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  1. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  2. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  3. [Anal suppurations].

    PubMed

    Senéjoux, A

    2001-01-15

    Anal suppurations can be classified according to their origin: from the anal canal, from above the anal canal, or independent from the ano-rectum. Wherever suppuration comes from, an abscess can be present at the acute phase. Anal fistulas represent about 70% of anal suppurations. They always begin by cryptoglandular infection, which can spread to the intersphincteric space and then pass through the anal sphincter. Treatment of anal fistula is a double challenge: healing the suppuration, and preserving anal continence. Among suppurations independent from the ano-rectum pilonidal disease is the most frequent (15% of the suppurations). Other causes of ano-perineal suppurations are infected fissure, Verneuil's disease, and gland, recto-vaginal fistulas and Crohn's disease. PMID:11234090

  4. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sexual activity. Having many sexual partners and having anal sex are both major risks. This may be due ... have sex with many partners or have unprotected anal sex are at high risk of these infections. Using ...

  5. Anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Amanda M

    2002-12-01

    Anal fissure is a common condition with a characteristic presentation. Despite increased pharmaceutical options in the medical management of anal fissures, surgical therapy is not in danger of becoming obsolete. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains an attractive option for many patients suffering from this painful condition. PMID:12516855

  6. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the last part of your large intestine where solid waste from food (stool) is stored. Stool leaves your body through the anus when you have a bowel movement. Anal cancer is fairly rare. It spreads ... Squamous cell carcinoma. This is the most common type of anal cancer. It starts in cells that ...

  7. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain interferes with normal bowel movements Petroleum jelly Zinc oxide, 1% hydrocortisone cream, Preparation H, and other ... anal muscle Prescription creams such as nitrates or calcium channel blockers, applied over the fissure to help ...

  8. Anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  9. Anal Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... entire pelvic region to include the vaginal or penile area to look for other warts that may require treatment. MUST I BE HOSPITALIZED FOR SURGICAL TREATMENT? Surgical treatment of anal warts is usually performed as outpatient surgery. HOW MUCH TIME WILL I LOSE FROM WORK ...

  10. Anal fissure - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ... Anal fissures are tears in the skin overlying the anal sphincter, usually due to increased tone of ...

  11. Anal fissure - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100154.htm Anal fissure - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ...

  12. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  13. Anal condyloma acuminatum.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2009-01-01

    Anal condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV) that affects the mucosa and skin of the anorectum and genitalia. Anal condyloma acuminatum is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted disease in the United States. To date, there are more than 100 HPV types, with HPV-6, HPV-10, and HPV-11 predominately found in the anogenital region and causing approximately 90% of genital warts. Risk factors for anal condyloma acuminatum include multiple sex partners, early coital age, anal intercourse, and immunosuppression. Transmission occurs by way of skin-to-skin contact through sexual intercourse, oral sex, anal sex, or other contact involving the genital area. The virus may remain latent for months to years until specific mechanisms cause production of viral DNA, leading to the presentation of anal condyloma acuminatum.Patients with anal condyloma acuminatum may be asymptomatic or present with presence of painless bumps, itching, and discharge or bleeding. It is not uncommon to have involvement of more than one area, and multiple lesions may also be present and extend into the anal canal or rectum. To date, there is no serologic testing or culture to detect anal condyloma acuminatum; therefore, diagnosis is made clinically or by detection of HPV DNA. Multiple factors determine the choice of treatment, which may range from patient-applied medications to surgical intervention. Despite treatment choice, recurrence rates are high, indicating the importance of patient education on prevention of HPV infection and reinfection. Unfortunately, at this time, no cure exists for anal condyloma acuminatum; however, recently Gardasil and Cervarix (in Australia only) vaccines have become available and are showing promising results. PMID:19820442

  14. What Is Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... anal papillae are also called fibroepithelial polyps . Skin tags: Skin tags are benign growths of connective tissue that are covered by squamous cells. Skin tags are often mistaken for hemorrhoids (swollen veins inside ...

  15. Stages of Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... following stages are used for anal cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In stage 0 , abnormal cells ... or check-ups. Treatment Options by Stage Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) Treatment of stage 0 is ...

  16. Anal Dysplasia Screening

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review considered the role of the anal Pap test as a screening test for anal dysplasia in patients at high risk of anal SCC. The screening process is now thought to be improved with the addition of testing for the human papillomavirus (HPV) in high-risk populations. High-resolution anoscopy (a method to view the rectal area, using an anoscope, a lighted instrument inserted into the rectum) rather than routine anoscopy-guided biopsy, is also now considered to be the diagnostic standard. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Anal cancer, like cervical cancer, is a member of a broader group of anogenital cancers known to be associated with sexually transmitted viral HPV infection. Human papillomavirus is extremely prevalent, particularly in young, sexually active populations. Sexual practices involving receptive anal intercourse lead to significantly elevated risk for anal dysplasia and cancer, particularly in those with immune dysfunctions. Anal cancer is rare. It occurs at a rate of about 1 to 2 per 100,000 in the general population. It is the least common of the lower gastrointestinal cancers, representing about 4% of them, in contrast to colorectal cancers, which remain the third most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Certain segments of the population, however, such as HIV-positive men and women, other chronic immune-suppressed patients (e.g., after a transplant), injection drug users, and women with genital dysplasia /cancer, have a high susceptibility to anal cancer. Those with the highest identified risk for anal cancer are HIV-positive homosexual and bisexual men, at a rate of 70 per 100,000 men. The risk for anal cancer is reported to be increasing dramatically in HIV-positive males and females, particularly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s. The introduction of effective viral therapy has been said to have transformed the AIDS epidemic in developed countries into a chronic

  17. Heterosexual anal sexuality and anal sex behaviors: a review.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kimberly R; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Little research addresses the role of anal sexuality and anal sexual behaviors as a widely practiced but relatively less frequent element of a heterosexual sexual repertoire. However, the importance of anal sex in sexual health is increasingly well-defined by epidemiological and clinical studies. This article reviews existing data on a range of heterosexual anal sex practices and provides conceptual and methodological recommendations for new research. PMID:20358456

  18. Anal itching - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Anal itching occurs when the skin around your anus becomes irritated. You may feel intense itching around ... Anal itching may be caused by: Spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, and other irritating foods and beverages Scents ...

  19. [Anal intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Fathallah, Nadia; Barret, Maximilien; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Molinié, Vincent; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial lesions are caused by chronic infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus. Their incidence and prevalence are increasing, especially among patients with HIV infection. Their natural history is not well known, but high-grade intraepithelial lesions seem to have an important risk to progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Their treatment can be achieved by many ways (surgery, coagulation, imiquimod, etc.) but there is a high rate of recurrent lesions. Pretherapeutic evaluation should benefit from high-resolution anoscopy. Periodic physical examination and anal cytology may probably be interesting for screening the disease among patients with risk factors. Vaccine against oncogenic types of papillomavirus may prevent the development of anal intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:23122632

  20. Encopresis and anal masturbation.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, R N; Ibarra, S; Strupp, K R

    2000-01-01

    Current pediatric and psychiatric studies on encopresis and its treatment are heavily influenced by mechanical, physiological, and behavioral considerations. Although psychodynamic treatment has generally been considered to be of little benefit, and its findings suspect, the authors suggest that a psychodynamic approach adds substantially to the understanding of some cases of encopresis; that the anal sensations and anal erotic feelings reported by a number of encopretic children are intense, and that the encopretic symptom, soiling, in these children is the result of a conscious form of anal masturbation in which the fecal mass is used for stimulation; and that any study of encopresis is incomplete that does not include what encopretic children, engaged in a sound therapeutic relationship, know and say about their soiling. The authors further suggest that physical treatments of those children whose encopresis is psychologically driven may be contraindicated. The presence of a large stool does not in itself substantiate a physical illness. Further research is needed to elucidate the prevalence of anal masturbation in encopretic children. PMID:11212192

  1. [Death after anal "fisting"].

    PubMed

    Preuss, Johanna; Strehler, Marco; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    A 45-year-old homeless woman was found dead at her usual sleeping place. Apart from traces of blood on the lower abdomen of the body, the police investigations did not produce any clues pointing to an unnatural death. At autopsy, it was found, however, that death had been caused by extensive disruptions of the intestine. After being confronted with the results, the sexual partner of the victim admitted manual anal penetration, but claimed that this had been done by mutual agreement. The court did not accept that statement and sentenced him to life imprisonment for murder. The frequency of such fatal outcomes of anal penetration, the relationship between the perpetrator and the victim and the special features at the scene are discussed. PMID:18389861

  2. Screening for Anal Cancer in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Berry-Lawhorn, J. Michael; Roberts, Jennifer Margaret; Khan, Michelle J.; Boardman, Lori A.; Chiao, Elizabeth; Einstein, Mark H.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Jay, Naomi; Likes, Wendy M.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Welton, Mark Lane; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of anal cancer is higher in women than men in the general population and has been increasing for several decades. Similar to cervical cancer, most anal cancers are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) and it is believed that anal cancers are preceded by anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Our goal was to summarize the literature on anal cancer, HSIL and HPV infection in women, and provide screening recommendations in women. Methods A group of experts convened by the ASCCP and the International Anal Neoplasia Society reviewed the literature on anal HPV infection, anal SIL and anal cancer in women. Results Anal HPV infection is common in women but is relatively transient in most. The risk of anal HSIL and cancer varies considerably by risk group, with HIV-infected women and those with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia (LGTN) at highest risk compared with the general population. Conclusions While there are no data yet to demonstrate that identification and treatment of anal HSIL leads to reduced risk of anal cancer, women in groups at the highest risk should be queried for anal cancer symptoms and have digital anorectal examinations to detect anal cancers. HIV-infected women and women with LGTN, may be considered for screening with anal cytology with triage to treatment if HSIL is diagnosed. Healthy women with no known risk factors or anal cancer symptoms do not need to be routinely screened for anal cancer or anal HSIL. PMID:26103446

  3. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... anal cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes anal cancer? Researchers have found some risk factors that increase ... now being done to learn how HPV might cause anal cancer. There is good evidence that HPV causes many ...

  4. Can Anal Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Signs and symptoms of anal cancer Can anal cancer be found early? Many anal cancers can be found early in the course of the ... they reach an advanced stage. Other anal cancers can cause symptoms like those of diseases other than ...

  5. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject.

  6. Anal Pap smears and anal cancer: what dermatologists should know.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, Walter; Ananth, Amy T; Ploch, Lauren E; Rogers, Nicole E

    2014-11-01

    Squamous epithelial cells are susceptible to infection by the human papillomavirus. Infection of squamous epithelium with oncogenic human papillomavirus types is associated with development of dysplasia and potential malignant transformation. Historically, cervical cancer has been the most prevalent human papillomavirus-induced squamous neoplasia. However, because of widespread screening via Pap smear testing, rates of cervical cancer in the United States have decreased dramatically during the past 50 years. Rates of anal cancer, in contrast, have doubled during the past 30 years. The groups at highest risk for development of anal cancer are men who have sex with men, HIV-positive patients, and patients immunosuppressed as a result of solid-organ transplantation. By detecting dysplasia before it develops into invasive cancer, anal Pap smears may be a potentially useful screening tool for anal cancer, particularly in individuals known to be at increased risk. However, at this time, sufficient data supporting the benefit of anal Pap smear screening are lacking. With insufficient evidence, no national health care organizations currently recommend the use of anal Pap smears as a routine screening test, even among high-risk groups. PMID:25088812

  7. [HPV-induced anal lesions].

    PubMed

    Wieland, U; Kreuter, A

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections belong to the most common sexually transmitted infections. To date, more than 200 completely classified HPV-types have been reported, and those belonging to the genus alpha predominantly infect the anogenital region. Condylomata acuminata are caused by the two low-risk types HPV6 and HPV11 in more than 90 % of cases. Treatment of genital warts might be either ablative (e.g. electrocautery, surgical excision, or laser therapy) or topical (e.g. podophyllotoxine, trichloroacetic acid, or imiquimod), and depends on the size, location, morphology and anatomical region. Recurrences after treatment are frequent. Therefore, combination therapies (e.g. topical and ablative) play an important role in daily routine. HIV-infected individuals, especially HIV-positive MSM, have a strongly increased risk for anal dysplasia and anal cancer. Condylomata acuminata and a large proportion of anal dysplasia and anal carcinoma are preventable by prophylactic HPV-vaccination. PMID:25859930

  8. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  9. Modern management of anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  10. Modern management of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  11. Sphincteroplasty for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Pescatori, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Sphincteroplasty (SP) is the operation most frequently performed in patients suffering from moderate-to-severe anal incontinence (AI) who do not respond to conservative treatment. Other costly surgeries, such as artificial bowel sphincter (ABS) and electro-stimulated graciloplasty, have been more or less abandoned due to their high morbidity rate. Minimally invasive procedures are widely used, such as sacral neuromodulation and injection of bulking agents, but both are costly and the latter may cure only mild incontinence. The early outcome of SP is usually good if the sphincters are not markedly denervated, but its effect diminishes over time. SP is more often performed for post-traumatic than for idiopathic AI. It may also be associated to the Altemeier procedure, aimed at reducing the recurrence rate of rectal prolapse, and may be useful when AI is due either to injury to the sphincter, or to a narrowed rectum following the procedure for prolapse and haemorrhoids (PPH) and stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR). The outcome of SP is likely to be improved with biological meshes and post-operative pelvic floor rehabilitation. SP is more effective in males than in multiparous women, whose sphincters are often denervated, and its post-operative morbidity is low. In conclusion, SP, being both low-cost and safe, remains a good option in the treatment of selected patients with AI. PMID:24759337

  12. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  13. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  14. Internal anal sphincter: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Uz, A; Elhan, A; Ersoy, M; Tekdemir, I

    2004-01-01

    The anatomy of the internal anal sphincter and surrounding structures was investigated in 24 cadavers using a surgical microscope (6-25 x magnification). An understanding of the anatomy of the internal anal sphincter is helpful in avoiding complications during surgical procedures in the anorectal region. The external anal sphincter was composed of three ellipsoid rings of skeletal muscle (subcutaneous, superficial, and deep) that encircle the anal canal; in contrast, we found that the internal anal sphincter was composed of flat rings of smooth muscle bundles stacked one on top of the other, like the slats of a Venetian blind. In each anal canal, the average number of ring-like slats observed was 26.33 +/- 2.93 (range = 20-30) and each was covered by its own fascia. The smooth muscle fibers and fascia coalesced at three equidistant points around the anal canal to form three columns that extended distally into the lumen and differed in form from the other anal columns. When viewed from an anterior position, the columns were located anteriorly at the observer's right (5 o'clock position), posteriorly at the right (1 o'clock position), and laterally at the left (9 o'clock position). This heretofore unreported anatomy of the internal anal sphincter may play an important role in closing off the lumen of the anal canal and maintaining bowel continence. PMID:14695582

  15. Conservative management of anal leiomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Hajdu, S.I. )

    1991-10-01

    Leiomyosarcomas of the large intestine are unusual neoplasms, comprising less than 0.1% of all malignancies of the colon and rectum. Six cases of leiomyosarcoma of the anus have been reported. The optimal treatment for this neoplasm is not known. The standard surgical approach is abdominoperineal resection. The authors report the seventh case of this rare neoplasm and outline its treatment using local excision and iridium 192 brachytherapy in an attempt to preserve the anal sphincter. In selected patients, conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy may be an alternative to radical surgery, with the goals of local control of the disease and anal sphincter preservation. However, more experience is needed before this approach could be recommended routinely.

  16. [Anal cancer in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Quéro, Laurent; Duval, Xavier; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Despite effective highly active antiretroviral treatment, anal cancer incidence has recently strongly increased in HIV-infected population. Treatment strategy in HIV-infected patients does not differ from general population. HIV-infected patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy are exposed to high-grade toxicities and should be closely monitored to deliver the optimal treatment. Close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is highly recommended to adjust antiretroviral therapy if necessary. PMID:25418596

  17. Elements of an anal dysplasia screening program.

    PubMed

    Jay, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) is highly elevated compared to the general population, as is the incidence of its precursor lesion, high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN). MSM in general and other immunocompromised populations are also at higher risk. Treatment of HGAIN may prevent development of cancer, similar to the decrease in cervical cancers that has occurred since the advent of cervical cancer screening programs in women. Cervical cancer screening tools have been adapted and validated for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of anal HGAIN. Anal cancer screening programs have now been available for more than a decade, although they are not yet standards of care. Incorporating screening procedures into practice depends on the available resources in a particular community. This article discusses the procedures for anal cancer screening including cytology, digital anal rectal examinations, high-resolution anoscopy, and biopsy. PMID:22035526

  18. Increased anal basal pressure in chronic anal fissures may be caused by overreaction of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex.

    PubMed

    van Meegdenburg, Maxime M; Trzpis, Monika; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a painful disorder caused by linear ulcers in the distal anal mucosa. Even though it counts as one of the most common benign anorectal disorders, its precise etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Current thinking is that anal fissures are caused by anal trauma and pain, which leads to internal anal sphincter hypertonia. Increased anal basal pressure leads to diminished anodermal blood flow and local ischemia, which delays healing and leads to chronic anal fissure. The current treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure is either lateral internal sphincterotomy or botulinum toxin injections. In contrast to current thinking, we hypothesize that the external, rather than the internal, anal sphincter is responsible for increased anal basal pressure in patients suffering from chronic anal fissure. We think that damage to the anal mucosa leads to hypersensitivity of the contact receptors of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex, resulting in overreaction of the reflex. Overreaction causes spasm of the external anal sphincter. This in turn leads to increased anal basal pressure, diminished anodermal blood flow, and ischemia. Ischemia, finally, prevents the anal fissure from healing. Our hypothesis is supported by two findings. The first concerned a chronic anal fissure patient with increased anal basal pressure (170mmHg) who had undergone lateral sphincterotomy. Directly after the operation, while the submucosal anesthetic was still active, basal anal pressure decreased to 80mmHg. Seven hours after the operation, when the anesthetic had completely worn off, basal anal pressure increased again to 125mmHg, even though the internal anal sphincter could no longer be responsible for the increase. Second, in contrast to previous studies, recent studies demonstrated that botulinum toxin influences external anal sphincter activity and, because it is a striated muscle relaxant, it seems reasonable to presume that it affects the striated

  19. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: review and recommendations for screening and management.

    PubMed

    Smyczek, Petra; Singh, Ameeta E; Romanowski, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Anal cancer is a rare malignancy of the distal gastrointestinal tract, often associated with human papillomavirus, the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Currently available screening methods for anal intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor for anal cancer, combine anal Papanicolaou cytology and high resolution anoscopy with biopsy of suspicious lesions. Significant barriers to establishing anal cancer screening programmes include the small number of healthcare professionals performing high resolution anoscopy and the lack of data showing that anal cancer screening can reduce morbidity and mortality related to anal carcinoma. Despite several controversies surrounding anal cancer screening, the rising incidence of this disease in some groups supports routine screening programmes in high-risk populations, especially in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. This review outlines the epidemiology of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer and summarizes issues related to the introduction of anal cancer screening programmes. PMID:23970583

  20. New Techniques for Treating an Anal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Surgery for an anal fistula may result in recurrence or impairment of continence. The ideal treatment for an anal fistula should be associated with low recurrence rates, minimal incontinence and good quality of life. Because of the risk of a change in continence with conventional techniques, sphincter-preserving techniques for the management complex anal fistulae have been evaluated. First, the anal fistula plug is made of lyophilized porcine intestinal submucosa. The anal fistula plug is expected to provide a collagen scaffold to promote tissue in growth and fistula healing. Another addition to the sphincter-preserving options is the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure. This technique is based on the concept of secure closure of the internal opening and concomitant removal of infected cryptoglandular tissue in the intersphincteric plane. Recently, cell therapy for an anal fistula has been described. Adipose-derived stem cells have two biologic properties, namely, ability to suppress inflammation and differentiation potential. These properties are useful for the regeneration or the repair of damaged tissues. This article discusses the rationales for, the estimated efficacies of, and the limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques for the treatment of anal fistulae. PMID:22413076

  1. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer. PMID:26933898

  2. Anal Cancer: What Happens After Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this phase of your treatment. For patients with colostomies Most people treated for anal cancer don’t ... APR, you will need to have a permanent colostomy. If you have a colostomy, follow-up is ...

  3. Anal Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anal Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/analdisorders.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  4. Anal Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anal Disorders URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/analdisorders.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following stages are used for anal cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In stage 0 , abnormal cells ... or check-ups. Treatment Options by Stage Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) Treatment of stage 0 is ...

  6. Neural control of internal anal sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Lubowski, D Z; Nicholls, R J; Swash, M; Jordan, M J

    1987-08-01

    The effect on anal tone of electrical stimulation of the presacral (hypogastric) sympathetic nerves has been studied in eight patients during abdominal rectopexy or restorative proctocolectomy. A sharp fall in anal pressure occurred in seven patients (mean fall 59 cmH2O; range 35-80 cmH2O). In one patient given a beta- and alpha-sympathetic blocking drug (labetalol 200 mg) intra-operatively, the anal pressure decreased by 15 cmH2O. These observations show that stimulation of the presacral sympathetic nerves causes relaxation of the internal anal sphincter and implies that these nerves may induce relaxation of the sphincter in vivo. The pathway of the recto-anal reflex has been studied intra-operatively in three patients undergoing rectal excision. The recto-anal reflex is present after presacral nerve blockade and after full mobilization of the rectum, but is abolished by circumferential rectal myotomy. The reflex has a local intramural pathway. This observation validates the assumption that absence of this reflex is a feature of aganglionosis, as in Hirschsprung's disease. PMID:3651766

  7. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for anal cancer What’s new in anal cancer research and treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  8. Introducing the operation method for curing anal fistula by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bingzhi

    1993-03-01

    The key to the treatment of anal fistula lies in scavenging the infected anal gland thoroughly, which is the source of anal fistula infection. The fistula tract at the internal orifice of the anal fistula is cut 1 cm using laser with the infectious source completely degenerated and the wound gassified and scanned. The residual distal fistula softens and disappears upon the action of organic fibrinolysin.

  9. Teaching Men's Anal Pleasure: Challenging Gender Norms with "Prostage" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branfman, Jonathan; Ekberg Stiritz, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To help students critique sex/gender norms, sexuality educators should address men's anal pleasure. Men's anal receptivity blurs accepted binaries like male/female, masculine/feminine, and straight/queer. By suppressing men's receptivity, the taboo against men's anal pleasure helps legitimize hegemonic sex/gender beliefs--and the sexism,…

  10. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A…

  11. Study of Operated Patients of Lateral Internal Anal Sphincterotomy for Chronic Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harshad Shankarlal; Chavda, Jagdish; Parikh, Jayesh; Naik, Nehal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anal fissure causes significant morbidity in the population. It is proposed that elevated sphincter pressures may cause ischaemia of the anal lining and this may be responsible for the pain of anal fissures and their failure to heal. When pharmacologic therapy fails or fissures recur frequently, lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical treatment of choice. Material and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done of admitted and operated patients of anal fissure by lateral anal internal sphincterotomy either by open or closed technique between April 2010 and November 2011 in Gujarat Medical Education & Research Society Medical College, Sola, Ahmedabad, India. The follow-up data of all patients was evaluated for pain relief, recurrence, wound infection, incontinence to flatus or stool or both for a period of up to 6 months. Results: Wound infection rate was 10.3% in open method and 4.2% in closed method. Incontinence to flatus was 8.3% in closed method and 3.4% in open method. This was temporary and controlled within a 1 week. Incontinence to stool was 3.4% in open method which was temporary and controlled within 2 weeks while none in closed method. None of the patients in either group had come with recurrence within 6 months follow-up. Conclusion: Lateral anal internal sphincterotomy is safe regarding long term incontinence and effective regarding recurrence. PMID:24551659

  12. Prevalence and Risk Indicators for Anal Incontinence among Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Sandvik, Leiv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of anal incontinence in an unselected pregnant population at second trimester. A survey of pregnant women attending a routine ultrasound examination was conducted in a university hospital in Oslo, Norway. A questionnaire consisting of 105 items concerning anal incontinence (including St. Mark's score), urinary incontinence, medication use, and comorbidity was posted to women when invited to the ultrasound examination. Results. Prevalence of self-reported anal incontinence (St. Mark's score ≥ 3) was the lowest in the group of women with a previous cesarean section only (6.4%) and the highest among women with a previous delivery complicated by obstetric anal sphincter injury (24.4%). Among nulliparous women the prevalence of anal incontinence was 7.7% and was associated to low educational level and comorbidity. Prevalence of anal incontinence increased with increasing parity. Urinary incontinence was associated with anal incontinence in all parity groups. Conclusions. Anal incontinence was most frequent among women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter injury. Other obstetrical events had a minor effect on prevalence of anal incontinence among parous women. Prevention of obstetrical sphincter injury is likely the most important factor for reducing bothersome anal incontinence among fertile women. PMID:23819058

  13. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Sebring, Meagan C; Mendez, Audrey E; Ba, Fatimata S; Trimble, Debra D; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in women. We conducted a systematic review among publications published from Jan. 1, 1997, to Sept. 30, 2013, to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: women and anal HPV, women anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women and anal cancer. Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Among HIV-positive women, the prevalence of high-risk (HR)-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, the prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4% to 86%. The prevalence of anal HR-HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina, and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23% to 86% and from 5% to 22%, respectively. Histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9 to 30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3, the incidence rates of anal cancer ranged from 0.8 to 63.8 per 100,000 person-years, and in

  14. Internal anal sphincter augmentation and substitution

    PubMed Central

    de la Portilla, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing recognition of the importance of internal anal sphincter (IAS) dysfunction presenting as passive faecal incontinence. This problem may manifest after anal sphincterotomy or following the more minimally invasive operations for haemorrhoids, as well as with advancing age. Because of the poor results of IAS plication and the beneficial outcomes with peri-urethral bulking agents in urology, these materials have been developed for use in IAS dysfunction. This review outlines the basic purported mechanisms of action, defining the materials in clinical use, their methods of deployment, complications and reported outcomes. There is still much that is unknown concerning the ideal agent or the volume and the technique of deployment, which will only be answered by powerful, prospective, randomized, controlled trials. The specific role of autologous stem cells designed to regenerate the sphincters in cases of functional impairment or muscle loss is yet to be seen. PMID:24759338

  15. Risk Factors for Anal HPV Infection and Anal Precancer in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lauren M.; Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Fetterman, Barbara; Tokugawa, Diane; Lorey, Thomas S.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Luhn, Patricia; Gage, Julia C.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a large proportion of anal cancers. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of HPV infection and anal cancer compared with HIV-negative men. We evaluated risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer in a population of HIV-infected MSM. Methods. Our study included 305 MSM at an HIV/AIDS clinic in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Health Maintenance Organization. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of risk factors comparing men without anal HPV infection; men with anal HPV infection, but no precancer; and men with anal precancer. Results. Low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) and previous chlamydia infection were associated with an increased risk of carcinogenic HPV infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–10.40 and OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.16–15.51, respectively). History of smoking (OR, 2.71 95% CI, 1.43–5.14), duration, recency, and dose of smoking increased the risk of anal precancer among carcinogenic HPV-positive men but had no association with HPV infection. Conclusions. We found distinct risk factors for anal HPV infection and anal precancer. Risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer are similar to established risk factors for cervical cancer progression. PMID:23908478

  16. Anorectal conditions: anal fissure and anorectal fistula.

    PubMed

    Fox, Audralan; Tietze, Pamela H; Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Anal fissures are linear splits in the anal mucosa. Acute fissures typically resolve within a few weeks; chronic fissures persist longer than 8 to 12 weeks. Most fissures are posterior and midline and are related to constipation or anal trauma. Painful defecation and rectal bleeding are common symptoms. The diagnosis typically is clinical. High-fiber diet, stool softeners, and medicated ointments relieve symptoms and speed healing of acute fissures but offer limited benefit in chronic fissures. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical management of choice for chronic and refractory acute fissures. Anorectal fistula is an abnormal tract connecting the anorectal mucosa to the exterior skin. Fistulas typically develop after rupture or drainage of a perianal abscess. Fistulas are classified as simple or complex; low or high; and intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric, or extrasphincteric. Inspection of the perianal area identifies the skin opening, and anoscopy visualizes internal openings. The goal of management is to obliterate the tract and openings with negligible sphincter disruption to minimize incontinence. Fistulotomy is effective for simple fistulas; patients with complex fistulas may require fistulectomy. Other procedures that are used include injection of fibrin glue or insertion of a bioprosthetic plug into the fistula opening. PMID:24742084

  17. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  18. Anal intraepitelial neoplasia: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Elorza, Garazi; Saralegui, Yolanda; Enríquez-Navascués, Jose María; Placer, Carlos; Velaz, Leyre

    2016-01-01

    Anal intraepitelial neoplasia (AIN) constitutes a major health problem in certain risk groups, such as patients with immunosuppression of varied origin, males who have sexual relations with other males, and females with a previous history of vaginal or cervical abnormalities in cytology. Its relationship with the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been well documented; however, many of the factors involved in the progression and regression of the viral infection to dysplasia and anal carcinoma are unknown. AIN can be diagnosed through cytology of the anal canal or biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy. However, the need for these techniques in high-risk groups remains controversial. Treatment depends on the risk factors and given the high morbidity and high recurrence rates the utility of the different local treatments is still a subject of debate. Surgical biopsy is justified only in the case of progression suggesting lesions. The role of the vaccination in high-risk patients as primary prevention has been debated by different groups. However, there is no general consensus on its use or on the need for screening this population. PMID:26765233

  19. Anal squamous cell carcinoma: An evolution in disease and management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Marc C; Maykel, Justin; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer represents less than 1% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Yet, despite the relative paucity of cases, the incidence of anal cancer has seen a steady about 2% rise each year over the last decade. As such, all healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the evaluation and treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma. While chemoradiation remains the mainstay of therapy for most patients with anal cancer, surgery may still be required in recurrent, recalcitrant and palliative disease. In this manuscript, we will explore the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. PMID:25278699

  20. Environmental scan of anal cancer screening practices: worldwide survey results

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jigisha; Salit, Irving E; Berry, Michael J; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Nathan, Mayura; Fishman, Fred; Palefsky, Joel; Tinmouth, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is rare in the general population but certain populations, such as persons with HIV, are at increased risk. High-risk populations can be screened for anal cancer using strategies similar to those used for cervical cancer. However, little is known about the use of such screening practices across jurisdictions. Data were collected using an online survey. Health care professionals currently providing anal cancer screening services were invited to complete the survey via email and/or fax. Information was collected on populations screened, services and treatments offered, and personnel. Over 300 invitations were sent; 82 providers from 80 clinics around the world completed the survey. Fourteen clinics have each examined more than 1000 patients. Over a third of clinics do not restrict access to screening; in the rest, eligibility is most commonly based on HIV status and abnormal anal cytology results. Fifty-three percent of clinics require abnormal anal cytology prior to performing high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) in asymptomatic patients. Almost all clinics offer both anal cytology and HRA. Internal high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is most often treated with infrared coagulation (61%), whereas external high-grade AIN is most commonly treated with imiquimod (49%). Most procedures are performed by physicians, followed by nurse practitioners. Our study is the first description of global anal cancer screening practices. Our findings may be used to inform practice and health policy in jurisdictions considering anal cancer screening. PMID:24740973

  1. Environmental scan of anal cancer screening practices: worldwide survey results.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jigisha; Salit, Irving E; Berry, Michael J; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Nathan, Mayura; Fishman, Fred; Palefsky, Joel; Tinmouth, Jill

    2014-08-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is rare in the general population but certain populations, such as persons with HIV, are at increased risk. High-risk populations can be screened for anal cancer using strategies similar to those used for cervical cancer. However, little is known about the use of such screening practices across jurisdictions. Data were collected using an online survey. Health care professionals currently providing anal cancer screening services were invited to complete the survey via email and/or fax. Information was collected on populations screened, services and treatments offered, and personnel. Over 300 invitations were sent; 82 providers from 80 clinics around the world completed the survey. Fourteen clinics have each examined more than 1000 patients. Over a third of clinics do not restrict access to screening; in the rest, eligibility is most commonly based on HIV status and abnormal anal cytology results. Fifty-three percent of clinics require abnormal anal cytology prior to performing high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) in asymptomatic patients. Almost all clinics offer both anal cytology and HRA. Internal high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is most often treated with infrared coagulation (61%), whereas external high-grade AIN is most commonly treated with imiquimod (49%). Most procedures are performed by physicians, followed by nurse practitioners. Our study is the first description of global anal cancer screening practices. Our findings may be used to inform practice and health policy in jurisdictions considering anal cancer screening. PMID:24740973

  2. Risk of Anal Cancer in People Living with HIV: Addressing Anal Health in the HIV Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Walker, Crystal Martin; Likes, Wendy; Bernard, Marye; Kedia, Satish; Tolley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Anal health and anal cancer are rarely addressed in HIV primary care. We sought to understand factors that impeded or promoted addressing anal health in HIV primary care from providers' perspectives. In this exploratory study, HIV primary care providers from the Mid-South region of the United States participated in brief individual interviews. We analyzed transcribed data to identify barriers and facilitators to addressing anal health. Our study sample included five physicians and four nurse practitioners. The data revealed a number of barriers such as perception of patient embarrassment, provider embarrassment, external issues such as time constraints, demand of other priorities, lack of anal complaints, lack of resources, and gender discordance. Facilitators included awareness, advantageous circumstances, and the patient-provider relationship. Anal health education should be prioritized for HIV primary care providers. Preventive health visits should be considered to mitigate time constraints, demands for other priorities, and unequal gender opportunities. PMID:27080925

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal: A report of two cases with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Medha Pradip; Momin, Yasmin Altaf; Pandav, Amitkumar Bapuso; Sulhyan, Kalpana Ranjitsingh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal accounts for about 20% of all anal canal cancers. It is subclassified into two types. (1) Colorectal type, which arises from the mucosa above dentate line and (2) extramucosal type, which includes adenocarcinoma arising in anorectal fistulae and adenocarcinoma arising from anal glands. Anal gland adenocarcinomas are extremely rare. In this article, we present two cases of anal adenocarcinoma, one colorectal type, and other anal gland carcinoma along with review of literature. PMID:27510691

  4. Survey of anal sphincter dysfunction using anal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence: a possible guide to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; DiMarino, Anthony J.; Moleski, Stephanie; Rattan, Satish; Cohen, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the surge of new medical and surgical approaches to treat fecal incontinence, the types of sphincter abnormalities in patients with incontinence have not been well characterized. We aimed to categorize anal sphincter dysfunction using anorectal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence as a potential guide for improved treatment. Methods A retrospective review of 162 consecutive patients with fecal incontinence referred for anorectal manometry was performed. Resting anal pressure and maximal squeeze pressure were considered as measures of internal anal sphincter and external anal sphincter function respectively. Results Mean age of the patients was 63 years (13-89); females (81.5%) and males (18.5%). 74% of the patients had sphincter dysfunction on anorectal manometry. Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 62% patients vs. external anal sphincter dysfunction present in 44% patients. 80% females had abnormal manometry vs. 44% in males (P<0.0001). Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 68% females vs. 37% in males (P=0.0026). Conclusions Overall, abnormal anorectal manometry studies revealed that internal anal sphincter dysfunction is the most common finding, alone or in combination with external anal sphincter dysfunction. We suggest that anorectal manometry may be important to delineate anal sphincter function prior to using newer therapeutic mechanical devices. Future studies using pharmacological agents to increase internal anal sphincter tone may be of clinical importance. Finally, the classification of fecal incontinence based on the type of sphincter dysfunction may be an improved guide in the selection of newer agents in treating fecal incontinence. PMID:26423466

  5. [The anal incontinence-- study on 20 operated cases].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Grasa, C; Cristache, C; Botea, F

    2001-01-01

    The authors present 20 cases operated for anal incontinence. Two techniques were performed: direct repair (18 cases) and Musset-Cottrell procedure (2 cases). The results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 5 cases and satisfactory in 3 cases. The method of choice seems to be the direct repair of the anal sphincter after a proper local and general preparation. PMID:12731180

  6. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  7. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-27

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  8. Cost considerations in the treatment of anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Bianco, Giuseppe; Silvestrini, Nicola; Maria, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Anal fissure is a split in the lining of the distal anal canal. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treatment of anal fissure. Although technique is simple and effective, a drawback of this surgical procedure is its potential to cause minor but some times permanent alteration in rectal continence. Conservative approaches (such as topical application of ointment or botulinum toxin injections) have been proposed in order to treat this condition without any risk of permanent injury of the internal anal sphincter. These treatments are effective in a large number of patients. Furthermore, with the ready availability of medical therapies to induce healing of anal fissure, the risk of a first-line surgical approach is difficult to justify. The conservative treatments have a lower cost than surgery. Moreover, evaluation of the actual costs of each therapeutic option is important especially in times of economic crisis and downsizing of health spending. PMID:24867398

  9. Research on a novel artificial anal sphincter for human incontinence.

    PubMed

    Zan, P; Yang, B; Zhang, J Y; Shao, Y

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel artificial anal sphincter with sensor feedback for controlling anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is a novel hydraulic-electric muscle which mainly comprises an artificial anal sphincter, a wireless power supply subsystem, and a communication subsystem. High integration of all functional components and no wire linking to the outer device make surgical implantation easier and lower risk. The wireless power supply subsystem employs a Class-E power amplifier based on adaptive control technique, and the electromagnetic compatibility in biological tissue is analysed. With the goal of designing a reliable and safe instrument, the models of human colonic blood flow and rectum motion are developed, the biomechanical material properties of human rectum and tissue ischaemia are analysed. The results show that the deformation of the artificial anal sphincter can be controlled by the press of reservoir below the upper limit of human tissue ischaemia. In vitro experiments demonstrate the artificial anal sphincter system is a good cure for human anal incontinence problems. PMID:20653341

  10. Ultrasound imaging of the anal sphincter complex: a review

    PubMed Central

    Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2012-01-01

    Endoanal ultrasound is now regarded as the gold standard for evaluating anal sphincter pathology in the investigation of anal incontinence. The advent of three-dimensional ultrasound has further improved our understanding of the two-dimensional technique. Endoanal ultrasound requires specialised equipment and its relative invasiveness has prompted clinicians to explore alternative imaging techniques. Transvaginal and transperineal ultrasound have been recently evaluated as alternative imaging modalities. However, the need for technique standardisation, validation and reporting is of paramount importance. We conducted a MEDLINE search (1950 to February 2010) and critically reviewed studies using the three imaging techniques in evaluating anal sphincter integrity. PMID:22374273

  11. Advances in the Management of Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Julie, Diana R; Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-03-01

    Although anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is an uncommon malignancy, its incidence has been increasing markedly in recent decades due to its association with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The well-established standard of care for localized ASCC consists of the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin (MMC) chemotherapy, concurrent with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). However, newer techniques are being actively pursued, including the use of newer radiation therapy (RT) technologies, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The areas of debate and development include the dosing and timing of MMC delivery, the role of cisplatin chemotherapy as an alternative to MMC, the replacement of the standard 96-h infusion of 5FU with oral capecitabine, the use of targeted chemotherapy agents, and the duration and dose of RT. PMID:26905274

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have few or no known risk factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection Most squamous cell anal cancers ... to be linked to infection by the human papilloma virus (HPV), the same virus that causes cervical ...

  13. Anal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Suárez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer is a rare tumor that is associated with oncogenic HPV genotypes. This study aims to compare the age-standardized rates (ASRs) of anal cancer incidence and mortality in men and women living in Puerto Rico (PR) with those of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanics (USH) living in the continental United States (US). Methods ASRs were calculated based on cancer data that came from the PR Cancer Central Registry and from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The age-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Results Comparing the period of 2001 to 2004 to that of 1992 to 1996, the incidence of anal cancer increased among NHW, NHB, and PR men. In females, an increase in the incidence was observed for all racial groups except for Puerto Rican women. When evaluating findings by age groups, Puerto Rican men younger than 60 years old had a 20% higher incidence of anal cancer than did USH men of the same age strata (RR: 2.20; 95% CI = 1.48–3.29). However, Puerto Rican females had a lower incidence of anal cancer than NHW and NHB women. An increased percent change in mortality was observed only in NHW and NHB men. A decreasing trend was observed in all racial/ethnic groups except for NHW women. Conclusion Our results support the notion that there are racial/ethnic differences in anal cancer incidence and mortality, with potential disparities among men and women in PR compared with USH men and women. Given the increasing incidence trends in anal cancer, particularly among PR, NHW, and NHB men, further investigation is needed to better elucidate screening practices that can aid in the prevention of anal cancer. PMID:23781623

  14. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  15. A Rare Case of Granular Cell Tumor of the Anal Region: Diagnostic Difficulty to Masses in the Anal Area

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Takaaki; Morita, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Granular cell tumor may be located anywhere in the body; however, the gastrointestinal tract is infrequently involved and anal granular cell tumors are extremely rare. We report herein a rare case of granular cell tumor in the anal region. In the current case, a 66-year-old Japanese woman was found to have a polypoid lesion in the anus with hemorrhoids. The mass detected as an anal polypoid lesion with ulceration was resected and diagnosed as granular cell tumor by histologic examination. Granular cell tumor of the anal region is rare, and benign perianal polypoid lesions are relatively uncommon clinical findings. They might present diagnostic challenges to surgeons and pathologists. Awareness of the differential diagnosis of granular cell tumor and careful microscopic examination might allow proper management and diagnosis. PMID:24444268

  16. A rare case of granular cell tumor of the anal region: diagnostic difficulty to masses in the anal area.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Morita, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Granular cell tumor may be located anywhere in the body; however, the gastrointestinal tract is infrequently involved and anal granular cell tumors are extremely rare. We report herein a rare case of granular cell tumor in the anal region. In the current case, a 66-year-old Japanese woman was found to have a polypoid lesion in the anus with hemorrhoids. The mass detected as an anal polypoid lesion with ulceration was resected and diagnosed as granular cell tumor by histologic examination. Granular cell tumor of the anal region is rare, and benign perianal polypoid lesions are relatively uncommon clinical findings. They might present diagnostic challenges to surgeons and pathologists. Awareness of the differential diagnosis of granular cell tumor and careful microscopic examination might allow proper management and diagnosis. PMID:24444268

  17. High prevalence of high grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected women screened for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, June Y; Smotkin, David; Grossberg, Robert; Suhrland, Mark; Levine, Rebecca; Smith, Harriet O; Negassa, Abdissa; McAndrew, Thomas C; Einstein, Mark H

    2012-06-01

    There is no consensus on optimal screening for anal cancer (AC) in HIV+ women. Seven hundred fifteen unique asymptomatic women in a high-prevalence HIV+ community were screened for AC with anal cytology and triage to high-resolution anoscopy after routine screening was implemented in a large urban hospital system. Of these, 75 (10.5%) had an abnormal anal cytology and 29 (38.7%) of those with an abnormality had high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Women with poorly controlled HIV were significantly more likely to have high-grade AIN (P = 0.03). Given the high rate of AIN in screened HIV-infected women, routine AC screening in all HIV-infected women should be strongly considered. PMID:22466085

  18. Anal avulsion caused by abdominal crush injury.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, G; Rossetto, A; Kocjancic, E; Rossitti, P; Bresadola, V

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a pelvic and lower abdomen crushing trauma in 37-year-old male patient. The patient had an open lumbar wound, laceration of the psoas muscle, pelvic fracture, a ruptured urogenital diaphragm, and extensive urogenital lacerations. An emergency laparotomy was performed with debridment, urethral reconstruction, and osteosynthesis of the pubic bone. The mobilization of the patient revealed a deep gap, about 8 × 8 cm, in the perineum, with the anus and rectum displaced from their original site. Anal reimplantation was performed, suturing the median raphe, inserting two pelvic drainage tubes, and fashioning a loop transverse colostomy. Closed rectal traumas account for only 4-11% of all rectal traumas. Crushing of the pelvis causes a sudden reduction in its anteroposterior diameter and a corresponding increase in its latero-lateral diameter, together with an abrupt rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The anus is pushed out of the perineal plane due to the divarication of the levator muscles. As suggested in the literature, the standard treatment is wound debridement with immediate or deferred repair, fashioning a diversion colostomy, and repair of the rectum, wherever possible. PMID:21556880

  19. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  20. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  1. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  2. Treating anal fistula with the anal fistula plug: case series report of 12 patients

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Reza Bagherzadeh; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Ajeka, Somar; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent and complex high fistulas remain a surgical challenge. This paper reports our experience with the anal fistula plug in patients with complex fistulas. Methods Data were collected prospectively and analyzed from consecutive patients undergoing insertion of a fistula plug from January 2011 through April 2014 at Hazrat-e-Rasoul Hospital in Tehran. We ensured that sepsis had been eradicated in all patients prior to placement of the plug. During surgery, a conical shaped collagen plug was pulled through the fistula tract. Results Twelve patients were included in this case study. All patients had previously undergone failed surgical therapy to cure their fistula and had previously-placed Setons. There were eight males and four females with an average age of 44 who were treated for complex fistulas. At a median time of follow-up of 22.7 months, 10 of the 12 patients had healed (83.3%). One patient developed an abscess that was noted on the sixth postoperative day, and there was one recurrence during follow-up. Conclusions Fistula plugs are effective for the long-term closure of complex anal fistulas. Success of treatment with the fistula plug depends on the eradication of sepsis prior to plug placement. PMID:27280009

  3. Metachronous tubulovillous and tubular adenomas of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Morikawa, Teppei; Tanaka, Junichiro; Yasuda, Koji; Ohtani, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Anal canal adenoma is an extremely rare disease that has the potential to transform into a malignant tumor. We herein presented a rare case of metachronous multiple adenomas of the anal canal. A 48-year-old woman underwent total colonoscopy following a positive fecal blood test. A 9-mm villous polyp arising from the posterior wall of the anal canal was removed by snare polypectomy. Histologically, the tumor was tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and the cut end was negative for tumor cells. Six years later, an elevated lesion, macroscopically five millimeters in size, was detected in the left wall of the anal canal in a follow-up colonoscopy. Local excision of the tumor was performed, and the lesion was pathologically confirmed to be tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia limited to the mucosa. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of recurrence for six months after surgery. Although she had a past history of cervical cancer, the multiple tumors arising in the anal canal were unlikely to be related to human papilloma virus infection. Our case report underscores the importance of careful observations throughout colonoscopy to detect precancerous lesions, particularly in anatomically narrow segments. PMID:26249723

  4. Nicorandil associated anal ulcers: an estimate of incidence

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, HS; Barakat, T; Moussa, O; Babu, H; Slaughter, T; Palmer, JG; Hinson, FL

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nicorandil is a commonly prescribed antianginal medication that has been found to be associated with painful anal ulceration. The incidence of this complication is unknown. We have used the best data available to us to make an estimate of this figure in a health district with a remarkably stable population of approximately 200,000 people. METHODS Using an electronic search of all letters generated from colorectal and gastroenterology clinics as well as endoscopy reports from January 2004 to November 2010, patients with anal ulceration who were taking nicorandil were identified. Other causes of ulceration were excluded by biopsy in the majority of cases. The central hospital and community pharmacy database was interrogated to estimate the number of patients who were prescribed nicorandil over a six-year period (2004-2010). RESULTS A total of 30 patients (24 men, 6 women) with a median age of 79.5 years were identified who fulfilled the criteria of: taking nicorandil; having no other identified cause for anal ulceration; and achieving eventual healing after withdrawal of nicorandil. In the six-year period an estimated mean of 1,379 patients were prescribed nicorandil each year. The mean annual incidence of anal ulcers among nicorandil users is therefore calculated to be in the region of 0.37%. CONCLUSIONS Anal ulceration appears to occur in approximately four in every thousand patients prescribed nicorandil each year. Prescribing physicians should explain the risk of this unpleasant complication to their patients. PMID:22507720

  5. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  6. Anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh for rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sainio, A P; Halme, L E; Husa, A I

    1991-10-01

    Seventeen selected patients (mean age, 74 years)--14 with rectal prolapse and 3 with persisting anal incontinence after previous operations--underwent high anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh. There was no operative mortality. Prolapse recurred in 2 (15 percent) of the 13 patients followed up for 6 months or more (mean, 3.5 years). Three (27 percent) of the 11 patients with associated anal incontinence improved functionally, as did the three operated on for persisting incontinence, but only one patient regained normal continence. No breakage, cutting out, or infection related to the mesh was observed. Because of the risk of fecal impaction encountered in three of our patients, the procedure is not advocated for severely constipated patients. Despite the somewhat disappointing results regarding restoration of continence, we find this method useful in patients with rectal prolapse who are unfit for more extensive surgery, in controlling the prolapse to an acceptable degree. PMID:1914725

  7. Disseminated neonatal herpetic infection simulating abusive anal trauma.

    PubMed

    Panella, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Potential simulators of premortem trauma present problems of misinterpretation and possible false accusations of caregivers. A case of unsuspected neonatal herpes is reported with associated perianal ecchymosis that raises the possibility of sexual abuse. The decedent was an 8-day-old newborn infant who was born by Cesarean section and treated for 5 days postdelivery for sepsis. The newborn infant was discharged home but returned 2 days later with probable sepsis and new onset of perianal hemorrhage. She died 1 day later with autopsy, revealing neonatal disseminated herpetic infection with early anal involvement consisting of microscopic ulcerations with leukocytoclastic-like vasculitis and rare viral cytopathic changes. These histological changes produced grossly appearing anal ecchymosis with an absence of typical herpetic vesiculopapular lesions, which simulated abusive trauma. This case highlights the importance of considering occult neonatal herpes with associated perianal ecchymosis when presented with possible abusive anal trauma in a newborn infant. PMID:21496019

  8. Anal Cancer debuting as Cancer of Unknown Primary

    PubMed Central

    Sveistrup, Joen; Loft, Annika; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2011-01-01

    Anal cancer usually presents with a visible or palpable tumour. In this case we describe a 54-year old man diagnosed with Cancer of Unknown Primary (CUP) with a single inguinal node as the only finding. Thorough examination failed to identify any primary tumour. The patient was treated with lymph node dissection and not until nearly two years after initial diagnosis, was the primary tumour found, and the patient was diagnosed with anal cancer. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and 45 months after initial diagnosis there is still no sign of relapse. This case illustrates, that anal cancer can metastasise before the primary tumour is detectable. Furthermore, it demonstrates the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up after treatment of CUP since the primary tumour was found later. Finally this is a case of a long-term survivor following treatment for metastatic inguinal lymph nodes from an initially unknown primary cancer. PMID:21769317

  9. Anal carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?

    PubMed

    Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild anal symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of anal warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the anal margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented? PMID:24139082

  10. Anal Cancer Screening Behaviors and Intentions in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Robert L.; Ostrow, David; Johnson-Hill, Lisette M.; Wiley, Dorothy; Silvestre, Tony

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The incidence of anal cancer has increased in the past decade, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-infected individuals. There is controversy about whether to routinely screen for anal cancer in MSM. Objectives To determine whether current anal cancer screening behaviors, intention, and concern differ by HIV serostatus and to identify characteristics of men who intend to seek anal cancer screening. Design and Participants Cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 901 HIV-infected and 1,016 HIV-uninfected MSM from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) in 2005–2006. Measurements Self-reported anal cancer screening history, attitudes, and intentions. Results A history of anal warts was relatively common in these men (39%), whereas having a recent anal Pap test (5%), intention to seek anal cancer screening in the next 6 months (12%), and concern about anal cancer (8.5%) were less common. Intention to seek anal cancer screening was associated with enabling factors (screening availability, health insurance), need factors (HIV-infection, history of anal warts), concern about anal cancer, and recent sexual risk taking. Among four large US cities, there was significant regional variability in anal cancer screening behaviors, intention, and concern (all p<0.001). Most MSM (76%) indicated they would go to their primary care physician for an anal health problem or question. Conclusions This study demonstrates a low rate of anal cancer screening and intention to screen among MSM. As more evidence emerges regarding screening, primary care physicians should be prepared to discuss anal cancer screening with their patients. PMID:18618198

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in metastatic anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jane E; Ohinata, Aki; Silva, Ninoska N; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Eng, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) anal cancer is relatively rare. With limited data, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil has traditionally been utilized in the first-line setting. Treatment beyond front-line cisplatin progression is not well defined. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly overexpressed in SCCA anal cancer and EGFR inhibition may represent a potential treatment target for this population in need. Our case series evaluated metastatic SCCA anal cancer patients who received an EGFR monoclonal antibody as second-line or third-line therapy. Data collected consisted of demographics, previous treatment, metastatic disease sites, localized therapy received, regimen received, first radiographic result, progression-free survival, and overall survival. A total of 17 patients were included, with most (76%) patients receiving an EGFR monoclonal antibody in the second-line setting. Common regimens identified combined cetuximab or panitumumab with a fluoropyrimidine plus platinum (35%), carboplatin plus paclitaxel (29%), or cisplatin plus vinorelbine (18%). Thirty-five percent of patients achieved a response and 24% had stable disease. The overall median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.3 and 24.7 months, respectively. Compared with our large retrospective study in the front-line metastatic anal cancer setting, our study suggests that anti-EGFR therapy in combination with certain chemotherapy derived additional benefit in the refractory setting. In the metastatic setting, there is a need to discover effective therapies. We present a diverse metastatic SCCA anal cancer patient population who received cetuximab or panitumumab with chemotherapy in the second-line or third-line setting. Our case series strengthens the concept of EGFR inhibition in metastatic SCCA anal cancer. PMID:27272412

  12. Anal high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Sumanth; Azar, Aline; Wessolossky, Mireya

    2015-01-01

    Background Although anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM) and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of anal HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+) among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women). Methods A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent anal cancer screening with anal cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013. Results Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and anal cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal anal cytology 48%) of MSM, 28% (abnormal anal cytology 28%) of HSM, and 27% (abnormal anal cytology 34%) of women. Among 117 (53%) individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above), 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM). HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with anal cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49) and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=−0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09). Conclusion Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine anal cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for anal cancer screening among non-MSM. PMID:25670914

  13. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:21838873

  14. Anal lesions presenting in a cohort of child gastroenterological examinations. Implications for sexual traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde; Houdu, Sora; Darviot, Estelle; Buchaillet, Céline; Baron, Céline

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anal lesions found in children during a pediatric gastroenterology consultation when the reason for the complaint was related to a digestive disease. This prospective descriptive study included 100 children under 15 years of age over a 13-month period, consulting due to digestive symptoms. The children were under 8 years old (90%) and 25% were under 3.1 years old. Constipation was the most frequent reason for consultation (69%). Fifty-one anal lesions were observed, of which 58.8% were anal fissures, 15.7% were skin tags and 5.8% were venous congestions related to straining. Anal fissures and skin tags were located at the median line, according to the clock-face method in supine position. No child had more than two anal lesions. No anal dilatation, sphincter hypotonia, anal scars, anal lacerations or bruises were found. The two most common anal lesions were anal fissures and skin tags. These anal lesions were mainly observed at the median line and were due to constipation. No cases of multiple anal lesions were found in terms of common digestive diseases. PMID:25882145

  15. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  16. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma presenting as a peri-anal abscess.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Hasanga; Gorissen, Kym; Francis, Leo; Chow, Carina

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing peri-anal abscess can be difficult to manage and is often attributed to chronic disease. This case documents a male in his seventh decade who presented with multiple peri-anal collections. The abscess cavity had caused necrosis of the internal sphincter muscles resulting in faecal incontinence. Biopsies were conclusive for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A de-functioning colostomy was performed and the patient was initiated on CHOP-R chemotherapy. Anal lymphoma masquerading as a peri-anal abscess is rare. A high degree of suspicion must be maintained for an anal abscess which does not resolve with conservative management. PMID:24898408

  17. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE STRICTURE OF ANAL CHANNELL].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Sadoviy, I Ya; Novytskiy, O V

    2015-09-01

    The results of treatment of 50 patients, suffering postoperative stricture of anal channell (SACH), who were treated in Proctology Department of Ivano-Frankivskiy Rural Clinical Hospital in 2006-2014 yrs, were analyzed. After conduction of hemorrhoidectomy in accordance to Milligan-Morgan method for chronic hemorrhoids grades III-IV a SACH have occurred in 46 (92%) patients, excision of a chronic anal fissura was performed in 3 (6%) and excision of perianal pointed condylomas--in 1 patient. In 2006-2007 yrs 11 (22%) patients were operated in accordance to approaches, which were conventional at that time (comparison group). In 2008 - 2014 yrs 39 (78%) patients were admitted to hospital (main group), in whom new approaches for diagnosis, conservative and surgical treatment were applied, 30 (76.9%) of them were operated. The proposed method on isolated roentgen contrast investigation of anal channell have permitted to determine objectively a form, diameter and grade of the anal channel stricture, and it may be applied as a screening procedure, as additional objective criterion while choosing a surgical tactic. Application of the improved operative technique for SACH have permitted to lower its occurrence rate from 45.4 to 6.7%. PMID:26817078

  18. Carcinoma of the anal canal and flow cytometric DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. A.; Beart, R. W.; Weiland, L. H.; Cha, S. S.; Lieber, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Using flow cytometric DNA analysis of paraffin embedded tissue, DNA histograms were successfully obtained from the anal cancers of 117 patients. DNA diploid patterns were given by 82 cancers (70%) and DNA non-diploid patterns by 35 cancers (30%): 15 DNA aneuploid, 20 DNA tetraploid. Well differentiated squamous cell cancers were mainly DNA diploid, while a larger proportion of poorly differentiated and small cell cancers were DNA non-diploid. The large majority of stage A cancers were DNA diploid. A greater proportion of tumours that had invaded through the anal sphincter or had lymph node metastases or distant spread were DNA non-diploid. Prognosis was slightly poorer for patients with DNA non-diploid cancers when compared to patients with DNA diploid tumours (P = 0.08) and significantly poorer for individuals with DNA aneuploid anal cancers (P = 0.037). However, in a multivariate analysis model, the DNA ploidy pattern of an anal cancer was not of independent prognostic significance alongside tumour histology and tumour stage. PMID:2803916

  19. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  20. Histo-topographic study of the longitudinal anal muscle.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Vigato, Enrico; Parenti, Anna; De Caro, Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    The longitudinal anal muscle (LAM) has been described as a vertical layer of muscular tissue interposed between the circular layers of the internal (IAS) and external (EAS) anal sphincters. There is, however, no general agreement in the literature on its composition and attachments. The aim of this study was to investigate the histological structure, attachments, and topography of the LAM in order to evaluate its role in continence and defecation, thus enhancing knowledge of the surgical anatomy of this region. After in situ formalin fixation, the pelvic viscera were removed from eight male and eight female cadavers (age range: 52-72 years). Serial macrosections of the bladder base, lower rectum and anal canal, cervix and pelvic floor complex, cut in the transverse (six specimens) and coronal (six specimens) planes, underwent histological and immunohistochemical studies. Four specimens were studied using the E12 sheet plastination technique. The LAM was identified in 10/12 specimens (83%). Transverse and coronal sections made clear that it is a longitudinal layer of muscular tissue, marking the boundary between the internal and external anal sphincters. From the anorectal junction it extends along the anal canal, receives fibers from the innermost part of the puborectalis and the puboanalis muscles, and terminates with seven to nine fibro-elastic septa, which traverse the subcutaneous part of the external anal sphincter, reaching the perianal dermis. In the transverse plane, the mean thickness of the LAM was 1.68 +/- 0.27 mm. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the LAM consists of predominantly outer striated muscle fibers and smaller numbers of inner smooth muscle fibers, respectively coming from the levator ani muscle and from the longitudinal muscular layer of the rectum. The oblique fibers suggest that the LAM may represent the intermediate longitudinal course of small bridging muscle bundles going reciprocally from the striated EAS to the smooth IAS and

  1. Abnormal anal cytology risk in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    do Socorro Nobre, Maria; Jacyntho, Claudia Marcia; Eleutério, José; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of abnormal anal cytology in women with known genital squamous intraepithelial lesion. This study evaluated 200 women with and without genital squamous intraepithelial lesion who were recruited for anal Pap smears. Women who had abnormal results on equally or over atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance were classified as having abnormal anal cytology. A multiple logistic regression analysis (stepwise) was performed to identify the risk for developing abnormal anal cytology. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20.0 program. The average age was 41.09 (±12.64). Of the total participants, 75.5% did not practice anal sex, 91% did not have HPV-infected partners, 92% did not have any anal pathology, and 68.5% did not have anal bleeding. More than half (57.5%) had genital SIL and a significant number developed abnormal anal cytology: 13% in the total sample and 17.4% in women with genital SIL. A significant association was observed between genital squamous intraepithelial lesion and anal squamous intraepithelial lesion (PR=2.46; p=0.03). In the logistic regression model, women having genital intraepithelial lesion were more likely to have abnormal anal Pap smear (aPR=2.81; p=0.02). This report shows that women with genital squamous intraepithelial lesion must be more closely screened for anal cancer. PMID:27037113

  2. Human papillomavirus, anal cancer, and screening considerations among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, William Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Invasive anal cancer has become an important cause of non AIDS-related cancer among HIV-infected individuals. Human papillomavirus is the main etiological agent. This review explains the pathophysiologic role of human papillomavirus in the development of invasive anal cancer, summarizes recent epidemiological trends of invasive anal cancer, and reviews the evidence to address common clinical questions posed when screening for anal cancer in HIV-infected patients. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on human papillomavirus oncogenesis is still unclear, but given the increased clinical burden of invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients, many clinics have implemented screening programs for anal cancer and its precursors. Despite the availability of several modalities for treatment of precursors of anal cancer, evidence that current treatment modalities favorably alter the natural history of human papillomavirus oncogenesis in the anal and perianal regions is still inconclusive. However, there is sufficient evidence to state that the accuracy of anal cancer screening procedures (cytology and high-resolution anoscopy directed biopsy) is comparable to the accuracy of those used in screening for cervical cancer precursors. Studies that systematically assess the efficacy of these anal cancer screening programs in reducing the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients are needed. PMID:23681437

  3. Incidence and Predictors of Anal Incontinence after Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury in Primiparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E; Nager, Charles W; Burgio, Kathryn L; Whitworth, Ryan; Weidner, Alison C; Schaffer, Joseph; Zyczynski, Halina M; Norton, Peggy; Jelovsek, J Eric; Meikle, Susan F; Spino, Cathie; Gantz, Marie; Graziano, Scott; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the incidence of fecal incontinence (FI) at 6, 12 and 24 weeks postpartum, anal incontinence (AI) and fecal urgency at 24 weeks and identify predictors of AI in women with obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASI). Methods Primiparous women sustaining OASIs were identified at 8 clinical sites. Third degree OASIs were characterized using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, 3a (<50%) or 3b (>50%) tear through the sphincter. FI was defined as leakage of liquid/solid stool and/or mucus in the past month; AI was defined as leakage of liquid/solid stool and/or mucus and/or gas in the past month and was assessed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks postpartum using the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index. Logistic regression identified variables associated with AI. Results 343 women participated: 297 subjects sustained a third degree OASI, 168 type 3a, 98 type 3b and 31 indeterminant; 45 had a fourth degree OASI. Overall FI incidence at 6, 12 and 24 weeks was 7% (23/326, 95% CI: 4%,10%), 4% (6/145, 95% CI: 2%,9%) and 9% (13/138, 95% CI: 5%,16%), respectively. At 24 weeks AI incidence was 24% (95% CI: 17%,32%) and fecal urgency 21% (95% CI: 15%,29%). No significant differences in FI and AI rates were noted by 3rd degree type or between groups with 3rd and 4th OASI. Flatal incontinence was greater in women sustaining a 4th degree tear (35% vs 16%, p=0.04). Caucasian race (AOR 4.64, 95% CI: 1.35-16.02) and shorter duration of second stage (AOR 1.47 per 30 minute decrease, 95% CI: 1.12-1.92) were associated with AI at 24 weeks. Conclusions Overall 24-week incidence of FI is 9% (95% CI: 5%,16%) and AI is 24% (95% CI: 17%,32%). In women with OASI, Caucasian race and shorter second stage labor were associated with postpartum AI. PMID:25679358

  4. Early effect of external beam radiation therapy on the anal sphincter: A study using anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, E.H.; Dreznik, Z.; Myerson, R.J.; Lacey, D.L.; Fry, R.D.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W. )

    1992-08-01

    The early of pelvic irradiation on the anal sphincter has not been previously investigated. This study prospectively evaluated the acute effect of preoperative radiation on anal function. Twenty patients with rectal carcinoma received 4,500 cGy of preoperative external beam radiation. The field of radiation included the sphincter in 10 patients and was delivered above the anorectal ring in 10 patients. Anal manometry and transrectal ultrasound were performed before and four weeks after radiotherapy. No significant difference in mean maximal squeeze or resting pressure was found after radiation therapy. An increase in mean minimal sensory threshold was significant. Histologic examination revealed minimal radiation changes at the distal margin in 8 of 10 patients who underwent low anterior resection and in 1 of 3 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection. The authors conclude that preoperative radiation therapy has minimal immediate effect on the anal sphincter and is not a major contributing factor to postoperative incontinence in patients after sphincter-saving operations for rectal cancer.

  5. Tumors and Tumorlike Conditions of the Anal Canal and Perianal Region: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, Venkateswar R; Menias, Christine O; Amer, Ahmed M; Elshikh, Mohamed; Katabathina, Venkata S; Hara, Amy K; Baughman, William C; Kielar, Ania; Elsayes, Khaled M; Siegel, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Tumors and tumorlike conditions of the anus and perianal region originate from the anal canal and anal margin or result from direct extension of tumors from adjacent organs. The anatomy of the anal canal is complex, and its different histologic characteristics can lead to diverse pathologic conditions. The anal canal extends from the anorectal junction to the anal verge. The World Health Organization classification of anal canal tumors includes (a) anal intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and (b) invasive tumors. Invasive tumors are further classified on the basis of cell type as epithelial tumors (SCC, adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma), nonepithelial tumors, carcinoid tumors, melanoma, and secondary tumors (direct spread from rectal, cervical, or prostate carcinoma). The anal margin, or perianal skin, lies outside the anal verge and encompasses a radius of 5 cm from the anal verge. Tumors in the anal margin are classified according to the World Health Organization classification of skin tumors. Anal margin tumors include SCC, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also known as Bowen disease, adenocarcinoma and its precursor Paget disease, basal cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma (Buschke-Löwenstein tumor), which is a rare variant of SCC. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, staging, and follow-up of patients with anal and perianal tumors. However, because of the overlap in imaging features among these diverse entities, a definitive diagnosis is best established at histopathologic examination. Nevertheless, familiarity with the pathogenesis, imaging features, and treatment of these tumors can aid radiologic diagnosis and guide appropriate patient treatment. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618320

  6. Increased HIV-1 activity in anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions compared with unaffected anal mucosa in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Pollakis, Georgios; Richel, Olivier; Vis, Joost D; Prins, Jan M; Paxton, William A; de Vries, Henry J C

    2014-06-01

    We studied 3 patients with focal intra-anal tissue high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). All had increased human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA in lesions compared with that in healthy mucosa. HIV-1 RNA and HIV-1 episomal DNA were indicative of ongoing viral replication, more so in anal HSILs. PMID:24604897

  7. Translabial ultrasound assessment of the anal sphincter complex: normal measurements of the internal and external anal sphincters at the proximal, mid-, and distal levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rebecca J; Rogers, Rebecca G; Saiz, Lori; Qualls, C

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the internal and external anal sphincters using translabial ultrasound (TLU) at the proximal, mid, and distal levels of the anal sphincter complex. The human review committee approval was obtained and all women gave written informed consent. Sixty women presenting for gynecologic ultrasound for symptoms other than pelvic organ prolapse or urinary or anal incontinence underwent TLU. Thirty-six (60%) were asymptomatic and intact, 13 symptomatic and intact, and 11 disrupted. Anterior-posterior diameters of the internal anal sphincter at all levels and the external anal sphincter at the distal level were measured in four quadrants. Mean sphincter measurements are given for symptomatic and asymptomatic intact women and are comparable to previously reported endoanal MRI and ultrasound measurements. PMID:17221149

  8. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-05-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  9. A Very Rare Cause of Anal Atresia: Currarino Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Parmaksiz, Mehmet Ergun; Cabalar, Esra; Karapur, Ali; Kaya, Cihat

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (triad) is an extremely rare condition characterized by presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and sacral bone deformation. The complete form of this syndrome displays all three irregularities. Herein, we report a male case who was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of urinary system infection and persistent constipation 2 years after colostomy operation performed with the indication of rectovestibular fistula and anal atresia, diagnosed as Currarino syndrome based on imaging modalities. In a patient who was admitted because of the presence of anal atresia, in order to preclude potential complications, probable concomitancy of this syndrome should not be forgotten. Early diagnosis is important for the prevention of meningitis, urinary tract infections, and malignant change. PMID:27081429

  10. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  11. Dietary habits after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Chartrand-Lefebvre, C; Heppell, J; Davignon, I; Dubé, S; Pomp, A

    1990-04-01

    Dietary habits of patients who had undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis were assessed and correlated with bowel function. Twenty-four well-adapted patients (11 women, 13 men; mean age 32 years) voluntarily entered the study 30 +/- 4 months after closure of the diverting ileostomy. A standardized questionnaire on 108 food items and a 3-day food journal were used in the assessment. Twenty-one patients had no difficulty in selecting an appropriate diet. Caloric intake was adequate. Specific symptoms associated with several foods were as follows: increased stool frequency (beer, spirits, chinese food), decreased stool consistency (beer, wine, fried fish), perianal irritation (spicy foods), undigested particles (grapefruit, lettuce), odours (eggs). Pasta and bananas were associated with increased stool consistency. The authors believe that these observations may help in dietary counselling after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. PMID:2268807

  12. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  13. Progression of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Berry, J Michael; Jay, Naomi; Cranston, Ross D; Darragh, Teresa M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Welton, Mark L; Palefsky, Joel M

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) compared to the general population. Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) are common in HIV-infected MSM and the presumed precursors to anal squamous cell cancer; however, direct progression of HSIL to anal cancer has not been previously demonstrated. The medical records were reviewed of 138 HIV-infected MSM followed up at the University of California, San Francisco, who developed anal canal or perianal squamous cancer between 1997 and 2011. Men were followed up regularly with digital anorectal examination (DARE), high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and HRA-guided biopsy. Although treatment for HSIL and follow-up were recommended, not all were treated and some were lost to follow-up. Prevalent cancer was found in 66 men. Seventy-two HIV-infected MSM developed anal cancer while under observation. In 27 men, anal cancer developed at a previously biopsied site of HSIL. An additional 45 men were not analyzed in this analysis due to inadequate documentation of HSIL in relation to cancer location. Of the 27 men with documented progression to cancer at the site of biopsy-proven HSIL, 20 men progressed from prevalent HSIL identified when first examined and seven men from incident HSIL. Prevalent HSIL progressed to cancer over an average of 57 months compared to 64 months for incident HSIL. Most men were asymptomatic, and cancers were detected by DARE. Anal HSIL has clear potential to progress to anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM. Early diagnosis is facilitated by careful follow-up. Carefully controlled studies evaluating efficacy of screening for and treatment of HSIL to prevent anal cancer are needed. PMID:23934991

  14. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:26446683

  15. Management of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in subsequent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Evans, C; Archer, R; Forrest, A; Barrington, J

    2014-08-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) are common and may greatly affect a patient's quality of life. There is very little information regarding optimum management in future pregnancies. Based upon anecdotal experience, this study describes the recommendations of a cohort of consultant obstetricians in the UK, in this clinical situation. There is limited adherence to the available national guidelines due to the absence of available equipment and expertise to perform endo-anal ultrasound and manometry. Elective episiotomy is still recommended by a small number of obstetricians but the majority of patients are routinely followed-up. Caesarean section is only advised for asymptomatic patients with a previous stage 4 tear, and for any symptomatic patient with a previous stage 3 or 4 tear, irrespective of subgrade. A request for elective caesarean section is likely to be granted, irrespective of OASIS grade. The use of postpartum endo-anal ultrasound would help identify those women in whom a further vaginal delivery is unlikely to exacerbate any symptoms of faecal incontinence. PMID:24800795

  16. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  17. Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: Points of controversy.

    PubMed

    Trigui, A; Frikha, F; Rejab, H; Ben Ameur, H; Triki, H; Ben Amar, M; Mzali, R

    2014-09-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the most commonly used procedure for elective treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Since its original description, the procedure has been modified in order to obtain optimal functional results with low morbidity and mortality, and yet provide a cure for the disease. In this review of the literature of restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, we discuss these technical modifications, limiting our discussion to the current points of controversy. The current "hot topics" for debate are: indications for ileal pouch-anal or ileo-rectal anastomosis, indications for pouch surgery in the elderly, indeterminate colitis and Crohn's disease, the place of the laparoscopic approach, transanal mucosectomy with hand-sewn anastomosis vs. the double-stapled technique, the use of diverting ileostomy and the issue of the best route for delivery of pregnant women. Longer follow-up of patients and increased knowledge and experience with pouch surgery, coupled with ongoing prospective evaluation of the procedure are required to settle these issues. PMID:24999229

  18. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS. PMID:25545893

  19. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Long, Kevin C; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost-effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  20. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia--is treatment better than observation?

    PubMed

    Orchard, M; Roman, A; Parvaiz, A C

    2013-01-01

    Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is an increasingly common condition for which the best treatment has not been well established. Traditional management was based on a 'watch and wait' strategy, but as the natural history of AIN and its progression to anal cancer is becoming better understood, more active treatment strategies are warranted. A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol to address the question whether treatment is indicated in patients with AIN. A total of 169 papers were identified using the defined search criteria. This included only one randomised controlled trial. Case series were therefore also included to help answer the question. The details of the papers were tabulated including relevant outcomes and study weaknesses. We conclude that treatment of high grade AIN, particularly in high risk groups is recommended to try to avoid progression to anal cancer. Treatment options that have shown some benefit include topical use of imiquimod cream or ablation directed by high resolution anoscopy. PMID:23643642

  1. Heterosexual anal intercourse among men in Long Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Hess, Kristen L; Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Anal intercourse poses a greater risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission than vaginal intercourse, and in recent years there has been a growing understanding that heterosexual anal intercourse (HAI) is not uncommon. However, the majority of the anal intercourse literature has focused on men who have sex with men. The little research on HAI has mostly looked at women, with limited work among men. This analysis examined the association between HAI and high-risk behaviors (N = 1,622) and sexual sensation seeking (N = 239) in a sample of men recruited from 2001 to 2012 in Long Beach, California. Almost half of the sample was non-Hispanic Black. The median age was 42 years, 42% were homeless, and 20% reported recent HAI. Men who reported HAI were likely to be Hispanic, were likely to be homeless, had a male partner, engaged in sex exchange, and used cocaine or amphetamines during sex. Men who reported HAI scored higher on the Sexual Sensation Seeking scale. This research supports other work showing the relationship between HAI and high-risk behaviors. More important, it contributes new knowledge by demonstrating the association between HAI and sexual sensation seeking. This research highlights the importance of personality traits when trying to understand sexual behavior and when developing HIV prevention interventions. PMID:24024565

  2. Gender Differences in Factors Associated With Anal Intercourse Among Heterosexual Adolescents in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ng, Junice Y S; Wong, Mee-Lian; Chan, Roy K W; Sen, Priya; Chio, Martin T W; Koh, David

    2015-08-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey, we examined the gender differences in prevalence of and factors associated with anal sex among adolescents attending the only public STI clinic in Singapore. Data were collected from 1035 sexually active adolescents aged 14 to 19 and analyzed using Poisson regression. Prevalence of anal intercourse was 28%, with significantly more females (32%) than males (23%) ever engaged in it. On multivariate analysis, the factors associated with anal intercourse for both genders were oral sex and the nonuse of contraception at last sex. For males, anal intercourse was associated with younger age of sexual debut and greater perceived external control. Among females, it was associated with higher rebellious scores and lack of confidence to resist peer pressure to engage in sex. Consistent condom use for anal sex was 22% and 8% for males and females, respectively. STI prevention programs for adolescents should address anal sex, be gender-specific, and take into consideration individual personality characteristics. PMID:26241386

  3. HPV infection and intraepithelial lesions from the anal region: how to diagnose?

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Newton Sérgio de; Ferreira, Aliana Meneses; Bueno, Camila Caroline Tremel

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, the prevalence of HPV infection in the anal region has increased, especially in some groups like homosexual and HIV-positive people. Since this infection can be associated with the development of squamous anal cancer due to its progression from HPV infection to anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and finally to cancer, the screening and evaluation of these conditions are important. Anal cytology and high resolution anoscopy are good methods that are available and can be used. Although useful, these methods should be performed correctly and not indiscriminately in all patients. Patients for whom anal cytology screening is recommended are: HIV-infected patients, homosexuals, women who present with high-grade vulvar squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, vulvar cancer or cervical cancer. An abnormal anal cytology should be further evaluated with high resolution anoscopy. PMID:22230855

  4. Functional Morphology of Anal Sphincter Complex Unveiled by High Definition Manometery & 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Varuna; Bhargava, Valmik; Karsten, Anna; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Anal sphincter complex consists of anatomically overlapping internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) & puborectalis muscle (PRM). We determined the functional morphology of anal sphincter muscles using high definition manometery (HDAM), 3D-ultrasound (US) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Patients We studied 15 nulliparous women. Interventions HDAM probe equipped with 256 pressure transducers was used to measure the anal canal pressures at rest and squeeze. Lengths of IAS, PRM and EAS were determined from the 3D-US images and superimposed on the HDAM plots. Movements of anorectal angle with squeeze were determined from the dynamic MR images. Results HDAM plots reveal that anal canal pressures are highly asymmetric in the axial and circumferential direction. Anal canal length determined by the 3D-US images is slightly smaller than measured by HDAM. The EAS (1.9 ± 0.5 cm long) and PRM (1.7 ± 0.4 cm long) surround distal and proximal parts of the anal canal respectively. With voluntary contraction, anal canal pressures increase in the proximal (PRM) and distal (EAS zone) parts of anal canal. Posterior peak pressure in the anal canal moves cranially in relationship to the anterior peak pressure, with squeeze. Similar to the movement of peak posterior pressure, MR images show cranial movement of anorectal angle with squeeze. Conclusion Our study proves that the PRM is responsible for the closure of the cranial part of anal canal. HDAM, in addition to measuring constrictor function can also record the elevator function of levator ani/pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21951657

  5. Incidence and epidemiology of anal cancer in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS)

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Li, Xiuhong; Chmiel, Joan S.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Cranston, Ross D.; Jacobson, Lisa P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the incidence and risk factors for anal cancer in a multicenter cohort of HIV-positive and negative men who have sex with men followed between 1984 and 2006 (MACS). Methods Prospective analysis using Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazard models, and a nested case-control study using conditional logistic regression. Results There were 28 cases of anal cancer among the 6,972 men who were evaluated. The incidence rate was significantly higher in HIV-positive men than in HIV-negative men (IR= 69 vs. 14 per 100,000 person-years). Among HIV-positive men, anal cancer incidence was higher in the HAART era than the pre-HAART era (IR=137 vs. 30 per 100,000 person-years). In multivariate analysis restricted to the HAART era, anal cancer risk increased significantly with HIV infection (RH=4.7, 95%CI=1.3–17), and increasing number of unprotected receptive anal sex partners at the first three study visits (p-trend=0.03). Among HIV-positive men, current HAART use did not decrease anal cancer risk. Conclusion HIV-positive men had increased risk of anal cancer. Improved survival of HIV-positive individuals following HAART initiation may allow for sufficient time for human papillomavirus (HPV) associated anal dysplasias to develop into malignancies, thus explaining the increased incidence of anal cancer in the HAART era. PMID:18614927

  6. Anal Pap Screening for HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex With Men: Practice Improvement.

    PubMed

    Welbeck, Monique

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) have the highest rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer when compared to HIV-uninfected MSM and when compared to HIV-infected heterosexual men and women. Despite significantly increasing rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM, in many settings, no standard protocol is in place to screen for anal dysplasia in this high-risk group. A practice improvement project was conducted at a primary care health center to educate the HIV health care team about anal Pap screening in an effort to increase provider knowledge and rates of anal Pap screening performed as part of primary comprehensive care for HIV-infected MSM. Increased health care provider knowledge of anal Pap screening within this setting resulted in increased anal Pap screening for HIV-infected MSM. Routine screening leads to improved surveillance and treatment of precancerous lesions, decreasing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected MSM. PMID:26427364

  7. The impact of anaemia on treatment outcome in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal and anal margin

    PubMed Central

    Cesnjevar, Monika; Anzic, Mitja; Hadzic, Jasna But; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; Jeromen, Ana; Korosec, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiochemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Anaemia is reported to have adverse effect on survival in cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of anaemia on radiochemotherapy treatment outcome in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Patients and methods One hundred consecutive patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal were treated radically with 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy boost and with concurrent mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. The influence on survival of pre-treatment, mean on-treatment and end-of-treatment haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations was studied. Results The 5-year locoregional control, disease free survival, disease specific survival and overall survival rates for all patients were 72%, 71%, 77% and 62%, respectively. In univariate analysis, patients with pre-treatment and end-of-treatment Hb > 120 g/L survived statistically significantly better compared to patients with Hb ≤ 120 g/L. Patients with mean on-treatment Hb > 120 g/L only had statistically significant better locoregional control and overall survival than patients with Hb ≤ 120 g/L. In multivariate analysis, independent prognostic factors were pre-treatment Hb (> 120 g/L vs. ≤ 120 g/L) for overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.419, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.190–0.927, p = 0.032) and stage (I & II vs. III) for disease specific (HR = 3.523, 95% CI = 1.375–9.026, p = 0.009) and overall survival (HR = 2.230, 95% CI = 1.167–4.264, p = 0.015). Conclusions The pre-treatment, mean on-treatment and end-of-treatment Hb concentration > 120 g/L carried better prognosis for patients for with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal treated with radiochemotherapy. The pre-treatment Hb > 120 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for overall

  8. Investigation of anal motor characteristics of the sensorimotor response (SMR) using 3-D anorectal pressure topography

    PubMed Central

    Cheeney, Gregory; Remes-Troche, Jose M.; Attaluri, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Desire to defecate is associated with a unique anal contractile response, the sensorimotor response (SMR). However, the precise muscle(s) involved is not known. We aimed to examine the role of external and internal anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle in the genesis of SMR. Anorectal 3-D pressure topography was performed in 10 healthy subjects during graded rectal balloon distention using a novel high-definition manometry system consisting of a probe with 256 pressure sensors arranged circumferentially. The anal pressure changes before, during, and after the onset of SMR were measured at every millimeter along the length of anal canal and in 3-D by dividing the anal canal into 4 × 2.1-mm grids. Pressures were assessed in the longitudinal and anterior-posterior axis. Anal ultrasound was performed to assess puborectalis morphology. 3-D topography demonstrated that rectal distention produced an SMR coinciding with desire to defecate and predominantly induced by contraction of puborectalis. Anal ultrasound showed that the puborectalis was located at mean distance of 3.5 cm from anal verge, which corresponded with peak pressure difference between the anterior and posterior vectors observed at 3.4 cm with 3-D topography (r = 0.77). The highest absolute and percentage increases in pressure during SMR were seen in the superior-posterior portion of anal canal, reaffirming the role of puborectalis. The SMR anal pressure profile showed a peak pressure at 1.6 cm from anal verge in the anterior and posterior vectors and distinct increase in pressure only posteriorly at 3.2 cm corresponding to puborectalis. We concluded that SMR is primarily induced by the activation and contraction of the puborectalis muscle in response to a sensation of a desire to defecate. PMID:21109594

  9. A rare case of leiomyoma of the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Fabiani, Bernardina; Naldini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leiomyoma is a benign tumour which derives from the smooth muscle fibres and it may occurs in every site in which this type of muscle is present. Among all benign soft tissue tumours it represents almost 3.8% and its pathogenesis remains still unknown. Presentation of case The present case is about a 62 year old woman referred to our centre complaining anal and perineal pain which increase after defecation in association with the appearance of a nodule in the perianal region fixed to the anal sphincter. A 360° tridimensional transanal ultrasound was performed and it showed an anterior nodular thickening of the internal anal sphincter. After an inconclusive preoperative biopsy and a counselling with the patient, the surgeons decided to proceed with the surgical excision. The immunohistochemical examination confirmed the preoperative suspicion of leiomyoma. At 1 year follow-up the patient had not tumour-related symptoms or fecal incontinence and any signs of local recurrence at ultrasound imaging were demonstrated. Discussion Leiomyomas are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy whereby surgery is the treatment of choice and it should be adequate to the site and dimension of the lesion achieving a complete resection with free margins. A further close follow-up is needed too. Conclusion Nowadays there is not a gold standard technique to treat such kind of lesions and the decision of the best surgical approach should depend on the dimension and site. In fact, surgery aims to the oncological outcome trying also to minimize the possible post-operative functional complications. PMID:27078867

  10. Changing Patterns of Anal Canal Carcinoma in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Rebecca A.; Levine, Alexandra M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Smith, David D.; Lai, Lily L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Persistent human papillomavirus infection is associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA). With changing sexual behaviors, SCCA incidence and patient demographics may also have changed in recent years. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results public-use data set from 1973 to 2009 was analyzed to determine incidence trends for and demographic factors characterizing SCCA. Joinpoint analyses identified time points when incidence rates changed. For comparison, similar analyses were conducted for anal adenocarcinoma. Results Joinpoint analyses identified 1997 as the single inflection point among 11,231 patients with SCCA, at which the slope of incidence rates statistically increased (1997 to 2009 v 1973 to 1996: risk ratio [RR], 2.2; 95% CI, 2.1 to 2.3). Annual percent change (APC) increased for all SCCA stages and was the greatest for anal carcinoma in situ (CIS; APC, 14.2; 95% CI, 10.2 to 18.4). Demographic changes characterizing later versus earlier time period included younger age at diagnosis and rising incidence rates in all stage, sex, and racial groups. During 1997 to 2009, women were less likely to present with CIS (RR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.3) but more likely to present with localized (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.3) and regional SCCA (RR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 1.7). In contrast, adenocarcinoma APCs among 1,791 patients remained stable during this time period. Conclusion CIS and SCCA incidence increased dramatically after 1997 for men and women, although men were more likely to be diagnosed with CIS. These changes likely resulted from available screening in men and argue for efforts to identify high-risk individuals who may benefit from screening. PMID:23509304

  11. Ileo-anal pouch procedure: experience in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lau, P W; Boey, J; Lorentz, T G

    1991-11-01

    The ileo-anal pouch procedure is now a well-established method for dealing with ulcerative colitis and familial polyposis in many centres in the West. Experience in the Chinese population is not well documented, mainly due to the rarity of inflammatory bowel disease. This report documents the experience of a university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Despite being a small series, the low complication rates and good functional results show that the pelvic pouch procedure has now evolved to a stage where it can be performed safely even in centres with infrequent experience. PMID:1661110

  12. Biomaterials in the Treatment of Anal Fistula: Hope or Hype?

    PubMed Central

    Scoglio, Daniele; Walker, Avery S.; Fichera, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (AF) presents a chronic problem for patients and colorectal surgeons alike. Surgical treatment may result in impairment of continence and long-term risk of recurrence. Treatment options for AFs vary according to their location and complexity. The ideal approach should result in low recurrence rates and minimal impact on continence. New technical approaches involving biologically derived products such as biological mesh, fibrin glue, fistula plug, and stem cells have been applied in the treatment of AF to improve outcomes and decrease recurrence rates and the risk of fecal incontinence. In this review, we will highlight the current evidence and describe our personal experience with these novel approaches. PMID:25435826

  13. [The time of proctectomy during ileo-anal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Hautefeuille, P

    1993-01-01

    Proctectomy is one of the most important operative phases of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. It allows complete resection of the rectal mucosa and determines the quality of the postoperative course and the functional results. Two procedures are described, either with a distal rectal mucosectomy or complete resection of the rectal wall as far as the pectinate line. Functional results are identical. The second procedure leads to a complete resection of the rectal mucosa and therefore will be indicated in cases of low rectal cancer of dysplasia when the anus can be preserved. PMID:8161140

  14. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barišić, Goran; Krivokapić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  15. Resisting the "Condom Every Time for Anal Sex" Health Education Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Neville, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ensuring men who have sex with men (MSM) adopt and maintain condom use for anal sex is a challenging health education goal. In order to inform the development of social marketing practices to encourage safe-sex practices, the views of MSM about a key HIV health education message ("using a condom every time for anal sex") were sought.…

  16. Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland—Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Fumio; Yoshida, Takayoshi; Yoshinaga, Yasuo; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Lefor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is extremely rare. Most anal canal cancers are squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma is infrequently diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria and the standard treatment for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been clearly defined, in part because of the rarity of this lesion. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 84-year-old man who presented with a piece of tissue prolapsing from the anus. An incisional biopsy showed adenocarcinoma, and an abdomino-perineal resection was then performed. Cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 19 (CK19) stained positive in the specimen, suggesting that the tumor developed from an anal gland. The patient was discharged after surgery without any complications. DISCUSSION Exact diagnostic criteria for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been previously described. In the present case, CK7 and CK19 were stained, and the tumor showed positivity for both of these markers, which is compatible with the staining patterns of anal gland origin cancer. Radical resection is recommended rather than local resection, because of the tumor's high recurrence rate. Some authors recommend combined modality treatment with preoperative or postoperative chemoradiotherapy because of the high rate of distant recurrence. CONCLUSION The preoperative diagnosis of adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is not easily established. However, it may be possible to suspect an anal glandular adenocarcinoma based on a meticulous physical examination, appropriate diagnostic studies and pathological findings on biopsy. PMID:24705191

  17. Anal Intercourse and Sexual Risk Factors among College Women, 1993-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Diana; Ellingson, Lyndall; Votaw, Karen S.; Schaefer, Elizabeth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine trends and sexual risk behaviors associated with anal intercourse among college women over an 8-year period. Methods: A sexual activity questionnaire was used to collect data from 813 students enrolled in a women's health course. Results: Thirty-two percent of the women had engaged in anal intercourse, and this measure was…

  18. Invited commentary: Biological and clinical insights from epidemiologic research into HIV, HPV, and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Madeleine, Margaret M

    2013-09-15

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877-884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6-7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population. PMID:23900552

  19. Invited Commentary: Biological and Clinical Insights From Epidemiologic Research Into HIV, HPV, and Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Eric A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877–884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6–7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population. PMID:23900552

  20. New method for assessment of anal sensation in various anorectal disorders.

    PubMed

    Roe, A M; Bartolo, D C; Mortensen, N J

    1986-04-01

    A new technique for quantifying anal sensation utilizing mucosal electrosensitivity is described and has been tested in 97 patients. Normal subjects (n = 20) have a sensory threshold varying from 2 to 7.3 mA being most acute in the region of the anal valves. Sensory awareness also extends into the upper anal canal. Patients with neuropathic incontinence (n = 17) have a sensory deficit (P less than 0.002) whilst patients with haemorrhoids (n = 28) have less sensitive mucosa displaced into the upper anal canal (P less than 0.0001). Patients with acute fissure-in-ano (n = 10) have lower thresholds of sensation at the site of the fissure and slow transit constipation patients (n = 22) have normal anal sensation. The technique is reproducible and should prove useful in the investigation of anorectal disorders. PMID:3697665

  1. [Japanese HIV-infected men who have sex with men screened for anal intraepithelial neoplasia].

    PubMed

    Itoda, Ichiro; Kitamura, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence of and the risk factors for abnormal anal cytology among Japanese men who have sex with men (MSM) who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have not been fully investigated up to now. We conducted a nested case-control study of 81 HIV-infected Japanese MSM treated with antiretroviral therapy at a sexuality minority affirmative clinic between April 2010 and March 2011. Results showed that 41 (50.6%) of the 81 had normal anal cytology, 13 (16.0%) atypical squamous cells, 24 (29.6%) low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 3 (3.7%) high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. No carcinoma cases were seen. Multivariate analysis showed abnormal anal cytology to be associated with a history of genital condyloma (OR 4.19, p = .021). We concluded that abnormal anal cytology was common among HIV-infected Japanese MSM. Effective screening and management should be planned for precancerous anal lesions. PMID:22250457

  2. The magnetic anal sphincter: a new device in the management of severe fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mantoo, Surendra; Meurette, Guillaume; Podevin, Juliette; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2012-09-01

    The authors aim to report the concept and technique of implantation and the first results of the clinical use of the magnetic anal sphincter (MAS) in the management of fecal incontinence (FI). The MAS device is designed to augment the native anal sphincter. The implant is a series of titanium beads with magnetic cores linked together with independent titanium wires. To defecate, the force generated by straining separates the beads to open up the anal canal. The technique of implantation is simple with no requirement of adjustments. The MAS has a role in the management of severe FI. The device has acceptable and comparable adverse effects to other therapies. FI and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scores are significantly improved in the short term. The MAS offers a simple and less invasive option of anal reinforcement. It is one step further in the quest for an ideal artificial anal sphincter device. PMID:23116075

  3. [Early detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia in high-risk patients].

    PubMed

    Sendagorta, E; Herranz, P; Guadalajara, H; Zamora, F X

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma has increased alarmingly, particularly in high-risk groups such as men who have sex with men and immunosuppressed patients. Infection with an oncogenic strain of the human papillomavirus in the anal canal or perianal skin leads to anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN), progressive dysplastic intraepithelial lesions that are the precursors of anal squamous cell carcinoma. AIN can be diagnosed through cytological screening and biopsy guided by high-resolution anoscopy and can be treated using a range of procedures in an effort to prevent progression to invasive anal carcinoma. Given the recent advances in the understanding of this disease, and the increasing calls from experts for the establishment of screening programs to identify AIN, we review current knowledge on the condition, its diagnosis, and treatment from the point of view of dermatology. PMID:21764027

  4. Peri-anal implantation of bioengineered human internal anal sphincter constructs intrinsically innervated with human neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Gilmont, Robert R.; Somara, Sita; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a major contributing factor to anal canal pressure and is required for maintenance of rectoanal continence. IAS damage or weakening results in fecal incontinence. We have demonstrated that bioengineered intrinsically innervated human IAS tissue replacements possess key aspects of IAS physiology, like generation of spontaneous basal tone and contraction/relaxation in response to neurotransmitters. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of implantation of bioengineered IAS constructs in the peri-anal region of athymic rodents. Methods Human IAS tissue constructs were bioengineered from isolated human IAS circular smooth muscle cells and human enteric neuronal progenitor cells. Upon maturation of the bioengineered constructs in culture, they were implanted surgically into the perianal region of athymic rats. Growth factor was delivered to the implanted constructs through a microosmotic pump. Implanted constructs were retrieved from the animals 4 weeks post-implantation. Results Animals tolerated the implantation well, and there were no early postoperative complications. Normal stooling was observed during the implantation period. Upon harvest, implanted constructs were adherent to the perirectal rat tissue, and appeared healthy and pink. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed neovascularization. Implanted smooth muscle cells maintained contractile phenotype. Bioengineered constructs responded to neuronally evoked relaxation in response to electrical field stimulation and vasoactive intestinal peptide, indicating the preservation of neuronal networks. Conclusions Our results indicate that bioengineered innervated IAS constructs can be used to augment IAS function in an animal model. This is a regenerative medicine based therapy for fecal incontinence that would directly address the dysfunction of the IAS muscle. PMID:24582493

  5. Exploring dynamics of anal sex among female sex workers in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Saroj; Krishna, Rama; Prabhakar, Parimi; Panyam, Swarup; Anand, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The anal sex among heterosexual couples is on the rise as reported in many scientific studies. Considering that unprotected anal sex has higher risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission than the vaginal sex, we undertook a study to understand the anal sex practices among Female Sex Workers (FSW). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among FSW attending 11 randomly selected sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics in Bill and Melinda Gates supported targeted interventions in Andhra Pradesh. A structured questionnaire was administered to the 555 FSW attending these clinics by project clinic counselors. Informed consent was obtained from all the study participants. Results: Engaging in anal sex was self reported by 22% of sex workers, though demand from clients was reported to be much higher (40%). The reasons for anal sex practices included more money (61%), clout/influence of the client (45%), risk of losing client (27%), and forced sex (1.2%). Factors associated with anal sex were higher number of clients, higher duration of sex work, higher income, and older age group. Associated risks perceived by FSW were bleeding and injury to anal canal (98%) while only 28% associated it with higher HIV transmission risk. Reported Condom and lubricant use was about 88% and 39% respectively. Conclusion: The study shows that there is frequent anal sex, inconsistent condom and infrequent lubricant usage, economic and physical coercion, and low awareness of STI/HIV transmission risk among FSW, which have serious implications for HIV prevention programmes. There is a need to focus on anal sex education and use of lubricants along with condoms during anal sex in FSW-targeted interventions in AP. PMID:22529447

  6. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Smaglo, Brandon G.; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  7. The hero, the anima and the claustrum: anality and idealization.

    PubMed

    Meredith-Owen, William

    2012-04-01

    Joe Redfearn's (1979) classic paper 'The captive, the treasure, the hero and the anal stage of development' is recognized as seminal to the development of Jungian thought about anality, particularly its integration with mainstream (Freudian, Kleinian) psychoanalytic perspectives. This paper develops such an approach through drawing on contributions from Meltzer, Green, Bion, Chasseguet-Smirgel and Kernberg. More specifically, it is argued that over-investment in hero and anima archetypal configurations may represent an attempt to replace the resource of the internal parental couple that, at the level of unconscious phantasy, has been destroyed by the aggrieved child's attack on the primal scene. Unless this usually dissociated sadism can be integrated, the creative epistemophilic instinct may remain blunted, giving rise, through projective identification, to the adoption of a pseudo-adult identity based on appropriation or assertion. This in turn may lead to manic attempts to reach authentic ('animating') experience through the (often erotized) excitement of heroic endeavour. Consideration of both Redfearn's and the author's own clinical material demonstrates how close attention to process as well as content is fundamental to revealing and addressing such likely-to-be dissociated scenarios. PMID:22444354

  8. A case of syphilitic anal condylomata lata mimicking malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Tayal, Sarup; Shaban, Fadlo; Dasgupta, Kaushik; Tabaqchali, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Condylata lata in secondary syphilis is well known presentation and needs to be considered in differential diagnosis of perianal lesions. In England between 2013 and 2014 the overall incidence of infectious syphilis increased by 33% and is mainly seen in men who have sex with men. Presentation of case We report the management of a 49-years-old Caucasian homosexual man with perianal lesions that were suspicious of malignancy. After biopsies, colonoscopy, staging with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and syphilis serology anal cancer was excluded and a diagnosis of syphilis was confirmed. He was referred to the sexual health clinic for the appropriate investigations and treatment. Discussion This case highlights the consideration of treatable infectious syphilis pathology. The main differential diagnosis of perianal growths to consider is condylomata acuminata (warts caused by human papillomavirus), anal cancer, syphilis, chancroid, haemorrhoids, tuberculosis and lymphogranuloma venereum. To differentiate a biopsy is needed for histopathological examination. A dense plasma cell infiltrate and numerous spirochetes visualised by immunostaining confirms condylomata lata. Conclusion In UK, it is important for colorectal surgeons to be aware of syphilitic condylomata lata and consider this when dealing with perianal lesions. It is advisable to refer patients suspected of or diagnosed with syphilis to sexual health clinics to help improve outcome. In sexual health clinics additional investigations and treatment are available in addition to partner notification and follow-up can be offered. PMID:26555060

  9. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Smaglo, Brandon G; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Meyer, Joshua E; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M

    2015-12-22

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  10. Value of human papillomavirus typing for detection of anal cytological abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Livia Bravo; Marinho, Larissa Cardoso; Barbosa, Tânia Wanderley Paes; Velasco, Lara Franciele Ribeiro; Costa, Patrícia Godoy Garcia; Carneiro, Fabiana Pirani; de Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate anal cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) typing in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Materials and Methods: Anal samples were collected from 61 patients (44 men and 17 women) and analyzed by PapilloCheck test and conventional cytology. Results: Of all anal samples, 37.7% had cytological abnormalities, 47.54% were negative and 14.75% were unsatisfactory. High-risk HPV, multiple high-risk HPV and HPV 16 infection was detected in 91.13%, 78.26% and 47.82% of the samples with cytological abnormalities and in 47.54%, 6.89% and 3.44% of the negative samples, respectively. High-risk HPV infection was significantly more frequent in anal samples with cytological abnormalities than in negative samples (P = 0.0005, Fisher's test), particularly multiple high-risk HPV infection (P < 0.0001) and HPV 16 infection (P = 0.0002). Conclusions: High-risk HPV, multiple high-risk HPV and HPV 16 infections are significantly associated with anal cytological abnormalities. Furthermore, the frequency of HPV infection in anal cytological samples suggests that high-risk HPV detection has high sensitivity, but low specificity for detection of anal cytological abnormalities, but multiple high-risk HPV typing and HPV 16 typing have a lower sensitivity and high specificity. Results suggest that HPV typing may be useful as an adjunct to cytology to screen patients for high-resolution anoscopy and biopsy. PMID:24339460

  11. The epidemiology and natural history of anal human papillomavirus infection in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Machalek, Dorothy A; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Templeton, David J; Poynten, I Mary

    2012-12-01

    Studies on the epidemiology and natural history of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are essential to understand the significance of this virus in the aetiology of anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM). This paper presents a review of studies on anal HPV in MSM. For this review, a Medline search was performed to identify English-language articles published in peer-reviewed journals on the epidemiology, natural history and risk factors for anal HPV infection in MSM. Anal HPV prevalence is high in MSM and infection with multiple HPV types is common. The available prospective data suggest detection of new anal HPV infections may also be common. However, with limited epidemiological data available on infection dynamics and associated behavioural risk factors, it is difficult to draw conclusions on how persistent anal HPV infection is in this population. PMID:23380235

  12. Anal signs of child sexual abuse: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is uncertainty about the nature and specificity of physical signs following anal child sexual abuse. The study investigates the extent to which physical findings discriminate between children with and without a history of anal abuse. Methods Retrospective case note review in a paediatric forensic unit. Cases: all eligible cases from1990 to 2007 alleging anal abuse. Controls: all children examined anally from 1998 to 2007 with possible physical abuse or neglect with no identified concern regarding sexual abuse. Fisher’s exact test (two-tailed) was performed to ascertain the significance of differences for individual signs between cases and controls. To explore the potential role of confounding, logistic regression was used to produce odds ratios adjusted for age and gender. Results A total of 184 cases (105 boys, 79 girls), average age 98.5 months (range 26 to 179) were compared with 179 controls (94 boys, 85 girls) average age 83.7 months (range 35–193). Of the cases 136 (74%) had one or more signs described in anal abuse, compared to 29 (16%) controls. 79 (43%) cases and 2 (1.1%) controls had >1 sign. Reflex anal dilatation (RAD) and venous congestion were seen in 22% and 36% of cases but <1% of controls (likelihood ratios (LR) 40, 60 respectively), anal fissure in 14% cases and 1.1% controls (LR 13), anal laxity in 27% cases and 3% controls (LR 10). Novel signs seen significantly more commonly in cases were anal fold changes, swelling and twitching. Erythema, swelling and fold changes were seen most commonly within 7 days of last reported contact; RAD, laxity, venous congestion, fissure and twitching were observed up to 6 months after the alleged assault. Conclusions Anal findings are more common in children alleging anal abuse than in those presenting with physical abuse or neglect with no concern about sexual abuse. Multiple signs are rare in controls and support disclosed anal abuse. PMID:24884914

  13. Complex rectal and anal canal injuries secondary to unusual blunt perineal trauma.

    PubMed

    El Lakis, Mustapha A; Rida, Khaled; Nakhle, Ram; Abi Saad, George

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman sustained a trauma to her perineal area when she was ejected from a jet ski while riding on water at high speed. The patient presented to the emergency department with blood streaking from her anal canal. Imaging revealed pneumoperitoneum. Surgical intervention showed complex anal canal and rectal injuries. Primary repair of the injuries was performed. Postoperatively the patient did well and was followed up with no evidence of residual symptoms and with a continent anal sphincter. PMID:25352384

  14. Retrospective Audit of the Management of Anal Insertion of Foreign Bodies: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Ahmed; Chukwuma, Jude

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with voluntary anal insertion of a foreign body (IFB) present to the emergency department and are then managed by the surgical team. This report reviews the medical literature on IFB and includes results of a chart review of operative logged interventions and clinically coded procedures for anal IFBs at a single acute hospital in the United Kingdom between May 2009 and September 2013. The objective was to establish the current practice in the management of anal IFB and update a framework for the initial workup, surgical procedure, and appropriate mental health intervention. PMID:27247831

  15. Anal sphincter injury. Management and results of Parks sphincter repair.

    PubMed Central

    Browning, G G; Motson, R W

    1984-01-01

    The surgical management of a consecutive series of 97 patients with complete division of the anal sphincter musculature is reported. The sphincter damage followed operative, traumatic, or obstetric injury and resulted in frank fecal incontinence or the urgent necessity of a defunctioning colostomy. All patients were treated by delayed sphincter repair using an overlapping technique; in 93 the repair was protected by a temporary defunctioning stoma. There were no deaths. The repair was completely successful in 65 (78%) and partially successful in 11 (13%) of the 83 patients assessed from 4 to 116 months after surgery. Complications occurred in 27 patients but did not usually affect the eventual clinical outcome. Provided there has been no major neurological damage to the sphincter complex, surgical reconstruction can be expected to restore continence in most patients. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6703796

  16. Planar spin-transfer device with dynamical polarizer and analizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Kravchenko, Anton

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of the planar spin-transfer devices with monodomain magnetic layers can be described by the macrospin Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with spin-transfer terms. The LLG description of a device with two layers is simplified after applying the overdamped, large easy-plane anisotropy approximation. A decrease of the magnetic layer thickness asymmetry creates a transition from the conventional polarizer-analizer (``fixed layer -- free layer'') operation regime to the regime of the nearly identical magnets. Here electric current leads to a ``Slonczewski windmill'' dynamic state, rather than producing the magnetic switching. The ``windmill'' precession state of a device with two free layers was investigated by numerical solution of the LLG equation.

  17. The epidemiology of anal incontinence and symptom severity scoring

    PubMed Central

    Nevler, Avinoam

    2014-01-01

    For many patients, anal incontinence (AI) is a devastating condition that can lead to social isolation and loss of independence, contributing to a substantial economic health burden, not only for the individual but also for the allocation of healthcare resources. Its prevalence is underestimated because of poor patient reporting, with many unrecorded but symptomatic cases residing in nursing homes. Endosonography has improved our understanding of the incidence of post-obstetric sphincter tears that are potentially suitable for repair and those cases resulting from anorectal surgery, most notably after fistula and hemorrhoid operations. The clinical scoring systems assessing the severity of AI are discussed in this review, along with their limitations. Improvements in the standardization of these scales will advance our understanding of treatment response in an era where the therapeutic options have multiplied and will permit a better comparison between specific therapies. PMID:24759339

  18. Technical aspects of radiation therapy for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Ahmed, Inaya; Yue, Ning J.

    2014-01-01

    Historically treated with surgery, current practice recommends anal carcinoma to be treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. This review will examine the anatomy, modes of disease spread and recurrence, and evaluate the existing evidence for treatment options for these tumors. An in-depth examination of specific radiation therapy (RT) techniques—such as conventional 3D-conformal RT and intensity-modulated RT—will be discussed along with modern dose constraints. RT field arrangement, patient setup, and recommended gross and clinical target volume (CTV) contours will be considered. Areas in need of further investigation, such as the role in treatment for positron emission tomography (PET) will be explored. PMID:24982768

  19. [Preservation of the anal sphincter in low rectal lesions].

    PubMed

    Arthur, K E; Guerra, M

    1997-01-01

    We have discussed the surgical options to save the anorectal sphincter in lesions within the lower 2/3 of the rectum. We presented four clinical cases: two villous adenomas, one adenocarcinoma and one benign tumor, probably of embryonic origin. We discussed the surgical options in order to avoid a permanent colostomy. There is not a single surgical procedure that we can count on to preserve the anal sphincter, either in benign or malignant lesions. The surgeons treating this pathology should consider all options and be able to select the most adequate, the less complicated and yet be able to preserve continence. The surgeons should remember that in treating malignant lesions "a curative resection is worth a colostomy". PMID:9805095

  20. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Cancer.gov

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  1. A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole anal canal imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-02-01

    We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the anal canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 μm, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire anal canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the anal canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for anal cancer. PMID:25780750

  2. [A Case of Anal Canal Carcinoma with Inguinal Lymph Node Metastasis Treated with Laparoscopic Abdominoperineal Resection].

    PubMed

    Tonooka, Toru; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kainuma, Osamu; Soda, Hiroaki; Cho, Akihiro; Saito, Hiroshige; Arimitsu, Hidehito; Yanagibashi, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Chibana, Tomofumi; Tokoro, Yukinari; Nagata, Matsuo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of anal canal cancer with inguinal lymph node metastasis treated with laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection combined with inguinal lymph node dissection. A 52-year-old woman was diagnosed with anal squamous carcinoma after excision of an anal canal tumor. Further examination revealed right inguinal lymph node metastasis. Chemoradiotherapy was administered but was discontinued because of serious adverse events. We therefore performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection combined with inguinal lymph node dissection. The pathological findings revealed residual squamous cell carcinoma at the lymphatic vessels in the rectal wall and lymph nodes, including the right inguinal region. Therapeutic effect of Grade 1a was achieved in spite of interruption of the chemoradiotherapy. She was discharged 17 days after the operation, and no recurrence was observed for 11 months. Radical resection was performed for the anal canal squamous cell carcinoma with the metastasis to the right inguinal lymph node, even after interruption of the chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26805350

  3. Histochemical properties of sialic acids and antimicrobial substances in canine anal glands

    PubMed Central

    Nara, T.; Yasui, T.; Fujimori, O.; Meyer, W.; Tsukise, A.

    2011-01-01

    The functional properties of sialic acids appear to be manifold. Additionally, antimicrobial substances serve as a non-specific defense against microorganisms. In this study, therefore, the localization of sialic acids and antimicrobial substances in the anal glands of dog was studied by sialoglycoconjugate histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The secretory epithelium, luminal secretions and excretory ducts exhibited high levels of sialoglycoconjugates that terminated in Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc or Siaα2-3Gal1-4GlcNAc. Additionally, O-acetylated sialic acids were detectable in these glandular structures. Antimicrobial substances, such as lysozyme, immunoglobulin A (IgA), lactoferrin and the peptide group of β-defensins, were also demonstrated as products of the anal glands. The results obtained are discussed with regard to the functional significance of the anal glands. These secretory products may create a defensive barrier against microbial invasion at the anal mucosa. PMID:22073376

  4. [The usefulness of manometry in the determination of the morphology of the anal canal].

    PubMed

    Gil-Vernet, J M; Asensio, M; Marhuenda, C; Broto, J; Lloret, J; Boix-Ochoa, J

    1997-07-01

    The appearance of the new lecture systems for the manometry studies by computer, like the Polygram by Synectics (vector volume), offer the possibility to see the circumferential pressure forces, that even in rest conditions as in voluntary contraction, they keep coaptation of the anal canal, and this will act as a continent closure system in the most distal part of the G.I. tract. The study is with the normal parameters obtained in 14 individuals, considered as normal, getting the mean +/- sd pressure of the anal canal convey in mm Hg, from de anal canal profile in rest as in voluntary contraction, and the maximum variability that could exist between the six profile waves, that are obtained in the same individual to develop an image of the anal canal. This valves will allow the author's to get to the bottom of fecal incontinence derivative from anorectal malformations, defining the pressure valves of muscular hypoplasia or surgical outcomes of the malformations. PMID:9376242

  5. Rare Case of Anal Canal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Associated with Perianal and Vulvar Pagetoid Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Cho, Hyun Yee; Baek, Jeong-Heum; Jeong, Juhyeon; Ha, Seung Yeon; Seok, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Won; Sym, Sun Jin; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chung, Dong Hae

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman was referred to surgery for incidentally found colonic polyps during a health examination. Physical examination revealed widespread eczematous skin lesion without pruritus in the perianal and vulvar area. Abdominopelvic computed tomography showed an approximately 4-cm-sized, soft tissue lesion in the right perianal area. Inguinal lymph node dissection and Mils’ operation extended to perianal and perivulvar skin was performed. Histologically, the anal canal lesion was composed of mucin-containing signet ring cells, which were similar to those found in Pagetoid skin lesions. It was diagnosed as an anal canal signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) with perianal and vulvar Pagetoid spread and bilateral inguinal lymph node metastasis. Anal canal SRCC is rare, and the current case is the third reported case in the English literature. Seven additional cases were retrieved from the world literature. Here, we describe this rare case of anal canal SRCC with perianal Pagetoid spread and provide a literature review. PMID:26447133

  6. Anal Papilloma: An Exceptional Presentation of Fibrocystic Disease in Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Priya; Esakkai, Muthuvel; Venugopal, Palani; Kannaiyan, Ilavarasan; Srinivasan, Chitra; Reddy, Punuru Tejashwini; Ebenezer, Evelyn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Previously ectopic breast tissue was thought to be derived from the caudal remnants of the primitive embryonic milk ridges; anogenital mammary-like glands are presently considered as normal constituents of the anogenital region. We report a case of young female, who presented with an anal papilloma. Histopathological examination revealed extensive fibrocystic changes in anogenital mammary-like glands. To date, a lot of benign changes and a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms have been reported in these glands. However, extensive fibrocystic change of these glands in anal region is very rare. In addition, fibrocystic disease of anal mammary glands, masquerading clinically as an anal papilloma, has not been reported in literature. Hence, it is essential for clinicians and the pathologists to be aware of such a rare presentation. The features of fibrocystic disease in perianal region are also discussed. PMID:26495147

  7. Human papillomavirus-related squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal with papillary features

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Marino E; Shamekh, Rania; Coppola, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the anal canal is a well-known carcinoma associated with high-risk types of HPV. HPV-related SCC with papillary morphology (papillary SCC) has been described in the oropharynx. We describe, for the first time, a case of anal HPV-related squamous carcinoma with papillary morphology. The tumor arose from the anal mucosa. The biopsies revealed a superficially invasive SCC with prominent papillary features and associated in situ carcinoma. The tumor cells were positive for p16 and were also positive for high-risk types of HPV using chromogenic in situ hybridization. The findings are consistent with a HPV-related SCC of the anal canal with papillary features. This tumor shows histologic features similar to a papillary HPV-related SCC of the oropharynx. Additional studies are needed to characterize these lesions. PMID:25717259

  8. A wide field-of-view scanning endoscope for whole anal canal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Lai, Lily L.; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel wide field-of-view (FOV) scanning endoscope, the AnCam, which is based on contact image sensor (CIS) technology used in commercialized business card scanners. The AnCam can capture the whole image of the anal canal within 10 seconds with a resolution of 89 μm, a maximum FOV of 100 mm × 120 mm, and a depth-of-field (DOF) of 0.65 mm at 5.9 line pairs per mm (lp/mm). We demonstrate the performance of the AnCam by imaging the entire anal canal of pigs and tracking the dynamics of acetowhite testing. We believe the AnCam can potentially be a simple and convenient solution for screening of the anal canal for dysplasia and for surveillance in patients following treatment for anal cancer. PMID:25780750

  9. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions. PMID:27050294

  10. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Linear Array for HPV Genotyping in Anal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Michelle I.; Brown, Brandon J.; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Woo, Yin Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ2 tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  11. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples.

    PubMed

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I; Brown, Brandon J; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; Gravitt, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ(2) tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  12. Correlates of anal sex roles among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Gravitt, Patti; Rompalo, Anne M; Tai, Raymond; Lim, Sin How

    2016-03-01

    Identifying roles for anal sex is an important issue for populations of MSM. We describe the prevalence of identifying as being 'top', 'bottom', 'versatile', or 'don't know/not applicable' among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and behavioural outcomes according to these labels for sexual role identity. Data analysis was conducted on a survey administered during weekly outreach throughout Kuala Lumpur in 2012. Pearson's Chi square tests were used to compare demographic and behavioural characteristics of MSM who reported roles for anal sex. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the odds of behavioural outcomes among MSM who identified as 'bottom', 'versatile,' and 'don't know' compared to MSM who reported that 'top' was their sexual role. Labels for anal sex roles were significantly associated with condom use for last anal sex. Among MSM who used labels for anal sex roles, MSM who identified as 'bottom' had highest level of not using condoms for last anal sex (24.1%, p = .045). In binary logistic regression model, identifying as 'top' was significantly associated with reporting using a condom during last anal sex and reported consistent condom use for anal sex in the past six months (p = .039 and .017, respectively). With regard to sexual role identity, some MSM may be a part of a special subgroup of at-risk men to be targeted. Future research should evaluate the origins, meanings, and perceptions of these labels, and the developmental process of how these MSM identify with any of these categories. Research should also uncover condom use decision making with regard to these labels for sexual positioning. PMID:25887064

  13. Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Peterson, E.K.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves was investigated by a labelling technique using protein-bound iodine125 and food dye. Wolves deposited secretions on some but not all scats. Adult males, especially the alpha male, deposited anal-sac secretions more frequently while defecating than did females or juveniles. Secretions sometimes also were deposited independently of defecation, suggesting a dual role in communication by these substances.

  14. Five-year cumulative incidence of invasive anal cancer among HIV-infected patients according to baseline anal cytology results: an inception cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cachay, E.; Agmas, W.; Mathews, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of, and rates of progression to, invasive anal cancer (IAC) according to baseline anal cytology screening category in an unselected HIV clinical care cohort in the antiretroviral era. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of HIV-infected patients under care at the University of California at San Diego Owen Clinic was carried out. Patients were eligible for this analysis if they had at least two anal cytohistological results available for longitudinal analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of IAC over time according to baseline cytology category [less than high-grade intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) versus HSIL]. Cox regression analysis was used to adjust for the following covariates: antiretroviral use, level of HIV viraemia, smoking status and infrared photocoagulation (IRC) ablation therapy. Results Between 2000 and 2012, we followed 2804 HIV-infected patients for a median of 4 years under a clinic protocol requiring baseline anal cytology screening. Incident IAC was diagnosed in 23 patients. Patients with a baseline HSIL anal cytology had an estimated 5-year probability of progression to IAC of 1.7% and an estimated annual progression risk of 1 in 263. None of the examined covariates was significantly associated with IAC incidence when examined in separate unadjusted Cox models. Conclusions HIV-infected patients with a baseline HSIL anal cytology had a 5-year cumulative incidence of IAC of 1.65%, with an upper 95% confidence bound of 4.5%. This population-based study provides quantitative risk estimates that may be used for counselling patients regarding management options for abnormal cytology results. PMID:25197003

  15. Anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma: report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ang; Mei, Zubing; Cui, Long

    2015-01-01

    Trichilemmoma is a rare type of benign cutaneous neoplasm, which derives from outer sheath of hair follicle. It barely develops malignant progression and has rarely been reported in anal cancer. In this article, we report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented to the outer-patient department with complaints of a ruptured and longstanding anal phyma. All the appearances were atypical. Blood routine examination showed that neutrophilic granulocyte percentage was elevated and suggest it was a simple inflammation response. No evidence of malignancy was detected upon the laboratory examinations. Then we performed an abscess incision drainage for the patient. A few days later, the biopsy pathological report suggested the specimen is a malignant proliferative trichilemmoma. We decided to perform a wide local excision instead of an extended radical operation in order to preserve anus. After the surgery, we chose not to give chemoradio-treatment for fear of side effects and complications. Careful follow-up indicates that peri-anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma may have a good prognosis and our treatment is a good choice for the patients with this tumor. Because of the low occurrence rate of anal cancer, especially malignant trichilemmoma, any clinical manifestation and experience are valuable. On one hand, our case may help to take the consideration of the diagnosis of malignant trichilemmoma in case of longtime-suffered peri-anal mass, on the other hand it propose a different treatment method from other anal cancers for clinical doctors. PMID:26045866

  16. Successful Treatment of Metastatic Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma with mFOLFOX6 + Bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Miwa, Keisuke; Oka, Yosuke; Nagasu, Sachiko; Sakaue, Takahiko; Fukahori, Masaru; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Anal canal adenocarcinoma is a relatively rare malignancy without established diagnostic and treatment criteria. Case reports of chemotherapy for anal canal adenocarcinoma with distant metastasis are limited, and there is no convincing evidence for treatment effectiveness. A 62-year-old man complained of difficulty in defecation, anal pain, and bleeding during bowel movement. He was diagnosed with moderately differentiated primary anal canal adenocarcinoma. A computed tomography scan revealed multiple metastases in the lung and liver. The patient was treated with abdominoperineal resection to control local tumor growth and then with chemotherapy consisting of mFOLFOX6 + bevacizumab. Because he had an activating KRAS mutation, anti-EGFR therapy was not considered. A reduction in the size of lung and liver metastases was observed after 4 courses of mFOLFOX6 + bevacizumab, and after 22 courses, maximum reduction in the metastatic lesions was achieved. The patient demonstrated tolerable levels of oxaliplatin-related peripheral neurotoxicity (grades 1–2) and was considered as having partial response to treatment. He is currently at the partial response state for 1 year. We plan to continue the treatment unless the patient develops progressive disease or intolerable adverse reactions. This case demonstrates that anal canal adenocarcinoma with distant metastases could be successfully treated with mFOLFOX6 + bevacizumab therapy according to the guidelines for rectal carcinoma. However, as anal canal carcinoma has multiple histological subtypes, it is important to establish subtype-specific treatment strategies.

  17. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L.; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai‘i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger’s focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being “on the radar” of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through “real talk” (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai‘i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  18. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2016-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai'i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger's focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being "on the radar" of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through "real talk" (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai'i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  19. Human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?

    PubMed

    Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with anal cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of anal cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and anal cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT-RT for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive anal cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898

  20. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an “app” created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors. PMID:25835461

  1. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an "app" created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors. PMID:25835461

  2. Purse-string morphology of external anal sphincter revealed by novel imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Valmik; Sheean, Geoff; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    The external anal sphincter (EAS) may be injured in 25–35% of women during the first and subsequent vaginal childbirths and is likely the most common cause of anal incontinence. Since its first description almost 300 years ago, the EAS was believed to be a circular or a “donut-shaped” structure. Using three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound imaging, MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and muscle fiber tracking, we delineated various components of the EAS and their muscle fiber directions. These novel imaging techniques suggest “purse-string” morphology, with “EAS muscles” crossing contralaterally in the perineal body to the contralateral transverse perineal (TP) and bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, thus attaching the EAS to the pubic rami. Spin-tag MRI demonstrated purse-string action of the EAS muscle. Electromyography of TP/BS and EAS muscles revealed their simultaneous contraction and relaxation. Lidocaine injection into the TP/BS muscle significantly reduced anal canal pressure. These studies support purse-string morphology of the EAS to constrict/close the anal canal opening. Our findings have implications for the effect of episiotomy on anal closure function and the currently used surgical technique (overlapping sphincteroplasty) for EAS reconstructive surgery to treat anal incontinence. PMID:24458022

  3. Anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma: report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ang; Mei, Zubing; Cui, Long

    2015-01-01

    Trichilemmoma is a rare type of benign cutaneous neoplasm, which derives from outer sheath of hair follicle. It barely develops malignant progression and has rarely been reported in anal cancer. In this article, we report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented to the outer-patient department with complaints of a ruptured and longstanding anal phyma. All the appearances were atypical. Blood routine examination showed that neutrophilic granulocyte percentage was elevated and suggest it was a simple inflammation response. No evidence of malignancy was detected upon the laboratory examinations. Then we performed an abscess incision drainage for the patient. A few days later, the biopsy pathological report suggested the specimen is a malignant proliferative trichilemmoma. We decided to perform a wide local excision instead of an extended radical operation in order to preserve anus. After the surgery, we chose not to give chemoradio-treatment for fear of side effects and complications. Careful follow-up indicates that peri-anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma may have a good prognosis and our treatment is a good choice for the patients with this tumor. Because of the low occurrence rate of anal cancer, especially malignant trichilemmoma, any clinical manifestation and experience are valuable. On one hand, our case may help to take the consideration of the diagnosis of malignant trichilemmoma in case of longtime-suffered peri-anal mass, on the other hand it propose a different treatment method from other anal cancers for clinical doctors. PMID:26045866

  4. HPV and anal cancer in HIV-infected individuals: a review.

    PubMed

    Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Mooij, Sofie H; Richel, Oliver; de Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M

    2014-09-01

    HIV infection is one of the strongest risk factors for anal squamous cell cancer (ASCC). Most ASCC are caused by HPV, and most HPV-associated ASCC are caused by HPV-16. Anal HPV infections are very common in men who have sex with men (MSM), and nearly universal among HIV-infected MSM. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor for ASCC, is present in about 30 % of HIV+ MSM, but neither the progression rate to ASCC nor the regression rate are known. The incidence rate of ASCC among HIV-infected people has risen in the first decade after cART became available, but appears to be plateauing recently. Anal cytology has poor sensitivity and specificity. High resolution anoscopy (HRA) is advocated by some as a screening tool in high-risk groups, but is cumbersome and time-consuming and it is unknown whether HRA followed by treatment of HGAIN prevents ASCC. More research is needed on progression and regression rates of HGAIN, on effective therapy of HGAIN, and on biomarkers that predict HGAIN or anal cancer. HPV vaccination and earlier start of cART may prevent most anal cancers in the long run. PMID:24990810

  5. [The current place of abdomino-anal pull-through resection of the rectum in the modern rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Nechaĭ, I A

    2014-01-01

    It was discussed abdomino-anal resection of rectum with relegation of colon excess in anal canal in case of cancer. It was presented the data about state of colo-anal functions in patients after such operations. The reasons of unsatisfactory functional results are analyzed in the article. Also it was described the factors influencing on violation of tank, evacuation and obturator functions. PMID:24874224

  6. Anal adenocarcinoma complicating chronic Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzos, Dionysios S.; Kondi-Pafiti, Agathi; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal adenocarcinoma and Crohn’s disease are known to be associated entities. However, a carcinoma arising within a chronic perianal fistulous tract in a patient with Crohn’s disease is a rare complication. Presentation of case We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient with a long-standing perianal Crohn’s disease who developed an anal mucinous adenocarcinoma within the fistulous tracts. Discussion Although, Crohn’s disease and colorectal carcinoma association is well established, few cases have been reported where the cancer has originated within a perianal fistula. Constant mucosal regeneration occurring within a fistula seems to be the predominant pathogenetic mechanism, while immunosuppressants and anti-TNF agents may also contribute to the malignant transformation. Unfortunately, the lack of suspicion and the inadequate physical examination or colonoscopy due to exacerbation of the perianal symptoms could lead to delayed diagnosis; and thus, a poor prognosis. Conclusion Albeit a rare complication, clinicians should maintain a high degree of vigilance about the possible development of adenocarcinoma in patients with long-standing perianal Crohn’s disease. Thus, these patients should be kept under regular surveillance with examination under anaesthesia and biopsies or curettage of the tracts. PMID:25884608

  7. Rectal atresia and anal stenosis: the difference in the operative technique for these two distinct congenital anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Lane, V A; Wood, R J; Reck, C; Skerritt, C; Levitt, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rectal atresia and anal stenosis are rare forms of anorectal malformations. The aim of the definitive surgical repair in such cases is to preserve the anal canal, the dentate line, and the sphincter complex. We present a case of rectal atresia and anal stenosis to demonstrate the differences in the operative repair. The techniques described leave the anterior wall of the very distal anal canal untouched in both rectal stenosis and anal atresia; however, the dissection of the rectum differs. The atretic rectum in rectal atresia is mobilized and sutured to the anal canal circumferentially. In anal stenosis, the posterior rectum is mobilized in the form of rectal advancement, and the posterior 180° is anastomosed directly to the skin (as in a standard PSARP) with preservation of the anal canal as the anterior 180° of the final anoplasty. These patients have an excellent prognosis for bowel control and fecal continence, and therefore, complete mobilization and resection of the anal canal must be avoided. PMID:26902368

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for anal human papillomavirus in men having sex with women: A cross–national study

    PubMed Central

    Nyitray, Alan G.; Smith, Dan’elle; Villa, Luisa; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    Background While the primary cause of anal cancer is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the anal canal, little attention has been paid to the epidemiology of anal HPV in men having sex with women (MSW). Methods Anal canal exfoliated cells from 903 MSW in Brazil (São Paulo), Mexico (Cuernavaca) and the United States (Tampa) were tested for HPV DNA. Results HPV prevalence in the anal canal (12.0%) was similar in MSW in each city (P=0.77) while 7.0% had oncogenic types. Men in Tampa had a four–fold higher prevalence of HPV 16 than men in São Paulo or Cuernavaca (P<0.001). Duration of relationship with a primary sex partner and ever having oral or anal sex with a man was associated with any HPV type and any oncogenic type while lifetime number of female sex partners was associated with any HPV type. Conclusions Anal canal HPV is commonly found in MSW and the prevalence of HPV 16 may differ substantially by geography. Men with a larger number of female sex partners, in a sexual relationship of <1 year duration, and with a history of oral or anal sex with men were most likely to have an anal HPV infection. PMID:20367457

  9. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection Among Young Healthy Women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe A.; Quint, Wim; Gonzalez, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Herrero, Rolando; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; DelVecchio, Corey; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), yet little is known about anal HPV infection among healthy young women. Methods. A total of 2017 sexually active women in the control arm of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial had a single anal specimen collected by a clinician at the 4-year study visit. Samples were tested for HPV by SPF10 PCR/DEIA/LiPA25, version 1. Results. A total of 4% of women had HPV-16, 22% had oncogenic HPV, and 31% had any HPV detected in an anal specimen. The prevalence of anal HPV was higher among women who reported anal intercourse, compared with those who did not (43.4% vs 28.4%; P < .001). Among women who reported anal intercourse, cervical HPV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.4–8.2]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.2 [95% CI, 1.1–4.6] for ≥4 partners), and number of anal intercourse partners (aOR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1–3.3] for ≥2 partners) were independent risk factors for anal HPV detection. Among women who reported no anal intercourse, cervical HPV (aOR, 4.7 [95% CI, 3.7–5.9]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.4 [95% CI, 1.7–3.4] for ≥4 partners), and report of anal fissures (aOR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1–4.8]) were associated with an increased odds of anal HPV detection. Conclusion. Anal HPV is common among young women, even those who report no anal sex, and was associated with cervical HPV infection. Anal fissures in women who report never having had anal intercourse may facilitate HPV exposure. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661. PMID:22850119

  10. Reinnervation of Urethral and Anal Sphincters With Femoral Motor Nerve to Pudendal Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Bernal, Raymond M.; Lamarre, Neil S.; Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lower motor neuron damage to sacral roots or nerves can result in incontinence and a flaccid urinary bladder. We showed bladder reinnervation after transfer of coccygeal to sacral ventral roots, and genitofemoral nerves (L1, 2 origin) to pelvic nerves. This study assesses the feasibility of urethral and anal sphincter reinnervation using transfer of motor branches of the femoral nerve (L2–4 origin) to pudendal nerves (S1, 2 origin) that innervate the urethral and anal sphincters in a canine model. Methods Sacral ventral roots were selected by their ability to stimulate bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter contraction and transected. Bilaterally, branches of the femoral nerve, specifically, nervus saphenous pars muscularis [Evans HE. Miller’s anatomy of the dog. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders; 1993], were transferred and end-to-end anastomosed to transected pudendal nerve branches in the perineum, then enclosed in unipolar nerve cuff electrodes with leads to implanted RF micro-stimulators. Results Nerve stimulation induced increased anal and urethral sphincter pressures in five of six transferred nerves. Retrograde neurotracing from the bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter using fluorogold, fast blue, and fluororuby, demonstrated urethral and anal sphincter labeled neurons in L2–4 cord segments (but not S1–3) in nerve transfer canines, consistent with rein-nervation by the transferred femoral nerve motor branches. Controls had labeled neurons only in S1–3 segments. Postmortem DiI and DiO labeling confirmed axonal regrowth across the nerve repair site. Conclusions These results show spinal cord reinnervation of urethral and anal sphincter targets after sacral ventral root transection and femoral nerve transfer (NT) to the denervated pudendal nerve. These surgical procedures may allow patients to regain continence. PMID:21953679

  11. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.

  12. Chemoradiation for the treatment of epidermoid anal cancer: 13-year follow-up of the first randomised UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    PubMed Central

    Northover, J; Glynne-Jones, R; Sebag-Montefiore, D; James, R; Meadows, H; Wan, S; Jitlal, M; Ledermann, J

    2010-01-01

    Background: The first UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (1996) demonstrated the benefit of chemoradiation over radiotherapy (RT) alone for treating epidermoid anal cancer, and it became the standard treatment. Patients in this trial have now been followed up for a median of 13 years. Methods: A total of 577 patients were randomised to receive RT alone or combined modality therapy using 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. All patients were scheduled to receive 45 Gy by external beam irradiation. Patients who responded to treatment were recommended to have boost RT, with either an iridium implant or external beam irradiation. Data on relapse and deaths were obtained until October 2007. Results: Twelve years after treatment, for every 100 patients treated with chemoradiation, there are an expected 25.3 fewer patients with locoregional relapse (95% confidence interval (CI): 17.5–32.0 fewer) and 12.5 fewer anal cancer deaths (95% CI: 4.3–19.7 fewer), compared with 100 patients given RT alone. There was a 9.1% increase in non-anal cancer deaths in the first 5 years of chemoradiation (95% CI +3.6 to +14.6), which disappeared by 10 years. Conclusions: The clear benefit of chemoradiation outweighs an early excess risk of non-anal cancer deaths, and can still be seen 12 years after treatment. Only 11 patients suffered a locoregional relapse as a first event after 5 years, which may influence the choice of end points in future studies. PMID:20354531

  13. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Infected Men in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Shinwon; Cho, Heerim; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Eun ju; Lee, Su jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Ki Hyung; Moon, Eunsoo; Cho, Hong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. Methods A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted with HIV-infected men in Korea. Participants completed a detailed sexual behavior risk factor questionnaire. Anal samples were collected for cytology and HPV genotyping. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, stratifying by sexual behaviour. Results A total of 201 HIV-infected men were included in the study: 133 were from men who have sex with men (MSM) and 68 from men who have sex with women (MSW). Any anal HPV infection was detected in 82.7% of HIV-infected MSM and in 51.5% of HIV- infected MSW (P < 0.001). High-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence was higher among MSM (47.4%) than MSW (25.0%; P = 0.002). The HR-HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 16 (11%), HPV 18 (9.9%), and HPV 58 (5%) in MSM, and HPV 58(11%) and HPV 16 (8.9%) in MSW. Prevalence of any HPV types in 9-valent vaccine types was higher among MSM than MSW (47.4% vs 22.1%. P = 0.001). Abnormal anal cytology was more commonly detected in MSM than MSW (42.9% vs.19.1%, P < 0.001). In HIV-infected MSM, higher number of lifetime male sex partners was significantly associated with any anal HPV infection, but age was a significant risk factor associated with anal HR-HPV infection. Conclusion Anal HPV infection was highly prevalent in HIV-infected MSM in Korea, and also commonly found in HIV-infected MSW. In HIV-infected MSM, the significant risk factor for being infected with any HPV infection was lifetime number of male sexual partners, and with anal oncogenic HPV infection was age. PMID:27548632

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal treated with chemoradiotherapy in a patient with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Aya; Nakazuru, Shoichi; Sakakibara, Yuko; Nishio, Kumiko; Yamada, Takuya; Ishida, Hisashi; Yajima, Keishiro; Uehira, Tomoko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mita, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), the life expectancy has increased for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This has been associated with reductions in the incidences of some AIDS-defining malignancies, such as Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but has coincided with an increased incidence of non-AIDS-defining malignancies, such as anal cancer. However, anal cancers are rare in patients with HIV in Japan. We report the case of an HIV-infected patient with anal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. A 37-year-old man receiving ART for HIV infection presented with a 1-month history of left inguinal lymphadenopathy and anal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed a 56-mm mass, left inguinal lymphadenopathy, and left external iliac lymphadenopathy. The mass had infiltrated from the anal canal to the right levator ani and corpus spongiosum. Colonoscopy revealed a tumor with an ulcer in the anal canal. Histological examination of the tumor biopsy specimens confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. The patient was diagnosed with anal cancer (T4N2M1 stage IV), and he received 5-fluorouracil (1000mg/m(2) on days 1-4 and 29-32) plus mitomycin C (10mg/m(2) on days 1 and 29) and concurrent radiotherapy (total dose, 59.4Gy in 33 fractions) along with ART. The treatment-related adverse events were grade 4 leukopenia and neutropenia, grade 3 thrombocytopenia, and grade 2 radiation dermatitis. Moreover, CD4 suppression was observed:the CD4 count decreased from 190 cells/μl before chemoradiotherapy to 138 cells/μl after 3 months, but increased to 210 cells/μl after 1 year. Because of the grade 4 leukopenia and neutropenia, the dose of 5-fluorouracil was reduced to 800mg/m(2) on days 29-32. A complete response was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging, and colonoscopy confirmed the disappearance of the anal cancer. The patient is living with no signs of recurrence at 2 years

  15. Persistent orocutaneous and anal fistulae induced by nicorandil: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Although nicorandil is prescribed widely, awareness of its potential to cause serious complications to the gastrointestinal tract mucosa is limited. Whilst nicorandil-induced oral and anal ulceration is well documented in the literature, nicorandil-induced fistulation is not. This is the first report in the literature of a single patient demonstrating simultaneous orocutaneous and anal fistulae during nicorandil therapy. Two separate cases of orocutaneous and anal fistulae associated nicorandil usage have previously been documented in specialist journals. Case presentation A 71-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 3-year history of concurrent orocutaneous and anal fistulae. He had been exposed to 30 mg twice-daily nicorandil therapy for 4 years. Both fistulae responded poorly to intensive and prolonged conventional treatment but healed promptly on reduction and eventual withdrawal of nicorandil therapy. Conclusion Management of resistant cases of orocutaneous and anal fistulae in patients on high-dose nicorandil therapy may be impossible without reduction or even withdrawal of nicorandil. PMID:19946537

  16. Anal heterosex among young people and implications for health promotion: a qualitative study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Marston, C; Lewis, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore expectations, experiences and circumstances of anal sex among young people. Design Qualitative, longitudinal study using individual and group interviews. Participants 130 men and women aged 16–18 from diverse social backgrounds. Setting 3 contrasting sites in England (London, a northern industrial city, rural southwest). Results Anal heterosex often appeared to be painful, risky and coercive, particularly for women. Interviewees frequently cited pornography as the ‘explanation’ for anal sex, yet their accounts revealed a complex context with availability of pornography being only one element. Other key elements included competition between men; the claim that ‘people must like it if they do it’ (made alongside the seemingly contradictory expectation that it will be painful for women); and, crucially, normalisation of coercion and ‘accidental’ penetration. It seemed that men were expected to persuade or coerce reluctant partners. Conclusions Young people's narratives normalised coercive, painful and unsafe anal heterosex. This study suggests an urgent need for harm reduction efforts targeting anal sex to help encourage discussion about mutuality and consent, reduce risky and painful techniques and challenge views that normalise coercion. PMID:25122073

  17. Properties of HPV-positive and HPV-negative anal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, G R; Lu, Q L; Love, S B; Talbot, I C; Northover, J M

    1996-12-01

    Evidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) can be found in up to 85 per cent of anal carcinomas. In the vulva, a discrete subset of HPV-positive carcinomas which show koilocytic morphology and distinct clinical features has recently been identified (warty carcinoma). The morphological and prognostic features of HPV-positive and HPV-negative anal carcinomas were compared in this study of the tumour distribution of HPV DNA. Vulval and anal neoplasia are similar in many ways and we have also looked to see if their similarity extends to 'warty' morphology in relation to HPV status. Thirty-five resection specimens of anal carcinoma were examined with biotin-labelled probes for HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 DNA, using a non-isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) technique. No tumour was found to contain HPV 6, 11, or 18. Twenty-four (72 per cent) showed positivity for HPV 16 DNA. Staining was homogeneous and independent of local squamous, basaloid, or ductal differentiation. The majority of tumours showed staining suggestive of episomal, non-productive HPV infection. HPV-positive tumours were more likely to occur in the anal canal than perianally and to show a mixed squamous and basaloid appearance. No difference between the two groups was found in patient age, presence of adjacent dysplasia, ductal differentiation, or prognosis. There was no correlation between condylomatous tumour morphology and HPV 16 DNA positivity; thus, a subset equivalent to vulval warty carcinoma could not be identified. PMID:9014857

  18. Size of anal squamous cell carcinomas at diagnosis: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Read, T R H; Huson, K L; Millar, J L; Haydon, A; Porter, I W T; Grulich, A E; Hocking, J S; Chen, M Y; Bradshaw, C S; Fairley, C K

    2013-11-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is more common in HIV-positive homosexual men than in the general population and prognosis worsens with increasing tumour size. To identify opportunities for earlier diagnosis, we aimed to determine size and visibility of anal squamous cell carcinoma at diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of medical records between 1992 and 2010 from one hospital radiotherapy centre, a major centre for HIV care, in Melbourne, Australia. Of 128 cases of anal squamous cell carcinoma, 24 (19%) were in HIV-positive men. At diagnosis, half (52%) of the tumours were externally visible and mean estimated tumour size was 36 mm (29 mm in HIV-positive and 38 mm in HIV-negative patients; p = 0.04) and 114/121 (94%) tumours were 1 cm or larger. The most frequent symptoms were bleeding (43%) and pain (36%) and mean duration of symptoms was 22 weeks. This suggests most anal squamous cell carcinoma were visible or palpable for some time before diagnosis, meaning that screening high-risk groups by anal inspection and palpation is plausible. PMID:23970608

  19. Anal Cancer Screening in an Urban HIV Clinic: Provider Perceptions and Practice.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Leonard Anang; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Riedel, David J; Gilliam, Bruce L; Khambaty, Mariam; Fantry, Lori; Spencer, Derek E; Weaver, Jeffery; Taylor, Gregory; Skoglund, Mary; Amoroso, Anthony; Redfield, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we sought to understand the perceptions and practice of providers on anal cancer screening in HIV-infected patients. Providers in an academic outpatient HIV practice were surveyed. Data were analyzed to determine the acceptability and perceptions of providers on anal Papanicolaou tests. Survey response rate was 55.3% (60.7% among male and 47.4% among female providers). One-third of the providers had received screening requests from patients. Female providers had higher self-rated comfort with anal Papanicolaou tests, with a mean score of 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7-9.5) compared to 3.6 (95% CI 1.5-5.7) for male providers, P = .02. Sixty-seven percent of male providers and 37.5% of female providers would like to refer their patients for screening rather than perform the test themselves. Only 54.2% of our providers have ever performed anal cytology examination. Our survey revealed that not all providers were comfortable performing anal cancer screening for their patients. PMID:26307210

  20. High resolution anoscopy may be useful in achieving reductions in anal cancer local disease failure rates.

    PubMed

    Goon, P; Morrison, V; Fearnhead, N; Davies, J; Wilson, C; Jephcott, C; Sterling, J; Crawford, R

    2015-05-01

    Anal cancer is uncommon, with an incidence rate of 0.5-1.0 per 100,000 of the population but incidence rates have been steadily increasing over the last 3 decades. Biological and epidemiological evidence have been mounting and demonstrate that anal cancer has many similarities to cervical cancer, especially in regard to its aetiology. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) of the anal region – analogous to colposcopy of the cervix, is a technique that is not well-known in the medical and surgical fraternity. Evidence to support the use of HRA for detection and treatment in the surveillance of AIN exists and strongly suggests that it is beneficial, resulting in reduced rates of cancer progression. Pilot data from our study showed a local disease failure rate of 1.73 per 1000 patient-months compared with a published rate of 9.89 per 1000 patient-months. This demonstrates a 5.72-fold reduction in local disease failure rates of patients with T1-T3 tumours; the data therefore suggests that use of HRA for detection and treatment in surveillance of anal cancer patients will help prevent local regional relapse at the anal site. There is an urgent need for a large, randomised controlled clinical trial to definitively test this hypothesis. PMID:24373061

  1. Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

    2014-01-01

    Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

  2. Anal Intercourse among Young Heterosexuals in Three US STD Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hess, Kristen L.; Stoner, Bradley P.; Martin, David H.; Holmes, King K.

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine factors associated with heterosexual anal intercourse (AI). Methods Between 2001 and 2004, 890 heterosexual adults aged 18-26 attending public STD clinics in Seattle, New Orleans and St Louis were interviewed using CASI and tested for sexually transmitted infections (STI) Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, and genital herpes (HSV-2). Characteristics associated with AI were identified using logistic regression. Results Overall 289 (32%) reported ever having had AI, 201 (26.5%) reported AI with at least one of their last three partners and 17% reported AI with their last partner. Fewer females than males reported condom use at last AI (24% vs. 47%, p<0.001). Ever having AI was associated with sex on the same day as meeting a partner (AOR 3.5 [95% CI 1.94-6.15]), receiving money for sex (AOR 3.3 [1.40-7.75]), and >3 lifetime sex partners (AOR 2.2 [1.17-4.26]) among women, and sex on the same day as meeting a partner (AOR 2.0 [1.28-3.14]) and paying for sex (AOR 1.8 [1.00-3.15]) among men. AI with the last partner was associated with sex toy use (AOR 5.3 [2.35-12.0]) and having concurrent partners (AOR 2.3 [1.18-4.26]) among men, and with sex within a week of meeting (AOR 2.7 [1.21-5.83]), believing the partner was concurrent (AOR 2.6 [1.38-4.83]), and partnership duration >3 months (AOR 3.2 [1.03-10.1]) among women. Prevalent STI was not associated with AI. Conclusions Many young heterosexuals attending STD clinics reported AI, which was associated with other sexual risk behaviors, suggesting a confluence of risks for HIV infection. PMID:19265740

  3. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, Rodney C.; Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

  4. Felching among men who engage in barebacking (unprotected anal sex).

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh

    2012-04-01

    Felching (sucking or eating semen out of someone's anus) is a sexual behavior about which virtually nothing has been written in the scholarly literature, despite the fact that it appears to be a not-uncommon practice among certain subpopulations of men who have sex with men (MSM). This study examined three broad research questions: (1) How common is felching? (2) How does a desire for felching relate to other HIV risk practices and risk behavior preferences? (3) What factors are associated with the desire to engage in felching? The data were from a content analysis study of one of the largest Internet websites specifically targeting MSM looking for partners for unprotected sex. A total of 1,316 profiles on the site were analyzed and selected randomly based on users' ZIP codes. Felching was mentioned as a sought-after practice in approximately one-sixth of the men's profiles. Men who wanted to find felching partners were significantly more likely than those not searching for felching partners to seek other types of risky sex, including unprotected oral and unprotected anal sex, and various enhanced risk preferences (e.g., having sex while high, multiple-partner sex, unwillingness to withdraw the penis prior to internal ejaculation). Multivariate analysis revealed several factors that were related to an interest in identifying partners online for felching, including race/ethnicity, indifference to sex partners' HIV serostatus, several sensation-seeking measures (e.g., wanting "wild" or "uninhibited" sex, self-identification as a "bug chaser"), and eroticizing ejaculatory fluids. PMID:21573705

  5. Genetics of canine anal furunculosis in the German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Massey, Jonathan; Short, Andrea D; Catchpole, Brian; House, Arthur; Day, Michael J; Lohi, Hannes; Ollier, William E R; Kennedy, Lorna J

    2014-05-01

    Canine anal furunculosis (AF) is characterised by ulceration and fistulation of perianal tissue and is a disease that particularly affects German shepherd dogs (GSDs). There are some similarities between AF and perianal Crohn's disease (CD) in man. An immune-mediated aetiopathogenesis for AF has been suggested due to tissue pathology, a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) association and clinical response to ciclosporin. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) can be conducted in dogs with fewer markers and individuals than would be required in a human study. A discovery GWAS was performed on 21 affected and 25 control GSDs from the UK. No SNPs reached genome-wide significance levels at this stage. However, 127 nominally associated SNPs were genotyped in further 76 cases and 191 controls from the UK and Finland. Sequencing of these regions was undertaken to discover novel genetic variation. Association testing of these variants in the UK and Finnish cohorts revealed nine significantly associated SNPs, six of which cause non-synonymous changes in protein sequence. The ADAMTS16 and CTNND2 gene regions were most significantly associated with disease. Members of the butyrophilin protein family, important in intestinal inflammatory regulation, were also associated with disease, but their independence from the MHC region remains to be established. The CTNND2 gene region is also interesting as this locus was implicated in human ulcerative colitis and CD, albeit at a different candidate gene: DAP. We suggest that this represents a common association between inflammatory bowel disease-related conditions in both species and believe that future studies will strengthen this link. PMID:24626934

  6. Bacteriological comparison of low anal fistula operated by ordinary methods and laser methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanrong; Xiong, Yigai

    1996-09-01

    Since 1989, 42 cases with low anal fistula were operated with laser and ordinary methods respectively. During the operation, secreted or charred tissues were extracted from the surface of the wound for bacteria culture. Experimental group (laser method): no bacteria were found in 24 cases operated by laser method. Control group (ordinary method): bacterial were found in 16 out of 18 cases operated by ordinary methods. The results of two different group showed that they had statistical difference for P < 0.001. So, CO2 laser is proved to be a definitely practical tool in surgical use for its bacteria killing power. While the anal fistula were operated by the laser, the neurotic carboatomic tissue can block blood vessel and prevent infection from spreading. The high temperature produced by the carboatomic action have enough ability to kill directly the bacteria living in the anal fistula.

  7. Combined radical radiation therapy and chemotherapy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B J; Rider, W D; Harwood, A R; Keane, T J; Thomas, G M; Erlichman, C; Fine, S

    1982-03-01

    Radical radiation therapy (5000 rads in 20 fractions in 4 weeks) combined with iv mitomycin (10 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2/24 hours for 4 days) was used to treat 13 patients with locally advanced but operable squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. All patients achieved local control and retained anal continence, and none developed metastases. The patients were followed from 4 to 34 months (median, 12). Severe acute gastrointestinal toxic effects were seen in three patients; the same patients had significant thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. Treatment with this combined program may allow conservative management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and should be considered as an alternative to abdominoperineal resection. PMID:6800654

  8. mFOLFOX6 Chemotherapy after Resection of Anal Canal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Miwa, Keisuke; Oka, Yosuke; Nagasu, Sachiko; Sakaue, Takahiko; Fukahori, Masaru; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Because of their rarity, there are no clear guidelines for the treatment of anal carcinomas; such tumors are normally subjected to the same modalities as recommended for rectal cancer. We report a patient with anal canal mucinous adenocarcinoma, with metastases in the pararectal and right inguinal lymph nodes, who was treated with abdominoperineal resection followed by mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy for 6 months (12 cycles). The patient has remained recurrence-free thus far, approximately 2 years since the surgery. As the optimal treatments for anal carcinomas have not been fully elucidated, we present this case to highlight a possible course of action for such patients that appears to be effective and promising.

  9. Cytological Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Associated with Anal High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ruanpeng, Darin; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Supindham, Taweewat; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Wongthanee, Antika

    2016-01-01

    Background Anal cancer, one of human papillomavirus (HPV) related malignancies, has increased in recent decades, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-infected (HIV+) persons. We aimed to explore the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL) using Papanicolau (Pap) screening among MSM in northern Thailand and its associated factors. Methods Two hundreds MSM aged ≥18 years reporting receptive anal intercourse in the prior 6 months were recruited from July 2012 through January 2013. Medical history and behavioral data were collected by staff interview and computer-assisted self interview. Anal Pap smear, HPV genotyping, and HIV testing were performed. Two pathologists blinded to HPV and HIV status reported cytologic results by Bethesda classification. Results Mean age was 27.2 years (range 18–54). Overall, 86 (43.0%) had ASIL: 28 (14.2%) with atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 1 (0.5%) with atypical squamous cells—cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H), 56 (28.4%) with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), and 1 (0.5%) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). ASIL was associated by univariate analysis (p ≤0.05) with older age, gender identity other than bisexual (i.e., gay men and transgender women), rectal douching, anal symptoms, genital warts, HIV positivity, and high-risk-HPV infection. However, on multiple logistic regression ASIL was associated only with high-risk HPV type (p = 0.002) and HIV infection (p = 0.01). Conclusions ASIL is quite common in high-risk MSM in northern Thailand and is associated with high-risk HPV types and HIV infection. Routine anal Pap screening should be considered, given the high frequency of ASIL, particularly in the HIV+. High resolution anoscopy (HRA), not done here, should be to confirm PAP smears whose sensitivity and specificity are quite variable. Timely HPV vaccination should be considered for this population

  10. The Relationship of 3D Translabial Ultrasound Anal Sphincter Complex Measurements to Postpartum Anal and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine whether ASC measurements on translabial ultrasound (TL-US) were related to anal incontinence (AI) or fecal incontinence (FI) symptoms six months postpartum. Methods A prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent TL-US six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). Muscle thickness was measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions of the external sphincter (EAS), the same four quadrants of the internal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels, and at the bilateral pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Measurements were correlated to AI and FI on the Wexner Fecal Incontinence Scale, with sub-analyses by mode of delivery. The odds ratio (OR) of symptoms was calculated for every one millimeter increase in muscle thickness (E1MIT). Results 423 women (299 VB, 124 CD) had TL-US six months postpartum. Decreased AI risk was associated with thicker measurements at the 6 o’clock (OR 0.74 E1MIT) and 9 o’clock proximal IAS (OR 0.71 E1MIT) in the entire cohort. For CD women, thicker measurements of the 9 o’clock proximal IAS were associated with decreased risk of AI (OR 0.56 E1MIT) and thicker distal 6 o’clock IAS measurements were related to a decreased risk of FI (OR 0.37 E1MIT). For VB women, no sphincter measurements were significantly related to symptoms, but thicker PVM measurements were associated with increased risk of AI (right side OR 1.32 E1MIT; left side OR 1.21 E1MIT). Conclusions ASC anatomy is associated with AI and FI in certain locations; these locations varybased on the patient’s mode of delivery. PMID:26085463

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  12. Screening and risk factors for anal cancer precursors in men infected with HIV in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Hsing; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Wang, Chi-Chao; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-02-01

    Homosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at a greater risk of developing anal cancer. Men who are infected with HIV and visited the outpatient clinics in Taoyuan General Hospital were enrolled to this study. During March to December 2011, thin preparation anal Pap smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping were performed in 230 subjects, of which 69 subjects underwent anoscopic biopsy. Their mean age was 32.9 ± 8.1 years, and 181 (78.6%) men were homosexual. The proportion and 95% confidence interval (CI) of subjects with anal dysplasia in cytology was 23.0% (17.56-28.44), including 13.4% (9.26-18.14) with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 7.0% (3.70-10.30) with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 2.6% (0.54-4.66) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. For participants having atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or higher grades, multivariate logistic regression models yielded adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of 12.61 (1.63-97.56) for homosexuality, 1.62 (1.31-2.00) for number of oncogenic HPV types, and 1.01 (1.00-1.02) for number of lifetime sexual partners. For detection of histological grade II or III anal intraepithelial neoplasm in anoscopic biopsies, the sensitivity of sequential tests for oncogenic HPV and cytology with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or higher grades was 100%. The positive likelihood ratio was 3.09 (P = 0.05). It is important to consider anal cancer precursors among homosexual men who are infected with HIV. Anal cytology and oncogenic HPV genotyping testing are effective screening methods. PMID:24166485

  13. Lifestyle and reproductive risk factors associated with anal cancer in women aged over 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, K; Beral, V; Green, J; Reeves, G; Barnes, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anal cancer incidence increases with age and is higher in women than men. Risk factors in this group other than high-risk human papillomavirus infection are unclear. Methods: In all, 1.3 million women were recruited in 1996–2001 and followed for incident anal cancer. Cox regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) for anal cancer by various potential risk factors. Results: Five hundred and seventeen incident anal cancers were registered over 13 years of follow-up. The largest RR was associated with a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3; RR=4.03, 95% CI 2.59–6.28). Other factors associated with significantly increased risks in multivariate analyses were: ever smoking (RR=1.49, 1.24–1.80); previous use of oral contraceptives (RR=1.51, 1.24–1.83); nulliparity (RR=1.61, 1.24–2.07); tubal ligation (RR=1.39, 1.13–1.70) and not living with a partner (RR=1.82, 1.40–2.38). The association with smoking was significantly greater for squamous cell carcinoma than adenocarcinoma of the anus (RR 1.66 vs 0.89, P for heterogeneity=0.04). Conclusions: History of CIN 3, smoking, past oral contraceptive use, nulliparity, tubal ligation and not living with a partner are risk factors for anal cancer in women. There was a significant increase in risk associated with smoking for squamous cell anal cancers but not adenocarcinomas. PMID:25867258

  14. DNA Methylation Profiling across the Spectrum of HPV-Associated Anal Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, Bridget; Eschrich, Steven; Elahi, Abul; Qu, Xiaotao; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Berglund, Anders; Coppola, Domenico; Grady, William M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Shibata, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in host tumor genome DNA methylation patterns are among the molecular alterations associated with HPV-related carcinogenesis. However, there is little known about the epigenetic changes associated specifically with the development of anal squamous cell cancer (SCC). We sought to characterize broad methylation profiles across the spectrum of anal squamous neoplasia. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-nine formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples from 24 patients were evaluated and included adjacent histologically normal anal mucosa (NM; n = 3), SCC-in situ (SCC-IS; n = 11) and invasive SCC (n = 15). Thirteen women and 11 men with a median age of 44 years (range 26–81) were included in the study. Using the SFP10 LiPA HPV-typing system, HPV was detected in at least one tissue from all patients with 93% (27/29) being positive for high-risk HPV types and 14 (93%) of 15 invasive SCC tissues testing positive for HPV 16. Bisulfite-modified DNA was interrogated for methylation at 1,505 CpG loci representing 807 genes using the Illumina GoldenGate Methylation Array. When comparing the progression from normal anal mucosa and SCC-IS to invasive SCC, 22 CpG loci representing 20 genes demonstrated significant differential methylation (p<0.01). The majority of differentially methylated gene targets occurred at or close to specific chromosomal locations such as previously described HPV methylation “hotspots” and viral integration sites. Conclusions We have identified a panel of differentially methlylated CpG loci across the spectrum of HPV-associated squamous neoplasia of the anus. To our knowledge, this is the first reported application of large-scale high throughput methylation analysis for the study of anal neoplasia. Our findings support further investigations into the role of host-genome methylation in HPV-associated anal carcinogenesis with implications towards enhanced diagnosis and screening strategies. PMID:23226306

  15. Injectable silicone biomaterial for faecal incontinence due to internal anal sphincter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kenefick, N J; Vaizey, C J; Malouf, A J; Norton, C S; Marshall, M; Kamm, M A

    2002-01-01

    Background: A weak or disrupted internal anal sphincter can cause passive faecal incontinence. Conservative measures may help some patients but there is no simple surgical solution for those who fail conservative treatment. A successful technique using trans-sphincteric injection of a bulking agent to augment the internal anal sphincter was developed in a previous pilot study. Aim: To determine the clinical results and underlying physiological effects of biomaterial injection. Patients: Six patients (four males, median age 53 years (range 36–65)) with faecal incontinence to solid or liquid stool related to poor internal anal sphincter function, of varied aetiology, were recruited. Methods: Silicone based biomaterial injections were performed, under local anaesthesia, with antibiotic cover. Three injections were placed circumferentially, trans-sphincterically, entering away from the anal margin and injecting at or just above the dentate line. Anorectal physiological studies, endoanal ultrasound, a bowel symptom diary, a validated incontinence score, and quality of life questionnaires were completed before treatment and on completion of follow up. Results: At a median follow up of 18 months (range 15–19), five of six patients had marked symptom improvement. Faecal incontinence scores improved from a median of 14/24 (range 11–20) before to 8/24 (6–15) after injection. Short form-36 quality of life physical and social function scores improved from a median of 26/100 (5–33) to 79/100 (25–100) and from 10/100 (5–37) to 100/100 (50–100), respectively. There was a corresponding physiological increase in maximum anal resting and squeeze pressures. Ultrasound showed the Bioplastique to be retained in the correct position in the improved patients without migration. There were no complications. Conclusion: Trans-sphincteric injection of silicone biomaterial can provide a marked improvement in faecal incontinence related to a weak or disrupted internal anal

  16. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: The HIM study

    PubMed Central

    Sichero, Laura; Nyitray, Alan G.; Nunes, Emily Montosa; Nepal, Bal; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-alpha HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse men group. The HIM (HPV in Men) Study is a multicenter study of the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico and USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal specimens PCR HPV-positive were not typed by the Roche Linear Array and were considered unclassified. Our goal was characterizing HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline and assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP+ nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted using FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV at the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women (MSW). Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. A total of 18, 26, and 3 different α-, β- and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. Compared to older men (45-70 years), α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than non-heterosexual men. β2-HPV types composed all β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse. PMID:25698660

  17. DOES ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND IMPROVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY RECURRENT ANAL SQUAMOUS CELL CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie Y.; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Guillem, Jose G.; Nash, Garrett M.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult due to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. Objective To compare the effectiveness of digital rectal exam and endoscopic ultrasound during routine follow-up of anal cancer patients in detecting locally recurrent disease. Design Retrospective, single-institution review Settings Oncologic tertiary referral center Patients 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous cell cancer without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy who had at least one post-treatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. Main Outcome Measures First modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Results 855 endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal exams were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital exam detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital exam. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital exam in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE 0.08, 95% CI 0.21-0.54) and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. Limitations The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and exams is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Conclusions Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for routine surveillance. PMID:25585077

  18. Application of YAG laser technique in the treatment of anal fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-xun; Zhang, Xinrong

    1993-03-01

    The method of treating anal fistula with YAG laser technique is described in this essay. One-hundred-twenty patients have been treated successfully with this method and no recurrence was found in our series. Anal fistula is a common disorder in the anus and rectum. The tunnel of fistula zigzags around the external or internal sphincters. If the drainage is poor, and the skin around the external opening grows rapidly, false healing may occur and cause recurrent abscess. In this case, a fistula can not be cured except by operation.

  19. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis. PMID:27037640

  20. Factors Associated With Emotional Satisfaction During First Anal Intercourse in a Sample of YMSM.

    PubMed

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Matson, Pamela; Novak, David S; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-07-01

    We sought to determine, in a sample of 2,813 HIV seronegative young men who had sex with other men age 18-24, whether physical satisfaction would explain emotional satisfaction during first anal intercourse and whether emotional satisfaction would impact having sex with a partner a second time. Emotional satisfaction was explained mostly by physical satisfaction during the event, but partner type also had direct impact on emotional satisfaction. Our findings suggest that first anal intercourse experiences in young men are both emotionally and physically satisfying and may impact subsequent sexual behavior and partner decision-making. PMID:26571213

  1. Anal cytology and p16 immunostaining for screening anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rahul; Pandhi, Deepika; Mishra, Kiran; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Yhome, Vizodilhou A

    2014-09-01

    Summary Akin to cervical cancer in sexually-active women, men who have sex with men (MSM) are predisposed to anal cancers, especially those with HIV co-infection. This cross-sectional study endeavored to assess the prevalence of anal dysplasia using Pap smears and p16 immunostaining amongst Indian MSM. A total of 31 consecutive HIV-positive and 34 HIV-negative MSM, from a cohort of sexually transmitted infection clinic attendees, underwent anal cytological evaluation with Pap smear and p16 staining. Chi square test and coefficient of correlation were used for comparison. Eighteen (27.7%) had abnormal anal cytology; increased in HIV-positive as compared to HIV-negative men (35% versus 20%, p = 0.180). Similarly, both low-grade (25.8% versus 17.6%) and high-grade lesions (8.3% versus 4.8%) were comparable in HIV-positive and HIV-negative group. Thirteen (20%) smears were p16-positive with a sensitivity and specificity for anal dysplasia of 72.3% and 100%, respectively. Anal cytology may be used to screen for anal dysplasia in MSM irrespective of HIV status. Furthermore, the addition of p16, with greater specificity for high-grade lesions, may improve diagnostic accuracy especially for high-grade lesions. A larger study to further corroborate these observations is warranted. PMID:24435064

  2. New approach to anal cancer: Individualized therapy based on sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    De Nardi, Paola; Carvello, Michele; Staudacher, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Oncological treatment is currently directed toward a tailored therapy concept. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal could be considered a suitable platform to test new therapeutic strategies to minimize treatment morbidity. Standard of care for patients with anal canal cancer consists of a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This treatment has led to a high rate of local control and a 60% cure rate with preservation of the anal sphincter, thus replacing surgical abdominoperineal resection. Lymph node metastases represent a critical independent prognostic factor for local recurrence and survival. Mesorectal and iliac lymph nodes are usually included in the radiation field, whereas the inclusion of inguinal regions still remains controversial because of the subsequent adverse side effects. Sentinel lymph node biopsies could clearly identify inguinal node-positive patients eligible for therapeutic groin irradiation. A sentinel lymph node navigation procedure is reported here to be a feasible and effective method for establishing the true inguinal node status in patients suffering from anal canal cancer. Based on the results of sentinel node biopsies, a selective approach could be proposed where node-positive patients could be selected for inguinal node irradiation while node-negative patients could take advantage of inguinal sparing irradiation, thus avoiding toxic side effects. PMID:23197880

  3. Local transdermal delivery of phenylephrine to the anal sphincter muscle using microneedles.

    PubMed

    Baek, Changyoon; Han, MeeRee; Min, Junhong; Prausnitz, Mark R; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2011-09-01

    We propose pretreatment using microneedles to increase perianal skin permeability for locally targeted delivery of phenylephrine (PE), a drug that increases resting anal sphincter pressure to treat fecal incontinence. Microneedle patches were fabricated by micromolding poly-lactic-acid. Pre-treatment of human cadaver skin with microneedles increased PE delivery across the skin by up to 10-fold in vitro. In vivo delivery was assessed in rats receiving treatment with or without use of microneedles and with or without PE. Resting anal sphincter pressure was then measured over time using water-perfused anorectal manometry. For rats pretreated with microneedles, topical application of 30% PE gel rapidly increased the mean resting anal sphincter pressure from 7±2 cm H(2)O to a peak value of 43±17 cm H(2)O after 1 h, which was significantly greater than rats receiving PE gel without microneedle pretreatment. Additional safety studies showed that topically applied green fluorescent protein-expressing E. coli penetrated skin pierced with 23- and 26-gauge hypodermic needles, but E. coli was not detected in skin pretreated with microneedles, which suggests that microneedle-treated skin may not be especially susceptible to infection. In conclusion, this study demonstrates local transdermal delivery of PE to the anal sphincter muscle using microneedles, which may provide a novel treatment for fecal incontinence. PMID:21586307

  4. Patterns of Vaginal, Oral, and Anal Sexual Intercourse in an Urban Seventh-Grade Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Christine M.; Peskin, Melissa Fleschler; Addy, Robert C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Tortolero, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examines the prevalence of vaginal, oral, and anal intercourse among a population of urban, public middle school students, the characteristics of early sexual initiators, and the sequence of sexual initiation. Such data are limited for early adolescents. Methods: A total of 1279 seventh-grade students (57.3% female, 43.6%…

  5. Characterization and virulence of Beauveria bassiana associated with auger beetle (Sinoxylon anale) infesting allspice (Pimenta dioica).

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, C M; Jacob, T K; Devasahayam, S; D'Silva, Sharon; Nandeesh, P G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of auger beetle, Sinoxylon anale Lesne (Bostrichidae: Coleoptera), a destructive pest of cosmopolitan occurrence is reported for the first time on allspice trees, Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. in Kerala, India. The insects bored through the basal region of fresh twigs resulting in dieback symptoms. Morphological characterization and sequencing of a partially amplified fragment of the mitochondrial CO1 gene (696bp) revealed the insect to be Sinoxylon anale. An entomopathogenic fungus was isolated from infected cadavers of S. anale that was identified as Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill., sensu stricto (s.s.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) based on morphological and molecular studies. The partial sequences of the ITS, TUB, TEF and Bloc gene regions were sequenced. The fungus grew well in ambient room temperature conditions (28-32±2°C; 60-70% relative humidity) and the infection process on the insect was documented by scanning electron microscopy. Bioassay studies with the isolate indicated that the fungus was virulent against adult beetles as evidenced by the LC50 (3.6×10(6)conidia/ml) and ST50 values (6.8days at a dose of 1×10(7)conidia/ml and 5.8days at a dose of 1×10(8)conidia/ml, respectively). This is the first record of B. bassiana naturally infecting S. anale and the fungus holds promise to be developed as a mycoinsecticide. PMID:27480402

  6. Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Baranzini, Sergio E; Schanze, Denny; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Short, Kieran M; Chao, Ryan; Yahyavi, Mani; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Chu, Catherine; Musone, Stacey; Wheatley, Ashleigh; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Marles, Sandra; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Maga, A Murat; Hassan, Mohamed G; Gould, Douglas B; Madireddy, Lohith; Li, Chumei; Cox, Timothy C; Smyth, Ian; Chudley, Albert E; Zenker, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is a rare condition defined by eyelid colobomas, cryptophthalmos and anophthalmia/ microphthalmia, an aberrant hairline, a bifid or broad nasal tip, and gastrointestinal anomalies such as omphalocele and anal stenosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance had been assumed because of consanguinity in the Oji-Cre population of Manitoba and reports of affected siblings, but no locus or cytogenetic aberration had previously been described. Methods and results This study shows that MOTA syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1, a gene previously mutated in bifid nose, renal agenesis, and anorectal malformations (BNAR) syndrome. MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome can therefore be considered as part of a phenotypic spectrum that is similar to, but distinct from and less severe than, Fraser syndrome. Re-examination of Frem1bat/bat mutant mice found new evidence that Frem1 is involved in anal and craniofacial development, with anal prolapse, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, a shortened snout and reduced philtral height present in the mutant mice, similar to the human phenotype in MOTA syndrome. Conclusions The milder phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in humans (MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome) compared to that resulting from FRAS1 and FREM2 loss of function (Fraser syndrome) are also consistent with the less severe phenotypes resulting from Frem1 loss of function in mice. Together, Fraser, BNAR and MOTA syndromes constitute a clinically overlapping group of FRAS–FREM complex diseases. PMID:21507892

  7. New treatment for ileal pouch-anal or coloanal anastomotic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Benoist, S; Panis, Y; Berdah, S; Hautefeuille, P; Valleur, P

    1998-07-01

    Persistent anastomotic stricture following ileal pouch-anal or coloanal anastomoses can be treated by transanal resection using a stapler or a more complex procedure, such as transanal pouch advancement with neoanastomosis. We propose an easier and faster technique, which does not require any particular device. Its long-term functional results are satisfactory in most patients. PMID:9678384

  8. Anal Neoplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Associated With HPV and Perianal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Joannie; Ko, Huaibin Mabel; Roda, Giulia; Patil, Ninad; Zhang, David; Jharap, Bindia; Harpaz, Noam; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Literature describing the risk factors predisposing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients to anal squamous neoplasia is very scarce. Case reports and small case series have implicated perianal Crohn's disease (CD), long-standing IBD, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and immunosuppressive treatment. In this study, we retrospectively examined the association between HPV infection and anal squamous neoplastic lesions among IBD patients from our center. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology records and slides of IBD patients diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs) who presented at our center between 1 March 1994 and 9 September 2014. The HPV status of the neoplasms was assessed histologically, by immunohistochemical staining for p16 overexpression, and by global and type-specific HPV PCR. RESULTS: SCCs, HSILs, LSILs, and small cell carcinoma were identified, respectively, in six, nine, two, and one IBD patients. All six patients with SCC had CD with perianal involvement. HPV-related neoplasia was identified in 3/6 cases of SCC (all HPV-16), 1/1 small cell carcinoma (HPV-18), and 9/9 HSIL (7 HPV-16, 2 not typed); 2/2 LSILs were negative for high-risk HPV. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, anal squamous neoplastic lesions in IBD are associated with HPV infection and SCC seem to be associated with perianal CD. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:26938479

  9. Patterns of anal carcinoma by gender and marital status in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, R. K.; Mack, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    Marital status and other characteristics of 970 residents of Los Angeles County in whom cancer of the anus (including perianal skin) was diagnosed during the period 1972-1981 were compared with those of all county residents and all other persons in whom cancer was diagnosed during the same period. The incidence rate of anal cancer for single males was 6.1 times that for married males (P less than 0.001). This excess was limited to squamous and transitional cell carcinomas and was reasonably consistent by age, stage, subsite, social class and race. Single women were not at increased risk, but separated and divorced persons of both sexes were at increased risk compared to married persons. Anal cancers were more common in males under the age of 35, after which there was a substantial female predominance. This relative excess in older women occurred at all stages, subsites, and social classes of whites and also in blacks, but not in Hispanics, among whom women had lower overall incidence rates compared to both whites and blacks. The findings were consistent with the hypothesis that sexual activity involving the anus is related to anal cancer. We could not rule out the possibility that anal cancer is related to the acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) since the incidence in young single men appears to have increased in 1980 and 1981. PMID:6639856

  10. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups. PMID:18574114

  11. High reproducibility of histological diagnosis of human papillomavirus-related intraepithelial lesions of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer M; Jin, Fengyi; Thurloe, Julia K; Biro, Clare; Poynten, Isobel M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Fairley, Christopher K; Templeton, David J; Carr, Andrew D; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard J; Cornall, Alyssa M; Grulich, Andrew E; Farnsworth, Annabelle

    2015-06-01

    In a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-related lesions, we examined the reproducibility of histological high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Three expert anogenital pathologists share the reporting of histological specimens from the Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC), utilising Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) criteria. In total, 194 previously reported biopsies were randomly chosen within diagnostic strata [50 HSIL-anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 3; 45 HSIL-AIN 2; 49 'flat' low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL); 50 'exophytic' LSIL; and 50 negative for squamous intraepithelial lesion] and reviewed by each of these three pathologists. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least two review diagnoses, using a binary classification of HSIL and non-HSIL, or if consensus was not obtained in this way, it was achieved through a multiheader microscope session by the three pathologists. We found very high agreement between original and consensus diagnoses (Kappa = 0.886) and between each pathologist's review and consensus (Kappas = 0.926, 0.917 and 0.905). Intra-observer agreement for the three pathologists was 0.705, 1.000 and 0.854. This high level of diagnostic reproducibility indicates that the findings of SPANC should be robust and provide reliable information about HPV-related anal canal disease. PMID:25938361

  12. Video Assisted Anal Fistula Treatment in a Child with Perianal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asif; Dar, Sajid Hameed; Liaqat, Faheem

    2016-01-01

    Perianal fistula formation is a rare complication in children after rectal biopsy. Perianal fistula may become difficult to treat; therefore a lot of surgical options are present. One of these options is video assisted anal fistula treatment (VAAFT). We present a 6-year-old female who developed perianal fistula following rectal biopsy for which VAAFT was done successfully. PMID:26816676

  13. Inhibition of mTOR Reduces Anal Carcinogenesis in Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hall, Bradford; Bian, Yansong; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of human anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is unclear, and the accumulating evidence indicate association of ASCC with the activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway. Here we describe a mouse model with spontaneous anal squamous cell cancer, wherein a combined deletion of Tgfbr1 and Pten in stratified squamous epithelia was induced using inducible K14-Cre. Histopathologic analyses confirmed that 33.3% of the mice showed increased susceptibility to ASCC and precancerous lesions. Biomarker analyses demonstrated that the activation of the Akt pathway in ASCC of the Tgfbr1 and Pten double knockout (2cKO) mouse was similar to that observed in human anal cancer. Chemopreventive experiments using mTOR inhibitor-rapamycin treatment significantly delayed the onset of the ASCC tumors and reduced the tumor burden in 2cKO mice by decreasing the phosphorylation of Akt and S6. This is the first conditional knockout mouse model used for investigating the contributions of viral and cellular factors in anal carcinogenesis without carcinogen-mediated induction, and it would provide a platform for assessing new therapeutic modalities for treating and/or preventing this type of cancer. PMID:24124460

  14. Uptake and Predictors of Anal Cancer Screening in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Rajan, Shirani D.; Bhatia, Rohini; Cranston, Ross D.; Plankey, Michael W.; Silvestre, Anthony; Ostrow, David G.; Wiley, Dorothy; Shah, Nisha; Brewer, Noel T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated attitudes about and acceptance of anal Papanicolaou (Pap) screening among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. Free anal Pap screening (cytology) was offered to 1742 MSM in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, who reported history of, attitudes about, and experience with screening. We explored predictors of declining screening with multivariate logistic regression. Results. A history of anal Pap screening was uncommon among non–HIV-infected MSM, but more common among HIV-infected MSM (10% vs 39%; P < .001). Most participants expressed moderate or strong interest in screening (86%), no anxiety about screening (66%), and a strong belief in the utility of screening (65%). Acceptance of screening during this study was high (85%) across all 4 US sites. Among those screened, most reported it was “not a big deal” or “not as bad as expected,” and 3% reported that it was “scary.” Declining to have screening was associated with Black race, anxiety about screening, and low interest, but not age or HIV status. Conclusions. This study demonstrated high acceptance of anal Pap screening among both HIV-infected and non–HIV-infected MSM across 4 US sites. PMID:23865658

  15. Squamous-cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Anal Canal: An Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, W. B.

    1941-01-01

    The analysis is of 55 cases admitted into St. Mark's Hospital from 1922 to 1940. The incidence was 3.35% of all cases of cancer of the rectum, anal canal and anus admitted during this period. Sex distribution—27 males and 28 females. The average age (61.7 years) is higher than that of columnar-cell carcinoma of the rectum (57.4 years). Histology.—The cases have been graded into three grades of malignancy—low grade, medium grade, and high grade. Low grade squamous carcinoma is twice as frequent in men as in women, and generally originates at the anal margin. Medium grade squamous carcinoma is equally distributed between men and women; it may arise at the anus or in the anal canal. High grade squamous carcinoma is much more common in the female sex and is almost entirely limited to the anal canal. Quadrant affected—about one-third of the anal margin growths and one-half of the anal canal growths were situated anteriorly. Differential diagnosis from simple papilloma, simple ulcer, chronic inflammation, tuberculous ulcer, tuberculide, primary chancre, amœbic ulcer, basal-cell carcinoma, columnar-cell carcinoma. Biopsy and grading essential before treatment is decided upon. The results of treatment in the three grades of malignancy are described. The best results were obtained in the early low-grade cases treated by interstitial radium needling. In the medium and high grades only three five-year survivals can be reported and these followed excision of the rectum. The management of the inguinal glands is discussed and the importance of a very close post-operative supervision emphasized. Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal may cause lymphatic metastases in the superior hæmorrhoidal glands; there have been four such cases in this series. Diathermy perineal excision is indicated in these cases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19992316

  16. Efficacy and safety of helical tomotherapy with daily image guidance in anal canal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Jumeau, Raphael; Bouchaab, Hasna; Vallet, Véronique; Matzinger, Oscar; Troussier, Idriss; Mirimanoff, René-Olivier; Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Hanhloser, Dieter; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Esat Mahmut

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), also using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) techniques, has been only recently introduced for treating anal cancer patients. We report efficacy and safety HT, and daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for anal cancer. Materials and methods We retrospectively analyzed efficacy and toxicity of HT with or without chemotherapy for anal cancer patients. Local control (LC) and grade 3 or more toxicity rate (CTC-AE v.4.0) were the primary endpoints. Overall (OS), disease-free (DFS), and colostomy-free survival (CFS) are also reported. Results Between October 2007 and May 2014, 78 patients were treated. Fifty patients presented a stage II or stage IIIA (UICC 2002), and 33 presented a N1-3 disease. Radiotherapy consisted of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) delivered on the pelvis and on the anal canal, with a sequential boost up to 59.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) delivered to the anal and to nodal gross tumor volumes. Concomitant chemotherapy was delivered in 73 patients, mainly using mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil (n = 30) or mitomycin C and capecitabine combination (n = 37). After a median follow-up period of 47 months (range 3-75), the five-year LC rate was 83.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.4%). Seven patients underwent a colostomy because of local recurrence (n = 5) or pretreatment dysfunction (n = 2). Overall incidence of grade 3 acute toxicity was 24%, mainly as erythema (n = 15/19) or diarrhea (n = 7/19). Two patients presented a late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anal incontinence). No grade 4 acute or late toxicity was recorded. Conclusions HT with daily IGRT is efficacious and safe in the treatment of anal canal cancer patients, and is considered in our department standard of care in this clinical setting. PMID:27034083

  17. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  18. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  19. Papillary Immature Metaplasia of the Anal Canal: A Low-grade Lesion That Can Mimic a High-grade Lesion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer M; Cornall, Alyssa M; Ekman, Deborah; Law, Carmella; Poynten, I Mary; Jin, Fengyi; Hillman, Richard J; Templeton, David J; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Thurloe, Julia K; Grulich, Andrew E; Farnsworth, Annabelle

    2016-03-01

    In a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-related lesions among homosexual men in Sydney, Australia, we identified 15 examples of papillary immature metaplasia (PIM) in anal biopsy samples. PIM has previously been described in the cervix, but not in the anal canal. PIM is a form of exophytic low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (eLSIL) also known as condyloma. In contrast to the maturing keratinocytes and koilocytosis seen in conventional eLSIL, the slender papillary structures of PIM have a surface population of immature squamous cells. In our anal samples PIM was characterized by close proximity to conventional eLSIL, was negative for p16 (p16) expression, and revealed the presence of a single low-risk HPV genotype (either 6 or 11) in laser capture microdissected lesions. The clinical significance of recognizing PIM lies in preventing misdiagnosis as high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, (the presumed precursor to anal cancer), due to the morphologic immaturity of the cell population. In routine practice, awareness of anal canal PIM and p16 immunostaining will prevent this. Further study of the natural history of anal canal PIM is needed. PMID:26551619

  20. Genetic Architecture of the Variation in Male-Specific Ossified Processes on the Anal Fins of Japanese Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Kawajiri, Maiko; Fujimoto, Shingo; Yoshida, Kohta; Yamahira, Kazunori; Kitano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Traits involved in reproduction evolve rapidly and show great diversity among closely related species. However, the genetic mechanisms that underlie the diversification of courtship traits are mostly unknown. Japanese medaka fishes (Oryzias latipes) use anal fins to attract females and to grasp females during courtship; the males have longer anal fins with male-specific ossified papillary processes on the fin rays. However, anal fin morphology varies between populations: the southern populations tend to have longer anal fins and more processes than the northern populations. In the present study, we conducted quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to investigate the genetic architecture underlying the variation in the number of papillary processes of Japanese medaka fish and compared the QTL with previously identified QTL controlling anal fin length. First, we found that only a few QTL were shared between anal fin length and papillary process number. Second, we found that the numbers of papillary processes on different fin rays often were controlled by different QTL. Finally, we produced another independent cross and found that some QTL were repeatable between the two crosses, whereas others were specific to only one cross. These results suggest that variation in the number of papillary processes is polygenic and controlled by QTL that are distinct from those controlling anal fin length. Thus, different courtship traits in Japanese medaka share a small number of QTL and have the potential for independent evolution. PMID:26511497

  1. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  2. Genetic Architecture of the Variation in Male-Specific Ossified Processes on the Anal Fins of Japanese Medaka.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Maiko; Fujimoto, Shingo; Yoshida, Kohta; Yamahira, Kazunori; Kitano, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Traits involved in reproduction evolve rapidly and show great diversity among closely related species. However, the genetic mechanisms that underlie the diversification of courtship traits are mostly unknown. Japanese medaka fishes (Oryzias latipes) use anal fins to attract females and to grasp females during courtship; the males have longer anal fins with male-specific ossified papillary processes on the fin rays. However, anal fin morphology varies between populations: the southern populations tend to have longer anal fins and more processes than the northern populations. In the present study, we conducted quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to investigate the genetic architecture underlying the variation in the number of papillary processes of Japanese medaka fish and compared the QTL with previously identified QTL controlling anal fin length. First, we found that only a few QTL were shared between anal fin length and papillary process number. Second, we found that the numbers of papillary processes on different fin rays often were controlled by different QTL. Finally, we produced another independent cross and found that some QTL were repeatable between the two crosses, whereas others were specific to only one cross. These results suggest that variation in the number of papillary processes is polygenic and controlled by QTL that are distinct from those controlling anal fin length. Thus, different courtship traits in Japanese medaka share a small number of QTL and have the potential for independent evolution. PMID:26511497

  3. Epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. A series of 276 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    During the past ten years, substantial progress has been made in the knowledge of the natural history of epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal and of the response of the disease to radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. At the present time, the main problem in the management of this tumor concerns identification of the best modalities to achieve local control and preservation of anal function. From a series of 276 cases, followed for more than three years, the necessity for a careful pretreatment evaluation was stressed. This included a systematic search for pelvic metastatic lymph nodes by palpation and CT scan. All patients were treated initially by irradiation except those who underwent groin dissection for inguinal node metastasis or colostomy for complete anal obstruction. Three groups of patients have been identified: unresectable or disseminated tumors (33 cases), resectable tumors but not suitable for sphincter conservation (21 cases) treated by radiochemotherapy and delayed surgery, and resectable tumors suitable for sphincter conservation (222 cases) which were treated by a split-course regimen combining a short course of carefully planned external beam irradiation (19 days) followed by an iridium 192 implant after a two-month rest. In this group, which represents 80 percent of the whole series, 80 percent of patients have had their cancer controlled and 90 percent of controlled patients have retained normal anal function. The use of chemotherapy during the first days of irradiation is advisable in all cases to reinforce the efficacy of treatment and increase the chance of anal preservation. Results of the split-course regimen, combining external beam and interstitial irradiation, demonstrate a clear superiority over external beam irradiation alone, especially for large infiltrating tumors, which represent the majority of cases.

  4. Experience with a new prosthetic anal sphincter in three coloproctological centres

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence is a common and severely disabling disorder. For patients with severe fecal incontinence, surgery may prove to be the only adequate treatment option. Methods This study reports on 43 patients that were treated with a prosthetic sphincter system between 2005 and 2009 in three coloproctological centres. Main Outcome Measures: complications, anal pressures before and after surgery, fecal continence score. Results The new artificial sphincter system significantly improves continence but leads to some complications in clinical practice. After implantation of the device, continence improved significantly (Keller & Jostarndt continence score 2.6 to 14.3 (P < 0.01)). With the band activated, resting pressure improved significantly as compared to baseline (10.7 mmHg vs. 66.1 mm Hg, P < 0.01). The same holds for anal sphincter squeeze pressure (32.2 mmHg versus 85.9 mm Hg, P < 0.01). Complications occurred in 21 patients (48.8%): 10 surgical and 13 technical. Two patients were affected by both technical and surgical problems. The median time of the occurrence was 3 months postop. In five patients difficulties arose within the first postoperative month leading to explantation of the device in three patients. 90% of complications occurred in the first year. Conclusions The soft anal band of AMI (AAS), a new artificial anal sphincter, improves severe anal incontinence, but it must be regarded as a last treatment option to avoid a stoma. PMID:24502440

  5. Thermal control of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters for complete implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Okuyama, Takeshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kamiyama, Takamichi; Nishi, Kotaro; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for the thermal control of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys. An artificial anal sphincter has been proposed by the authors to resolve problems of severe fecal incontinence in patients. The basic design of the artificial sphincter consists of two all-round shape memory alloy plates as the main functional parts, and heaters that are attached to the SMA plates for generating the thermal cycles required for the phase transformation accompanied shape changes of the plates. The SMA artificial sphincter could be fitted around intestines, performing an occlusion function at body temperature and a release function upon heating. Thermal compatibility of such prostheses is most important and is critical for practical use. Since a temperature rise of approximately 20 °C from body temperature is needed to activate a complete transformation of SMA plates, an earlier model of ours allowed only a short period of heating, resulting in incomplete evacuation. In this work, a thermal control approach using a temperature-responsive reed switch has been incorporated into the device to prevent the SMA plates from overheating. Then, with thermal insulation the artificial anal sphincter is expected to allow a long enough opening period for fecal continence; without any thermal impact to the surrounding tissues that would be in contact with the artificial sphincter. Thermal control was confirmed in both in vitro and in vivo experiments, suggesting the effectiveness of the present approach. The modified SMA artificial anal sphincter has been implanted into animal models for chronic experiments of up to 4 weeks, and has exhibited good performance by maintaining occlusion and release functions. At autopsy, no anomaly due to thermal impact was found on the surfaces of intestines that had been in contact with the artificial anal sphincter.

  6. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  7. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  8. A novel method of anal fissure laser surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mehran Nasr; Madani, Golnoush; Madhkhan, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    Anal fissure is a common painful problem, affecting all age groups. Its pathophysiology is based on high sphincter pressures and reduced blood supplying and treatments which means that it generally reduces anal pressures and increases anodermal blood flow. Since each of the anal fissure's routine therapies has some limitations such as definite risk of permanent fecal incontinence and high recurrence rate, we tried to find a more effective and less invasive procedure. In this pilot study which was implemented on 25 male and female patients aged 20-75 years, diagnosed clinically with chronic anal fissure, the Carbon Dioxide Laser Fractional was used to treat patients. In order to first remove fibrotic and granulation tissues, the base and the edges of the fissure were laser beamed. Eight spots were made on the sphincter by the laser on its continuous mode; somehow, they were passed through the full thickness of sphincter without interrupting its continuance. Afterwards, the area around the fissure ulcer was irradiated by deep fractional mode of the laser to stimulate the submucosa to regenerate and rejuvenate. After going through this procedure, patients were followed up within 6 months to 1 year. Pain, bleeding, and constipation were significantly improved. None of the patients had recurrence after a 1-year follow-up, and none of them had fecal incontinence and/or inability to control the passage of gas too. This study revealed that this new laser-based surgery is a simple, safe, and effective procedure to treat the anal fissure that can be performed with local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic with minimal postoperative morbidity. PMID:26067925

  9. Condyloma acuminatum of the anal canal, treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Akiko; Nakajima, Takeshi; Egashira, Hideto; Takeda, Kotaro; Tokoro, Shinnosuke; Ichita, Chikamasa; Masuda, Sakue; Uojima, Haruki; Koizumi, Kazuya; Kinbara, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Saito, Yutaka; Kako, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Condyloma acuminatum (CA) is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by human papilloma virus infection. Not all individuals develop persistent, progressive disease, but careful follow up is required with moderate-to-severe dysplasia to prevent progression to malignancy. Standard therapies include surgical treatments (trans-anal resection and trans-anal endoscopic microsurgery) and immunotherapeutic and topical methods (topical imiquimod); however, local recurrence remains a considerable problem. Here, we report a case with superficial CA of the anal canal, treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). A 28-year-old man presented with a chief complaint of hematochezia. Digital exam did not detect a tumor. Screening colonoscopy revealed 10-mm long, whitish condyles extending from the anal canal to the lower rectum. The lesion covered almost the whole circumference, and only a small amount of normal mucosa remained. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging showed brownish hairpin-shaped, coiled capillaries. Although histopathological diagnosis by biopsy revealed CA, accurate histological differentiation between CA, papilloma, and squamous cell carcinoma can be difficult with a small specimen. Therefore, we performed diagnostic ESD, which provides a complete specimen for precise histopathological evaluation. The pathological diagnosis was CA, with moderate dysplasia (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2). There was no recurrence at 16 mo after the initial ESD. Compared to surgical treatment, endoscopic diagnosis and resection could be performed simultaneously and the tumor margin observed clearly with a magnifying chromocolonoscopy, resulting in less recurrence. These findings suggest that endoscopic resection may be an alternative method for CA that prevents recurrence. PMID:26937152

  10. Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis Load Is Similar in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women Reporting Anal Sex

    PubMed Central

    van Liere, Geneviève A. F. S.; Dirks, Jeanne A. M. C.; Hoebe, Christian J. P. A.; Wolffs, Petra F.; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anorectal Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia) is frequently diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) and in women, but it is unknown whether these infections are comparable in clinical impact and transmission potential. Quantifying bacterial load and identifying determinants associated with high bacterial load could provide more insight. Methods We selected a convenience sample of MSM who reported anal sex (n = 90) and women with concurrent urogenital/anorectal chlamydia who reported anal sex (n = 51) or did not report anal sex (n = 61) from the South Limburg Public Health Service’s STI unit. Bacterial load (Chlamydia/ml) was quantified for all samples and log transformed for analyses. Samples with an unquantifiable human leukocyte antigen (n = 9) were excluded from analyses, as they were deemed inadequately sampled. Results The mean log anorectal chlamydia load (3.50) was similar for MSM and women who reported having anal sex (3.80, P = 0.21). The anorectal chlamydia load was significantly higher in these groups than in women who did not report having anal sex (2.76, P = 0.001). Detectable load values ranged from 1.81–6.32 chlamydia/ml for MSM, 1.74–7.33 chlamydia/ml for women who reported having anal sex and 1.84–6.31 chlamydia/ml for women who did not report having anal sex. Symptoms and several other determinants were not associated with anorectal chlamydia load. Conclusions Women who did not report anal sex had lower anorectal loads, but they were within a similar range to the other two groups. Anorectal chlamydia load was comparable between MSM and women who reported anal sex, suggesting similar transmission potential. PMID:26262680

  11. Prevention of Anal Condyloma with Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination of Older Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Swedish, Kristin A.; Goldstone, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (qHPV) is FDA-approved for use in males 9 to 26 years old to prevent anogenital condyloma. The objective of this study is to determine if qHPV is effective at preventing anal condyloma among men who have sex with men (MSM) aged 26 years and older. Methods This post-hoc analysis of a nonconcurrent cohort study evaluated 210 patients without history of anal condyloma and 103 patients with previously-treated anal condyloma recurrence-free for at least 12 months prior to vaccination/time zero. We determined the rate of anal condyloma development in vaccinated versus unvaccinated patients. Results 313 patients with mean age 42 years were followed for median 981 days. During 773.6 person-years follow-up, condyloma developed in 10 (8.6%) vaccinated patients (incidence of 3.7 per 100 person-years) and 37 (18.8%) unvaccinated patients (incidence 7.3 per 100 person-years; p = 0.05). Multivariable hazards ratio showed that qHPV was associated with decreased risk of anal condyloma development (HR 0.45; 95% CI 0.22–0.92; p = 0.03). History of anal condyloma was associated with increased risk of anal condyloma development (HR 2.28; 95% CI 1.28–4.05; p = 0.005), as was infection with oncogenic HPV (HR 3.87; 95% CI 1.66–9.03; p = 0.002). Conclusions Among MSM 26 years of age and older with and without history of anal condyloma, qHPV reduces the risk of anal condyloma development. A randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these findings in this age group. PMID:24714693

  12. Cost-effectiveness of screening for anal cancer using regular digital ano-rectal examinations in men who have sex with men living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason J; Fairley, Christopher K; Carroll, Susan; Walker, Sandra; Chen, Marcus; Read, Tim; Grulich, Andrew; Bradshaw, Catriona; Kaldor, John; Clarke, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV is an important issue but there are no consistent guidelines for how to screen for this cancer. In settings where screening with anal cytology is unavailable, regular anal examinations have been proposed in some guidelines but their cost-effectiveness is unknown. Methods Our objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of regular anal examinations to screen for anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM living in Australia using a probabilistic Markov model. Data sources were based on the medical literature and a clinical trial of HIV-positive MSM receiving an annual anal examination in Australia. The main outcome measures for calculating effectiveness were undiscounted and discounted (at 3%) lifetime costs, life years gained, quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Base-case analysis estimated the average cost of screening for and management of anal cancer ranged from $195 for no screening to $1,915 for lifetime annual screening of men aged ≥ 50. Screening of men aged ≥ 50 generated ICERs of $29,760 per QALY gained (for screening every four years), $32,222 (every three years) and $45,484 (every two years). Uncertainty for ICERs was mostly influenced by the cost (financially and decrease in quality of life) from a false-positive result, progression rate of anal cancer, specificity of the anal examination, the probability of detection outside a screening program and the discount rate. Conclusions Screening for anal cancer by incorporating regular anal examinations into routine HIV care for MSM aged ≥ 50 is most likely to be cost-effective by conventional standards. Given that anal pap smears are not widely available yet in many clinical settings, regular anal exams for MSM living with HIV to detect anal cancer earlier should be implemented. PMID:26942721

  13. Efficacy of low-dose epidural anaesthesia in surgery of the anal canal--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kausalya, R; Jacob, R

    1994-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in terms of patient comfort, surgical requirements and anaesthetic safety, the difference between epidural and general anaesthesia in patients undergoing surgery of the anal canal. The study was undertaken on 50 adult patients undergoing anal surgery. By random allocation 25 were given a general anaesthetic while 25 were given a low-dose epidural using 0.375% bupivacaine. Advantages and disadvantages of both methods were noted in the study. It was concluded that low-dose epidural is a more effective means of providing analgesia, while maintaining adequate sphincter tone for surgery on the anal canal, than general anaesthesia. PMID:8210019

  14. Anal Cancer Screening: Barriers and Facilitators Among Ethnically Diverse Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Masongsong, Emmanuel; Wiley, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge and beliefs about anal cancer screening among gay and other men who have sex with men remains unclear, despite data that suggests significant risk for intra-anal HPV-related cancers. Nevertheless, community-based screening activities may be most effective when stake-holder perspectives are addressed. We conducted four focus groups among 16 male and 3 female health care advocates experienced in working with diverse gay and other men who have sex with men in Los Angeles. Barriers to anal cancer screening included lack of awareness, stigma, psychological and physical discomfort, the anus as hidden/private, primary concern with HIV, and men's lack of healthcare seeking. Facilitators were community screening sites, novel strategies such as home testing, health care system changes and targeted educational campaigns, which may increase anal cancer awareness and screening among ethnically diverse men who have sex with men. PMID:21165164

  15. Smoking and anal high-risk human papillomavirus DNA loads in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Ulrike; Hellmich, Martin; Wetendorf, Janna; Potthoff, Anja; Höfler, Daniela; Swoboda, Jochen; Fuchs, Wolfgang; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Pfister, Herbert; Kreuter, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) have an increased risk for anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and anal cancer. Smoking is associated with abnormal anal cytology and with an increased risk for anal cancer. We collected 3736 intraanal swabs from 803 HIV-positive MSM who participated in an anal cancer screening program between October 2003 and August 2014. HPV prevalence, anal cytology and HPV DNA load of high-risk (HR) HPV-types 16, 18, 31 and 33 of non-smokers and smokers were compared. HPV-typing was performed by alpha-HPV genus-specific PCR and hybridization with 38 type-specific probes using a multiplex genotyping assay. In samples positive for HPV16, 18, 31, or 33, HPV DNA loads were determined by type-specific real-time PCRs and expressed as HPV DNA copies per betaglobin gene copy. At baseline, HR-HPV DNA (80.5 vs. 89.0%, p=0.001), HPV16 DNA (41.6 vs. 52.3%, p=0.003), HPV18 DNA (15.5 vs. 26.0%, p<0.001), anal dysplasia (LSIL+HSIL; 51.5 vs. 58.4%, p=0.045) and HSIL (17.2 vs. 22.7%, p=0.048) were detected more frequently in smokers compared to non-smokers. Throughout the study period 32.7% of non-smokers and 39.9% of smokers developed HSIL (p=0.011), and three smokers developed anal cancer. Considering swabs from the entire study period (median HPV load value per patient per cytology grade), smokers with normal anal cytology had significantly higher HPV16 loads (median 0.29 vs. 0.87, n=201, p=0.007) and cumulative high-risk-HPV loads (median 0.53 vs. 1.08, n=297, p=0.004) than non-smokers. Since elevated HR-HPV DNA loads are associated with an increased risk for HPV-induced anogenital cancers, HPV-infected HIV-positive MSM should be counseled to refrain from smoking. Additionally, for smokers, shorter anal cancer screening intervals than for non-smokers may be appropriate. PMID:26319939

  16. The Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC): design and methods of a three-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal cancer is increasing in men who have sex with men (MSM). Screening for the presumed cancer precursor, high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in a manner analogous to cervical cancer screening has been proposed. Uncertainty remains regarding anal HPV natural history and the role of anal cytology and high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) as screening tests. Well-designed cohort studies are required to address these issues. Methods/design The SPANC study is a prospective study of the epidemiology of low-risk and high-risk anal HPV infection and related cytological and histological abnormalities in HIV-negative and HIV-positive homosexual men aged 35 years and over. The study aims to recruit 600 men from community-based settings in Sydney, Australia. There are six study visits over three years. At the first five visits men undergo a digital ano-rectal examination (DARE), an anal “Papanicolaou” (Pap) test for HPV detection, genotyping and anal cytology, followed by HRA and directed biopsy of any visible abnormalities. The men also complete a behavioural questionnaire before each visit. Questions include a detailed history of sexual behaviour, of anal symptoms, possible anal cancer risk factors and validated quality of life and psychosocial questions. Questionnaires are also completed 2 weeks and 3 months following the provision of test results and include questions on participant experience during the procedure and post-procedure symptoms, including pain and bleeding in addition to quality of life/ psychosocial outcomes. Discussion Recruitment for the study began in September 2010 and will conclude in mid-2015, with follow up continuing to 2018. Thus far, over 350 men have been recruited from a variety of community-based settings and are broadly representative of the target screening population. The SPANC study is one of only a small number of cohort studies globally to perform HPV

  17. Risk Factors for the Presence of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia in HIV+ Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Richel, Olivier; De Vries, Henry J. C.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Van Noesel, Carel J. M.; Prins, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (AIN) is present in the majority of HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM) and routine AIN-screening is subject of discussion. In this study we analysed a wide range of potential risk factors for AIN in order to target screening programs. Methods We screened 311 HIV+ MSM by high resolution anoscopy, with biopsies of suspect lesions. HIV-parameters, previous sexual transmitted infections (STI’s), anal pathology, sexual practices and substance use were analysed in relation to AIN by uni- and multivariable logistic regression. Results AIN (any grade) was found in 175/311 MSM (56%), high grade (HG)AIN in 30%. In the univariable analysis, years since HIV diagnosis, years of antiretroviral therapy (cART) and anal XTC use decreased AIN risk, while a history of anogenital warts and use of GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) increased this risk. In the multivariable analysis three parameters remained significant: years of cART (OR=0.92 per year, p=0.003), anal XTC use (OR=0.10, p=0.002) and GHB use (OR=2.60, p=0.003). No parameters were significantly associated with HGAIN, but there was a trend towards increased risk with anal enema use prior to sex (>50 times ever; p=0.07) and with a history of AIN (p=0.06). CD4 count, STI’s, anal pathology, smoking, number of sex partners and anal fisting were not associated with (HG)AIN. Conclusion GHB use increases the risk for AIN, while duration of cART and anal XTC use are negatively correlated with AIN. Given the high prevalence of AIN in HIV+ MSM, these associations are not helpful to guide a screening program. PMID:24367625

  18. Trends in the Occurrence of High-Grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia in San Francisco: 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Edgar P.; Watson, Meg; Saraiya, Mona; Clarke, Christina A.; Palefsky, Joel M.; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although screening of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN; a precursor of anal cancer) has been practiced in San Francisco among HIV health care providers since the early 1990s, to the authors’ knowledge no study to date has focused on evaluating recent AIN trends. METHODS Cases of high-grade AIN 3 and invasive anal cancer from 2000 to 2009 were obtained from the San Francisco/Oakland Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based cancer registry. Age-standardized rates of AIN 3 and anal cancer were calculated overall and by demographic characteristics (sex, race, and age group). Log-linear regression calculated annual percent change in rates during 2000 to 2009, and rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), evaluated differences in rates during 2000 through 2004 and 2005 through 2009. RESULTS During 2000 through 2009, the majority of AIN 3 cases occurred among men (1152 of 1320 men; 87.3%). Rates of AIN 3 during the corresponding period increased by 11.48% per year (P <.05) among men and were stable among women. Comparing rates among men during 2000 to 2004 with those during 2005 to 2009, the largest increases were noted among those aged 50 years to 64 years (RR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.93–3.17) and among black individuals (RR, 3.49; 95% CI, 2.14–5.85). During the same period, anal cancer rates were stable among men and women. CONCLUSIONS Rates of AIN 3 increased in San Francisco during 2000 through 2009, in conjunction with an anal cytology screening program for high-risk groups, whereas rates of invasive anal cancer were unchanged. Continued surveillance is necessary to evaluate the impact of screening and human papillomavirus vaccination on the prevention of human papillomavirus-related AIN and anal cancer. PMID:23861091

  19. Cost-effectiveness of surveillance strategies after treatment for high-grade anal dysplasia in high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Panther, Lori; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Jane J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected male patients. Currently, there is no consensus on post-treatment surveillance of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) who have been treated for high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the likely precursor to anal cancer. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of a range of strategies for anal cancer surveillance in HIV-infected MSM previously treated for HGAIN. Methods We developed a Markov model to project quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE), lifetime costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of five strategies using high resolution anoscopy (HRA) and/or anal cytology testing after treatment. Results Performing HRA alone at 6- and 12-month visits was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio of $4,446 per QALY gained. In comparison, combined HRA and anal cytology at both visits provided the greater health benefit at a cost of $ 17,373 per QALY gained. Our results were robust over a number of scenarios and assumptions, including patients’ level of immunosuppression. Results were most sensitive to test characteristics and cost, and progression rates of normal to HGAIN and HGAIN to cancer. Conclusions Our results suggest that combined HRA and anal cytology at 6 and 12 months may be a cost-effective surveillance strategy following treatment of HGAIN in HIV-infected MSM. PMID:23486494

  20. Anal metastasis as the sentinel and isolated presentation of invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rengifo, C; Titi, S; Walls, J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer currently affects 1 in 8 women in the UK during their lifetime. Common sites for breast cancer metastasis include the axillary lymph nodes, bones, lung, liver, brain, soft tissue and adrenal glands. There is well documented evidence detailing breast metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract but anal metastasis is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with an anal metastasis as the sentinel and isolated presentation of an invasive ductal breast carcinoma. As advances in the treatment of breast cancer improve, and with an ageing and expanding population, there will be an increasing number of cancer survivors, and more of these unusual presentations may be encountered in the future. PMID:27087339

  1. A case of severe anal injury in an adolescent male due to bestial sexual experimentation.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Roger O

    2009-10-01

    This report delineates a case of anal injury in a 12-year-old boy who gave a detailed history of bestial behavior with a male bulldog. The child described how he had seen this behavior modeled on the internet and subsequently initiated contact with his own dog, causing the dog to penetrate him anally. This type of juvenile bestial behavior with injury has only been reported once previously in the medical literature. Zoophilia, along with a number of other paraphilias, frequently has its onset in the adolescent age group. Adolescents evidencing paraphilic behaviors require thorough psychological evaluation. Spontaneous sexual assault of a human by a canine has never been described in the human or veterinary medical literature, nor is such a thing likely. A clinician involved in evaluating serious ano-genital injury in a child reportedly due to spontaneous canine sexual assault must consider other possible traumatic etiologies including sexual abuse. Investigation in any such case is essential. PMID:19733331

  2. Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome and anal canal stenosis: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Milind; Singh, Sangram; Vyas, Tanmay; Chourishi, Vighya; Jain, Anvesh

    2010-12-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) is a characteristic syndrome in which the mullerian structures are absent or rudimentary. It is also associated with anomalies of the genitourinary and skeletal systems. There are very few cases reported regarding its association with anorectal malformations, particularly perineal fistulas. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of anal canal stenosis in patients with MRKH. We describe a very rare association of MRKH with anal canal stenosis and multiple renal calculi. The patient underwent corrective surgery for the anomalies and removal of renal calculi. She has been under regular follow-up for the last few months and is doing well. PMID:21129528

  3. Total excision and V-Y plasty technique in the anal area condyloma acuminatum.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Arif H; Ongoren, Ali U; Bingül, Ferruh; Gulcelik, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is located in the perianal region, anal canal, vagina and the perineum. It is caused by human papillomavirus types 6 and 11. A 18 year-old man was admitted to the clinic because of a perianal mass. On examination of the patient's perianal area and inside the anal canal, a mass was found, which was nearly 8 x 8 cm in size. We could not obtain any information about venereal transmission. The mass was totally excised and the defect was reconstructed with a bilateral V-Y advancement flap. This technique has been used for sacrococcygeal, ischial and other defects but rarely used for condyloma acuminatum. We think that total excision and the use of the V-Y advancement flap technique is safe and has low morbidity in the treatment of condyloma acuminatum. PMID:19753205

  4. Electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter system.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yang, Bang-hua; Shao, Yong; Yan, Guo-zheng; Liu, Hua

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic effects on the biological tissue surrounding a transcutaneous transformer for an artificial anal sphincter. The coupling coils and human tissues, including the skin, fat, muscle, liver, and blood, were considered. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by a finite-length solenoid model. First, SAR and current density as a function of frequency (10-10(7) Hz) for an emission current of 1.5 A were calculated under different tissue thickness. Then relations between SAR, current density, and five types of tissues under each frequency were deduced. As a result, both the SAR and current density were below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The results show that the analysis of these data is very important for developing the artificial anal sphincter system. PMID:21121071

  5. Management of persistent anal canal carcinoma after combined-modality therapy: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare gastro-intestinal cancer. Radiochemotherapy is the recommended primary treatment for patients with non-metastatic carcinoma; surgery is generally reserved for persistent or recurrent disease. Follow-up and surveillance after primary treatment is paramount to classify patients in those with complete remission, persistent or progressive disease. Locally persistent disease represents a clinically significant problem and its management remains subject of some controversy. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise recommendations for the primary treatment of anal canal carcinoma, to focus on the optimal time to consider residual disease as genuine persistence to proceed with salvage treatment, and to discern how this analysis might inform future clinical trials in management in this class of patients. PMID:24472223

  6. Interstitial curietherapy in the conservative treatment of anal and rectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Chassard, J.L.; Ardiet, J.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Conservative treatment has become a valid alternative to radical surgery in most cases of cancer of the anal canal and in selected cases of cancer of the low rectum. In this strategy interstitial curietherapy has an appreciable role to play. The results of a series of 369 patients followed more than 3 years indicate that implantation of Iridium-192 is effective not as sole treatment but as a booster dose 2 months after a course of external beam or intracavitary irradiation. The dose delivered did not exceed 20 to 30 Gy and the implantations were always performed in one plane using either a plastic template or a steel fork. Three groups of cases must be considered: (a) among 221 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, the rate of death related to treatment failures was 20% and among the patients cured more than 90% retained normal sphincter function. (b) In 90 patients with T1-T2 invasive adenocarcinoma of the rectum, Iridium-192 was carried out after four applications of contact X ray therapy. The rate of control was 84%. (c) In 62 elderly, poor risk patients with T2-T3 tumor of the low rectum initially suitable for an abdomino-perineal resection, a tentative extension of the field of conservation was made using a split-course protocol combining a short course of external beam irradiation at a dose of 30-35 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days and an Iridium-192 implant. The rate of death due to treatment failures was 14.5% and among the patients controlled 97% had a normal anal function. These results show that implantations of Iridium-192 may contribute to the control of anal and rectal cancers and may spare many patients a permanent colostomy, but the treatment requires great care in patient selection, treatment protocol, technical details, and follow-up. This treatment policy must be conceived as a team work of radiation oncologists and surgeons.

  7. Incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries after training to protect the perineum: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Katariina; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Sandvik, Leiv; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in two time periods, before and after implementing a training programme for improved perineal support aimed at reducing the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. The secondary aim was to study incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in subgroups defined by risk factors for OASIS. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting University hospital setting in Oslo, Norway. Participants Two cohorts of all delivering women in the largest hospital in Norway during two time periods (2003–2005 and 2008–2010) were studied. After excluding caesarean sections and preterm deliveries (< week 32), the study population consisted of 31 709 deliveries, among which 907 women were identified with obstetric anal sphincter injury. Primary and secondary outcome measures Incidence of OASIS in two time periods. Maternal, obstetrical and foetal risk factors for OASIS were collected from the hospital obstetric database. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses, presenting adjusted ODs for OASIS, were performed. Results The OASIS incidence was significantly reduced by 50%, from 4% (591/14787) in the first time period to 1.9% (316/16 922) in the second. This reduction could not be explained by changes in population characteristics or OASIS risk factors during the study years. The reduction of incidence of OASIS between the two study periods was consistent across subgroups of women; regardless of parity, delivery method and infant birth weight. Conclusions A marked reduction in the incidence of OASIS was observed in all studied subgroups of women after implementing the training programme for perineal protection. Further, this reduction could not be explained by the differences in patient characteristics across the study period. These findings indicate that the training programme with improved perineal protection markedly reduced the risk of OASIS. PMID:23075573

  8. Anal cancer: ESMO-ESSO-ESTRO clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, R; Nilsson, P J; Aschele, C; Goh, V; Peiffert, D; Cervantes, A; Arnold, D

    2014-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is a rare cancer but its incidence is increasing throughout the world, and is particularly high in the human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) population. A multidisciplinary approach is mandatory (involving radiation therapists, medical oncologists, surgeons, radiologists and pathologists). SCCA usually spreads in a loco-regional manner within and outside the anal canal. Lymph node involvement at diagnosis is observed in 30%-40% of cases while systemic spread is uncommon with distant extrapelvic metastases recorded in 5%-8% at onset, and rates of metastatic progression after primary treatment between 10 and 20%. SCCA is strongly associated with human papilloma virus (HPV, types 16-18) infection. The primary aim of treatment is to achieve cure with loco-regional control and preservation of anal function, with the best possible quality of life. Treatment dramatically differs from adenocarcinomas of the lower rectum. Combinations of 5FU-based chemoradiation and other cytotoxic agents (mitomycin C) have been established as the standard of care, leading to complete tumour regression in 80%-90% of patients with locoregional failures in the region of 15%. There is an accepted role for surgical salvage. Assessment and treatment should be carried out in specialised centres treating a high number of patients as early as possible in the clinical diagnosis. To date, the limited evidence from only 6 randomised trials [1,2,3,4,5,6,7], the rarity of the cancer, and the different behaviour/natural history depending on the predominant site of origin, (the anal margin, anal canal or above the dentate line) provide scanty direction for any individual oncologist. Here we aim to provide guidelines which can assist medical, radiation and surgical oncologists in the practical management of this unusual cancer. PMID:25239441

  9. Anal cancer: ESMO-ESSO-ESTRO clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Robert; Nilsson, Per J; Aschele, Carlo; Goh, Vicky; Peiffert, Didier; Cervantes, Andrés; Arnold, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is a rare cancer but its incidence is increasing throughout the world, and is particularly high in the human immunodeficiency virus positive (HIV+) population. A multidisciplinary approach is mandatory (involving radiation therapists, medical oncologists, surgeons, radiologists and pathologists). SCCA usually spreads in a loco-regional manner within and outside the anal canal. Lymph node involvement at diagnosis is observed in 30-40% of cases while systemic spread is uncommon with distant extrapelvic metastases recorded in 5-8% at onset, and rates of metastatic progression after primary treatment between 10% and 20%. SCCA is strongly associated with human papilloma virus (HPV, types 16-18) infection. The primary aim of treatment is to achieve cure with loco-regional control and preservation of anal function, with the best possible quality of life. Treatment dramatically differs from adenocarcinomas of the lower rectum. Combinations of 5FU-based chemoradiation and other cytotoxic agents (mitomycin C) have been established as the standard of care, leading to complete tumour regression in 80-90% of patients with locoregional failures in the region of 15%. There is an accepted role for surgical salvage. Assessment and treatment should be carried out in specialised centres treating a high number of patients as early as possible in the clinical diagnosis. To date, the limited evidence from only 6 randomised trials [1,2,3,4,5,6,7], the rarity of the cancer, and the different behaviour/natural history depending on the predominant site of origin, (the anal margin, anal canal or above the dentate line) provide scanty direction for any individual oncologist. Here we aim to provide guidelines which can assist medical, radiation and surgical oncologists in the practical management of this unusual cancer. PMID:24947004

  10. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  11. [Gangrenous pyoderma and enterocutaneous fistulas after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Fadrique, Alfonso García; Ferrer, Francisco Villalba; Esteban, Marcos Bruna; Vila, José Vicente Roig

    2007-05-01

    We describe the medical-surgical management of a patient with a complex inflammatory bowel disease who developed 2 acute episodes of pyoderma gangrenosum and enterocutaneous fistulas after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. The rarity of this postsurgical complication is emphasized. A good response to topical tacrolimus was achieved in cutaneous wounds. A less favorable response to infliximab was achieved in the abdominal fistulas, requiring surgical excision of the pouch. PMID:17498458

  12. Molecular biology of anal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for future research and clinical intervention.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Maria-Pia; Ngan, Samuel Y; Michael, Michael; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G; Ramsay, Robert G; Phillips, Wayne A

    2015-12-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is a human papillomavirus-related disease, in which no substantial advances in treatment have been made in over 40 years, especially for those patients who develop disease relapse and for whom no surgical options exist. HPV can evade the immune system and its role in disease progression can be exploited in novel immunotherapy platforms. Although several studies have investigated the expression and inactivation (through loss of heterozygosity) of tumour suppressor genes in the pathways to cancer, no clinically valuable biomarkers have emerged. Regulators of apoptosis, including survivin, and agents targeting the PI3K/AKT pathway, offer opportunities for targeted therapy, although robust data are scarce. Additionally, antibody therapy targeting EGFR may prove effective, although its safety profile in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy has proven to be suboptimal. Finally, progress in the treatment of anal cancer has remained stagnant due to a lack of preclinical models, including cell lines and mouse models. In this Review, we discuss the molecular biology of anal squamous cell carcinoma, clinical trials in progress, and implications for novel therapeutic targets. Future work should focus on preclinical models to provide a resource for investigation of new molecular pathways and for testing novel targets. PMID:26678214

  13. Combined sphincter repair and postanal repair for the treatment of complicated injuries to the anal sphincters.

    PubMed Central

    Browning, G. G.; Henry, M. M.; Motson, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    The management of seven patients with multiple injuries to the anal sphincter musculature and its nerve supply, from major pelvic trauma, anal fistula surgery, or obstetric trauma, was reviewed. All were either incontinent of solid stools or had defunctioning colostomies. Anal manometry was abnormal in all patients. Concentric needle electromyography (EMG) showed anterior division of the external sphincter in all the patients; five also had posterior division of both the external sphincter and puborectalis. EMG abnormalities were found in the lateral quadrants of these muscles, particularly the external sphincter. Single fibre needle EMG showed evidence of reinnervation in the external sphincter in six patients, and in the puborectalis in two, indicating partial denervation of the muscles. Treatment was by anterior sphincter repair using an overlapping technique, combined with postanal repair; the repairs were protected by a defunctioning colostomy. When assessed 4-60 months (mean 17 months) after colostomy closure all seven patients were continent of solid and semi-formed stools, but had urgency of defaecation. None could control liquid stool or flatus. After complicated sphincter injuries planned surgical reconstruction, based on EMG assessment of the sphincter muscles, can restore acceptable continence. PMID:3190132

  14. A decade of selective use of adjustable cutting seton combined with fistulotomy for anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Kamrava, Allen; Collins, J Craig

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the division of sphincter muscle in the treatment of anal fistula may precipitate fecal incontinence. Cutting setons may pose a particular risk of unrecoverable injury to the sphincter apparatus. To evaluate if the use of an adjustable cutting seton mitigates this risk, we performed a retrospective review of all patients operated on for anal fistulae in a 10-year period by a single surgeon. Adjustable cutting setons (consisting of heavy silk ligature with patient-controllable tension) were used selectively. Forty-seven patients met the study criteria. Ninety-four per cent of the fistulae treated were transsphincteric. All of the fistulae were treated with at least partial fistulotomy. Ninety-nine per cent of patients were followed to completion of treatment. One (2%) patient subsequently developed fecal incontinence, and four (9%) developed a recurrent or persistent fistula in the same location. Adjustable cutting setons have been used in our practice with a high success rate and low risk of complications. Our data support adjustable cutting setons as a useful tool in the surgeon's repertoire for treating fistulae that involve the anal sphincter complex. PMID:22127093

  15. A new approach to the management of epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Mayer, M.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Chassard, J.L.; Bailly, C.

    1983-05-15

    Until recently most squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal were treated by radical surgery. Radiation therapy was only considered for palliation in case of inoperable tumors. Important progress has been made in the knowledge of the natural history of the disease and in the field of radiotherapy. Anal canal squamous cell carcinoma should not be treated any longer by the same procedure as adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, because both these diseases differ markedly. Multimodality therapy with radiotherapy as first approach has been considered. This series of 121 cases treated since 1971 and followed more than three years suggests that three protocols based on irradiation followed or not by surgery should be used according to the extent of the disease. Of the 72 patients with resectable tumor, the five-year survival rate was 65%. Three-quarters of the patients cured had normal anal function. The rate of death from cancer was 18%. The method requires an accurate assessment of the extent of the tumor and of its pelvic lymphatic spread. Great care must be taken in planning treatment in a close cooperation between radiotherapist and surgeon.

  16. Urinary Tract Infection In Young Healthy Women Following Heterosexual Anal Intercourse: Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lema, Valentino M

    2015-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in outpatient clinical settings globally. Young healthy women are at highest risk of community-acquired UTI. While uncomplicated UTI is not life-threatening, it is associated with high morbidity and treatment costs. The pathogenesis of urinary tract infection in young healthy women is complex. It is influenced by a number of host biological and behavioural factors and virulence of the uropathogen. The infecting uropathogens in community-acquired UTI originate from the fecal flora, E. coli being the most predominant, accounting for 80-90% of these UTIs. Vaginal colonization with uropathogens, a pre-requisite for bladder infection may be facilitated by sexual intercourse, which has been shown to be a strong risk factor and predictor of UTI. While majority of studies have explored the association between heterosexual vaginal intercourse and UTI in healthy young women, the possible association with heterosexual receptive anal intercourse has not received adequate attention despite evidence of high prevalence globally. This paper presents two young healthy married women who had severe UTI following heterosexual anal intercourse and discusses possible association thereof. Understanding the risk factors for UTI and identification of possible predisposing conditions in a particular individual are important in guiding therapeutic approaches and preventive strategies. Cognisant of reportedly high prevalence of various sexual practices including receptive heterosexual anal intercourse and their impact on individuals' health, details on sexual history should always be enquired into in young women presenting with genito-urinary complaints. PMID:26506666

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in an Australian sample of anal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Richard J; Garland, Suzanne M; Gunathilake, Manoji P W; Stevens, Matthew; Kumaradevan, Nirmala; Lemech, Charlotte; Ward, Robyn L; Meagher, Alan; McHugh, Leo; Jin, Fengyi; Carroll, Susan; Goldstein, David; Grulich, Andrew E; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2014-08-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes most cases of anal cancers. In this study, we analyzed biopsy material from 112 patients with anal cancers in Australia for the presence of HPV DNA by the INNO LiPA HPV genotyping assay. There were 82% (92) males and 18% (20) females. The mean age at diagnosis was significantly (p = 0.006) younger for males (52.5 years) than females (66 years). HIV-infected males were diagnosed at a much earlier mean age (48.2 years) than HIV negative (56.3 years) males (p = 0.05). HPV DNA was detected in 96.4% (108) of cases. HPV type 16 was the commonest, at 75% (81) of samples and being the sole genotype detected in 61% (66). Overall, 79% (85) of cases had at least one genotype targeted by the bivalent HPV (bHPV) vaccine, 90% (97) by the quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine and 96% (104) by the nonavalent HPV (nHPV) vaccine. The qHPV vaccine, which is now offered to all secondary school students in Australia, may prevent anal cancers in Australia. However, given the mean age of onset of this condition, the vaccine is unlikely to have a significant impact for several decades. Further research is necessary to prove additional protective effects of the nHPV vaccine. PMID:24497322

  18. Can we omit prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation in anal cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hakyoung; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of prophylactic inguinal nodal irradiation (PINI), we analyzed patterns of failure in anal cancer patients who were inguinal node-negative at presentation and did not receive PINI. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 33 anal cancer patients treated by definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) between 1994 and 2013. Radiotherapy consisted of a total dose of 44-45 Gy (22-25 fractions in 5 weeks) on the whole pelvis, anus, and perineum. Except inguinal lymphadenopathy was present at initial diagnosis, the entire inguinal chain was not included in the radiation field. In other words, there was no PINI. Results The median follow-up duration was 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months). Median survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were 57 months (range, 10 to 218 months) and 50 months (range, 4 to 218 months), respectively. Among the survival, the median follow-up duration was 51 months (range, 12 to 218 months). The 5-year overall survival and PFS rates were 93.4% and 88.8%, respectively. Although none of the patients received inguinal node irradiation for prophylactic purposes, there was no inguinal recurrence. Conclusion Treatment of anal cancer by omitting PINI might be considered in selected patients with clinically uninvolved inguinal nodes. PMID:26157677

  19. High grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia among HIV-1-infected men screening for a multi-center clinical trial of a human papillomavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Aboulafia, David M.; Einstein, Mark H.; Saah, Alfred; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) is the precursor lesion to invasive anal cancer. HPV vaccination holds great promise for preventing anal cancer. Methods We examined 235 HIV-1-infected men screening for participation in a multi-site clinical trial of a quadrivalent HPV vaccine. All participants had anal swabs obtained for HPV testing and cytology, and high resolution anoscopy with biopsies of visible lesions to assess for HGAIN. Results HPV 16 and 18 were detected in 23% and 10%, respectively; abnormal anal cytology was found in 56% and HGAIN in 30%. HGAIN prevalence was significantly higher in those with HPV 16 detection compared to those without (38% vs. 17%, P=.01). Use of antiretroviral therapy, nadir and current CD4+ cell count were not associated with abnormal anal cytology or HGAIN. Conclusion HGAIN is highly prevalent in HIV-infected men. Further studies are needed on treatment and prevention of HGAIN. PMID:23611828

  20. Anal Cytology and Human Papillomavirus Genotyping in Women With a History of Lower Genital Tract Neoplasia Compared With Low-Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Katina; Cronin, Beth; Bregar, Amy; Luis, Christine; DiSilvestro, Paul; Schechter, Steven; Pisharodi, Latha; Raker, Christina; Clark, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of abnormal anal cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women with a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia with women without a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia. METHODS A cross-sectional cohort study was performed from December 2012 to February 2014. Women were recruited from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center. Women with a history of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal cytology, dysplasia, or cancer were considered the high-risk group. Women with no history of high-grade anogenital dysplasia or cancer were considered the low-risk group. Human immunodeficiency virus–positive women were excluded. Anal cytology and HPV genotyping were performed. Women with abnormal anal cytology were referred for high-resolution anoscopy. RESULTS There were 190 women in the high-risk group and 83 in the low-risk group. The high-risk group was slightly older: 57 years compared with 47 years (P=.045); 21.7% of low-risk women had abnormal anal cytology compared with 41.2% of high-risk women (P=.006). High-risk HPV was detected in the anal canal of 1.2% of the low-risk group compared with 20.8% of the high-risk group (P<.001). Among women who underwent anoscopy, no anal dysplasia was detected in the low-risk group, whereas 13.4% in the high-risk group had anal dysplasia with 4.2% having anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater (P<.001). CONCLUSION Human immunodeficiency virus–negative women with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia are more likely to have positive anal cytology, anal high-risk HPV, and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. Anal cancer screening should be considered for these high-risk women. PMID:26551180

  1. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  2. Epigenomic Characterization of Locally Advanced Anal Cancer: An RTOG 98-11 Specimen Study

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Eschrich, Steven; Winter, Kathryn; Riggs, Bridget; Berglund, Anders; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Simko, Jeff; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer; Magliocco, Anthony; Elahi, Abul; Hoffe, Sarah; Shibata, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-11 clinical trial demonstrated the superiority of standard 5FU/mitomycin-C over 5FU/cisplatin in combination with radiation in the treatment of anal squamous cell cancer. Tumor size (>5cm) and lymph node metastases are associated with disease progression. There may be key molecular differences (e.g. DNA methylation changes) in tumors at high-risk for progression. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine if there are differences in DNA methylation at individual CpG sites and within genes among locally advanced anal cancers, with large tumor size and/or nodal involvement, compared to those that are less advanced. Design Case-case study among 121 patients defined as high-risk (tumor size>5cm and/or nodal involvement; n=59) or low-risk (≤5cm, node negative; n=62) within the mitomycin-C arm of RTOG98-11 trial. DNA methylation was measured using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 Array. Settings Tertiary care cancer center in collaboration with a national clinical trials cooperative group. Patients The patients consisted of 74 women and 47 men with a median age of 54 years (minmax 25-79). Main Outcome Measures DNA methylation differences at individual CpG sites and within genes between low and high-risk patients were compared using Mann-Whitney test (p-value<0.001). Results A total of 16 CpG loci were differentially methylated (14 increased and 2 decreased) in high vs. low-risk cases. Genes harboring differentially methylated CpG sites included known tumor suppressor genes and novel targets. Limitations This study only included patients in mitomycin-C arm with tumor tissue; however, this sample was representative of the trial. Conclusions This is the first study to apply genome-wide methylation analysis to anal cancer. Biologically relevant differences in methylated targets were found to discriminate locally advanced from early anal cancer. Epigenetic events likely play a significant role in the

  3. Event-Level Analysis of Anal Sex Roles and Sex Drug Use Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzed event-level partnership data from a computer-assisted survey of 719 gay and bisexual men (GBM) enrolled in the Momentum Health Study to delineate potential linkages between anal sex roles and the so-called "sex drugs," i.e., erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD), poppers, and crystal methamphetamine. Univariable and multivariable analyses using generalized linear mixed models with logit link function with sexual encounters (n = 2514) as the unit of analysis tested four hypotheses: (1) EDD are significantly associated with insertive anal sex roles, (2) poppers are significantly associated with receptive anal sex, (3) both poppers and EDD are significantly associated with anal sexual versatility, and (4) crystal methamphetamine is significantly associated with all anal sex roles. Data for survey respondents and their sexual partners allowed testing these hypotheses for both anal sex partners in the same encounter. Multivariable results supported the first three hypotheses. Crystal methamphetamine was significantly associated with all anal sex roles in the univariable models, but not significant in any multivariable ones. Other multivariable significant variables included attending group sex events, venue where first met, and self-described sexual orientation. Results indicate that GBM sex-drug use behavior features rational decision-making strategies linked to anal sex roles. They also suggest that more research on anal sex roles, particularly versatility, is needed, and that sexual behavior research can benefit from partnership analysis. PMID:26525571

  4. An animal homolog of plant Mep/Amt transporters promotes ammonia excretion by the anal papillae of the disease vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Ionescu, Adrian; Misyura, Lidiya; Bui, Phuong; Fazio, Kimberly; Wang, Jason; Patrick, Marjorie; Weihrauch, Dirk; Donini, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The transcripts of three putative ammonia (NH3/NH4 (+)) transporters, Rhesus-like glycoproteins AeRh50-1, AeRh50-2 and Amt/Mep-like AeAmt1 were detected in the anal papillae of larval Aedes aegypti Quantitative PCR studies revealed 12-fold higher transcript levels of AeAmt1 in anal papillae relative to AeRh50-1, and levels of AeRh50-2 were even lower. Immunoblotting revealed AeAmt1 in anal papillae as a pre-protein with putative monomeric and trimeric forms. AeAmt1 was immunolocalized to the basal side of the anal papillae epithelium where it co-localized with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Ammonium concentration gradients were measured adjacent to anal papillae using the scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) and used to calculate ammonia efflux by the anal papillae. dsRNA-mediated reductions in AeAmt1 decreased ammonia efflux at larval anal papillae and significantly increased ammonia levels in hemolymph, indicating a principal role for AeAmt1 in ammonia excretion. Pharmacological characterization of ammonia transport mechanisms in the anal papillae suggests that, in addition to AeAmt1, the ionomotive pumps V-type H(+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase as well as NHE3 are involved in ammonia excretion at the anal papillae. PMID:26944496

  5. Behavioral and psychosocial correlates of anal sex among male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Chavarin, Claudia; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    Most studies of heterosexual sex risk practices have focused on condomless vaginal sex despite evidence that condomless anal sex has a significantly higher risk of HIV transmission. The present study focused on male clients' anal sex practices with female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana, Mexico, where an HIV epidemic is growing among high-risk groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify psychosocial and behavioral correlates of anal sex among male clients. Our sample of HIV-negative men (N = 400) was predominantly Latino (87.5 %), born in Mexico (78.8 %), never married (36.8 %) or in a regular or common-law marriage (31.5 %), and employed (62.8 %), with an average age and education of 37.8 and 9.2 years, respectively. Eighty-nine percent identified as heterosexual and 11 % as bisexual. By design, 50 % of the sample resided in Tijuana and the other 50 % in San Diego County. Nearly half (49 %) reported at least one incident of anal sex with a FSW in Tijuana in the past 4 months; of those participants, 85 % reported that one or more of their anal sex acts with FSWs had been without a condom. In a multivariate model, anal sex with a FSW in the past 4 months was associated with bisexual identification, methamphetamine use with FSWs, repeat visits to the same FSW, higher scores on perceived stigma about being a client of FSWs, and sexual compulsivity. Prevention programs are needed that address the behavioral and psychosocial correlates of heterosexual anal sex in order to reduce HIV/STI transmission risk among male clients, FSWs, and their sexual network members. PMID:25795530

  6. Antiretroviral Therapy as a Factor Protective against Anal Dysplasia in HIV-Infected Males Who Have Sex with Males

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; Rivero-Rodriguez, Mar; Gil-Anguita, Concepción; Lopez De Hierro, Mercedes; Palma, Pablo; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; Esquivias, Javier; López-Ruz, Miguel Angel; Javier-Martínez, Rosario; Pasquau-Liaño, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Chronic infection with oncogenic HPV genotype is associated with the development of anal dysplasia. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been shown to decrease the incidence of cervical carcinoma in women with HIV. We sought to: 1) describe the prevalence and grade of anal dysplasia and HPV infection in our study subjects; 2) analyze the grade of correlation between anal cytology, PCR of high-risk HPV, and histology; 3) identify the factors associated with the appearance of ≥AIN2 lesions. Design Cross-sectional, prospective study. Methods A cohort of HIV-positive males (n = 140, mean age  = 37 years) who have sex with males (MSM) had epidemiological, clinical and analytical data collected. Anal mucosa samples were taken for cytology, HPV PCR genotyping, and anoscopy for histological analysis. Results Within the cohort, 77.1% were being treated with ART, 8.5% anoscopy findings were AIN2, and 11.4% carcinoma in situ; 74.2% had high-risk (HR), 59.7% low-risk (LR) HPV genotypes and 46.8% had both. The combination of cytology with PCR identifying HR-HPV better predicts the histology findings than either of these factors alone. Logistic regression highlighted ART as a protective factor against ≥AIN2 lesions (OR: 0.214; 95%CI: 0.054–0.84). Anal/genital condylomas (OR: 4.26; 95%CI: 1.27–14.3), and HPV68 genotype (OR: 10.6; 95%CI: 1.23–91.47) were identified as risk factors. Conclusions In our cohort, ART has a protective effect against dysplastic anal lesions. Anal/genital warts and HPV68 genotype are predictors of ≥AIN2 lesions. Introducing PCR HPV genotype evaluation improves screening success over that of cytology alone. PMID:24676139

  7. Identification of epithelial label-retaining cells at the transition between the anal canal and the rectum in mice

    PubMed Central

    Runck, Laura A; Kramer, Megan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Lewis, Alfor G

    2010-01-01

    In certain regions of the body, transition zones exist where stratified squamous epithelia directly abut against other types of epithelia. Certain transition zones are especially prone to tumorigenesis an example being the anorectal junction, although the reason for this is not known. One possibility is that the abrupt transition of the simple columnar epithelium of the colon to the stratified squamous epithelium of the proximal portion of the anal canal may contain a unique stem cell niche. We investigated whether the anorectal region contained cells with stem cell properties relative to the adjacent epithelium. We utilized a tetracycline-regulatable histone H2B-GFP transgenic mice model, previously used to identify hair follicle stem cells, to fluorescently label slow-cycling anal epithelial cells (e.g., prospective stem cells) in combination with a panel of putative stem cell markers. We identified a population of long-term GFP label-retaining cells concentrated at the junction between the anal canal and the rectum. These cells are BrdU-retaining cells and expressed the stem cell marker CD34. Moreover, tracking the fate of the anal label-retaining cells in vivo revealed that the slow-cycling cells only gave rise to progeny of the anal epithelium. In conclusion, we identified a unique population of cells at the anorectal junction which can be separated from the other basal anal epithelial cells based upon the expression of the stem cell marker CD34 and integrin α6, and thus represent a putative anal stem cell population. PMID:20647777

  8. Healthcare Spending and Performance of Specialty Hospitals: Nationwide Evidence from Colorectal-Anal Specialty Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and performance of colorectal-anal specialty vs. general hospitals for South Korean inpatients with colorectal-anal diseases, and assesses the short-term designation effect of the government's specialty hospital. Materials and Methods Nationwide all colorectal-anal disease inpatient claims (n=292158) for 2010-2012 were used to investigate length of stay and inpatient charges for surgical and medical procedures in specialty vs. general hospitals. The patients' claim data were matched to hospital data, and multi-level linear mixed models to account for clustering of patients within hospitals were performed. Results Inpatient charges at colorectal-anal specialty hospitals were 27% greater per case and 92% greater per day than those at small general hospitals, but the average length of stay was 49% shorter. Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals had shorter length of stay and a higher inpatient charges per day for both surgical and medical procedures, but per case charges were not significantly different. A "specialty" designation effect also found that the colorectal-anal specialty hospitals may have consciously attempted to reduce their length of stay and inpatient charges. Both hospital and patient level factors had significant roles in determining length of stay and inpatient charges. Conclusion Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals have shorter length of stay and higher inpatient charges per day than small general hospitals. A "specialty" designation by government influence performance and healthcare spending of hospitals as well. In order to maintain prosperous specialty hospital system, investigation into additional factors that affect performance, such as quality of care and patient satisfaction should be carried out. PMID:26446659

  9. Clinical Role of Modified Seton Procedure and Coring Out for Treatment of Complex Anal Fistulas Associated With Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Sasaki, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been described to treat complex anal fistulas. When complex anal fistulas are associated with hidradenitis suppurativa, the treatment has to be appropriately tailored for the severity and distribution of the disease so as to remove the external fistula tract to prevent recurrence while ensuring fecal continence. Between 2007 and 2011, a total of 10 males (ranging in age from 32 to 54 years) complained of recurrent purulent discharge in the buttocks and thigh regions. The discharge had started about 12 to 18 months prior, and had increased progressively resulting in complex anal fistulas and hidradenitis suppurativa in the buttocks. They underwent surgical operation according to a modified seton procedure for complex anal fistulas and coring out for hidradenitis suppurativa. They were discharged from the hospital in 4 to 5 days, while the seton dropped spontaneously about 6 to 8 months after surgery. They have been well without any morbidities or recurrence. The present paper demonstrates that cases of complex anal fistulas associated with hidradenitis suppurativa can be successfully treated with a modified seton procedure and coring out of hidradenitis suppurativa. PMID:26414817

  10. Drug Use, Interpersonal Attraction, and Communication: Situational Factors as Predictors of Episodes of Unprotected Anal Intercourse among Latino Gay Men

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rafael M.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Shrout, Patrick E.

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand situational factors linked to episodes of unprotected sexual intercourse among Latino gay men (LGM), who are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Past research has suggested that participation in difficult sexual situations mediates the relationship between socio-cultural factors and sexual risk behaviors among LGM. This study examined drug use by self and sex partners, interpersonal factors, and other key variables, each examined at the situation-level of analysis, as predictors of episodes of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among LGM. Study participants included 270 LGM living in New York City, Miami, and Los Angeles who reported inconsistent condom use during anal intercourse in the last year. Men participated in structured interviews in which they were asked sets of detailed questions about their most recent episode of anal intercourse in which they used condoms, and their most recent anal intercourse episode in which they did not use condoms. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the relevance of specific situational factors to participants’ episodes of UAI and protected anal intercourse. We found that drug use by a sex partner and lacks of discussions about condom use with partners, among other situational factors, were significantly related to episodes of UAI. The findings highlight the importance of considering the impact of sexual situations and interactions with sex partners when studying HIV risk among LGM and when designing interventions. PMID:18985447

  11. Human papillomavirus mRNA testing for the detection of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in men who have sex with men infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sendagorta, Elena; Romero, Maria P; Bernardino, Jose I; Beato, María J; Alvarez-Gallego, Mario; Herranz, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Currently, screening for anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal HSIL) relies on anal cytology and high-resolution anoscopy. Since this approach has limited sensitivity and specificity for detecting anal HSIL, there is increasing interest in the role of biomarkers for predicting anal HSIL. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of HPV E6/E7-mRNA expression for the detection of anal HSIL in MSM infected with HIV, in comparison to DNA-HR-HPV and anal cytology. This cross-sectional screening study included 101 MSM followed at the HIV-unit of La Paz University Hospital. Intra-anal swabs from patients participating in a screening program including cytology, high-resolution anoscopy and histology were analyzed. HR-HPV-DNA detection was performed by means of the CLART® HPV2 assay (GENOMICA S.A.U., Madrid, Spain). E6/E7-mRNA detection of HR-HPV-types 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 was performed using the NucliSENS-EasyQ assay (BioMérieux, Marcy ĺEtoile, France). HR-HPV DNA and HPVE6/E7 mRNA were detected in 82% and 57% of the anal smears respectively. Anal cytology screening was abnormal in 70.3%. For the detection of HSIL sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 71.7%, 55.6%, 57.9%, and 69.8% for E6/E7-mRNA testing, respectively, compared to 100%, 31.5%, 55.4%, and 100% for HR-HPV-DNA testing and to 83%, 40.7%, 54.9%, 73.3% of cytology testing. In comparison with the other tests, HPVE6/E7 mRNA testing yielded a lower clinical sensitivity but a higher clinical specificity and PPV for the detection of anal HSIL in MSM infected with HIV. PMID:25940055

  12. Human papillomavirus genotyping, human papillomavirus mRNA expression, and p16/Ki-67 cytology to detect anal cancer precursors in HIV-infected MSM

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Schwartz, Lauren; Lorey, Thomas S.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Lamere, Brandon; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer incidence is high in HIV-infected MSM. Screening for anal intraepithelial lesions and cancers is performed at specialized clinics and relies on high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and anal cytology. Both approaches have limited reproducibility and sensitivity for detecting anal cancer precursors. We evaluated biomarkers for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease in a population of HIV-infected MSM. Methods A cross-sectional screening study with passive follow-up included 363 MSM followed at a HIV/AIDS clinic. All men had anal cytology samples taken and were evaluated using HRA and anal biopsies. Using a composite endpoint of biopsy results and cytology, we compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping, HPVE6/E7 mRNA expression, and p16/Ki-67 cytology to detect high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AINs). Results For all biomarkers analyzed, there was a significant trend of increasing percentage of men testing positive with increasing severity of disease (P< 0.001). HPV DNA testing had the highest sensitivity for anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 and anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (AIN3), followed by p16/Ki-67, HPVE6/E7 mRNA testing, and HPV16/18 genotyping. The highest Youden's index was observed for HPVE6/E7 mRNA testing, followed by HPV16/18 genotyping, p16/Ki-67 cytology, and HPV DNA testing. Increasing the threshold for positivity of p16/Ki-67 to five or more positive cells led to significantly higher specificity, but unchanged sensitivity for detecting AIN3. Conclusion Molecular features of anal disease categories are similar to those of corresponding cervical lesions. Biomarkers evaluated for cervical cancer screening may be used for primary anal cancer screening or to decide who should require immediate treatment vs. expectant management. PMID:23018436

  13. Sphincter Contractility After Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Autograft into the Cryoinjured Anal Sphincters of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Haet Nim; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jun-Seok; Lee, Hye Seung

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the anal sphincter can improve functional properties in a fecal incontinence rat model. Methods Cryoinjured rats were utilized as a fecal incontinence model. The gastrocnemius muscles of normal three-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the purification of the muscle-derived stem cells. The experimental group was divided into three subgroups: normal control; cryoinjured; and muscle-derived stem cells (3 × 106 cells) injection group of cryoinjured rats. All groups were subsequently employed in contractility experiments using muscle strips from the anal sphincter, one week after preparation. Results Contractility in the cryoinjured group was significantly lower than in the control after treatment with acetylcholine and KCl. In the muscle-derived stem cells injection group, contraction amplitude was higher than in the cryoinjured group but not significantly (20.5 ± 21.3 vs. 17.3 ± 3.4 g per gram tissue, with acetylcholine (10−4 mol/l); 31 ± 14.2 vs. 18.4 ± 7.9 g per gram tissue, with KCl (10−4 mol/l)). PKH-26-labeled transplanted cells were detected in all of the grafted sphincters. Differentiated muscle masses stained positively for alpha smooth muscle actin and myosin heavy chain at the muscle-derived stem cells injection sites. Conclusions This is the first study reporting that autologous muscle-derived stem cell grafts may be a tool for improving anal sphincter function. PMID:18536965

  14. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer O.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968–2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993–2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968–2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968–2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968–2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  15. Restoration of anal sphincter function after myoblast cell therapy in incontinent rats.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Aurélie; Fréret, Manuel; Drouot, Laurent; Jean, Laetitia; Le Corre, Stéphanie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Doucet, Christelle; Michot, Francis; Boyer, Olivier; Lamacz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) remains a socially isolating condition with profound impact on quality of life for which autologous myoblast cell therapy represents an attractive treatment option. We developed an animal model of FI and investigated the possibility of improving sphincter function by intrasphincteric injection of syngeneic myoblasts. Several types of anal cryoinjuries were evaluated on anesthetized Fischer rats receiving analgesics. The minimal lesion yielding sustainable anal sphincter deficiency was a 90° cryoinjury of the sphincter, repeated after a 24-h interval. Anal sphincter pressure was evaluated longitudinally by anorectal manometry under local electrostimulation. Myoblasts were prepared using a protocol mimicking a clinical-grade process and further transduced with a GFP-encoding lentiviral vector before intrasphincteric injection. Experimental groups were uninjured controls, cryoinjured + PBS, and cryoinjured + myoblasts (different doses or injection site). Myoblast injection was well tolerated. Transferred myoblasts expressing GFP integrated into the sphincter and differentiated in situ into dystrophin-positive mature myofibers. Posttreatment sphincter pressures increased over time. At day 60, pressures in the treated group were significantly higher than those of PBS-injected controls and not significantly different from those of normal rats. Longitudinal follow-up showed stability of the therapeutic effect on sphincter function over a period of 6 months. Intrasphincteric myoblast injections at the lesion borders were equally as effective as intralesion administration, but an injection opposite to the lesion was not. These results provide proof of principle for myoblast cell therapy to treat FI in a rat model. This strategy is currently being evaluated in humans in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. PMID:24143883

  16. Chemoradiation with capecitabine and mitomycin-C for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for patients with stage I-III squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal is chemo-radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC). While there is limited published evidence to substitute capecitabine (CAP) for 5-FU, the objectives of the study were to describe the toxicity, dose intensity and outcomes of a sequential cohort of patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy with CAP and MCC in a population-based setting. Methods Patients with stage I-III malignancies of the anal canal referred between February 2010 and March 2012 were included. Dose intensity was calculated by comparing delivered versus planned radiation and chemotherapy treatments and toxicity was retrospectively graded according to standard protocol-specified criteria. Results Among 66 eligible patients, median planned dose of radiation was 51.9 Gy over 5.5 weeks, range 25.0 to 63 Gy, and dose intensity was 98%. Median delivered dose of MCC delivered was 12 mg/m2 on day one, week one while median CAP dose was 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation days. CAP dose reductions due to toxicity were recorded for 13 patients (20%). Median follow-up was 20 months and 94% of patients with squamous cell histology had no evidence of relapse. Conclusions Chemo-radiation with CAP plus MMC is well tolerated and may be a reasonable consideration for patients with stage I-III SCC of the anal canal. A range of planned radiation dose was observed and longer follow-up is necessary to ensure that patients who received lower doses of radiation have similar outcomes to those who received larger doses. PMID:24885554

  17. Incidence, Trends and Ethnic Differences of Oropharyngeal, Anal and Cervical Cancers: Singapore, 1968-2012.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jennifer O; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chow, Khuan-Yew; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, several Western countries have reported an increase in oropharyngeal and anal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Trends in HPV-associated cancers in Asia have not been as well described. We describe the epidemiology of potentially HPV-related cancers reported to the Singapore Cancer Registry from 1968-2012. Analysis included 998 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), 183 anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) and 8,019 invasive cervical cancer (ICC) cases. Additionally, 368 anal non-squamous cell carcinoma (ANSCC) and 2,018 non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinoma (non-OP HNC) cases were included as comparators. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were determined by gender and ethnicity (Chinese, Malay and Indian). Joinpoint regression was used to evaluate annual percentage change (APC) in incidence. OPSCC incidence increased in both genders (men 1993-2012, APC = 1.9%, p<0.001; women 1968-2012, APC = 2.0%, p = 0.01) and was 5 times higher in men than women. In contrast, non-OP HNC incidence declined between 1968-2012 among men (APC = -1.6%, p<0.001) and women (APC = -0.4%, p = 0.06). ASCC and ANSCC were rare (ASR = 0.2 and 0.7 per 100,000 person-years, respectively) and did not change significantly over time except for increasing ANSCCs in men (APC = 2.8%, p<0.001). ICC was the most common HPV-associated cancer (ASR = 19.9 per 100,000 person-years) but declined significantly between 1968-2012 (APC = -2.4%). Incidence of each cancer varied across ethnicities. Similar to trends in Western countries, OPSCC incidence increased in recent years, while non-OP HNC decreased. ICC remains the most common HPV-related cancer in Singapore, but Pap screening programs have led to consistently decreasing incidence. PMID:26720001

  18. Characterization of the α1-adrenoceptor subtype mediating contractions of the pig internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K A; Hausman, N; Chess-Williams, R

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The internal anal sphincter has been shown to contract in response to α1-adrenoceptor stimulation and therefore α1-adrenoceptor agonists may be useful in treating faecal incontinence. This study characterizes the α1-adrenoceptor subtype responsible for mediating contraction of the internal anal sphincter of the pig. Experimental approach: The potency of agonists and the affinities of several receptor subtype selective antagonists were determined on smooth muscle strips for the pig internal anal sphincter. Cumulative concentration–response curves were performed using phenylephrine and noradrenaline. Key results: The potency of the α1A-adrenoceptor selective agonist A61603 (pEC50=7.79±0.04) was 158-fold greater than that for noradrenaline (pEC50=5.59±0.02). Phenylephrine (pEC50=5.99±0.05) was 2.5-fold more potent than noradrenaline. The α1D-adrenoceptor selective antagonist BMY7378 caused rightward shifts of the concentration–response curves to phenylephrine and noradrenaline, yielding low affinity estimates of 6.59±0.15 and 6.33±0.13, respectively. Relatively high affinity estimates were obtained for the α1A-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, RS100329 (9.01±0.14 and 9.06±0.22 with phenylephrine and noradrenaline, respectively) and 5-methylurapidil (8.51±0.10 and 8.31±0.10, respectively). Prazosin antagonized responses of the sphincter to phenylephrine and noradrenaline, yielding mean affinity estimates of 8.58±0.10 and 8.15±0.08, respectively. The Schild slope for prazosin with phenylephrine was equal to unity (1.01±0.24), however the Schild slope using noradrenaline was significantly less than unity (0.50±0.11, P<0.05). Conclusion and implications: The results suggest that contraction of circular smooth muscle from the pig internal anal sphincter is mediated via a population of adrenoceptors with the pharmacological characteristics of the α1A/L-adrenoceptor, most probably the α1L-adrenoceptor form of this receptor

  19. Cervical, Anal and Oral HPV in an Adolescent Inner-City Health Clinic Providing Free Vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Shankar, Viswanathan; Peake, Ken; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Porter, Richard; Linares, Lourdes Oriana; Rojas, Mary; Strickler, Howard D.; Diaz, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Published human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine trials indicate efficacy is strongest for those naive to the vaccine-types. However, few high-risk young women have been followed and cervical HPV has been the predominant outcome measure. Methods We collected cervical and anal swabs, as well as oral rinse specimens from 645 sexually active inner-city young females attending a large adolescent health-clinic in New York City that offers free care and HPV vaccination. Specimens were tested for HPV-DNA using a MY09/MY11-PCR system. Type-specific prevalence of HPV at each anatomic site was compared for individuals by vaccination dose using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models. Results The majority of subjects reported being of non-Caucasian (92%) and/or Hispanic ethnicity (61%). Median age was 18 years (range:14–20). All had practiced vaginal sex, a third (33%) practiced anal sex, and most (77%) had also engaged in oral sex. At enrollment, 21% had not received the vaccine and 51% had received three doses. Prevalent HPV infection at enrollment was detected in 54% of cervical, 42% of anal and 20% of oral specimens, with vaccine types present in 7%, 6% and 1% of specimens, respectively. Comparing prevalence for vaccine types, the detection of HPV in the cervix of vaccinated compared to unvaccinated adolescents was significantly reduced: HPV6/11 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.19, 95%CI:0.06–0.75), HPV16 (OR = 0.31, 95%CI:0.11–0.88) and HPV18 (OR = 0.14, 95%CI:0.03–0.75). For anal HPV, the risk of detecting vaccine types HPV6/11 (OR = 0.27, 95%CI:0.10–0.72) and HPV18(OR = 0.12, 95%CI:0.01–1.16) were significantly reduced for vaccinated adolescents however, the risk for HPV16 was not significantly decreased (OR = 0.63, 95%CI:0.18–2.20). Conclusion HPV Prevalence is extremely high in inner-city female adolescents. Administration of the HPV vaccine reduced the risk for cervical HPV; however continued follow-up is required

  20. Craniosynostosis, anal anomalies, and porokeratosis (CDAGS syndrome): case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chouery, Eliane; Guissart, Claire; Mégarbané, Hala; Aral, Bernard; Nassif, Charbel; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Faivre, Laurence; Mégarbané, André

    2013-12-01

    CDAGS syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by craniosynostosis, large open fontanelles, hearing loss, anal anomalies, genitourinary malformations and porokeratosis. To our knowledge, only four families from different geographic regions and ethnic backgrounds have been reported until now and no molecular defect has been identified. Here we report two sisters presenting with craniosynostosis, microcephaly, short downslanting palpebral fissures, sparse hair, eyelashes, and eyebrows and porokeratosis that appeared at the age of one month. The youngest sister had an imperforate anus with rectoperineal fistula. Array-CGH did not reveal any pathological CNV. Molecular analysis of the c16orf57, RECQL4 and MCM5 genes was normal. PMID:24095818

  1. Local control and distant metastasis after electrochemotherapy of a canine anal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Filipponi, Marino; Romani, Luca; Dotsinsky, Ivan; Mudrov, Nikolay; Baroni, Adone; Ruocco, Eleonora; Laieta, Maria Teresa; Montesarchio, Vincenzo; Cassandro, Roberto; Citro, Gennaro; Baldi, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Canine anal melanoma is an aggressive neoplasm that rapidly leads to constipation in dogs, thus mimicking the behavior of their human counterpart. In this paper, the successful local palliation of this neoplasm is described using cisplatin selectively driven within the tumor cells by trains of biphasic pulses. The dog experienced tumor reduction with restoration of normal defecation for three months, then experienced massive dissemination to the sublumbar lymph nodes that led to intestinal obstruction and euthanasia. Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a safe palliative therapy for such neoplasm and warrants further investigations in dogs as well humans. PMID:18019432

  2. Dosimetric study and in-vivo dose verification for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using helical tomotherapy for conformal avoidance treatment of anal adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively generated step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) plans and helical tomotherapy plans for two anal cancer patients, one male and one female, who were treated by the sIMRT technique. Dose parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs-at-risk (OARs) were compared between the sIMRT and the helical tomotherapy plans. The helical tomotherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the PTV, better dose conformity around the PTV, and, therefore, better sparing of nearby OARs compared with the sIMRT plans. In-vivo skin dose measurements were performed during conformal avoidance helical tomotherapy treatment of an anal cancer patient to verify adequate delivery of skin dose and sparing of OARs.

  3. Use of human papillomavirus vaccine in HIV-infected men for the prevention of anal dysplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cachay, Edward R; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There are two commercially available vaccines licensed worldwide for the prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated cancers such as anal cancer. However, only two countries have implemented healthcare programs that include human papillomavirus vaccination for boys and men. Although most of the human papillomavirus-related cancers in the world are attributable to cervical cancer, in developed countries anal cancer accounts for a larger proportion of human papillomavirus-related cancers. Most cases of anal cancer occur in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In this review, we discuss the burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers in men, the most plausible immune mechanism associated with the high efficacy of the human papillomavirus vaccine, and address key issues of vaccination for HIV-infected men. Finally, we review cost-effectiveness considerations for the use of the vaccine in boys and recent guidelines for vaccination in boys, with attention to HIV-infected men. PMID:24818632

  4. Brief Report: Anal Cancer in the HIV-Positive Population: Slowly Declining Incidence After a Decade of cART.

    PubMed

    Richel, Olivier; Van Der Zee, Ramon P; Smit, Colette; De Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M

    2015-08-15

    We surveyed trends in incidence (1995-2012) and risk factors for anal cancer in the Dutch HIV-positive population. After an initial increase with a peak incidence in 2005-2006 of 114 [95% confidence interval (CI): 74 to 169] in all HIV+ patients and 168 (95% CI: 103 to 259) in HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM), a decline to 72 (95% CI: 43 to 113) and 100 (95% CI: 56 to 164), respectively, was seen in 2011-2012. Low nadir CD4, alcohol use, and smoking were significantly associated with anal cancer in MSM. In conclusion, anal cancer remains a serious problem in predominantly HIV+ MSM. However, it seems that incidence rates are leveling off. PMID:26167621

  5. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  6. Antibody responses following incident anal and penile infection with human papillomavirus in teenage men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huachun; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Grulich, Andrew E; Hocking, Jane S; Garland, Suzanne M; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Cornall, Alyssa M; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer. Few data exist on antibody responses following incident anogenital infection with HPV in teenage MSM. A cohort of 200 MSM aged 16-20 years from Melbourne, Australia were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. At each visit anal and penile swabs were collected for HPV DNA and serum for HPV antibodies for genotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Merck's Multiplex Assays using Luminex). The main outcome, seroconversion, was defined as the detection of HPV antibodies following a negative antibody result for the same HPV type at baseline. The seroincidence rates for HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 were: 19 (95% CI 12-26), 7 (3-12), 4 (1-8) and 6 (3-11) per 100 person-years, respectively. Men who experienced incident anal HPV infections from types 6/11 were significantly more likely to develop serum antibodies to the same HPV type(s) than those who experienced incident anal infections from types 16/18 [73 vs. 18%, odds ratio (OR) = 15, 95% CI: 2-118]. The median time between incident anal HPV infection and seroconversion for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 was: 91, 38, 161 and 182 days, respectively. Antibody responses against HPV types 6/11 were significantly more likely to occur following incident anal compared with incident penile infection with HPV types 6/11 (OR = 6, 95% CI: 2-21). The likelihood of antibody responses following anogenital HPV infections depends on the HPV type and site of infection. PMID:26991809

  7. Concomitant anal and cervical human papillomavirusV infections and intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected and uninfected women

    PubMed Central

    Hessol, Nancy A.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Minkoff, Howard; Weber, Kathleen M.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess factors associated with concomitant anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in HIV-infected and at-risk women. Design A study nested within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), a multi-center longitudinal study of HIV-1 infection in women conducted in six centers within the United States. Methods Four hundred and seventy HIV-infected and 185 HIV-uninfected WIHS participants were interviewed and examined with anal and cervical cytology testing. Exfoliated cervical and anal specimens were assessed for HPV using PCR and type-specific HPV testing. Women with abnormal cytologic results had colposcopy or anoscopy-guided biopsy of visible lesions. Logistic regression analyses were performed and odds ratios (ORs) measured the association for concomitant anal and cervical HPV infection. Results One hundred and sixty-three (42%) HIV-infected women had detectable anal and cervical HPV infection compared with 12 (8%) of the HIV-uninfected women (P <0.001). HIV-infected women were more likely to have the same human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype in the anus and cervix than HIV-uninfected women (18 vs. 3%, P <0.001). This was true for both oncogenic (9 vs. 2%, P = 0.003) and nononcogenic (12 vs. 1%, P <0.001) HPV types. In multivariable analysis, the strongest factor associated with both oncogenic and nononcogenic concomitant HPV infection was being HIV-infected (OR = 4.6 and OR = 16.9, respectively). In multivariable analysis of HIV-infected women, CD4+ cell count of less than 200 was the strongest factor associated with concomitant oncogenic (OR = 4.2) and nononcogenic (OR = 16.5) HPV infection. Conclusion HIV-infected women, particularly those women with low CD4+ cell counts, may be good candidates for HPV screening and monitoring for both cervical and anal disease PMID:23803793

  8. Adding the Female Condom to the Public Health Agenda on Prevention of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Men and Women During Anal Intercourse

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Raymond A.; Mantell, Joanne E.; Stein, Zena A.

    2009-01-01

    Legal barriers to conducting public health research on methods of protection for anal intercourse were lifted in the United States in 2003 when the US Supreme Court invalidated all state antisodomy laws. Although research funding has been available for the development of rectal microbicides, the female condom, which has already been approved for vaginal use, has not been evaluated for anal use. Although there is no evidence that the female condom is safe for anal intercourse, it has already been taken up for off-label use by some men who have sex with men. This demonstrates the urgent need for more protection options for anal intercourse and, more immediately, the need to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the female condom for anal intercourse. PMID:19372513

  9. Sources and severity of self-reported food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Steenhagen, Elles; de Roos, Nicole M; Bouwman, Carolien A; van Laarhoven, Cees J H M; van Staveren, Wija A

    2006-09-01

    Data on food intolerance after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis are scarce. The aim of this study was to identify foods causing intolerance and to determine the nature and severity of reported symptoms. Patients from the Dutch Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis Association were mailed a survey on food intolerance; 105 (31% men) of 137 patients took part. They all reported intolerance to one or more foods. Common symptoms (scored from 0=absent to 10=severe), included diarrhea (mean score=5.8), fatigue (mean score=5.5), and thirst (mean score=4.6). Spicy foods, cabbage, and citrus fruits (or juice) were most likely to decrease stool consistency, increase stool frequency, or cause perianal irritation. Onions, cabbage, or leeks were reported by 28% of the patients to cause flatulence. The urge to defecate was stronger after a cooked meal (45% within (1/2) hour) than after sandwiches (15% within (1/2) hour). Foods reported to increase stool consistency were potato products, bread, and bananas. This study demonstrates that food intolerance is a common, albeit mild, problem after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Food and nutrition professionals should encourage patients to base their food choices on individual tolerance as long as no (patho-) physiological-based evidence to the contrary is available. PMID:16963353

  10. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  11. Anal human papillomavirus infection is associated with HIV acquisition in men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Chin-Hong, Peter V.; Husnik, Marla; Cranston, Ross D.; Colfax, Grant; Buchbinder, Susan; Da Costa, Maria; Darragh, Teresa; Jones, Dana; Judson, Franklyn; Koblin, Beryl; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted agent that causes anogenital cancer and precancer lesions that have an inflammatory infiltrate, may be friable and bleed. Our aim was to determine the association between anal HPV infection and HIV acquisition. Design A prospective cohort study. Methods We recruited 1409 HIV-negative men who have sex with men recruited from a community-based setting in Boston, Denver, New York and San Francisco. We used Cox proportional hazards regression modeling and assessed the independent association of HPV infection with the rate of acquisition of HIV infection. Results Of 1409 participants contributing 4375 person-years of follow-up, 51 HIV-seroconverted. The median number of HPV types in HPV-infected HIV-seroconverters was 2 (interquartile range 1–3) at the time of HIV seroconversion. After adjustment for sexual activity, substance use, occurrence of other sexually transmitted infections and demographic variables, there was evidence (P░=░0.002) for the effect of infection with at least two HPV types (hazard ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2–10.6) in HIV seroconversion. Conclusion Anal HPV infection is independently associated with HIV acquisition. Studies that incorporate high-resolution anoscopy to more accurately identify HPV-associated disease are needed to determine the relationship between HPV-associated disease and HIV seroconversion. PMID:19390418

  12. Advancement flap plasty for the closure of anal and recto-vaginal fistulas in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Penninckx, F; D'Hoore, A; Filez, L

    2001-01-01

    The management of anal fistulas in patients with IBD continues to be extremely challenging and, indeed, somewhat frustrating. Despite a global closure rate of about 75%, all patients should be informed about the risk of infection, early failure, eventual temporary disfunctioning stoma and the possibility of late recurrence (about 15%). Closure of a RVF in Crohn's disease should not be considered an easy undertaking, especially in patients with several Crohn localisations. The technique can be adapted to the local situation. Construction of a temporary stoma is not mandatory. However, stoma construction seems to be beneficial when extensive perianal or recto-vaginal dissection including eventual tissue interposition is required. Advancement flaps are an attractive surgical alternative for the management of all anal transsphincteric fistulas, also in Crohn's disease, because sphincter architecture and function are well preserved. Improved medical treatment and the changed approach from conservative to reparative surgery may well have resulted in a decreased need or at least in a delay of the need for a proctectomy. Although the surgical principles of advancement flap techniques are sound, these techniques have not been used for many decades. Skills needed, problematic approach, suboptimal quality of local tissues have contributed to its selective use and to the absence of prospective randomised studies. PMID:11475141

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Traslavina, Ryan P; Emanuelson, Karen; Affolter, Verena K; Gaffney, Patricia M; Vernau, William; Williams, Colette; Wu, Connie I-kuan; Sturges, Beverly K; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2013-12-01

    A 25-yr-old spayed female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) developed intermittent right pelvic limb lameness that persisted following conservative medical therapy. No obvious musculoskeletal lesions were noted on initial physical exam; however, spinal radiography was suspicious for possible intervertebral degenerative joint disease or discospondylitis. Despite prolonged medical therapy, the lameness progressed to minimal weight bearing and marked muscle atrophy of the right pelvic limb. Electromyography showed spontaneous activity in the muscles of right sciatic nerve distribution. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities in the right tibial and peroneal nerves were undetectable and markedly reduced, respectively. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a large, space-occupying mass on the right side of the sacrum and pelvis. Antemortem fine-needle aspiration of the mass and postmortem histopathology resulted in diagnosis of a high-grade squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac is very rare in domestic dogs and previously unreported in spotted hyenas. PMID:24450071

  14. A recurrent pattern of chromosomal aberrations and immunophenotypic appearance defines anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Heselmeyer, K.; du Manoir, S.; Blegen, H.; Friberg, B.; Svensson, C.; Schröck, E.; Veldman, T.; Shah, K.; Auer, G.; Ried, T.

    1997-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus are rare neoplasias that account for about 3% of large bowel tumours. Infections with human papillomaviruses are frequently detected in these cancers, suggesting that pathogenic pathways in anal carcinomas and in carcinomas of the uterine cervix are similar. Little is known regarding recurrent chromosomal aberrations in this subgroup of squamous cell carcinomas. We have applied comparative genomic hybridization to identify chromosomal gains and losses in 23 cases of anal carcinomas. A non-random copy number increase of chromosomes 17 and 19, and chromosome arm 3q was observed. Consistent losses were mapped to chromosome arms 4p, 11q, 13q and 18q. A majority of the tumours were aneuploid, and most of them showed increased proliferative activity as determined by staining for Ki-67 antigen. p53 expression was low or undetectable, and expression of p21/WAF-1 was increased in most tumours. Sixteen cancers were satisfactorily tested for the presence of HPV by consensus L1-primer polymerase chain reaction; nine were HPV positive, of which eight were positive for HPV 16. Images Figure 2 PMID:9374370

  15. KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA Status in Squamous Cell Anal Carcinoma (SCAC)

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Massimo; Freier, Eva; Tamberi, Stefano; Scarpi, Emanuela; Passardi, Alassandro; Zoli, Wainer; Ragazzini, Angela; Amadori, Dino; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2014-01-01

    Anti-EGFR therapy appears to be a potential treatment option for squamous cell anal carcinoma (SCAC). KRAS mutation is a rare event in SCAC, indicating the absence of the principal mechanism of resistance to this type of therapy. However, no information is available from the literature regarding the status of BRAF or PIK3CA in this cancer type. We analysed KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA status in SCAC patients in relation to the clinical-pathological characteristics of patients and to the presence of the human papilloma virus (HPV). One hundred and three patients were treated with the Nigro scheme for anal cancer from March 2001 to August 2012. Fifty patients were considered for the study as there was insufficient paraffin-embedded tumour tissue to perform molecular analysis the remaining 53. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded sections. KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA gene status and HPV genotype were evaluated by pyrosequencing. KRAS and BRAF genes were wild-type in all cases. Conversely, PIK3CA gene was found to be mutated in 11 (22%) cases. In particular, 8 mutations occurred in exon 9 and 3 in exon 20 of the PIK3CA gene. These findings suggest that SCAC could potentially respond to an anti-EGFR drug. PIK3CA mutation may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis in some cases of SCAC. PMID:24642661

  16. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied. PMID:24362899

  17. Automatic detection of motor unit innervation zones of the external anal sphincter by multichannel surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Khalil; Cescon, Corrado; Afsharipour, Babak; Merletti, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    A method to detect automatically the location of innervation zones (IZs) from 16-channel surface EMG (sEMG) recordings from the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle is presented in order to guide episiotomy during child delivery. The new algorithm (2DCorr) is applied to individual motor unit action potential (MUAP) templates and is based on bidimensional cross correlation between the interpolated image of each MUAP template and two images obtained by flipping upside-down (around a horizontal axis) and left-right (around a vertical axis) the original one. The method was tested on 640 simulated MUAP templates of the sphincter muscle and compared with previously developed algorithms (Radon Transform, RT; Template Match, TM). Experimental signals were detected from the EAS of 150 subjects using an intra-anal probe with 16 equally spaced circumferential electrodes. The results of the three algorithms were compared with the actual IZ location (simulated signal) and with IZ location provided by visual analysis (VA) (experimental signals). For simulated signals, the inter quartile error range (IQR) between the estimated and the actual locations of the IZ was 0.20, 0.23, 0.42, and 2.32 interelectrode distances (IED) for the VA, 2DCorr, RT and TM methods respectively. PMID:24948528

  18. [Anal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Signorelli, I; Andreoni, G M; Capelli, G; Gozzini, P A

    1983-06-01

    The Authors describe the clinical rectal incontinence according to etiology, physiology and pathologic anatomy. They report a case of such rectal incontinence followed to hemorroidectom and treated by transplantation of gracilis muscle according to Pikrell technique, comparing this approach with other current surgical procedures. PMID:6680848

  19. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  20. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... cream, if pain interferes with normal bowel movements Petroleum jelly Zinc oxide, 1% hydrocortisone cream, Preparation H, ... is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation ...

  1. Anal Fissure

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content ASCRS Patients Educational Resources Diseases and Conditions Patient Education Library Patient Success Stories Treatments and Screening Resources Find a Surgeon Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registries Helpful Links Physicians ...

  2. Anal Warts

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content ASCRS Patients Educational Resources Diseases and Conditions Patient Education Library Patient Success Stories Treatments and Screening Resources Find a Surgeon Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registries Helpful Links Physicians ...

  3. Curli modulates adherence of Escherichia coli O157 to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent studies have shown that Intimin and the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement-encoded proteins do not play a role in Escherichia coli O157 (O157) adherence to the bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSE) cells. Hence, to define factors that play a contributory role, we investi...

  4. Can photodynamic therapy be the preferred treatment option for anal intraepithelial neoplasia? Initial results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Hannah; Duthie, Graeme; Powell, John; Moghissi, Keyvan

    2014-03-01

    Anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a pre-malignant condition, which over time may progress to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. There is no standard treatment for AIN, but one of the therapeutic options available is photodynamic therapy (PDT). There are very few published studies of the efficacy of PDT, but it has been shown to produce downgrading of high-grade dysplasia in the anal region. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of PDT in the treatment of AIN. Fifteen patients who received anal PDT between 2004 and 2013 were identified; twelve of these had AIN, two had intra-epithelial adenocarcinoma and one had dysplasia with high-risk human papillomavirus. After a median follow-up of nineteen months, ten of these have had at least one follow-up with aceto-white staining. Six of these ten patients had a complete response to PDT, although three subsequently had some recurrence. Three further patients had a partial response to PDT. There were no major therapeutic complications. Our findings suggest that PDT is a safe and feasible treatment option for AIN, associated with reasonable response rates and relatively little morbidity. Further research into the efficacy of PDT for AIN is required. PMID:24280437

  5. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotyping among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in Xi’an, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Yang, Yu; Xin, Henan; Li, Mufei; Feng, Boxuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and its related diseases are relatively common in men who have sex with men (MSM), especially in those HIV positive. In China, molecular epidemiology of anal HPV infection among HIV-positive MSM has been sparsely studied. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-positive MSM in Xi’an, China between April and July 2014. Anal swabs were collected for HPV genotyping. Results A total of 195 HIV-positive MSM were included in this study. HPV genotyping showed that 99.0% (191/193) of participants were positive for at least one of the targeted 37 HPV genotypes. 183 (94.8%) of them were infected with multiple high-risk types and 154 (79.8%) of them with low-risk HPV types. HPV 18 was the most frequently identified high-risk type, followed by HPV 16 and HPV 51. As for low-risk types, HPV11, HPV 6 and HPV 81 were most commonly observe. High-risk HPV infection was found to be associated with the status of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the distribution of low-risk types was observed to be varied by CD4+ T cell level. Conclusion Almost all HIV-positive MSM were anal HPV infected in our study. It is highly recommended to consider regular active screening and preventive intervention of HPV infection among this high risk population. PMID:25923768

  6. S1 nerve is the most efficient nerve rootlet innervating the anal canal and rectum in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Luo, Pengbo; Zheng, Xianyou; Zhu, Xiaozhong; Wang, Lei; Chai, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic and somatic components participate in the defecation process in mammals, combining signals from the brainstem and forebrain. The innervation pattern involved in micturition in rats has been well studied, while defecation has been less studied. The aim of the present study was to identify the most important sensory and motor nerves of the anal canal and rectum involved in defecation. The amplitudes of evoked potential of the anal canal and rectum were higher when L6 and S1 ventral rootlets were stimulated, compared with the other segments (ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test, all P < 0.05). The S1 segment was more strongly cholera toxin subunit B conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (CB-HRP) positive compared with the other segments (ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test, P < 0.05). Ventral spinal rootlets of L6 and S1 mainly contributed to the pressure change in the anal canal and rectum when the ventral spinal rootlets from L5 to S3 were stimulated electrically. In conclusion, many afferent and efferent nerves innervate the anal canal and rectum and are involved in defecation, but the S1 nerve rootlet could be the most efficient one. These results could provide a basis for defecation reconstruction, especially for patients with spinal cord injuries. PMID:26260583

  7. Proteins facilitating Escherichia coli O157 persistence at the bovine recto-anal junction (RAJ) squamous epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157 (O157) persist at the recto-anal junction (RAJ) of gastrointestinal tracts (GIT) of cattle, the primary reservoirs of this human pathogen. We recently reported (Kudva et al., BMC Microbiol. 2012, 12: 103) that the previously identified and extensively documented principal O157...

  8. Management of rare, low anal anterior fistula exception to Goodsall's rule with Kṣārasūtra

    PubMed Central

    Shindhe, Pradeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (bhagandara) is a chronic inflammatory condition, a tubular structure opening in the ano-rectal canal at one end and surface of perineum/peri-anal skin on the other end. Typically, fistula has two openings, one internal and other external associated with chronic on/off pus discharge on/off pain, pruritis and sometimes passing of stool from external opening. This affects predominantly male patients due to various etiologies viz., repeated peri-anal infections, Crohn's disease, HIV infection, etc., Complex and atypical variety is encountered in very few patients, which require special treatment for cure. The condition poses difficulty for a surgeon in treating due to issues like patient hesitation, trouble in preparing kṣārasūtra, natural and routine infection with urine, stool etc., and dearth of surgical experts and technique. We would like to report a complex and atypical, single case of anterior, low anal fistula with tract reaching to median raphe of scrotum, which was managed successfully by limited application of kṣārasūtra. PMID:25538355

  9. Management of rare, low anal anterior fistula exception to Goodsall's rule with Kṣārasūtra.

    PubMed

    Shindhe, Pradeep S

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (bhagandara) is a chronic inflammatory condition, a tubular structure opening in the ano-rectal canal at one end and surface of perineum/peri-anal skin on the other end. Typically, fistula has two openings, one internal and other external associated with chronic on/off pus discharge on/off pain, pruritis and sometimes passing of stool from external opening. This affects predominantly male patients due to various etiologies viz., repeated peri-anal infections, Crohn's disease, HIV infection, etc., Complex and atypical variety is encountered in very few patients, which require special treatment for cure. The condition poses difficulty for a surgeon in treating due to issues like patient hesitation, trouble in preparing kṣārasūtra, natural and routine infection with urine, stool etc., and dearth of surgical experts and technique. We would like to report a complex and atypical, single case of anterior, low anal fistula with tract reaching to median raphe of scrotum, which was managed successfully by limited application of kṣārasūtra. PMID:25538355

  10. The frequency of herpes simplex virus changes in anal Pap smear and its association with squamous intraepithelial lesions in high-risk male patients.

    PubMed

    Greebon, Leslie J; Avery, Diane L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Valente, Philip T; Policarpio-Nicolas, Maria Luisa C

    2014-06-01

    While there are studies postulating a model of synergism between human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) in cervical carcinogenesis, the frequency of anal herpes as well as its association with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASILs) has been understudied in men. This study evaluates the frequency of HSV changes in anal Pap smears and its association with ASILs in a high-risk population. A computerized search for specimens associated with anal cytology that had positive findings of HSV was performed. The electronic medical records were examined for past diagnosis of herpes, HSV serology prior to or after cytology, and if the patient received treatment after cytologic diagnosis of HSV. Of the 470 anal Pap smears (Thin-prep) examined, seven had cellular changes consistent with HSV infection. All patients were asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive males with no prior HSV serology tests. Two patients had prior diagnoses of HSV infection. Cytologic abnormalities were identified in 86% ranging from atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance to high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Three patients were treated after the HSV cytologic diagnosis. The frequency of HSV changes in anal Pap smear is low (1.48%), but the presence of concomitant cytologic abnormalities is high (86%). While our findings suggest the possible role of HSV as a HPV co-factor in ASILs, larger studies are needed to support this. Identification of HSV infection on anal Pap smear is important for institution of patient treatment and subsequent reduction of transmission. PMID:24692314

  11. High Prevalence and Genotype Diversity of Anal HPV Infection among MSM in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Supindham, Taweewat; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Ruanpeng, Darin; Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee; Wongthanee, Antika

    2015-01-01

    Background HPV infection is common and may cause cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM). Anal HPV infection (HPV+) was found in 85% of HIV-positive (HIV+) and 59% of HIV-negative (HIV-) MSM in Bangkok, central Thailand. As little is known about HPV in this group in northern Thailand, we studied MSM subgroups comprised of gay men (GM), bisexual men (BM), and transgender women (TGW). Methods From July 2012 through January 2013, 85 (42.5% of 200) GM, 30 (15%) BM, and 85 (42.5%) TGW who practiced receptive anal intercourse were recruited after informed consent, followed by self-assisted computer interview, HIV testing, and anal swabs for HPV genotyping. Results Of 197 adequate specimens, the overall prevalence of any HPV was 157 (80%). Prevalence was 89% (76/85) in GM, 48% (14/29) in BM, and 81% (67/83) in TGW. The most common high-risk types were HPV16 (27% of 197), HPV58 (23%), and HPV51 (18%). Prevalence of high-risk types was 74% in 85 GM, 35% in 29 BM, and 71% in 83 TGW. Prevalence of any HPV type, or high-risk type, was 100% and 94%, respectively, among 48 HIV+ MSM, 70% and 54% among 120 HIV- MSM. Of the 197 specimens, 36% (70) had HPV types 16 and/or 18 in the bivalent vaccine, compared to 48% (95) with ≥1 of types 16/18/06/11 in the quadrivalent, 56% (111) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58 in the 7-valent, and 64% (126) for 16/18/31/33/45/52/58/06/11 in the 9-valent. HIV+, GM, and TGW were independently associated with HPV infection. Conclusions We found higher rates of both any HPV and high-risk types than previous studies. Among the heretofore unstudied TGW, their equivalent HPV rates were comparable to GM. Current and investigational HPV vaccines could substantially protect GM, BM, and TGW from the serious consequences of HPV infection especially among HIV + MSM. PMID:25932915

  12. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Staging and Treatment of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sveistrup, Joen; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Henriksen, Birthe Merete; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: This study was intended to determine the role of PET/CT in the staging of anal cancer as a supplement to three-dimensional transanal ultrasound (TAUS) and inguinal ultrasound (US). The impact of the PET/CT on the initial stage and treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US was assessed. Methods and Materials: Ninety-five (95) patients referred to our clinic between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had biopsy-proven primary squamous cell cancer of the anal canal. There were 65 females (68%) and 30 males (32%), and the median age was 58 years (range, 35-88 years). Six (6%) of the patients were HIV positive. All patients were staged with TAUS/US and PET/CT. Results: Twenty-eight (28) patients were diagnosed with suspicious perirectal node metastases. TAUS visualized 24 of these, whereas PET/CT detected 15. Suspicious inguinal nodes were visualized on either US or PET/CT in 41 patients. Seventeen (17) of these had confirmed malignant disease on biopsy, and 15 had confirmed benign disease. All 17 patients (100%) with malignant inguinal nodes were diagnosed by PET/CT, whereas US identified 16 (94%). Ten patients were diagnosed with suspicious inguinal nodes on PET/CT that had not been seen on US. One of these was malignant, three were benign, and six were not biopsied. PET/CT diagnosed eight metastatic sites, whereas TAUS/US diagnosed three. PET/CT discovered three of the five synchronous cancers seen in this study. PET/CT upstaged the disease in 14% of the cases and changed the treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US in 17%. Conclusion: PET/CT has great potential influence on the staging and treatment of anal cancer. TAUS is important in the staging of the primary tumor and N1-stage, whereas PET/CT seems necessary for the N2/3-stage, the M-stage and synchronous cancers.

  13. Role of Brachytherapy in the Boost Management of Anal Carcinoma With Node Involvement (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Ortholan, Cecile; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Teissier, Eric; Cowen, Didier; Salem, Nagi; Lemanski, Claire; Ellis, Steve; Resbeut, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients, with lymph node involvement, treated with split-course radiation therapy and receiving a boost through external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2005, among 229 patients with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma, a selected group of 99 patients, with lymph node involvement, was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 in 4 patients, T2 in 16 patients, T3 in 49 patients, T4 in 16 patients, and T unknown in 14 patients and as N1 in 67 patients and N2/N3 in 32 patients. Patients underwent a first course of EBRT (mean dose, 45.1 Gy) followed by a boost (mean dose, 18 Gy) using EBRT (50 patients) or BCT (49 patients). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Prognostic factors of cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR), cumulative rate of distant (including nodal) recurrence (CRDR), colostomy-free survival (CFS) rate, and overall survival (OS) rate were analyzed for the overall population and according to the nodal status classification. Results: The median follow-up was 71.5 months. The 5-year CRLR, CRDR, CFS rate, and OS rate were 21%, 19%, 63%, and 74.4%, respectively. In the overall population, the type of node involvement (N1 vs N2/N3) was the unique independent prognostic factor for CRLR. In N1 patients, by use of multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor for CRLR (4% for BCT vs 31% for EBRT; hazard ratio, 0.08; P=.042). No studied factors were significantly associated with CRDR, CFS, and OS. No difference with regard to boost technique and any other factor studied was observed in N2/N3 patients for any kind of recurrence. Conclusion: In anal cancer, even in the case of initial perirectal node invasion, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR, without an influence on OS, suggesting that N1 status should not be a contraindication to

  14. Anal human papillomavirus and HIV: An exploratory study among men who have sex with men in Moscow, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, AL; Zelaya, CE; Peryshkina, A; McGowan, I; Cranston, RD; Latkin, C; D’Souza, G; Galai, N; Mogilniy, V; Dzhigun, P; Kostetskaya, I; Beyrer, C

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) is prevalent among men who have sex with men (MSM), but has not been studied in the Russian Federation. HIV seropositive (N=58) and seronegative MSM (N=65) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study in Moscow, Russia, surveyed, and underwent anal cytology and anal HPV genotyping. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of infection with oncogenic HPV genotypes 16 and/or 18 (HPV 16/18). Some 39.5% of all MSM were infected with at least one anal HPV genotype, 31.7% with HPV16/18, and 11.7% had high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). HPV 16/18 was more prevalent among HIV seropositive than seronegative men (41.4% vs. 23.1%; p=0.03). In the final multivariable model, HIV infection was independently associated with HPV 16/18 (AOR:5.08; 95%CI:1.49–17.34), as were migration to/within Russia (AOR:3.18; 95%CI:1.00–10.09) and having 2–4 steady male sex partners in the last year (vs. ≤1 partner; AOR:6.99; 95%CI:1.94–25.24). History of jail/prison and use of incompatible lubricants were marginally associated with HPV 16/18 (p<0.10). Anal HPV 16/18 was prevalent among this sample of Moscow-based MSM and strongly associated with HIV infection. Correlations with mobility and detention in prison/jail, likely reflect behavioural risk and low healthcare access among marginalized populations that limits access to HIV/STI prevention options. Comprehensive prevention options are needed for MSM in Russia and may benefit from inclusion of young men in piloted HPV vaccination programs. PMID:25953132

  15. Risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection type 16 among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Alexandra L.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of anal cancer compared with the general population. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly HPV 16, is causally associated with anal cancer. However, risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection are poorly understood. We determined the prevalence and risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection in a population of HIV-positive MSM, most of whom were being treated with antiretroviral therapy. Design Cross-sectional data from the baseline visit of a 4-year prospective cohort study. Methods 348 HIV-positive MSM were recruited in San Francisco and received a detailed sexual behavior risk-factor questionnaire. An anal swab was used to collect specimens for HPV type-specific DNA testing using L1 HPV DNA PCR. We used log-binomial multivariable models to determine risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection. Results 92% of HIV-positive MSM had at least one anal HPV type, 80% had at least one oncogenic HPV type and 42% had HPV 16. Non-Hispanic white race and higher level of education were associated with a decreased risk of HPV 16 infection. A higher number of total male partners was associated with HPV 16 (RR: 1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4, p=0.01) for 201–1000 partners compared with 1–200. Injection drug use (IDU) was independently associated with anal HPV 16 infection (RR: 1.5, 95%CI 1.2–1.9, p=0.003). Conclusions The prevalence of anal HPV infection, including HPV 16, is high in HIV-positive MSM. HIV-positive MSM should be counseled about the risk associated with increased partners and IDU. PMID:23614994

  16. Analytic and Clinical Performance of cobas HPV Testing in Anal Specimens from HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Chen, Jie; Lorey, Thomas S.; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Boyle, Sean; Sadorra, Mark; Tang, Scott Dahai; Darragh, Teresa M.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common, and the incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). To evaluate the performance of HPV assays in anal samples, we compared the cobas HPV test (cobas) to the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping assay (LA) and cytology in HIV-infected MSM. Cytology and cobas and LA HPV testing were conducted for 342 subjects. We calculated agreement between the HPV assays and the clinical performance of HPV testing and HPV genotyping alone and in combination with anal cytology. We observed high agreement between cobas and LA, with cobas more likely than LA to show positive results for HPV16, HPV18, and other carcinogenic types. Specimens testing positive in cobas but not in LA were more likely to be positive for other markers of HPV-related disease compared to those testing negative in both assays, suggesting that at least some of these were true positives for HPV. cobas and LA showed high sensitivities but low specificities for the detection of anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (AIN2/3) in this population (100% sensitivity and 26% specificity for cobas versus 98.4% sensitivity and 28.9% specificity for LA). A combination of anal cytology and HPV genotyping provided the highest accuracy for detecting anal precancer. A higher HPV load was associated with a higher risk of AIN2/3 with HPV16 (Ptrend < 0.001), HPV18 (Ptrend = 0.07), and other carcinogenic types (Ptrend < 0.001). We demonstrate that cobas can be used for HPV detection in anal cytology specimens. Additional tests are necessary to identify men at the highest risk of anal cancer among those infected with high-risk HPV. PMID:24899025

  17. A six-year experience with anal cytology in women with HPV in the lower genital tract: utility, limitations, and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, L H; Carballo, P; Lorenzo, M C Cabral; García, A; Suzuki, V; Tatti, S; Vighi, S; Díaz, L B

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed the utility and limitations of anal cytology as a screening method for women infected with human papilloma virus (HPV) in the lower genital tract. Furthermore, this study aimed to establish risk factors for pathological anal cytology/biopsy findings, the prevalence of anatomopathological lesions associated with positive anal brushings, and the frequency of concomitant lesions of the lower genital tract. A cross-sectional, retrospective, descriptive study in 207 women with HPV-associated lesions of the lower genital tract and 25 women with immunosuppression was carried out. Anal cytology, high resolution anoscopy, and biopsy of suspicious lesions were performed. In total, 232 anal brushings were performed: 184 (79.3%) were negative, 24 (10.34%) showed atypical squamous cells of undeterminated significance, 18 (7.7%) showed low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 6 (2.6%) showed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Cytohistological correlation was obtained for 70 cases. The sensitivity of anal cytology in detecting intraepithelial lesions was 70%, whereas the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of the method for detecting high-grade lesions (84%) was higher, than that for detecting low-grade lesions (66%). The most frequently associated pathology was vulvar lesion. It is important to perform anal brushings in women who have had lower genital tract biopsies for HPV-associated lesions due to the high prevalence of anal lesions in such patients. Anal cytology is useful for detecting high-grade lesions but the sensitivity for detecting low-grade lesions is low. It is of the utmost importance to perform high-resolution anoscopy and biopsy in women with suspicious lesions in order to confirm the pathology. PMID:24166879

  18. Traditional Chinese surgical treatment for anal fistulae with secondary tracks and abscess

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Lu, Jin-Gen; Cao, Yong-Qing; Yao, Yi-Bo; Guo, Xiu-Tian; Yin, Hao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese surgical treatment for anal fistulae with secondary tracks and abscess. METHODS: Sixty patients with intersphincteric or transsphincteric anal fistulas with secondary tracks and abscess were randomly divided into study group [suture dragging combined with pad compression (SDPC)] and control group [fistulotomy (FSLT)]. In the SDPC group, the internal opening was excised and incisions at external openings were made for drainage. Silk sutures were put through every two incisions and knotted in loose state. The suture dragging process started from the first day after surgery and the pad compression process started when all sutures were removed as wound tissue became fresh and without discharge. In the FSLT group, the internal opening and all tracts were laid open and cleaned by normal saline postoperatively till all wounds healed. The time of healing, postoperative pain score (visual analogue scale), recurrence rate, patient satisfaction, incontinence evaluation and anorectal manometry before and after the treatment were examined. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, gender and fistulae type. The time of healing was significantly shorter (24.33 d in SDPC vs 31.57 d in FSLT, P < 0.01) and the patient satisfaction score at 1 mo postoperative follow-up was significantly higher in the SDPC group (4.07 in SDPC vs 3.37 in FSLT, P < 0.05). The mean maximal postoperative pain scores were 5.83 ± 2.5 in SDPC vs 6.37 ± 2.33 in FSLT and the recurrence rates were 3.33 in SDPC vs 0 in FSLT. None of the patients in the two groups experienced liquid and solid fecal incontinence and lifestyle alteration postoperatively. The Wexner score after treatment of intersphincter fistulae were 0.17 ± 0.41 in SDPC vs 0.40 ± 0.89 in FSLT and trans-sphincter fistulae were 0.13 ± 0.45 in SDPC vs 0.56 ± 1.35 in FSLT. The maximal squeeze pressure and resting pressure declined after

  19. Surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis: Ileorectal vs ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Scoglio, Daniele; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Fichera, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the current gold standard in the surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) refractory to medical management. A procedure of significant magnitude carries its own risks including anastomotic failure, pelvic sepsis and a low rate of neoplastic degeneration overtime. Recent studies have shown that total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) has been associated with good long-term functional results in a selected group of UC patients amenable to undergo a strict surveillance for the relatively high risk of cancer in the rectum. This manuscript will review and compare the most recent literature on IRA and IPAA as it pertains to postoperative morbidity and mortality, failure rates, functional outcomes and cancer risk. PMID:25309058

  20. Stressful events, avoidance coping, and unprotected anal sex among gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Martin, James I; Alessi, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    This study examined associations among stressful life events, avoidance coping, and unprotected anal sex (UAS) in a convenience sample of 297 men obtained through the Internet and who either reported having sex with men or self-identified as gay or bisexual. Participants completed an Internet-hosted self-administered questionnaire that included measures of victimization experiences and other stressful life events, and avoidance coping. More than half of the sample reported engaging in UAS during the previous 6 months. Victimization predicted UAS regardless of partner type; victimization, HIV-positive serostatus, and avoidance coping predicted UAS with nonprimary partners. The findings provide evidence that American gay and bisexual men may experience a variety of stressful life events, including a surprising amount of victimization, and that at least some episodes of UAS may be associated with attempts to cope with distress associated with such events. PMID:20636934

  1. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy ileal pouch anal anastomosis: How I do it?

    PubMed Central

    Madnani, Manish A; Mistry, Jitendra H; Soni, Harshad N; Shah, Atul J; Patel, Kantilal S; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for ulcerative colitis is a major and complex colorectal surgery. Laparoscopy benefits these patients with better outcomes in context of cosmesis, pain and early recovery, especially in young patients. For surgeons, it is a better tool for improving vision and magnification in deep cavities. This is not the simple extension of the laparoscopy training. Starting from preoperative preparation to post operative care there are wide variations as compared to open surgery. There are also many variations in steps of laparoscopic surgery. It involves left colon, right colon and rectal mobilisation, low division of rectum, pouch creation and anastomosis of pouch to rectum. Over many years after standardisation of this technique, it takes same operative time as open surgery at our centre. So we present our standardized technique of laparoscopic assisted restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). PMID:26195886

  2. Plasmablastic Lymphoma of the Anal Canal in an HIV-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Lucia Antunes; Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; Vidal, Débora Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Celso Estevão; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani; Oria, Gabriel Peixoto Castro; de França Silva, Monique; de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Plasmablastic lymphoma Symptoms: Fecal incontinence Medication: Chemotherapy Clinical Procedure: Anal canal biopsy Specialty: Internal medicine • Oncology • Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The advent of antiretroviral therapy increased the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and, consequently, the morbidity and mortality due to neoplasms. Plasmablastic lymphoma is one such neoplasm that generally presents with involvement of the oral cavity; cases of extra-oral involvement are rare. Case Report: We report a case of plasmablastic lymphoma in a 46-year-old woman for whom the initial clinical manifestation was a painless perineal tumor accompanied by fecal incontinence. Conclusions: The possibility of this neoplasm should be considered in patients with HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) because its early diagnosis is essential so that the start of the treatment is not delayed. PMID:25479715

  3. Intentional Condomless Anal Intercourse Among Latino MSM Who Meet Sexual Partners on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Balán, Iván C.; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ventuneac, Ana; Remien, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Data on intentional condomless anal intercourse in risky contexts, also known as “barebacking,” among ethnic minority MSM, whose rates of HIV infection continue to rise, is extremely limited. In this study, thirty-one Latino MSM who seek barebacking partners via the Internet underwent in-depth interviews about bareback sex and its association to pleasure, substance use, HIV concerns, and cultural identity. Participants reported engaging in bareback sex due to the physical and emotional pleasure they experience. They expressed concern about HIV infection and took steps to reduce risk of infection. While a majority of participants reported using alcohol or drugs in the context of bareback sex, substance use did not appear to propel the behavior. Crystal methamphetamine use, prevalent only among our HIV-positive participants, was related to very high HIV-risk behavior. In this sample, culture did not seem to play a large role in barebacking. PMID:19243228

  4. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects

    PubMed Central

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Farrey, Karl J.; Rash, Carla C.; Heimann, Ruth; Chmura, Steven J. . E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade {>=}3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose.

  6. Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Paul; Cooper, Rachel; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To report the results of patients with early-stage anal cancer treated using a low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2006, 21 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks) and concurrent chemotherapy (bolus mitomycin-C 12 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 to a maximum of 20 mg followed by infusion 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h on Days 1-4). Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent small-volume, involved-field radiotherapy and 3 were treated with anteroposterior-posteroanterior parallel-opposed pelvic fields. Of the 21 patients, 17 had had lesions that were excised with close (<1 mm) or involved margins, 1 had had microinvasive disease on biopsy, and 3 had had macroscopic tumor <2 cm in diameter (T1). All were considered to have Stage N0 disease radiologically. Results: After a median follow-up of 42 months, only 1 patient (4.7%) had experienced local recurrence and has remained disease free after local excision. No distant recurrences or deaths occurred. Only 1 patient could not complete treatment (because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (9.5%). No significant late toxicity was identified. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that for patients with anal carcinoma who have residual microscopic or very-small-volume disease, a policy of low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy produces excellent local control and disease-free survival, with low rates of acute and late toxicity.

  7. Prospective evaluation of a new device for the treatment of anal fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Ratto, Carlo; Litta, Francesco; Donisi, Lorenza; Parello, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of the implantation of a new device for the treatment of anal fistulas. The short-term clinical efficacy was also assessed. METHODS: This study took place at a tertiary care university hospital. Patients with a complex anal fistula of cryptoglandular origin were enrolled in the study and were treated with insertion of the new device. All patients were evaluated by clinical and physical examination, including an endoanal ultrasound at the baseline, and then at the 2 wk and 1, 2, 3 and 6-mo follow-up visits. RESULTS: Morbidity, continence status, and success rate were the main outcome measures. Ten patients underwent the placement of the new device. The fistulas were transphincteric in eight patients and extrasphincteric in the remaining two. The median duration of the surgical procedure was 34.5 (range, 27-42) min. Neither intra- nor postoperative complications occurred, and all patients were discharged the day after the procedure. At the 6-mo follow-up evaluation, the final success rate was 70%. Three failures were registered: a device expulsion (on the 10th postoperative day), the persistence of inflammatory tissue around the fistula tract (at the 2-mo follow up), and the persistence of serum discharge (at the 6-mo follow up). No patient experienced any change incontinence, as assessed by the Cleveland Clinic Fecal Incontinence score. CONCLUSION: The technical procedure is simple and has low risk of perioperative morbidity. The pre- and post-operative continence status did not change in any of the patients. The initial results at the 6-mo follow up seem to be promising. However, a longer follow-up period and a larger sample size are needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:27570429

  8. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis is a frequent finding in biopsies from ileal pouch-anal anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, David F; Walsh, Joanna C; Tyler, Andrea D; Ben-Bassat, Ofer; Silverberg, Mark S; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Following restorative proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, the small bowel mucosa undergoes several specific histologic adaptions, which may be unrelated to the underlying disease or symptoms of pouchitis. An increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) has not been described as part of this spectrum. Mucosal biopsies of the ileal pouch and afferent limb of 230 patients (mean age: 45.7y [18.3-74.7], gender [female/male]: 117/113) with a functioning ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (mean time since ileostomy closure: 10.8months) and associated clinically annotated outcome data were assessed for IELs/100 enterocytes. Forty-two patients (18.3%) showed an increase in IELs (≥20 IELs/100 enterocytes [range 20-39]), in pouch and/or afferent limb biopsies. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis was more commonly observed in afferent limb compared to pouch biopsies (18.8% vs 8.3%; P = .42) and in familial adenomatous polyposis compared to ulcerative colitis patients (16% vs 8%; P = 0.36), but neither difference reached statistical significance. No cases with increased IELs displayed severe villous blunting. Increased IELs were not significantly associated with age, sex, ethnicity, smoking history, time since ileostomy, use of antibiotics, biologic agents, anti-diarrheal agents or probiotics, C-reactive protein levels or differential white cell count. None of the 42 patients with increased IELs had positive celiac serology (anti-human tissue transglutaminase IgA [ELISA] with corresponding total serum IgA). Intraepithelial lymphocytosis in pouch biopsies may represent a subclinical response to an altered bacterial microenvironment. Pathologists should be aware that intraepithelial lymphocytosis is part of the spectrum of changes in pouch biopsies, and only rarely is due to celiac disease. PMID:27063473

  9. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  10. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT rectal and anal canal plans generated using an anterior dose avoidance structure

    SciTech Connect

    Leicher, Brian; Day, Ellen; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    To describe a dosimetric method using an anterior dose avoidance structure (ADAS) during the treatment planning process for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with anal canal and rectal carcinomas. A total of 20 patients were planned on the Elekta/CMS XiO treatment planning system, version 4.5.1 (Maryland Heights MO) with a superposition algorithm. For each patient, 2 plans were created: one employing an ADAS (ADAS plan) and the other replanned without an ADAS (non-ADAS plan). The ADAS was defined to occupy the volume between the inguinal nodes and primary target providing a single organ at risk that is completely outside of the target volume. Each plan used the same beam parameters and was analyzed by comparing target coverage, overall plan dose conformity using a conformity number (CN) equation, bowel dose-volume histograms, and the number of segments, daily treatment duration, and global maximum dose. The ADAS and non-ADAS plans were equivalent in target coverage, mean global maximum dose, and sparing of small bowel in low-dose regions (5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy). The mean difference between the CN value for the non-ADAS plans and ADAS plans was 0.04 ± 0.03 (p < 0.001). The mean difference in the number of segments was 15.7 ± 12.7 (p < 0.001) in favor of ADAS plans. The ADAS plan delivery time was shorter by 2.0 ± 1.5 minutes (p < 0.001) than the non-ADAS one. The ADAS has proven to be a powerful tool when planning rectal and anal canal IMRT cases with critical structures partially contained inside the target volume.

  11. Mitomycin-C- or Cisplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Anal Canal Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Olivatto, Luis O.; Cabral, Vania; Rosa, Arthur; Bezerra, Marcos; Santarem, Erick; Fassizoli, Ana; Castro, Leonaldson; Simoes, Jose Humberto; Small, Isabele A.; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of concurrent radiotherapy with mitomycin-C (MMC)-based or cisplatin (CP)-based combinations in a cohort of patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 2000, 179 patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma were treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer with two cycles of chemotherapy during Weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. 5-Fluorouracil (750 mg/m{sup 2} 120-hour infusion or 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 96-hour infusion) plus CP (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of each cycle or MMC (10-15 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of Cycle 1 was administered concurrent with radiotherapy (total dose, 55-59.4 Gy). Of the 179 patients, 60% were included from a randomized trial initiated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer in 1991 that compared concurrent chemoradiotherapy with MMC vs. CP. Results: The median follow-up for the whole chemoradiotherapy group was 83 months. The median patient age was 58 years, 57% had Stage T3-T4 tumors, and 35% had N-positive disease. The 5-year cumulative colostomy rate was not significantly different between the CP group (22%) and MMC group (29%; p = .28). The actuarial 10-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate for the CP group was 54% and 49% and for the MMC group was 52% and 53%, respectively (p = .32 and p = .92, respectively). On multivariate analysis, male gender (p = .042) and advanced Stage T3-T4 disease (p <.0001) were statistically significant for worse disease-free survival. Stage T3-T4 (p = .039) and N+ (p = .039) disease remained independently significant for overall survival. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up has confirmed the good results of chemoradiotherapy with CP plus 5-fluorouracil, which seem to provide results equivalent to those with MMC plus 5-fluorouracil.

  12. Twenty-Five-Year Experience With Radical Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M.; Link, Emma; Leong, Trevor; Heriot, Alexander; Vazquez, Melisa; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Foo, Marcus; Lee, Mark T.; Lynch, Craig A.; Mackay, John; Michael, Michael; Tran, Phillip; Ngan, Samuel Y.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, patterns of failure, and late toxicity in patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT) for anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anus treated by CRT with curative intent between February 1983 and March 2008 were identified through the institutional database. Chart review and telephone follow-up were undertaken to collect demographic data and outcome. Results: Two hundred eighty-four patients (34% male; median age 62 years) were identified. The stages at diagnosis were 23% Stage I, 48% Stage II, 10% Stage IIIA, and 18% Stage IIIB. The median radiotherapy dose to the primary site was 54 Gy. A complete clinical response to CRT was achieved in 89% of patients. With a median follow-up time of 5.3 years, the 5-year rates of locoregional control, distant control, colostomy-free survival, and overall survival were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78-88), 92% (95% CI, 89-96), 73% (95% CI, 68-79), and 82% (95% CI, 77-87), respectively. Higher T stage and male sex predicted for locoregional failure, and higher N stage predicted for distant metastases. Locoregional failure occurred most commonly at the primary site. Omission of elective inguinal irradiation resulted in inguinal failure rates of 1.9% and 12.5% in T1N0 and T2N0 patients, respectively. Pelvic nodal failures were very uncommon. Late vaginal and bone toxicity was observed in addition to gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: CRT is a highly effective approach in anal cancer. However, subgroups of patients fare relatively poorly, and novel approaches are needed. Elective inguinal irradiation can be safely omitted only in patients with Stage I disease. Vaginal toxicity and insufficiency fractures of the hip and pelvis are important late effects that require prospective evaluation.

  13. Radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer: Institutional experience at a large radiation oncology center in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Moisés; Ovalle, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Aim In this article the aim is to provide a concise narrative review and inform the institutional experience at a referral center in Chile with the use of radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer. Background Cancer of the anus and anal canal is mainly a loco-regional disease. For years the standard of care has been concomitant radio-chemotherapy, which permits organ preservation and better local control than alternative surgical procedures. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis of 44 patients treated between 2002 and 2010 was performed. Local recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. Relevant groups where compared with the log-rank test and univariate analysis were done with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Median follow-up of the cohort was 56 months, with a minimum follow-up of at least 24 months. There was a significant difference between clinical stages in disease free survival (log-rank trend p < 0.001), and a significant difference in overall survival (OS) when comparing clinical stages that were grouped in stage I–IIIa and IIIB (log-rank p = 0.001). On univariate analysis, age older than 60, having received full treatment and dose above 45 Gy were all significantly related to OS (p < 0.05). An overall survival of 45% and disease free survival of 45% at 5 years were found in our series. Conclusions Our findings show that results at the Instituto de Radiomedicina in Chile are comparable to published literature. Dismal results in stage IIIb cases indicate much work remains in therapies to achieve loco-regional control in locally advanced cases. PMID:25061522

  14. Evaluation of the hybrid capture 2 assay for detecting anal high-grade dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Stephen E; Lowe, Brian; Rothmann, Thomas; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-10-01

    Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Test® is FDA approved and is a proven aid in detecting HPV infections of the cervix and as an aid in diagnosing, with cytology, cervical disease. A prospective feasibility study was conducted to determine if HC2 testing has utility when screening for high-grade anal dysplasia (AIN2+). We enrolled 298 patients (45% HIV+) who had AIN2+ screening with cytology, histology and HC2 testing for two specimens: a swab into liquid-based cytology medium and either a swab or a brush collection in specimen transport medium (STM). High-resolution anoscopy was performed on all patients with biopsy of AIN2+ suspicious lesions. Cytology was benign (42%), atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (30%), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (18%), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (1%), ASCUS possibly high-grade dysplasia (1.7%) and nondiagnostic (7%) and 36% had AIN2+ histology. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting AIN2+ histology for any abnormal cytology were 77 and 52%, whereas HC2 sensitivity and specificity were 91 and 40% (p = 0.005 for sensitivity), respectively. There was no significant difference in HC2 sensitivity or specificity between brush and swab or STM and residual cells from cytology. AIN2+ was found in 20% of patients with benign cytology. Only nine AIN2+ specimens were HC2-. This prospective study indicates that HC2 may be useful when screening for anal dysplasia; however, a larger study is recommended. PMID:22234750

  15. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandra; Gabriella Dona, Maria; Ronchetti, Livia; Giglio, Amalia; Moretto, Domenico; Colafigli, Manuela; Laquintana, Valentina; Frasca, Mirko; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Antinori, Andrea; Cristaudo, Antonio; Giuliani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 85% of anal cancers. Recently, anal cancer incidence has been increasing, particularly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytology may be a useful tool for the detection of anal precancerous lesions. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities among HIV-infected and -uninfected MSM. Materials and Methods MSM ≥18-year-old attending an STI clinic in Rome (Italy) were enrolled. Anal cytologic samples were collected in PreservCyt (Hologic) using a Dacron swab. The Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) was used for the detection and genotyping of 37 mucosal HPV types. Liquid-based cytological slides were obtained using a ThinPrep2000 processor (Hologic). The morphology of the anal pap-test was classified following the Bethesda 2001 guidelines. Results We enrolled 180 HIV-infected (median age 41 years, IQR 33–47) and 438 HIV-uninfected MSM (median age 32 years, IQR: 27–39). Most of the individuals were Caucasian (92.2% and 97.0%, respectively). HPV prevalence, both overall (93.3% vs 72.4%, p<.001) and by high-risk (HR) HPV types (80.5% vs 56.0%, p<.001), was significantly higher among HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected individuals. HPV-multiple infections were evidenced in 48.2% of the HIV-uninfected and 76.1% of the HIV-infected MSM (p<.001). HPV16 was the most prevalent genotype in both groups (23.3% in HIV-positive and 17.6% in HIV-negative MSM). HPV6 and 84 were the most frequent low-risk types in both cohorts. Anal cytologic abnormalities were found in a significantly higher proportion of HIV-infected MSM (46.1% vs 27.9%, p<.001). H-SILs (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) were exclusively observed among the HIV-infected individuals, although at a low prevalence (1.2%). Conclusions A high prevalence of anal HPV infection and cytologic abnormalities was evidenced in both populations. Nonetheless, HIV-infected MSM showed a

  16. Comparable performance of conventional and liquid-based cytology in diagnosing anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected and -uninfected Thai men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Lim, Cherry; Changnam, Taweesak; Kerr, Stephen J.; Deesua, Amornrat; Hongchookiat, Piranun; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Numto, Saranya; Barisri, Jiranuwat; Phanuphak, Praphan; Keelawat, Somboon; Sohn, Annette H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Triratanachat, Surang

    2013-01-01

    Background Anal cytology has increasingly been used to screen for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) among men who have sex with men (MSM) at increased risk for anal cancer. Use of liquid-based cytology has been reported to reduce fecal and bacterial contamination and air-drying artifact compared to conventional cytology. Costs associated with liquid-based cytology, however, may limit its use in resource-limited settings. Methods Anal swab samples were collected from MSM participants and used to prepare conventional and liquid-based cytology slides. Abnormal conventional cytology results triggered referral for high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and biopsy. Agreement between the two cytology techniques and the positive predictive value (PPV) ratios of histology confirmed AIN were calculated. Results Among 173 MSM, abnormal anal cytology was identified in 46.2% of conventional and 32.4% of liquid-based slides. The results agreed in 62.4% of cases with a kappa (κ) value of 0.49 (P <0.001). HIV-infected MSM had a 3.6-fold increased odds of having discordant anal cytology results (95% CI 1.6–7.8, p=0.001) compared with HIV-uninfected MSM. Histological AIN 2 and 3 were identified in 20 MSM. The PPV ratios and 95% CI indicated no difference between the two techniques. Conclusions Conventional anal cytology may be a preferred option for resource-limited settings given comparable performances to liquid-based cytology for the detection of AIN, although the agreement between the two techniques was lower among HIV-infected MSM. Due to high prevalence of abnormal anal cytology and AIN, health systems should prepare adequate infrastructure for HRA services and AIN treatment. PMID:23535296

  17. Anal HPV/HIV co-infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men: a cross-sectional survey from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Li, Mufei; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Xiang; Feng, Boxuan; Xin, Henan; Li, Zhen; Jin, Qi; Gao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is linked to anal warts and anal cancer, is common among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially among those HIV positives. MSM aged 18 years or older were recruited from mainland China. Blood and anal cytologic samples were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. A total of 889 eligible participations were included. The genotyping results of HPV were available for 822 participants (92.46%), 65.32% of which were positive for the targeted 37 HPV types. Prevalence of infection with any type of HPV was higher among HIV-infected participants (82.69%) as compared to HIV-uninfected participants (62.81%) (p < 0.01). HPV06 (15.45%), HPV18(13.50%), HPV16 (11.44%), and HPV11 (10.71%) were the most frequent types identified in the study population. Ever had paid sex with man was found to be independent predictor for HPV positivity with an adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 2.34 (1.16–4.74). Anal HPV positivity was observed to be independently associated with HIV infection with an adjusted OR of 3.03 (1.76–5.21) in the study population. In conclusion, the prevalence of anal HPV infection was observed to be common among MSM from mainland China, and it was significantly associated with the status of HIV infection. PMID:26892938

  18. Anal HPV/HIV co-infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men: a cross-sectional survey from three cities in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangwei; Li, Mufei; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Xiang; Feng, Boxuan; Xin, Henan; Li, Zhen; Jin, Qi; Gao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which is linked to anal warts and anal cancer, is common among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially among those HIV positives. MSM aged 18 years or older were recruited from mainland China. Blood and anal cytologic samples were collected for HIV-1 serological test and HPV genotyping. A total of 889 eligible participations were included. The genotyping results of HPV were available for 822 participants (92.46%), 65.32% of which were positive for the targeted 37 HPV types. Prevalence of infection with any type of HPV was higher among HIV-infected participants (82.69%) as compared to HIV-uninfected participants (62.81%) (p < 0.01). HPV06 (15.45%), HPV18(13.50%), HPV16 (11.44%), and HPV11 (10.71%) were the most frequent types identified in the study population. Ever had paid sex with man was found to be independent predictor for HPV positivity with an adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 2.34 (1.16-4.74). Anal HPV positivity was observed to be independently associated with HIV infection with an adjusted OR of 3.03 (1.76-5.21) in the study population. In conclusion, the prevalence of anal HPV infection was observed to be common among MSM from mainland China, and it was significantly associated with the status of HIV infection. PMID:26892938

  19. Cylindroma-like basaloid anal cancer presenting as a large pelvic mass in a patient with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sugong; Tan, Sanda A.; Shon, Wonwoo; Shaw, Christiana M.

    2015-01-01

    Basaloid cancers of the lower gastrointestinal tract are rare. The lack of mucosal involvement of this type of tumor is uncharacteristic and, to our knowledge, has not been described. In addition, the cylindroma-like appearance of this cancer has only a few examples in the literature. A 51-year-old male presented to us with a history of ulcerative colitis (UC) and obstruction of the anal canal. Imaging and colonoscopy revealed an entirely extraluminal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy yielded a diagnosis of cylindroma-like basaloid carcinoma of the anal region. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation resulted in stable disease by RECIST criteria. Surgical planning ensued, which led to R0 resection of the tumor, total colectomy and end ileostomy for his UC, and reconstruction of the perineal defect with a rectus myocutaneous flap. Surveillance at 6 months demonstrated no evidence of disease. PMID:26224891

  20. Ab-initio calculations and phase diagram assessments of An-Al systems (An = U, Np, Pu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedmidubský, D.; Konings, R. J. M.; Souček, P.

    2010-02-01

    The enthalpies of formation of binary intermetallic compounds AnAl n(n=2,3,4, An=U,Np,Pu) were assessed from first principle calculations of total energies performed using full potential APW + lo technique within density functional theory ( WIEN2k). The substantial contribution to entropies, S298°, arising from lattice vibrations was calculated by direct method within harmonic crystal approximation ( Phonon software + VASP for obtaining Hellmann-Feynman forces). The electronic heat capacity and the corresponding contribution to entropy were estimated from the density of states at Fermi level obtained from electronic structure calculations. The phase diagrams of the relevant systems An-Al were calculated based on the thermodynamic data assessed from ab-initio calculations, known equilibrium and calorimetry data by employing the FactSage program.

  1. Effects of Referral Bias on Estimates of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression and Regression Rates in a 3-State Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Mathews, William Christopher; Cachay, Edward Rafael; Agmas, Wollelaw; Jackson, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The study aim is to compare anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) progression and regression rates in a cytology inception cohort to estimates based on the subcohort referred for ≥1 high-resolution anoscopies (HRAs).A cytology-based retrospective cohort was assembled including the anal cytology histories and invasive anal cancer (IAC) outcomes of all HIV-infected adults under care between 2001 and 2012. A 3-state Markov model (400, and to have HSIL at baseline and thereafter. They also had more anal cytology examinations (median 6 vs 3) and longer follow-up (median 5.5 vs 3.6 years). State transition rates were overestimated in the HRA subcohort relative to inception cohort, but the degree of discordance varied by transition: for

  2. A comparative analysis of homosexual behaviors, sex role preferences, and anal sex proclivities in Latino and non-Latino men.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, William L

    2009-10-01

    Machismo prescribes that homosexual encounters among Latino men are conducted along highly gendered lines: men tend to be anally insertive or receptive over the lifecourse, but not both. Some have argued that Latino men have more lifecourse homosexual behaviors in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups. This is often due to the perception that Latin America has quasi-institutionalized homosexuality, which sharply contrasts it with the United States. Although scholars suggest that sex role preferences and greater likelihoods for homosexual behaviors exist among Latino men in the United States, limited empirical data validate these claims. Latino/non-Latino differences in male homosexual behaviors and sex role preferences were analyzed by using the 2002 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representative, probability sample of 4,928 men. Findings revealed that non-Mexican Latino, but not Mexican, men had increased likelihoods of ever having anal sex than non-Latino Whites and oral sex than non-Latino Blacks. These relationships remained after controlling for age, education, and foreign birth. Latino men preferred insertive or receptive sex in comparison to non-Latino Blacks and Whites, but this difference disappeared after education was controlled. In full and reduced models, Mexican men tended to be orifice-specific (oral or anal), while non-Mexican Latinos were more oriented to both oral and anal sex. Controlling for other factors, all Latinos were more likely than non-Latino Blacks and Whites to refuse to answer male homosexual behavior questions. The implications of race/ethnicity are discussed for homosexual behavior patterns among U.S. men. PMID:17968645

  3. 2D and 3D endoanal and translabial ultrasound measurement variation in normal postpartum measurements of the anal sphincter complex

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women may experience anal sphincter anatomy changes after vaginal or Cesarean delivery. Therefore, accurate and acceptable imaging options to evaluate the anal sphincter complex (ASC) are needed. ASC measurements may differ between translabial (TL-US) and endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) imaging and between 2D and 3D ultrasound. The objective of this analysis was to describe measurement variation between these modalities. Methods Primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US imaging of the ASC six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). A subset of women also underwent EA-US measurements. Measurements included the internal anal sphincter (IAS) thickness at proximal, mid, and distal levels and the external anal sphincter (EAS) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions as well as bilateral thickness of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 433 women presented for US: 423 had TL-US and 64 had both TL-US and EA-US of the ASC. All IAS measurements were significantly thicker on TL-US than EA-US (all p<0.01), while EAS measurements were significantly thicker on EA-US (p<0.01). PVM measurements with 3D or 2D imaging were similar (p>0.20). On both TL-US and EA-US, there were multiple sites where significant asymmetry existed in left versus right measurements. Conclusion The ultrasound modality used to image the ASC introduces small but significant changes in measurements, and the direction of the bias depends on the muscle and location being imaged. PMID:25344221

  4. Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) Contouring Atlas and Planning Guidelines for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Michael; Leong, Trevor; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Wiltshire, Kirsty; Ngan, Samuel; Kachnic, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a high-resolution target volume atlas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning guidelines for the conformal treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A draft contouring atlas and planning guidelines for anal cancer IMRT were prepared at the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) annual meeting in September 2010. An expert panel of radiation oncologists contoured an anal cancer case to generate discussion on recommendations regarding target definition for gross disease, elective nodal volumes, and organs at risk (OARs). Clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins, dose fractionation, and other IMRT-specific issues were also addressed. A steering committee produced the final consensus guidelines. Results: Detailed contouring and planning guidelines and a high-resolution atlas are provided. Gross tumor and elective target volumes are described and pictorially depicted. All elective regions should be routinely contoured for all disease stages, with the possible exception of the inguinal and high pelvic nodes for select, early-stage T1N0. A 20-mm CTV margin for the primary, 10- to 20-mm CTV margin for involved nodes and a 7-mm CTV margin for the elective pelvic nodal groups are recommended, while respecting anatomical boundaries. A 5- to 10-mm PTV margin is suggested. When using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions to gross disease and 45 Gy to elective nodes with chemotherapy is appropriate. Guidelines are provided for OAR delineation. Conclusion: These consensus planning guidelines and high-resolution atlas complement the existing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) elective nodal ano-rectal atlas and provide additional anatomic, clinical, and technical instructions to guide radiation oncologists in the planning and delivery of IMRT for anal cancer.

  5. Elective Inguinal Node Irradiation in Early-Stage T2N0 Anal Cancer: Prognostic Impact on Locoregional Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Betz, Michael; Bieri, Sabine; Ris, Frederic; Roche, Bruno; Roth, Arnaud D.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of elective inguinal node radiation therapy (INRT) on locoregional control (LRC) in patients with early-stage T2N0 anal cancer treated conservatively with primary RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1976 and 2008, 116 patients with T2 node-negative anal cancer were treated curatively with RT alone (n=48) or by combined chemoradiation therapy (CRT) (n=68) incorporating mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. Sixty-four percent of the patients (n=74) received elective INRT. Results: Over a median follow-up of 69 months (range, 4-243 months), 97 (84%) and 95 patients (82%) were locally and locoregionally controlled, respectively. Rates for 5-year actuarial local control, LRC, cancer-specific, and overall survival for the entire population were 81.7% ± 3.8%, 79.2% ± 4.1%, 91.1% ± 3.0%, and 72.1% ± 4.5%, respectively. The overall 5-year inguinal relapse-free survival was 92.3% ± 2.9%. Isolated inguinal recurrence occurred in 2 patients (4.7%) treated without INRT, whereas no groin relapse was observed in those treated with INRT. The 5-year LRC rates for patients treated with and without INRT and with RT alone versus combined CRT were 80.1% ± 5.0% versus 77.8% ± 7.0% (P=.967) and 71.0% ± 7.2% versus 85.4% ± 4.5% (P=.147), respectively. A trend toward a higher rate of grade ≥3 acute toxicity was observed in patients treated with INRT (53% vs 31%, P=.076). Conclusions: In cases of node-negative T2 anal cancer, the inguinal relapse rate remains relatively low with or without INRT. The role of INRT in the treatment of early-stage anal carcinoma needs to be investigated in future prospective trials.

  6. A mixed-methods exploration of women's experiences of anal intercourse: meanings related to pain and pleasure.

    PubMed

    Stulhofer, Aleksandar; Ajduković, Dea

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this mixed-methods study was to document and analyze the dimensions and meanings of anoreceptive pain and pleasure among heterosexual women. An online survey was carried out on a convenience sample of 1,893 women aged 18-60 years. Qualitative data were collected using open-ended questions mailed to women who expressed interest in continuing participation in the study; narratives from 68 women who had experienced anal intercourse were collected and analyzed for pain themes. Most surveyed women had experienced anoreceptive intercourse. A majority of women (79.1%) reported their first anal intercourse to be painful, but for most of them the intensity and duration of pain/discomfort substantially diminished over time. Less than a third (27.7%) of participants who regularly engaged in anoreceptive intercourse in the past 12 months stated that they rarely or never experience pain/discomfort with the practice. Nevertheless, most women who continued to practice anal intercourse (58.1%) reported it to be very arousing and pleasurable. The pleasure associated with anoreceptive intercourse was best predicted by masturbatory frequency and orgasmic ability (with sexual intercourse). The qualitative assessment pointed to a wide range of personal experiences with and meanings attached to pain/discomfort associated with anoreceptive intercourse. Three broad pain themes emerged: (1) pain as insurmountable obstacle, (2) strategic management of pain, and (3) pain eroticization. The study findings suggested that the successful inclusion of anal intercourse into a couple's sex life is often dependent on a specific learning process. PMID:23519588

  7. Complete anal membrane in a female: a rare malformation and indication for prone cross-table lateral radiograph.

    PubMed

    England, Richard J; Murthi, Govind V

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a 27 week gestation female fetus suggested an abnormal rectum. Subsequent examination of the term newborn confirmed an imperforate anus present in the normal position. No meconium was seen on the perineum by 18 hours. A prone cross-table lateral radiograph confirmed that rectal gas was present 3 mm beneath the membrane leading to the diagnosis of complete anal membrane, and an anoplasty rather than a colostomy was performed. PMID:23583151

  8. Effects of Referral Bias on Estimates of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia Progression and Regression Rates in a 3-State Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, William Christopher; Cachay, Edward Rafael; Agmas, Wollelaw; Jackson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study aim is to compare anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) progression and regression rates in a cytology inception cohort to estimates based on the subcohort referred for ≥1 high-resolution anoscopies (HRAs). A cytology-based retrospective cohort was assembled including the anal cytology histories and invasive anal cancer (IAC) outcomes of all HIV-infected adults under care between 2001 and 2012. A 3-state Markov model (400, and to have HSIL at baseline and thereafter. They also had more anal cytology examinations (median 6 vs 3) and longer follow-up (median 5.5 vs 3.6 years). State transition rates were overestimated in the HRA subcohort relative to inception cohort, but the degree of discordance varied by transition: for

  9. Natural History of Anal Dysplasia in an HIV-Infected Clinical Care Cohort: Estimates Using Multi-State Markov Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, William C.; Agmas, Wollelaw; Cachay, Edward R.; Cosman, Bard C.; Jackson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives (1) To model the natural history of anal neoplasia in HIV-infected patients using a 3-state Markov model of anal cancer pathogenesis, adjusting for cytology misclassification; and (2) to estimate the effects of selected time-varying covariates on transition probabilities. Design A retrospective cytology-based inception screening cohort of HIV-infected adults was analyzed using a 3-state Markov model of clinical pathogenesis of anal neoplasia. Methods Longitudinally ascertained cytology categories were adjusted for misclassification using estimates of cytology accuracy derived from the study cohort. Time-varying covariate effects were estimated as hazard ratios. Results (1) There was a moderate to high probability of regression of the high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) state (27–62%) at 2 years after initial cytology screening; (2) the probability of developing invasive anal cancer (IAC) during the first 2 years after a baseline HSIL cytology is low (1.9–2.8%); (3) infrared coagulation (IRC) ablation of HSIL lesions is associated with a 2.2–4.2 fold increased probability of regression to

  10. Evaluation of an anal sac adenocarcinoma tumor in a Spitz dog

    PubMed Central

    Javanbakht, Javad; Tavassoli, Abbas; Sabbagh, Atefeh; Hassan, Mehdy Aghamohammmad; Samakkhah, Shohreh Alian; Shafiee, Radmehr; Lakzian, Ali; Ghalee, Vahideh Rahmani; Gharebagh, Sonia Shoja

    2013-01-01

    A 9-year-old emasculated male Spitz with tenesmus and constipation had a subcutaneous mass at the left ventral aspect of the anus with history of polyuria and polydipsia. A complete blood cell count, serum biochemistry panel, and urinalysis (cystocentesis sample) were evaluated. Abnormalities in the serum biochemistry panel included a mildly elevated serum cholesterol concentration (7.28 mmol/L; reference interval, 2.70–5.94 mmol/L), increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity (184 U/L; reference interval, 9–90 U/L), alanine transaminase (122 U/L; reference interval, 5–60 U/L) activity and aspartate aminotransferase (80 U/L; reference interval, 5–55 U/L) activity, severe increased total calcium concentration (16.3 mg/dL; reference interval, 8.2–12.4 mg/dL or 9.3–11.4 mg/dL), and decreased total calcium concentration (3.4 mg/dL, reference interval, 2.5–5.6mg/dL). Furthermore, testing revealed an increased intact parathyroid hormone concentration (38.6 pmol/L; reference interval, 3–17 pmol/L). On cytologic and histopathologic examinations, various types of cells were observed. Most of the cells were oval to polygonal and had elliptical or elongate nuclei and a moderate amount of pale to basophilic cytoplasm. The remaining cells had round to oval nuclei and pale to basophilic cytoplasm. Cells of both types were loosely adhered to each other and were arranged in rosette-like structures. Both neoplastic cell types had fine homogenous chromatin and either a small indistinct nucleolus or no visible nucleolus. Mild anisokaryosis and anisocytosis were observed. Histologically, the mass consists of glandular structures formed by cuboidal cells admixed with bundles of spindle cells. Based on location and histologic features, the final diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the apocrine gland of the anal sac, which should be included as a cytologic differential diagnosis when spindle cells and typical epithelial cells are observed in masses in the region of the anal

  11. Intensified intensity-modulated radiotherapy in anal cancer with prevalent HPV p16 positivity

    PubMed Central

    Belgioia, Liliana; Vagge, Stefano; Agnese, Dario; Garelli, Stefania; Murialdo, Roberto; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Chiara, Silvana; Gallo, Fabio; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Corvò, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the toxicity and response of intensity-modulated radiotherapy schedule intensified with a simultaneous integrated boost in anal canal cancer. METHODS: From March 2009 to March 2014, we retrospectively analyzed 41 consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for anal canal squamous cell carcinoma at our center. Radiotherapy was delivered via simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique by helical tomotherapy, and doses were adapted to two clinical target volumes according to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage: 50.6 Gy and 41.4 Gy in 23 fractions in T1N0, 52.8 Gy and 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions in T2N0, and 55 Gy and 45 Gy in 25 fractions in all patients with N positive and/or ≥ T3, respectively, to planning target volumes 1 and 2. The most common chemotherapy regimen was 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin-based. Human papilloma virus (HPV) p16 expression was performed by immunohistochemistry and evaluated in the majority of patients. Acute and late toxicity was scored according to CTCAe v 3.0 and RTOG scales. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 30 mo (range: 12-71). Median age was 63 years (range 32-84). The stage of disease was: stage I in 2 patients, stage II in 13 patients, stage IIIA in 12 patients, and stage IIIB in 14 patients, respectively. Two patients were known to be HIV positive (4.9%). HPV p16 expression status was positive in 29/34 (85.3%) patients. The 4-year progression-free survival and overall survival in HPV-positive patients were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute grade 3 skin and gastrointestinal toxicities were reported in 5% and 7.3% of patients, respectively; patients’ compliance to the treatment was good due to a low occurrence of severe acute toxicity, although treatment interruptions due to toxicity were required in 7.3% of patients. At 6 mo from end of treatment, 36/40 (90%) patients obtained complete response; during follow-up, 5 (13.8%) patients presented with

  12. [Results of complex treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal using advanced radiotherapy technologies].

    PubMed

    Glebovskaya, V V; Tkachev, S I; Rasulov, A O; Tsaryuk, V F; Gordeev, S S; Fedyanin, M Yu; Aliev, V A; Mamedly, Z Z; Kuzmichev, D V; Trofimova, O P; Borisova, T N; Yazhgunovich, I P

    2015-01-01

    During recent decades radiotherapy is the basis, on which it is built a medical complex that is the first-line treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. An increase of overall and disease-free survival and quality of life of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at the present stage of development of a comprehensive medical treatment is largely due to the improvement of technical equipment of radiotherapy departments of oncology clinics. The use of modem linear electron accelerators and systems of computer dosimetric planning to create a 3D program of isodose distribution, diagnostic devices (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as a number of other conditions permit accurate summarizing of proposed dose, reducing of absorbed dose to critical structures, diminishing unplanned interruptions in chemoradiotherapy course by means of modern technologies of conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT, IMRT, VMAT). The paper presents the preliminary results of a comprehensive medical treatment of 14 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. PMID:26571840

  13. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  14. Changes in the absorption of bile acids after total colectomy in patients with an ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nasmyth, D.G.; Johnston, D.; Williams, N.S.; King, R.F.; Burkinshaw, L.; Brooks, K.

    1989-03-01

    Bile acid absorption was investigated using /sup 75/Se Taurohomocholate (SeHCAT) in controls and patients who had undergone total colectomy with either conventional ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis or adenomatous polyposis. Whole-body retention of SeHCAT after 168 hours was greater in the controls than the patients who had undergone colectomy (P less than .05). Retention of SeHCAT did not differ significantly between patients with an ileostomy and patients with pouch-anal anastomosis, but patients with an ileostomy and ileal resection of more than 20 cm retained less SeHCAT than patients with a pouch-anal anastomosis (P less than .01). Analysis of fecal bile acids from ileostomies and pouches showed that bacterial metabolism of primary conjugated bile acids was greater in patients with a pouch. It was concluded that bile acid absorption was not significantly impaired by construction of a pouch compared with conventional ileostomy, but bacterial metabolism of bile acids was greater in the pouches.

  15. A Novel Pre-Clinical Murine Model to Study the Life Cycle and Progression of Cervical and Anal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Papillomavirus disease and associated cancers remain a significant health burden in much of the world. The current protective vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are expensive and not readily available to the underprivileged. In addition, the vaccines have not gained wide acceptance in the United States nor do they provide therapeutic value. Papillomaviruses are strictly species specific and thus human viruses cannot be studied in an animal host. An appropriate model for mucosal disease has long been sought. We chose to investigate whether the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, could infect mucosal tissues in Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice. Methods The vaginal and anal canals of Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu mice were gently abraded using Nonoxynol-9 and “Doctor’s BrushPicks” and MmuPV1 was delivered into the vaginal tract or the anal canal. Results Productive vaginal, cervical and anal infections developed in all mice. Vaginal/cervical infections could be monitored by vaginal lavage. Dysplasias were evident in all animals. Conclusions Anogenital tissues of a common laboratory mouse can be infected with a papillomavirus unique to that animal. This observation will pave the way for fundamental virological and immunological studies that have been challenging to carry out heretofore due to lack of a suitable model system. PMID:25803616

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression As Prognostic Marker in Patients With Anal Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Falk, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens of patients with anal cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for EGFR was performed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of 103 patients with anal carcinoma. EGFR expression was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and with clinical endpoints, including local failure-free survival (LFFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: EGFR staining intensity was absent in 3%, weak in 23%, intermediate in 36% and intense in 38% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the level of EGFR staining was significantly correlated with CSS (absent/weak vs intermediate/intense expression: 5-year CSS, 70% vs 86%, P=.03). As a trend, this was also observed for DMFS (70% vs 86%, P=.06) and LFFS (70% vs 87%, P=.16). In multivariate analysis, N stage, tumor differentiation, and patients’ sex were independent prognostic factors for CSS, whereas EGFR expression only reached borderline significance (hazard ratio 2.75; P=.08). Conclusion: Our results suggest that elevated levels of pretreatment EGFR expression could be correlated with favorable clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with CRT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate how EGFR is involved in the response to CRT.

  17. Intersphincteric anal lipofilling with micro-fragmented fat tissue for the treatment of faecal incontinence: preliminary results of three patients

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Michele; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno; Gentile, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Faecal incontinence is a very debilitating problem. Many techniques have been proposed to treat this condition, with controversial results. Autologous transplant of fat tissue is an established procedure used for the repair of tissue damage, and recent studies revealed the potentiality of tissue regeneration by human adipose-derived stem cells. We treated this condition with the injection, in the intersphincteric anal groove, of lipoaspirate processed by an innovative technology (Lipogems). The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Lipogems injection for the treatment of faecal incontinence. In February 2014 we treated 3 patients with faecal incontinence. The surgical procedure required three phases: lipoaspiration, processing of lipoaspirate with the Lipogems system, and injection of the obtained product in the intersphincteric anal groove. An accurate proctological examination followed at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Each patient reported an improved Wexner incontinence score at 1 month after the procedure. We observed an increase of resting pressure (by at least 10 mm Hg) and thickness of the internal anal sphincter respectively at ano-rectal manometry and by ultrasound (US) evaluation at the sixth month of follow-up. Our preliminary results are encouraging, but multicentric studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate this novel technique for treatment of faecal incontinence. PMID:26240640

  18. Treatment of High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in High Risk Patients: Outcome at an Urban Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Assoumou, Sabrina Annick; Panther, Lori Ann; Feng, Yang; Gelman, Rebecca Sue; Fugelso, Dana Kailani; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Human immunodeficiency (HIV)-infected patients and men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher rate of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), a likely precursor to anal cancer. This retrospective study describes the outcome of treating MSM with incident biopsy-proven HGAIN in an urban community health setting with access to outpatient ablation or operative treatment. The main outcome was freedom from HGAIN at follow-up. 153 met inclusion criteria; 86 (56%) were HIV-infected. Eighty (52%) received outpatient ablation, 49(61%) had a follow-up within 9 months. Among those, 26 (53%) were free of high-grade disease, 19 (39%) had high-grade disease; and 4 (8%) had unknown grading. In a logistic regression model, a lower extent of anal disease (1 quadrant vs. 2,3, or 4 quadrants) was significantly associated with a lower probability of high-grade disease (p-value 0.04.) HGAIN could be managed in a community health setting; however, systems are needed to ensure follow-up care. PMID:23535356

  19. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderas, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Tveit, Kjell M.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  20. [Management of locally advanced anal canal carcinoma with modulated arctherapy and concurrent chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Troussier, I; Huguet, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Benahim, C; Khalifa, J; Darmon, I; Ortholan, C; Krebs, L; Dejean, C; Fenoglietto, P; Vieillot, S; Bensadoun, R-J; Thariat, J

    2015-04-01

    The standard treatment of locally advanced (stage II and III) squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal consists of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (two cycles of 5-fluoro-uracil, mitomycin C, on a 28-day cycle), with a dose of 45 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction in the prophylactic planning target volume and additional 14 to 20 Gy in the boost planning target volume (5 days per week) with a possibility of 15 days gap period between the two sequences. While conformal irradiation may only yield suboptimal tumor coverage using complex photon/electron field junctions (especially on nodal areas), intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques (segmented static, dynamic, volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy) allow better tumour coverage while sparing organs at risk from intermediate/high doses (small intestine, perineum/genitalia, bladder, pelvic bone, etc.). Such dosimetric advantages result in fewer severe acute toxicities and better potential to avoid a prolonged treatment break that increases risk of local failure. These techniques also allow a reduction in late gastrointestinal and skin toxicities of grade 3 or above, as well as better functional conservation of anorectal sphincter. The technical achievements (simulation, contouring, prescription dose, treatment planning, control quality) of volumetric modulated arctherapy are discussed. PMID:25770884

  1. Perianal pyoderma gangrenosum after excision and fulguration of anal condyloma acuminatum

    PubMed Central

    Agnew, Jennifer L.; Strombom, Paul D.; Fong, Carmen F.; Kelly, Timothy J.; Martz, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare, inflammatory skin pathology frequently associated with systemic inflammatory disease. While rare after surgery, recognition of this disease in the post-surgical setting is important as it can mimic wound infection. Presentation of case We herein present a dramatic presentation of perianal PG four days after routine excision and fulguration of anal condyloma acuminatum. The affected area did not improve with broad spectrum antibiotics or surgical debridement. A diagnosis of PG was made from clinical suspicion and pathology findings, and further confirmed with rapid improvement after starting steroids. Diagnosis of this disease in the postoperative period requires high suspicion when the characteristic ulcerative or bullae lesions are seen diffusely and show minimal improvement with antibiotic treatment or debridement. Discussion Our case highlights the importance of recognizing this disease in the post-operative period, to allow for early initiation of appropriate treatment and prevent unnecessary surgical debridement of a highly sensitive area. There have been 32 case reports of PG in the colorectal literature, mostly following stoma creation. There is one case report of idiopathic perianal pyoderma gangrenosum with no known prior trauma. To our knowledge there are no previously reported cases of perianal PG after routine elective anorectal surgery. Conclusion This is the first reported case of perianal pyoderma gangrenosum in the post-surgical setting. Increased awareness of pyoderma gangrenosum in the surgical literature will aid in prompt diagnosis and proper medical management of this uncommon postoperative morbidity. PMID:26547888

  2. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  3. Treatment of urogenital and anal condylomata acuminata with Neodym: YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dann, Thomas; Knipper, Ansgar; Thomas, Stephen; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Condylomata acuminata of the urogenital and anal region are sexually transmitted warts caused by infection of human papilloma virus. In the literature different treatment modalities are reported. We report the treatment of 323 patients (315 male, 8 female) with a mean age of 27.9 years using the Nd:YAG laser. In 65% the lesions were located in the fossa navicularis, in 37% at the glans, in 30% at the foreskin. Thirty-five percent of all patients required endoscopic treatment of the distal urethra. Two-hundred-seventy-nine patients had recurrence after unsuccessful pretreatment with surgical and chemical therapy. After a mean follow-up of 15.5 months (2 - 43 months) of 95 evaluable patients 15 showed recurrences all within the first 6 months. The advantages of Nd:YAG laser treatment of condylomata acuminata, which might be done in local anaesthesia, are a low rate of recurrences and complications, the option of endoscopic treatment and the excellent cosmetic results.

  4. [A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal with a Perianal Abscess].

    PubMed

    Adikrisna, Rama; Udagawa, Masaru; Sugita, Yuusuke; Ishii, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was referred to our department because she felt pain at the anus with pus discharge. Physical examination revealed a tumor on the left side of the anus, and a subcutaneous induration near the tumor. Abdominal CT scan revealed an irregularly shaped tumor with abscess formation. There were no enlarged lymph nodes or distant metastasis. Anal canal carcinoma (cStage Ⅱ) with a complication of perianal abscess was suspected, so we performed surgical incision and drainage. A biopsy of the tumor led to the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. However, because surgical drainage alone was not effective for treatment of the abscess, colostomy of the sigmoid colon was carried out 14 days after admission. After chemoradiation therapy (5-FU 800 mg/m2/day on days 1-4 and 29-32, mitomycin C [MMC] 10 mg/m2 on days 1 and 29, and radiation with a total dose 54 Gy), the tumor disappeared completely, considered to be a complete response. Twenty months after chemoradiation, there were no signs of recurrence. PMID:26805351

  5. Risk factors for anal cancer in persons infected with HIV: a nested case-control study in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bertisch, Barbara; Franceschi, Silvia; Lise, Mauro; Vernazza, Pietro; Keiser, Olivia; Schöni-Affolter, Franziska; Bouchardy, Christine; Dehler, Silvia; Levi, Fabio; Jundt, Gernot; Ess, Silvia; Pawlita, Michael; Kovari, Helen; Wandeler, Gilles; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Stöckle, Marcel; Clifford, Gary

    2013-09-15

    Although persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly men who have sex with men, are at excess risk for anal cancer, it has been difficult to disentangle the influences of anal exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, immunodeficiency, and combined antiretroviral therapy. A case-control study that included 59 anal cancer cases and 295 individually matched controls was nested in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (1988-2011). In a subset of 41 cases and 114 controls, HPV antibodies were tested. A majority of anal cancer cases (73%) were men who have sex with men. Current smoking was significantly associated with anal cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 5.34), as were antibodies against L1 (OR = 4.52, 95% CI: 2.00, 10.20) and E6 (OR = ∞, 95% CI: 4.64, ∞) of HPV16, as well as low CD4+ cell counts, whether measured at nadir (OR per 100-cell/μL decrease = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.18, 2.00) or at cancer diagnosis (OR per 100-cell/μL decrease = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.42). However, the influence of CD4+ cell counts appeared to be strongest 6-7 years prior to anal cancer diagnosis (OR for <200 vs. ≥500 cells/μL = 14.0, 95% CI: 3.85, 50.9). Smoking cessation and avoidance of even moderate levels of immunosuppression appear to be important in reducing long-term anal cancer risks. PMID:23900553

  6. Inconsistent condom use by male clients during anal intercourse with occasional and regular female sex workers (FSWs): survey findings from southern states of India

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Shreena; Nagarajan, Karikalan; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Mainkar, Mandar K; Goswami, Prabuddhagopal; Yadav, Diwakar; Sen, Shrabanti; George, Bitra; Rachakulla, Harikumar; Subramanian, Thilakavathi; Paranjape, Ramesh S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Self-reported anal intercourse by female sex workers (FSWs) documented in recent studies from India range between 11.9% and 22%. However, comparable data on anal intercourse and condom use from male clients of FSWs is lacking. Using data from a bio-behavioural survey (2009–2010), we examined prevalence of anal intercourse, male clients’ self-reported inconsistent condom use during anal intercourse with FSWs, and correlates of this behaviour in India's high HIV prevalence southern states (Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu combined). Methods Using two-stage time location cluster sampling, we recruited 4803 clients of FSWs, ages 18–60 years, who had purchased sex from an FSW in the past month. After obtaining informed consent, respondents were interviewed and tested for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (syphilis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with inconsistent condom use during anal intercourse (in the past 6 months) with FSWs. Results Overall, 12.3% clients reported anal intercourse in the past 6 months, of whom 48.4% used condoms inconsistently. Clients of FSWs who were ages 26 years or older (AOR 2.68, p=0.032); employed as manual labourers (AOR 2.43, p=0.013); consumed alcohol (AOR 2.63, p=0.001); reported five or more sex acts with FSWs in the past month (AOR 2.53, p=0.031); and perceived themselves to be at higher risk for HIV (AOR 4.82, p=0.001) were more likely to inconsistently use condoms during anal intercourse. Conclusions The results suggest that sex workers and their clients commonly practice anal intercourse, but a relatively high proportion of clients do not consistently use condoms, leading to a greater risk of acquiring HIV and its further transmission to other male and female sexual partners. Given the multidirectional risk, safer sex communication on heterosexual anal intercourse must be incorporated into HIV prevention programmes. PMID

  7. Modelo analítico del efecto de PRS sobre satélites GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, A.; Brunini, C.; Usandivaras, J. C.

    El sistema GPS (Global Position System) es, hoy en día, la herramienta de navegación y posicionamiento más potente y lo será sin duda en la próxima década. Gran parte de su valiosa utilidad se debe a la alta precisión que permite lograr y ésta, a su vez, depende, entre otras causas, de la precisión con que se conocen las órbitas de los satélites. La presión de radiación solar (PRS) fija el límite de la precisión con que pueden calcularse en la actualidad las efemérides satelitarias. El objetivo de este trabajo es proponer una mejor resolución de este fenómeno. El modelo analítico aquí presentado, se basa en el análisis del comportamiento de los residuos de un ajuste por mínimos cuadrados en el que se utiliza el modelo de PRS propuesto por Beutler. El mismo consiste en un modelo determinista del fenómeno con dos parámetros libres. Los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto que, aún después de aplicar dichos parámetros, prevalecen en los residuos efectos semidiurnos en las componentes radial,tangencial y normal. Estos resultados obtenidos se comparan con los de un trabajo desarrollado por el Instituto de Berne (Beutler et al., 1994), en el que se utilizaron como pseudo-observaciones las órbitas precisas del IGS (CODE). El intervalo de integración escogido por este centro fueron las semanas 680 y 681. En resumen se tienen arcos de 14 días para todos los satélites, donde las efemérides precisas de los mismos para los 14 días fueron utilizados como pseudo-observaciones. El modelo de fuerza que empleó dicho centro fue básicamente el tradicional en lo que respecta al modelo de las fuerzas gravitacionales, y para la PRS utilizo el modelo standard de Beutler. Los parámetros de este modelo junto con las 6 condiciones iniciales (posición y velocidad) fueron ajustados por el método general de mínimos cuadrados. Los residuos en la componente radial, tangencial y normal, para los satélites con un buen comportamiento, presentan una

  8. Does the Finnish intervention prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Mette Østergaard; Madsen, Mia Lund; Skriver-Møller, Anne-Cathrine; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A rise in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) has been observed and a preventive approach, originating in Finland, has been introduced in several European hospitals. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate the evidence behind the ‘Finnish intervention’. Design A systematic review of the literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Outcome measures The primary outcome was OASIS. Secondary outcomes were (perinatal): Apgar scores, pH and standard base excess in the umbilical cord, and (maternal): episiotomy, intact perineum, first and second-degree perineal lacerations, duration of second stage, birth position and women's perceptions/birth experiences. Methods Multiple databases (Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed and SveMed) were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2014. Both randomised controlled trials and observational studies were eligible for inclusion. Studies were excluded if a full-text article was not available. Studies were evaluated by use of international reporting guidelines (eg, STROBE). Results Overall, 1042 articles were screened and 65 retrieved for full-text evaluation. Seven studies, all observational and with a level of evidence at 2c or lower, were included and consistently reported a significant reduction in OASIS. All evaluated episiotomy and found a significant increase. Three studies evaluated perinatal outcomes and reported conflicting results. No study reported on other perineal outcomes, duration of the second stage, birth positions or women's perceptions. Conclusions A reduction in OASIS has been contributed to the Finnish intervention in seven observational studies, all with a low level of evidence. Knowledge about the potential perinatal and maternal side effects and women's perceptions of the intervention is extremely limited and the biological mechanisms underlying the Finnish intervention are not well documented

  9. Prognostic value of tumor regression evaluated after first course of radiotherapy for anal canal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier . E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Riche, Benjamin; Alessio, Annunziato; Mornex, Francoise; Romestaing, Pascale

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the tumor response after an initial course of irradiation predicts for colostomy-free survival and overall survival in patients with anal canal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1998, 252 patients were treated by pelvic external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy boost in 218 or EBRT in 34. EBRT was combined with chemotherapy in 168 patients. An evaluation of tumor regression, before the boost, was available for 221 patients. They were divided into four groups according to the tumor response: <70%, 70-80%, >80% but <100%, and 100%. Results: The median follow-up time was 58 months. The overall survival rate was 72.6% {+-} 3.1% and 57.3% {+-} 4.2% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The disease-free survival rate was 60.0% {+-} 3.3% and 49.4% {+-} 3.9% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The colostomy-free survival rate was 61% at 5 years and 47% at 10 years. Two groups could be differentiated according to the percentage of tumor regression before the boost: >80% vs. {<=}80%. The group with a T3-T4 lesion and tumor regression {<=}80% had the poorest overall (52.8% {+-} 12.3%), disease-free (19.9% {+-} 9.9%), and colostomy-free survival (24.8% {+-} 11.2%) rates. Conclusion: The amount of tumor regression before EBRT or brachytherapy boost is a strong prognostic factor of disease control without colostomy. When regression is {<=}80% in patients with an initial T3-T4 lesion, the use of conservative RT should be carefully evaluated because of the very poor disease-free and colostomy-free survival.

  10. The Association of Episiotomy with Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury–A Population Based Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Räisänen, Sari; Selander, Tuomas; Cartwright, Rufus; Gissler, Mika; Kramer, Michael R.; Laine, Katariina; Heinonen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the independent association of episiotomy with obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) using first a cross-sectional and then a matched pair analysis. Design A matched cohort. Setting Data was gathered from the Finnish Medical Birth Register from 2004–2011. Population All singleton vaginal births (n = 303,758). Methods Women resulting matched pairs (n = 63,925) were matched based on baseline risk of OASIS defined based on parity (first or second/subsequent vaginal births), age, birth weight, mode of delivery, prior caesarean section, and length of active second stage of birth. Results In cross-sectional analysis episiotomy was associated with a 12% lower incidence of OASIS (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80 to 0.98) in first vaginal births and with a 132% increased incidence of OASIS in second or subsequent vaginal births (aOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.77 to 3.03). In matched pair analysis episiotomy was associated with a 23% (aOR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) lower incidence of OASIS in first vaginal births and a 61% (aOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.29) increased incidence of OASIS in second or subsequent vaginal births compared to women who gave birth without an episiotomy. The matched pair analysis showed a 12.5% and a 31.6% reduction in aORs of OASIS associated with episiotomy, respectively. Conclusions A matched pair analysis showed a substantial reduction in the aORs of OASIS with episiotomy, due to confounding by indication. This indicates that results of observational studies evaluating an association between episiotomy and OASIS should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25203655

  11. Single incision laparoscopic surgery - trans anal endoscopic microsurgery: A technological innovation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha; Sasikumar, Pattabi; Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran

    2014-04-01

    Trans anal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then underwent a period of immersion. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. The advent of single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has made great inroads into various fields of general and gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. We decided to make use of the same technique in TEM for two patients who had large sessile villous adenomas of the rectum. We used this port and fixed it transanally to the edge of the anus. Carbon dioxide used for insufflation in laparoscopic surgery was used through one of the ports, and a telescope was inserted to the larger port. We made sure that the entire polyp was cut out completely until the circular muscle of the internal sphincter was clearly exposed. Next, the cut edges of the rectum were undermined between the mucosa and the circular muscles in order to bring the cut edges closer together. We were able to perform this SILS TEM in two cases. In both the cases, well differentiated villous adenoma (colonoscopically, biopsy proven before surgery) was confirmed after excision. The question has been raised whether TEM is the new laparoscopy for anorectal surgery. Increasingly, several reports are showing promise for treatment for early stage cancers and large rectal adenomas using TEM. Adoption of our technique using the SILS port that has not been previously described in medical literature, seems to be a promising tool for the future. TEM first burst upon the scene several decades ago and then under went a period of immersion. In recent years, with the onset of laparoscopic surgery, the thoughts and the ideas of using a laparoscopic surgical technique have invaded the area of colorectal cancer as well. We have herein reported our experience in two cases who underwent TEM using laparoscopic techniques. PMID:24761088

  12. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cray, Alison; Haworth, Annette; Chander, Sarat; Lin, Robert; Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  13. The Differential Impact of Flatal Incontinence in Women With Anal Versus Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Isuzu; Tang, Ying; Szychowski, Jeff M; Richter, Holly E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The differential impact on quality of life (QOL) that leakage of both stool and flatus confers on women compared to stool only is unclear. Our aim was to characterize differences in symptom distress, impact on QOL, and anorectal testing among women with leakage of stool and flatus, stool only, and flatus only. Methods A retrospective review was conducted of women undergoing evaluation of at least monthly bowel incontinence symptoms. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: liquid/solid stool and flatus (anal incontinence, AI); liquid/solid stool only (fecal incontinence, FI); and flatal only (FL). Baseline assessment included the Modified Manchester Health Questionnaire (MMHQ) including the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI), Short Form-12 (SF-12), as well as anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound evaluations. Results Of 436 subjects, 381 had AI, 45 FI, and 10 FL. Significant between-group differences were noted in MMHQ (p=0.0002) and FISI total scores (p<0.0001) where women with AI reflected greater negative impact than women with FI. The SF-12 (PCS, MCS) scores were similar in all three groups (p=0.22, 0.08). Resting/squeeze pressures were significantly lower in AI and FI groups compared to FL (p=0.0004), whereas rectal capacity was similar in all three groups. Although exploratory, MMHQ scores were similar between FI and FL groups, although FISI scores were higher in the FI group (p<0.0001). Conclusions Women with AI have higher symptom specific distress and greater negative impact on QOL compared to women with FI. Treatment of all bowel incontinence symptoms is important to improve symptom-specific and general QOL. PMID:26506162

  14. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process. PMID:25808086

  15. Anal Canal Cancer: Management of Inguinal Nodes and Benefit of Prophylactic Inguinal Irradiation (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Resbeut, Michel; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Teissier, Eric; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ronchin, Philippe; Zaccariotto, Audrey; Minsat, Mathieu; Benezery, Karen; Francois, Eric; Salem, Naji; Ellis, Steve; Azria, David; Champetier, Cedric; Gross, Emmanuel; Cowen, Didier

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the benefit of prophylactic inguinal irradiation (PII) in anal canal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed the outcome of 208 patients presenting with ASCC treated between 2000 and 2004 in four cancer centers of the south of France. Results: The population study included 35 T1, 86 T2, 59 T3, 20 T4, and 8 T stage unknown patients. Twenty-seven patients presented with macroscopic inguinal node involvement. Of the 181 patients with uninvolved nodes at presentation, 75 received a PII to a total dose of 45-50 Gy (PII group) and 106 did not receive PII (no PII group). Compared with the no PII group, patients in the PII group were younger (60% vs. 41% of patients age <68 years, p = 0.01) and had larger tumor (T3-4 = 46% vs. 27% p = 0.01). The other characteristics were well balanced between the two groups. Median follow-up was 61 months. Fourteen patients in the no PII group vs. 1 patient in the PII group developed inguinal recurrence. The 5-year cumulative rate of inguinal recurrence (CRIR) was 2% and 16% in PII and no PII group respectively (p = 0.006). In the no PII group, the 5-year CRIR was 12% and 30% for T1-T2 and T3-T4 respectively (p = 0.02). Overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival were similar between the two groups. In the PII group, no Grade >2 toxicity of the lower extremity was observed. Conclusion: PII with a dose of 45 Gy is safe and highly efficient to prevent inguinal recurrence and should be recommended for all T3-4 tumors. For early-stage tumors, PII should also be discussed, because the 5-year inguinal recurrence risk remains substantial when omitting PII (about 10%).

  16. The Use of a Staged Drainage Seton for the Treatment of Anal Fistulae or Fistulous Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon Keun; Kang, Wook Ho; Park, Chan Ho; Hong, Sa Min; Jeong, Seung Kyu; Kim, June Young; Yang, Hyung Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the rate of recurrence and incontinence after the treatment of fistulae or fistulous abscesses by using the staged drainage seton method. Methods According to the condition, a drainage seton alone or a drainage seton combined with internal opening (IO) closure and relocation of the seton was used. After a period of time, the seton was changed with 3-0 nylon; then, after another period of time, the authors terminated the treatment by removing the 3-0 nylon. Telephone interviews were used for follow-up. The following were evaluated: the relationship between the type of fistula and recurrence; the relationship between the type of fistula and the period of treatment; the relationship between the recurrence and presence of abscess; the relationship between IO closure and recurrence; the relationship between the period of seton change and recurrence; reported continence for flatus, liquid stool, and solid stool. Results The recurrence rate of fistulae or suppuration was 6.5%, but for cases of horseshoe extension, the recurrence rate was 57.1%. The rate of recurrence was related to the type of fistula (P = 0.001). Incontinence developed in 3.8% of the cases. No statistically significant relationship was found between the rate of recurrence and the presence of an abscess or between the closure of the IO and the period of seton change or removal. Conclusion In the treatment of anal fistulae or fistulous abscesses, the use of a staged drainage seton can reduce the rate of recurrence and incontinence. PMID:23346510

  17. Etiologic and clinical analysis of chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation in children less than 3 years old

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanlei; Zheng, Shan; Xiao, Xianmin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the etiology and clinical diagnostic method for chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation in children less than 3 years old. Method: Seven children (5 males and 2 females; 1 year 8 months to 3 years of age at the time of physician evaluation) with chronic complex anal and rectal inflammation were enrolled between May 2008 and May 2013 at our hospital. Clinical history, results of auxiliary examinations, and empirical treatment of the children were analyzed retrospectively combined with the etiologic diagnosis. Results: Four patients were confirmed to have Crohn’s disease and one patient was confirmed to have intestinal tuberculosis; two patients were suspected to have Crohn’s disease. Anemia and low pre-albumin level were common (seven patients); serologic testing revealed four patients with elevated IgG levels and seven patients with elevated IgA levels; there were no patients with positive tuberculosis antibody titers and two patients were weakly positive for C-ANCA (one patient with Crohn’s disease and one patient intestinal tuberculosis). Colonoscopies revealed that the entire colon was affected in one patient, the left hemicolon was affected in four patients, and the sigmoid colon and rectum were affected in two patients. Two patients with Crohn’s disease and one patient with intestinal tuberculosis were diagnosed by colonoscopies in combination with histopathologic examinations. Two patients with Crohn’s disease were confirmed after empirical drug treatment, and two other patients were not definitely diagnosed. Conclusion: The possibility of Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis should be considered in the clinical diagnosis of complex chronic anal and rectal inflammation in younger children. Local surgery is sometimes unnecessary. Empirical drug treatment should be used if necessary. PMID:25550910

  18. Increasing proportions of Australian gay and homosexually active men engage in unprotected anal intercourse with regular and with casual partners.

    PubMed

    Van De Ven, P; Rawstorne, P; Crawford, J; Kippax, S

    2002-06-01

    We examined trends in sexual practice among gay and homosexually active men in Australia. Self-complete questionnaires were distributed with mail-order sex video catalogues in 2000 and returned anonymously through a reply-paid facility. The data were compared with those from men who responded to promotional material sent out with the same catalogues and who participated in national telephone surveys of men who have sex with men conducted in 1992 and 1996. A key independent variable was gay community attached (GCA) versus non-GCA (NGCA) derived from two items about number of gay friends and amount of free time spent with gay men. Responses came from 1,832 men ranging in age from 16 to 80 (median = 39) years. HIV status was 73% negative, 5% positive, 22% untested; 1,181 men were GCA and 651 men were NGCA. Overall, from 1992 to 2000 there was a significant upward trend in the proportion of men reporting any unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the previous six months with regular partners: 21.5%, 24.7%, 46.4% of the total sample (p < 0.001). And similarly for UAI with casual partners: 12.4%, 16.2%, 25.5% (p < 0.001). The upward trends in UAI-regular and UAI-casual were similar and significant (p < 0.001) for both GCA and NGCA men. These nationwide Australian data provide evidence of continuing increases in unprotected anal intercourse with regular and with casual partners. Whereas the majority of men do not engage in any unprotected anal intercourse during a defined interval, ever increasing proportions of them do. PMID:12042079

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Reish, Andrew G.; Beddar, A. Sam; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the rates of toxicity, locoregional control, distant control, and survival in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement, treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 6 patients with squamous cell anal cancer and para-aortic nodal involvement were treated with IMRT and concurrent infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The primary tumor was treated with a median dose of 57.5 Gy (range, 54-60 Gy), involved para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes were treated with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 50.5-55 Gy), and noninvolved nodal regions were treated with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 43.5-45 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 25 months, none of the patients had a recurrence at the primary tumor, pelvic/inguinal nodes, or para-aortic nodes, whereas 2 patients developed distant metastases to the liver. Four of the 6 patients are alive. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 100%, 56%, and 63%, respectively. Four of the 6 patients developed Grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity during chemoradiation. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy could potentially serve as definitive therapy in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated in these patients, as demonstrated by the distant failure rates. These patients need to be followed carefully because of the potential for treatment-related toxicities.

  20. Practices of receptive and insertive anal sex among transgender women in relation to partner types, sociocultural factors, and background variables.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tooru; Bödeker, Birte; Iwamoto, Mariko; Sakata, Maria

    2014-04-01

    It is urgent to develop efficacious HIV prevention programs to curb the reported extremely high HIV prevalence and incidence among transgender women (male-to-female transgender persons) who reside in large cities in the USA. This study aimed to describe unprotected receptive anal sex (URAS) and unprotected insertive anal sex (UIAS) among high-risk transgender women in relation to partner types, psychosocial factors, and background variables. Based on purposive sampling from the targeted communities and AIDS service organizations in San Francisco and Oakland, a total of 573 transgender women who had a history of sex work were recruited and individually interviewed using a structured survey questionnaire. Significant correlates with URAS with primary, casual, and commercial sex partners were found (e.g., needs for social support, frequency of social support received, exposure to transphobia, self-esteem, economic pressure, norms toward practicing healthy behaviors, and self-efficacy toward practicing safe sex). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that transgender women who had engaged in URAS with commercial partners were more likely to have higher levels of transphobia or lower levels of the norms or self-efficacy to practice safe sex. Among the participants who did not have vaginoplasty (preoperative transgender women), 16.4% had engaged in insertive anal sex (IAS) with commercial partners in the past 30 days. The participants who were HIV positive and had engaged in IAS were more likely to be African-American or Caucasians, coinfected with sexually transmitted infections, or identified themselves as homosexual. Practices of IAS among transgender women have not been thoroughly investigated in relation to sexual and gender identity. UIAS with homosexual and bisexual men in addition to URAS may be a cause for high HIV incidence among transgender women. An HIV prevention intervention study must be developed and evaluated, which aims to reduce HIV

  1. The functional role of caudal and anal/dorsal fins during the C-start of a bluegill sunfish.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman

    2013-05-01

    Fast starts are crucial in the survival of aquatic swimmers to capture prey or avoid predators. Currently, it is widely accepted that during C-starts: (1) the caudal fin generates a considerable hydrodynamic force; and (2) anal/dorsal fins are erected to significantly increase the hydrodynamic force. In this work, the above hypotheses on the role of fins during C-starts are studied using experimentally guided numerical simulations of four bluegill sunfish, whose fins are removed or erected. The amount of force created by the body and fins at each time instant was not constant and varied during the C-start. Nevertheless, in agreement with hypothesis (1), up to 70% of the instantaneous hydrodynamic force was generated by the tail during Stage 2 of the C-start, when the sunfish rapidly bends out of the C-shape. Additionally, the contribution in Stage 1, when the sunfish bends into a C-shape, is less than 20% at each instant. Most of the force in Stage 1 was produced by the body of the sunfish. In contrast to hypothesis (2), the effect of erection/removal of the fins was less than 5% of the instantaneous force in both Stages 1 and 2, except for a short period of time (2 ms) just before Stage 2. However, it is known that the anal/dorsal fins are actively controlled during the C-start from muscle activity measurements. Based on the results presented here, it is suggested that the active control of the anal/dorsal fins can be related to retaining the stability of the sunfish against roll and pitch movements during the C-start. Furthermore, the erection of the fins increases the moment of inertia to make the roll and pitch movements more difficult. PMID:23307797

  2. Anal Cancer Incidence and Survival: Comparing the Greater San-Francisco Bay Area to Other SEER Cancer Registries

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Fickey, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus, anal canal, and anorectum (SCCA) has increased over time. However, there are still no national guidelines on screening for SCCA among high-risk populations. Providers at University of California, San Francisco have been at the forefront of providing anal dysplasia screening. To determine whether such a screening program allows for earlier detection of abnormalities and consequently, improves patient survival, we conducted an ecological study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program to compare the San Francisco-Oakland catchment area (SF-O) to other SEER sites where routine screening has not been as accessible. Cox regression models were utilized to assess the impact of residing in the SF-O region, versus other SEER sites, on cause-specific mortality hazard. Logistic regression was used to determine if site was associated with the probability of having an in situ versus invasive tumor among SCCA cases. All analyses were stratified on calendar time (1985–1995 and 1996–2008) to compare differences pre- and post- highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among SCCA cases, being reported by the SF-O registry was associated with a four fold higher probability of having an in situ tumor (rather than an invasive tumor) [95% CI: 3.48–4.61], compared to sites outside of California, between 1996 and 2008. Cases reported from the SF-O region between 1996 and 2008 had a 39% lower mortality risk than those reported from registries outside California (95% CI: 0.51–0.72). However, there was no decrease in the rate of invasive SCCA over this period. This is the first ecological study to evaluate whether access to anal cancer screening programs may help improve patient survival by allowing for earlier detection of lesions. Our results imply that routine screening programs may help detect SCCA at an earlier stage and thus, potentially impact patient survival. PMID:23484057

  3. MITHRA – multiparametric MR/CT image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) in anal canal cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Manfrida, Stefania; Barbaro, Brunella; Colangione, Maria Maddalena; Masiello, Valeria; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Placidi, Elisa; Autorino, Rosa; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Chiesa, Silvia; Mantini, Giovanna; Kovács, György; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to test a novel multiparametric imaging guided procedure for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in anal canal cancer, in order to evaluate the feasibility and safety. Material and methods For this analysis, we considered all consecutive patients who underwent magnetic resonance/computed tomography image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) treated from February 2012 to July 2014. To conduct this project, we formed a working group that established the procedure and identified the indicators and benchmarks to evaluate the feasibility and safety. We considered the procedure acceptable if 90% of the indicators were consistent with the benchmarks. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast and diffusion weighted imaging were performed with an MRI-compatible dummy applicator in the anus to define the position of the clinical target volume disease and biological information. A pre-implantation treatment planning was created in order to get information on the optimal position of the needles. Afterwards, the patient underwent a simulation CT and the definite post-implantation treatment planning was created. Results We treated 11 patients (4 men and 7 women) with MR/CT-IABT and we performed a total of 13 procedures. The analysis of indicators for procedure evaluation showed that all indicators were in agreement with the benchmark. The dosimetric analysis resulted in a median of V200, V150, V100, V90, V85, respectively of 24.6%, 53.4%, 93.5%, 97.6%, and 98.7%. The median coverage index (CI) was 0.94, the median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.43, the median dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) resulted 0.56, the median overdose volume index (ODI) was 0.27. We observed no episodes of common severe acute toxicities. Conclusions Brachytherapy is a possible option in anal cancer radiotherapy to perform the boost to complete external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance can also have biological advantages compared to the US. Our results suggest that

  4. The Prognostic Value of HPV Status and p16 Expression in Patients with Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Roldán Urgoiti, Gloria B.; Gustafson, Karla; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Doll, Corinne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In anal cancer studies, the detection frequency of high-risk HPV (human papillomavirus) is variable, depending on the method used. There are limited data reporting results of different HPV detection techniques in the same clinical series, and very few correlating results with clinical outcome. Objectives To evaluate tumor expression of p16/HPV16 using three different methods, and to determine their association with clinical outcome in patients with anal canal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Design This retrospective study included patients with anal canal SCC treated with definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy at a single institution between 1992 and 2005. Formalin-fixed paraffin–embedded tumor samples from 53 of the 89 (60%) patient pre-treatment biopsies were adequate for tissue microarray construction. HPV status was determined using: p16 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative IHC (AQUA), HPV genotype analysis by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and HPV linear array sub-typing. Expression status was correlated with clinical outcome. Results 80% (28/35) of patient tumors had high p16 expression using conventional IHC. HPV16 CISH was positive in 81% (34/42) of tumors, and 78% (28/36) of tumors were HPV subtype 16. HPV16 CISH correlated with p16 evaluated by conventional IHC (correlation coefficient 0.46; p = 0.01) and by p16 AQUA score (correlation coefficient 0.49; p = 0.001). A subset of cases (15%) had very high p16 quantitative IHC scores (>244) and were associated with a higher incidence of local or distant recurrence (p = 0.04). Conclusions The vast majority (80%) of anal canal SCC in our series were positive for HPV16/p16, regardless of the testing method used. The exploratory analysis of automated quantitative IHC scoring was the only technique to define a subset of patients with a worse prognosis by p16 expression status on univariate analysis. Further exploration of the molecular

  5. A Case of In-Bore Transperineal MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy of a Patient with Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Michael; Frye, Thomas; George, Arvin K.; Kilchevsky, Amichai; Iyer, Amogh; Kadakia, Meet; Muthigi, Akhil; Turkbey, Baris; Wood, Brad J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory disease that specifically affects the colon. Ulcerative colitis is primarily treated medically and refractory disease is treated with proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). Gastroenterologists advise against digital rectal exams, pelvic radiation therapy, and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies of the prostates of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis patients. Any form of pouch manipulation can lead to severe bleeding, inflammation, and pain. Urologists are therefore faced with the challenge of doing a prostate biopsy without a transrectal ultrasound. We report the rare case of a patient with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis who underwent in-bore transperineal MRI-guided biopsy of the prostate. PMID:26844005

  6. Daily Associations between Alcohol Use and Unprotected Anal Sex Among Heavy Drinking HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Kahler, Christopher W.; Wray, Tyler B.; Pantalone, David W.; Kruis, Ryan D.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Monti, Peter M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) account for the largest proportion of new HIV infections in the United States. Alcohol may facilitate HIV transmission by increasing unprotected anal sex, but few studies have focused on transmission behaviors in HIV-positive MSM. This study explored daily associations between alcohol use and sexual behavior among heavy drinking HIV-positive MSM using a 30-day Timeline Followback interview. Results of generalized estimating equations indicated that greater alcohol consumption on a given day was associated with a linear increase in the odds of having unprotected anal sex with partners of any HIV status. However, the odds of reporting unprotected anal sex with HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown partners increased in a curvilinear fashion, occurring primarily at very heavy levels of use (12+ drinks). Results suggest that very heavy drinking increases the risk of engaging in sexual behavior that has the potential for transmitting HIV to other men. PMID:25194967

  7. A combined modality therapeutic approach to metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma with systemic chemotherapy and local therapy to sites of disease: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Graham W.; Okun, Sherry; Peterson, Lindsay L.

    2016-01-01

    Cases of metastatic anal carcinoma managed with a combination of systemic chemotherapy and local therapies to both solitary sites of metastases and the primary site have been reported in the literature. We present a case of a 55-year-old male with metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma to the liver treated with induction chemotherapy with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) followed by liver resection and radiation to the anal primary with concurrent 5FU and mitomycin. This approach resulted in control of disease without evidence of recurrence, and no increased toxicities now 19 months from initial diagnosis to time of reporting. This novel approach resulted in a good treatment response as documented by imaging and symptom improvement and a long disease free interval. PMID:27284490

  8. Viewing of Internet-Based Sexually Explicit Media as a Risk Factor for Condomless Anal Sex among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Four U.S. Cities

    PubMed Central

    Antebi-Gruszka, Nadav; Downing, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in the availability of sexually explicit media (SEM) on the Internet. Men who have sex with men (MSM) report near universal use of SEM. However, this widespread use of SEM among MSM may contribute to more condomless anal sex. To examine the association of viewing SEM on the Internet and the number of condomless anal sex encounters among MSM, in 2012, an online survey was conducted of 265 MSM from New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, or Washington D.C. who reported viewing SEM online in the past 3 months. Analyses were performed using negative binomial regression. Nearly all men reported viewing SEM featuring anal sex with (91%) or without (92%) condoms in the past 3 months. Neither viewing more hours of SEM per week or compulsively viewing SEM were associated with more condomless anal sex encounters. Rather, viewing a greater proportion of SEM containing condomless anal sex was associated with engaging in more condomless anal encounters (IRR = 1.25), while viewing a greater proportion of SEM containing anal sex where condoms were used was associated with fewer condomless anal sex encounters (IRR = 0.62). MSM reported that viewing SEM caused changes in their sexual fantasies, desires, and behaviors. These findings provide important insights for health policy and the design of interventions addressing SEM and condomless sex among MSM. The findings suggest that condom use by SEM performers may benefit not only actor health, but also have health implications for SEM viewers. PMID:27119990

  9. Therapeutic management of complex anal fistulas by installing a nitinol closure clip: study protocol of a multicentric randomised controlled trial—FISCLOSE

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Anne; Carrier, Guillaume; Pereira, Bruno; Gillet, Brigitte; Faucheron, Jean-Luc; Pezet, Denis; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complex anal fistulas are responsible for pain, faecal incontinence and impaired quality of life. The rectal mucosa advancement flap (RMAF) procedure to cover the internal opening of the fistula remains a strategy of choice. However, a new procedure for closing anal fistulas is now available with the use of a nitinol closure clip (OTSC Proctology, OVESCO), which should ensure a better healing rate. This procedure is currently becoming more widespread, though without robust scientific validation, and it is therefore essential to carry out a prospective evaluation in order to determine the efficacy and safety of this new medical device for complex anal fistulas. Methods and analysis The FISCLOSE trial is aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of a nitinol closure clip compared to the RMAF procedure for the management of complex anal fistulas. This trial is a prospective, randomised, controlled, single-blind, bicentre and interventional study. Patients (n=46 per group) will be randomly assigned for management with either a closure clip or RMAF. The main objectives are to improve the healing rate of the anal fistula, lessen the postoperative pain and faecal incontinency, enhance the quality of life, and lower the number of reinterventions and therapeutic management costs. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with a healed fistula at 3 months. The secondary outcomes are anal fistula healing (6 and 12 months), proctological pain (visual analogue scale), the faecal incontinence score (Jorge and Wexner questionnaire), digestive disorders and quality of life (Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index and Euroqol EQ5D-3 L) up to 1 year. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by an independent medical ethics committee 1 (IRB00008526, CPP Sud-Est 6, Clermont-Ferrand, France) and registered by the competent French authority (ANSM, Saint Denis, France). The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at

  10. Exposing the gaps in awareness, knowledge and estimation of risk for anal cancer in men who have sex with men living with HIV: a cross-sectional survey in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason J; Chen, Marcus; Grulich, Andrew; Walker, Sandra; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bradshaw, Catriona; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard; Templeton, David; Hocking, Jane; Eu, Beng; Tee, BK; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of anal cancer is significantly higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV when compared to the general population. We aimed to assess their awareness, knowledge and perceived level of personal risk for anal cancer to help inform educational strategies targeting this group. Methods A cross-sectional study of 327 HIV positive MSM in Melbourne, Australia, attending clinical settings (a sexual health centre, tertiary hospital HIV outpatients and high HIV caseload general practices) completed a written questionnaire in 2013/14. Poor knowledge was defined as those who had never heard of anal cancer, or scored 5 or less out of 10 in knowledge questions amongst those who reported ever hearing about anal cancer. Underestimation of risk was defined as considering themselves as having the same or lower risk for anal cancer compared to the general population. Results Of 72% (95% confidence interval (CI): 67–77) who had heard of anal cancer, 47% (95% CI: 41–53) could not identify any risk factors for anal cancer. Of total men surveyed, 51% (95% CI: 46–57) underestimated their risk for anal cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that men who underestimated their risk were older (OR 1.04 (per year increase in age), 95% CI: 1.01–1.07), had poor anal cancer knowledge (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.21–3.51), and more likely to have ever had an anal examination (OR 2.41, 95% CI: 1.18–4.93). They were less likely to consult a physician if they had an anal abnormality (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.96), to have had receptive anal sex (OR 0.12, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) or speak English at home (OR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09–0.90). Conclusions This survey of MSM living with HIV demonstrated limited awareness, knowledge level and estimation of risk for anal cancer. Further educational and public health initiatives are urgently needed to improve knowledge and understanding of anal cancer risk in MSM living with HIV. PMID:25828269

  11. Chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine for locally advanced anal carcinoma: an alternative treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Meulendijks, D; Dewit, L; Tomasoa, N B; van Tinteren, H; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; Cats, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Capecitabine is an established treatment alternative to intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for patients with rectal cancer receiving chemoradiotherapy. Its place in the treatment of locally advanced anal carcinoma (AC), however, remains undetermined. We investigated whether capecitabine is as effective as 5-FU in the treatment of patients with locally advanced AC. Methods: One hundred and five patients with squamous cell AC stage T2-4 (T2>4 cm), N0-1, M0 or T1-4, N2-3, M0, were included in this retrospective study. Forty-seven patients were treated with continuous 5-FU (750 mg m−2) on days 1–5 and 29–33, mitomycin C (MMC, 10 mg m−2) on day 1, and radiotherapy; 58 patients were treated with capecitabine (825 mg m−2 b.i.d. on weekdays), MMC (10 mg m−2) on day 1, and radiotherapy. The primary end points of the study were: clinical complete response rate, locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were: colostomy-free survival (CFS), toxicity and associations of genetic polymorphisms (GSTT1, GSTM1, GSTP1 and TYMS) with outcome and toxicity. Results: Clinical complete response was achieved in 41/46 patients (89.1%) with 5-FU and in 52/58 patients (89.7%) with capecitabine. Three-year LRC was 76% and 79% (P=0.690, log-rank test), 3-year OS was 78% and 86% (P=0.364, log-rank test) and CFS was 65% and 79% (P=0.115, log-rank test) for 5-FU and capecitabine, respectively. GSTT1 and TYMS genotypes were associated with severe (grade 3–4) toxicity. Conclusions: Capecitabine combined with MMC and radiotherapy was equally effective as 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy. This study shows that capecitabine can be used as an acceptable alternative to 5-FU for the treatment of AC. PMID:25167226

  12. Tumours and inflammatory lesions of the anal canal and perianal skin revisited: an update and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Heather; Serra, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Tumours of the anal and perianal region are relatively rare, and clinically often interpreted as innocuous lesions, leading to frequent delays in diagnosis and adequate treatment. Although squamous cell neoplasia represents the most common entity encountered in this anatomically complex area, many conditions, both neoplastic and inflammatory, may occur. Adding to the challenge of correct diagnosis and patient management, recent years have seen major updates in the terminology of squamous cell neoplasia, created to reflect advances in our understanding of the role of human papilloma virus and unify previous terminologies used for different sites in the anogenital tract. However, squamous cell neoplasia in the anal canal and perianal region may differ in terms of histology, biological behaviour, staging and treatment. The aim of this review is to present an overview of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions that may be seen in this area, an update on important developments and terminology, potential pitfalls that may be encountered in routine pathology practice and a practical approach on how to resolve these issues. PMID:26602415

  13. Prognostic factors in anal squamous carcinoma: a multivariate analysis of clinical, pathological and flow cytometric parameters in 235 cases.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, N A; Scholefield, J H; Love, S B; England, J; Northover, J M

    1990-06-01

    Clinical, pathological and flow cytometric parameters have been analysed by univariate and multivariate analysis to define those parameters of important prognostic influence in 235 cases of surgically treated squamous carcinoma of the anus and perianal skin. Patients had been treated by anorectal excision (166 patients) or by local excision (69). Analyses were carried out on five data sets--the two surgical subgroups, two groups distinguished by site of tumour and on all 235 patients. Univariate analysis showed many parameters to be of prognostic influence, although histological typing of tumours into the more common histological subtypes was of no prognostic value. Parameters of independent prognostic significance in multivariate analysis were those indicating depth of spread, inguinal lymph node involvement and DNA-ploidy. In this study the subdivision of the rarer types of anal canal tumour, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, microcystic squamous carcinoma and small cell anaplastic carcinoma, was relevant confirming that these tumours have a poor prognosis. It is now felt that surgery should not be employed as primary treatment in most cases of anal cancer and the results of this study have to be interpreted with caution when applied to patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that the most useful prognostic information can be gleaned from accurate clinical staging and an assessment of DNA-ploidy status. PMID:2376397

  14. Results and toxicity of the treatment of anal canal carcinoma by radiation therapy or radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B; Keane, T; Thomas, G; Harwood, A; Rider, W

    1984-11-15

    The results of treating anal canal carcinoma by radical external beam radiation alone (RT) or by combined 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C and radiation (FUMIR), were compared in nonrandomized groups of patients treated in a single center. In each treatment regimen, surgery was reserved for those patients with residual carcinoma. The uncorrected 5-year survival rate in each group was approximately 70%, but primary tumor control was achieved in 93% (28/30) with FUMIR compared to 60% (15/25) treated with RT. Acute hematologic and enterocolic toxicity with uninterrupted external beam radiation courses of 5000 cGy in 4 weeks plus chemotherapy led to the adoption of split-course treatment. Serious late toxicity requiring surgical intervention occurred in 3 of 25 following RT, and in 5 of 30 following FUMIR. Colostomies were needed as part of treatment for residual carcinoma or for the management of treatment-related toxicity in 11 of 25 treated by RT and have been required to date in 4 of 30 treated by FUMIR. The improvement in the primary tumor control rate and the reduction in the number of patients requiring colostomy when compared with the results of RT favor combined chemotherapy and radiation as the initial treatment for anal canal carcinoma. PMID:6435851

  15. Application of a spontaneously closed protective stoma in an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinhai; Ke, Bingxin; Lin, Jianjiang; Xu, Jiahe; Chen, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the application value of a spontaneously closed protective stoma (SCPS) in an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, which is a novel procedure first performed in our hospital in 2008. Materials and methods: Two males cases with ulcerative colitis and one female with familial adenomatous polyposis were treated with colorectal surgery at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University since March 2010. The surgery was designed as total proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and SCPS. The surgical plan and procedure was determined with the patients after analyzing their hospitalized records and follow-up information. Results: No operation-induced death or anastomotic leakage occurred. One patient had a persistent fever and another patient presented with postoperative urinary retention. The average time until flatulence occurred post-SCPS was 26 days, and the average time until the removal of the postoperative stomal tube was 46 days that healed well. Conclusions: An SCPS can effectively protect the anastomosis with a simple operation and avoid the second surgery. Patients with ulcerative colitis require a two-stage operation, those who were in poor health and had a long history of hormone treatment even requiring a three-stage operation. However, a one- or two-stage operation could help alleviate pain for patients who require multiple surgeries and reduce economic burden. PMID:25785126

  16. How long-distance truck drivers and villagers in rural southeastern Tanzania think about heterosexual anal sex: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Mtenga, S; Shamba, D; Wamoyi, J; Kakoko, D; Haafkens, J; Mongi, A; Kapiga, S; Geubbels, E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore ideas of truck drivers and villagers from rural Tanzania about heterosexual anal sex (HAS) and the associated health risks. Methods Qualitative study using 8 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and 2 focus group discussions (FGDs) with truck drivers and 16 IDIs and 4 FGDs with villagers from the Morogoro region. Study participants included 24 women and 46 men. Data analysis was performed thematically employing standard qualitative techniques. Results Reasons why men would practice HAS included sexual pleasure, the belief that anal sex is safer than vaginal sex, alternative sexual practice, exploration and proof of masculinity. Reasons why women would practice HAS included financial need, retaining a partner, alternative for sex during menses, pregnancy prevention and beauty enhancement because HAS is believed to ‘fatten the female buttocks’. Most participants believed that condoms are not needed during HAS. This was linked to the ideas that infections only ‘reside in wet places’ (vagina) and that the anus is not ‘conducive’ for condom use; condoms reduce ‘dryness’ and ‘friction’ (pleasure) and may ‘get stuck inside’. Conclusions The study participants reported practices and ideas about HAS that put them at risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Greater attention to education about HAS is urgently needed in Tanzania, where this sexual practice is still regarded as a taboo. This study offers useful information that could be included in sex education programmes. PMID:26113730

  17. Sexual scripting of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse amongst participants in an HIV prevention trial in South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Duby, Zoe; Hartmann, Miriam; Montgomery, Elizabeth T; Colvin, Christopher J; Mensch, Barbara; van der Straten, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Sexual risk-taking is influenced by individual, interpersonal and social factors. This paper presents findings from a qualitative follow-up study to a clinical trial evaluating biomedical HIV prevention products among African women, explored participants' perceptions and experiences of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, as well as the gendered power dynamics and relationship contexts in which this sexual behaviour occurs. In-depth interviews were conducted with 88 women from South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Findings reveal that despite its social stigmatisation, women engage in penile-anal intercourse for reasons including male pleasure, relationship security, hiding infidelity, menstruation, vaginal infections, money and beliefs that it will prevent HIV transmission. In addition, participants described experiences of non-consensual penile-anal intercourse. We used sexual scripting theory as an analytical framework with which to describe the sociocultural and relationship contexts and gendered power dynamics in which these practices occur. These data on the distinct individual, dyadic and social contexts of heterosexual penile-anal intercourse, and the specific factors that may contribute to women's HIV risk, make a unique contribution to our understanding of heterosexual behaviour in these sub-Saharan countries, thereby helping to inform both current and future HIV prevention efforts for women in the region. PMID:26223703

  18. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  19. Prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse and unprotected vaginal intercourse among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in China: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Qian; Peng, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Wang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    This study aims at deriving a general description of the prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse among HIV-positive MSM in China using published epidemiological research. Comprehensively searching Wanfang, Weipu, China Biological Medicine (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Pubmed databases in the systematic review. Meta-analysis were conducted over a final set of nineteen studies (n=1603). The pooled prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse among HIV-positive MSM was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.5%∼82.5%) and unprotected vaginal intercourse was 68.0% (95% CI: 46.0%∼86.4%). The prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse differed significantly in sampling method, data collection method, sample size, location, recruitment setting and data collection period. Studies with the following features had a higher prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse: recruiting participants from 2005 to 2007, sample size being below 50, recruiting participants from MSM venues/internet, using convenience sampling, study location being Chongqing city, and using interviewer administered questionnaire. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that a majority percentage of HIV-positive MSM engage in unprotected sexual behavior. So that place their sex partners at risk for infecting HIV and also place themselves at risk for other sexually transmitted diseases. An effective strategy for prevention and control is required for this specific population in China. PMID:22158936

  20. Urethral dose sparing in squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal using proton therapy matching electrons with prior brachytherapy for prostate cancer: A case study.

    PubMed

    Apinorasethkul, Ontida; Lenards, Nishele; Hunzeker, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to communicate a technique on treating the re-irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of anal canal with proton fields matched with electron fields to spare prostatic urethra. A 76-year old male presented with a secondary radiation-induced malignancy as a result of prostate brachytherapy seeds irradiation 10 years prior. A rectal examination revealed a bulky tumor at the top of the anal canal involving the left superior-most aspect of the anal canal extending superiorly into the rectum. The inferior extent was palpable approximately 3cm from the anal verge and the superior extent of the mass measured greater than 5cm in the superior-inferior dimension. Chemoradiation was suggested since the patient was opposed to abdominoperineal resection (APR) and colostomy. The use of proton therapy matching with electron fields in the re-irradiation setting could help reduce the complications. A 2 lateral proton beams were designed to treat the bulky tumor volume with 2 electron beams treating the nodal volumes. This complication of treatment fields helped spare the prostatic urethra and reduced the risk of urinary obstruction in the future. PMID:27396941

  1. Retinoic Acid Is Involved in the Metamorphosis of the Anal Fin into an Intromittent Organ, the Gonopodium, in the Green Swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii)

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Axel; Begemann, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    In poeciliid fish the male anal fin has been transformed into a gonopodium, an intromittent organ required for internal fertilization. Elevated testosterone levels induce metamorphosis of a subset of anal fin rays to grow and form the specialized terminal structures of the gonopodium. The molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether retinoic acid (RA) signaling is involved in gonopodium development in the swordtail Xiphophorus hellerii. We showed that aldh1a2, a RA synthesizing enzyme, and the RA receptors, rar-ga and rar-gb, are expressed in anal fins during metamorphosis. aldh1a2 expression is regulated by testosterone in a concentration-dependent manner and is up-regulated in both hormone-induced and naturally developing gonopodia. Androgen receptor (ar), a putative regulator of gonopodial development, is co-expressed with aldh1a2 and the RA receptors in gonopodial rays. Importantly, experimental increase of RA signaling promoted growth of the gonopodium and increased the number of new segments. Based on gene expression analyses and pharmacological manipulation of gonopodium development, we show that the RA signaling pathway is activated in response to androgen signaling and promotes fin ray growth and development during the metamorphosis of the anal fin into the gonopodium. PMID:24204880

  2. A comparative study between conventional and liquid-based cytology in screening for anal intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Maia, Livia Bravo; Marinho, Larissa Cardoso; Wanderley Paes Barbosa, Tania; Batalha Filho, Eronides Salustiano; Ribeiro Velasco, Lara Franciele; Garcia Costa, Patrícia Godoy; Carneiro, Fabiana Pirani; de Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is associated with HPV infection and can be detected by cytological screening. While conventional exfoliative cytology (CC) is a low-cost and nonaggressive method, liquid-based cytology (LBC) tends to give clearer readings. Although studies of the efficacy of anal cancer screening methods would be of great importance for groups at high risk for AIN, few such studies have been conducted. The aim of the present study was to assess the concordance of CC and LBC in diagnosing anal pre-neoplastic lesions, and to compare cytological results with anoscopy, histopathological, and molecular biology findings. Comparative study involving 33 HIV-positive patients, who underwent anoscopy and biopsy of suspected lesions. Concordance between the two cytology methods was calculated, as were the associations between cytology results and findings from other screening methods. A total of 54.5% of cases were considered AIN-negative by CC and LBC, and concordance between the two methods was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Anoscopy was negative in 15 of the 18 CC- and LBC-negative cases. CC identified 75% of patients with positive biopsy, while LBC identified 85.71% of these patients. Molecular biology results showed that patients with LSIL tested positive for the highest number of HPV subtypes. The associations between positive biopsy and high grade HPV, HPV 16, and multiple HPV infections were not statistically significant. Conventional and liquid-based cytology are equally effective in screening for anal preneoplastic lesions. PMID:24591207

  3. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn’s Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 50 Final Diagnosis: Anal canal adenocarcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT • MRI • biopsy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn’s disease (CD). Case Report: A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months’ duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. Conclusions: Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract. PMID:27373845

  4. Association between Free Testosterone Levels and Anal Human Papillomavirus Types 16/18 Infections in a Cohort of Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hilary K.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Xiuhong; Young, Stephen; Cranston, Ross D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Seaberg, Eric C.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Moran, Matthew G.; Chua, Kristofer; Bolan, Robert K.; Detels, Roger; Wiley, Dorothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause invasive cervical cancer and most invasive anal cancers (IACs). Overall, IAC rates are highest among men who have sex with men (MSM), especially MSM with HIV infection. Testosterone is prescribed for men showing hypogonadism and HIV-related wasting. While there are direct and indirect physiological effects of testosterone in males, its role in anal HPV16/18 infections in men is unknown. Methods Free testosterone (FT) was measured in serum from 340 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who were tested for anal HPV16/18-DNA approximately 36 months later. The effect of log10-transformed current FT level on anal HPV16/18 prevalence was modeled using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Multivariate models controlled for other HPV types, cumulative years of exogenous testosterone use, race, age, lifetime number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships, body mass index, tobacco smoking, HIV-infection and CD4+ T-cell counts among HIV-infected, and blood draw timing. Results Participants were, on average, 60 (+5.4) years of age, White (86%), and HIV-uninfected (56%); Twenty-four percent tested positive for anal HPV16 and/or 18-DNA (HPV16 prevalence=17.1%, HPV18=9.1%). In adjusted analysis, each half-log10 increase of FT was associated with a 1.9-fold (95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 3.24) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Additionally, other Group 1 high-risk HPVs were associated with a 1.56-fold (1.03, 2.37) higher HPV16/18 prevalence. Traditional risk factors for HPV16/18 infection (age, tobacco smoking; lifetime number of sexual partners, including the number of receptive anal intercourse partnerships within 24 months preceding HPV testing) were poorly correlated with one another and not statistically significantly associated with higher prevalence of HPV16/18 infection in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Conclusions Higher free testosterone was associated with increased HPV16/18 prevalence

  5. Interest of retro-anal levator plate myorrhaphy in selected cases of descending perineum syndrome with positive anti-sagging test

    PubMed Central

    Beco, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background Levator plate sagging (LPS), usually called descending perineum syndrome, is one of the main defects encountered in perineology. This defect is classically associated with colo-proctologic functional troubles (dyschesia and anal incontinence) but can also induce perineodynia, gynaecological and lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods A retrospective case series of nine female patients (mean age: 44.3) underwent an isolated retro-anal levator plate myorrhaphy (RLPM) to treat symptomatic LPS confirmed by rectal examination and/or Perineocaliper®. An anti-sagging test (support of the posterior perineum) must significantly improve the symptoms that were resistant to conservative treatment. The effect of the procedure on the symptoms of the 3 axes of the perineum (urological, colo-proctologic and gynecological) and on perineodynia was evaluated during a follow up consultation more than 9 months after surgery. The effect of RLPM on the position of the anal margin and on the levator plate angle was studied using rectal examination, Perineocaliper® and retro-anal ultrasound. Results Before surgery, anti-sagging tests were positive for dyschesia, urinary urgency and pain. After a mean follow-up of 16.1 months, RLPM resolved or improved 2/2 cases of stress urinary incontinence, 3/5 of urinary urgency, 3/4 of dysuria, 3/3 of anal incontinence, 7/8 of dyschesia, 3/4 of cystocele, 4/5 of rectocele, 5/8 of dyspareunia and 6/7 of perineodynia. Rectal examination showed a complete suppression of sagging in 4 patients and an improvement in the 5 others. The mean reduction of perineal descent was 1.08 cm (extremes: 0–1.5). Using retro-anal ultrasound of the levator plate, the mean reduction of sagging was 12.67 degrees (extremes: 1 – 21). Conclusion Anti-sagging tests can be used before surgery to simulate the effect of RLPM. This surgical procedure seems to improve stress urinary incontinence, frequency, nocturia, urgency, dysuria, anal incontinence, dyschesia

  6. Factors Associated With Condom Breakage During Anal Intercourse: A Cross-Sectional Study of Men Who Have Sex With Men Recruited in an Online Survey

    PubMed Central

    Khosropour, Christine M; Prater, Adam B; Rosenberg, Eli S; Siegler, Aaron J; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Background Within the United States, HIV affects men who have sex with men (MSM) disproportionally compared to the general population. In 2011, MSM represented nearly two-thirds of all new HIV infections while representing less than 2% of the US male population. Condoms continue to be the foundation of many HIV prevention programs; however, the failure rate of condoms during anal intercourse among MSM is estimated to be 0.5% to 8%, and condom breakages leave those affected at high risk for HIV transmission. Objective Estimate the frequency of condom breakage and associated demographic and behavioral factors during last act of anal intercourse using data from a national online HIV prevention survey of MSM. Methods From March 19 to April 16, 2009, data were collected on 9005 MSM through an online survey of US MSM recruited through a social networking site. Using multivariable logistic regression and controlling for several demographic and sexual risk behaviors, we estimated odds ratios of the association between condom breakage and several risk factors. Results In the study, 8063 participants reported having at least one male sexual partner in the last 12 months. The median age of participants was 21 years (range 18-65). More than two-thirds (68.2%, 5498/8063) reported anal intercourse during last sex and 16.90% (927/5498) reported using a condom during last anal intercourse act. Condom breakage was reported by 4.4% (28/635) participants who engaged in receptive anal intercourse and 3.5% (16/459) participants who engaged in insertive anal intercourse, with an overall failure rate of 4.0% (95% CI 3.2%-6.0%). Age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] per 5 years: 0.53 (95% CI 0.30-0.94), number of male sex partners (aOR per 5 sex partners: 1.03 (95% CI 1.00-1.08), and being high or buzzed during sex with a casual sex partner (aOR: 3.14, 95% CI 1.02-9.60) were associated with condom breakage. Conclusions Our results indicate condom breakage is an important problem for MSM that may

  7. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Gonzalèz, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Background Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of ∼1.5 per 100,000 women annually) but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV16) infection causes most cases. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) of an ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection. Methods In a randomized double-blind controlled trial designed to evaluate VE against persistent cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions in Costa Rica, 4210 healthy women underwent anal specimen collection (4224 of 5968= 70.8% of eligible women) at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination to evaluate anal HPV16/18 VE. Cervical HPV16/18 VE among the same women at the same visit was calculated as a comparator. For this ancillary work, analyses were conducted in a restricted cohort of women both cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative and HPV 16/18 seronegative prior at enrollment (N=1989), and in the full cohort (all women with an anal specimen). Findings In the restricted cohort, VE against prevalent HPV16/18 anal infection measured one-time, four-years post-vaccination was 83.6% (95%CI 66.7% to 92.8%), which was comparable to cervical HPV16/18 VE (87.9%, 95%CI 77.4% to 94.0%). In the full cohort, HPV16/18 VE was statistically lower at the anus (62.0%, 95%CI 47.1% to 73.1%) compared to the cervix (76.4%, 95%CI 67.0% to 83.5%) (p for anatomic-site interaction =0.03). Significant and comparable VE estimates against a composite endpoint of HPV31/33/45 (i.e.: cross-protection) was observed at the anus and cervix. Interpretation The ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine affords strong protection against anal HPV, particularly among women more likely to be HPV naïve at vaccination. Funding. The Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial is sponsored and funded by the NCI (contract N01-CP-11005), with funding support from the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, and conducted with support from the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica. Vaccine was

  8. Earlier anal sexarche and co-occurring sexual risk are associated with current HIV-related risk behaviors among an online sample of men who have sex with men in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Doug H.; Suharlim, Christian; Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Lim, Sin How; Koe, Stuart; Wei, Chongyi

    2014-01-01

    Studies of heterosexual populations across the globe and men who have sex with men (MSM) in a few developed countries showed that earlier sexual debut (sexarche) was associated with higher levels of co-occurring and subsequent HIV risk behaviors. We examined the relationships between earlier anal sexarche, unprotected earlier anal sexarche and current HIV risks among MSM from Asia. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among MSM (N = 10,826) in Asia in 2010. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify co-occurring (i.e., sexual experiences during sexarche) and current HIV-related risk factors (i.e., past six months) associated with earlier anal sexarche (before the age of 18) and unprotected earlier anal sexarche, respectively. Earlier anal sexarche was significantly associated with lack of condom use, being anal receptive or both receptive and insertive, and having a partner who were older during sexarche. It was also associated with current HIV-related risk behaviors including having multiple male sexual partners, having been paid for sex, and increased frequencies of recreational drug use. Unprotected earlier anal sexarche was significantly associated with inconsistent condom use in the past the six months. Improved and culturally sensitive sex education at schools should be included in national and regional HIV/AIDS prevention programming and policies in Asia. Such sex education programs should incorporate curriculum that address sexuality, sexual orientation, and sexual behaviors beyond those related to reproductive health. PMID:24920344

  9. High-Dose Split-Course Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: Outcome Analysis Regarding the Boost Strategy (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Ortholan, Cecile; Resbeut, Michel; Teissier, Eric; Ronchin, Philippe; Cowen, Didier; Zaccariotto, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; Francois, Eric; Salem, Naji; Ellis, Steve; Azria, David; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with split-course radiation therapy and boosted through external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2004, a selected group (162 patients) with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 = 31 patients (19%), T2 = 77 patients (48%), T3 = 42 patients (26%), and T4= 12 patients (7%). Lymph node status was N0-1 (86%) and N2-3 (14%). Patients underwent a first course of EBRT: mean dose 45.1 Gy (range, 39.5-50) followed by a boost: mean dose 17.9 Gy (range, 8-25) using EBRT (76 patients, 47%) or BCT (86 patients, 53%). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Results: The mean overall treatment time (OTT) was 82 days (range, 45-143) and 67 days (range, 37-128) for the EBRT and BCT groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The median follow-up was 62 months (range, 2-108). The 5-year cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR) was 21%. In the univariate analysis, the prognostic factors for CRLR were as follows: T stage (T1-2 = 15% vs. T3-4 = 36%, p = 0.03), boost technique (BCT = 12% vs. EBRT = 33%, p = 0.002) and OTT (OTT <80 days = 14%, OTT {>=}80 days = 34%, p = 0.005). In the multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 0.62 (0.41-0.92). In the subgroup of patients with OTT <80 days, the 5-year CRLR was significantly increased with the BCT boost (BC = 9% vs. EBRT = 28%, p = 0.03). In the case of OTT {>=}80 days, the 5-year CRLR was not affected by the boost technique (BCT = 29% vs. EBRT = 38%, p = 0.21). Conclusion: In anal cancer, when OTT is <80 days, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR. These results suggest investigating the benefit of BCT boost in prospective trials.

  10. A comparison between 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin and capecitabine/mitomycin in combination with radiation for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dante D.; Schellenberg, Devin; Lim, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no randomized phase III trials comparing 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin (FM) versus capecitabine/mitomycin (CM) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced anal cancer. We aim to evaluate the outcomes of patients treated with FM and CM at our institution. Methods Patients with stage I–III anal cancer who initiated curative-intent RT (50–54 Gy) with either CM or FM between 1998 and 2013 at the BC Cancer Agency were reviewed. Cox proportional models were used to analyze the impact of regimen on disease-free survival (DFS) and anal cancer-specific survival (ACSS). Results A total of 300 patients were included. Baseline characteristics were well-distributed between the groups. A total of 194 patients (64.6%) received FM and 106 (35.3%) CM. The 2-year DFS was 79.7% for CM [95% confidence intervals (95% CI), 71.1–88.3%] and 78.8% for FM (95% CI, 73–84.6%); 2-year ACSS was 88.7% for CM (95% CI, 81.8–95.5%) and 87.5% for FM (95% CI, 82.8–92.2%). On multivariate analysis, only HIV status, clinical T size (≤5 vs. >5 cm), and N status (negative vs. positive) remained as significant prognostic factors for both DFS and ACSS. Chemotherapy regimen (CM vs. FM) had no impact on either DFS [P=0.995; hazard ratios (HR) =0.99; 95% CI, 0.57–1.74] or ACSS (P=0.847; HR =0.93; 95% CI, 0.46–1.86). Conclusions In our population-based study, CM and FM concomitant with RT achieved similar DFS and ACSS. Substitution of capecitabine for infusional 5-FU may therefore be a reasonable option for patients and physicians who prefer to avoid the inconvenience and potential complications of a central infusional device. PMID:27563458

  11. Prevalence and associated factors of condomless receptive anal intercourse with male clients among transgender women sex workers in Shenyang, China

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yong; Wang, Zixin; Lau, Joseph TF; Li, Jinghua; Ma, Tiecheng; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Globally, transgender women sex workers have a high prevalence of HIV and condomless receptive anal intercourse with male clients (CRAIMC). We investigated the prevalence of CRAIMC and factors associated with CRAIMC among transgender women sex workers in China. Methods In 2014, we anonymously interviewed 220 transgender women sex workers face to face in Shenyang, China. Those who self-reported as HIV negative or as having unknown HIV serostatus were invited to take up free, anonymous HIV rapid testing (n=183); 90 did so. Using CRAIMC in the last month as the dependent variable, three types of associated factors were investigated, in addition to background factors: feminizing medical interventions, sex work and perceptions related to condom use. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Results Of the participants, 16.8% self-reported as HIV positive and 9.1% were detected to be HIV positive through free HIV testing; 26.8% had had CRAIMC in the last month, 45.5% had performed sex work in other Chinese cities (last year), and 23.2% had had condomless anal intercourse with men who were non-clients. In the adjusted analysis, significant factors associated with CRAIMC (last month) included the following: 1) any feminizing medical intervention performed (adjusted odds ratio, AOR: 2.22); 2) sex-work-related factors, including recruitment of male clients most often at hotels (AOR: 5.02) and charge per episode of transactional sex (201 to 400 RMB, AOR: 0.27; reference group: ≤100 RMB); and 3) perceptions related to condom use, including perceived transgender identity's impact on condomless sex such as wearing feminine attire, concern about exposing their status as a transgender woman to male clients (AOR: 1.20) and perceived self-efficacy of consistent condom use with male clients (AOR: 0.56). Perceived self-efficacy of consistent condom use with male clients fully mediated the association between perceived transgender identity's impact

  12. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen; Suh, Steve; Nelson, Rebecca A.; Liu An; Pezner, Richard D.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3 Degree-Sign , respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable

  13. Anal human papillomavirus genotype distribution in HIV-infected men who have sex with men by geographical origin, age, and cytological status in a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-11-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  14. Trends of incidence and survival in squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal in France: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Belot, Aurélien; Manfredi, Sylvain; Jooste, Valérie; Uhry, Zoé; Faivre, Jean; Duport, Nicolas; Grabar, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Data on anal cancer epidemiology are rare. The aim of this study was to report on trends of incidence and survival for anal cancer in France before the implementation of the human papilloma virus vaccine. This analysis was carried out on 1150 squamous-cell carcinomas of the anal canal diagnosed from 1989 to 2004 in a population of 5.7 million people covered by eight population-based cancer registries. Time trends in incidence were modeled using an age-period-cohort model. Net survival rates were obtained using the recently validated unbiased Pohar-Perme estimator. The incidence of squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal increased from 0.2 to 0.5/100 000 person-years among men and from 0.7 to 1.3/100 000 person-years among women from 1982 to 2012. Among women, the increase peaked after 2005, with an annual percentage change of +3.4% between 2005 and 2012, as compared with +2.6% among men. The net survival was 56% (95% confidence interval, 49-64) at 5 years and 48% (33-70) at 10 years among men. It was higher among women, at 65% (61-69) and 56% (50-63) at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The prognosis improved between 1989-1997 and 1998-2004. This improvement was slightly greater for men than for women, thus progressively reducing the gap between sexes. The incidence of squamous-cell anal canal cancer increased slightly among both sexes, but the increase was more marked among women than among men. The potential benefit of prophylactic female human papilloma virus vaccination against cervical cancer in France should be further evaluated. PMID:25973771

  15. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Tsai, Henry K.; Coen, John J.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Hartshorn, Kevan; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willins, John D.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs {<=}3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6-43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2-24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  16. EXTRA-A Multicenter Phase II Study of Chemoradiation Using a 5 Day per Week Oral Regimen of Capecitabine and Intravenous Mitomycin C in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Ed; McDonald, Alec C.; Myint, Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. Results: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. Conclusions: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.

  17. Similar outcomes for anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibody and immunosuppressant following seton drainage in patients with Crohn's disease-related anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xutao; Fan, Dejun; Cai, Zerong; Lian, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Zhi, Min; Wu, Xiaojian; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anal fistula is common in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and leads to significant morbidity. The efficacy of seton drainage combined with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody (anti-TNF-α) or immunosuppressant in the treatment of CD-related anal fistula remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy between seton drainage combined with anti-TNF-α and seton drainage combined with immunosuppressant postoperatively on the treatment of CD-related anal fistula. A total of 65 patients with CD-related anal fistula who had received seton drainage combined with postoperative medication were divided into an antibiotics only group, anti-TNF-α group and immunosuppressant group; all patients were treated with antibiotics. Fistula closure, external orifice exudation rate and recurrence rate were assessed among these patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 3 to 84 months with an average of 25.3 months. There were 11 (16.9%) cases of recurrence after seton drainage, 9 of which underwent a second seton drainage. In the total study group, 34 (52.3%) cases achieved complete fistula closure, and 10 (15.4%) cases showed external orifice exudation. No significant difference was found among these three groups, regarding fistula closure rate, closure time of fistula and recurrence rate. The external orifice exudation rate was significantly higher in the anti-TNF-α group compared with the antibiotics only group and immunosuppressant group (P=0.004 and P=0.026, respectively). Seton drainage is an effective treatment for CD-related anal fistula. The efficacy is similar whether combined with anti-TNF-α or immunosuppressant.

  18. Value of histopathology for predicting the post-operative complications of ileo-anal anastomosis (J-pouch) procedure in children with refractory ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    El Demellawy, Dina; El Hallani, Soufiane; de Nanassy, Joseph; Lee, James Young; Chan, Emily; Sullivan, Katrina; Bass, Juan; Mack, David; Nasr, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    The J-pouch is a surgical procedure offered to children with refractory ulcerative colitis (UC) who have undergone subtotal colectomy to reconstruct a reservoir function with ileo-anal anastomosis. Unfortunately, post-operative complications may occur and can compromise the pouch function. We assessed rectal histopathology to determine whether severity of inflammation in the rectum prior to the creation of the J-Pouch was associated with post-operative complications. We retrospectively reviewed the histopathology of all J-pouch procedure specimens from paediatric patients during the period 2000-2013 using an objective grading system that assesses the chronicity and activity of the UC disease. We analysed the parameters for association with the post-operative complications. A classification tree algorithm was generated to predict the risk of complication based on histopathological parameters. A total of 28 paediatric patients were identified, among whom 10 developed post-operative complications (35%). The activity score at the recto-anal margin was higher among the patients with post-operative complications (mean 7.3±3.1 versus 4.8±3.1; p=0.04). The involvement of more than 5% colonic crypts with epithelial neutrophilic infiltration at the recto-anal margin was found to be an independent parameter that would stratify the patients into low-risk or high-risk group for developing complications (17% versus 64%; p=0.04). An association between UC disease activity at the recto-anal margin and post-operative J-pouch complications was determined. Potentially, this association suggests that a histopathological assessment of the recto-anal transitional zone may have value in guiding the surgeon on the risk of post-operative complications. PMID:27130833

  19. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men by Geographical Origin, Age, and Cytological Status in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Montserrat; González, Cristina; del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Ocampo, Antonio; Rodríguez-Fortúnez, Patricia; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, José Ramón; Portilla, Joaquín; Rodríguez, Carmen; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in populations at risk for anal cancer is needed. Here, we describe the anal HPV genotype distribution in a large Spanish cohort (Cohort of the Spanish HIV Research Network HPV [CoRIS-HPV]) of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) according to geographical origin, age, and cytological status. A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 1,439 HIV-infected MSM (2007 to 2012) was performed. Anal HPV genotyping was performed using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test. Descriptive analyses of subject characteristics, prevalences, and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were performed. The global prevalences of HPV, high-risk HPV (HR-HPV), and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) types were 95.8%, 83.0%, and 72.7%, respectively. Among the HR-HPV types, HPV16 was the most common, followed by HPV59, -39, -51, -18, and -52. The prevalence of multiple HR-HPV infections was 58.5%. There were no differences in the crude analyses between Spanish and Latin-American MSM for most HPV types, and a peak in prevalence for most HPV types was seen in patients in their late thirties. Globally and by specific HPV groups, men with abnormal anal cytologies had a higher prevalence of infection than those with normal cytologies. This study has the largest number of HIV-positive MSM with HPV genotype data analyzed according to cytological status as far as we know. The information gained from this study can help with the design of anal cancer prevention strategies in HIV-positive patients. PMID:23966501

  20. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum attenuates the severity of pouchitis in a rat model of ileal J pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Atila, Koray; Terzi, Cem; Canda, Aras Emre; Akhisaroglu, Serpil Tanriverdi; Avci, Hatice Sanli; Sarioglu, Sulen; Oktay, Gulgun; Gulay, Zeynep

    2009-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of treatment with partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) using a rat model of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis and pouchitis. In the J pouch groups, tissue myeloperoxidase activities were significantly higher than native myeloperoxidase activities (P = 0.020; P = 0.015; P = 0.004, respectively). A statistically significant difference in total histological score was detected in the J pouch + 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) group, compared to the J pouch control and the J pouch + 5% DSS + PHGG groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). There was a significant overgrowth of aerobes and anaerobes in the J pouch + 5% DSS group. This study demonstrated that rectal administration of PHGG attenuates the severity of pouchitis in a rat model. In conclusion, PHGG may be an additional therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pouchitis. PMID:18594969

  1. Outcomes of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C for Anal Cancer in Immunocompetent Versus Immunodeficient Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Yuji; Kinsella, Michael T.; Reynolds, Harry L.; Chipman, Gregory; Remick, Scot C.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Information is limited as to how we should treat invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients with chronic immunosuppression, since the majority of clinical studies to date have excluded such patients. The objective of this study is to compare treatment outcomes in immunocompetent (IC) versus immunodeficient (ID) patients with invasive anal SCC treated similarly with combined modality therapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and March 2007, a total of 36 consecutive IC and ID patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with infusional 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. The IC and ID groups consisted of 19 and 17 patients, respectively, with 14 human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) and 3 post-solid organ transplant ID patients. There were no significant differences in tumor size, T stage, N stage, chemotherapy doses, or radiation doses between the two groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.1 years, no differences were found in overall survival, disease-specific survival, and colostomy-free survival. Three-year overall survival was 83.6% (95% CI = 68.2-100) and 91.7% (95% CI = 77.3-100) in the IC and ID groups, respectively. In addition, there were no differences in acute and late toxicity profiles between the two groups. In the human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, Cox modeling showed no difference in overall survival by pretreatment CD4 counts (hazard ratio = 0.994, 95% CI = 0.98-1.01). No correlation was found between CD4 counts and the degree of acute toxicities. Conclusion: Our data suggest that standard combined modality therapy with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil plus mitomycin C is as safe and effective for ID patients as for IC patients.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  3. Epidermoid anal cancer: treatment by radiation alone or by radiation and 5-fluorouracil with and without mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B J; Keane, T J; O'Sullivan, B; Wong, C S; Catton, C N

    1991-10-01

    One hundred ninety-two patients with primary epidermoid cancer of the anal canal were treated by a series of prospectively designed, sequential non-randomized protocols of radiation alone (RT), radiation with concurrent 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C (FUMIR), or radiation with concurrent 5-Fluorouracil only (FUR). The 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 69% overall, 68% RT, 76% FUMIR, 64% FUR. The primary tumor was controlled by radiation with or without chemotherapy in 68% (130/191) overall, 56% (32/57) by RT, 86% (59/69) by FUMIR, 60% (39/65) by FUR. The results with FUMIR were significantly better than with either RT alone or FUR, and except in tumors up to 2 cm in size, this superiority was found in all T stages. Regional lymph node metastases were controlled in 33 of 38 (87%) overall. The finding of clinically detectable regional lymph node metastases at presentation did not affect survival significantly in any treatment group. Anorectal function was preserved in 88% of the patients in whom the primary tumor was controlled, and in 64% overall. The delivery of 5FU and MMC concurrently with uninterrupted radical irradiation, 50 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks, produced severe acute and late normal tissue morbidity. Split course treatment, and reduction of the daily fractional dose to 2 Gy, diminished the severity of normal tissue damage. Omission of Mitomycin C reduced acute hematological toxicity, but was associated with a decreased primary tumor control rate. The most effective treatment protocols as measured by survival rates, primary anal tumor control rates, and the likelihood of conservation of anorectal function included the administration of both Mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil concurrently with radiation therapy. PMID:1938508

  4. Investigation of the distribution and function of α-adrenoceptors in the sheep isolated internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Rayment, SJ; Eames, T; Simpson, JAD; Dashwood, MR; Henry, Y; Gruss, H; Acheson, AG; Scholefield, JH; Wilson, VG

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have investigated the distribution of α-adrenoceptors in sheep internal anal sphincter (IAS), as a model for the human tissue, and evaluated various imidazoline derivatives for potential treatment of faecal incontinence. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Saturation and competition binding with 3H-prazosin and 3H-RX821002 were used to confirm the presence and density of α-adrenoceptors in sheep IAS, and the affinity of imidazoline compounds at these receptors. A combination of in vitro receptor autoradiography and immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the regional distribution of binding sites. Contractile activity of imidazoline-based compounds on sheep IAS was assessed by isometric tension recording. KEY RESULTS Saturation binding confirmed the presence of both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors, and subsequent characterization with sub-type-selective agents, identified them as α1A- and α2D-adrenoceptor sub-types. Autoradiographic studies with 3H-prazosin showed a positive association of α1-adrenoceptors with immunohistochemically identified smooth muscle fibres. Anti-α1-adrenoceptor immunohistochemistry revealed similar distributions of the receptor in sheep and human IAS. The imidazoline compounds caused concentration-dependent contractions of the anal sphincter, but the maximum responses were less than those elicited by l-erythro-methoxamine, a standard non-imidazoline α1-adrenoceptor agonist. Prazosin (selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) significantly reduced the magnitude of contraction to l-erythro-methoxamine at the highest concentration used. Both prazosin and RX811059 (a selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) reduced the potency (pEC50) of clonidine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study shows that both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors are expressed in the sheep IAS, and contribute (perhaps synergistically) to contractions elicited by various imidazoline derivatives. These agents may prove useful in the treatment of faecal incontinence

  5. Comparative study of Ksharasutra suturing and Lord's anal dilatation in the management of Parikartika (chronic fissure-in-ano)

    PubMed Central

    Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parikartika resembles fissure-in-ano which is very common among all ano-rectal disorders. In Ayurvedic texts, Parikartika is described as a complication of Vamana and Virechana as well as complication of Atisara. Ksharasutra was proved successful in the management of fistula-in-ano, piles, and there is a need to try its efficacy in fissure-in-ano. Aim: To evaluate the role of Ksharasutra suturing (KSS) in fissure bed in chronic fissure-in-ano. Materials and Methods: Total 100 patients of chronic fissure-in-ano were selected and randomly divided into two groups (50 in each group). In group-A, patients were undergone by KSS; while in patients of Group-B Lord's anal dilatation followed by KSS was done under spinal anesthesia. The KSS was done once and after slough out of Ksharasutra, the wound was treated for 4 weeks and assessment of the result was done on the basis of gradation adopted. Results: The pain relief on 14th day in Group-A was 86% while in Group-B 100% was observed. As on 7th day in Group-A, oozing was stopped in 68% patients, while in Group-B, oozing was stopped in 82% patients. On 21st day, Group-B showed more healing (85%) as compared to Group-A (69%). In this study 68% of patients were cured. Conclusion: In Group-B (KSS with Lord's anal dilatation) patients were cured early as compared to patients of Group-A (KSS alone). PMID:25558158

  6. Treatment and prevention of pouchitis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for chronic ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Stroud, Andrea M; Holubar, Stefan D; Sandborn, William J; Pardi, Darrell S

    2016-01-01

    Background Pouchitis occurs in approximately 50% of patients following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for chronic ulcerative colitis. Objectives The primary objective was to determine the efficacy and safety of medical therapies (including antibiotics, probiotics, and other agents) for prevention or treatment of acute or chronic pouchitis. Search methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from inception to October 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials of prevention or treatment of acute or chronic pouchitis in adults who underwent IPAA for ulcerative colitis were considered for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened studies for eligibility, extracted data and assessed study quality. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the outcomes was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinical improvement or remission of pouchitis in patients with acute or chronic pouchitis, or the proportion of patients with no episodes of pouchitis after IPAA. The proportion of patients who developed at least one adverse event was a secondary outcome. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for each dichotomous outcome. Main results Thirteen studies (517 participants) were included in the review. Four studies assessed treatment of acute pouchitis. One study (16 participants) compared ciprofloxacin and metronidazole; another (26 participants) compared metronidazole to budesonide enemas; another (18 participants) compared rifaximin to placebo; and the fourth study (20 participants) compared Lactobacillus GG to placebo. Four studies assessed treatment of chronic pouchitis. One study (19 participants) compared glutamine to butyrate suppositories; another (40 participants) compared bismuth enemas to placebo; and two studies (76 participants

  7. Laser capture microdissection as a tool to evaluate human papillomavirus genotyping and methylation as biomarkers of persistence and progression of anal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Cornall, Alyssa M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Molano, Monica; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anal squamous cell carcinoma is preceded by persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and the cancer precursor, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Detection of specific HPV genotypes and HPV-related biomarkers may be an option for primary anal screening. However, more data on the natural history of HPV-related anal lesions are required. The outcomes from this study will enhance our understanding of the clinical and biological behaviour of HPV-related anal lesions and inform the development of future HPV genotype and/or biomarker screening tests. Methods and analysis HIV-negative and HIV-positive men who have sex with men, aged 35 years and over, recruited from community-based settings in Sydney, Australia, attend 6 clinic visits over 3 years. At the first 5 visits, participants undergo a digital anorectal examination, an anal swab for HPV genotyping and anal cytology, and high-resolution anoscopy with directed biopsy of any visible abnormalities that are suggestive of any abnormality suspicious of SIL. Tissue sections from participants diagnosed with histologically confirmed HSIL at the baseline clinic visit will undergo laser capture microdissection, HPV detection and genotyping, and quantitation of CpG methylation in baseline and follow-up biopsies. Histological and cytological findings in combination with HPV genotyping data will be used to identify persistent HSIL. HSIL will be stratified as non-persistent and persistent based on their status at 12 months. The performance of HPV genotype and methylation status in predicting disease persistence at 12 months will be assessed, along with associations with HIV status and other covariates such as age. Ethics and dissemination The St Vincent's Hospital Ethics Committee granted ethics approval for the study. Written informed consent is obtained from all individuals before any study-specific procedures are performed. Findings from this study will be disseminated

  8. A retrospective clinical study of the treatment of high-grade anal dysplasia by infrared coagulation in a population of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Cranston, R D; Hirschowitz, S L; Cortina, G; Moe, A A

    2008-02-01

    HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of developing human papillomavirus-associated anal squamous cell cancer. Similar to the management of cervical dysplasia, clinicians are treating high-grade anal dysplasia to prevent progression to cancer. Initial treatments such as cold scalpel excision and electrofulguration have shown limited efficacy in a HIV-positive population. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is an outpatient treatment for high-grade anal dysplasia. This retrospective clinical study reports on 68 HIV-positive MSM with 78 biopsy proven high-grade anal lesions. Each lesion was treated with the IRC with re-biopsy of the treatment site a mean of 140 days later. Of the 74 evaluable lesions; 39 had anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 1, 20 had AIN 2, seven had AIN 3, and eight had normal epithelium. The IRC showed 64% efficacy per treated lesion and shows promise as a treatment modality for high-grade anal dysplasia in this population. PMID:18334066

  9. Endoscopy-assisted transanal repair of afferent limb obstruction and long efferent limb with ileopexy after ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Kawamura, Mikio; Kondo, Satoru; Kobayashi, Minako; Ohi, Masaki; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2016-05-01

    Afferent limb obstruction can be a persistent complication after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. We present a case of afferent limb obstruction complicated by a long efferent limb of the ileal pouch that we successfully treated with side-to-side anastomosis of the afferent and efferent limbs. The procedure involved using a transanal endoscopic stapling device assisted by transanal endoscopy with a thin intestinal video endoscope. This allowed reliable, safe visualization of the lesion from the tight pouch-anal anastomosis and facilitated repair with an endoscopic stapling device. Because the technique was performed without enterotomy, it reduced the risks of contamination and leakage from transabdominal small bowel anastomosis. Laparotomy view also prevented of injury to the pouch itself and entrapment of the mesentery of the afferent and efferent limbs of the pouch between the stapler anvils. PMID:27117971

  10. The role of systemic chemotherapy and multidisciplinary management in improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Eng, Cathy; Chang, George J; You, Y Nancy; Das, Prajnan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Xing, Yan; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Rogers, Jane E; Ohinata, Aki; Pathak, Priyanka; Sethi, Salil; Phillips, Jonathan K; Crane, Christopher H; Wolff, Robert A

    2014-11-30

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the anal canal is a rare malignancy for which no standard treatment algorithm exists. To determine the best approach, all patients diagnosed with metastatic SCCA of the anal canal treated at a single institution were evaluated for choice of chemotherapy and treatment outcome. A retrospective study from January 2000 to May 2012 was conducted. Electronic medical records were reviewed for diagnosis of metastatic SCCA of the anal canal. All patients were treatment naïve for metastatic disease and completed all radiographic imaging at our institution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes among patients who received systemic chemotherapy and if appropriate were referred for multidisciplinary intervention (e.g., surgery, radiofrequency ablation, etc.). Seventy-seven patients fulfilled eligibility criteria. Forty-two patients (55%) received 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + cisplatin (PF); 24 patients (31%) received carboplatin + paclitaxel (CP); 11 patients (14%) received an alternative regimen. After a median follow-up of 42 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients was 7 months; the median overall survival (OS) was 22 months. Thirty-three patients (43%) underwent multidisciplinary management for metastatic disease resulting in a median PFS of 16 months (95% CI: 9.2 -22.8) and median OS of 53 months (95% CI: 28.3 - 77.6). Systemic chemotherapy provides durable survival for patients with surgically unresectable metastatic SCCA of the anal canal. Multidisciplinary management for select patients with metastatic disease effectively improves survival and should be considered whenever possible. PMID:25373735

  11. Contrast-Enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Staging and Radiotherapy Planning in Patients With Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bannas, Peter; Weber, Christoph; Adam, Gerhard; Frenzel, Thorsten; Derlin, Thorsten; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: The practice of surgical staging and treatment of anal cancer has been replaced by noninvasive staging and combined modality therapy. For appropriate patient management, accurate lymph node staging is crucial. The present study evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and radiotherapy planning of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 consecutive patients (median age, 61 years old) with anal cancer underwent complete staging evaluation including physical examination, biopsy of the primary tumor, and contrast-enhanced (ce)-PET/CT. Patients were positioned as they would be for their subsequent radiotherapy. PET and CT images were evaluated independently for detectability and localization of the primary tumor, pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, and distant metastasis. The stage, determined by CT or PET alone, and the proposed therapy planning were compared with the stage and management determined by ce-PET/CT. Data from ce-PET/CT were used for radiotherapy planning. Results: ce-PET/CT revealed locoregional lymph node metastasis in 11 of 22 patients (50%). After simultaneous reading of PET and CT data sets by experienced observers, 3 patients (14%) were found to have sites of disease not seen on CT that were identified on PET. Two patients had sites of disease not seen on PET that were identified on CT. In summary, 2 patients were upstaged, and 4 patients were downstaged due to ce-PET/CT. However, radiotherapy fields were changed due to the results from ce-PET/CT in 23% of cases compared to CT or PET results alone. Conclusions: ce-PET/CT is superior to PET or CT alone for staging of anal cancer, with significant impact on therapy planning.

  12. Postpartum translabial 2D and 3D ultrasound measurements of the anal sphincter complex in primiparous women delivering by vaginal birth versus Cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rebecca J.; Leeman, Lawrence M.; Migliaccio, Laura; Qualls, Clifford; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Consensus on normal translabial ultrasound (TL-US) anal sphincter complex measurements for postpartum women is lacking. We aimed to evaluate normative measurements in 2D and 3D TL-US for the anal sphincter complex (ASC) at 6 months postpartum and compare these measurements in women who had a vaginal birth (VB) and in those who had a Cesarean delivery (CD). Methods A large, prospective cohort of primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US 6 months after their first delivery. For normative sphincter measurements, we excluded women with third- or fourth-degree lacerations or with sphincter interruption on TL-US. Measurements included the sphincter thickness at the 3, 6, 9, and 12 o'clock positions of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and the internal anal sphincter (IAS) at proximal, mid, and distal levels. We also measured the mean coronal diameter of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 696 women consented to participate, and 433 women presented for ultrasound imaging 6 months later. Women who sustained a third- or fourth-degree laceration had significantly thicker EAS measurements at 12 o'clock. Sphincter asymmetry was common (69 %), but was not related to mode of delivery. Only IAS measurements at the proximal and distal 12 o'clock position were significantly thicker for CD patients. There were no significant differences in the EAS or PVM measurements between VB and CD women. Conclusions There appear to be few differences in normative sphincter ultrasound measurements between primiparous patients who had VB or CD. PMID:24105408

  13. Correlation between gross anatomical topography, sectional sheet plastination, microscopic anatomy and endoanal sonography of the anal sphincter complex in human males

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, S; Blyth, P; Beatty, S; Duang, A; Parry, B; Bissett, I P

    2009-01-01

    This study elucidates the structure of the anal sphincter complex (ASC) and correlates the individual layers, namely the external anal sphincter (EAS), conjoint longitudinal muscle (CLM) and internal anal sphincter (IAS), with their ultrasonographic images. Eighteen male cadavers, with an average age of 72 years (range 62–82 years), were used in this study. Multiple methods were used including gross dissection, coronal and axial sheet plastination, different histological staining techniques and endoanal sonography. The EAS was a continuous layer but with different relations, an upper part (corresponding to the deep and superficial parts in the traditional description) and a lower (subcutaneous) part that was located distal to the IAS, and was the only muscle encircling the anal orifice below the IAS. The CLM was a fibro-fatty-muscular layer occupying the intersphincteric space and was continuous superiorly with the longitudinal muscle layer of the rectum. In its middle and lower parts it consisted of collagen and elastic fibres with fatty tissue filling the spaces between the fibrous septa. The IAS was a markedly thickened extension of the terminal circular smooth muscle layer of the rectum and it terminated proximal to the lower part of the EAS. On endoanal sonography, the EAS appeared as an irregular hyperechoic band; CLM was poorly represented by a thin irregular hyperechoic line and IAS was represented by a hypoechoic band. Data on the measurements of the thickness of the ASC layers are presented and vary between dissection and sonographic imaging. The layers of the ASC were precisely identified in situ, in sections, in isolated dissected specimens and the same structures were correlated with their sonographic appearance. The results of the measurements of ASC components in this study on male cadavers were variable, suggesting that these should be used with caution in diagnostic and management settings. PMID:19486204

  14. Association Between Bone Marrow Dosimetric Parameters and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K. Schomas, David A.; Salama, Joseph K.; Devisetty, Kiran; Aydogan, Bulent; Miller, Robert C.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Kindler, Hedy L.; Roeske, John C.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the volume of pelvic bone marrow (PBM) receiving 10 and 20 Gy or more (PBM-V{sub 10} and PBM-V{sub 20}) is associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 48 consecutive anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median radiation dose to gross tumor and regional lymph nodes was 50.4 and 45 Gy, respectively. Pelvic bone marrow was defined as the region extending from the iliac crests to the ischial tuberosities, including the os coxae, lumbosacral spine, and proximal femora. Endpoints included the white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin, and platelet count nadirs. Regression models with multiple independent predictors were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT. Results: Twenty patients (42%) had Stage T3-4 disease; 15 patients (31%) were node positive. Overall, 27 (56%), 24 (50%), 4 (8%), and 13 (27%) experienced acute Grade 3-4 leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, respectively. On multiple regression analysis, increased PBM-V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were significantly associated with decreased WBC and ANC nadirs, as were female gender, decreased body mass index, and increased lumbosacral bone marrow V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} (p < 0.05 for each association). Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with a decreased WBC nadir on multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This analysis supports the hypothesis that increased low-dose radiation to PBM is associated with acute HT during chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Techniques to limit bone marrow irradiation may reduce HT in anal cancer patients.

  15. Clinical and physiological study of anal sphincter and ileal J pouch before preileostomy closure and 6 and 12 months after closure of loop ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Chaussade, S; Michopoulos, S; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Guerre, J; Couturier, D

    1991-02-01

    Spontaneous evolution of pouch and anal function, and absorption features has been assessed in 15 patients who underwent proctocolectomy with J ileal pouch anastomosis without conservation of a rectal muscular cuff. All the patients were studied before preileostomy closure and six and 12 months after the closure of the protection loop ileostomy. Stool frequency was identical at six and 12 months (mean +/- SEM: 5.0 +/- 0.4 and 5.3 +/- 0.5/day, respectively). Sixty-six percent of patients at six months and 40% of patients at 12 months need to defecate at least one time during night. Stool weight as well as steatorrhea decreased significantly six months after the closure of loop ileostomy (P less than 0.05). Mean resting anal pressure remained unchanged six and 12 months after closure of the loop ileostomy (41 +/- 6 and 45 +/- 5 cm H2O, respectively). Maximum squeeze anal pressures increased significantly at six (P less than 0.05) and 12 months (P less than 0.05). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was always absent at the same period. The maximum pouch capacity increased significantly during the first six months (P less than 0.01) from 142 +/- 17 to 279 +/- 27 ml. The maximum infused volume during a saline continence test was not significantly different at six and 12 months; the percentage of evacuation of the reservoir and the volume at which the first ileal contraction appeared in the reservoir increased significantly (P less than 0.05) at six and 12 months. In conclusion, in patients with ileoanal anastomosis and pouch reservoir, the closure of the loop ileostomy is associated with spontaneous modifications of the anal and pouch parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1988259

  16. The role of systemic chemotherapy and multidisciplinary management in improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Cathy; Chang, George J.; Nancy You, Y.; Das, Prajnan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Xing, Yan; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Rogers, Jane E.; Ohinata, Aki; Pathak, Priyanka; Sethi, Salil; Phillips, Jonathan K.; Crane, Christopher H.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) of the anal canal is a rare malignancy for which no standard treatment algorithm exists. To determine the best approach, all patients diagnosed with metastatic SCCA of the anal canal treated at a single institution were evaluated for choice of chemotherapy and treatment outcome. A retrospective study from January 2000 to May 2012 was conducted. Electronic medical records were reviewed for diagnosis of metastatic SCCA of the anal canal. All patients were treatment naïve for metastatic disease and completed all radiographic imaging at our institution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes among patients who received systemic chemotherapy and if appropriate were referred for multidisciplinary intervention (e.g., surgery, radiofrequency ablation, etc.). Seventy-seven patients fulfilled eligibility criteria. Forty-two patients (55%) received 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) + cisplatin (PF); 24 patients (31%) received carboplatin + paclitaxel (CP); 11 patients (14%) received an alternative regimen. After a median follow-up of 42 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients was 7 months; the median overall survival (OS) was 22 months. Thirty-three patients (43%) underwent multidisciplinary management for metastatic disease resulting in a median PFS of 16 months (95% CI: 9·2 −22·8) and median OS of 53 months (95% CI: 28·3 – 77·6). Systemic chemotherapy provides durable survival for patients with surgically unresectable metastatic SCCA of the anal canal. Multidisciplinary management for select patients with metastatic disease effectively improves survival and should be considered whenever possible. PMID:25373735

  17. Correlation between gross anatomical topography, sectional sheet plastination, microscopic anatomy and endoanal sonography of the anal sphincter complex in human males.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, S; Blyth, P; Beatty, S; Duang, A; Parry, B; Bissett, I P

    2009-08-01

    This study elucidates the structure of the anal sphincter complex (ASC) and correlates the individual layers, namely the external anal sphincter (EAS), conjoint longitudinal muscle (CLM) and internal anal sphincter (IAS), with their ultrasonographic images. Eighteen male cadavers, with an average age of 72 years (range 62-82 years), were used in this study. Multiple methods were used including gross dissection, coronal and axial sheet plastination, different histological staining techniques and endoanal sonography. The EAS was a continuous layer but with different relations, an upper part (corresponding to the deep and superficial parts in the traditional description) and a lower (subcutaneous) part that was located distal to the IAS, and was the only muscle encircling the anal orifice below the IAS. The CLM was a fibro-fatty-muscular layer occupying the intersphincteric space and was continuous superiorly with the longitudinal muscle layer of the rectum. In its middle and lower parts it consisted of collagen and elastic fibres with fatty tissue filling the spaces between the fibrous septa. The IAS was a markedly thickened extension of the terminal circular smooth muscle layer of the rectum and it terminated proximal to the lower part of the EAS. On endoanal sonography, the EAS appeared as an irregular hyperechoic band; CLM was poorly represented by a thin irregular hyperechoic line and IAS was represented by a hypoechoic band. Data on the measurements of the thickness of the ASC layers are presented and vary between dissection and sonographic imaging. The layers of the ASC were precisely identified in situ, in sections, in isolated dissected specimens and the same structures were correlated with their sonographic appearance. The results of the measurements of ASC components in this study on male cadavers were variable, suggesting that these should be used with caution in diagnostic and management settings. PMID:19486204

  18. Presence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotype and Human Immunodeficiency Virus DNA in Anal High-Grade and Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chin-Yuan; Agsalda-Garcia, Melissa; Nagata, Ian; Milne, Cris; Zhu, Xuemei; Killeen, Jeffrey; Berry, J. Michael; Goodman, Marc T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-infected individuals are at risk for anal cancer, which is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The relationship between HIV and HPV that leads to anal cancer remains unclear. Recent data, however, suggest that the continued persistence of HIV DNA in patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy leads to progression of HIV disease and other HIV-associated complications. Therefore, we investigated the relationship among anal low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL/HGSIL), high-risk HPV genotypes, and high HIV DNA copy numbers. Anal cytology specimens were assayed for HPV genotype and HIV DNA copy number. High-risk HPV genotypes (odds ratio OR: 3.73; 95% confidence interval CI: 1.08–12.91; p=0.04) and high HIV DNA copy numbers (ORper 100 HIV DNA copies: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.01–1.27, p=0.04) were both associated with LGSIL/HGSIL. When considering both high-risk HPV genotypes and HIV DNA copy numbers in predicting LGSIL/HGSIL, HIV DNA copy number was significant (ORper 100 HIV DNA copies: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.96–1.23, p=0.04) but not high-risk HPV genotypes (OR: 2.30, p=0.28), which did not change when adjusted for nadir CD4 cell count and HIV RNA levels. The findings warrant further investigation of HIV DNA and its relationship with HPV in LGSIL/HGSIL pathogenesis. PMID:22816619

  19. High prevalence and incidence of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia among young Thai men who have sex with men with and without HIV

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Triratanachat, Surang; Keelawat, Somboon; Pankam, Tippawan; Kerr, Stephen J.; Deesua, Amornrat; Tantbirojn, Patou; Numto, Saranya; Phanuphak, Praphan; Palefsky, Joel M.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at elevated risk of having anal cancer. However, the prevalence and incidence among MSM of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the putative precursor of anal cancer, is understudied, particularly in Asians. Methods A total of 123 HIV-positive and 123 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled at the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre in Bangkok, Thailand, and followed for 12 months. Anal sample collection for human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping and high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with biopsies were performed at every visit. Results Mean age at enrollment was 28.9 years. HIV-positive MSM were more commonly infected with high-risk HPV types in the anus than HIV-negative MSM (57.5% vs. 36.6%, p=0.001). The prevalence of HGAIN was 18.9% in HIV-positive and 11.4% in HIV-negative MSM (p=0.1). The incidence of HGAIN at 12 months was 29% in HIV-positive and 8% in HIV-negative MSM (p=0.001). The hazard ratios for incident HGAIN in multivariate models were 5.16 (95% CI 1.89–14.08, p<0.001) in MSM with persistent HPV 16 and/or 18 infection and 2.62 (95% CI 1.04–6.61, p=0.042) in HIV-positive MSM. Conclusions Approximately one-third of HIV-positive MSM developed incident HGAIN within 12 months. Given the relative increased prevalence of HIV among MSM worldwide, local HGAIN data are needed to guide practitioners, policy makers, and communities in planning for strategies to screen for and treat HGAIN in this population. PMID:23807271

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Acute Toxicity and Quality of Life After IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Anal Canal and Perianal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Cummings, Bernard J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Skliarenko, Julia; Craig, Tim; Le, Lisa W.; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Dinniwell, Robert; Bayley, Andrew J.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Moore, Malcolm J.; Chen, Eric X.; Easson, Alexandra M.; Kassam, Zahra; Cho, Charles; Kim, John

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate toxicity, quality of life (QOL), and clinical outcomes in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for anal and perianal cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2008 to November 2010, patients with anal or perianal cancer treated with IMRT were eligible. Radiation dose was 27 Gy in 15 fractions to 36 Gy in 20 fractions for elective targets and 45 Gy in 25 fractions to 63 Gy in 35 fractions for gross targets using standardized, institutional guidelines, with no planned treatment breaks. The chemotherapy regimen was 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Toxicity was graded with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. QOL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and CR29 questionnaires. Correlations between dosimetric parameters and both physician-graded toxicities and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated by polyserial correlation. Results: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 34 months; the median age was 56 years; 52% of patients were female; and 19% were human immunodeficiency virus—positive. Stage I, II, III, and IV disease was found in 9%, 57%, 26%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Twenty-six patients (45%) required a treatment break because of acute toxicity, mainly dermatitis (23/26). Acute grade 3 + toxicities included skin 46%, hematologic 38%, gastrointestinal 9%, and genitourinary 0. The 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), and cumulative locoregional failure (LRF) rates were 90%, 77%, 84%, and 16%, respectively. The global QOL/health status, skin, defecation, and pain scores were significantly worse at the end of treatment than at baseline, but they returned to baseline 3 months after treatment. Social functioning and appetite scores were

  1. High-Grade Acute Organ Toxicity as a Positive Prognostic Factor in Primary Radiochemotherapy for Anal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Raus, Ismene; Jung, Klaus; Schueler, Phillip; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Hennies, Steffen; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radiochemotherapy and treatment outcome for patients with anal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 72 patients with anal carcinoma were treated at our department (10 patients had stage I, 28 patients had stage II, 11 patients had stage IIIA, and 13 patients had stage IIIB cancer [Union Internationale Contre le Cancer criteria]). All patients received normofractionated (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) whole-pelvis irradiation including iliac and inguinal lymph nodes with a cumulative dose of 50.4 Gy. Concomitant chemotherapy regimen consisted of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}total body surface area (TBSA)/day as continuous intravenous infusion on days 1-4 and 29-32) and mitomycin C (10 mg/m{sup 2}/TBSA, intravenously on days 1 and 29). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly, and any incidence of Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade of {>=}3 for skin reaction, cystitis, proctitis, or enteritis was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: We found significant correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival, locoregional control, and stoma-free survival, which was independent in multivariate analysis from other possible prognostic factors: patients with a CTC acute organ toxicity grade of {>=}3 had a 5-year overall survival rate of 97% compared to 30% in patients without (p < 0.01, multivariate analysis; 97% vs. 48%, p = 0.03 for locoregional control, and 95% vs. 59%, p = 0.05 for stoma-free survival). Conclusions: Our data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, since high-grade acute organ toxicity during radiochemotherapy showed itself to be an independent prognostic marker in our patient population. This hypothesis should be further analyzed by using biomolecular and clinical levels in future clinical trials.

  2. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P.; Yang, T. Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  3. Sexual Behaviors and Partner-Specific Correlates of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse Among Truck Drivers and Their Wives in South India

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Tarun; Saravanamurthy, P. Sakthivel; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    It is important to know about patterns of sexual behaviors among married couples in order to develop effective HIV prevention strategies for them. Herein we describe the sexual behaviors, estimate prevalence of anal intercourse (AI) among truck drivers (‘‘truckers’’) and their wives, and determine partner-specific demographic and behavioral correlates of AI. We carried out a cluster-sampled cross-sectional survey among 18–49 year-old wives and their trucker husbands in a south Indian district. Data were collected by same-gender research team members with color-coded computer-assisted interviews. We used random intercept logistic regression to identify the independent correlates of AI. Thirteen percent of 475 wives and 467 truckers reported ever having AI with their spouse. Of those who responded, 55 % of 40 wives and 47 % of 36 truckers never used condoms during AI. Of those who responded, 22 of 32 wives and 24 of 32 husbands felt that condoms were unnecessary during AI. Reporting ever having AI was associated with younger age and higher education of both husband and wife. AI reported by wives was associated with having sexual partner(s) other than husband (adjusted OR 8.8 [95 % CI 3.2–24.0]), correctly answering all HIV knowledge items (adjusted OR 4.9 [95 % CI 1.9–12.5]), husband’s sexual debut occurring before marriage (adjusted OR 1.9 [95 % CI 1.0–3.5]), and husband’s high HIV risk perception (adjusted OR 2.5 [95 % CI 1.2–5.4]). AI reported by truckers was associated with having sex with a male or transgender (adjusted OR 4.0 [95 % CI 1.2–13.3]). Reported prevalence of AI was high considering that in India anal sex is non-normative, heavily stigmatized and, criminal. Indian heterosexual mobile populations need to be informed about the greater risk of HIV infection consequent to unprotected AI. PMID:25252610

  4. Sexual behaviors and partner-specific correlates of heterosexual anal intercourse among truck drivers and their wives in South India.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tarun; Sakthivel Saravanamurthy, P; Detels, Roger

    2015-02-01

    It is important to know about patterns of sexual behaviors among married couples in order to develop effective HIV prevention strategies for them. Herein we describe the sexual behaviors, estimate prevalence of anal intercourse (AI) among truck drivers ("truckers") and their wives, and determine partner-specific demographic and behavioral correlates of AI. We carried out a cluster-sampled cross-sectional survey among 18-49 year-old wives and their trucker husbands in a south Indian district. Data were collected by same-gender research team members with color-coded computer-assisted interviews. We used random intercept logistic regression to identify the independent correlates of AI. Thirteen percent of 475 wives and 467 truckers reported ever having AI with their spouse. Of those who responded, 55 % of 40 wives and 47 % of 36 truckers never used condoms during AI. Of those who responded, 22 of 32 wives and 24 of 32 husbands felt that condoms were unnecessary during AI. Reporting ever having AI was associated with younger age and higher education of both husband and wife. AI reported by wives was associated with having sexual partner(s) other than husband (adjusted OR 8.8 [95 % CI 3.2-24.0]), correctly answering all HIV knowledge items (adjusted OR 4.9 [95 % CI 1.9-12.5]), husband's sexual debut occurring before marriage (adjusted OR 1.9 [95 % CI 1.0-3.5]), and husband's high HIV risk perception (adjusted OR 2.5 [95 % CI 1.2-5.4]). AI reported by truckers was associated with having sex with a male or transgender (adjusted OR 4.0 [95 % CI 1.2-13.3]). Reported prevalence of AI was high considering that in India anal sex is non-normative, heavily stigmatized and, criminal. Indian heterosexual mobile populations need to be informed about the greater risk of HIV infection consequent to unprotected AI. PMID:25252610

  5. Effects of Aloe vera cream on chronic anal fissure pain, wound healing and hemorrhaging upon defection: a prospective double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, N; Khademloo, M; Vosoughi, K; Assadpour, S

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that promotes wound healing in burn injuries. A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of a topical cream containing 0.5% Aloe vera juice powder in the treatment of chronic anal fissures. The aloe cream was applied by the patients to the wound site 3 times per day for 6 weeks following the instructions of a physician. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before treatment and at the end of each week of treatment. Wound healing and the amount and severity of bleeding were examined and evaluated before and at the end of each week of treatment. There were statistically significant differences in chronic anal fissure pain, hemorrhaging upon defection and wound healing before and at the end of the first week of treatment also in comparison with control group (p < 0.0001). In this study, a topical cream containing aloe vera juice was an effective treatment for chronic anal fissures. This is a promising result indicating that further comparative studies are justified. PMID:24763890

  6. Association of Situational and Environmental Factors With Last Episode of Unprotected Anal Intercourse Among MSM in Hong Kong: A Case-Crossover Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Joseph T F; Mo, Phoenix K H; Gu, Jing; Hao, Chun; Lai, CoCo H Y

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates event-specific factors that differentiate the last episodes of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) from protected anal intercourse (PAI) with regular partner (RP) among 213 men who have sex with men (MSM) who did not use condoms consistently using case-crossover analysis. Factors positively associated with the last episode of UAI with RP included: two situational factors (i.e., participant's suggestion to have UAI, alcohol use) and three environmental/setting factors (i.e., sex took place overseas, during a weekday and not at home). Negative associations with an episode of UAI with RP included: five situational factors (i.e., discussion about condom use prior to sex, RP's suggestion to have PAI, participant's suggestion to have PAI, perception that RP would like to use a condom, participant's planning to use a condom) and two environmental/setting factors (i.e., condoms placed at the venue where sex took place, partner possessed a condom). Thus, these significant event-specific factors explained under which circumstances some MSM would use and would not use condoms during anal sex with RP. PMID:26829255

  7. Efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perianal hidradenitis suppurativa, complicated by anal fistulae: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Hirotoshi; Kazama, Shinsuke; Tanoue, Yusuke; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Miyagawa, Takuya; Yamada, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Perianal hidradenitis suppurativa (PHS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease of the apocrine glands present in the skin and soft tissue adjacent to the anus. It is often misdiagnosed or treatment is delayed, resulting in the formation of an abscess or, in the worst case, leading to sepsis. It is difficult to treat perianal lesions merged with fistulae completely due to its high recurrence rate. Therefore, we should diagnose it correctly and treat it with appropriate methods. Presentation of case We report two cases of PHS with anal fistulae that were examined preoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treated safely by surgery without any recurrence. Discussion The anal sphincter area cannot be visualized and evaluated directly by fistulography. Also CT has only limited resolution, making it difficult to distinguish between soft tissues and inflammatory streaks. Endosonography is not suitable for the examination of supra-sphincteric or extra-sphincteric extensions, as it is limited by insufficient penetration of the ultrasonic beams. MRI can demonstrate the entire course of the fistulae owing to its high contrast resolution. Conclusion Our findings support the idea that PHS with complicated anal fistulae can be diagnosed accurately using MRI and treated safely and completely with surgery. PMID:26339787

  8. Galectin-1-induced skeletal muscle cell differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on an acellular dermal matrix improves injured anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhao; Liu, Xiangui; Ren, Xianghai; Zhang, Qiulei; Zhang, Tingtao; Qian, Qun; Liu, Weicheng; Jiang, Congqing

    2016-05-01

    According to recent studies, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplanted via local or tail vein injection can improve healing after anal sphincter injury (ASI) in animal models. However, the transplanted MSCs do not generate skeletal muscle that completely resembles the natural anal sphincter structure. In the present study, we investigated whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs could be induced by Galectin-1 (Gal-1) to differentiate into skeletal muscle and whether the recellularization of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) with skeletal muscle-differentiated MSCs represents a promising approach to restore ASI in a rat model. BM-MSCs subjected to adenovirus-mediated transfection with Gal-1-GFP (Ad-GFP-Gal-1) displayed increased Gal-1 and desmin expression and differentiated into skeletal muscle cells. MSCs transfected with Ad-GFP-Gal-1 (MSC-Gal-1) were seeded onto an ADM (ADM-MSC-Gal-1) via co-culture, and fusion was observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope. ADM-MSC-Gal-1, ADM-MSC, ADM-MSC-Ad, ADM, or a saline control was applied to a rat ASI model, and injury healing was evaluated via histological examination 6 weeks following treatment. ADM-MSC-Gal-1 treatment promoted significant healing after ASI and improved external anal sphincter contraction curves compared with the other treatments and also led to substantial skeletal muscle regeneration and neovascularization. Our results indicate that repair using ADMs and differentiated MSCs may improve muscle regeneration and restore ASI. PMID:27355329

  9. HIV prevalence and demographic determinants of unprotected anal sex and HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Beirut, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn J; Tohme, Johnny; Hoover, Matthew; Frost, Simon; Ober, Allison; Khouri, Danielle; Iguchi, Martin; Mokhbat, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    The limited epidemiological data in Lebanon suggest that HIV incident cases are predominantly among men who have sex with men (MSM). We assessed the prevalence of HIV and demographic correlates of condom use and HIV testing among MSM in Beirut. Respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit 213 participants for completion of a behavioral survey and an optional free rapid HIV test. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine demographic correlates of unprotected anal sex and any history of HIV testing. Nearly half (47 %) were under age 25 years and 67 % self-identified as gay. Nearly two-thirds (64 %) reported any unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with men in the prior 3 months, including 23 % who had unprotected anal intercourse with men whose HIV status was positive or unknown (UAIPU) to the participant. Three men (1.5 % of 198 participants tested) were HIV-positive; 62 % had any history of HIV testing prior to the study and testing was less common among those engaging in UAIPU compared to others (33 % vs. 71 %). In regression analysis, men in a relationship had higher odds of having UAI but lower odds of UAIPU and any university education was associated with having UAI; those with any prior history of HIV testing were more likely to be in a relationship and have any university education. HIV prevention efforts for MSM need to account for the influence of relationship dynamics and promotion of testing needs to target high-risk MSM. PMID:24752791

  10. HIV Prevalence and Demographic Determinants of Unprotected Anal Sex and HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Glenn J.; Tohme, Johnny; Hoover, Matthew; Frost, Simon; Ober, Allison; Khouri, Danielle; Iguchi, Martin; Mokhbat, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The limited epidemiological data in Lebanon suggest that HIV incident cases are predominantly among men who have sex with men (MSM). We assessed the prevalence of HIV and demographic correlates of condom use and HIV testing among MSM in Beirut. Respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit 213 participants for completion of a behavioral survey and an optional free rapid HIV test. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine demographic correlates of unprotected anal sex and any history of HIV testing. Nearly half (47%) were under age 25 years and 67% self-identified as gay. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported any unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with men in the prior 3 months, including 23% who had unprotected anal intercourse with men whose HIV status was positive or unknown (UAIPU) to the participant. Three men (1.5% of 198 participants tested) were HIV-positive; 62% had any history of HIV testing prior to the study and testing was less common among those engaging in UAIPU compared to others (33% vs. 71%). In regression analysis, men in a relationship had higher odds of having UAI but lower odds of UAIPU and any university education was associated with having UAI; those with any prior history of HIV testing were more likely to be in a relationship and have any university education. HIV prevention efforts for MSM need to account for the influence of relationship dynamics and promotion of testing needs to target high-risk MSM. PMID:24752791

  11. The Pleasure Principle: The Effect of Perceived Pleasure Loss Associated with Condoms on Unprotected Anal Intercourse Among Immigrant Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J.; Bianchi, Fernanda T.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sexual pleasure has been identified as an important consideration in decision-making surrounding condom use. We examined the impact of perceived pleasure loss associated with condom use on recent history of insertive and receptive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) living in the United States. A total of 482 Dominican, Colombian, and Brazilian immigrant MSM were surveyed regarding sexual attitudes and practices via computer-assisted self-interviewing technology with audio enhancement (ACASI). Participants rated the pleasure they derived from protected and unprotected anal intercourse in each position (insertive and receptive) and also reported their HIV status, relationship status, and recent sexual history. Men who had engaged in both positions, with and without condoms (n=268), perceived a greater pleasure loss associated with condoms during anal intercourse in the insertive versus receptive position. Logistic regression analyses controlling for HIV status, relationship status, and age revealed that men who perceived greater pleasure loss from condoms were more likely to have engaged in UAI over the past 3 months (n[insertive]=297; n[receptive]=284). Findings indicate that the pleasure loss associated with condoms may be a key deterrent for their use in either sex position among Latino MSM. Therefore, pleasure needs to be prioritized in the development of condoms and other sexual safety measures as well as in the promotion of their use. PMID:22663165

  12. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2011-10-01

    PURPOSE: Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. METHODS: Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. RESULTS: Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. CONCLUSION: Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  13. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. Methods Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. Results Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. Conclusion Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  14. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn's Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn's disease (CD). CASE REPORT A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months' duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. CONCLUSIONS Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract. PMID:27373845

  15. ProEx™ C is a useful ancillary study for grading anal intraepithelial neoplasia alone and in combination with other biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brent K; Mohanty, Sambit K; Wu, Julie M; Bose, Shikha; Walts, Ann E

    2016-03-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a precursor to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Histologic evaluation is hampered by intra- and interobserver variability. Various biomarkers have been investigated to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnosis and grading, but interpretation can be challenging. ProEx™ C is an antibody cocktail for proteins upregulated in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This study investigated ProEx™ C's role alone and with p16 and Ki-67 in the diagnosis and grading of AIN. Sixty-seven anal tissue samples (22 AIN I, 25 AIN II/III, and 20 non-dysplastic) were stained for ProEx™ C, Ki-67, and p16. Staining patterns were recorded and correlated with morphologic diagnoses. Considering AIN II/III vs I, full-thickness ProEx™ C staining was more frequent in AIN II/III (p = 0.0373), and showed the highest sensitivity of the biomarkers. In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity was lower, but specificity for AIN II/III rose to 83%. For differentiating non-dysplasia from AIN I, negative ProEx™ C staining correlated with non-dysplasia (p < 0.0001) and had the highest sensitivity (90%). In combination with Ki-67, sensitivity dropped to 80%, but specificity was high (96%). ProEx™ C is useful for diagnosing and grading AIN, performing as well or better than other markers at identifying AIN II/III and non-dysplastic epithelium. PMID:26590011

  16. Intraperitoneal injection (IP), Intravenous injection (IV) or anal injection (AI)? Best way for mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Liang, Cong; Hu, Hao; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Bing; Wang, Xin; Han, Ying; Nie, Yongzhan; Jia, Shuyun; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation showed promising results in IBD management. However, the therapeutic impacts of cell delivery route that is critical for clinical translation are currently poorly understood. Here, three different MSCs delivery routes: intraperitoneal (IP), intravenous (IV), and anal injection (AI) were compared on DSS-induced colitic mice model. The overall therapeutic factors, MSCs migration and targeting as well as local immunomodulatory cytokines and FoxP3(+) cells infiltration were analyzed. Colitis showed varying degrees of alleviation after three ways of MSCs transplantation, and the IP injection showed the highest survival rate of 87.5% and displayed the less weight loss and quick weight gain. The fecal occult blood test on the day 3 also showed nearly complete absence of occult blood in IP group. The fluorescence imaging disclosed higher intensity of engrafted cells in inflamed colon and the corresponding mesentery lymph nodes (MLNs) in IP and AI groups than the IV group. Real time-PCR and ELISA also demonstrate lower TNF-α and higher IL-10, TSG-6 levels in IP group. The immunohistochemistry indicated higher repair proliferation (Ki-67) and more FoxP3(+) cells accumulation of IP group. IP showed better colitis recovery and might be the optimum MSCs delivery route for the treatment of DSS-induced colitis. PMID:27488951

  17. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with synchronous rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Er; Niu, Bei-Zhan; Ji, Wu-Yang; Wu, Bin

    2016-06-14

    We report on a patient diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with synchronous rectal cancer who was treated with laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). PJS is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and increased risks of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancer. This report presents a patient with a 20-year history of intermittent bloody stool, mucocutaneous pigmentation and a family history of PJS, which together led to a diagnosis of PJS. Moreover, colonoscopy and biopsy revealed the presence of multiple serried giant pedunculated polyps and rectal adenocarcinoma. Currently, few options exist for the therapeutic management of PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. For this case, we adopted an unconventional surgical strategy and ultimately performed laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA. This procedure is widely considered to be the first-line treatment option for patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. However, there are no previous reports of treating PJS patients with laparoscopic IPAA. Since the operation, the patient has experienced no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and has demonstrated satisfactory bowel control. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. PMID:27298573

  18. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with synchronous rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Min-Er; Niu, Bei-Zhan; Ji, Wu-Yang; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We report on a patient diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with synchronous rectal cancer who was treated with laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). PJS is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and increased risks of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancer. This report presents a patient with a 20-year history of intermittent bloody stool, mucocutaneous pigmentation and a family history of PJS, which together led to a diagnosis of PJS. Moreover, colonoscopy and biopsy revealed the presence of multiple serried giant pedunculated polyps and rectal adenocarcinoma. Currently, few options exist for the therapeutic management of PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. For this case, we adopted an unconventional surgical strategy and ultimately performed laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA. This procedure is widely considered to be the first-line treatment option for patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. However, there are no previous reports of treating PJS patients with laparoscopic IPAA. Since the operation, the patient has experienced no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and has demonstrated satisfactory bowel control. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. PMID:27298573

  19. Prospective Predictors of Unprotected Anal Intercourse among HIV-Seropositive Men Who Have Sex with Men Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, David W.; Huh, David; Nelson, Kimberly M.; Pearson, Cynthia R.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary HIV prevention efforts are increasingly focused on those already living with HIV/AIDS (i.e., “prevention with positives”). Key to these initiatives is research identifying the most risky behavioral targets. Using a longitudinal design, we examined socio-demographic and psychosocial factors that prospectively predicted unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in a sample of 134 HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) initiating, changing, or re-starting an antiretroviral therapy (ARV) regimen as part of a behavioral intervention study. Computer-based questionnaires were given at baseline and 6 months. In a sequential logistic regression, baseline measures of UAI (Step 1), socio-demographic factors such as Latino ethnicity (Step 2), and psychosocial factors such as crystal methamphetamine use, greater life stress, and lower trait anxiety (Step 3) were predictors of UAI at 6 months. Problem drinking was not a significant predictor. Prevention efforts among MSM living with HIV/AIDS might focus on multiple psychosocial targets, like decreasing their crystal methamphetamine use and teaching coping skills to deal with life stress. PMID:23640652

  20. Viewing Pornography Depicting Unprotected Anal Intercourse: Are There Implications for HIV Prevention among Men Who Have Sex with Men?

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Dylan J; Silvera, Richard J; Hagerty, Robert; Marmor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We used an Internet-based questionnaire to investigate whether viewing pornography depicting unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) was associated with engaging in UAI in a sample of 821 non-monogamous men who have sex with men (MSM). In the three months prior to interview, 77.2% viewed pornography depicting UAI, 42.6% engaged in insertive UAI, and 38.9% engaged in receptive UAI. Polytomous logistic regression of the 751 subjects who provided data on pornography viewing showed significantly elevated odds ratios for having engaged in receptive UAI, insertive UAI, and both receptive and insertive UAI associated with increasing percentage of pornography viewed that depicted UAI. We also found independently significant associations of engaging in UAI with age, use of inhalant nitrites, and HIV status. Although the data cannot establish causality, our findings indicate that viewing pornography depicting UAI and engaging in UAI are correlated. Further research is needed to determine if this observation may have utility for HIV prevention. PMID:21755381

  1. Gay Asian men in Sydney resist international trend: no change in rates of unprotected anal intercourse, 1999-2002.

    PubMed

    Van de Ven, Paul; Mao, Limin; Prestage, Garrett

    2004-02-01

    Against a background of increasing unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the Sydney gay community (and internationally), complementary cross-sectional surveys of sexual practice were conducted among gay men of Asian background in 1999 (N = 319) and 2002 (N = 457). Self-complete questionnaires were used with recruitment at gay bars, gay social functions, and gay sex-on-premises venues. In 2002, self-report HIV status was 73.7% HIV-negative, 3.6% HIV-positive, and 22.8% unknown status (no significant change from 1999). Over time, the proportion of gay Asian men who reported any UAI with regular partners (in the previous 6 months) did not change significantly: 27.9% in 1999; 24.3% in 2002. Similarly, rates of any UAI with casual partners remained steady: 16.3% in 1999; 14.4% in 2002. Only one factor, more extensive engagement in esoteric practices (fisting, sadomasochism, group sex, rimming), was independently associated with sexual risk practice. This suggests that risk in this population of gay men, as in others, has more to do with the sexual cultures in which men are embedded rather than individual-level differences. PMID:15058706

  2. The diameter of the ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis as an important risk factor of pouchitis – clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Marciniak, Ryszard; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Meissner, Wiktor; Krokowicz, Piotr; Paszkowski, Jacek; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Majewski, Przemysław; Marszałek, Andrzej; Drews, Michał

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Patients’ quality of life after restorative proctocolectomy depends on the potential complications. Stricture of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is one of the complications following restorative proctocolectomy. Material/Methods We analyzed the correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and clinical parameters, including pouchitis disease activity index (PDAI), the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase and maximum tolerable volume of the pouch. The study group consisted of 31 patients in whom covering ileostomy had been closed 72±50 months before enrolement to the study. Restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis coli had been performed in this group. Results The study did not show any correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and primary indication for surgery, the time elapsed after restoration of the bowel continuity, the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase, or maximum tolerable volume. However, meaningful correlations between the stricture of the anastomosis and the presence and activity of pouchitis, together with the ileal villi atrophy, were detected. Conclusions Stricture of the anastomosis appears to be an important factor increasing the incidence of pouchitis, and is independent of the underlying condition and time after the operation. Dilation of the anastomosis and prevention of stricture should constitute a permanent element of postoperative follow-up. PMID:21278694

  3. Prevalence of Unprotected Anal Intercourse among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Hu, Yifei; Jia, Yujiang; Su, Yingying; Cui, Huixia; Liu, Huixin; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review was to assess the prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted including online databases like “Wanfang”, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, PubMed and manual searches. Analyses using random-effects models were performed to estimate the prevalence of UAI among MSM in China. Results Sixty-two articles reporting eighty-two studies were selected. The pooled prevalence rates of UAI with any male partner, with regular male partners, with non-regular male partners, with casual male partners, and with commercial male partners among MSM were 53%(95%CI: 51–56%), 45%(95%CI: 39–51%), 34%(95%CI: 24–45%), 33%(95%CI: 30–36%), 12% (95%CI: 5–26%), respectively. A cumulative meta-analysis found that the pooled UAI prevalence decreased over time. Conclusions Although the prevalence of UAI with male partners among MSM in China presents a decreasing trend over the past decade, the concomitant rise in HIV prevalence and incidence indicates that current prevention intervention efforts are insufficient to effectively contain the spread of HIV. Therefore, the persistently high prevalence of risky sexual behaviors underscores the need for innovative and effective prevention strategies among MSM. PMID:24874882

  4. Unprotected anal intercourse among immigrant Latino MSM: the role of characteristics of the person and the sexual encounter.

    PubMed

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Reisen, Carol A; Poppen, Paul J; Bianchi, Fernanda T

    2009-08-01

    Theoretical models of sexual risk-taking have traditionally focused on personal characteristics, but conceptual approaches emphasizing the social and situational context have also been proposed. This study examined the impact of characteristics of the person and of the sexual encounter on unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among 482 immigrant Latino MSM. Analyses included logistic regression and hierarchical linear modeling. The personal characteristic of self-efficacy for safer sex was negatively associated with UAI over the previous three months, at the most recent encounter, and over multiple encounters reported by each participant. In addition, a cross-level interaction of self-efficacy at the person-level and sexual desire at the encounter-level showed that increased sexual desire was associated with greater likelihood of UAI for those with low self-efficacy, but not those with high self-efficacy. Likelihood of UAI was also linked to the situational characteristics of closeness to the partner, seroconcordance, and concern about STIs in the encounter. PMID:19030982

  5. Prevalence and Frequency of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse Among Young People: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Owen, Branwen N; Brock, Patrick M; Butler, Ailsa R; Pickles, Michael; Brisson, Marc; Baggaley, Re