight line elements. The vortex lift and induced drag due to leading edge vortices are calculated using Polhamus leading edge suction analogy. The Polhamus proportionality constants (Kp, Kv) are used to estimate the overall coefficient of lift and drag (C L, CD) and are computed using Multhopp lifting surface theory. The values of total coefficient of lift and drag (CL, CD) are examined for a wide variety of aspect ratio of delta kite and are validated by comparing with the experimental data. Linear stability analysis is performed for the chosen design variables to ensure the nominal design has stable longitudinal dynamics. A plot of the root locus of the system matrix for longitudinal dynamics as a function of geometry and flight conditions, provided an intuitive understanding of the flight modes of the kite, with respect to design parameters of interest.

  11. Neuron-synapse IC chip-set for large-scale chaotic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Horio, Y; Aihara, K; Yamamoto, O

    2003-01-01

    We propose a neuron-synapse integrated circuit (IC) chip-set for large-scale chaotic neural networks. We use switched-capacitor (SC) circuit techniques to implement a three-internal-state transiently-chaotic neural network model. The SC chaotic neuron chip faithfully reproduces complex chaotic dynamics in real numbers through continuous state variables of the analog circuitry. We can digitally control most of the model parameters by means of programmable capacitive arrays embedded in the SC chaotic neuron chip. Since the output of the neuron is transfered into a digital pulse according to the all-or-nothing property of an axon, we design a synapse chip with digital circuits. We propose a memory-based synapse circuit architecture to achieve a rapid calculation of a vast number of weighted summations. Both of the SC neuron and the digital synapse circuits have been fabricated as IC forms. We have tested these IC chips extensively, and confirmed the functions and performance of the chip-set. The proposed neuron-synapse IC chip-set makes it possible to construct a scalable and reconfigurable large-scale chaotic neural network with 10000 neurons and 10000/sup 2/ synaptic connections. PMID:18244585

  12. Design and development of volatile analysis system for analog field test of lunar exploration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Captain, Janine E.; Weis, Kyle; Cryderman, Katherine; Coan, Mary; Lance, Lucas; Levine, Lanfang; Brooks Loftin, Kathleen; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Bauer, Brint; Quinn, Jaqueline

    2015-05-01

    The recent evidence of water in the lunar crater Cabeus from the LCROSS mission (Colaprete et al., 2010) provides confirmation of a valuable resource on the lunar surface. To understand this resource and the impact it can have on future exploration, further information is needed on the distribution and availability of the water ice. The Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is a part of the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload, designed to provide ground truth to the volatile distribution near the permanently shadowed regions on the lunar surface. The payload is designed to drill and extract a regolith core sample, heat the regolith to drive off the volatiles, and identify and quantify the volatile resources. The LAVA subsystem is specifically responsible for processing and analyzing the volatile gas sample from the lunar regolith sample. The main objective of this paper is to provide insight into the operations and hardware for volatile analysis developed and deployed at the 2012 RESOLVE Field Test on the slopes of Mauna Kea. The vision of employing Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) and modified COTS hardware to lower the cost for mission-enabling field tests will be highlighted. This paper will discuss how the LAVA subsystem hardware supported several high level RESOLVE mission objectives to demonstrate the challenging lunar mission concept proposed.

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of FGLamide allatostatin analogs with Phe(3) residue modifications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yong; Wang, Meizi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Xinling; Tobe, Stephen S

    2016-09-01

    A FGLamide allatostatin neuropeptide mimic (H17) is a potential insect growth regulator which inhibits the production of juvenile hormone by the corpora allata. To find more evidence to reveal the structure-activity relationships of the Phe(3) residue in the C-terminal conserved pentapeptide and search for novel analogs with high activity, a series of Phe(3) residue-modified analogs were designed and synthesized using H17 as the lead compound. Bioassay using juvenile hormone (JH) production by corpora allata of the cockroach Diploptera punctata indicated that analogs 4, 11, and 13 showed strong ability to inhibit JH production in vitro, with IC50 of 38.5, 22.5, and 26 nM, respectively. As well, the activity of analog 2 (IC50 : 89.5 nM) proved roughly equivalent to that of H17. Based on the primary structure-activity relationships of Phe(3) residue, we suggest that for analogs containing six-membered aromatic rings, removing the methylene group of Phe(3) or an o-halogen or p-halogen-substituted benzene ring could increase the ability to inhibit biosynthesis of JH. This study will be useful for the design of new allatostatin analogs for insect management. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27477941

  14. Design, synthesis and crystallization of a novel glucagon analog as a therapeutic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pengyun; Rogers, Tanya; Smiley, David; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Zhang, Faming

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis and crystallization of glucagon-Cex are reported. Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are drugs or drug candidates for the treatment of metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The native hormones have pharmacological deficiencies such as short half-life and poor solubility. A novel glucagon receptor agonist named glucagon-Cex has been designed, synthesized and crystallized. This peptide was highly soluble under physiological conditions and crystallized readily. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.2 Å resolution and the diffraction was consistent with space group P23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 48.20 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. The crystals were suitable for a full structural determination to reveal the conformational differences between glucagon-Cex and the native hormone.

  15. Computational approaches for designing potent and selective analogs of peptide toxins as novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kuyucak, Serdar; Norton, Raymond S

    2015-01-01

    Peptide toxins provide valuable therapeutic leads for many diseases. As they bind to their targets with high affinity, potency is usually ensured. However, toxins also bind to off-target receptors, causing potential side effects. Thus, a major challenge in generating drugs from peptide toxins is ensuring their specificity for their intended targets. Computational methods can play an important role in solving such design problems through construction of accurate models of receptor–toxin complexes and calculation of binding free energies. Here we review the computational methods used for this purpose and their application to toxins targeting ion channels. We describe ShK and HsTX1 toxins, high-affinity blockers of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3, which could be developed as therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25406005

  16. Design of a hydraulic analog of the circulatory system for evaluating artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Donovan, F M

    1975-01-01

    A major problem in improving artificial heart designs is the absence of methods for accurate in vitro testing of artificial heart systems. A mock circulatory system has been constructed which hydraulically simulates the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the normal human. The device is constructed of 1/2 in. acrylic sheet and has overall dimensions of 24 in. wide, 16 in. tall, and 8 in. deep. The artificial heart to be tested is attached to the front of the device, and pumps fluid from the systemic venous chamber into the pulmonary arterial chamber and from the pulmonary venous chamber into the systemic arterial chamber. Each of the four chambers is hermetically sealed. The compliance of each chamber is determined by the volume of air trapped above the fluid in that chamber. The pulmonary and systemic resistances are set automatically by bellows-operated valves to simulate the barroreceptor response in the systemic arteries and the passive pulmonary resistance response in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiac output is measured by a turbine flowmeter in the systemic circulation. Results using the Kwan-Gett artificial heart show a good comparison between the mock circulatory system response and the calf response. PMID:1225373

  17. Extending analog design scaling to sub-wavelength lithography: co-optimization of RET and photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Ashesh; Dorris, Siew; Smelko, Tom; Walbrick, Walter; Mahalingam, Pushpa; Arch, John; Green, Kent; Garg, Vishal; Buck, Peter; West, Craig

    2011-04-01

    The mask requirements for 110nm half-node BiCMOS process were analyzed with the goal to meet customer needs at lower cost and shorter cycle times. The key differentiating features for this technology were high density CMOS libraries along with high-power Bipolar, LDMOS and DECMOS components. The high voltage components were characterized by transistors that formed cylindrical junctions. The presence of curved features in the data is particularly detrimental to the write time on a 50KeV vector mask writer. The mask write times have a direct impact on both mask cost and cycle time. Design rules also permit rectangular or stretched contacts to allow conductance of high currents. To meet customer needs but still manage the computational lithography overhead as well as the patterning process performance, this process was evaluated in terms of computational lithography and photomask co-optimization for the base-line 50KeV vector and laser mask-writers. Due to the differences in imaging and processing of the different mask writing systems, comparative analysis of critical dimension (CD) performance both in terms of linearity and pitch was done. Differences in imaging on silicon due to mask fidelity were also expected and characterized. The required changes in OPC necessary to switch to the new mask process were analyzed.

  18. Rational design of triazololipopeptides analogs of kisspeptin inducing a long-lasting increase of gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Massimiliano; Robert, Vincent; Galibert, Mathieu; Madinier, Jean-Baptiste; Marceau, Philippe; Dardente, Hugues; Decourt, Caroline; De Roux, Nicolas; Lomet, Didier; Delmas, Agnès F; Caraty, Alain; Aucagne, Vincent

    2015-04-23

    New potent and selective KISS1R agonists were designed using a combination of rational chemical modifications of the endogenous neuropeptide kisspeptin 10 (KP10). Improved resistance to degradation and presumably reduced renal clearance were obtained by introducing a 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole as a proteolysis-resistant amide mimic and a serum albumin-binding motif, respectively. These triazololipopeptides are highly potent full agonists of KISS1R and are >100 selective over the closely related NPFF1R. When injected in ewes with a quiescent reproductive system, the best compound of our series induced a much prolonged increase of luteinizing hormone release compared to KP10 and increased follicle-stimulating hormone plasma concentration. Hence, this KISS1R agonist is a new valuable pharmacological tool to explore the potential of KP system in reproduction control. Furthermore, it represents the first step to develop drugs treating reproductive system disorders due to a reduced activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis such as delayed puberty, hypothalamic amenorrhea, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:25811530

  19. Analog synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  20. Design and Stereochemical Research (DFT, ECD and Crystal Structure) of Novel Bedaquiline Analogs as Potent Antituberculosis Agents.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yiding; Li, Linwei; Wu, Chengjun; Chi, Yumeng; Li, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Sun, Tiemin

    2016-01-01

    A series of bedaquiline analogs containing H-bond donors were designed as anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis drugs. A pair of diastereoisomers (R/S- and S/S-isomers) was selected from these designed compounds for synthetic and stereochemical research. The title compounds were synthesized from chiral precursors for the first time and the absolute configurations (ACs) were determined by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) with quantum chemical calculations. Moreover, a single crystal of the S/S compound was obtained for X-ray diffraction analysis, and the crystal structure showed high consistency with the geometry, confirming the reliability of ACs obtained by ECD analyses and theoretical simulation. Furthermore, the effect of stereochemistry on the anti-tuberculosis activity was investigated. The MICs of the R/S- and S/S-isomers against Mycobacterium phlei 1180 are 9.6 and 32.1 μg·mL(-1), respectively. Finally, molecular docking was carried out to evaluate the inhibitory nature and binding mode differences between diastereoisomers. PMID:27384553

  1. Things to Consider When Upgrading a Non-Power Reactor to a Digital I&C System

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Hardin, LeRoy A; Hardesty, Duane; Wilson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Non-Power Reactor (NPR) licensees are increasing their use of state-of-the-art digital technology in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems because digital systems offer improved reactor control, information processing, and information storage. In Generic Letter GL 95-02, the NRC recognized that the design characteristics specific to the new digital electronics could result in failure modes and system malfunctions that either were not considered during the initial plant design or not evaluated in sufficient detail in the safety analysis report. These concerns include potential common mode failures. A conversion from analog to digital I&C systems in NPRs solves some problems while potentially introducing others. Good design, engineering, review, and testing can identify and minimize these risks.

  2. Silicon Based Millimeter Wave and THz ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jixin; Hong, Wei; Tang, Hongjun; Yan, Pinpin; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guangqi; Hou, Debin; Wu, Ke

    In this paper, the research advances in silicon based millimeter wave and THz ICs in the State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves is reviewed, which consists of millimeter wave amplifiers, mixers, oscillators at Q, V and W and D band based on CMOS technology, and several research approaches of THz passive ICs including cavity and filter structures using SIW-like (Substrate Integrated Waveguide-like) guided wave structures based on CMOS and MEMs process. The design and performance of these components and devices are presented.

  3. S-IC Static Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Constructed in 1964, the S-IC Static Test Stand was designed to develop and test the first stage (S-IC) of the Saturn V launch vehicle. In the 1974 the test stand was modified to test the liquid hydrogen tank on the Space Shuttle External Tank. The facility was again modified in 1986 and its name was changed to the Advanced Engine Test Facility. These modifications were made to accommodate the Technology Test Bed engine which is a derivative of the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  4. Multiple-site replacement analogs of glucagon. A molecular basis for antagonist design.

    PubMed

    Unson, C G; Wu, C R; Fitzpatrick, K J; Merrifield, R B

    1994-04-29

    Extensive structure activity analysis has allowed us to identify specific residues in the glucagon sequence that are responsible for either receptor recognition or signal transduction. For instance, we have demonstrated that aspartic acid 9 and histidine 1 are essential for activation, and that an ionic interaction between the negative carboxylate and the protonated imidazole may contribute to the activation reaction at the molecular level. In the absence of the carboxylic group at position 9, aspartic 21 or aspartic 15 might furnish distal electrostatic effects to maintain partial agonism. Further investigation established that each of the 4 serine residues in the hormone play distinct roles. Serine 8 provides an important determinant of binding. Whereas neither serines 2, 11, nor 16 are required for receptor recognition. We have shown that serine 16 is essential for signal transduction and thus have identified it to be the third residue in glucagon to participate in a putative catalytic triad together with aspartic 9 and histidine 1, in the transduction of the glucagon response. In this work, we utilized insights into the functional significance of particular residues in the peptide appropriated from our structure-function assignments, as the basis of a molecular approach for the design of active-site directed antagonists of glucagon. The importance as well as the accuracy of our findings are confirmed by the synthesis of a series of improved glucagon antagonists based on replacements at positions 1, 9, 11, 16, and 21. The inhibition index, (I/A)50, of our best antagonist des-His1-[Nle9-Ala11-Ala16]glucagon amide, has been improved 10-fold over the previous best glucagon inhibitor. PMID:8175663

  5. 50-200 GHz Silicon-Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor BICMOS Technology and a Computer-Aided Design Environment for 2--50+ GHz Very Large-Scale Integration Mixed-Signal ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbanna, Seshadri; Freeman, Gregory; Rieh, Jae-Sung; Ahlgren, David; Stein, Kenneth; Dickey, Carl; Mecke, James; Bacon, Peter; Groves, Robert; Meghelli, Mounir; Soyuer, Mehmet; Jagannathan, Basanth; Schonenberg, Kathryn; Jeng, Shwu-Jen; Joseph, Alvin; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Volant, Richard; Greenberg, David; Chen, Huajie; Brelsford, Kevin; Harame, David; Dunn, James; Larson, Lawrence; Herman, Dean; Meyerson, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Silicon-germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) BICMOS technology is a stable, ultra-high performance, semiconductor technology capable of supporting mixed-signal, very large-scale integration (VLSI) circuit designs for a variety of emerging communication applications. This technology is supported by a computer-aided design (CAD) system that supports a variety of high-performance circuit designs, mixed-signal circuit block reuse, and the ability to accurately predict circuit performance at the highest frequencies. This paper summarizes the progress this technology has made in recent years in moving from the research laboratory to a production environment. We also specifically address performance, operating voltage, reliability and integration considerations for using 100--200 GHz SiGe HBTs in high-speed (10--40 Gb/s) network ICs, an application space previously only addressed by InP technology. All indications are that SiGe will be very successful at addressing this new application space, and all facets of the networking IC market.

  6. Frequency domain near-infrared multiwavelength imager design using high-speed, direct analog-to-digital conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Fang, Qianqian; Boas, David A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) has proven to be a reliable method for quantification of tissue absolute optical properties. We present a full-sampling direct analog-to-digital conversion FD-NIR imager. While we developed this instrument with a focus on high-speed optical breast tomographic imaging, the proposed design is suitable for a wide-range of biophotonic applications where fast, accurate quantification of absolute optical properties is needed. Simultaneous dual wavelength operation at 685 and 830 nm is achieved by concurrent 67.5 and 75 MHz frequency modulation of each laser source, respectively, followed by digitization using a high-speed (180 MS/s) 16-bit A/D converter and hybrid FPGA-assisted demodulation. The instrument supports 25 source locations and features 20 concurrently operating detectors. The noise floor of the instrument was measured at <1.4 pW/√Hz, and a dynamic range of 115+ dB, corresponding to nearly six orders of magnitude, has been demonstrated. Titration experiments consisting of 200 different absorption and scattering values were conducted to demonstrate accurate optical property quantification over the entire range of physiologically expected values.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 3'-benzylated analogs of 3'-epi-neoponkoranol as potent α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; He, Weigang; Wang, Zihao; Liu, Long; Wang, Chengqian; Zhang, Chenxi; Wang, Chengcheng; Wang, Yuxuan; Tanabe, Genzoh; Muraoka, Osamu; Wu, Xiaoming; Wu, Liang; Xie, Weijia

    2016-03-01

    A group of 3'-epi-neoponkoranol analogs with different hydrophobic substituents attached at 3'-position of side chain moiety were designed and synthesized in order to further improve the inhibitory activities against α-glucosidases. Biological evaluation of these compounds revealed that sulfonium salts attached with ortho-substituted benzyl groups showed best α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. The most potent compound 10i showed greater inhibitory activities than all natural products. Moreover, docking studies on 10i with ntMGAM presented a new binding mode, indicating that amino residue Asp542 should be the key interacting point for strong inhibitory activity of small molecules against α-glucosidase enzymes. The strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of 10i could be rationalized by van der Waals interactions between the 3'-attached substituent and particularly the ortho-substituted trifluoromethyl on benzyl group with the adjacent hydrophobic amino residues. Cytotoxicity evaluation assay demonstrated a high level of safety profile of the synthesized sulfonium salts against normal cell line. The enzyme kinetic studies showed a fully competitive inhibition of these sulfonium salts on each α-glucosidase. PMID:26840363

  8. Irregular Dwarf Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the irregular dwarf galaxy IC 1613. Low surface brightness galaxies, such as IC 1613, are more easily detected in the ultraviolet because of the low background levels compared to visual wavelengths.

  9. Analog synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Sarpeshkar, R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog–digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA–protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  10. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Banerjee, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.

    2003-12-01

    analysis in the magnetic studies. Integration with these existing components will guarantee direct traceability to the original sources of the MagIC data and metadata. The MagIC database design focuses around the general workflow that results in the determination of typical paleomagnetic and rock magnetic analyses. This ensures that individual data points can be traced between the actual measurements and their associated specimen, sample, site, rock formation and locality. This permits a distinction between original and derived data, where the actual measurements are performed at the specimen level, and data at the sample level and higher are then derived products in the database. These relations will also allow recalculation of derived properties, such as site means, when new data becomes available for a specific locality. Data contribution to the MagIC database is critical in achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template that can be used to provide all data at the same time as publication. Software tools are provided to facilitate easy population of these templates. The tools allow for the import/export of data files in a delimited text format, and they provide some advanced functionality to validate data and to check internal coherence of the data in the template. During and after publication these standardized MagIC templates will be stored in the ERR database of EarthRef.org from where they can be downloaded at all times. Finally, the contents of these template files will be automatically parsed into the online relational database.

  11. SVX4: A New Deep-Submicron Readout IC for the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, B.; Alfonsi, S.; Bacchetta, N.; Centro, S.; Christofek, L.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Haber, C.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Johnson, M.; vonderLippe, H.; Lujan, P.; Mandelli, E.; Meng, G.; Nomerotski, A.; Pellet, D.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; Walder, J.-P.; Weber, M.; Wester, W.; /LBL, Berkeley /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Kansas U. /Fermilab /UC, Davis

    2003-10-01

    SVX4 is the new silicon strip readout IC designed to meet the increased radiation tolerance requirements for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider. Devices have been fabricated, tested, and approved for production. The SVX4 design is a technology migration of the SVX3D design currently in use by CDF. Whereas SVX3D was fabricated in a 0.8 {micro}m radiation-hard process, SVX4 was fabricated in a standard 0.25 {micro}m mixed-signal CMOS technology using the ''radiation tolerant by design'' transistor topologies devised by the RD-49 collaboration. The specific cell layouts include digital cells developed by the ATLAS Pixel group, and full-custom analog blocks. Unlike its predecessors, the new design also includes the necessary features required for generic use by both the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. Performance of the IC includes >20 MRad total dose tolerance, and {approx}2000 e-rms equivalent input noise charge with 40 pF input capacitance, when sampled at 132 ns period with an 80 ns preamp risetime. At the nominal digitize/readout rate of 106/53 MHz, the 9 mm x 6.3 mm die dissipates {approx}2 mW/channel average at 2.5 V. A review of typical operation, details of the design conversion process, and performance measurements are covered.

  12. Dynamical Competition of IC-Industry Clustering from Taiwan to China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei; Tsai, Kuo-Hui

    2009-08-01

    Most studies employ qualitative approach to explore the industrial clusters; however, few research has objectively quantified the evolutions of industry clustering. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively analyze clustering among IC design, IC manufacturing as well as IC packaging and testing industries by using the foreign direct investment (FDI) data. The Lotka-Volterra system equations are first adopted here to capture the competition or cooperation among such three industries, thus explaining their clustering inclinations. The results indicate that the evolution of FDI into China for IC design industry significantly inspire the subsequent FDI of IC manufacturing as well as IC packaging and testing industries. Since IC design industry lie in the upstream stage of IC production, the middle-stream IC manufacturing and downstream IC packing and testing enterprises tend to cluster together with IC design firms, in order to sustain a steady business. Finally, Taiwan IC industry's FDI amount into China is predicted to cumulatively increase, which supports the industrial clustering tendency for Taiwan IC industry. Particularly, the FDI prediction of Lotka-Volterra model performs superior to that of the conventional Bass model after the forecast accuracy of these two models are compared. The prediction ability is dramatically improved as the industrial mutualism among each IC production stage is taken into account.

  13. Design and characterization of a mixed-signal PCB for digital-to-analog conversion in a modular and scalable infrared scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Jacob

    Infra-red (IR) sensors have proven instrumental in a wide variety of fields from military to industrial applications. The proliferation of IR sensors has spawned an intense push for technologies that can test and calibrate the multitudes of IR sensors. One such technology, IR scene projection (IRSP), provides an inexpensive and safe method for the testing of IR sensor devices. Previous efforts have been conducted to develop IRSPs based on super-lattice light emitting diodes (SLEDS). A single-color 512x512 SLEDs system has been developed, produced, and tested as documented in Corey Lange's Master's thesis, and a GOMAC paper by Rodney McGee [1][2]. Current efforts are being undergone to develop a two-color 512x512 SLEDs system designated (TCSA). The following thesis discusses the design and implementation of a custom printed circuit board (PCB), known as the FMC 4DAC, that contains both analog and digital signals. Utilizing two 16-bit digital-to-analog converters (DAC) the purpose of the board is to provide four analog current output channels for driving the TCSA system to a maximum frame rate of 1 kHz. In addition, the board supports a scalable TCSA system architecture. Several copies of the board can be run in parallel to achieve a range of analog channels between 4 and 32.

  14. Analog earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  15. Design, synthesis, and anti-breast cancer evaluation of new triarylethylene analogs bearing short alkyl- and polar amino-/amido-ethyl chains.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurleen; Mahajan, Mohinder P; Pandey, Manoj K; Singh, Parvesh; Ramisetti, Srinivasa R; Sharma, Arun K

    2016-04-15

    The synthesis of novel triarylethylene analogs, designed based on well-known Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs), i.e., ospemifene and tamoxifen, as potential anti-breast cancer agents is described. The cytotoxic potential of these analogs against ER-positive (MCF-7) and ER-negative (MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cell lines was determined and compared with the standards, ospemifene and tamoxifen. In initial screening, analogs 5, 14 and 15 were found to be much more effective than the standards against both the cell lines. The results showed that these novel analogs inhibit the expression of proteins involved in the migration and metastasis, compound 5 being most effective. Compound 5 inhibited the expression of MMP-9, c-Myc and Caveolin in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and suppressed the invasion of ER-negative cells in a dose dependent manner. Finally, in silico docking simulations of the representative compounds in the binding sites of the estrogen receptors (ERs) indicated a good binding affinity of the compounds with the ERs, and supported their experimental toxicity against MCF-7 cancer cell lines. PMID:26972118

  16. The future through the past: The use of analog sites for design criteria and long-term performance assessment of evapotranspiration landfill covers.

    SciTech Connect

    David Shafer; Julianne Miller; Susan Edwards; Stuart Rawlinson

    2001-10-18

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. For the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers is the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two are relatively recently disturbed sites (within the last 50 years) and have been selected for the evaluation of processes and changes on ET covers for the early period of post-institutional controls when cover maintenance would be discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end (1,000 years or more) of the compliance period. The late to mid-Holocene surfaces are both abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits, dated by thermoluminescence analysis. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites is being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified and the mode of disturbance, to help set baseline conditions. Similar to the other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water-balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time. Results of analog site work and resultant modifications to design, monitoring and maintenance of ET covers on the NTS will be compared with results of a similar study being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), where ET cover closures are planned as well. The comparison will

  17. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; Young, M. H.; Edwards, S. C.; Rawlinson, S. E.

    2002-02-26

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time.

  18. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  19. High-accuracy fit of the poles of spectroscopy amplifiers designed for mixed analog-digital filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bittanti, S.; Gatti, E.; Ripamonti, G.; Savaresi, S.M.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, a method for the identification of the poles` and zeros` position of an analog amplifier for nuclear spectroscopy used as a prefilter for a subsequent digital filter setup is presented. The proposed technique is based upon a subspace-based system state-space identification (4SID) method, which is well suited to a data set constituted by a noisy measurement of the sampled impulse response of the circuit. The algorithm runs unassisted and does not require skills by the operator. The experiments confirm that by using the so-obtained pole values, the shape of the impulse response of the amplifier can be fit with much better than 1% accuracy. Consequently, the overall filtering (analog + digital) can have finite duration and a top with a flatness much better than 1%.

  20. Design and synthesis of 3,5-disubstituted boron-containing 1,2,4-oxadiazoles as potential combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) analogs

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhaskar C.; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Rogler, Patrick; Evans, Todd

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a small library of 3,5-disubstituted-1,2,4-oxadiazole containing combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) analogs. Our objective is to increase the efficacy of the CA-4 as an anti-tubulin and antimitotic agent by substituting the cis-alkene bond with one of its bioisosteres, the 1,2,4-oxadiazole ring. We also modified the substituents attached to both of the phenyl rings (ring A and B in Fig. 1) of CA-4 for the purpose of diversifying our analogs based on SAR. These compounds were synthesized via a coupling reaction between an amidoxime and a carboxylic acid in DMF solvent, with HOBt as a base, and utilizing EDCI as a coupling reagent. Using this protocol, we synthesized a small library of 10 compounds with moderate to good yields. A detailed biological study is currently undergoing in our laboratory to evaluate the activity of these compounds. PMID:24039307

  1. An operational multifield analog/antianalog prediction system for United States seasonal temperatures: 1. System design and winter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, Robert E.; Barnston, Anthony G.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical framework developed by Barnett and Preisendorfer (1978) for multifield analog prediction of United States seasonal temperatures has been modified and expanded to accommodate the use of composites of analogs and antianalogs to form predictions. Major changes have also been made both in predictor data and in the way it is processed, although the general strategy of Barnett and Preisendorfer served as a guide in this regard. Cross-validation tests on a 35-year record suggest that substantial gains in winter forecast skill have been achieved through both the previously mentioned architectural changes and several predictor data set changes. The latter include the use of a different El Niño/Southern Oscillation index and United States surface temperature data but not precipitation data. It was found that significant model skill depends most on these two data sets, along with well-filtered 700-mbar heights, and depends least on sea surface temperatures. Considerable skill was found over the eastern half and the north-central portion of the United States. Forecasts were found to be effectively independent of and to outperform those of persistence and were comparable in skill to official forecasts. In a quasi-operational test most of the system's skill was reproduced, even under very disadvantageous circumstances. Because of all these factors, the mixed analog and antianalog prediction system has been adopted as a major input for operational use by official forecasters. Development of models for other seasons will be described in a subsequent paper.

  2. Local environments of SNe Ic and Ic-BL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selsing, Jonatan; Christensen, Lise; Thöne, Christina; Modjaz, Maryam

    2015-08-01

    In this project we have observed the local explosion environments of a sample Type Ic and Type Ic-BL Supernove (SNe) selected from both targeted and non-targeted surveys using VLT/VIMOS in IFU-mode. It is believed that by probing the local surroundings of the parent stellar populations of these types of SNe, valuable information can be gained about the physical conditions, which affect the type of SNe produced. The different kinds of SNe produced are determined by the initial mass and metallicity of the stellar progenitor, as well as by the metallicity-dependent mass loss in the stellar winds at the end phase of their evolution and the interaction with a sufficiently close companion star. At the redshift of the galaxies we have selected, we spatially resolve regions ~250 pc across, comparable to the size of HII regions in local galaxies and using strong nebular emission lines as a proxy for the metal content of the stellar population, we can investigate if the conditions for the two types of SNe differ. The connection between long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and broad-lined SNe Ic and the existence of SNe Ic-bl without observed GRBs raises the question of what distinguishes a GRB progenitor from that of an ordinary SN Ic-bl without a GRB and this project will help with the elucidation of this. Moreover, from the HII region ages and stellar mass estimates, we examine the two suggested progenitor models for stripped SNe: single massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with main-sequence masses of >30M⊙ that have experienced mass loss during the main sequence and WR stages, vs. binaries from lower-mass He stars.

  3. Low-Power Analog Processing for Sensing Applications: Low-Frequency Harmonic Signal Classification

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel J.; William, Peter E.; Hoffman, Michael W.; Balkir, Sina

    2013-01-01

    A low-power analog sensor front-end is described that reduces the energy required to extract environmental sensing spectral features without using Fast Fouriér Transform (FFT) or wavelet transforms. An Analog Harmonic Transform (AHT) allows selection of only the features needed by the back-end, in contrast to the FFT, where all coefficients must be calculated simultaneously. We also show that the FFT coefficients can be easily calculated from the AHT results by a simple back-substitution. The scheme is tailored for low-power, parallel analog implementation in an integrated circuit (IC). Two different applications are tested with an ideal front-end model and compared to existing studies with the same data sets. Results from the military vehicle classification and identification of machine-bearing fault applications shows that the front-end suits a wide range of harmonic signal sources. Analog-related errors are modeled to evaluate the feasibility of and to set design parameters for an IC implementation to maintain good system-level performance. Design of a preliminary transistor-level integrator circuit in a 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit process showed the ability to use online self-calibration to reduce fabrication errors to a sufficiently low level. Estimated power dissipation is about three orders of magnitude less than similar vehicle classification systems that use commercially available FFT spectral extraction. PMID:23892765

  4. Low-power analog processing for sensing applications: low-frequency harmonic signal classification.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel J; William, Peter E; Hoffman, Michael W; Balkir, Sina

    2013-01-01

    A low-power analog sensor front-end is described that reduces the energy required to extract environmental sensing spectral features without using Fast Fouriér Transform (FFT) or wavelet transforms. An Analog Harmonic Transform (AHT) allows selection of only the features needed by the back-end, in contrast to the FFT, where all coefficients must be calculated simultaneously. We also show that the FFT coefficients can be easily calculated from the AHT results by a simple back-substitution. The scheme is tailored for low-power, parallel analog implementation in an integrated circuit (IC). Two different applications are tested with an ideal front-end model and compared to existing studies with the same data sets. Results from the military vehicle classification and identification of machine-bearing fault applications shows that the front-end suits a wide range of harmonic signal sources. Analog-related errors are modeled to evaluate the feasibility of and to set design parameters for an IC implementation to maintain good system-level performance. Design of a preliminary transistor-level integrator circuit in a 0.13 µm complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit process showed the ability to use online self-calibration to reduce fabrication errors to a sufficiently low level. Estimated power dissipation is about three orders of magnitude less than similar vehicle classification systems that use commercially available FFT spectral extraction. PMID:23892765

  5. Triptycene analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy (Inventor); Perchellet, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention provides analogs of triptycene which are useful as anticancer drugs, as well as for other uses. The potency of these compounds is in a similar magnitude as daunomycin, a currently used anticancer drug. Each compound of the invention produces one or more desired effects (blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting nucleic acid or protein syntheses, decreasing the proliferation and viability of cancer cells, inducing DNA fragmentation or retaining their effectiveness against multidrug-resistant tumor cells).

  6. Analog and digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baher, H.

    The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

  7. R&D100: IC ID

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason; Pierson, Lyndon; Bauer, Todd

    2015-11-19

    Supply chain security to detect, deter, and prevent the counterfeiting of networked and stand-alone integrated circuits (ICs) is critical to cyber security. Sandia National Laboratory researchers have developed IC ID to leverage Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) and strong cryptographic authentication to create a unique fingerprint for each integrated circuit. IC ID assures the authenticity of ICs to prevent tampering or malicious substitution.

  8. Young Stars in IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Rebull, Luisa; Daou, Doris; Maranto, Tony; Roelofsen, Theresa; Sepulveda, Babs; Weehler, Cynthia

    2005-02-01

    IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula (~210 parsecs), is region forming stars located near the supergiant star Rigel in the constellation Orion. Kun et al. (2004, A&A, 418, 89) have determined that IC 2118 is on the near side of the Orion-Eridanus Super Bubble and that stellar winds from the Orion OB1 association may be triggering new star formation in the nebula. We propose using IRAC and MIPS to reexamine a small dense region of this nebula where Kun et al. have spectroscopically identified three 2MASS sources as T Tauri stars embedded in the cloud. Previous all-sky surveys, including both IRAS and 2MASS, have included this region, but not to the resolution that Spitzer can provide, and there are few studies of this particular region in the literature. Our team proposes to use IRAC and MIPS observations to (1) investigate star formation, (2) look for likely cluster member stars with infrared excesses, and characterize this young star population by obtaining their colors and therefore estimates of masses and ages, (3) study the distribution of stars, their relationship to the ISM, and the possibilities of triggered star formation, (4) compare the young star population, distribution, and age to other similar sites of star formation, e.g., IC 1396 and (5) produce a dramatic image of the interstellar medium in the region surrounding IC 2118. Since this region is in the Orion constellation near the bright star Rigel, it provides additional appeal to students and the general public.

  9. Intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) induces local and systemic antitumor effects that involve both activated T and NK cells as well as enhanced IC retention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) is an immunocytokine consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase 2 clinical trials of i.v. hu14.18-IL-2 (i.v.-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. We showed previously that intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IT-IC) results in enhanced antitumor activity in mouse models compared with i.v.-IC. The studies presented in this article were designed to determine the mechanisms involved in this enhanced activity and to support the future clinical testing of intratumoral administration of immunocytokines. Improved survival and inhibition of growth of both local and distant tumors were observed in A/J mice bearing s.c. NXS2 neuroblastomas treated with IT-IC compared with those treated with i.v.-IC or control mice. The local and systemic antitumor effects of IT-IC were inhibited by depletion of NK cells or T cells. IT-IC resulted in increased NKG2D receptors on intratumoral NKG2A/C/E⁺ NKp46⁺ NK cells and NKG2A/C/E⁺ CD8⁺ T cells compared with control mice or mice treated with i.v.-IC. NKG2D levels were augmented more in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with splenocytes, supporting the localized nature of the intratumoral changes induced by IT-IC treatment. Prolonged retention of IC at the tumor site was seen with IT-IC compared with i.v.-IC. Overall, IT-IC resulted in increased numbers of activated T and NK cells within tumors, better IC retention in the tumor, enhanced inhibition of tumor growth, and improved survival compared with i.v.-IC. PMID:22844125

  10. Configurable analog-digital conversion using the neural engineering framework

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Christian G.; Partzsch, Johannes; Noack, Marko; Schüffny, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Efficient Analog-Digital Converters (ADC) are one of the mainstays of mixed-signal integrated circuit design. Besides the conventional ADCs used in mainstream ICs, there have been various attempts in the past to utilize neuromorphic networks to accomplish an efficient crossing between analog and digital domains, i.e., to build neurally inspired ADCs. Generally, these have suffered from the same problems as conventional ADCs, that is they require high-precision, handcrafted analog circuits and are thus not technology portable. In this paper, we present an ADC based on the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). It carries out a large fraction of the overall ADC process in the digital domain, i.e., it is easily portable across technologies. The analog-digital conversion takes full advantage of the high degree of parallelism inherent in neuromorphic networks, making for a very scalable ADC. In addition, it has a number of features not commonly found in conventional ADCs, such as a runtime reconfigurability of the ADC sampling rate, resolution and transfer characteristic. PMID:25100933

  11. Configurable analog-digital conversion using the neural engineering framework.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Christian G; Partzsch, Johannes; Noack, Marko; Schüffny, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Efficient Analog-Digital Converters (ADC) are one of the mainstays of mixed-signal integrated circuit design. Besides the conventional ADCs used in mainstream ICs, there have been various attempts in the past to utilize neuromorphic networks to accomplish an efficient crossing between analog and digital domains, i.e., to build neurally inspired ADCs. Generally, these have suffered from the same problems as conventional ADCs, that is they require high-precision, handcrafted analog circuits and are thus not technology portable. In this paper, we present an ADC based on the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). It carries out a large fraction of the overall ADC process in the digital domain, i.e., it is easily portable across technologies. The analog-digital conversion takes full advantage of the high degree of parallelism inherent in neuromorphic networks, making for a very scalable ADC. In addition, it has a number of features not commonly found in conventional ADCs, such as a runtime reconfigurability of the ADC sampling rate, resolution and transfer characteristic. PMID:25100933

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted noscapine analogs as potent and microtubule-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ram C; Gundala, Sushma R; Karna, Prasanthi; Lopus, Manu; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Hamelberg, Donald; Tandon, Vibha; Panda, Dulal; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an opium-derived kinder-gentler microtubule-modulating drug, currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report the synthesis of four more potent di-substituted brominated derivatives of noscapine, 9-Br-7-OH-NOS (2), 9-Br-7-OCONHEt-NOS (3), 9-Br-7-OCONHBn-NOS (4), and 9-Br-7-OAc-NOS (5) and their chemotherapeutic efficacy on PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The four derivatives were observed to have higher tubulin binding activity than noscapine and significantly affect tubulin polymerization. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the interaction between tubulin and 2, 3, 4, 5 was found to be, 55±6μM, 44±6μM, 26±3μM, and 21±1μM respectively, which is comparable to parent analog. The effects of these di-substituted noscapine analogs on cell cycle parameters indicate that the cells enter a quiescent phase without undergoing further cell division. The varying biological activity of these analogs and bulk of substituent at position-7 of the benzofuranone ring system of the parent molecule was rationalized utilizing predictive in silico molecular modeling. Furthermore, the immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from cells treated with 4 and 5, revealed the induction of apoptosis and down-regulation of survivin levels. This result was further supported by the enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 enzymes in treated samples compared to the controls. Hence, these compounds showed a great potential for studying microtubule-mediated processes and as chemotherapeutic agents for the management of human cancers. PMID:25891106

  13. Synthesis and Antimalarial Activities of Cyclen 4-Aminoquinoline Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to augment the efficacy of 7-chloro 4-aminoquinoline analogs and also to overcome resistance to anti-malarial agents we synthesized three cyclen analogs of chloroquine (4,6,7). Compound 4 displays the most potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities. It displays an IC50 of 7.5 ...

  14. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Tetrazole Analogs of Cl-Amidine as Protein Arginine Deiminase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational hydrolysis of arginine residues to form citrulline. This once obscure modification is now known to play a key role in the etiology of multiple autoimmune diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and ulcerative colitis) and in some forms of cancer. Among the five human PADs (PAD1, -2, -3, -4, and -6), it is unclear which isozyme contributes to disease pathogenesis. Toward the identification of potent, selective, and bioavailable PAD inhibitors that can be used to elucidate the specific roles of each isozyme, we describe tetrazole analogs as suitable backbone amide bond bioisosteres for the parent pan PAD inhibitor Cl-amidine. These tetrazole based analogs are highly potent and show selectivity toward particular isozymes. Importantly, one of the compounds, biphenyl tetrazole tert-butyl Cl-amidine (compound 13), exhibits enhanced cell killing in a PAD4 expressing osteosarcoma bone marrow (U2OS) cell line and can also block the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. These bioisosteres represent an important step in our efforts to develop stable, bioavailable, and selective inhibitors for the PADs. PMID:25559347

  15. Conceptual design of the TRACE detector readout using a compact, dead time-less analog memory ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliaga, R. J.; Herrero-Bosch, V.; Capra, S.; Pullia, A.; Dueñas, J. A.; Grassi, L.; Triossi, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gadea, R.; González, V.; Hüyük, T.; Sanchís, E.; Gadea, A.; Mengoni, D.

    2015-11-01

    The new TRacking Array for light Charged particle Ejectiles (TRACE) detector system requires monitorization and sampling of all pulses in a large number of channels with very strict space and power consumption restrictions for the front-end electronics and cabling. Its readout system is to be based on analog memory ASICs with 64 channels each that sample a 1 μs window of the waveform of any valid pulses at 200 MHz while discarding any other signals and are read out at 50 MHz with external ADC digitization. For this purpose, a new, compact analog memory architecture is described that allows pulse capture with zero dead time in any channel while vastly reducing the total number of storage cells, particularly for large amounts of input channels. This is accomplished by partitioning the typical Switched Capacitor Array structure into two pipelined, asymmetric stages and introducing FIFO queue-like control circuitry for captured data, achieving total independence between the capture and readout operations.

  16. The Young Cluster IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.

    1998-04-01

    CCD photometry in BVRI was obtained for about 260 stars in and around IC 348, and multiobject spectroscopy for 80 of these. A somewhat larger region was surveyed for stars having Hα in emission; over 110 emission-line stars brighter than about R = 19 were discovered. Because Hα emission could be detected to a limit near W = 3 Å, division into weak-line (WTTSs) and classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) was possible on purely spectroscopic grounds. There is a steep rise in the number of emission-line stars below W(Hα) = 10 Å the proportion of WTTSs to CTTSs in the area surveyed is 58:51. ROSAT detected only about 58% of the spectroscopic WTTSs and about 65% of the CTTSs, although these numbers are sensitive to the survey thresholds. The bulk of the ages of about 100 stars, read off the theoretical tracks of D'Antona & Mazzitelli, range between about 0.7 and 12 Myr, but the emission-line stars, which are most likely to be members of IC 348, have a mean age of 1.3 Myr. Allowance for unresolved binaries would increase this somewhat, but there is a firm upper limit at 2.95 Myr. There is no indication that the ages of the emission-line stars depend upon W(Hα): the IC 348 WTTSs as a population are not systematically older than the CTTSs, but there is a tendency for the WTTSs to be concentrated toward the center of IC 348, while the CTTSs are more widely distributed. There is a scattering of emission-Hα stars over the entire area surveyed. There are too many to be explained as low-mass members of an earlier generation of star formation in Per OB2 or as foreground dMe stars. The mass frequency function, based on some 125 stars fitted to theoretical tracks, rises from 1.5 M⊙ to about 0.2 M⊙, with a slope very much like that of the Scalo initial mass function. The optical cluster IC 348 radius is about 4.0 arcmin, or 0.37 pc. The total mass of optically detectable stars in this volume is 57 M⊙, while the mean space density is about 520 stars pc-3. The amount of

  17. A novel class of achiral seco-analogs of CC-1065 and the duocarmycins: design, synthesis, DNA binding, and anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Kupchinsky, Stanley; Centioni, Sara; Howard, Tiffany; Trzupek, John; Roller, Shane; Carnahan, Virginia; Townes, Heather; Purnell, Bethany; Price, Carly; Handl, Heather; Summerville, Kaitlin; Johnson, Kimberly; Toth, James; Hudson, Stephen; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Hartley, John A; Lee, Moses

    2004-12-01

    The synthesis, DNA binding properties, and in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of fifteen achiral seco-cyclopropylindoline (or achiral seco-CI) analogs (5a-o) of CC-1065 and the duocarmycins are described. The achiral seco-CI analogs contain a 4-hydroxyphenethyl halide moiety that is attached to a wide range of indole, benzimidazole, pyrrole, and pyridyl-containing noncovalent binding components. The 4-hydroxyphenethyl halide moiety represents the simplest mimic of the seco-cyclopropylpyrroloindoline (seco-CPI) pharmacophore found in the natural products, and it lacks a chiral center. The sequence and minor groove specificity of the achiral compounds was ascertained using a Taq DNA polymerase stop assay and a thermal induced DNA cleavage experiment using either a fragment of pBR322 or pUC18 plasmid DNA. For example, seco-CI-InBf (5a) and seco-CI-TMI (5c) demonstrated specificity for AT-rich sequences, particularly by reacting with the underlined adenine-N3 position of 5'-AAAAA(865)-3'. This is also the sequence that CC-1065 and adozelesin prefer to alkylate. The achiral seco-CI compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity studies against several human (K562, LS174T, PC3, and MCF-7) and murine cancer cell lines (L1210 and P815). Following continuous drug exposure, the achiral compounds were found to be cytotoxic, with IC(50) values in the muM range. Interestingly, the carbamate protected compound 5p was significantly less cytotoxic than agent 5c, supporting the hypothesis that loss of HCl and formation of a spiro[2,5]cyclopropylcyclohexadienone intermediate is necessary for biological activity. The achiral seco-CI compounds 5a and 5c were submitted to the National Cancer Institute for further cytotoxicity screening against a panel of 60 different human cancer cell lines. Both compounds showed significant activity, particularly against several solid tumor cell lines. Flow cytometry studies of P815 cells that were incubated with compound 5c at its IC(50

  18. Young Stars in IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Sepulveda, Babs; Maranto, Tony; Weehler, Cynthia; Roelofsen, Theresa; Rebull, Luisa

    2006-02-01

    IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula (~210 parsecs), is a region of star formation located near the supergiant star Rigel in the constellation Orion. Last year, we observed the head of the nebula and approximately QUADRUPLED the number of young stars known here. We propose using IRAC and MIPS to continue our investigation by observing the densest part of the rest of the cloud. Our team proposes to use IRAC and MIPS observations to (1) investigate star formation, (2) look for likely cluster member stars with infrared excesses, and characterize this young star population by obtaining their colors and therefore estimates of masses and ages, (3) study the distribution of stars, their relationship to the ISM, and the possibilities of triggered star formation, (4) compare the young star population, distribution, and age to other similar sites of star formation, e.g., IC 1396 and (5) produce a dramatic image of the interstellar medium in the region surrounding IC 2118. Since this region is in the Orion constellation near the bright star Rigel, it provides additional appeal to students and the general public.

  19. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of Leu-Arg dipeptide analogs as novel hepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hongmok; Kim, YunHye; Park, Kieung; Choi, Soo An; Son, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Youngjoo

    2016-01-15

    Hepsin, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is an attractive protein as a potential therapeutic and diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer because it is highly up-regulated in prostate cancer and promotes both progression and metastasis. Starting from the reported tetrapeptide hepsin inhibitor Ac-KQLR-ketothiazole (kt) (1), we investigated the minimal structural requirements for hepsin inhibitory activity by truncating amino acids at the N-terminus. The kt and ketobenzothiazole (kbt) dipeptide analogs Ac-LR-kt (3) and Ac-LR-kbt (15) were found to be potent hepsin inhibitors, exhibiting Ki values of 22nM and 3nM, respectively. The present work suggests that LR-containing dipeptide molecules could be useful as lead compounds for the development of novel hepsin inhibitors. PMID:26711145

  20. The Use of Analog Sites for Designing and Evaluating Long Term Performance of Evapotranspiration Covers in the Northern Mojave Desert, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    Support is growing for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closing low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. ET covers are planned at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for closure of LLW shallow land burial waste cells. To better predict the long-term performance of ET covers, and to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the hydrologic and ecological processes occurring on analog surfaces for ET covers are being studied. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to study performance of ET covers over a 1000-year compliance period. Two are relatively recently disturbed sites (less than 40 years ago) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on covers for the early period of post-institutional controls when the waste cell covers will no longer be maintained. The histories of these control sites were evaluated by an archeologist to help determine the mode and timing of site disturbance to understand baseline conditions. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period for LLW closure (>1000 years). Both are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits, dated by thermoluminscence analysis. Observations to date on the younger analog sites suggest that bioturbation by small mammals begins immediately after site abandonment and may alter surface properties that effect the hydrologic performance and vegetation succession of the cover system. Bioturbation has resulted in local mounds of larger surface clasts, which are favorable sites for the establishment of native shrubs. Vegetation density and diversity decrease away from these mounds. While infiltration is expected to be greater in the vicinity of these shrubs because of their co-occurrence with bioturbated surface soils, ET potential may also be greater because of deeper root penetration. However, the bioturbation

  1. Improvement of Organizational Performance and Instructional Design: An Analogy Based on General Principles of Natural Information Processing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darabi, Aubteen; Kalyuga, Slava

    2012-01-01

    The process of improving organizational performance through designing systemic interventions has remarkable similarities to designing instruction for improving learners' performance. Both processes deal with subjects (learners and organizations correspondingly) with certain capabilities that are exposed to novel information designed for producing…

  2. A Triple-Band WCDMA Direct Conversion Receiver IC with Reduced Number of Off-Chip Components and Digital Baseband Control Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Osamu; Ito, Rui; Mitomo, Toshiya; Saigusa, Shigehito; Arai, Tadashi; Toyoda, Takehiko

    This paper presents a triple-band WCDMA direct conversion receiver (DCR) IC that needs a small number of off-chip components and control signals from digital baseband (DBB) IC. The DCR IC consists of 3 quadrature demodulators (QDEMs) with on-chip impedance matching circuit and an analog baseband block (ABB) that contains a low-pass filter (LPF) with fc automatic tuning circuit using no off-chip components and a linear-in-dB variable-gain amplifier (VGA) with on-chip analog high-pass filter (HPF). In order to make use of DBB control-free DC offset canceler, the DCR is designed to avoid large gain change under large interference that causes long transient response. In order to realize that characteristic without increasing quiescent current, the QDEM is used that employs class AB input stage and low-noise common mode feedback (CMFB) output stage. The DCR IC was fabricated in a SiGe BiCMOS process and occupies about 2.9mm×3.0mm. The DCR needs SAW filters only for off-chip components and a gain control signal from DBB IC for AGC loop. The IIP3 of over -4.4dBm for small signal input level and that of over +1.9dBm for large signal input level are achieved. The gain compression of the desired signal is less than 0.3dB for ACS Case-II condition.

  3. Analogies: Explanatory Tools in Web-Based Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Fowler, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This article helps designers of Web-based science instruction construct analogies that are as effective as those used in classrooms by exemplary science teachers. First, the authors explain what analogies are, how analogies foster learning, and what form analogies should take. Second, they discuss science teachers' use of analogies. Third, they…

  4. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  5. SEM probe of IC radiation sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) used to irradiate single integrated circuit (IC) subcomponent to test for radiation sensitivity can localize area of IC less than .03 by .03 mm for determination of exact location of radiation sensitive section.

  6. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  7. Photometric Study of IC 2156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadross, A. L.; Hendy, Y. H. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an optical UBVRI photometric analysis of the poorly studied open star cluster IC 2156 using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data in order to estimate its astrophysical properties. We compare these with results from our previous studies that relied on the 2MASS JHK near-infrared photometry. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster are used to determine its geometrical structure, real radius, core and tidal radii, and its distance from the Sun, the Galactic plane, and the Galactic center. We also estimate, the age, color excesses, reddening-free distance modulus, membership, total mass, luminosity function, mass function, and relaxation time of the cluster.

  8. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  9. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  10. Celastrol Analogs as Inducers of the Heat Shock Response. Design and Synthesis of Affinity Probes for the Identification of Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Klaić, Lada; Morimoto, Richard I.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The natural product celastrol (1) possesses numerous beneficial therapeutic properties and affects numerous cellular pathways. The mechanism of action and cellular target(s) of celastrol, however, remain unresolved. While a number of studies have proposed that the activity of celastrol is mediated through reaction with cysteine residues, these observations have been based on studies with specific proteins or by in vitro analysis of a small fraction of the proteome. In this study, we have investigated the spatial and structural requirements of celastrol for the design of suitable affinity probes to identify cellular binding partners of celastrol. Although celastrol has several potential sites for modification, some of these were not synthetically amenable or yielded unstable analogs. Conversion of the carboxylic acid functionality to amides and long-chain analogs, however, yielded bioactive compounds that induced the heat shock response (HSR) and antioxidant response and inhibited Hsp90 activity. This led to the synthesis of biotinylated celastrols (23 and 24) that were used as affinity reagents in extracts of human Panc-1 cells to identify Annexin II, eEF1A, and β-tubulin as potential targets of celastrol. PMID:22380712

  11. Do Cross-circle Designs, the Mayan World Tree, Chitto Tustenuggee's, and Miami's Tequesta, Sites have Analogs in Brazil as they have in Peru, Europe, and Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataide, Jade; Mc Leod, Roger; Mc Leod, David

    2007-04-01

    Florida's Miami Tequesta site conveys information about potential tornadoes, hurricanes, and even earthquakes. It is visually analogous to cross-circle designs, like other equivalent sites we have located, as in Maine, New Hampshire, in Medicine Wheels, and elsewhere. We focus on the detectable effects of time-and-place dependent electromagnetic signals. Non-technologic societies, and individuals, still find and use them, even today, especially in places like Cuzco, Peru. Modes of detection involve senses, such as sensitive, observant eyesight, and electromagnetically induced nerve signals interpreted as tinnitus, as traditionally indicated by ``Kokopelli's'' flute-playing, ``pins and needles,'' or even odor sensations. Recorded events show that youthful children are sometimes involved, as by Pacal's Classic-Mayan-era son, who became Kan Balum, Serpent Jaguar. Our intent is to check whether similar signals can be technologically identified in Brazil and New England. Site information investigated by us seems to be driven by the electromagnetic field. Enigmatic Brazilian locations should be technologically investigated with site correlations to other possible analogs, such as Florida's Chitto Tustenuggee site at Miramar. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.6

  12. Rocket Observations of IC 405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Burgh, E. B.

    2001-12-01

    We present the preliminary results from a NASA/JHU sounding rocket mission (36.198 UG), launched on 09 February 2001 at 21:00 MST, to obtain a long slit (200\\arcsec x 12\\arcsec) spectrum of the reflection nebula IC 405 in the 900 -- 1400 Å wavelength region. Several pointings within the nebula were obtained, including a high quality (S/N ≈ 10-15 at R = 300) spectrum of the central star, HD 34078, which clearly shows absorption from molecular hydrogen (H2). Observations of the nebula reveal a surface brightness to stellar flux ratio that rises by two orders of magnitude between 1400 and 900 Å. This is in contrast with the relatively flat nebular dust scattering observed during a prior sounding rocket observation of the reflection nebula NGC 2023. We will also present additional nebular pointings within IC 405, including a region observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope showing evidence of H2 fluorescent emission. These observations were supported by NASA grant NAG5-5122 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  13. 100 gigasamples per second 12 bits optoelectronic analog-to-digital converter design and implementation based on cellular polyphase-sampling architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Angulo, Carlos

    The next generation digital information systems such as high performance computers, multigigabit/sec communication networks, distributed sensors, three dimensional digital imaging systems etc, will require analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) with high sampling rates exceeding 10 Gigasamples per second (GSPS) and high bit resolution of at least 10 bits. Such performance criteria are difficult to achieve with silicon electronics technology because the switching speeds peak at about 10-20GHz. Also, timing jitters, amplitude fluctuations, phase noise, thermal noise, and harmonic distortion, all contribute to reductions in ADC bit resolution as sampling rate increases. Photonics ADCs are rapidly emerging as the enabling technologies for high-performance digital signal processing systems. For this technology, high optical pulses repetition rate (in the order of GHz) with low time jitter and pulse width in the femtoseconds regime are the major attractive characteristics of optical sources. In this dissertation work, a novel 102.4 GSPS 12-bit optoelectronic analog-to-digital converter architecture that is based on a Cellular Polyphase-Sampling architecture is introduced. First, a 102.4 GHz all-optical clock was designed and implemented using a femtosecond laser source and passive optical components. Second, a novel optoelectronic architecture for optical sampling and parallel demultiplexing of different phases (polyphase) of an input analog signal is presented. The optoelectronic sampling and demultiplexing architecture is composed by 20 optoelectronic subcircuit referred as "OE-Cell"; these have been designed and implemented using optical passive components and InGaAs PIN photodiodes. A unique feature of this approach is that the optically sampled RF signal always remains in the electrical domain and thus eliminates the need for electrical-to-optical and optical-to-electrical conversions. The electrical-in to electrical-out transfer functions of the sampling and

  14. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage in the S-IC Static Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The S-IC-T stage (static firing stage) is installed and awaits the first static firing of all five F-1 engines at the Marshall Space Flight Center S-IC static test stand. Constructed in 1964, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed to develop and test the first stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle that used five F-1 engines. Each F-1 engine developed 1,500,000 pounds of thrust for a total liftoff thrust of 7,500,000 pounds. To handle this research and development effort, the stand contains 12,000,000 pounds of concrete on its base legs that are planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. Of concrete and steel construction, the stand foundation walls are 4 feet thick, and topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand is given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time.

  15. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Whitfield, Dennis M; Cox, Andrew D; Li, Jianjun; St Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A; Taylor, Rachel E; Landig, Corinna S; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    -Leg5Ac7Ac-treated mice were sensitive to human complement ex vivo, simulating in vitro findings. These data reveal critical roles for the Sia exocyclic side-chain in gonococcal serum-resistance. Such CMP-NulO analogs may provide a novel therapeutic strategy against the global threat of multidrug-resistant gonorrhea. PMID:26630657

  16. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Whitfield, Dennis M.; Cox, Andrew D.; Li, Jianjun; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A.; Taylor, Rachel E.; Landig, Corinna S.; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W.; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A.; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac-treated mice were sensitive to human complement ex vivo, simulating in vitro findings. These data reveal critical roles for the Sia exocyclic side-chain in gonococcal serum-resistance. Such CMP-NulO analogs may provide a novel therapeutic strategy against the global threat of multidrug-resistant gonorrhea. PMID:26630657

  17. Computational Protein Design to Re-Engineer Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1α (SDF) Generates an Effective and Translatable Angiogenic Polypeptide Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Atluri, Pavan; Marotta, Nicole A.; Frederick, John R.; Fitzpatrick, J. Raymond; McCormick, Ryan C.; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Yang, Elaine C.; Levit, Rebecca D.; Yuan, Li-Jun; MacArthur, John W.; Saven, Jeffery G.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND After ischemic injury, cardiac secretion of the potent endothelial progenitor stem cell (EPC) chemokine SDF stimulates endogenous neovascularization and myocardial repair, a process insufficiently robust to repair major infarcts. Experimentally, exogenous administration of recombinant SDF enhances neovasculogenesis and cardiac function after MI. However, SDF has a short half-life, is bulky, and very expensive. Smaller analogs of SDF may provide translational advantages including enhanced stability and function, ease of synthesis, lower cost, and potential modulated delivery via engineered biomaterials. In this study, computational protein design was used to create a more efficient evolution of the native SDF protein. METHODS and RESULTS Protein structure model was used to engineer an SDF polypeptide analog (ESA) that splices the N-terminus (activation and binding) and C-terminus (extracellular stabilization) with a diproline segment designed to limit the conformational flexibility of the peptide backbone and retain the relative orientation of these segments observed in the native structure of SDF. EPCs in ESA gradient, assayed by Boyden chamber, showed significantly increased migration compared to both SDF and control gradients (ESA 567±74 cells/HPF vs SDF 438±46 p=0.037; vs Control 156±45 p=0.001). EPC receptor activation was evaluated by quantifying phosphorylated AKT. ESA had significantly greater pAKT levels than SDF and control (1.64±0.24 vs 1.26±0.187, p=0.01; vs. 0.95±0.08, p<0.001). Angiogenic growth factor assays revealed a distinct increase in Angiopoietin-1 expression in the ESA and SDF treated hearts. Also, CD-1 mice (n=30) underwent LAD ligation and peri-infarct intramyocardial injection of ESA, SDF-1α, or saline. At 2 weeks, echocardiography demonstrated a significant gain in EF, CO, SV, and Fractional Area Change (FAC) in mice treated with ESA when compared to controls and significant improvement in FAC when compared to SDF treated

  18. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF IC 2118

    SciTech Connect

    Guieu, S.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Cole, D. M.; Flagey, N.; Laher, R.; Stolovy, S.; Spuck, T.; Roelofsen Moody, T.; Sepulveda, B.; Weehler, C.; Maranto, A.; Penprase, B.; Ramirez, S.

    2010-09-01

    IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula, is a wispy, roughly cometary, {approx}5 degree long reflection nebula, and is thought to be a site of triggered star formation. In order to search for new young stellar objects (YSOs), we have observed this region in seven mid- and far-infrared bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope and in four bands in the optical using the U. S. Naval Observatory 40 inch telescope. We find infrared excesses in four of the six previously known T Tauri stars in our combined infrared maps, and we find six entirely new candidate YSOs, one of which may be an edge-on disk. Most of the YSOs seen in the infrared are Class II objects, and they are all in the 'head' of the nebula, within the most massive molecular cloud of the region.

  19. Spitzer Observations of IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Vrba, F. J.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Spuck, T.; Roelofsen Moody, T.; Sepulveda, B.; Weehler, C.; Maranto, A.; Cole, D. M.; Flagey, N.; Laher, R.; Penprase, B.; Ramirez, S.; Stolovy, S.

    2010-09-01

    IC 2118, also known as the Witch Head Nebula, is a wispy, roughly cometary, ~5 degree long reflection nebula, and is thought to be a site of triggered star formation. In order to search for new young stellar objects (YSOs), we have observed this region in seven mid- and far-infrared bands using the Spitzer Space Telescope and in four bands in the optical using the U. S. Naval Observatory 40 inch telescope. We find infrared excesses in four of the six previously known T Tauri stars in our combined infrared maps, and we find six entirely new candidate YSOs, one of which may be an edge-on disk. Most of the YSOs seen in the infrared are Class II objects, and they are all in the "head" of the nebula, within the most massive molecular cloud of the region.

  20. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    for the actual can welding process, however, did not result in an improved weld geometry. Several possibilities for the lack of positive response exist, some of which are that (1) an insufficient number of test articles were welded under prototypic conditions, (2) the process was not optimized so that significant improvements were observable over the 'noise', and (3) the in-situ arc anneal closed the gap down too much so the can was unable to exhaust pressure ahead of the weld. Several operational and mechanical improvements were identified. The weld clamps were changed to a design consistent with those used in the legacy operations. A helium puff operation was eliminated; it is believed that this operation was the cause of the original weld defect. Also, timing of plug mast movement was found to correspond with weld irregularities. The timing of the movement was changed to occur during weld head travel between tacks. In the end a three sequential tack weld process followed by a pulse weld at the same current and travel speed as was used for the legacy processes was suggested for use during the IC qualification effort. Relative to legacy welds, the PDC IC weld demonstrates greater fluctuation in the region of the weld located between tack welds. However, canister weld response (canister to canister) is consistent and with the aid of the optical mapping system (for targeting the cut position) is considered adequate. DR measurements and METs show the PDC IC welds to have sufficient ligament length to ensure adequate canister pressure/impact capacity and to ensure adequate stub function. The PDC welding process has not been optimized as a result of this effort. Differences remain between the legacy BTC welds and the PDC IC weld, but these differences are not sufficient to prevent resumption of the current PDC IC qualification effort. During the PDC IC qualification effort, a total of 17 cans will be welded and a variety of tests/inspections will be performed. The

  1. Click chemistry inspired facile synthesis and bioevaluation of novel triazolyl analogs of Ludartin.

    PubMed

    Lone, Shabir H; Bhat, Khursheed A; Majeed, Rabiya; Hamid, Abid; Khuroo, Mohd A

    2014-02-15

    A convenient and modular synthesis involving diastereoselective Michael addition followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction was carried out to furnish 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles of Ludartin. This reaction scheme involving Michael addition followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction leading to the formation of triazolyl analogs is being reported for the first time. All the triazolyl products were characterised using spectral data analysis. Sulphorhodamine B cytotoxicity screening of the resulting products against a panel of five human cancerous cell-lines revealed that few of the analogs display promising broad spectrum cytotoxic effect. Among all the synthesized compounds, only 3q displayed the best cytotoxic effect with IC50 values of 12, 11, 38, 39 and 8.5 μM but less than the standard Ludartin (1) with IC50 values of 6.3, 7.4, 7.5, 6.9 and 0.5 μM against human neuroblastoma (T98G), lung (A-549), prostate (PC-3), colon (HCT-116) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cell lines, respectively. The present synthesis was designed based on the previous literature reports of Ludartin as an aromatase inhibitor. Our work provides an initial study on structure-activity relationship of triazolyl analogs of sesquiterpene lactones in general and Ludartin (1) in particular. PMID:24484897

  2. An automated oxide and diffusion facility for IC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Report discusses totally-automated oxidation and diffusion facility for fabricating IC's. Several innovations are demonstrated: process controller specifically designed for semiconductor processing; automatic loading system to accept wafers from air track, insert them in quartz carrier, and place carrier on paddle for insertion into furnace; automatic unloading of wafers back onto air track; and boron diffusion using diborane.

  3. Modification Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was originally designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage. Modifications to the S-IC Test Stand began in 1975 to accommodate space shuttle external tank testing. This photo depicts the continuation of the modification process as of July 14, 1975. The flame deflector originally used to provide water to the 5 F-1 engines of the S-IC stage during testing has been removed.

  4. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pictured is the Saturn V S-IC-T stage (static testing stage) on a transporter showing its forward end in building 4705 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This stage underwent numerous static firings at the newly-built S-IC Static Test Stand at the MSFC west test area. The S-IC (first) stage used five F-1 engines that produced a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds as each engine produced 1,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage lifted the Saturn V vehicle and Apollo spacecraft from the launch pad.

  5. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Pictured is the Saturn V S-IC-T stage (static testing stage) being assembled in the horizontal assembly station at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), building 4705. This stage underwent numerous static firings at the newly-built S-IC Static Test Stand at the MSFC west test area. The S-IC (first) stage used five F-1 engines that produced a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds as each engine produced 1,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage lifted the Saturn V vehicle and Apollo spacecraft from the launch pad.

  6. Counterrotating core in IC 1459

    SciTech Connect

    Franx, M.; Illingworth, G.D.

    1988-04-01

    The radio elliptical IC 1459 is shown to have a massive rapidly counterrotating stellar core. Along the major axis a strong peak in the rotational velocity is observed at a distance of 2 arcsec (0.3 kpc) from the center. The velocity reaches 170 + or - 20 km/s. The rotational velocity in the outer parts rises to 45 + or - 8 km/s, but in the opposite sense to the rotation of the center. Along the minor axis, no significant rotation is measured, neither in the center nor in the outer parts. Line profiles derived from cross-correlated spectra along the major axis in the core show a clear asymmetry. Ionized gas rotates around the minor axis in the same sense as the outer part of the galaxy. The other properties are typical of normal ellipticals. The galaxy has a regular color gradient and line strength gradient. The mass of the counterrotating component is estimated to be about 10 to the 10th solar masses. It is postulated that such a core could form, following the merger of two galaxies, either by the tidal disruption of the victim or through a starburst-like event. 27 references.

  7. Structural and Functional Analysis of G Protein–Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibition by Paroxetine and a Rationally Designed Analog

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Wu, Emily; Wilson, Michael W.; Singh, Puja; Larsen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we identified the serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine as an inhibitor of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) that improves cardiac performance in live animals. Paroxetine exhibits up to 50-fold selectivity for GRK2 versus other GRKs. A better understanding of the molecular basis of this selectivity is important for the development of even more selective and potent small molecule therapeutics and chemical genetic probes. We first sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying paroxetine selectivity among GRKs. We directly measured the KD for paroxetine and assessed its mechanism of inhibition for each of the GRK subfamilies and then determined the atomic structure of its complex with GRK1, the most weakly inhibited GRK tested. Our results suggest that the selectivity of paroxetine for GRK2 largely reflects its lower affinity for adenine nucleotides. Thus, stabilization of off-pathway conformational states unique to GRK2 will likely be key for the development of even more selective inhibitors. Next, we designed a benzolactam derivative of paroxetine that has optimized interactions with the hinge of the GRK2 kinase domain. The crystal structure of this compound in complex with GRK2 confirmed the predicted interactions. Although the benzolactam derivative did not significantly alter potency of inhibition among GRKs, it exhibited 20-fold lower inhibition of serotonin reuptake. However, there was an associated increase in the potency for inhibition of other AGC kinases, suggesting that the unconventional hydrogen bond formed by the benzodioxole ring of paroxetine is better accommodated by GRKs. PMID:24220010

  8. A Newly Designed Curcumin Analog Y20 Mitigates Cardiac Injury via Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Oxidant Actions in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dandan; Xu, Zheng; Skibba, Melissa; Zeng, Chunlai; Li, Xiaokun; Wei, Tiemin; Wu, Lianpin; Liang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with the cause of structural and functional changes of the heart in both human and animal models. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced cardiac disorders. Curcumin is a natural product from Curcuma Longa with multiple bioactivities. In our previous study, in order to reach better anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant dual activities, we designed a new mono-carbonyl curcumin analog, Y20, via the structural modification with both trifluoromethyl and bromine. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of Y20 on obesity-induced cardiac injury and its underlying mechanisms. In high fat diet–fed rats, oral administration of Y20 at 20 mg/kg or curcumin at 50 mg/kg significantly decreased the cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress and eventually improved the cardiac remodeling by mitigating cardiac disorganization, hypertrophy, fibrosis and apoptosis. Y20 at 20 mg/kg showed comparable and even stronger bioactivities than curcumin at 50 mg/kg. The beneficial actions of Y20 are closely associated with its ability to increase Nrf2 expression and inhibit NF-κB activation. Taken together, these results suggest that Y20 may have a great therapeutic potential in the treatment of obesity-induced cardiac injury using Nrf2 and NF-κB as the therapeutic targets for treating obesity-related disorders. PMID:25786209

  9. A high-performance analog-to-digital conversion subsystem suitable for the study of evoked potentials, with design considerations for the eclipse $140 (trademark) computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, M. D.

    1983-02-01

    In order to evaluate impact protection devices, an impact injury model for restrained humans in a crash environment must be developed. Disruption of the functioning of the central nervous system is an important consequence of impact injury involving the head and neck, and is an important consideration in the development of a useful impact-injury model. Ultimately, neurophysiological criteria are desired. Evoked potentials (EPs) are likely to provide appropriate neurophysiological information, but quantitative analysis of EP data presents considerable difficulty. Among the technical problems encountered is efficient digitization of large amounts of EP data presents considerable difficulty. Among the technical problems encountered is efficient digitization of large amounts of EP data. This report presents detailed specifications for a high-performance analog-to-digital conversion subsystem suitable for various aspects of such work. Procedures utilizing various aspects of the design presented have been have been found to be effective. In the future acquisition of A/D conversion hardware, the design presented here should be considered.

  10. Design challenges of EO polymer based leaky waveguide deflector for 40 Gs/s all-optical analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjloum, Massinissa; El Gibari, Mohammed; Li, Hongwu; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    2016-08-01

    Design challenges and performance optimization of an all-optical analog-to-digital converter (AOADC) is presented here. The paper addresses both microwave and optical design of a leaky waveguide optical deflector using electro-optic (E-O) polymer. The optical deflector converts magnitude variation of the applied RF voltage into variation of deflection angle out of a leaky waveguide optical beam using the linear E-O effect (Pockels effect) as part of the E-O polymer based optical waveguide. This variation of deflection angle as result of the applied RF signal is then quantized using optical windows followed by an array of high-speed photodetectors. We optimized the leakage coefficient of the leaky waveguide and its physical length to achieve the best trade-off between bandwidth and the deflected optical beam resolution, by improving the phase velocity matching between lightwave and microwave on one hand and using pre-emphasis technique to compensate for the RF signal attenuation on the other hand. In addition, for ease of access from both optical and RF perspective, a via-hole less broad bandwidth transition is designed between coplanar pads and coupled microstrip (CPW-CMS) driving electrodes. With the best reported E-O coefficient of 350 pm/V, the designed E-O deflector should allow an AOADC operating over 44 giga-samples-per-seconds with an estimated effective resolution of 6.5 bits on RF signals with Nyquist bandwidth of 22 GHz. The overall DC power consumption of all components used in this AOADC is of order of 4 W and is dominated by power consumption in the power amplifier to generate a 20 V RF voltage in 50 Ohm system. A higher sampling rate can be achieved at similar bits of resolution by interleaving a number of this elementary AOADC at the expense of a higher power consumption.

  11. Syntheses and Cytotoxic Properties of the Curcumin Analogs 2,6-Bis(benzylidene)-4-phenylcyclohexanones

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan; Das, Umashankar; Mackay, Hilary; Brown, Toni; Mooberry, Susan L.; Dimmock, Jonathan R.; Lee, Moses; Pati, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen curcumin analogs were synthesized and tested for in-vitro cytotoxicity towards B16 and L1210 murine cancer cell lines using an MTT assay. Significant activity was discovered for two analogs: 8 (B16 IC50 = 1.6 μM; L1210 IC50 = 0.35 μM) and 9 (B16 IC50 = 0.51 μM; L1210 IC50 = 1.2 μM). Several other analogs exhibited notable cytotoxicity. The data from quantitative structure-activity relationships suggest that large electron-withdrawing substituents placed in the meta-position of the arylidene aryl rings enhance potencies. Compounds 8 and 9 were found using a cell-based assay to have virtually no effects on microtubules at concentrations up to 40 μM. These results suggest that tubulin inhibition is not the principal mechanism by which the curcumin analogs act. PMID:18574852

  12. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  13. Electromigration of damascene copper of IC interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, William Kevin

    Copper metallization patterned with multi-level damascene process is prone to electromigration failure, which affects the reliability and performance of IC interconnect. In typical products, interconnect that is not already constrained by I·R drop or Joule self-heating operates at 'near threshold' conditions. Measurement of electromigration damage near threshold is very difficult due to slow degradation requiring greatly extended stress times, or high currents that cause thermal anomalies. Software simulations of the electromigration mechanism combined with characterization of temperature profiles allows extracting material parameters and calculation of design rules to ensure reliable interconnect. Test structures capable of demonstrating Blech threshold effects while allowing thermal characterization were designed and processed. Electromigration stress tests at various conditions were performed to extract both shortline (threshold) and long-line (above threshold) performance values. The resistance increase time constant shows immortality below Je·L (product of current density and segment length) of 3200 amp/cm. Statistical analysis of times-to-failure show that long lines last 105 hours at 3.1 mA/mum2 (120°C). While this is more robust than aluminum interconnect, the semiconductor industry will be challenged to improve that performance as future products require.

  14. Design, synthesis and molecular modeling of novel pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine analogs as antifolates: Application of Buchwald-Hartwig aminations of heterocycles

    PubMed Central

    Gangjee, Aleem; Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Raghavan, Sudhir; Queener, Sherry F.; Kisliuk, Roy L.; Cody, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii, pj), Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii, tg) and Mycobacterium avium (M. avium, ma) are the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The absence of any animal models for human Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and the lack of crystal structures of pjDHFR and tgDHFR make the design of inhibitors challenging. A novel series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as selective and potent DHFR inhibitors against these opportunistic infections are presented. Buchwald-Hartwig coupling reaction of substituted anilines with pivaloyl protected 2,4-diamino-6-bromo-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine was successfully explored to synthesize these analogs. Compound 26 was the most selective inhibitor with excellent potency against pjDHFR. Molecular modeling studies with a pjDHFR homology model explained the potency and selectivity of 26. Structural data are also reported for 26 with pcDHFR and 16 and 22 with variants of pcDHFR. PMID:23627352

  15. The Front-End Readout as an Encoder IC for Magneto-Resistive Linear Scale Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Trong-Hieu; Chao, Paul Chang-Po; Chien, Ping-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a front-end readout circuit as an encoder chip for magneto-resistance (MR) linear scales. A typical MR sensor consists of two major parts: one is its base structure, also called the magnetic scale, which is embedded with multiple grid MR electrodes, while another is an "MR reader" stage with magnets inside and moving on the rails of the base. As the stage is in motion, the magnetic interaction between the moving stage and the base causes the variation of the magneto-resistances of the grid electrodes. In this study, a front-end readout IC chip is successfully designed and realized to acquire temporally-varying resistances in electrical signals as the stage is in motions. The acquired signals are in fact sinusoids and co-sinusoids, which are further deciphered by the front-end readout circuit via newly-designed programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs) and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The PGA is particularly designed to amplify the signals up to full dynamic ranges and up to 1 MHz. A 12-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for analog-to-digital conversion is designed with linearity performance of ±1 in the least significant bit (LSB) over the input range of 0.5-2.5 V from peak to peak. The chip was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.35-micron complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for verification with a chip size of 6.61 mm², while the power consumption is 56 mW from a 5-V power supply. The measured integral non-linearity (INL) is -0.79-0.95 LSB while the differential non-linearity (DNL) is -0.68-0.72 LSB. The effective number of bits (ENOB) of the designed ADC is validated as 10.86 for converting the input analog signal to digital counterparts. Experimental validation was conducted. A digital decoder is orchestrated to decipher the harmonic outputs from the ADC via interpolation to the position of the moving stage. It was found that the displacement measurement error is within

  16. Design of a 10-bit segmented current-steering digital-to-analog converter in CMOS 65 nm technology for the bias of new generation readout chips in high radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Robertis, G.; Loddo, F.; Mattiazzo, S.; Pacher, L.; Pantano, D.; Tamma, C.

    2016-01-01

    A new pixel front end chip for HL-LHC experiments in CMOS 65nm technology is under development by the CERN RD53 collaboration together with the Chipix65 INFN project. This work describes the design of a 10-bit segmented current-steering Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) to provide a programmable bias current to the analog blocks of the circuit. The main requirements are monotonicity, good linearity, limited area consumption and radiation hardness up to 10 MGy. The DAC was prototyped and electrically tested, while irradiation tests will be performed in Autumn 2015.

  17. Systolic array IC for genetic computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.

    1991-01-01

    Measuring similarities between large sequences of genetic information is a formidable task requiring enormous amounts of computer time. Geneticists claim that nearly two months of CRAY-2 time are required to run a single comparison of the known database against the new bases that will be found this year, and more than a CRAY-2 year for next year's genetic discoveries, and so on. The DNA IC, designed at HP-ICBD in cooperation with the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is being implemented in order to move the task of genetic comparison onto workstations and personal computers, while vastly improving performance. The chip is a systolic (pumped) array comprised of 16 processors, control logic, and global RAM, totaling 400,000 FETS. At 12 MHz, each chip performs 2.7 billion 16 bit operations per second. Using 35 of these chips in series on one PC board (performing nearly 100 billion operations per second), a sequence of 560 bases can be compared against the eventual total genome of 3 billion bases, in minutes--on a personal computer. While the designed purpose of the DNA chip is for genetic research, other disciplines requiring similarity measurements between strings of 7 bit encoded data could make use of this chip as well. Cryptography and speech recognition are two examples. A mix of full custom design and standard cells, in CMOS34, were used to achieve these goals. Innovative test methods were developed to enhance controllability and observability in the array. This paper describes these techniques as well as the chip's functionality. This chip was designed in the 1989-90 timeframe.

  18. BORON SYNTHESIS IN TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Takashi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the {nu}-process in an energetic Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) and the resultant productions of the light elements including boron and its stable isotopes. SN Ic is a very unique boron source because it can produce boron not only through spallation reactions as discussed in Nakamura and Shigeyama but also the {nu}-process. The {nu}-process is considered to occur in core-collapse supernovae and previous studies were limited to SNe II. Although the progenitor star of an SN Ic does not posses an He envelope so that {sup 7}Li production via the {nu}-process is unlikely, {sup 11}B can be produced in the C-rich layers. We demonstrate a hydrodynamic simulation of a SN Ic explosion and estimate the amounts of the light elements produced via the {nu}-process for the first time, and also the subsequent spallation reactions between the outermost layers of the compact SN Ic progenitor and the ambient medium. We find that the {nu}-process in the current SN Ic model produces a significant amount of {sup 11}B, which is diluted by {sup 10}B from spallation reactions to get closer to B isotopic ratios observed in meteorites. We also confirm that high-temperature {mu} and {tau} neutrinos and their anti-neutrinos, reasonably suggested from the compact structure of SN Ic progenitors, enhance the light-element production through the neutral current reactions, which may imply an important role of SNe Ic in the Galactic chemical evolution.

  19. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 22, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left. Just to the lower front of those are the cylindrical liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken April 4, 1963, gives a close up look at the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  2. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken March 29, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of November 20, 1963.

  5. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken April 17, 1963, gives a look at the four tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Kerosene storage tanks can be seen to the left.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken February 25, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken May 7, 1963, gives a close look at the four concrete tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken from ground level on May 7, 1963, gives a close look at one of the four towers legs of the S-IC test stand nearing its completed height.

  10. Rat hormone sensitive lipase inhibition by cyclipostins and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Elena; Dutta, Supratik; Malla, Raj K; Martin, Benjamin P; Spilling, Christopher D; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2015-03-01

    Cyclipostins are bicyclic lipophilic phosphate natural products. We report here that synthesized individual diastereomers of cyclipostins P and R have nanomolar IC50s toward hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). The less potent diastereomers of these compounds have 10-fold weaker IC50s. The monocyclic phosphate analog of cyclipostin P is nearly as potent as the bicyclic natural product. Bicyclic phosphonate analogs of both cyclipostins exhibit IC50s similar to those of the weaker diastereomer phosphates (about 400nM). The monocyclic phosphonate analog of cyclipostin P has similar potency. A series of monocyclic phosphonate analogs in which a hydrophobic tail extends from the lactone side of the ring are considerably poorer inhibitors, with IC50s around 50μM. Finally cyclophostin, a related natural product inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that lacks the hydrocarbon tail of cyclipostins, is not active against HSL. These results indicate a critical SAR for these compounds, the hydrophobic tail. The smaller lactone ring is not critical to activity, a similarity shared with cyclophostin and AChE. The HSL kinetics of inhibition for the cyclipostin P trans diastereomer were examined in detail. The reaction is irreversible with a KI of 40nM and a rate constant for inactivation of 0.2min(-1). These results are similar to those observed for cyclophostin and AChE. PMID:25678014

  11. Rat Hormone Sensitive Lipase Inhibition by Cyclipostins and Their Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Vasilieva, Elena; Dutta, Supratik; Malla, Raj K.; Martin, Benjamin P.; Spilling, Christopher D.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclipostins are bicyclic lipophilic phosphate natural products. We report here that synthesized individual diastereomers of cyclipostins P and R have nanomolar IC50s toward hormone sensitive lipase (HSL). The less potent diastereomers of these compounds have 10-fold weaker IC50s. The monocyclic phosphate analog of cyclipostin P is nearly as potent as the bicyclic natural product. Bicyclic phosphonate analogs of both cyclipostins exhibit IC50s similar to those of the weaker diastereomer phosphates (about 400 nM). The monocyclic phosphonate analog of cyclipostin P has similar potency. A series of monocyclic phosphonate analogs in which a hydrophobic tail extends from the lactone side of the ring are considerably poorer inhibitors, with IC50s around 50 μM. Finally cyclophostin, a related natural product inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that lacks the hydrocarbon tail of cyclipostins, is not active against HSL. These results indicate a critical SAR for these compounds, the hydrophobic tail. The smaller lactone ring is not critical to activity, a similarity shared with cyclophostin and AChE. The HSL kinetics of inhibition for the cyclipostin P trans diastereomer were examined in detail. The reaction is irreversible with a KI of 40 nM and a rate constant for inactivation of 0.2 min−1. These results are similar to those observed for cyclophostin and AChE. PMID:25678014

  12. Selective non-zinc binding MMP-2 inhibitors: Novel benzamide Ilomastat analogs with anti-tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiao; Peng, Peng; Chang, Jun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Yu, Jian-Ming; Zhou, Lu; Sun, Xun

    2016-05-01

    Novel Ilomastat analogs with substituted benzamide groups, instead of hydroxamic acid groups, were designed, synthesized and evaluated against MMP-2 and MMP-9. Among these analogs, the most potent compound 10a exhibited potent inhibitory activity against MMP-2 with IC50 value of 0.19nM, which is 5 times more potent than that of Ilomastat (IC50=0.94nM). Importantly, 10a exhibited more than 8300 fold selectivity for MMP-2 versus MMP-9 (IC50=1.58μM). Molecular docking studies showed that 10a bond to the catalytic active pocket of MMP-2 by a non-zinc-chelating mechanism which was different from that of Ilomastat. Furthermore, the invasion assay showed that 10a was effective in reducing HEY cells invasion at 84.6% in 50μM concentration. For 10a, the pharmacokinetic properties had been improved and especially the more desirable t1/2z was achieved compared with these of the lead compound Ilomastat. PMID:27038494

  13. Antarctic Space Analog Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, E. K. Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Holland, Albert W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to examine group dynamics and individual performance in extreme, isolated environments and identify human factors requirements for long-duration space missions using data collected in an analog environment. Specifically, we wished to determine: 1) the characteristics of social relations in small groups of individuals living and working together in extreme, isolated environments, and 2) the environmental, social and psychological determinants of performance effectiveness in such groups. These two issues were examined in six interrelated studies using data collected in small, isolated research stations in Antarctica from 1963 to the present. Results from these six studies indicated that behavior and performance on long-duration space flights is likely to be seasonal or cyclical, situational, social, and salutogenic in nature. The project responded to two NASA program emphases for FY 1997 as described in the NRA: 1) the primary emphasis of the Behavior and Performance Program on determining long-term individual and group performance responses to space, identifying critical factors affecting those responses and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in behavior and performance, and developing and using ground-based models and analogs for studying space-related behavior and performance; and 2) the emphasis of the Data Analysis Program on extended data analysis. Results from the study were used to develop recommendations for the design and development of pre-flight crew training and in-flight psychological countermeasures for long-duration manned space missions.

  14. Probing for improved potency and in vivo bioavailability of excitatory amino acid transporter subtype 1 inhibitors UCPH-101 and UCPH-102: design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of substituted 7-biphenyl analogs.

    PubMed

    Erichsen, Mette N; Hansen, Jeanette; Ruiz, Josep A; Demmer, Charles S; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Bastlund, Jesper F; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Jensen, Anders A; Bunch, Lennart

    2014-10-01

    Uptake of the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, (S)-glutamate, is mediated by a family of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT). Previously we have explored the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a series of EAAT1 selective inhibitors, leading to the development of the potent inhibitors UCPH-101 and UCPH-102. In the present study, we set out to improve the solubility properties of these EAAT1 inhibitors with the objective to develop analogs more suited as pharmacological tools for in vivo studies of EAAT1 in terms of their bioavailability. A total of 23 novel UCPH-101/102 analogs were designed, synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at EAAT1-3 in a [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake assay. Most notably, the potent EAAT1 inhibition displayed of UCPH-101 and UCPH-102 was retained in analog 1d in which the napht-1-yl group in the 7-position of UCPH-102 has been replaced by an o-biphenyl moiety. In contrast, EAAT1 activity was dramatically compromised in analogs 1e and 1f comprising m- and p-biphenyl groups as 7-substituents, respectively. Analog 1d displayed low bioavailability after oral administration in rats, and this problem was addressed by the synthesis of a series of analogs with different chloro, fluoro, methoxy, triflouromethyl and carboxy substitution patterns at the o-biphenyl group of 1d (1h-1s) and m- and p-pyridine analogs of 1d (1t and 1v). Unfortunately, all of the modifications resulted in substantial decreased EAAT1 inhibitory activity, which supports the notion of a very lipophilic binding pocket in EAAT1 for the aromatic 7-substituent in these ligands. In conclusion, while we have not succeeded in developing UCPH-101/102 analogs possessing improved bioavailability properties, this study does offer interesting SAR information about this inhibitor class, and analog 1d seems to be an interesting lead for future SAR studies with focus on the development of more potent EAAT1 inhibitors. PMID:24682739

  15. Giant Spherical Cluster with I-C140 Fullerene Topology**

    PubMed Central

    Heinl, Sebastian; Peresypkina, Eugenia; Sutter, Jörg; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    We report on an effective cluster expansion of CuBr-linked aggregates by the increase of the steric bulk of the CpR ligand in the pentatopic molecules [CpRFe(η5-P5)]. Using [CpBIGFe(η5-P5)] (CpBIG=C5(4-nBuC6H4)5), the novel multishell aggregate [{CpBIGFe(η5:2:1:1:1:1:1-P5)}12(CuBr)92] is obtained. It shows topological analogy to the theoretically predicted I-C140 fullerene molecule. The spherical cluster was comprehensively characterized by various methods in solution and in the solid state. PMID:26411255

  16. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Spiroindolone Analogs and KAE609 in a Murine Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Freymond, Céline; Fischli, Christoph; Yu, Jing; Weber, Sebastian; Goh, Anne; Yeung, Bryan K. S.; Ho, Paul C.; Dartois, Véronique; Diagana, Thierry T.; Rottmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters driving the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. Our objective in this study was to determine dose-response relationships of a panel of related spiroindolone analogs and identify the PK-PD index that correlates best with the efficacy of KAE609, a selected class representative. The dose-response efficacy studies were conducted in the Plasmodium berghei murine malaria model, and the relationship between dose and efficacy (i.e., reduction in parasitemia) was examined. All spiroindolone analogs studied displayed a maximum reduction in parasitemia, with 90% effective dose (ED90) values ranging between 6 and 38 mg/kg of body weight. Further, dose fractionation studies were conducted for KAE609, and the relationship between PK-PD indices and efficacy was analyzed. The PK-PD indices were calculated using the in vitro potency against P. berghei (2× the 99% inhibitory concentration [IC99]) as a threshold (TRE). The percentage of the time in which KAE609 plasma concentrations remained at >2× the IC99 within 48 h (%T>TRE) and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 h (AUC0–48)/TRE ratio correlated well with parasite reduction (R2 = 0.97 and 0.95, respectively) but less so for the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/TRE ratio (R2 = 0.88). The present results suggest that for KAE609 and, supposedly, for its analogs, the dosing regimens covering a T>TRE of 100%, AUC0–48/TRE ratio of 587, and a Cmax/TRE ratio of 30 are likely to result in the maximum reduction in parasitemia in the P. berghei malaria mouse model. This information could be used to prioritize analogs within the same class of compounds and contribute to the design of efficacy studies, thereby facilitating early drug discovery and lead optimization programs. PMID:25487807

  17. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides as inhibitors of cellular Shp2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiao-Li; Yin, Wen-Hui; Tian, Xia; Ma, Zhen-Jie; Fan, Shi-Ming; Han, Jian-Rong; Liu, Shouxin

    2015-05-15

    A series of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides was designed and synthesized using sansalvamide A as a model compound. All compounds exhibited low antitumor activity. Furthermore, the evaluation of their inhibitory potency toward IMPDH, SHP2, ACHE, proteasome, MAGL, and cathepsin B showed that all of the compounds were potent against protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Specifically, compounds 1a, 1d, 2b, and 2f were found to inhibit SHP2 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good selectivity. Based on the molecular docking results, the binding modes of the chain cyclic peptides in the active center of SHP2 were discussed. PMID:25865131

  19. Analog enhancement of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Nachazel, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows how analog methods for edge sharpening, contrast enhancement, and expansion of the range of gray levels of particular interest are effective for easy on-line application to video viewing of X-ray roentgenograms or to fluoroscopy. The technique for analog enhancement of radiographic images is a modified version of the system designed by Fuchs et al. (1972), whereby an all directional second derivative signal called detail signal is used to produce both vertical and horizontal enhancement of the image. Particular attention is given to noise filtration and contrast enhancement. Numerous radiographs supplement the text.

  20. Robust hyperchaotic synchronization via analog transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoudi, S.; Tanougast, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel experimental chaotic synchronization technique via analog transmission is discussed. We demonstrate through Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) implementation design the robust synchronization of two embedded hyperchaotic Lorenz generators interconnected with an analog transmission line. The basic idea of this work consists in combining a numerical generation of chaos and transmitting it with an analog signal. The numerical chaos allows to overcome the callback parameter mismatch problem and the analog transmission offers robust data security. As application, this technique can be applied to all families of chaotic systems including time-delayed chaotic systems.

  1. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  2. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of N-Acetyl-S-(pchlorophenylcarbamoyl)cysteine and Its Analogs as a Novel Class of Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Seefeldt, Teresa; Young, Alan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Guan, Xiangming

    2010-01-01

    N-Acetyl-S-(p-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)cysteine (NACC) was identified as a metabolite of sulofenur. Sulofenur was demonstrated to have broad activity against solid tumors in preclinical studies but exhibited disappointing clinical responses due to its high protein binding related adverse effects. NACC exhibited low protein binding and excellent activity against a sulofenur sensitive human colon cancer cell line. In this study, analogs of NACC were synthesized and evaluated with four human cancer cell lines. Two of the NACC analogs showed excellent activity against two human melanoma cell lines, while NACC remains the most potent of the series. All three compounds were more potent than dacarbazine, which is used extensively in treating melanoma. NACC was shown to induce apoptosis without affecting the cell cycle. Further, NACC exhibited low toxicity against monkey kidney cells. The selective anticancer activity, low toxicity, an unknown yet but unique anticancer mechanism and ready obtainability through synthesis make NACC and its analogs promising anticancer agents. PMID:21131205

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows pumps used for extracting water emerging form a disturbed natural spring that occurred during the excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, depicts the progress of the stand as of January 14, 1963, with its four towers prominently rising.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken June 24, 1963, the four tower legs of the test stand can be seen at their maximum height.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the construction progress as of August 5, 1961. Heavy equipment continues to clear the test stand site.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This construction photo depicts the progress of the stand site as of October 8, 1962.

  8. Multilevel clustering fault model for IC manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Yu. I.; Bogdanova, N. A.; Rudnev, A. V.

    2004-05-01

    A hierarchical approach to the construction of compound distributions for process-induced faults in IC manufacture is proposed. Within this framework, the negative binomial distribution is treated as level-1 models. The hierarchical approach to fault distribution offers an integrated picture of how fault density varies from region to region within a wafer, from wafer to wafer within a batch, and so on. A theory of compound-distribution hierarchies is developed by means of generating functions. A study of correlations, which naturally appears in microelectronics due to the batch character of IC manufacture, is proposed. Taking these correlations into account is of significant importance for developing procedures for statistical quality control in IC manufacture. With respect to applications, hierarchies of yield means and yield probability-density functions are considered.

  9. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The S-IC-T stage was hoisted into the S-IC static test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC-T stage was a static test vehicle not intended for flight. It was ground tested repeatedly over a period of many months to prove the vehicle's propulsion system. The 280,000-pound stage, 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, housed the fuel and liquid oxygen tanks that held a total of 4,400,000 pounds of liquid oxygen and kerosene. The two tanks are cornected by a 26-foot-long intertank section. Other parts of the booster included the forward skirt and the thrust structure, on which the engines were to be mounted. Five F-1 engines, each weighing 10 tons, gave the booster a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, roughly equivalent to 160 million horsepower.

  10. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The S-IC-T stage is hoisted into the S-IC static test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC-T stage is a static test vehicle not intended for flight. It was ground tested repeatedly over a period of many months proving the vehicle's propulsion system. The 280,000-pound stage, 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, houses the fuel and liquid oxygen tanks that hold a total of 4,400,000 pounds of liquid oxygen and kerosene. The two tanks are cornected by a 26-foot-long intertank section. Other parts of the booster included the forward skirt and the thrust structure, on which the engines were to be mounted. Five F-1 engines, each weighing 10 tons, gave the booster a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, roughly equivalent to 160 million horsepower.

  11. Saturn V S-IC-T Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The S-IC-T stage was hoisted into the S-IC Static Test Stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The S-IC-T stage was a static test vehicle, not intended for flight. It was ground tested repeatedly over a period of many months to prove the vehicle's propulsion system. The 280,000-pound stage, 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, housed the fuel and liquid oxygen tanks that held a total of 4,400,000 pounds of liquid oxygen and kerosene. The two tanks were cornected by a 26-foot intertank section. Other parts of the booster included the forward skirt and the thrust structure, on which the engines were to be mounted. Five F-1 engines, each weighing 10 tons, gave the booster a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds, roughly equivalent to 160 million horsepower.

  12. A wideband analog correlating spectrometer for millimeter astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeller, Robert E.

    2007-08-01

    This project developed an analog correlating spectrometer intended for use in millimeter Astronomy. It is based in part on the Wideband Analog Spectrometers (WASP and WASP-II) built by Harris, et al (See Harris, et al, (1998), and Harris and Zmuidzinas, (2001)). Like WASP, we use tapped microstrip traces etched on a circuit board as delay lines to produce the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the incoming signal. We then get the spectrum by taking the Fourier Transform of the ACF. A major innovation of our design is the use of a single delay line (per segment) where the signal to be analyzed is launched on to the same delay line from either end. We produce the discrete autocorrelation function of the incoming signal via resistive taps coupled to detector diodes. Multiplication of the signals from each end is accomplished using the detector diode characteristics, along with phase switches and synchronous detectors, eliminating the need for expensive Gilbert Cell multipliers. We designed, built, and tested a complete prototype system with a bandwidth of 6.7 GHz and a resolution of 31 MHz. In this work we describe the detailed design, operation and performance of the prototype spectrometer. The work culminated with the observation of several nearby galaxies; M82, NGC253, IC342 and NGC1068 as well as Sagittarius B2 and Venus, using the prototype spectrometer. We used the FCRAO 14 meter radio telescope with the SEQUOIA receiver, which covers from 85 to 115.5 GHz. Our observations produced continuous spectra over 4 bands, giving near continuous coverage from 86 GHz to 115.5 GHz.

  13. Functional Laser Trimming Of Thin Film Resistors On Silicon ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael J.; Mickanin, Wes

    1986-07-01

    Modern Laser Wafer Trimming (LWT) technology achieves exceptional analog circuit performance and precision while maintain-ing the advantages of high production throughput and yield. Microprocessor-driven instrumentation has both emphasized the role of data conversion circuits and demanded sophisticated signal conditioning functions. Advanced analog semiconductor circuits with bandwidths over 1 GHz, and high precision, trimmable, thin-film resistors meet many of todays emerging circuit requirements. Critical to meeting these requirements are optimum choices of laser characteristics, proper materials, trimming process control, accurate modeling of trimmed resistor performance, and appropriate circuit design. Once limited exclusively to hand-crafted, custom integrated circuits, designs are now available in semi-custom circuit configurations. These are similar to those provided for digital designs and supported by computer-aided design (CAD) tools. Integrated with fully automated measurement and trimming systems, these quality circuits can now be produced in quantity to meet the requirements of communications, instrumentation, and signal processing markets.

  14. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  15. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This illustration shows a cutaway drawing with callouts of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimball for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  16. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a cutaway view of the Saturn V first stage, known as the S-IC, detailing the five F-1 engines and fuel cells. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through the five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  17. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage with detailed callouts of the components. The S-IC Stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  18. Pyrazole inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase: an attempt to dramatically reduce synthetic complexity through minimal analog re-design.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Scott D; Poel, Toni-Jo; Filipski, Kevin J; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Sorenson, Roderick J; Tait, Bradley D; Askew, Valerie; Dillon, Lisa; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lu, Gina H; Robertson, Andrew; Sekerke, Catherine; Kowala, Mark C; Auerbach, Bruce J

    2007-10-15

    An extraordinarily potent and hepatoselective class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors containing a pyrazole core was recently reported; however, its development was hampered by a long and difficult synthetic route. We attempted to circumvent this obstacle by preparing closely related analogs wherein the key dihydroxyheptanoic acid sidechain was tethered to the pyrazole core via an oxygen linker ('oxypyrazoles'). This minor change reduced the total number of synthetic steps from 14 to 7. Although the resulting analogs maintained much of the in vitro and cell activity of the pyrazoles, inferior in vivo activity precluded further development. Caco-2 cell permeability data suggest that enhanced cellular efflux of the oxypyrazoles relative to the pyrazoles may be responsible for the poor in vivo activity. PMID:17764936

  19. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  20. Measurement selection for parametric IC fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, A.; Meador, J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with the use of measurement reduction for statistical IC fault diagnosis are described. The reduction method used involves data pre-processing in a fashion consistent with a specific definition of parametric faults. The effects of this preprocessing are examined.

  1. IC Engine Applications of Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. Burton; Rivers, H. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Many of the properties of carbon-carbon make it an ideal material for reciprocating materials of intermittent combustion (IC) engines. Recent diesel engine tests, shown herein, indicate that the thermal and mechanical properties of carbon-carbon are adequate for piston applications, However, reducing the manufacturing costs and providing long term oxidation protection are still issues that need to be addressed.

  2. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  3. Analog pulse processor

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  4. Challenges in Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same…

  5. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  6. THE YOUNG CLUSTER IN IC 1274

    SciTech Connect

    Dahm, S. E.; Herbig, G. H.; Bowler, Brendan P.

    2012-01-15

    IC 1274 is a faintly luminous nebula lying on the near surface of the Lynds 227 (L227) molecular cloud. Its cavity-like morphology is reminiscent of a blistered star-forming region. Four luminous, early-type (B0-B5) stars are located within a spherical volume {approx}5' in diameter that appears to be clear of heavy obscuration. Approximately centered in the cleared region is the B0 V star HD 166033, which is thought to be largely responsible for the cavity's excavation. Over 80 H{alpha} emission sources brighter than V {approx} 21 have been identified in the region. More than half of these are concentrated in IC 1274 and are presumably members of a faint T Tauri star population. Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging of a nearby suspected pulsar and time-variable {gamma}-ray source (GeV J1809-2327) detected 21 X-ray sources in the cluster vicinity, some of which are coincident with the early-type stars and H{alpha} emitters in IC 1274. Deep (V {approx} 22) optical BVRI photometry has been obtained for the cluster region. A distance of 1.82 {+-} 0.3 kpc and a mean extinction of A{sub V} {approx} 1.21 {+-} 0.2 mag follow from photometry of the early-type stars. Using pre-main-sequence evolutionary models, we derive a median age for the H{alpha} emitters and X-ray sources of {approx}1 Myr; however, a significant dispersion is present. Our interpretation of the structure of IC 1274 and the spatial distribution of H{alpha} emitters is that the early-type stars formed recently and are in the process of ionizing and dispersing the molecular gas on the near surface of L227. The displaced material was driven against what remains of the molecular cloud to the east, enabling the formation of the substantial number of T Tauri stars found there. A dispersed population of H{alpha} emitters is also found along the periphery of L227, IC 1275, and IC 4684. These sources, if pre-main-sequence stars, appear to have formed in relative isolation compared to the dense cluster

  7. Developing Analogy Cost Estimates for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The analogy approach in cost estimation combines actual cost data from similar existing systems, activities, or items with adjustments for a new project's technical, physical or programmatic differences to derive a cost estimate for the new system. This method is normally used early in a project cycle when there is insufficient design/cost data to use as a basis for (or insufficient time to perform) a detailed engineering cost estimate. The major limitation of this method is that it relies on the judgment and experience of the analyst/estimator. The analyst must ensure that the best analogy or analogies have been selected, and that appropriate adjustments have been made. While analogy costing is common, there is a dearth of advice in the literature on the 'adjustment methodology', especially for hardware projects. This paper discusses some potential approaches that can improve rigor and repeatability in the analogy costing process.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken October 2, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen in the bottom center portion

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In the early stages of excavation, a natural spring was disturbed that caused a water problem which required constant pumping from the site and is even pumped to this day. Behind this reservoir of pumped water is the S-IC test stand boasting its ever-growing four towers as of March 29, 1963.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo, taken September 5, 1963, the flame deflector is being installed in the S-IC test stand.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken September 25, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen rotated to the outside on

  12. Triazole-containing monophosphate mRNA cap analogs as effective translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Piecyk, Karolina; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic analogs of the 5′ end of mRNA (cap structure) are widely used in molecular studies on mechanisms of cellular processes such as translation, intracellular transport, splicing, and turnover. The best-characterized cap binding protein is translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Recognition of the mRNA cap by eIF4E is a critical, rate-limiting step for efficient translation initiation and is considered a major target for anticancer therapy. Here, we report a facile methodology for the preparation of N2-triazole-containing monophosphate cap analogs and present their biological evaluation as inhibitors of protein synthesis. Five analogs possessing this unique hetero-cyclic ring spaced from the m7-guanine of the cap structure at a distance of one or three carbon atoms and/or additionally substituted by various groups containing the benzene ring were synthesized. All obtained compounds turned out to be effective translation inhibitors with IC50 similar to dinucleotide triphosphate m7GpppG. As these compounds possess a reduced number of phosphate groups and, thereby, a negative charge, which may support their cell penetration, this type of cap analog might be promising in terms of designing new potential therapeutic molecules. In addition, an exemplary dinucleotide from a corresponding mononucleotide containing benzyl substituted 1,2,3-triazole was prepared and examined. The superior inhibitory properties of this analog (10-fold vs. m7GpppG) suggest the usefulness of such compounds for the preparation of mRNA transcripts with high translational activity. PMID:25150228

  13. DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION OF THIO-ARSENOSUGAR IN MARINE MOLLUSKS BY IC-ICP-MS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON THE INTERACTION OF ARSENOSUGARS WITH SULFIDE AS A FUNCTION OF PH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sulfar analog of As(328)(2,3-dihydroxypropyl-5-deoxy-5-dimethylarsinoyl-ß-D-riboside), abbreviated (As(328-S), was detected and quantified in five species of marine shellfish using IC-ICP-MS with structural verification via IC-ESI-MS/MS. The CAD spectra produced from the par...

  14. Interstellar and Planetary Analogs in the Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss the unique capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation (UV, charged particles) with molecular species (neutral molecules, radicals and ions) and carbonaceous grains in the Solar System and in the Interstellar Medium (ISM). COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber, a laboratory chamber where interstellar and planetary analogs are generated, processed and analyzed. It is composed of a pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a free jet supersonic expansion in a plasma cavity coupled to two ultrahigh-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for photonic detection and a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection. This setup allows the study of molecules, ions and solids under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate some interstellar, circumstellar and planetary physical environments providing new fundamental insights on the molecular level into the processes that are critical to the chemistry in the ISM, circumstellar and planet forming regions, and on icy objects in the Solar System. Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be discussed, in particular the progress that have been achieved in monitoring in the laboratory the formation of solid particles from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as circumstellar outflow and planetary atmospheres.

  15. Engineering information on an Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter (ASDT-IC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An electronic control system for nondissipative dc power converters is presented which improves (1) the routinely attainable static output voltage accuracy to the order of + or - 1% for ambient temperatures from -55 to 100 C and (2) the dynamic stability by utilizing approximately one tenth of the feedback gain needed otherwise. Performance is due to a functional philosophy of deterministic pulse modulation based on pulse area control and to an autocompensated signal processing principle. The system can be implemented with commercially available unselected components.

  16. Meat analog: a review.

    PubMed

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers. PMID:24915320

  17. A novel passive electric network analog to Kirchhoff-Love plate designed to efficiently damp forced vibrations by distributed piezoelectric tranducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandroni, Silvio; Andreaus, Ugo; dell'lsola, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    Recently the concept of Piezo-Electro-Mechanical (PEM) structural member has been developed. Given a structural member, a set of piezoelectric actuators if uniformly distributed on it and electrically interconnected by one of its analog circuits. In this way it is obtained a high-performances piezoelectric structural-modification aiming to multimodal mechanical vibrations control. In the present paper it is addressed the problem of synthesizing an electrically dissipative PEM Kirchhoff-Love (K-L) plate by using completely passive electric networks.

  18. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  19. Status of the ITER IC H and CD System

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P. U.; Beaumont, B.; Gassmann, T.; Kazarian, F.; Arambhadiya, B.; Bora, D.; Jacquinot, J.; Mitteau, R.; Schueller, F. C.; Tanga, A.; Baruah, U.; Bhardwaj, A.; Kumar, R.; Mukherjee, A.; Singh, N. P.; Singh, R.; Goulding, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Swain, D.; Agarici, G.

    2009-11-26

    The ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system will deliver 20 MW of radio frequency power to the plasma in quasi continuous operation during the different phases of the experimental programme. The system also has to perform conditioning of the tokamak first wall at low power between main plasma discharges. This broad range of requirements imposes a high flexibility and a high availability. The paper highlights the physics and design requirements on the IC system, the main features of its subsystems, the predicted performance, and the current procurement and installation schedule.

  20. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  1. Chip Design Process Optimization Based on Design Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Stefan; Blaschke, Jana; Sebeke, Christian; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Hahn, Axel

    2010-06-01

    Nowadays, the managing of product development projects is increasingly challenging. Especially the IC design of ASICs with both analog and digital components (mixed-signal design) is becoming more and more complex, while the time-to-market window narrows at the same time. Still, high quality standards must be fulfilled. Projects and their status are becoming less transparent due to this complexity. This makes the planning and execution of projects rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need for efficient project control. A main challenge is the objective evaluation of the current development status. Are all requirements successfully verified? Are all intermediate goals achieved? Companies often develop special solutions that are not reusable in other projects. This makes the quality measurement process itself less efficient and produces too much overhead. The method proposed in this paper is a contribution to solve these issues. It is applied at a German design house for analog mixed-signal IC design. This paper presents the results of a case study and introduces an optimized project scheduling on the basis of quality assessment results.

  2. Leishmanicidal Effect of Synthetic trans-Resveratrol Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Stilbene-based compounds show antitumoral, antioxidant, antihistaminic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. Here, we evaluated the effect of the trans-resveratrol analogs, pterostilbene, piceatannol, polydatin and oxyresveratrol, against Leishmania amazonensis. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results demonstrated a low murine macrophage cytotoxicity of all four analogs. Moreover, pterostilbene, piceatannol, polydatin and oxyresveratrol showed an anti-L. amazonensis activity with IC50 values of 18 μM, 65 μM, 95 μM and 65 μM for promastigotes, respectively. For intracellular amastigotes, the IC50 values of the analogs were 33.2 μM, 45 μM, 29 μM and 30.5 μM, respectively. Among the analogs assayed only piceatannol altered the cell cycle of the parasite, increasing 5-fold the cells in the Sub-G0 phase and decreasing 1.7-fold the cells in the G0-G1 phase. Piceatannol also changed the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and increased the number of annexin-V positive promastigotes, which suggests incidental death. Conclusion/Significance Among the analogs tested, piceatannol, which is a metabolite of resveratrol, was the more promising candidate for future studies regarding treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:26517558

  3. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  4. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P.; Smith, C.K.

    1991-09-01

    Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.

  5. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  6. Molecular Hydrogen Fluorescence in IC 63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, B-G

    2005-01-01

    This grant has supported the acquisition, reduction and analysis of data targeting the structure and excitation of molecular hydrogen in the reflection nebula IC 63 and in particular the fluorescent emission seen in the UV. In addition to manpower for analyzing the FUSE data, the grant supported the (attempted) acquisition of supporting ground-based data. We proposed for and received observing time for two sets of ground based, data; narrow band imaging ([S II], [O III) at KPNO (July 2002; Observer: Burgh) and imaging spectro-photometry of several of the near-infrared rotation-vibration lines of H2 at the IRTF (October 2003; Observer: Andersson). Unfortunately, both of these runs were failures, primarily because of bad weather, and did not result in any useful data. We combined the FUSE observations with rocket borne observations of the star responsible for exciting the H2 fluorescence in IC 63: gamma Cas, and with archival HUT observations of IC 63, covering the long-wavelength part of the molecular hydrogen fluorescence.

  7. Wire-bond inspection in IC assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Mandava; Rodd, Mike G.

    1996-02-01

    Wire-bonding in IC assembly process involves making a physical connection between the IC 'die' and the 'lead' by bonding wires between the two. Inspection of wire-bond quality is a' highly labor-intensive process and currently efforts are being made to automate it. This paper presents the results of a research conducted into developing a comprehensive automated wire- bond visual inspection system that is capable of performing final accept/reject inspection, providing on-line process feedback, and assisting in process validation. The proposed inspection system consists of the inspection of the bond on a bond pad, the bond on a lead and the inter-connecting wire between a bond pad and its corresponding lead. The algorithms are based on simple and easily extractable features that ensure achieving the desired accuracy and speed. A novel but simple illumination system is proposed to obtain the images of the inter- connecting wires. The proposed system is validated using several state-of-the-art IC samples. This work is sponsored by the Ministry of Science Technology and Environment, Malaysia and Intel Technology Pvt. Ltd., Malaysia.

  8. Simulation of SEU transients in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, N.; Bhuva, B.L.; Kerns, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that available analytical models of the number of single-event-induced errors (SEU) in combinational logic systems are not easily applicable to real integrated circuits (ICs). An efficient computer simulation algorithm set, SITA, predicts the vulnerability of data stored in and processed by complex combinational logic circuits to SEU. SITA is described in detail to allow researchers to incorporate it into their error analysis packages. Required simulation algorithms are based on approximate closed-form equations modeling individual device behavior in CMOS logic units. Device-level simulation is used to estimate the probability that ion-device interactions produce erroneous signals capable of propagating to a latch (or n output node), and logic-level simulation to predict the spread of such erroneous, latched information through the IC. Simulation results are compared to those from SPICE for several circuit and logic configurations. SITA results are comparable to this established circuit-level code, and SITA can analyze circuits with state-of-the-art device densities (which SPICE cannot). At all IC complexity levels, SITAS offers several factors of 10 savings in simulation time over SPICE.

  9. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  10. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd

    2007-01-01

    In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

  11. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  12. Analog front-end measuring biopotential signal with effective offset rejection loop.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seunghyun; Kim, Hyunho; Song, Haryong; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analog front-end (AFE) IC design for recording biopotential signals. The AFE employs a capacitively coupled instrumentation amplifier to achieve a low-noise and high-common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) system. A ripple reduction loop is proposed to reduce the ripple generated by the up-modulating chopper. The low frequency noise is attenuated by an input AC coupling capacitor, and is attenuated again by a DC servo loop. The proposed AFE features a differential gain of 71 dB, and a CMRR of 89 dB, at 50 Hz. Furthermore, the proposed AFE can robustly acquire biopotential signals even in the presence of an input offset and ripples. PMID:26406095

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of analogs of the phenylpyridazinone NPD-001 as potent trypanosomal TbrPDEB1 phosphodiesterase inhibitors and in vitro trypanocidals.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Johan; van den Bergh, Toine; Orrling, Kristina M; Jansen, Chimed; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Chatelain, Eric; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Edink, Ewald E; Tenor, Hermann; Seebeck, Thomas; de Esch, Iwan; Leurs, Rob; Sterk, Geert Jan

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosomal phosphodiesterases B1 and B2 (TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2) play an important role in the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative parasite of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as African sleeping sickness. Knock down of both enzymes leads to cell cycle arrest and is lethal to the parasite. Recently, we reported the phenylpyridazinone, NPD-001, with low nanomolar IC50 values on both TbrPDEB1 (IC50: 4nM) and TbrPDEB2 (IC50: 3nM) (J. Infect. Dis.2012, 206, 229). In this study, we now report on the first structure activity relationships of a series of phenylpyridazinone analogs as TbrPDEB1 inhibitors. A selection of compounds was also shown to be anti-parasitic. Importantly, a good correlation between TbrPDEB1 IC50 and EC50 against the whole parasite was observed. Preliminary analysis of the SAR of selected compounds on TbrPDEB1 and human PDEs shows large differences which shows the potential for obtaining parasite selective PDE inhibitors. The results of these studies support the pharmacological validation of the Trypanosome PDEB family as novel therapeutic approach for HAT and provide as well valuable information for the design of potent TbrPDEB1 inhibitors that could be used for the treatment of this disease. PMID:26935942

  14. Advanced digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants: Risk- sensitivities to environmental stressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1996-06-01

    Microprocessor-based advanced digital systems are being used for upgrading analog instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. A concern with using such advanced systems for safety-related applications in NPPs is the limited experience with this equipment in these environments. In this study, we investigate the risk effects of environmental stressors by quantifying the plant`s risk-sensitivities to them. The risk- sensitivities are changes in plant risk caused by the stressors, and are quantified by estimating their effects on I&C failure occurrences and the consequent increase in risk in terms of core damage frequency (CDF). We used available data, including military and NPP operating experience, on the effects of environmental stressors on the reliability of digital I&C equipment. The methods developed are applied to determine and compare risk-sensitivities to temperature, humidity, vibration, EMI (electromagnetic interference) from lightning and smoke as stressors in an example plant using a PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment). Uncertainties in the estimates of the stressor effects on the equipment`s reliability are expressed in terms of ranges for risk-sensitivities. The results show that environmental stressors potentially can cause a significant increase in I&C contributions to the CDF. Further, considerable variations can be expected in some stressor effects, depending on where the equipment is located.

  15. The conformational properties of methyl α-(2,8)-di/trisialosides and their N-acyl analogs: Implications for anti-Neisseria meningitidis B vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Yongye, Austin B.; Gonzalez-Outeiriño, Jorge; Glushka, John; Schultheis, Verena; Woods, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The conformational properties of di- and trisaccharide fragments of the polysialic acid O-antigen capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Neisseria meningitidis B (NmB), have been investigated by a combination of solution phase NMR spectroscopy and explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Simulations employing 100 ns of conventional MD, as well as 160 ns of replica exchange MD (REMD), with the GLYCAM06 force field were shown to be in agreement with experimental NMR scalar J-coupling and nOe values. The presence of conformational families has been determined by monitoring inter-glycosidic torsion angles, by comparing structural superimpositions, as well as via a Bayesian statistical analysis of the torsional data. Attempts to augment the immunogenicity of NmB CPS often involve chemical modifications of the N-acetyl moiety. Here the effects of these chemical group modifications on the conformational properties of the trisialoside have been probed via REMD simulations of the N-glycolyl, N-propionyl, N-propyl and N-butanoyl analogs. Although there were conformational families unique to each non-native analog, the chemical modifications resulted in largely equivalent overall conformational phase-spaces compared to the native trisialoside. On the basis of the conformational distributions, these shared conformational properties suggest that a recurrent global conformational epitope may be present in both the native and chemically modified CPS fragments. Explanations are therefore provided for monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity, in terms of recognition of a shared global CPS conformation, as well as for lack of cross-reactivity, in terms of fine structural differences associated with the N-acyl groups, which may be dominant in highly matured antibody responses. PMID:18954144

  16. Comparative evaluation of pressure generated on a simulated maxillary oral analog by impression materials in custom trays of different spacer designs: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sakshi; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Tandan, Amrit; Dwivedi, Ravi; Gupta, Swati; Agarwal, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Literature reveals that masticatory load on denture bearing tissues through complete dentures should be maximum on primary stress bearing areas and least on relief area in accordance with the histology of underlying tissues. A study to validate the existing beliefs was planned to compare the pressure on mucosa using selective pressure technique and minimal pressure technique, with the incorporation of two different impression materials utilizing the pressure sensors during secondary impression procedure. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using a maxillary analog. Three pressure sensors were imbedded in the oral analog, one in the mid palatine area and the other two in the right and left ridge crest. Custom trays of two different configurations were fabricated. The two impression materials tested were light body and zinc oxide eugenol. A total of 40 impressions were made. A constant weight of 1 kg was placed, and the pressure was recorded as initial and end pressures. Results: A significant difference in the pressure produced using different impression materials was found (P < 0.001). Light body vinyl polysiloxane produced significantly lesser pressure than zinc oxide eugenol impression materials. The presence of relief did affect the magnitude of pressure at various locations. Conclusion: All impression materials produced pressure during maxillary edentulous impression making. Tray modification is an important factor in changing the amount of pressure produced. The impression materials used also had a significant role to play on the pressures acting on the tissues during impression procedure. Clinical Implication: Light body VPS impression material may be recommended to achieve minimal pressure on the denture bearing tissues in both selective as well as minimal pressure techniques. PMID:27041902

  17. Special IC's in digital switching - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, S. D.

    1981-08-01

    This paper traces the influence of special-purpose integrated and LSI circuits in digital switching systems. The existence of custom digital chips, codecs and filters, and high- and low-voltage analog crosspoint arrays is related to the choice between alternative architectures. Recent trends toward replacing mature components such as transformers by subscriber line interface circuits (SLIC's) are outlined

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photograph taken on August 5th, 1961, a back hoe is nearly submerged in water in the test stand site. During the initial digging, the disturbance of a natural spring contributed to constant water problems during the construction process. It was necessary to pump the water from the site on a daily basis and is still pumped from the site today.

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the construction progress of the test stand as of August 14, 1961. Water gushing in from the disturbance of a natural spring contributed to constant water problems during the construction process. It was necessary to pump water from the site on a daily basis and is still pumped from the site today. The equipment is partially submerged in the water emerging from the spring.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows the construction of forms which became the concrete foundation for the massive stand. The lower right hand corner reveals a pump used for extracting water emerging from a disturbed natural spring that occurred during excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  1. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph of the Pump House area was taken August 13, 1963. The massive round water storage tanks can be seen to the left of

  2. Construction Progress S-IC Test Stand Block House Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken August 12, 1963, offers a view of the Block House interior.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a six month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications in March 1962. The original foundation walls built in the prior year were torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger boosters. This photo depicts that modification progress as of June 13,1962.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a 6 month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications. The original foundation walls built in the prior year had to be torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger booster. The demolition can be seen in this photograph taken on May 21, 1962.

  5. Design of a case management model for people with chronic disease (Heart Failure and COPD). Phase I: modeling and identification of the main components of the intervention through their actors: patients and professionals (DELTA-icE-PRO Study)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases account for nearly 60% of deaths around the world. The extent of this silent epidemic has not met determined responses in governments, policies or professionals in order to transform old Health Care Systems, configured for acute diseases. There is a large list of research about alternative models for people with chronic conditions, many of them with an advanced practice nurse as a key provider, as case management. But some methodological concerns raise, above all, the design of the intervention (intensity, frequency, components, etc). Methods/Design Objectives: General: To develop the first and second phases (theorization and modeling) for designing a multifaceted case-management intervention in people with chronic conditions (COPD and heart failure) and their caregivers. Specific aims: 1) To identify key events in people living with chronic disease and their relation with the Health Care System, from their point of view. 2) To know the coping mechanisms developed by patients and their caregivers along the story with the disease. 3) To know the information processing and its utilization in their interactions with health care providers. 4) To detect potential unmet needs and the ways deployed by patients and their caregivers to resolve them. 5) To obtain a description from patients and caregivers, about their itineraries along the Health Care System, in terms of continuity, accessibility and comprehensiveness of care. 6) To build up a list of promising case-management interventions in patients with Heart Failure and COPD with this information in order to frame it into theoretical models for its reproducibility and conceptualization. 7) To undergo this list to expert judgment to assess its feasibility and pertinence in the Andalusian Health Care. Design: Qualitative research with two phases: For the first five objectives, a qualitative technique with biographic stories will be developed and, for the remaining objectives, an expert

  6. Finding Young Stars in IC417

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odden, Caroline; Rebull, Luisa M.; Sanchez, Richard; Hall, Garrison; Dear, AnnaMaria; Hengel, Cassie; LaRocca, Mia; Lin, Samantha; Nix, Sabine; Sweckard, Teaghan; Wilhelm, Katie

    2016-01-01

    IC 417 is a young cluster in the constellation Auriga, towards the Galactic anti-center in the Perseus arm, at a distance of ~2.3 kpc. Previous studies suggested that there are young stars in this region; Camargo et al. (2012) identified several few-Myr-old clusters in this region from 2MASS clustering, and Jose et al. (2008) identified H-alpha excess sources. Since stars form from clouds of interstellar dust and gas, a signature of star formation is excess infrared (IR) emission, which is interpreted as evidence for circumstellar dust around young stars. We identified new candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in IC 417 by incorporating near- and mid-infrared observations from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). Infrared excess sources were identified by using a series of color cuts in various 2MASS/WISE color-magnitude and color-color diagrams following Koenig & Leisawitz (2014). We also assembled a list of OB and H-alpha stars from the literature, including those from Jose et al. (2008), and H-alpha bright stars from the IPHAS survey (Witham et al. 2008). Starting with this compiled list of approximately 200 interesting objects in the region, we then set about checking their reliability in three ways. We inspected the POSS, 2MASS, and WISE images of the sources. We assembled and inspected spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from archival data ranging from wavelengths of 0.7 to 22 um. Finally, we created and inspected color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. We find enough new YSO candidates to more than double the number yet identified in the IC 417 region. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program.

  7. Low-power analog integrated circuits for wireless ECG acquisition systems.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Hong, Jia-Hua; Wang, Liang-Hung; Lee, Shuenn-Yuh

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents low-power analog ICs for wireless ECG acquisition systems. Considering the power-efficient communication in the body sensor network, the required low-power analog ICs are developed for a healthcare system through miniaturization and system integration. To acquire the ECG signal, a low-power analog front-end system, including an ECG signal acquisition board, an on-chip low-pass filter, and an on-chip successive-approximation analog-to-digital converter for portable ECG detection devices is presented. A quadrature CMOS voltage-controlled oscillator and a 2.4 GHz direct-conversion transmitter with a power amplifier and upconversion mixer are also developed to transmit the ECG signal through wireless communication. In the receiver, a 2.4 GHz fully integrated CMOS RF front end with a low-noise amplifier, differential power splitter, and quadrature mixer based on current-reused folded architecture is proposed. The circuits have been implemented to meet the specifications of the IEEE 802.15.4 2.4 GHz standard. The low-power ICs of the wireless ECG acquisition systems have been fabricated using a 0.18 μm Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) CMOS standard process. The measured results on the human body reveal that ECG signals can be acquired effectively by the proposed low-power analog front-end ICs. PMID:22374371

  8. Digital and analog communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  9. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  10. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  11. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  12. Silicon photonics-wireless interface ICs for micro-/millimeter-wave fiber-wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Ko, Minsu; Lee, Myung-Jae; Rücker, Holger; Choi, Woo-Young

    2013-09-23

    We present two types of Si photonics-wireless interface (PWI) integrated circuits (ICs) realized in standard Si technology. Our PWI ICs convert optical signals into radio-frequency (RF) signals for downlink remote antenna units in fiber-wireless networks. Characterization and modeling of Si avalanche photodetectors (APDs) fabricated in two different Si technologies are carried out and used for PWI IC design. A 5-GHz RF-over-fiber PWI IC composed of APD, preamplifier, and power amplifier (PA) is fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology and its performance is verified by 54-Mb/s wireless local area network data transmission. A 60-GHz baseband-over-fiber PWI IC containing APD, baseband photoreceiver, 60-GHz binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulator, and 60-GHz PA is realized in 0.25-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. Error-free transmission of 1.6-Gb/s BPSK data in 60 GHz with this PWI IC is successfully achieved. PMID:24104180

  13. Achieving asthma control with ICS/LABA: A review of strategies for asthma management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, René; Vogelmeier, Claus; Kuna, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Maintenance treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) is recommended for patients whose asthma is not controlled with a low-to-moderate dose of ICS alone; a separate reliever medication is used on an as-needed basis. The Gaining Optimal Asthma ControL (GOAL) study demonstrated that salmeterol/fluticasone maintenance treatment can improve asthma control and reduce future risk compared with fluticasone alone, although the dose escalation design of this study meant that most patients treated with salmeterol/fluticasone were receiving the highest dose of ICS at the end of the study. Similarly, budesonide/formoterol maintenance therapy improved asthma control and reduced future risk compared with budesonide alone in the Formoterol and Corticosteroids Establishing Therapy (FACET) study. An alternative approach to asthma management is to use an ICS/LABA for both maintenance and reliever therapy. A large body of clinical evidence has shown that the use of budesonide/formoterol in this way improves both current control and reduces future risk compared with ICS/LABA plus as-needed short-acting β2-agonist (SABA), even when patients receive lower maintenance doses of ICS as part of the maintenance and reliever therapy regimen. In addition, one study has shown that beclometasone/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy reduces exacerbations more effectively than beclometasone/formoterol plus as-needed SABA. The use of ICS/LABA as both maintenance and reliever therapy ensures that an increase in reliever use in response to worsening symptoms is automatically matched by an increase in ICS. PMID:26614594

  14. Chemical Transformation and Biological Studies of Marine Sesquiterpene (S)-(+)-Curcuphenol and Its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Waseem; Hammond, Nicholas L.; Yousaf, Muhammad; Peng, Jiangnan; Holley, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Chemical transformation studies of the marine sesquiterpene phenol (S)-(+)-curcuphenol (1) isolated from the Jamaican sponges, Didiscus oxeata and Myrmekioderma styx, were accomplished. In order to optimize the activity and better understand the SAR of (S)-(+)-curcuphenol, nineteen semisynthetic analogs were prepared and evaluated for activity against infectious diseases. A number of analogs showed significant activity against Mtb and Leishmania donovani, while showing good to moderate activities in antibacterial and antifungal assays as well as against P. falciparium (D6 clone) and (W2 clone). The analogs a, c, h, and r exhibited Mtb activity with MICs of 24.6, 41.2, 6.90, and 50.5 μM, respectively. Analog f shows enhanced activity against L. donovani with an IC50 of 0.6 μM and IC90 of 40 μM respectively. PMID:17804167

  15. Air-turbulence-compensated interferometer for IC manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Steven A.

    1995-05-01

    SPARTA has developed a novel dual wavelength interferometer which is directly aimed at stepper stage control and general IC metrology. It utilizes an existing HeNe based dual frequency interferometric system and couples it directly to a second system which provides the real time air turbulence compensation. The optical design provides for colinear optical beam paths for the two systems over the measurement path. Compensated position measurements are provided at a rate of 30 Hz which is sufficient to permit high throughput stage positioning for all modern steppers. Stage position accuracy is determined to 4 nm 3(sigma) and stage precision (which is a two pass operation) can be 5.6 nm 3(sigma) . Future improvements in performance can be expected since the present design is not near fundamental limits. The interferometric system design has a form factor compatible with existing stepper systems. Testing of this system has been carried out in a laboratory environment under a variety of conditions, including those which would simulate a clean room environment. Test results are used in detail and conclusions will be presented which define the impact this system can have on stepper overlay performance and IC metrology. Because the interferometer is the basic ruler upon which much of the stepper metrology, setup, and operation is based, an improvement in performance of this system provides numerous benefits in the areas of stage precision, alignment, lens metrology, and reticle qualification and fabrication. Furthermore, the elimination of air turbulence as a stepper design concern can permit improvements in stepper performance and throughput with fewer engineering compromises.

  16. Designing remote operations strategies to optimize science mission goals: Lessons learned from the Moon Mars Analog Mission Activities Mauna Kea 2012 field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Russell, P.; ten Kate, I. L.; Noble, S.; Graff, T.; Graham, L. D.; Eppler, D.

    2015-08-01

    The Moon Mars Analog Mission Activities Mauna Kea 2012 (MMAMA 2012) field campaign aimed to assess how effectively an integrated science and engineering rover team operating on a 24-h planning cycle facilitates high-fidelity science products. The science driver of this field campaign was to determine the origin of a glacially-derived deposit: was the deposit the result of (1) glacial outwash from meltwater; or (2) the result of an ice dam breach at the head of the valley? Lessons learned from MMAMA 2012 science operations include: (1) current rover science operations scenarios tested in this environment provide adequate data to yield accurate derivative products such as geologic maps; (2) instrumentation should be selected based on both engineering and science goals; and chosen during, rather than after, mission definition; and (3) paralleling the tactical and strategic science processes provides significant efficiencies that impact science return. The MER-model concept of operations utilized, in which rover operators were sufficiently facile with science intent to alter traverse and sampling plans during plan execution, increased science efficiency, gave the Science Backroom time to develop mature hypotheses and science rationales, and partially alleviated the problem of data flow being greater than the processing speed of the scientists.

  17. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of JDTic analogs to examine the significance of replacement of the 3-hydroxyphenyl group with pyridine or thiophene bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Kormos, Chad M; Gichinga, Moses G; Runyon, Scott P; Thomas, James B; Mascarella, S Wayne; Decker, Ann M; Navarro, Hernán A; Carroll, F Ivy

    2016-08-15

    The potent and selective KOR antagonist JDTic was derived from the N-substituted trans-3,4-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine class of pure opioid antagonists. In previous studies we reported that compounds that did not have a hydroxyl on the 3-hydroxyphenyl group and did not have methyl groups at the 3- and 4-position of the piperidine ring were still potent and selective KOR antagonists. In this study we report JDTic analogs 2, 3a-b, 4a-b, and 5, where the 3-hydroxyphenyl ring has been replaced by a 2-, 3-, or 4-pyridyl or 3-thienyl group and do not have the 3-methyl or 3,4-dimethyl groups, remain potent and selective KOR antagonists. Of these, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-(1S)-2-methyl-[4-methyl-4-pyridine-3-yl-carboxamide (3b) had the best overall binding potency and selectivity in a [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay, with a Ke=0.18nM at the KOR and 273- and 16,700-fold selectivity for the KOR relative to the MOR and DOR, respectively. Calculated physiochemical properties for 3b suggest that it will cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27364611

  18. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  19. Trends in nondestructive imaging of IC packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. M.; Hartfield, C. D.

    1998-11-01

    Since the industry-wide conversion to surface mount packages in the mid-1980's, nondestructive imaging of moisture induced delaminations and cracks in plastic packaged ICs by scanning acoustic microscopy has been a critically important capability. Subsurface imaging and phase analysis of echoes has allowed scanning acoustic microscopy to become the primary nondestructive technique for component level inspection of packaged ICs and is sensitive to defects that are undetectable by real time x-ray inspection. It has become the preferred method for evaluating moisture sensitivity, and for many package processes, provides more reliable detection of wire bond degradation than physical cross sectioning or conventional electrical testing. However, the introduction of new technologies such as ball grid array (BGA) and flip chip packages demands improvements in acoustic inspection techniques. Echoes from the laminated substrates in BGA packages produce interference problems. Phase inversion detection is an important advantage of pulse-echo imaging of molded surface mount packages. However, phase inversion is not always helpful for delamination detection in these new packages, due to the properties of the materials involved. The requirement to nondestructively inspect flip chip interconnect bumps has arisen. Alternative approaches such as through-transmission screening of BGAs and high frequency (>200 MHz) pulse-echo inspection of flip chip bumps are addressing these new issues. As the acoustic frequency approaches the limits dictated by attenuation, new methods of frequency-domain signal analysis will become important for routine inspection and may give acoustic microscopy a predictive capability.

  20. The Violent Interstellar Medium of IC 2574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, F.; Brinks, E.; Duric, N.; Kerp, J.; Klein, U.

    1998-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the Violent Interstellar Medium of the nearby dwarf galaxy IC 2574, a member of the M81 group of galaxies. In particular, we concentrate on the most prominent supergiant shell in IC 2574 which was detected in neutral hydrogen (H I) observations obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA). This shell is thought to be produced by the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova explosions. Massive star forming regions, as traced by Hα emission, are situated predominantly on the rim of this H I shell. This supports the view that the accumulated H I on the rim has reached densities which are high enough for secondary star formation to commence. Soft X-ray emission from within the H I hole is detected by a pointed ROSAT PSPC observation. The emission is extended and has the same size and orientation as the H I shell. These spatial properties together with a first-order spectral analysis suggest that the emission is generated by an X-ray emitting plasma located within the H I shell. However, a contribution from X-ray binaries cannot be completely ruled out at this point.

  1. From incoherent to coherent x-rays with ICS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Graves, William S.; Moncton, David E.

    2015-08-01

    We present the design and performance parameters for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS), which is presently under construction, based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The flux and brilliance of this source are orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources. The accelerator operates at a repetition rate of 1 kHz with 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns, in each shot. The entire CXLS is a few meters in length and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The scattering laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 100 mJ pulses at 1030 nm. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and coupled into a ringdown cavity to match the linac pulse structure. At a photon energy of 12.4 keV, the predicted x-ray flux is 5×1011 photons/second in a 5% bandwidth and the brilliance is 2×1012 photons/(secmm2mrad20.1%) with a RMS pulse length of 490 fs. Novel concepts for improving the performance of the CXLS with the generation of relativistic electron beams having current modulation at nanometer scale and below are also discussed. This tunable longitudinal modulation enables the production of coherent hard x-rays with ICS.

  2. Chemical modification and structure-activity relationships of pyripyropenes. 2. 1,11-Cyclic analogs.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Kato, Y; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    1996-11-01

    A series of 1,11-cyclic analogs of pyripyropene A were prepared. Replacement of the 1,11-acyl groups of pyripyropenes with 1,11-cyclic acetals effectively improved in vitro acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitory activity. Especially noteworthy is benzylidene acetal analog 35, the most potent inhibitor (IC50 = 5.6 nM) among the derivatives prepared so far, which showed 16 times more potent inhibitory activity than pyripyropene A. PMID:8982344

  3. Reasoning through Instructional Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to account for students' assessments of the plausibility and applicability of analogical explanations, and individual differences in these assessments, by analyzing properties of students' underlying knowledge systems. We developed a model of explanation and change in explanation focusing on knowledge elements that provide a…

  4. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  5. Learning by Analogical Bootstrapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miao, Chun-Hui; Kurtz, Kenneth J.; Gentner, Dedre

    2001-01-01

    Reports on research into whether mutual alignment of partially known situations can be an effective strategy when compared to the common procedure of drawing analogies from a well understood situation to one that is poorly understood. Results suggest that such mutual alignment is an effective means of promoting insight. (MM)

  6. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  7. An Interesting Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Jose M.; Fernandez, Isabel

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this note is to give some insight into the formal unity of a very applicable area of mathematics by showing an interesting analogy between the weak part of the Rouche-Frobenius theorem and the existence result for the initial value problem for the general first-order linear two-dimensional PDE.

  8. How Analogy Drives Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadter, Doug

    2004-05-05

    Many new ideas in theoretical physics come from analogies to older ideas in physics. For instance, the abstract notion of 'isospin' (or isotopic spin) originated in the prior concept of 'spin' (quantized angular momentum); likewise, the concept of 'phonon' (quantum of sound, or quantized collective excitation of a crystal) was based on the prior concept of 'photon' (quantum of light, or quantized element of the electromagnetic field). But these two examples, far from being exceptions, in fact represent the bread and butter of inventive thinking in physics. In a nutshell, intraphysics analogy-making -- borrowing by analogy with something already known in another area of physics -- is central to the progress of physics. The aim of this talk is to reveal the pervasiveness -- indeed, the indispensability -- of this kind of semi-irrational, wholly intuitive type of thinking (as opposed to more deductive mathematical inference) in the mental activity known as 'doing physics'. Speculations as to why wild analogical leaps are so crucial to the act of discovery in physics (as opposed to other disciplines) will be offered.

  9. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  10. Winds of low-metallicity OB-type stars: HST-COS spectroscopy in IC 1613

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Miriam; Najarro, Francisco; Herrero, Artemio; Urbaneja, Miguel Alejandro

    2014-06-10

    We present the first quantitative ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of resolved OB stars in IC 1613. Because of its alleged very low metallicity (≲1/10 Z {sub ☉}, from H II regions), studies in this Local Group dwarf galaxy could become a significant step forward from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) toward the extremely metal-poor massive stars of the early universe. We present HST-COS data covering the ∼1150-1800 Å wavelength range with resolution R ∼ 2500. We find that the targets do exhibit wind features, and these are similar in strength to SMC stars. Wind terminal velocities were derived from the observed P Cygni profiles with the Sobolev plus Exact Integration method. The v {sub ∞}-Z relationship has been revisited. The terminal velocity of IC 1613 O stars is clearly lower than Milky Way counterparts, but there is no clear difference between IC 1613 and SMC or LMC analog stars. We find no clear segregation with host galaxy in the terminal velocities of B-supergiants, nor in the v {sub ∞}/v {sub esc} ratio of the whole OB star sample in any of the studied galaxies. Finally, we present the first evidence that the Fe-abundance of IC 1613 OB stars is similar to the SMC, which is in agreement with previous results on red supergiants. With the confirmed ∼1/10 solar oxygen abundances of B-supergiants, our results indicate that IC 1613's α/Fe ratio is sub-solar.

  11. Anti-AIDS agents 79. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and structure-activity relationships of novel dicamphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyranochromone (DCP) analogs as potent anti-HIV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Zhu, Hao; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    In a continued study, 23 3′R,4′R-di-O-(−)-camphanoyl-2′,2′-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) derivatives (5–27) were synthesized, and screened for anti-HIV activity against both a non-drug-resistant NL4-3 strain and multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR-1) strain, using 2-EDCP (4) and 2-MDCP (35) as controls. New DCP analogs 5, 9, 14, and 22 exhibited potent anti-HIV activity against HIVNL4-3 with EC50 and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 0.036 μM to 0.14 μM and from 110 to 420, respectively. Compounds 5 and 9 also exhibited good activity against RTMDR-1 (EC50 0.049 and 0.054 μM; TI 310 and 200, respectively), and were two-fold more potent than the leads 4 and 35 (EC50 0.11 and 0.19 μM; TI 60 and 58, respectively). Evaluation of water solubility showed that 5 and 22 were 5–10 times more water soluble than 4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling results were first performed on this compound type, and the models should aid in design of future anti-HIV DCP analogs and potential clinical drug candidates. PMID:20728367

  12. Anti-AIDS agents 79. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and structure-activity relationships of novel dicamphanoyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyranochromone (DCP) analogs as potent anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Zhu, Hao; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-09-15

    In a continued study, 23 3'R,4'R-di-O-(-)-camphanoyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) derivatives (5-27) were synthesized, and screened for anti-HIV activity against both a non-drug-resistant NL4-3 strain and multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR-1) strain, using 2-EDCP (4) and 2-MDCP (35) as controls. New DCP analogs 5, 9, 14, and 22 exhibited potent anti-HIV activity against HIVNL4-3 with EC50 and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 0.036 microM to 0.14 microM and from 110 to 420, respectively. Compounds 5 and 9 also exhibited good activity against RTMDR-1 (EC50 0.049 and 0.054 microM; TI 310 and 200, respectively), and were twofold more potent than the leads 4 and 35 (EC50 0.11 and 0.19 microM; TI 60 and 58, respectively). Evaluation of water solubility showed that 5 and 22 were 5-10 times more water soluble than 4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling results were first performed on this compound type, and the models should aid in design of future anti-HIV DCP analogs and potential clinical drug candidates. PMID:20728367

  13. The Effect of Analogy-Based Teaching on Students' Achievement and Students' Views about Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the analogy-based teaching on students' achievement and students' views about analogies. In this research, Solomon group design which is one of the experimental designs, was implemented. The sample of the research consists of 108 students in four 6th grade classes in Turkey. The…

  14. A revolutionary concept to improve the efficiency of IC antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2014-02-12

    The successful design of an Ion Cyclotron (IC) antenna mainly relies on the capability of coupling high power to the plasma (MW), feature that is currently reached by allowing rather high voltages (tens of kV) on the unavoidable unmatched part of the feeding lines. This requirement is often responsible of arcs along the transmission lines and other unwanted phenomena that considerably limit the usage of IC launchers. In this work, we suggest and describe a revolutionary approach based on high impedance surfaces, which allows to increase the antenna radiation efficiency and, hence, to highly reduce the imposed voltages to couple the same level of power to the plasma. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) displaced usually on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts usually embedded inside a dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. In terms of working properties, high impedance surfaces are electrically thin in-phase reflectors, i.e. they present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. While the usual design of a high impedance surface requires the presence of a dielectric layer, some alternative solutions can be realized in vacuum, taking advantage of double layers ofmetallic patches. After an introductory part on the properties of high impedance surfaces, this work documents both their design by means of numerical codes and their implementation on a scaled mock-up.

  15. Superconducting analog-to-digital converters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    The contents include: superconducting analog-to-digital converter work at MITRE; development of a rapidly tunable microwave source; design and evaluation of a Josephson array oscillator; obtaining high-accuracy measurements from low-accuracy measurements; superconducting microwave transmission lines; high performance, superconducting analog-to-digital converter; edge sharpening with Josephson Junction; design evaluation of a subranging superconducting analog-to-digital converter; feasibility study of a superconducting sigma-delta analog-to-digital converter, and VHDL simulation study of superconducting sigma delta modulators.

  16. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  17. Nuclear radiation test of a D flip-flop IC using a single-board microcomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T.S.; Martin, R.L.; Hughes, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a microcomputer-controlled electronic circuit and its use in evaluating the effects of nuclear radiation on a 4013 CMOS D flip-flop (FF) integrated circuit (IC) are described. The IC undergoing testing is attached to a DUT (device under test) board, which is enclosed in a metal container. The container is then lowered to the cobalt 60 radiation source located at the bottom of a 15-ft-deep pool filled to the top with water. The gamma-ray radiation test setup is schematically shown. The in-source test board containing the D FF IC is attached to an 8085-based single-board microcomputer, SDK-85, by a 30-ft multiconductor cable. Doses of gamma-ray radiation from the cobalt 60 are applied in steps at increasing quantities until the D FF IC, which is tested between doses, begins to malfunction. The leakage current and the propagation delay time are measured between doses. An 8085 assembly language program is used for functional test of the IC. The software design and the radiation testing procedure are discussed in detail.

  18. Electrical performance analysis of IC package for the high-end memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong H.; Han, Chan M.

    1997-08-01

    The developments of processing technology and design make it possible to increase the clock speed and the number of input outputs (I/Os) in memory devices. The interconnections of IC package are considered as an important factor to decide the performance of the memory devices. In order to overcome the limitations of the conventional package, new types of package such as Ball Grid Array (BGA), chip scale package or flip chip bonding are adopted by many IC manufacturers. The present work has compared the electrical performances of 3 different packages to provide deign guide for IC packages of the high performance memory devices in the future. Those packages are designed for the same memory devices to confront to the diversity of memory market demand. The conventional package using lead frame, wire bonded BGA using printed circuit board substrate and flip chip bonded BGA are analyzed. Their electrical performances are compared in the area of signal delay and coupling effect between signal interconnections. The electrical package modeling is built by extracting parasitic of interconnections in IC package through electro-magnetic simulations. The electrical package modeling is built by extracting parasitic of interconnections in IC package through electro-magnetic simulations. The analysis of electrical behavior is performed using SPICE model which is made to represent the real situation. The methodology presented is also capable of determining the most suitable memory package for a particular device based on the electrical performance.

  19. Synergy of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and double-stranded RNA (poly I:C) on nitric oxide induction in chicken peripheral blood monocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial components and initiate the innate immune responses that control microbial infections. We have investigated the innate immune response of chicken monocytes to ligands of TLR3 and TLR9, poly I:C, the analog of viral double-stranded RNA, and CpG-ODN, bac...

  20. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance

  1. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  2. Analogy Construction versus Analogy Solution, and Their Influence on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Itay, Yifat; Kaniel, Shlomo; Ben-Amram, Einat

    2006-01-01

    This study compares transfer performed by subjects trained to solve verbal analogies, with transfer by subjects trained to construct them. The first group (n = 57) received instruction in a strategy to solve verbal analogies and the second group (n = 66) was trained in strategies for constructing such analogies. Before and after intervention, all…

  3. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  4. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  5. Hardware Evolution of Analog Speed Controllers for a DC Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Ferguson, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    Evolvable hardware provides the capability to evolve analog circuits to produce amplifier and filter functions. Conventional analog controller designs employ these same functions. Analog controllers for the control of the shaft speed of a DC motor are evolved on an evolvable hardware platform utilizing a Field Programmable Transistor Array (FPTA). The performance of these evolved controllers is compared to that of a conventional proportional-integral (PI) controller.

  6. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  7. ICS logging solution for network-based attacks using Gumistix technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Jeremy R.; Berman, Dustin; Butts, Jonathan; Lopez, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Industrial Control Systems (ICS) monitor and control operations associated with the national critical infrastructure (e.g., electric power grid, oil and gas pipelines and water treatment facilities). These systems rely on technologies and architectures that were designed for system reliability and availability. Security associated with ICS was never an inherent concern, primarily due to the protections afforded by network isolation. However, a trend in ICS operations is to migrate to commercial networks via TCP/IP in order to leverage commodity benefits and cost savings. As a result, system vulnerabilities are now exposed to the online community. Indeed, recent research has demonstrated that many exposed ICS devices are being discovered using readily available applications (e.g., ShodanHQ search engine and Google-esque queries). Due to the lack of security and logging capabilities for ICS, most knowledge about attacks are derived from real world incidents after an attack has already been carried out and the damage has been done. This research provides a method for introducing sensors into the ICS environment that collect information about network-based attacks. The sensors are developed using an inexpensive Gumstix platform that can be deployed and incorporated with production systems. Data obtained from the sensors provide insight into attack tactics (e.g., port scans, Nessus scans, Metasploit modules, and zero-day exploits) and characteristics (e.g., attack origin, frequency, and level of persistence). Findings enable security professionals to draw an accurate, real-time awareness of the threats against ICS devices and help shift the security posture from reactionary to preventative.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of backbone/amide-modified analogs of leualacin.

    PubMed

    Hu, M K; Yang, F C; Chou, C C; Yen, M H

    1999-02-22

    Leualacin (1), a cyclic depsi-pentapeptide, and its backbone/amide-modified analogs 2-4 were synthesized. Amide analogue 3 exhibited stronger vasodilatory effects. It also strongly inhibited collagen- and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregations with IC50s of 0.6 microM and 2.0 microM, respectively. PMID:10098664

  9. Interim Human Factors Guidance for Hybrid and Digital I&C System

    SciTech Connect

    J.Naser, G.Morris

    2003-08-15

    OAK- B135 To help nuclear power plant operators and suppliers plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and other HSI in a way that takes advantage of digital systems and HSI technologies, reflects practical constraints associated with modernizing existing control rooms and I&C systems, and addresses issues associated with hybrid control room HSI.

  10. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    PubMed

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system. PMID:26372659

  11. Variations in IC(50) values with purity of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Neeley, Elizabeth; Fritch, George; Fuller, Autumn; Wolfe, Jordan; Wright, Jessica; Flurkey, William

    2009-09-01

    The effects of various inhibitors on crude, commercial and partially purified commercial mushroom tyrosinase were examined by comparing IC(50) values. Kojic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, tropolone, methimazole, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate had relatively similar IC(50) values for the crude, commercial and partially purified enzyme. 4-Hexylresorcinol seemed to have a somewhat higher IC(50) value using crude extracts, compared to commercial or purified tyrosinase. Some inhibitors (NaCl, esculetin, biphenol, phloridzin) showed variations in IC(50) values between the enzyme samples. In contrast, hydroquinone, lysozyme, Zn(2+), and anisaldehyde showed little or no inhibition in concentration ranges reported to be effective inhibitors. Organic solvents (DMSO and ethanol) had IC(50) values that were similar for some of the tyrosinase samples. Depending of the source of tyrosinase and choice of inhibitor, variations in IC(50) values were observed. PMID:19865520

  12. Variations in IC50 Values with Purity of Mushroom Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Neeley, Elizabeth; Fritch, George; Fuller, Autumn; Wolfe, Jordan; Wright, Jessica; Flurkey, William

    2009-01-01

    The effects of various inhibitors on crude, commercial and partially purified commercial mushroom tyrosinase were examined by comparing IC50 values. Kojic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, tropolone, methimazole, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate had relatively similar IC50 values for the crude, commercial and partially purified enzyme. 4-Hexylresorcinol seemed to have a somewhat higher IC50 value using crude extracts, compared to commercial or purified tyrosinase. Some inhibitors (NaCl, esculetin, biphenol, phloridzin) showed variations in IC50 values between the enzyme samples. In contrast, hydroquinone, lysozyme, Zn2+, and anisaldehyde showed little or no inhibition in concentration ranges reported to be effective inhibitors. Organic solvents (DMSO and ethanol) had IC50 values that were similar for some of the tyrosinase samples. Depending of the source of tyrosinase and choice of inhibitor, variations in IC50 values were observed. PMID:19865520

  13. [Role of ICS/LABA on COPD treatment].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoko

    2016-05-01

    In the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchodilators such as long acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and long acting β agonist(LABA) play key roles for improving respiratory function and symptoms, and reducing risk of exacerbation. However, inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), a key medicine for bronchial asthma, is limitedly used in COPD treatment. Japanese Respiratory Society recommends to use ICS for severe COPD patients who have been frequently exacerbated, because previous clinical studies indicated that ICS reduces exacerbation in moderate to severe COPD patients. Asthma sometimes overlaps with COPD, and symptoms of those patients are not well controlled by the bronchodilation therapy alone. Therefore, ICS/LABA or ICS/LAMA should be prescribed to those overlapped patients. Concentration of exhaled nitrogen oxide and percentage of peripheral eosinophil may be good biomarkers for discriminating the COPD patients who have good response to ICS treatment. PMID:27254954

  14. Module comprising IC memory stack dedicated to and structurally combined with an IC microprocessor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John C. (Inventor); Indin, Ronald J. (Inventor); Shanken, Stuart N. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A computer module is disclosed in which a stack of glued together IC memory chips is structurally integrated with a microprocessor chip. The memory provided by the stack is dedicated to the microprocessor chip. The microprocessor and its memory stack may be connected either by glue and/or by solder bumps. The solder bumps can perform three functions--electrical interconnection, mechanical connection, and heat transfer. The electrical connections in some versions are provided by wire bonding.

  15. Correct CMOS IC defect models for quality testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soden, Jerry M.; Hawkins, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    Leading edge, high reliability, and low escape CMOS IC test practices have now virtually removed the stuck-at fault model and replaced it with more defect-orientated models. Quiescent power supply current testing (I(sub DDQ)) combined with strategic use of high speed test patterns is the recommended approach to zero defect and high reliability testing goals. This paper reviews the reasons for the change in CMOS IC test practices and outlines an improved CMOS IC test methodology.

  16. Saturn V S-IC Stage Fuel Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This image shows the Saturn V S-IC-T stage (S-IC static test article) fuel tank being attached to the thrust structure in the vehicle assembly building at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The S-IC stage utilized five F-1 engines that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as propellant and provided a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds.

  17. F-1 Engine Installation to S-IC Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Marshall Space Flight Center were installing an F-I engine on the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage thrust structure in building 4705. The S-IC (first) stage used five F-1 engines that produced a total thrust of 7,500,000 pounds as each engine produced 1,500,000 pounds of thrust. The S-IC stage lifted the Saturn V vehicle and Apollo spacecraft from the launch pad.

  18. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4+ T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia. PMID:26865417

  19. Removal of Flame Deflector From the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was originally designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage. Modifications to the S-IC Test Stand began in 1975 to accommodate space shuttle external tank testing. This photo depicts the removal of the flame deflector which was originally used to provide water to the 5 F-1 engines of the S-IC stage during testing.

  20. First Saturn V S-IC Stage Five F-1 Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    This photograph depicts a dramatic view of the first test firing of all five F-1 engines for the Saturn V S-IC stage at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The testing lasted a full duration of 6.5 seconds. It also marked the first test performed in the new S-IC static test stand and the first test using the new control blockhouse. The S-IC stage is the first stage, or booster, of a 364-foot long rocket that ultimately took astronauts to the Moon. Operating at maximum power, all five of the engines produced 7,500,000 pounds of thrust. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the up position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. When the Saturn V S-IC first stage was placed upright in the stand , the five F-1 engine nozzles pointed downward on a 1,900 ton, water-cooled deflector. To prevent melting damage, water was sprayed through small holes in the deflector at the rate 320,000 gallons per minute.

  1. A quadratic analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.; Staples, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter with a square root transfer function has been developed for use with a pair of CCD imaging detectors in the White Light Coronagraph/X-ray XUV Telescope experiment to be flown as part of the Internal Solar Polar Mission. It is shown that in background-noise-limited instrumentation systems a quadratic analog-to-digital converter will allow a maximum dynamic range with a fixed number of data bits. Low power dissipation, moderately fast conversion time, and reliability are achieved in the proposed design using standard components and avoiding nonlinear elements.

  2. Fundamentals of IC engine torsional vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, S.

    1988-01-01

    Fluctuations in IC engine cylinder pressure are an obvious source of torsional vibration excitation, although the details of the coupling from cylinder pressure to torque on the crankshaft are complicated. A second, less obvious source of torsional excitation is the effect of variable inertia associated with the engine slider-crank mechanism. This is a tutorial paper, intended to show the relation between, on the one hand, the actual engine slider-crank mechanism subject to combustion gas pressure and, on the other hand, the models commonly used for torsional vibration analysis that involve constant inertias subject to torques expressed by Fourier series. As such, it uses some new approaches to reach previously known results with a greater degree of physical insight. The presentation is in terms of a single cylinder, two stroke engine with load, and makes clear the roles of piston mass, connecting rod mass and moment of inertia, and crank inertia as they affect both the effective inertia and the effective torque. The determination of natural frequencies and the forced vibration response calculation are briefly described to complete the analysis. The development of a Fourier series representation for the effective torque, including both the cylinder pressure and inertia variation is also discussed. The various components for the response are identified, in an effort to clarify the meaning of terms such as ''zero frequency mode,'' ''rigid body mode,'' and ''twisting mode.''

  3. Design and analysis of a low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and development of an X-band (8145 MHz) transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single-section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. A linear phase deviation of 92 deg with a linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent was measured for this modulator from 8257 MHz to 8634 MHz over the temperature range -20 to 75 C. The measured insertion loss and the static delay variation with temperature were 2 +/- 0.3 dB and 0.16 psec/ C, respectively. Based on this design, cascaded sections have been modeled, and simulations were performed to provide an X-band deep space transponder (DST) phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians (+/- 143 deg) of peak phase deviation to accommodate downlink signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging, with a deviation linearity tolerance of +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase-modulator requirements and show excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  4. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    by star formation at intermediate ages. In particular, the SFH and AMR for IC 1613 and Leo I are indistinguishable. This implies that dIrr galaxies cannot be distinguished from dSphs by their intermediate-age stellar populations. This type of a SFH may also be evidence for slower or suppressed early star formation in dwarf galaxies due to photoionization after the reionization of the universe by background radiation. Assuming that IC 1613 is typical of a dIrr evolving in isolation, since most of the star formation occurs at intermediate ages, these dwarf systems cannot be responsible for the fast chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium that is seen at high redshift. There is no evidence for any large-amplitude bursts of star formation in IC 1613, and we find it highly unlikely that analogs of IC 1613 have contributed to the excess of faint blue galaxies in existing galaxy redshift surveys. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal ID 7496.

  5. Design and analysis of low-loss linear analog phase modulator for deep space spacecraft X-band transponder (DST) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Mueller, Robert O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design concepts, analyses, and the development of an X-band transponder low-loss linear phase modulator for deep space spacecraft applications. A single section breadboard circulator-coupled reflection phase modulator has been analyzed, fabricated, and evaluated. Two- and three-cascaded sections have been modeled and simulations performed to provide an X-band DST phase modulator with +/- 2.5 radians of peak phase deviation to accommodate down-link signal modulation with composite telemetry data and ranging with a deviation linearity tolerance +/- 8 percent and insertion loss of less than 10 +/- 0.5 dB. A two-section phase modulator using constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit was breadboarded. The measured results satisfy the DST phase modulator requirements, and excellent agreement with the predicted results.

  6. Neural Analog Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1982-07-01

    Neural Analog Information Processing (NAIP) is an effort to develop general purpose pattern classification architectures based upon biological information processing principles. This paper gives an overview of NAIP and its relationship to the previous work in neural modeling from which its fundamental principles are derived. It also presents a theorem concerning the stability of response of a slab (a two dimensional array of identical simple processing units) to time-invariant (spatial) patterns. An experiment (via computer emulation) demonstrating classification of a spatial pattern by a simple, but complete NAIP architecture is described. A concept for hardware implementation of NAIP architectures is briefly discussed.

  7. Attribute Block Thinking Activities--Analogies. Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draze, Dianne

    Designed to develop K-3 children's thinking skills before the children have mastered reading, this book presents 32 activities in which children learn to complete analogies--presented with an "attribute block" with 3 attributes, children choose a fourth attribute block to complete the analogy. The attribute blocks in the book are of 4 types--shape…

  8. Analog forecasting with dynamics-adapted kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Analog forecasting is a nonparametric technique introduced by Lorenz in 1969 which predicts the evolution of states of a dynamical system (or observables defined on the states) by following the evolution of the sample in a historical record of observations which most closely resembles the current initial data. Here, we introduce a suite of forecasting methods which improve traditional analog forecasting by combining ideas from kernel methods developed in harmonic analysis and machine learning and state-space reconstruction for dynamical systems. A key ingredient of our approach is to replace single-analog forecasting with weighted ensembles of analogs constructed using local similarity kernels. The kernels used here employ a number of dynamics-dependent features designed to improve forecast skill, including Takens’ delay-coordinate maps (to recover information in the initial data lost through partial observations) and a directional dependence on the dynamical vector field generating the data. Mathematically, our approach is closely related to kernel methods for out-of-sample extension of functions, and we discuss alternative strategies based on the Nyström method and the multiscale Laplacian pyramids technique. We illustrate these techniques in applications to forecasting in a low-order deterministic model for atmospheric dynamics with chaotic metastability, and interannual-scale forecasting in the North Pacific sector of a comprehensive climate model. We find that forecasts based on kernel-weighted ensembles have significantly higher skill than the conventional approach following a single analog.

  9. Development of a front-end analog circuit for multi-channel SiPM readout and performance verification for various PET detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Guen Bae; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Chan Mi; Ito, Mikiko; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2013-03-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are outstanding photosensors for the development of compact imaging devices and hybrid imaging systems such as positron emission tomography (PET)/ magnetic resonance (MR) scanners because of their small size and MR compatibility. The wide use of this sensor for various types of scintillation detector modules is being accelerated by recent developments in tileable multichannel SiPM arrays. In this work, we present the development of a front-end readout module for multi-channel SiPMs. This readout module is easily extendable to yield a wider detection area by the use of a resistive charge division network (RCN). We applied this readout module to various PET detectors designed for use in small animal PET/MR, optical fiber PET/MR, and double layer depth of interaction (DOI) PET. The basic characteristics of these detector modules were also investigated. The results demonstrate that the PET block detectors developed using the readout module and tileable multi-channel SiPMs had reasonable performance.

  10. Discovery of Compounds Blocking the Proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum in a Chemical Space Based on Piperidinyl-Benzimidazolone Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Saïdani, Nadia; Botté, Cyrille Y.; Deligny, Michael; Bonneau, Anne-Laure; Reader, Janette; Lasselin, Ronald; Merer, Goulven; Niepceron, Alisson; Brossier, Fabien; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Rousseau, Bernard; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Mercier, Corinne; Vial, Henri; Lopez, Roman

    2014-01-01

    A piperidinyl-benzimidazolone scaffold has been found in the structure of different inhibitors of membrane glycerolipid metabolism, acting on enzymes manipulating diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Screening a focus library of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone analogs might therefore identify compounds acting against infectious parasites. We first evaluated the in vitro effects of (S)-2-(dibenzylamino)-3-phenylpropyl 4-(1,2-dihydro-2-oxobenzo[d]imidazol-3-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (compound 1) on Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum. In T. gondii, motility and apical complex integrity appeared to be unaffected, whereas cell division was inhibited at compound 1 concentrations in the micromolar range. In P. falciparum, the proliferation of erythrocytic stages was inhibited, without any delayed death phenotype. We then explored a library of 250 analogs in two steps. We selected 114 compounds with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 2 μM for at least one species and determined in vitro selectivity indexes (SI) based on toxicity against K-562 human cells. We identified compounds with high gains in the IC50 (in the 100 nM range) and SI (up to 1,000 to 2,000) values. Isobole analyses of two of the most active compounds against P. falciparum indicated that their interactions with artemisinin were additive. Here, we propose the use of structure-activity relationship (SAR) models, which will be useful for designing probes to identify the target compound(s) and optimizations for monotherapy or combined-therapy strategies. PMID:24550329

  11. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  12. Comparison of IC and MEMS packaging reliability approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of IC and MEMS packaging technology with emphasis on reliability, compares the norm for IC packaging reliability evaluation and identifies challenges for development of reliability methodologies for MEMS, and finally, proposes the use of COTS MEMS in order to start generating statistically meaningful reliability data as a vehicle for future standardization of reliability test methodology for MEMS packaging.

  13. Saturn V S-IC Stage LOX Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    This image depicts the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage liquid oxygen (LOX) tank being lowered into the irner tank in a high bay at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The S-IC stage utilized five F-1 engines that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as propellant and provided a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds.

  14. X-ray observations of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Clark, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Presented observation data from OSO-7 are shown to confirm the identification of IC 443 as an X-ray source, with a spectrum which is consistent with either thermal bremsstrahlung or a power law. These data lead to an age of 3400 years for IC 443, much younger than previous estimates.

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex Bunker House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC stand, additional related facilities were built during this time frame. Built to the east of the S-IC stand, the block house served as the control room. To the south of the blockhouse was a newly constructed pump house used for delivering water to the S-IC stand during testing. North of the massive test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built for testing a single F-1 engine. Just southeast of the S-IC stand a concrete bunker house was constructed. The bunker housed

  16. EXPANSION PARALLAX OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA IC 418

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, Lizette; Loinard, Laurent; Gomez, Yolanda; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we present radio continuum observations of the planetary nebula IC 418 obtained at two epochs separated by more than 20 years. These data allow us to show that the angular expansion rate of the ionization front in IC 418 is 5.8 {+-} 1.5 mas yr{sup -1}. If the expansion velocity of the ionization front is equal to the expansion velocity of the gas along the line of sight as measured by optical spectroscopy, then the distance to IC 418 must be 1.1 {+-} 0.3 kpc. Recent theoretical predictions appropriate for the case of IC 418, however, suggest that the ionization front may be expanding about 20% faster than the material. Under this assumption, the distance to IC 418 would increase to 1.3 {+-} 0.4 kpc.

  17. The next generation in optical transport semiconductors: IC solutions at the system level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Badri N.

    2005-02-01

    In this tutorial overview, we survey some of the challenging problems facing Optical Transport and their solutions using new semiconductor-based technologies. Advances in 0.13um CMOS, SiGe/HBT and InP/HBT IC process technologies and mixed-signal design strategies are the fundamental breakthroughs that have made these solutions possible. In combination with innovative packaging and transponder/transceiver architectures IC approaches have clearly demonstrated enhanced optical link budgets with simultaneously lower (perhaps the lowest to date) cost and manufacturability tradeoffs. This paper will describe: *Electronic Dispersion Compensation broadly viewed as the overcoming of dispersion based limits to OC-192 links and extending link budgets, *Error Control/Coding also known as Forward Error Correction (FEC), *Adaptive Receivers for signal quality monitoring for real-time estimation of Q/OSNR, eye-pattern, signal BER and related temporal statistics (such as jitter). We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of these receiver and transmitter architectures, provide examples of system performance and conclude with general market trends. These Physical layer IC solutions represent a fundamental new toolbox of options for equipment designers in addressing systems level problems. With unmatched cost and yield/performance tradeoffs, it is expected that IC approaches will provide significant flexibility in turn, for carriers and service providers who must ultimately manage the network and assure acceptable quality of service under stringent cost constraints.

  18. Dark Globule in IC 1396 (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view of inset

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope image of a glowing stellar nursery provides a spectacular contrast to the opaque cloud seen in visible light (inset). The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas. The dark globule is seen in silhouette at visible-light wavelengths, backlit by the illumination of a bright star located to the left of the field of view.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope pierces through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and previously unseen young stars. The infrared image was obtained by Spitzer's infrared array camera. The image is a four-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red). The filamentary appearance of the globule results from the sculpting effects of competing physical processes. The winds from a massive star, located to the left of the image, produce a dense circular rim comprising the 'head' of the globule and a swept-back tail of gas.

    A pair of young stars (LkHa 349 and LkHa 349c) that formed from the dense gas has cleared a spherical cavity within the globule head. While one of these stars is significantly fainter than the other in the visible-light image, they are of comparable brightness in the infrared Spitzer image. This implies the presence of a thick and dusty disc around LkHa 349c. Such circumstellar discs are the precursors of planetary systems. They are much thicker in the early stages of stellar formation when the placental planet-forming material (gas and dust) is still

  19. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose–Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  20. QUALIFICATION OF THE SECOND ICS-3000 ION CHROMATOGRAPH FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Mahannah, R.

    2009-12-03

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-14 has been qualified for use. The qualification testing was a head to head comparison of the second ICS-3000 with the initial ICS-3000 system that was installed in 221-S M-13. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has recently replaced the Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems that had been used since 1998 by the first of two new ICS-3000 systems. The replacement effort was necessary due to the vendor of the DX-500 systems no longer supporting service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of

  2. The broad-lined Type Ic supernova 2003jd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Patat, F.; Mazzali, P.; Turatto, M.; Hurley, K.; Maeda, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Foley, R. J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Pastorello, A.; Challis, P.; Frontera, F.; Harutyunyan, A.; Iye, M.; Kawabata, K.; Kirshner, R. P.; Li, W.; Lipkin, Y. M.; Matheson, T.; Nomoto, K.; Ofek, E. O.; Ohyama, Y.; Pian, E.; Poznanski, D.; Salvo, M.; Sauer, D. N.; Schmidt, B. P.; Soderberg, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2008-02-01

    The results of a worldwide coordinated observational campaign on the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) 2003jd are presented. In total, 74 photometric data points and 26 spectra were collected using 11 different telescopes. SN 2003jd is one of the most luminous SN Ic ever observed. A comparison with other Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) confirms that SN 2003jd represents an intermediate case between broad-line events (2002ap, 2006aj) and highly energetic SNe (1997ef, 1998bw, 2003dh, 2003lw), with an ejected mass of Mej = 3.0 +/- 1Msolar and a kinetic energy of Ek(tot) = 7+3-2 × 1051erg. SN 2003jd is similar to SN 1998bw in terms of overall luminosity, but it is closer to SNe 2006aj and 2002ap in terms of light-curve shape and spectral evolution. The comparison with other SNe Ic suggests that the V-band light curves of SNe Ic can be partially homogenized by introducing a time-stretch factor. Finally, because of the similarity of SN 2003jd to the SN 2006aj/XRF 060218 event, we discuss the possible connection of SN 2003jd with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). E-mail: svalenti@eso.org Based on observations at ESO-Paranal, Prog. 074.D-0161A.

  3. Defect classes - an overdue paradigm for CMOS IC testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, C.F.; Soden, J.M.; Righter, A.W.; Ferguson, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The IC test industry has struggled for more than 30 years to establish a test approach that would guarantee a low defect level to the customer. We propose a comprehensive strategy for testing CMOS ICs that uses defect classes based on measured defect electrical properties. Defect classes differ from traditional fault models. Our defect class approach requires that the test strategy match the defect electrical properties, while fault models require that IC defects match the fault definition. We use data from Sandia Labs failure analysis and test facilities and from public literature. We describe test pattern requirements for each defect class and propose a test paradigm.

  4. Considerations for IC and Component Selection for Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the integrated cycling and component selection technologies for aerospace systems. The topics include: 1) Semiconductors: The Evolution of ICs - Availability and Technology; 2) IC Selection Requirements - three fields of thought, "The Good", "The Bad" and "The Ugly"; 3) Reliability and Radiation; 4) Radiation Perspective-Four methods of selecting ICs for space systems, Guaranteed hardness, historical ground-based radiation data, historical flight usage, and unknown assurance; 5) Understanding Risk, including risk trade space and ASICs and FPGA sample selection criteria.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Hydrogen Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. In the center portion of this photograph, taken September 5, 1963, the spherical hydrogen storage tanks are being constructed. One of the massive tower legs of the S-IC test stand is visible to the far right.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Spherical Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. This photograph taken September 18, 1963 shows a spherical hydrogen tank being constructed next to the S-IC test stand.

  7. Recent Progresses in Laboratory Astrophysics with Ames’ COSmIC Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-06-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) [3] and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [4] and planetary atmospheres [5]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References: [1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Salama F., Galazutdinov G., Krelowski J

  8. Laboratory Astrophysics Studies with the COSmIC Facility: Interstellar and Planetary Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar S.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2015-08-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [3] and planetary atmospheres [4]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References:[1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Cesar Contreras and Farid Salama, The

  9. AN/AIC-22(V) Intercommunications Set (ICS) fiber optic link engineering analysis report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, Richard; Blocksom, Roland; Ling, Christopher

    1990-08-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems constitute a serious threat to operational Navy aircraft systems. The application of fiber optic technology is a potential solution to these problems. EMI reported problems in the P-3 patrol aircraft AN/AIC-22(V) Intercommunications System (ICS) were selected from an EMI problem database for investigation and possible application of fiber optic technology. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to demonstrate the level of EMI immunity of fiber optics when used in an ICS. A full duplex single channel fiber optic audio link was designed and assembled from modified government furnished equipment (GFE) previously used in another Navy fiber optic application. The link was taken to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC) Patuxent River, Maryland and temporarily installed in a Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) P-3A aircraft for a side-by-side comparison test with the installed ICS. With regards to noise reduction, the fiber optic link provided a qualitative improvement over the conventional ICS. In an effort to obtain a quantitative measure of comparison, audio frequency range both with and without operation of the aircraft VHF and UHF radio transmitters.

  10. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  11. Pictorial Analogies XII: Stoichiometric Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Pictorial analogies that demonstrate concepts of amounts allow instructors to teach that in stoichiometric problems, the number--or moles--of molecules of a chemical is what matters, even though it must be measured in masses or volumes. Analogies to stoichiometric relationships include the ratio of four wheels to one body in making wagons and…

  12. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  13. Conjecturing via Reconceived Classical Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyeong-Hwa; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is believed to be an efficient means of problem solving and construction of knowledge during the search for and the analysis of new mathematical objects. However, there is growing concern that despite everyday usage, learners are unable to transfer analogical reasoning to learning situations. This study aims at facilitating…

  14. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2014-01-01

    Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

  15. IC 1257: A New Globular Cluster in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. E.; Phelps, R. L.; Madore, B. F.; Pevunova, O.; Skiff, B. A.; Crute, C.; Wilson, B.

    1996-01-01

    New CCD photometry of the faint, compact star cluster IC 1257 (L = 17? = +/- 15?obtained with the Palomar 5m telescope, reveals that it is a highly reddened globular cluster well beyond the Galactic center.

  16. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  17. BCH codes for large IC random-access memory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In this report some shortened BCH codes for possible applications to large IC random-access memory systems are presented. These codes are given by their parity-check matrices. Encoding and decoding of these codes are discussed.

  18. IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Zhang

    2005-03-01

    A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

  19. A nano-power energy harvesting IC for arrays of piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, M.; Filippi, M.; Romani, A.; Bottarel, V.; Ricotti, G.; Tartagni, M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a multi-source energy harvester IC for arrays of independent transducers, designed in a 0.32μm STMicroelectronics BCD technology, that can manage up to 5 AC-DC channels (e.g. piezoelectric transducers). The IC implements a boost converter based on synchronous electrical charge extraction. A single external inductor is time-shared among all transducers and access conflicts are handled by an arbiter circuit implemented as an asynchronous FSM. The designed converter is fully autonomous and suitable for battery-less operation. The circuit area is 4.6 mm2 and has a power consumption of 175 nW/source at 2.5 V while efficiency ranges between 70% and over than 85%.

  20. 76 FR 59672 - Notice of Change In IC Docket Numbering Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... the Commission is modifying the numbering system for the docket prefix IC. These IC docket notices... Commission adopted the current IC docket prefix \\1\\ in order to properly track any comments it receives in... the way the IC docket prefix is set up. Beginning on October 1, 2011, IC dockets will continue to...

  1. Analogical Scaffolding and the Learning of Abstract Ideas in Physics: An Example from Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a model of analogy, analogical scaffolding, which explains present and prior results of student learning with analogies. We build on prior models of representation, blending, and layering of ideas. Extending this model's explanatory power, we propose ways in which the model can be applied to design a curriculum directed at…

  2. Tren-based Analogs of Bacillibactin: Structure and Stability1

    PubMed Central

    Dertz, Emily A.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic analogs were designed to highlight the effect of the glycine moiety of bacillibactin on the overall stability of the ferric complex as compared to synthetic analogs of enterobactin. Insertion of a variety of amino acids to catecholamide analogs based on a Tren (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) backbone increased the overall acidity of the ligands, causing an enhancement of the stability of the resulting ferric complex as compared to TRENCAM. Solution thermodynamic behavior of these siderophores and their synthetic analogs was investigated through potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. X-ray crystallography, circular dichroism, and molecular modeling were used to determine the chirality and geometry of the ferric complexes of bacillibactin and its analogs. In contrast to the Tren scaffold, addition of a glycine to the catechol chelating arms causes an inversion of the trilactone backbone, resulting in opposite chiralities of the two siderophores and a destabilization of the ferric complex of bacillibactin compared to ferric enterobactin. PMID:16813410

  3. Enhancing Physicochemical Properties through Synthesis and Formulation of Piclamilast- and Lapatinib-Derived Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodring, Jennifer L.

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a neglected tropical disease of significant morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Current chemotherapeutics targeting the causative agent Trypanosoma brucei lack oral bioavailability, efficacy, and safety. New small molecule drugs are desperately needed for HAT. Target repurposing represents one method for rapidly discovering new anti-trypanosomal compounds. This concept has been applied to repurposing small molecule inhibitors of human phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) for HAT, while improving physicochemical properties. The first project in this dissertation begins with the human PDE4 inhibitor piclamilast, which has an IC50 value of 4.7 microM against T. brucei PDEB1. Based upon this scaffold, new analogs were designed, synthesized, and screened for their biological activity against TbrPDEB1. Secondly, previous optimization of the human tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib led to the discovery of the 4-anilino-quinazoline NEU-617, a potent (EC 50 = 42 nM) antitrypanosomal agent. Since alkynyl thienopyrimidines are well-known scaffolds for tyrosine kinase inhibitors, we assessed this scaffold as an alternative to the quinazoline of NEU-617. In addition, analogs of the NEU-617 were designed and synthesized to improve their physicochemical properties, such as lipophilicity and predicted central nervous system penetration. Lastly, nanoformulations have been shown to improve the oral bioavailability and circulation half-life of their encapsulated drug components. Because of this, nanoemulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles were explored for their potential parasitic inhibitory effects and their ability to improve the physicochemical properties of NEU-617.

  4. Microstereolithography and its application to biochemical IC chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Takao

    2001-06-01

    The world's first micro stereo lithography, named IH process, was proposed and developed by the speaker in 1992. By now, several types of micro stereo lithography systems have been developed. Three-dimensional resolution of solidification has reached to 0.2 micron at present. These 3D micro fabrication processes using UV curable polymer gave a big impact on not only MEMS but also optics. The latest version of IH process enables us to make a movable micro mechanism without assemble process or sacrificial layer technique often used in silicon process. It is well known that the IH process is the mother of two-photon micro stereo lithography and its applications. Recently new micro chemical device named Biochemical IC Chip was proposed and developed by the speaker. This chip is based on the module IC chip-set like today's TTL family. IH process enable to make the biochemical IC including real three-dimensional micro fluid channels. Various kinds of Biochemical IC chips such as micro pump, switching valve, reactor, concentrator and detector have already been fabricated successfully. Basic performance of micro chemical devices constructed by the biochemical IC chips were demonstrated. The biochemical IC chips will open new bioscience and medicine based on innovative technology.

  5. Analog baselines: a critical review of the methodology.

    PubMed

    Sturmey, P

    1995-01-01

    Analog baselines are an experimental methodology for identifying the functions of maladaptive behavior in the naturally occurring environment (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982; Iwata et al., 1994). This article identifies a number of potential limitations in this methodology. These include: (a) procedural problems inherent in the use of multielement designs, (b) the fidelity of analog baseline design conditions, (c) the relation of the analog conditions to the naturally occurring environment, (d) a narrow analysis of behavior limited by an implicit adherence to an ABC model of behavior, (e) a limited acknowledgement of multifunction and idiosyncratically motivated behaviors, (f) problems in the definition of response classes, and (g) difficulties in the use of analog baselines to design interventions. Future research should attend to three main questions. First, the convergent validity of different assessment methodologies, including analog baselines, should be evaluated. Future research should attend to procedures that can integrate the entire clinical process of referral, identifying the functions of the target behavior, including other methods of identifying the functions of behavior, treatment design, and implementation. Second, assessment failures could be examined carefully to identify ways of developing this methodology further. Third, the process of designing an intervention depends upon input from many sources of information. The use of analog baselines will be enhanced by a greater understanding of the process of clinical decision making. PMID:7480956

  6. Unpowered wireless analog resistance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andringa, Matthew M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Wood, Sharon L.

    2004-07-01

    Our society depends heavily on a network of buildings, bridges and roadways. In order to properly maintain this civil infrastructure and avoid damage and costly repairs due to structural failure, it is necessary to monitor the health of these structures. Sensors must frequently be placed in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions and should ideally last the lifetime of the structure the sensors are monitoring. This paper presents the development of a low cost, passive, un-powered wireless analog resistance sensor. The sensor was originally designed for monitoring corrosion in concrete, but there are many other potential applications including remote temperature monitoring, embedded accelerometers, and embedded strain gauges. The passive wireless nature makes the sensor ideally suited for embedding in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions. The sensor consists of a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit containing a resistive transducer. The sensor is interrogated by measuring the impedance through a remote, magnetically coupled reader loop. The width of the resonance is directly related to the resistance of the transducer. The sensor has been simulated under a variety of conditions using a circuit model and compared to actual test sensors built and evaluated in the laboratory.

  7. Analogical reasoning and aging: the processing speed and inhibition hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bugaiska, Aurélia; Thibaut, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of aging on analogical reasoning by manipulating the strength of semantic association (LowAssoc or HighAssoc) and the number of distracters' semantic analogies of the A:B::C:D type and to determine which factors might be responsible for the age-related differences on analogical reasoning by testing two different theoretical frameworks: the inhibition hypothesis and the speed mediation hypothesis. We compared young adults and two groups of aging people (old and old-old) with word analogies of the A:B::C:D format. Results indicate an age-related effect on analogical reasoning, this effect being greatest with LowAssoc analogies. It was not associated with the presence of semantic distractors. Moreover, the results show that the variance part of the analogy task due to age was mainly explained by processing speed (rather than by inhibition) in the case of old participants and by both processing speed and inhibition in the old-old group. These results are discussed in relation to current models of aging and their interaction with the processes involved in analogical reasoning. PMID:25213435

  8. MALISAM: a database of structurally analogous motifs in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2008-01-01

    MALISAM (manual alignments for structurally analogous motifs) represents the first database containing pairs of structural analogs and their alignments. To find reliable analogs, we developed an approach based on three ideas. First, an insertion together with a part of the evolutionary core of one domain family (a hybrid motif) is analogous to a similar motif contained within the core of another domain family. Second, a motif at an interface, formed by secondary structural elements (SSEs) contributed by two or more domains or subunits contacting along that interface, is analogous to a similar motif present in the core of a single domain. Third, an artificial protein obtained through selection from random peptides or in sequence design experiments not biased by sequences of a particular homologous family, is analogous to a structurally similar natural protein. Each analogous pair is superimposed and aligned manually, as well as by several commonly used programs. Applications of this database may range from protein evolution studies, e.g. development of remote homology inference tools and discriminators between homologs and analogs, to protein-folding research, since in the absence of evolutionary reasons, similarity between proteins is caused by structural and folding constraints. The database is publicly available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/malisam. PMID:17855399

  9. Hybrid benzothiazole analogs as antiurease agent: Synthesis and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Wadood, Abdul; Rahim, Fazal; Khan, Khalid Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    Benzothiazole analogs (1-20) have been synthesized, characterized by EI-MS and (1)H NMR, and evaluated for urease inhibition activity. All compounds showed excellent urease inhibitory potential varying from 1.4±0.10 to 34.43±2.10μM when compared with standard thiourea (IC50 19.46±1.20μM). Among the series seventeen (17) analogs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, and 18 showed outstanding urease inhibitory potential. Analogs 15 and 19 also showed good urease inhibition activity. When we compare the activity of N-phenylthiourea 20 with all substituted phenyl derivatives (1-18) we found that compound 15 showed less activity than compound 20 having 3-methoxy substituent. The binding interactions of these active analogs were confirmed through molecular docking. PMID:27038849

  10. Precision-analog fiber-optic transmission system

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, G.

    1981-06-01

    This article describes the design, experimental development, and construction of a DC-coupled precision analog fiber optic link. Topics to be covered include overall electrical and mechanical system parameters, basic circuit organization, modulation format, optical system design, optical receiver circuit analysis, and the experimental verification of the major design parameters.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Crane Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken at the S-IC test stand on October 2, 1963, is of a crane control. It was from here that the massive cranes were operated. Seen in the background is the F-1 Test Stand. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC and F-1 Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. North of the massive S-IC test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F

  13. Soviet Space Stations as Analogs, Second Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluth, B. J.; Helppie, Martha

    1986-01-01

    The available literature that discusses the various aspects of the Soviet Salyut 6 and Salyut 7 space staions are examined as related to human productivity. The methodology for this analog was a search of unclassified literature. Additional information was obtained in interviews with the cosmonauts and some Soviet space personnel. Topics include: general layout and design of the spacecraft system; cosmonauts role in maintenance and repair; general layout and design of the Mir complex; effects of the environment on personnel; information and computer systems; organization systems; personality systems; and physical conditin of the cosmonaut.

  14. Analog Computation by DNA Strand Displacement Circuits.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianqi; Garg, Sudhanshu; Mokhtar, Reem; Bui, Hieu; Reif, John

    2016-08-19

    DNA circuits have been widely used to develop biological computing devices because of their high programmability and versatility. Here, we propose an architecture for the systematic construction of DNA circuits for analog computation based on DNA strand displacement. The elementary gates in our architecture include addition, subtraction, and multiplication gates. The input and output of these gates are analog, which means that they are directly represented by the concentrations of the input and output DNA strands, respectively, without requiring a threshold for converting to Boolean signals. We provide detailed domain designs and kinetic simulations of the gates to demonstrate their expected performance. On the basis of these gates, we describe how DNA circuits to compute polynomial functions of inputs can be built. Using Taylor Series and Newton Iteration methods, functions beyond the scope of polynomials can also be computed by DNA circuits built upon our architecture. PMID:27363950

  15. Evolutional Trend of Mixed Analog and Digital RF Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi

    This paper describes recent technology trend of mixed analog digital RF circuits. With the progress of CMOS technology, large-scale digital signal process and control function can be integrated in an RF integrated circuit and some analog signal process blocks can be translated to digital signal processing units. At the same time, the design of remaining analog functional blocks becomes very hard. In this paper, those integration techniques for receiver and transmitter in these 20 years are reviewed. As a typical example of digital assisted systems, synthesizer based transmitters are discussed in detail.

  16. Reasoning by analogy as an aid to heuristic theorem proving.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    When heuristic problem-solving programs are faced with large data bases that contain numbers of facts far in excess of those needed to solve any particular problem, their performance rapidly deteriorates. In this paper, the correspondence between a new unsolved problem and a previously solved analogous problem is computed and invoked to tailor large data bases to manageable sizes. This paper outlines the design of an algorithm for generating and exploiting analogies between theorems posed to a resolution-logic system. These algorithms are believed to be the first computationally feasible development of reasoning by analogy to be applied to heuristic theorem proving.

  17. A radial basis function neurocomputer implemented with analog VLSI circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Steven S.; Chau, Paul M.; Tawel, Raoul

    1992-01-01

    An electronic neurocomputer which implements a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is described. The RBFNN is a network that utilizes a radial basis function as the transfer function. The key advantages of RBFNNs over existing neural network architectures include reduced learning time and the ease of VLSI implementation. This neurocomputer is based on an analog/digital hybrid design and has been constructed with both custom analog VLSI circuits and a commercially available digital signal processor. The hybrid architecture is selected because it offers high computational performance while compensating for analog inaccuracies, and it features the ability to model large problems.

  18. Source selection for analogical reasoning an empirical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, W.A.; Luger, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    The effectiveness of an analogical reasoner depends upon its ability to select a relevant analogical source. In many problem domains, however, too little is known about target problems to support effective source selection. This paper describes the design and evaluation of SCAVENGER, an analogical reasoner that applies two techniques to this problem: (1) An assumption-based approach to matching that allows properties of candidate sources to match unknown target properties in the absence of evidence to the contrary. (2) The use of empirical learning to improve memory organization based on problem solving experience.

  19. Designing with superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, R.B.; Hey-Shipton, G.L. ); Matthaei, G.L. )

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the basics of designing with superconducting microwave ICs. The topics of this article include high-temperature superconductors of copper-oxide compounds, the shortcomings of designing ICs with CAD, building small, high-Q bandpass or bandstop filters, combining high-temperature superconductors and conventional components, oscillator stability, tuning, digital interconnects, and cryogenic cooling options.

  20. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  1. Solving a problem by analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    1999-03-01

    This note is a description of a student solution to a problem. I found the solution exciting because it exemplifies the kind of solution by analogy that Feynman describes in The Feynman Lectures on Physics.

  2. Evaluating countermeasures in spaceflight analogs.

    PubMed

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-04-15

    Countermeasures are defined as solutions to prevent the undesirable physiologic outcomes associated with spaceflight. Spaceflight analogs provide a valuable opportunity for the evaluation of countermeasures because they allow for the evaluation of more subjects, more experimental control, and are considerably less expensive than actual spaceflight. The various human analogs have differing strengths and weaknesses with respect to the development and evaluation of countermeasures. The human analogs are briefly reviewed with a focus on their suitability for countermeasure evaluation. Bed rest is the most commonly used analog for evaluating countermeasures. While countermeasures are typically developed to target one or maybe two particular physiologic issues, it is increasingly important to evaluate all of the organ systems to discern whether they might be unintended consequences on nontargeted tissues. In preparation for Mars exploration it will be necessary to fully integrate countermeasures to protect all organ systems. The synergistic and antagonistic effects of multiple countermeasures needs to be the focus of future work. PMID:26662054

  3. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  4. Activities of wogonin analogs and other flavones against Flavobacterium columnare.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng-Xia; Schrader, Kevin K; Khan, Ikhlas A; Rimando, Agnes M

    2015-02-01

    In our on-going pursuit to discover natural products and natural product-based compounds to control the bacterial species Flavobacterium columnare, which causes columnaris disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), we synthesized flavone and chalcone analogs, and evaluated these compounds, along with flavonoids from natural sources, for their antibacterial activities against two isolates of F. columnare (ALM-00-173 and BioMed) using a rapid bioassay. The flavonoids chrysin (1a), 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone (11), isorhamnetin (26), luteolin (27), and biochanin A (29), and chalcone derivative 8b showed strong antibacterial activities against F. columnare ALM-00-173 based on minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) results. Flavonoids 1a, 8, 11, 13 (5,4'-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone), 26, and 29 exhibited strong antibacterial activities against F. columnare BioMed based upon MIC results. The 24-h 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 ) results revealed that 27 and 29 were the most active compounds against F. columnare ALM-00-173 (IC50 of 7.5 and 8.5 mg/l, resp.), while 26 and 29 were the most toxic compound against F. columnare BioMed (IC50 of 9.2 and 3.5 mg/l, resp.). These IC50 results were lower than those obtained for wogonin against F. columnare ALM-00-173 and F. columnare BioMed (28.4 and 5.4 mg/l, resp.). However, based on MIC results, none of the compounds evaluated in this study were as active as wogonin (MIC 0.3 mg/l for each F. columnare isolate). Further modification of the wogonin structure to enhance antibacterial is of interest. PMID:25676507

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  6. A nonthermal superbubble in the irregular galaxy IC 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Hui; Skillman, Evan D.

    1993-01-01

    We present synthesis radio continuum observations of the nearby irregular galaxy IC 10. These observations, at 6, 20, and 49 cm, allow us to measure the flux and spectral index of a number of resolved sources in IC 10. While most of these are easily identified as thermal emission from H II regions and a few are nonthermal background sources, one extended, nonthermal source appears to be a superbubble in IC 10. Its large size (about 250 pc) implies that it is most likely the product of several supernovae. Comparisons of these radio observations with Halpha, H I, and optical imaging observations reveal that the large nonthermal superbubble is associated with a region of star formation containing two of the most luminous H II regions and the most massive H I cloud in IC 10. We tentatively identify a stellar cluster with two Wolf-Rayet stars in the center of the superbubble. We propose that this superbubble in IC 10 represents a bridge between the giant H II regions and the H I shells and supershells observed in our Galaxy and external galaxies.

  7. Chemical and physical effects in the bulk of cometary analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roessler, K.; Benit, Jean; Sauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    KOSI comet simulation experiments were designed as a macroscopic tester for the studies of physicochemical problems inherent to comet bodies. The analog samples consist of H2O and CO2 ice, organic admixtures, mineral dust, and carbon. Two of the fundamental changes the analogs undergo when submitted to 'insolation' by artificial sunlight, i.e., the diffusion of frozen gases and subsequent crust formation and the natural isotopic fractionation, are reported.

  8. Performance report for Stanford/SLAC Microstore Analog Memory Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, D.R.; Walker, J.T.

    1984-09-01

    Tests of a newly developed Analog Memory Unit (AMU) are described. The device contains 256 analog storage cells consisting of pass transistors, a storage capacitor and a differential read out buffer. By addressing the storage cells sequentially, the shape of the signal present at the input can be recorded in time. Fast response and good amplitude resolution were the design goals for the development. Measurements on individual devices will be presented and the status of hybridized subsystems containing eight AMUs discussed.

  9. GaAs high-speed digital IC technology: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.E.; Jensen, J.F.; Greiling, P.T.

    1986-10-01

    Gallium arsenide integrated circuit technology has advanced to the stage where small-scale integration (SSI) and medium-scale integration (MSI) circuits are available for implementation in high-speed digital systems. The recent availability of GaAs wafer foundries for fabrication of custom designs, along with commercially available GaAs components, allows system designers for the first time to take advantage of the inherent high speed and low power capabilities of the technology. Large-scale integration (LSI) complexity circuits are already being fabricated in the United States and abroad, and higher levels of integration are expected. This will result in improved levels of performance for large digital systems. The advantages of higher levels of integration are clearly evident, although there appears to be an optimum level of integration for each GaAs logic family beyond which system speed actually degrades. In conjunction with the development of GaAs technology, an industry-standard GaAs production process is also evolving. This generic process is available (with minor variations) from most of the GaAs wafer foundries and IC manufacturers. Here the authors review digital GaAs IC device and circuit technology and analyze the performance of GaAs circuits fabricated by this production process. They also analyze the effect of the GaAs IC integration level on computer system speed.

  10. The Robustness of Acoustic Analogies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Lele, S. K.; Wei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic analogies for the prediction of flow noise are exact rearrangements of the flow equations N(right arrow q) = 0 into a nominal sound source S(right arrow q) and sound propagation operator L such that L(right arrow q) = S(right arrow q). In practice, the sound source is typically modeled and the propagation operator inverted to make predictions. Since the rearrangement is exact, any sufficiently accurate model of the source will yield the correct sound, so other factors must determine the merits of any particular formulation. Using data from a two-dimensional mixing layer direct numerical simulation (DNS), we evaluate the robustness of two analogy formulations to different errors intentionally introduced into the source. The motivation is that since S can not be perfectly modeled, analogies that are less sensitive to errors in S are preferable. Our assessment is made within the framework of Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy, in which different choices of a base flow used in constructing L give different sources S and thus different analogies. A uniform base flow yields a Lighthill-like analogy, which we evaluate against a formulation in which the base flow is the actual mean flow of the DNS. The more complex mean flow formulation is found to be significantly more robust to errors in the energetic turbulent fluctuations, but its advantage is less pronounced when errors are made in the smaller scales.

  11. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  12. Enhancing fullchip ILT mask synthesis capability for IC manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Thomas; Ashton, Chris; Irby, David; Luan, Lan; Son, D. H.; Xiao, Guangming; Zhou, Xin; Kim, David; Gleason, Bob; Lee, H. J.; Sim, W. J.; Hong, M. J.; Jung, S. G.; Suh, S. S.; Lee, S. W.

    2011-04-01

    It is well known in the industry that the technology nodes from 30nm and below will require model based SRAF / OPC for critical layers to meet production required process windows. Since the seminal paper by Saleh and Sayegh[1][2] thirty years ago, the idea of using inverse methods to solve mask layout problems has been receiving increasing attention as design sizes have been steadily shrinking. ILT in its present form represents an attempt to construct the inverse solution to a constrained problem where the constraints are all possible phenomena which can be simulated, including: DOF, sidelobes, MRC, MEEF, EL, shot-count, and other effects. Given current manufacturing constraints and process window requirements, inverse solutions must use all possible degrees of freedom to synthesize a mask. Various forms of inverse solutions differ greatly with respect to lithographic performance and mask complexity. Factors responsible for their differences include composition of the cost function that is minimized, constraints applied during optimization to ensure MRC compliance and limit complexity, and the data structure used to represent mask patterns. In this paper we describe the level set method to represent mask patterns, which allows the necessary degrees of freedom for required lithographic performance, and show how to derive Manhattan mask patterns from it, which can be manufactured with controllable complexity and limited shot-counts. We will demonstrate how full chip ILT masks can control e-beam write-time to the level comparable to traditional OPC masks, providing a solution with maximized lithographic performance and manageable cost of ownership that is vital to sub-30nm node IC manufacturing.

  13. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. VIII - Groups IC, IIE, IIIF and 97 other irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Wasson, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for determinations of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir concentrations in 106 iron meteorites. Three new groups are defined (IC, IIE, and IIIF) which contain 10, 12, and 5 irons, respectively. It is noted that group IC is a cohenite-rich group distantly related to IA, group IIE consists of those irons previously designated as Weekeroo Station type together with five others having similar compositions but diverse structures, and group IIIF is a well-defined group of low-Ni and low-Ge irons. Several anomalous irons are discussed, including a cluster of five plessitic octahedrites and ataxites with Ge/Ga atomic ratios ranging from 10 to 16 and a meteorite that has the second highest Ni content of any iron. It is shown that the IIE irons are compositionally similar to the mesosiderites and pallasites, and it is suggested that the three groups probably formed at approximately the same heliocentric distance.

  14. Intracellular kinetics of the androgen receptor shown by multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Li; Patsch, Katherin; Cutrale, Francesco; Soundararajan, Anjana; Agus, David B.; Fraser, Scott E.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) pathway plays a central role in prostate cancer (PCa) growth and progression and is a validated therapeutic target. In response to ligand binding AR translocates to the nucleus, though the molecular mechanism is not well understood. We therefore developed multimodal Image Correlation Spectroscopy (mICS) to measure anisotropic molecular motion across a live cell. We applied mICS to AR translocation dynamics to reveal its multimodal motion. By integrating fluorescence imaging methods we observed evidence for diffusion, confined movement, and binding of AR within both the cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa cells. Our findings suggest that in presence of cytoplasmic diffusion, the probability of AR crossing the nuclear membrane is an important factor in determining the AR distribution between cytoplasm and the nucleus, independent of functional microtubule transport. These findings may have implications for the future design of novel therapeutics targeting the AR pathway in PCa. PMID:26936218

  15. Rethinking ASIC design with next generation lithography and process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Kaushik; Liu, Renzhi; Liebmann, Lars; Lai, Kafai; Strojwas, Andrzej; Pileggi, Larry

    2013-03-01

    Given the deployment delays for EUV, several next generation lithography (NGL) options are being actively researched. Several cost-effective NGL solutions, such as self-aligned double patterning through sidewall image transfer (SIT) and directed self-assembly (DSA), in conjunction with process integration challenges, mandate grating-like pattern design. As part of the GRATEdd project, we have evaluated the design cost of grating-based design for ASICs (application specific ICs). Based on our observations we have engineered fundamental changes to the primary ASIC design components to make scaling affordable and useful in deeply scaled sub-20 nm technologies: unidirectional-M1 based standard cells, application-specific smart SRAM synthesis, and statistical and self-healing analog design.

  16. Fault detection in digital and analog circuits using an i(DD) temporal analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J.; Magallanes, D.; Vridhagiri, A.; Ramamurthy, Hema; Deyong, Mark

    1993-01-01

    An i(sub DD) temporal analysis technique which is used to detect defects (faults) and fabrication variations in both digital and analog IC's by pulsing the power supply rails and analyzing the temporal data obtained from the resulting transient rail currents is presented. A simple bias voltage is required for all the inputs, to excite the defects. Data from hardware tests supporting this technique are presented.

  17. Intravesical liposome drug delivery and IC/BPS

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Joseph J.; Gruber, Michele A.

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical therapy has previously shown to be effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This local route of drug administration is now demonstrating promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with the benefit of minimal systemic side effects. Liposomes (LPs) are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and vastly improve cellular uptake of these drug molecules via endocytosis. Intravesical LPs have therapeutic effects on IC/BPS patients, mainly due to their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface and repair the damaged urothelium. This review considers the current status of intravesical LPs and LP mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/BPS. PMID:26816855

  18. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S. L.; McCollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.; Chevalier, R.

    1986-12-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  19. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  20. IC 3418: STAR FORMATION IN A TURBULENT WAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Janice A.; Neill, James D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Schiminovich, David; Rich, R. Michael

    2010-06-10

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of IC 3418, a low surface brightness galaxy in the Virgo Cluster, revealed a striking 17 kpc UV tail of bright knots and diffuse emission. H{alpha} imaging confirms that star formation is ongoing in the tail. IC 3418 was likely recently ram pressure stripped on its first pass through Virgo. We suggest that star formation is occurring in molecular clouds that formed in IC 3418's turbulent stripped wake. Tides and ram pressure stripping (RPS) of molecular clouds are both disfavored as tail formation mechanisms. The tail is similar to the few other observed star-forming tails, all of which likely formed during RPS. The tails' morphologies reflect the forces present during their formation and can be used to test for dynamical coupling between molecular and diffuse gas, thereby probing the origin of the star-forming molecular gas.

  1. Using consumer IC packages in harsh high reliability applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Cathleen A.; Palmer, David W.

    The improvements in purity of molding materials, the IC wafer passivation layers, and manufacturing quality have resulted over the last decade in extremely high reliability in commercial IC packages. In contrast the ceramic/hermetic package world is suffering from limited availability of the newest IC chips, higher cost, larger size, and decreasing quality and fewer manufacturing lines. Traditional manufacturing line qualification tests are a good start for conversion to commercial plastic parts. However, the use of standard sensitive test chips instead of product die is necessary to perform affordable, quantitative evaluations. These test chips have many integrated sensors measuring chemical, mechanical, thermal, and electrical degradation caused by manufacturing and the package environment. Besides visual, electrical test, and burn-in little has been documented on 100% nondestructive screening of plastic molded parts. Based on realistic process control and system engineer cultural expectations, user screening is necessary. Nondestructive tests of moisture and temperature excursion susceptibility are described.

  2. Intravesical liposome drug delivery and IC/BPS.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph J; Gruber, Michele A; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Intravesical therapy has previously shown to be effective in delaying or preventing recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. This local route of drug administration is now demonstrating promise in the treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) with the benefit of minimal systemic side effects. Liposomes (LPs) are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core. They can incorporate drug molecules, both hydrophobic and hydrophilic, and vastly improve cellular uptake of these drug molecules via endocytosis. Intravesical LPs have therapeutic effects on IC/BPS patients, mainly due to their ability to form a protective lipid film on the urothelial surface and repair the damaged urothelium. This review considers the current status of intravesical LPs and LP mediated drug delivery for the treatment of IC/BPS. PMID:26816855

  3. Using consumer IC packages in harsh high reliability applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, C.A.; Palmer, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    The improvements in purity of molding materials, the IC wafer passivation layers, and manufacturing quality have resulted over the last decade in extremely high reliability in commercial IC packages. In contrast the ceramic/hermetic package world is suffering from limited availability of the newest IC chips, higher cost, larger size, and decreasing quality and fewer manufacturing lines. Traditional manufacturing line qualification tests are a good start for conversion to commercial plastic parts. However, the use of standard sensitive test chips instead of product die is necessary to perform affordable, quantitative evaluations. These test chips have many integrated sensors measuring chemical, mechanical, thermal, and electrical degradation caused by manufacturing and the package environment. Besides visual, electrical test, and burn-in little has been documented on 100% nondestructive screening of plastic molded parts. Based on realistic process control and system engineer cultural expectations, user screening is necessary. Nondestructive tests of moisture and temperature excursion susceptibility are described.

  4. Backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1998-07-01

    A new failure analysis technique has been developed for backside and frontside localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. This scanning optical microscopy technique takes advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The method utilizes the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detects shorts. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed.

  5. Analog MOS integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temes, Gabor C.

    1988-01-01

    The goal was to design single-chip lowpass filters with constant group delay in the pass band and 60 dB minimum attenuation in the stop band. The desired 3 dB frequencies are (in Hertz) 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320. A filter class that satisfies the constant delay (linear phase) requirement while providing quite a narrow transition band is the Bessel-Chebyshev filters. It was found that the 7th order Bessel-Chebyshev response satisfied the requirement of the filter.

  6. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex-Aerial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex-Aerial View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and

  9. Flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC chips with PDMS microfluidics. Microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the CMOS die. The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the CMOS chip. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor die and matched PDMS microfluidic channels in a flexible package. The packaged system is fully functional under 3cm bending radius. The flexible integration of CMOS ICs with microfluidics enables previously unavailable flexible CMOS electronic systems with fluidic manipulation capabilities, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing.

  10. Saturn V S-IC (First Stage) Structural Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This illustration, with callouts, shows the structural arrangement of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage was 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, and produced more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that were powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines were mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine was rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equaled the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  11. Producing and recognizing analogical relations.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, Regina; Hayes, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is an important component of intelligent behavior, and a key test of any approach to human language and cognition. Only a limited amount of empirical work has been conducted from a behavior analytic point of view, most of that within Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which views analogy as a matter of deriving relations among relations. The present series of four studies expands previous work by exploring the applicability of this model of analogy to topography-based rather than merely selection-based responses and by extending the work into additional relations, including nonsymmetrical ones. In each of the four studies participants pretrained in contextual control over nonarbitrary stimulus relations of sameness and opposition, or of sameness, smaller than, and larger than, learned arbitrary stimulus relations in the presence of these relational cues and derived analogies involving directly trained relations and derived relations of mutual and combinatorial entailment, measured using a variety of productive and selection-based measures. In Experiment 1 participants successfully recognized analogies among stimulus networks containing same and opposite relations; in Experiment 2 analogy was successfully used to extend derived relations to pairs of novel stimuli; in Experiment 3 the procedure used in Experiment 1 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations; in Experiment 4 the procedure used in Experiment 2 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations. Although not every participant showed the effects predicted, overall the procedures occasioned relational responses consistent with an RFT account that have not yet been demonstrated in a behavior-analytic laboratory setting, including productive responding on the basis of analogies. PMID:19230515

  12. The Formation of Solid Particles from their Gas-Phase Molecular Precursors in Cosmic Environments with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss the unique characteristics and capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory. COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber and is dedicated to the study of molecules and ions under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate interstellar, circumstellar and planetary physical environments in space. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a free jet supersonic expansion coupled to two ultrahigh-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) system for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection. Recent, unique, laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using the capabilities of COSmIC will be discussed, in particular the progress that have been achieved in monitoring in the laboratory the formation of solid gains from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflow and planetary atmospheres. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of these studies for current and upcoming space missions.

  13. Dynamic image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) and two-color image cross-correlation spectroscopy (ICCS): concepts and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Paul W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Kent R.

    2000-05-01

    The interaction of macromolecules in space and time are known to be important for the regulation of many biochemical reactions. Image correlation spectroscopy (ICS) was recently introduced as an imaging analog of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy optimized for measuring the aggregation state of fluorescently labeled macromolecules on the surface of biological cells. We present two novel developments of dynamic ICS that will greatly enhance our abilities to measure molecular interactions as a function of time and space in living cells. We illustrate the use of a rapid scan two-photon microscope system to collect image series at high time resolution (30 frames/s) for dynamic ICS analysis. Secondly, we demonstrate the implementation of two-color image cross-correlation spectroscopy (ICCS) with a CLSM using multiple wavelength excitation, and with two-photon excitation of samples containing two different fluorescent species. Cross-correlation analysis allows the degree of co- localization of two different fluorophores to be measured directly. By performing two-color ICCS, we can monitor the interactions of non-identical labeled macromolecules as a function of time and space. We describe the experimental setup for both methods and illustrate the application for measurements of the diffusion coefficients of singly and doubly labeled fluorescent microspheres in aqueous solutions.

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo, taken August 12, 1963, the S-IC stand has received some of its internal components. Directly in the center is the framework

  15. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  16. All-optical analog comparator.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical '1' or '0' by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  17. All-optical analog comparator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pu; Yi, Xiaogang; Liu, Xianglian; Zhao, Dongliang; Zhao, Yongpeng; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    An analog comparator is one of the core units in all-optical analog-to-digital conversion (AO-ADC) systems, which digitizes different amplitude levels into two levels of logical ‘1’ or ‘0’ by comparing with a defined decision threshold. Although various outstanding photonic ADC approaches have been reported, almost all of them necessitate an electrical comparator to carry out this binarization. The use of an electrical comparator is in contradiction to the aim of developing all-optical devices. In this work, we propose a new concept of an all-optical analog comparator and numerically demonstrate an implementation based on a quarter-wavelength-shifted distributed feedback laser diode (QWS DFB-LD) with multiple quantum well (MQW) structures. Our results show that the all-optical comparator is very well suited for true AO-ADCs, enabling the whole digital conversion from an analog optical signal (continuous-time signal or discrete pulse signal) to a binary representation totally in the optical domain. In particular, this all-optical analog comparator possesses a low threshold power (several mW), high extinction ratio (up to 40 dB), fast operation rate (of the order of tens of Gb/s) and a step-like transfer function. PMID:27550874

  18. A 9 MHz-2.4 GHz Fully Integrated Transceiver IC for a Microfluidic-CMOS Platform Dedicated to Miniaturized Dielectric Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bakhshiani, Mehran; Suster, Michael A; Mohseni, Pedram

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated transceiver IC as part of a self-sustained, microfluidic-CMOS platform for miniaturized dielectric spectroscopy (DS) from MHz to GHz. Fabricated in AMS 0.35 μm 2P/4M RF CMOS, the transmitter (TX) part of the IC generates a single-tone sinusoidal signal with frequency tunability in the range of ~ 9 MHz-2.4 GHz to excite a three-dimensional (3D), parallel-plate, capacitive sensor with a floating electrode and 9 μL microfluidic channel for sample delivery. With a material-under-test (MUT) loaded into the sensor, the receiver (RX) part of the IC employs broadband frequency response analysis (bFRA) methodology to measure the amplitude and phase of the RF excitation signal after transmission through the sensor. A one-time, 6-point sensor calibration algorithm then extracts both the real and imaginary parts of the MUT complex permittivity, ϵr, from IC measurements of the sensor transmission characteristics in the voltage domain. The "sensor + IC" is fully capable of differentiating among de-ionized (DI) water, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and alcoholic beverages in tests conducted at four excitation frequencies of ∼ 50 MHz , 500 MHz, 1.5 GHz, and 2.4 GHz generated by the TX. Moreover, permittivity readings of PBS by the sensor interfaced with the IC at six excitation frequencies in the range of ~ 50 MHz-2.4 GHz are in excellent agreement (rms error of 1.7% (real) and 7.2% (imaginary)) with those from bulk-solution reference measurements by commercial benchtop equipment. The total power consumption of the IC is with 1.5 V (analog) and 3.3 V (digital) supplies. PMID:26761883

  19. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TYPE M MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF IC59: A NEW MODEL FOR BRIGHT RIM CLOUDS?

    SciTech Connect

    Miao Jingqi; Sugitani, Koji; White, Glenn J.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2010-07-10

    We report the results from a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation designed to model recent observational data on the nebula and Bright Rim Cloud IC59. We further examine, in the context of radiative-driven implosion (RDI) models, the possible formation mechanisms of the morphological structure of IC59. The results of the simulation reveal the existence of a new, fourth morphological state for Bright Rim Clouds (BRCs)-which we propose to call a Type M BRC morphology. We discuss the necessary conditions for the appearance of Type M BRCs, based on analytical and numerical simulations. The simulated physical properties from our model are consistent with the available observations of IC59. We further show that the prospect of RDI triggered star formation in all Type M BRCs is not supported by the simulations.

  20. Microstore: the Stanford analog memory unit

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.T.; Chae, S.I.; Shapiro, S.; Larsen, R.S.

    1984-11-01

    An NMOS device has been developed which provides high speed analog signal storage and readout for time expansion of transient signals. This device takes advantage of HMOS-1 VLSI technology to implement an array of 256 storage cells. Sequential samples of an input waveform can be taken every 5 ns while providing an effective sampling aperture time of less than 1 ns. The design signal-to-noise ratio is 1 part in 2000. Digital control circuitry is provided on the chip for controlling the read-in and read-out processes. A reference circuit is incorporated in the chip for first order compensation of leakage drifts, sampling pedestals, and temperature effects.

  1. Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Become familiar with the Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) major structural components: Forward Skirt, Oxidizer Tank, Intertank, Fuel Tank, and Thrust Structure. b) Gain a general understanding of the Stage I subsystems: Fuel, Oxidizer, Instrumentation, Flight Control, Environmental Control, Electrical, Control Pressure, and Ordinance.

  2. Lithium Abundances in the Young Open Cluster IC 2602

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randich, S.; Aharpour, N.; Pallavicini, R.; Prosser, C. F.; Stauffer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectra for 28 candidate late-type stars in the 30 Myr old cluster IC 2602. NLTE Li abundances have been derived from measured equivalent widths. The log n(Li) - T(sub eff) and log n(Li) - mass distributions for our sample stars have been compared with those of the Pleiades and alpha Persei. Our data show that F stars in the three clusters have the same lithium content, which corresponds to the initial content for Pop. I stars. G and early-K IC 2602 stars are, on average, somewhat more Li-rich than their counterparts in the two slightly older clusters. Finally, the latest-type IC 2602 stars are heavily Li depleted, with their Li content being as low as the lowest measured among the Pleiades. As in the Pleiades and alpha Per, a star-to-star scatter in lithium is observed among 30 Myr old late-K/early-K dwarfs in IC 2602, indicating that this spread develops in the pre-main sequence phases.

  3. Proton Ordering of Cubic Ice Ic: Spectroscopy and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several proton-disordered crystalline ice structures are known to proton order at sufficiently low temperatures, provided that the right preparation procedure is used. For cubic ice, ice Ic, however, no proton ordering has been observed so far. Here, we subject ice Ic to an experimental protocol similar to that used to proton order hexagonal ice. In situ FT-IR spectroscopy carried out during this procedure reveals that the librational band of the spectrum narrows and acquires a structure that is observed neither in proton-disordered ice Ic nor in ice XI, the proton-ordered variant of hexagonal ice. On the basis of vibrational spectra computed for ice Ic and four of its proton-ordered variants using classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations, we conclude that the features of our experimental spectra are due to partial proton ordering, providing the first evidence of proton ordering in cubic ice. We further find that the proton-ordered structure with the lowest energy is ferroelectric, while the structure with the second lowest energy is weakly ferroelectric. Both structures fit the experimental spectral similarly well such that no unique assignment of proton order is possible based on our results. PMID:24883169

  4. Validating the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS) in child welfare organizations.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Mark G; Torres, Elisa M; Wright, Lisa A; Martinez, Sandra Y; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in child welfare settings and growing recognition of the importance of the organizational environment, and the organization's climate in particular, for how employees perceive and support EBP implementation. Recently, Ehrhart, Aarons, and Farahnak (2014) reported on the development and validation of a measure of EBP implementation climate, the Implementation Climate Scale (ICS), in a sample of mental health clinicians. The ICS consists of 18 items and measures six critical dimensions of implementation climate: focus on EBP, educational support for EBP, recognition for EBP, rewards for EBP, selection or EBP, and selection for openness. The goal of the current study is to extend this work by providing evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS in a sample of child welfare service providers. Survey data were collected from 215 child welfare providers across three states, 12 organizations, and 43 teams. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated good fit to the six-factor model and the alpha reliabilities for the overall measure and its subscales was acceptable. In addition, there was general support for the invariance of the factor structure across the child welfare and mental health sectors. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the ICS measure for use in child welfare service organizations. PMID:26563643

  5. The spectrum of the planetary nebula IC 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed high-spectral-resolution study of the spectrum of IC 418 is made for the region 3650 to 10050 A, using the Hamilton echelle spectrograph of Lick Observatory, and of the UV spectral region with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data. From high-resolution images in both the near- and mid-infrared, Hora et al. (1993) showed that IC 418 probably has a compact shell interior to the detached, well-known, main shell emission. If one assumes a black body or Hubeny (or standard LTE) model atmosphere energy distribution, it does not appear possible to construct a fully satisfactory nebula model that will simultaneously represent the H-beta flux, the (O III) 5007/H-beta ratio, and the scale of this planetary nebula (PN). Fortunately, IUE and IR data supply information on ions in addition to those optically observed so that the chemical composition can be reasonably well established by summing over concentrations of observed ions. In spite of the fact that IC 418 is carbon rich in sense of having a C/O ratio exceeding the solar value, it is a 'metal-poor' object. Possibly it resembles IC 4997 but in a more advanced evolutionary phase. The central star is variable and has a strong wind.

  6. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22102 - Smoking (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking (I-C mines). 57.22102 Section 57.22102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards...

  11. Glass encapsulation provides extra protection for IC semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelp, W. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Oxide-passivated semiconductor chip is given protective glass coating by means of vapor deposition over metallic substrate of integrated circuit (IC). Method provides more reliable oxide-passivation and hermetic sealing in current use. Chips and scratches incurred during dicing, testing, and assembly are markedly reduced.

  12. Digital plus analog output encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafle, R. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The disclosed encoder is adapted to produce both digital and analog output signals corresponding to the angular position of a rotary shaft, or the position of any other movable member. The digital signals comprise a series of binary signals constituting a multidigit code word which defines the angular position of the shaft with a degree of resolution which depends upon the number of digits in the code word. The basic binary signals are produced by photocells actuated by a series of binary tracks on a code disc or member. The analog signals are in the form of a series of ramp signals which are related in length to the least significant bit of the digital code word. The analog signals are derived from sine and cosine tracks on the code disc.

  13. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, R. l.

    2016-01-01

    International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

  14. Federal efforts to improve quality of care: the Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force (QuIC).

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, J M; Foster, N E; Meyer, G; Holland, H

    2001-02-01

    FORMATION OF THE QUIC: The Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force (QuIC) was established in 1998 to enable the participating federal agencies to coordinate their activities to study, measure, and improve the quality of care delivered by federal health programs; provide people with information to help them in making more informed choices about their care; and develop the research base and infrastructure needed to improve the health care system, including knowledgeable and empowered workers, well-designed systems of care, and useful information systems. STUDY, MEASURE, AND IMPROVE CARE: The QuIC's initial efforts to improve the care delivered in federal health care programs have focused on diabetes, depression, and the effect of working conditions on quality of care. More recently, patient safety efforts are under way to establish a coordinating center that will enable those who are testing methods of reducing errors to share information across their projects and with experts in error reduction. DEVELOP A RESEARCH BASE AND INFRASTRUCTURE: The QuIC has coordinated efforts in credentialing, information on measures of quality, a taxonomy of quality improvement methods, and errors data collection. PROVIDE INFORMATION TO AMERICANS ABOUT HEALTH CARE QUALITY: The QuIC agencies are developing products that will enhance their ability to communicate with the American people about their health care choices: improved gateways for consumer information available from federal agencies, a glossary of commonly used terms, and guidance for producing report cards on quality of care. MOVING THE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT AGENDA FORWARD: Federal efforts to improve quality of care are moving forward in a more integrated fashion on a wide number of fronts. PMID:11221014

  15. Analog video to ARINC 818

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Many commercial and military aircraft still use analog video, such as RS-170, RS-343, or STANEG 3350. Though the individual digital components many be inexpensive, the cost to certify and retrofit an entire aircraft fleet may be prohibitively expensive. A partial or incremental upgrade program where analog cameras remain in use but data is converted and processed digitally can be an attractive option. This paper describes Great River Technology's experience in converting multiple channels of RS-170 and multiplexing them through a concentrator to put them onto a single fiber or cable. The paper will also discuss alternative architectures and how ARINC 818 can be utilized with legacy systems.

  16. ASKAP H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Koribalski, B.; Kilborn, V.; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kamphuis, P.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Meyer, M.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Troup, E.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C.; Wong, O. I.; Wu, X.

    2015-09-01

    We present H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve H I in 11 galaxies down to a column density of ˜1020 cm-2 inside a ˜6 deg2 field and with a resolution of ˜1 arcmin on the sky and ˜8 km s-1 in velocity. We present H I images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three H I clouds - two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an H I mass of ˜109 M⊙ and accounts for ˜15 per cent of the H I associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data, we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density H I emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intragroup gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the H I found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times 109 M⊙, at least 10 per cent of the H I contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.

  17. A Spitzer Census of the IC 348 Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, August A.; Lada, Charles J.; Luhman, K. L.; Muzerolle, James; Young, Erick

    2007-07-01

    Spitzer mid-infrared surveys enable an accurate census of young stellar objects by sampling large spatial scales, revealing very embedded protostars, and detecting low-luminosity objects. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we present a Spitzer-based census of the IC 348 nebula and embedded star cluster, covering a 2.5 pc region and comparable in extent to the Orion Nebula. Our Spitzer census supplemented with ground-based spectra has added 42 Class II T Tauri sources to the cluster membership and identified ~20 Class 0/I protostars. The population of IC 348 likely exceeds 400 sources after accounting statistically for unidentified diskless members. Our Spitzer census of IC 348 reveals a population of Class I protostars that is anticorrelated spatially with the Class II/III T Tauri members, which comprise the centrally condensed cluster around a B star. The protostars are instead found mostly at the cluster periphery about ~1 pc from the B star and spread out along a filamentary ridge. We further find that the star formation rate in this protostellar ridge is consistent with that rate which built the older exposed cluster, while the presence of 15 cold, starless, millimeter cores intermingled with this protostellar population indicates that the IC 348 nebula has yet to finish forming stars. Moreover, we show that the IC 348 cluster is of order 3-5 crossing times old, and, as evidenced by its smooth radial profile and confirmed mass segregation, is likely relaxed. While it seems apparent that the current cluster configuration is the result of dynamical evolution and its primordial structure has been erased, our finding of a filamentary ridge of Class I protostars supports a model in which embedded clusters are built up from numerous smaller subclusters. Finally, the results of our Spitzer census indicate that the supposition that star formation must progress rapidly in a dark cloud should not preclude these observations that show it can be relatively long lived.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Image: Planetary Nebula IC 4406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a rainbow of colors in this dying star, called IC 446. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 446 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We do not see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting HST. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut. This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.' The donut of material confines the intense radiation coming from the remnant of the dying star. Gas on the inside of the donut is ionized by light from the central star and glows. Light from oxygen atoms is rendered blue in this image; hydrogen is shown as green, and nitrogen as red. The range of color in the final image shows the differences in concentration of these three gases in the nebula. This image is a composite of data taken by HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in June 2001 and in January 2002 by Bob O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and collaborators, and in January by the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). Filters used to create this color image show oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas glowing in this object.

  19. Optical analogs of model atoms in fields

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1991-05-02

    The equivalence of the paraxial wave equation to a time-dependent Schroedinger equation is exploited to construct optical analogs of model atoms in monochromatic fields. The approximation of geometrical optics provides the analog of the corresponding classical mechanics. Optical analogs of Rabi oscillations, photoionization, stabilization, and the Kramers-Henneberger transformation are discussed. One possibility for experimental realization of such optical analogs is proposed. These analogs may be useful for studies of quantum chaos'' when the ray trajectories are chaotic. 9 refs.

  20. Terrestrial analogs for space exploration habitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Paul D.; Brown, Jeri W.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) can use early earth-based analogs to simulate many aspects of space flight missions and system operation. These analogs can thus provide information supporting future missions to the moon and to Mars. A study was performed to investigate the potential of terrestrial analogs in simulating human space exploration missions. The study resulted in preliminary requirements and concepts for analog habitation systems, and further study in this area is necessary for SEI terrestrial analog development.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 14, 1961, shows the abandoned site entirely flooded. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  2. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Flooding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September 1961 as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction about to resume, portable, floating pump stations were placed in the site to drain the flood waters caused by a disturbed natural spring months prior during excavation. In this March 31, 1962 photo, the foundation walls can once again be seen.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 22, 1961, shows danger signs posted around the abandoned site with floods nearing the top. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 4, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods at the 11 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 8, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods at the 16 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand would have to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 4, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods at the 11 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken February 2, 1962, shows the abandoned flooded site. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Flooding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken March 15, 1962, shows danger signs posted around the abandoned, flooded site. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 11, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods above the 18 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 18, 1961, shows the abandoned site entirely flooded. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction about to resume, portable floating pump stations were placed in the site, as seen in this March 20, 1962 photo, to drain the flood waters caused by a disturbed natural spring months prior during excavation.

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 1, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods at the 6 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken January 23, 1962, shows the abandoned flooded site. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site.

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Excavation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken July 13, 1961, progress is being made with the excavation of the S-IC test stand site. During the digging, a natural spring was disturbed which caused a constant flooding problem. Pumps were used to remove the water all through the construction process and the site is still pumped today.

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken September 25, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen rotated to the outside on

  16. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House Waterline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Completed Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken February 25, 1963, gives a close up look at the completed Block House. The side shown faces the S-IC Test Stand.

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand and Block House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph taken February 4, 1963, gives an impressive look at the Block House looking directly through the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  19. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken April 4, 1961, shows the S-IC test stand dry once again when workers resumed construction after a 6 month delay due to booster size reconfiguration back in September of 1961. The disturbance of a natural spring during the excavation of the site required water to be pumped from the site continuously. The site was completely flooded after the pumps were shut down during the construction delay.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand- Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small