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Sample records for analysis identifies chromosomal

  1. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  2. Genomewide copy number analysis of Müllerian adenosarcoma identified chromosomal instability in the aggressive subgroup.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Changou, Chun A; Liang, Cher-Wei; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lauria, Alexandra; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Lin, Chin-Yao; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Davidson, Ben; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Kuo, Kuan-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Müllerian adenosarcomas are malignant gynecologic neoplasms. Advanced staging and sarcomatous overgrowth predict poor prognosis. Because the genomic landscape remains poorly understood, we conducted this study to characterize the genomewide copy number variations in adenosarcomas. Sixteen tumors, including eight with and eight without sarcomatous overgrowth, were subjected to a molecular inversion probe array analysis. Copy number variations, particularly losses, were significantly higher in cases with sarcomatous overgrowth. Frequent gains of chromosomal 12q were noted, often involving cancer-associated genes CDK4 (six cases), MDM2, CPM, YEATS4, DDIT3, GLI1 (five each), HMGA2 and STAT6 (four), without association with sarcomatous overgrowth status. The most frequent losses involved chromosomes 13q (five cases), 9p, 16q and 17q (four cases each) and were almost limited to cases with sarcomatous overgrowth. MDM2 and CDK4 amplification, as well as losses of RB1 (observed in two cases) and CDKN2A/B (one case), was verified by FISH. By immunohistochemistry, all MDM2/CDK4-coamplified cases were confirmed to overexpress both encoded proteins, whereas all four cases with (plus an additional four without) gain of HMGA2 overexpressed the HMGA2 protein. Both cases with RB1 loss were negative for the immunostaining of the encoded protein. Chromothripsis-like copy number profiles involving chromosome 12 or 14 were observed in three fatal cases, all of which harbored sarcomatous overgrowth. With whole chromosome painting and deconvolution fluorescent microscopy, dividing tumor cells in all three cases were shown to have scattered extrachromosomal materials derived from chromosomes involved by chromothripsis, suggesting that this phenomenon may serve as visual evidence for chromothripsis in paraffin tissue. In conclusion, we identified frequent chromosome 12q amplifications, including loci containing potential pharmacological targets. Global chromosomal instability and

  3. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  4. Affected Kindred Analysis of Human X Chromosome Exomes to Identify Novel X-Linked Intellectual Disability Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S.; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders. PMID:25679214

  5. Analysis of the chromosome X exome in patients with autism spectrum disorders identified novel candidate genes, including TMLHE

    PubMed Central

    Nava, C; Lamari, F; Héron, D; Mignot, C; Rastetter, A; Keren, B; Cohen, D; Faudet, A; Bouteiller, D; Gilleron, M; Jacquette, A; Whalen, S; Afenjar, A; Périsse, D; Laurent, C; Dupuits, C; Gautier, C; Gérard, M; Huguet, G; Caillet, S; Leheup, B; Leboyer, M; Gillberg, C; Delorme, R; Bourgeron, T; Brice, A; Depienne, C

    2012-01-01

    The striking excess of affected males in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that genes located on chromosome X contribute to the etiology of these disorders. To identify new X-linked genes associated with ASD, we analyzed the entire chromosome X exome by next-generation sequencing in 12 unrelated families with two affected males. Thirty-six possibly deleterious variants in 33 candidate genes were found, including PHF8 and HUWE1, previously implicated in intellectual disability (ID). A nonsense mutation in TMLHE, which encodes the ɛ-N-trimethyllysine hydroxylase catalyzing the first step of carnitine biosynthesis, was identified in two brothers with autism and ID. By screening the TMLHE coding sequence in 501 male patients with ASD, we identified two additional missense substitutions not found in controls and not reported in databases. Functional analyses confirmed that the mutations were associated with a loss-of-function and led to an increase in trimethyllysine, the precursor of carnitine biosynthesis, in the plasma of patients. This study supports the hypothesis that rare variants on the X chromosome are involved in the etiology of ASD and contribute to the sex-ratio disequilibrium. PMID:23092983

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Thatcher, Louise F; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host-pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host-pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  7. Supernumerary ring chromosome 17 identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, K.; Edwards, M.

    1997-04-14

    We present a patient with multiple anomalies and severe developmental delay. A small supernumerary ring chromosome was found in 40% of her lymphocyte cells at birth. The origin of the marker chromosome could not be determined by GTG banding, but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) later identified the marker as deriving from chromosome 17. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 19 identified by comparative genomic hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, S R; Boyd, E; Connor, J M; Jones, A M; Tolmie, J L

    1998-01-01

    We report the use of comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) to define the origin of a supernumerary ring chromosome which conventional cytogenetic banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) methods had failed to identify. Targeted FISH using whole chromosome 19 library arm and site specific probes then confirmed the CGH results. This study shows the feasibility of using CGH for the identification of supernumerary marker chromosomes, even in fewer than 50% of cells, where no clinical or cytogenetic clues are present. Images PMID:9783708

  9. Genome-wide linkage analysis to identify chromosomal regions affecting phenotypic traits in the chicken. II. Body composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two informative chicken F2 populations based on crosses between a broiler breeder male line and dams from genetically distinct, highly inbred (>99%) chicken lines, the Leghorn G-B2 and Fayoumi M15.2, have been used for genome-wide linkage and QTL analysis. Phenotypic data on 12 body composition trai...

  10. GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY CHROMOSOMAL REGIONS AFFECTING PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN THE CHICKEN. IV. METABOLIC TRAITS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study is a comprehensive genome analysis to detect QTL affecting metabolic traits in chickens. Two unique F2 crosses generated from a commercial broiler male line and two genetically distinct lines (Leghorn and Fayoumi) were used in the present study. The plasma glucagons, insulin, lactate, g...

  11. GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY CHROMOSOMAL REGIONS AFFECTING PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN THE CHICKEN. IV. SKELETAL INTEGRITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two unique chicken F2 populations generated from a broiler breeder male line and two genetically distinct inbred (greater than 99%) chicken lines (Leghom and Fayoumi), were used for whole genome QTL analysis. Twelve phenotypic skeletal integrity traits (6 absolute and 6 relative traits) were measure...

  12. Genome-wide linkage analysis to identify chromosomal regions affecting phenotypic traits in the chicken. I. Growth and average daily gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome scan was used to detect chromosomal regions and QTL that control quantitative traits of economic importance in chickens. Two unique F2 crosses generated from a commercial broiler male line and 2 genetically distinct inbred lines (Leghorn and Fayoumi) were used to identify QTL affecting BW a...

  13. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  14. Genomic copy number analysis of a spectrum of blue nevi identifies recurrent aberrations of entire chromosomal arms in melanoma ex blue nevus.

    PubMed

    Chan, May P; Andea, Aleodor A; Harms, Paul W; Durham, Alison B; Patel, Rajiv M; Wang, Min; Robichaud, Patrick; Fisher, Gary J; Johnson, Timothy M; Fullen, Douglas R

    2016-03-01

    Blue nevi may display significant atypia or undergo malignant transformation. Morphologic diagnosis of this spectrum of lesions is notoriously difficult, and molecular tools are increasingly used to improve diagnostic accuracy. We studied copy number aberrations in a cohort of cellular blue nevi, atypical cellular blue nevi, and melanomas ex blue nevi using Affymetrix's OncoScan platform. Cases with sufficient DNA were analyzed for GNAQ, GNA11, and HRAS mutations. Copy number aberrations were detected in 0 of 5 (0%) cellular blue nevi, 3 of 12 (25%) atypical cellular blue nevi, and 6 of 9 (67%) melanomas ex blue nevi. None of the atypical cellular blue nevi displayed more than one aberration, whereas complex aberrations involving four or more regions were seen exclusively in melanomas ex blue nevi. Gains and losses of entire chromosomal arms were identified in four of five melanomas ex blue nevi with copy number aberrations. In particular, gains of 1q, 4p, 6p, and 8q, and losses of 1p and 4q were each found in at least two melanomas. Whole chromosome aberrations were also common, and represented the sole finding in one atypical cellular blue nevus. When seen in melanomas, however, whole chromosome aberrations were invariably accompanied by partial aberrations of other chromosomes. Three melanomas ex blue nevi harbored aberrations, which were absent or negligible in their precursor components, suggesting progression in tumor biology. Gene mutations involving GNAQ and GNA11 were each detected in two of eight melanomas ex blue nevi. In conclusion, copy number aberrations are more common and often complex in melanomas ex blue nevi compared with cellular and atypical cellular blue nevi. Identification of recurrent gains and losses of entire chromosomal arms in melanomas ex blue nevi suggests that development of new probes targeting these regions may improve detection and risk stratification of these lesions. PMID:26743478

  15. Integrated Genomic and Transcriptional Profiling Identifies Chromosomal Loci with Altered Gene Expression in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; de Wilde, Jillian; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berkhof, Johannes; Yi, Yajun; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J. M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.

    2009-01-01

    For a better understanding of the consequences of recurrent chromosomal alterations in cervical carcinomas, we integrated genome-wide chromosomal and transcriptional profiles of 10 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 5 adenocarcinomas (AdCAs) and 6 normal controls. Previous genomic profiling showed that gains at chromosome arms 1q, 3q, and 20q as well as losses at 8q, 10q, 11q, and 13q were common in cervical carcinomas. Altered regions spanned multiple megabases, and the extent to which expression of genes located there is affected remains unclear. Expression analysis of these previously chromosomally profiled carcinomas yielded 83 genes with significantly differential expression between carcinomas and normal epithelium. Application of differential gene locus mapping (DIGMAP) analysis and the array CGH expression integration tool (ACE-it) identified hotspots within large chromosomal alterations in which gene expression was altered as well. Chromosomal gains of the long arms of chromosome 1, 3, and 20 resulted in increased expression of genes located at 1q32.1-32.2, 3q13.32-23, 3q26.32-27.3, and 20q11.21-13.33, whereas a chromosomal loss of 11q22.3-25 was related to decreased expression of genes located in this region. Overexpression of DTX3L, PIK3R4, ATP2C1, and SLC25A36, all located at 3q21.1-23 and identified by DIGMAP, ACE-it or both, was confirmed in an independent validation sample set consisting of 12 SCCs and 13 normal ectocervical samples. In conclusion, integrated chromosomal and transcriptional profiling identified chromosomal hotspots at 1q, 3q, 11q, and 20q with altered gene expression within large commonly altered chromosomal regions in cervical cancer. PMID:18618715

  16. Identifying and Reducing Systematic Errors in Chromosome Conformation Capture Data

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seungsoo; Kim, Dongsup

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based techniques have recently been used to uncover the mystic genomic architecture in the nucleus. These techniques yield indirect data on the distances between genomic loci in the form of contact frequencies that must be normalized to remove various errors. This normalization process determines the quality of data analysis. In this study, we describe two systematic errors that result from the heterogeneous local density of restriction sites and different local chromatin states, methods to identify and remove those artifacts, and three previously described sources of systematic errors in 3C-based data: fragment length, mappability, and local DNA composition. To explain the effect of systematic errors on the results, we used three different published data sets to show the dependence of the results on restriction enzymes and experimental methods. Comparison of the results from different restriction enzymes shows a higher correlation after removing systematic errors. In contrast, using different methods with the same restriction enzymes shows a lower correlation after removing systematic errors. Notably, the improved correlation of the latter case caused by systematic errors indicates that a higher correlation between results does not ensure the validity of the normalization methods. Finally, we suggest a method to analyze random error and provide guidance for the maximum reproducibility of contact frequency maps. PMID:26717152

  17. Identifying and Reducing Systematic Errors in Chromosome Conformation Capture Data.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungsoo; Kim, Dongsup

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based techniques have recently been used to uncover the mystic genomic architecture in the nucleus. These techniques yield indirect data on the distances between genomic loci in the form of contact frequencies that must be normalized to remove various errors. This normalization process determines the quality of data analysis. In this study, we describe two systematic errors that result from the heterogeneous local density of restriction sites and different local chromatin states, methods to identify and remove those artifacts, and three previously described sources of systematic errors in 3C-based data: fragment length, mappability, and local DNA composition. To explain the effect of systematic errors on the results, we used three different published data sets to show the dependence of the results on restriction enzymes and experimental methods. Comparison of the results from different restriction enzymes shows a higher correlation after removing systematic errors. In contrast, using different methods with the same restriction enzymes shows a lower correlation after removing systematic errors. Notably, the improved correlation of the latter case caused by systematic errors indicates that a higher correlation between results does not ensure the validity of the normalization methods. Finally, we suggest a method to analyze random error and provide guidance for the maximum reproducibility of contact frequency maps. PMID:26717152

  18. An Automated System for Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Melnyk, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a complete system to produce karyotypes and chromosome measurement data from human blood samples, and to provide a basis for statistical analysis of quantitative chromosome measurement data are described.

  19. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  20. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  1. Y-Chromosome Analysis in Retuertas Horses

    PubMed Central

    Brandariz-Fontes, Claudia; Leonard, Jennifer A.; Vega-Pla, José Luis; Backström, Niclas; Lindgren, Gabriella; Lippold, Sebastian; Rico, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    Several studies based on a variety of genetic markers have attempted to establish the origins of horse domestication. Thus far a discrepancy between the results of mitochondrial DNA analysis, which show high levels of diversity, and results from the Y-chromosome, with almost no genetic variability, has been identified. Most previous work on the horse Y-chromosome has focused on widespread, popular breeds or local Asian breeds. It is possible that these breeds represent a reduced set of the genetic variation present in the species. Additional genetic variation may be present in local breeds and ancient feral populations, such as the Retuertas horse in Spain. In this study we analyzed the Y-chromosome of the Retuertas horse, a feral horse population on the Iberian Peninsula that is at least several hundred years old, and whose genetic diversity and morphology suggests that it has been reproductively isolated for a long time. Data from the Retuertas horse was compared to another 11 breeds from the region (Portugal, Spain and France) or likely of Iberian origin, and then to data from 15 more breeds from around the globe. We sequenced 31 introns, Zinc finger Y-chromosomal protein (ZFY) and anonymous Y-linked fragments and genotyped 6 microsatellite loci found on the Y-chromosome. We found no sequence variation among all individuals and all breeds studied. However, fifteen differences were discovered between our data set and reference sequences in GenBank. We show that these likely represent errors within the deposited sequences, and suggest that they should not be used as comparative data for future projects. PMID:23741439

  2. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Andrews, D. T.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Bannerjee, R.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burrill, W.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Clamp, M. E.; Clark, S. Y.; Clarke, G.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S. C. M.; Cobley, V.; Collins, J. E.; Corby, N.; Coville, G. J.; Deloukas, P.; Dhami, P.; Dunham, I.; Dunn, M.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Ellington, A. G.; Faulkner, L.; Frankish, A. G.; Frankland, J.; French, L.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Gilson, C. J.; Ghori, J.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S. M.; Griffiths, C.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E. J.; Hunt, P. J.; Hunt, A. R.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Kay, M.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C. J.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lloyd, C.; Loveland, J. E.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; McLaren, S. J.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Moore, M. J. F.; Nickerson, T.; Palmer, S. A.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Porter, K. M.; Rice, C. M.; Searle, S.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thomas, D. W.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Tubby, B.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Wright, M. W.; Young, L.; Coulson, A.; Durbin, R.; Hubbard, T.; Sulston, J. E.; Beck, S.; Bentley, D. R.; Rogers, J.; Ross, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  3. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Dunham, A; Matthews, L H; Burton, J; Ashurst, J L; Howe, K L; Ashcroft, K J; Beare, D M; Burford, D C; Hunt, S E; Griffiths-Jones, S; Jones, M C; Keenan, S J; Oliver, K; Scott, C E; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Andrews, D T; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Bannerjee, R; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burrill, W; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M E; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S C M; Cobley, V; Collins, J E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Deloukas, P; Dhami, P; Dunham, I; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M E; Ellington, A G; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A G; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gilbert, J G R; Gilson, C J; Ghori, J; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S M; Griffiths, C; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Howden, P J; Huckle, E J; Hunt, P J; Hunt, A R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C J; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Lloyd, C; Loveland, J E; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; McLaren, S J; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K M; Rice, C M; Searle, S; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thomas, D W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tubby, B; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wright, M W; Young, L; Coulson, A; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Sulston, J E; Beck, S; Bentley, D R; Rogers, J; Ross, M T

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  4. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  5. Marker chromosome 21 identified by microdissection and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Palmer, C.G.; Rubinstein, J.

    1995-03-27

    A child without Down`s syndrome but with developmental delay, short stature, and autistic behavior was found to be mosaic 46,XX/47,XX,+mar(21) de novo. The marker was a small ring or dot-like chromosome. Microdissection of the marker was performed. The dissected fragments were biotinylated with sequence-independent PCR as a probe pool for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results suggested an acrocentric origin of the marker. Subsequent FISH with {alpha}-satellite DNA probes for acrocentric chromosomes and chromosome-specific 21 and 22 painting probes confirmed its origin from chromosome 21. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  7. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  8. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  9. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  10. Heterozygous screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies dosage-sensitive genes that affect chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Strome, Erin D; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  11. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  12. Integrated Copy Number and Expression Analysis Identifies Profiles of Whole-Arm Chromosomal Alterations and Subgroups with Favorable Outcome in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Yuriko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Koso, Takahiro; Tsuji, Shingo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Asada, Kayo; Sone, Kenbun; Kurikawa, Reiko; Makii, Chinami; Hagiwara, Otoe; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Maeda, Daichi; Hasegawa, Kosei; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Kawana, Kei; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Yano, Tetsu; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is generally associated with chemoresistance and poor clinical outcome, even with early diagnosis; whereas high-grade serous carcinomas (SCs) and endometrioid carcinomas (ECs) are commonly chemosensitive at advanced stages. Although an integrated genomic analysis of SC has been performed, conclusive views on copy number and expression profiles for CCC are still limited. In this study, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism analysis with 57 epithelial ovarian cancers (31 CCCs, 14 SCs, and 12 ECs) and microarray expression analysis with 55 cancers (25 CCCs, 16 SCs, and 14 ECs). We then evaluated PIK3CA mutations and ARID1A expression in CCCs. SNP array analysis classified 13% of CCCs into a cluster with high frequency and focal range of copy number alterations (CNAs), significantly lower than for SCs (93%, P < 0.01) and ECs (50%, P = 0.017). The ratio of whole-arm to all CNAs was higher in CCCs (46.9%) than SCs (21.7%; P < 0.0001). SCs with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of BRCA1 (85%) also had LOH of NF1 and TP53, and LOH of BRCA2 (62%) coexisted with LOH of RB1 and TP53. Microarray analysis classified CCCs into three clusters. One cluster (CCC-2, n = 10) showed more favorable prognosis than the CCC-1 and CCC-3 clusters (P = 0.041). Coexistent alterations of PIK3CA and ARID1A were more common in CCC-1 and CCC-3 (7/11, 64%) than in CCC-2 (0/10, 0%; P < 0.01). Being in cluster CCC-2 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in CCC. In conclusion, CCC was characterized by a high ratio of whole-arm CNAs; whereas CNAs in SC were mainly focal, but preferentially caused LOH of well-known tumor suppressor genes. As such, expression profiles might be useful for sub-classification of CCC, and might provide useful information on prognosis. PMID:26043110

  13. Quantitative linkage analysis to the autism endophenotype social responsiveness identifies genome-wide significant linkage to two regions on chromosome 8

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Jennifer K.; Werling, Donna M.; Constantino, John N.; Cantor, Rita M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in social function and the presence of repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Following a previous test of principle, we adopted a quantitative approach to discovering genes contributing to the broader autism phenotype by using social responsiveness as an endophenotype for ASD. Method Linkage analyses using scores from the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) were performed in 590 families from AGRE, a largely multiplex ASD cohort. Regional and genome-wide association analyses were performed to search for common variants contributing to social responsiveness. Results SRS is unimodally distributed in male offspring from multiplex autism families, in contrast with a bimodal distribution observed in females. In correlated analyses differing by SRS respondent, genome-wide significant linkage for social responsiveness was identified at chr8p21.3 (multi-point LOD=4.11; teacher/parent scores) and chr8q24.22 (multi-point LOD=4.54; parent-only scores), respectively. Genome-wide or linkage-directed association analyses did not detect common variants contributing to social responsiveness. Conclusions The sex-differential distributions of SRS in multiplex autism families likely reflect mechanisms contributing to the sex ratio for autism observed in the general population and form a quantitative signature of reduced penetrance of inherited liability to ASD among females. The identification of two strong loci for social responsiveness validates the endophenotype approach for the identification of genetic variants contributing to complex traits such as ASD. While causal mutations have yet to be identified, these findings are consistent with segregation of rare genetic variants influencing social responsiveness and underscore the increasingly recognized role of rare inherited variants in the genetic architecture of ASD. PMID:25727539

  14. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Roland; Eckenberg, Ralph; Petit, Jean-Louis; Fonknechten, Núria; Da Silva, Corinne; Cattolico, Laurence; Levy, Michaël; Barbe, Valérie; de Berardinis, Véronique; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Pelletier, Eric; Vico, Virginie; Anthouard, Véronique; Rowen, Lee; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Sun, Hui; Du, Hui; Pepin, Kymberlie; Artiguenave, François; Robert, Catherine; Cruaud, Corinne; Brüls, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Friedlander, Lucie; Samson, Gaelle; Brottier, Philippe; Cure, Susan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Anière, Franck; Samain, Sylvie; Crespeau, Hervé; Abbasi, Nissa; Aiach, Nathalie; Boscus, Didier; Dickhoff, Rachel; Dors, Monica; Dubois, Ivan; Friedman, Cynthia; Gouyvenoux, Michel; James, Rose; Madan, Anuradha; Mairey-Estrada, Barbara; Mangenot, Sophie; Martins, Nathalie; Ménard, Manuela; Oztas, Sophie; Ratcliffe, Amber; Shaffer, Tristan; Trask, Barbara; Vacherie, Benoit; Bellemere, Chadia; Belser, Caroline; Besnard-Gonnet, Marielle; Bartol-Mavel, Delphine; Boutard, Magali; Briez-Silla, Stéphanie; Combette, Stephane; Dufossé-Laurent, Virginie; Ferron, Carolyne; Lechaplais, Christophe; Louesse, Claudine; Muselet, Delphine; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Pateau, Emilie; Petit, Emmanuelle; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Trybou, Arnaud; Vega-Czarny, Nathalie; Bataille, Elodie; Bluet, Elodie; Bordelais, Isabelle; Dubois, Maria; Dumont, Corinne; Guérin, Thomas; Haffray, Sébastien; Hammadi, Rachid; Muanga, Jacqueline; Pellouin, Virginie; Robert, Dominique; Wunderle, Edith; Gauguet, Gilbert; Roy, Alice; Sainte-Marthe, Laurent; Verdier, Jean; Verdier-Discala, Claude; Hillier, LaDeana; Fulton, Lucinda; McPherson, John; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Wilson, Richard; Scarpelli, Claude; Gyapay, Gábor; Wincker, Patrick; Saurin, William; Quétier, Francis; Waterston, Robert; Hood, Leroy; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end. PMID:12508121

  15. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F. A. Gemelli School of Medicine, Rome ); Cheng, S.; Gardiner, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span >100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total [approximately]6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  19. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  20. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  1. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  2. Y chromosomal STR analysis using Pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Hanna; Allen, Marie

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of Y chromosome STR markers has proven to be useful in forensic cases where the samples contain a mixture of DNA from several individuals. STR markers are commonly genotyped based on length separation of PCR products. In this study we evaluated if Pyrosequencing can be used as an alternative method for determining Y-STR variants. In total 70 unrelated Swedish males were typed for the Y chromosomal markers (DYS19, DYS389 I-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 and DYS438) using Pyrosequencing. Using the 8 markers, 57 unique haplotypes were observed with a discrimination capacity of 0.81. At four loci, the Pyrosequencing analysis revealed sequence variants. The sequence variants were found in the DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS393 loci in frequencies between 1.43% and 14.3%. Pyrosequencing has here been shown to be a useful tool for typing Y chromosomal STRs and the method can provide a complement to conventional forensic Y STR analyses. Moreover, the Pyrosequencing method can be used to rapidly evaluate novel markers. PMID:19215881

  3. Tyramide Signal Amplification: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identifying Homoeologous Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Araceli; Loarce, Yolanda; González, Juan M; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Tyramide signal amplification (TSA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been shown as a valuable molecular tool for visualizing specific amplified DNA sequences in chromosome preparations. This chapter describes how to perform TSA-FISH, paying special interest to its two critical steps: probe generation and metaphase plate generation. The potential of physically mapping 12S-globulin sequences by TSA-FISH as a means of identifying homeology among chromosome regions of Avena species was tested and is discussed. PMID:27511165

  4. Analysis of chromosome conservation in Lemur catta studied by chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Maria Francesca; Ventura, Mario; Tempesta, Sergio; Rocchi, Mariano; Archidiacono, Nicoletta

    2002-12-01

    A panel of human chromosome painting probes and bacterial and P1 artificial chromosome (BAC/PAC) clones were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments to investigate the chromosome conservation of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta, LCA) with respect to human. Whole chromosome paints specific for human chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, and X were found to identify a single chromosome or an uninterrupted chromosomal region in LCA. A large set of partial chromosome paints and BAC/PAC probes were then used to refine the characterization of the rearrangements differentiating the two karyotypes. The results were also used to reconstruct the ancestral Lemuridae karyotype. Lemur catta, indeed, can be used as an outgroup, allowing symplesiomorphic (ancestral) rearrangements to be distinguished from apomorphic (derived) rearrangements in lemurs. Some LCA chromosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically. The 'anchorage' of most LCA chromosomes to specific probes will contribute to the standardization of the karyotype of this species. PMID:12474064

  5. Localization of the murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene to chromosome 3 using interspecific backcross analysis.

    PubMed

    Buchberg, A M; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1989-08-01

    The chromosomal location of the murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor (Csfm) gene was determined by interspecific backcross analysis. We mapped Csfm to mouse chromosome 3, 2.5 cM distal to Ngfb and Nras and 1.3 cM proximal to Amy-2. CSFM maps to human chromosome 5q, while AMY2, NGFB, and NRAS map to human chromosome 1p. The chromosomal location of Csfm thus disrupts a previously identified conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 3 and human chromosome 1. The location of Csfm also identifies yet another mouse chromosome that shares synteny with human chromosome 5q, a region involved in several different types of myeloid disease. PMID:2676841

  6. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A.; Janke, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. PMID:26019166

  7. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses.

    PubMed

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A; Janke, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. PMID:26019166

  8. Chromosome substitution strains: gene discovery functional analysis and systems studies

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Joseph H.; Forejt, Jiri; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory mice are valuable in biomedical research in part because of the extraordinary diversity of genetic resources that are available for studies of complex genetic traits and as models for human biology and disease. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) are important in this resource portfolio because of their demonstrated use for gene discovery, genetic and epigenetic studies, functional characterizations, and systems analysis. CSSs are made by replacing a single chromosome in a host strain with the corresponding chromosome from a donor strain. A complete CSS panel involves a total of 22 engineered inbred strains, one for each of the 19 autosomes, one each for the X and Y chromosomes, and one for mitochondria. A genome survey simply involves comparing each phenotype for each of the CSSs with the phenotypes of the host strain. The CSS panels that are available for laboratory mice have been used to dissect a remarkable variety of phenotypes and to characterize an impressive array of disease models. These surveys have revealed considerable phenotypic diversity even among closely related progenitor strains, evidence for strong epistasis and for heritable epigenetic changes. Perhaps most importantly, and presumably because of their unique genetic constitution, CSSs, and congenic strains derived from them, the genetic variants underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are readily identified and functionally characterized. Together these studies show that CSSs are important resource for laboratory mice. PMID:22961226

  9. A Bayesian analysis of the chromosome architecture of human disorders by integrating reductionist data.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Glazko, Galina V; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach to estimate a chromosome and a disorder network from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. In contrast to other approaches, we obtain statistic rather than deterministic networks enabling a parametric control in the uncertainty of the underlying disorder-disease gene associations contained in the OMIM, on which the networks are based. From a structural investigation of the chromosome network, we identify three chromosome subgroups that reflect architectural differences in chromosome-disorder associations that are predictively exploitable for a functional analysis of diseases. PMID:22822426

  10. Applying deep learning technology to automatically identify metaphase chromosomes using scanning microscopic images: an initial investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Automated high throughput scanning microscopy is a fast developing screening technology used in cytogenetic laboratories for the diagnosis of leukemia or other genetic diseases. However, one of the major challenges of using this new technology is how to efficiently detect the analyzable metaphase chromosomes during the scanning process. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technology, which can identify the metaphase chromosomes with high accuracy. The CAD scheme includes an eight layer neural network. The first six layers compose of an automatic feature extraction module, which has an architecture of three convolution-max-pooling layer pairs. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd pair contains 30, 20, 20 feature maps, respectively. The seventh and eighth layers compose of a multiple layer perception (MLP) based classifier, which is used to identify the analyzable metaphase chromosomes. The performance of new CAD scheme was assessed by receiver operation characteristic (ROC) method. A number of 150 regions of interest (ROIs) were selected to test the performance of our new CAD scheme. Each ROI contains either interphase cell or metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that new scheme is able to achieve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.886+/-0.043. This investigation demonstrates that applying a deep learning technique may enable to significantly improve the accuracy of the metaphase chromosome detection using a scanning microscopic imaging technology in the future.

  11. Identifying the structural requirements for chromosomal aberration by incorporating molecular flexibility and metabolic activation of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mekenyan, Ovanes; Todorov, Milen; Serafimova, Rossitsa; Stoeva, Stoyanka; Aptula, Aynur; Finking, Robert; Jacob, Elard

    2007-12-01

    Modeling the potential of chemicals to induce chromosomal damage has been hampered by the diversity of mechanisms which condition this biological effect. The direct binding of a chemical to DNA is one of the underlying mechanisms that is also responsible for bacterial mutagenicity. Disturbance of DNA synthesis due to inhibition of topoisomerases and interaction of chemicals with nuclear proteins associated with DNA (e.g., histone proteins) were identified as additional mechanisms leading to chromosomal aberrations (CA). A comparative analysis of in vitro genotoxic data for a large number of chemicals revealed that more than 80% of chemicals that elicit bacterial mutagenicity (as indicated by the Ames test) also induce CA; alternatively, only 60% of chemicals that induce CA have been found to be active in the Ames test. In agreement with this relationship, a battery of models is developed for modeling CA. It combines the Ames model for bacterial mutagenicity, which has already been derived and integrated into the Optimized Approach Based on Structural Indices Set (OASIS) tissue metabolic simulator (TIMES) platform, and a newly derived model accounting for additional mechanisms leading to CA. Both models are based on the classical concept of reactive alerts. Some of the specified alerts interact directly with DNA or nuclear proteins, whereas others are applied in a combination of two- or three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models assessing the degree of activation of the alerts from the rest of the molecules. The use of each of the alerts has been justified by a mechanistic interpretation of the interaction. In combination with a rat liver S9 metabolism simulator, the model explained the CA induced by metabolically activated chemicals that do not elicit activity in the parent form. The model can be applied in two ways: with and without metabolic activation of chemicals. PMID:18052113

  12. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 17 and 18 in breast carcinoma: two additional regions identified.

    PubMed Central

    Cropp, C S; Lidereau, R; Campbell, G; Champene, M H; Callahan, R

    1990-01-01

    The loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at specific regions of the human genome in tumor DNA is recognized as evidence for a tumor-suppressor gene located within the corresponding region of the homologous chromosome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a panel of primary human breast tumor DNAs has led to the identification of two additional regions on chromosomes 17q and 18q that frequently are affected by LOH. Deletions of each of these regions have a significant correlation with clinical parameters that are associated with aggressive breast carcinomas. Previous restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of this panel of tumors has uncovered several other frequently occurring mutations. LOH on chromosome 18q frequently occurs in tumors with concomitant LOH of loci on chromosomes 17p and 11p. Similarly, tumors having LOH on 17q also have LOH on chromosomes 1p and 3p. This suggests that certain combinations of mutations may collaborate in the development and malignant progression of breast carcinomas. Images PMID:1977164

  13. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Zody, Michael C; Borowsky, Mark L; Kamal, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Taylor, Todd D; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Bugalter, Boris; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeCaprio, David; Engels, Reinhard; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Hafez, Nabil; Hall, Jennifer L; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Itoh, Takehiko; Jaffe, David B; Kuroki, Yoko; Lehoczky, Jessica; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; Noguchi, Hideki; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Piqani, Bruno; Smith, Cherylyn L; Talamas, Jessica A; Topham, Kerri; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Wain, Hester M; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Fujiyama, Asao; Hattori, Masahira; Birren, Bruce W; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Lander, Eric S

    2005-09-22

    Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements. PMID:16177791

  14. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  15. A multi-task graph-clustering approach for chromosome conformation capture data sets identifies conserved modules of chromosomal interactions.

    PubMed

    Fotuhi Siahpirani, Alireza; Ay, Ferhat; Roy, Sushmita

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture methods are being increasingly used to study three-dimensional genome architecture in multiple cell types and species. An important challenge is to examine changes in three-dimensional architecture across cell types and species. We present Arboretum-Hi-C, a multi-task spectral clustering method, to identify common and context-specific aspects of genome architecture. Compared to standard clustering, Arboretum-Hi-C produced more biologically consistent patterns of conservation. Most clusters are conserved and enriched for either high- or low-activity genomic signals. Most genomic regions diverge between clusters with similar chromatin state except for a few that are associated with lamina-associated domains and open chromatin. PMID:27233632

  16. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R2<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms. PMID:20161066

  17. Microcell-Mediated Chromosome Transfer Identifies EPB41L3 as a Functional Suppressor of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers12

    PubMed Central

    Dafou, Dimitra; Grun, Barbara; Sinclair, John; Lawrenson, Kate; Benjamin, Elizabeth C; Hogdall, Estrid; Kruger-Kjaer, Susanne; Christensen, Lise; Sowter, Heidi M; Al-Attar, Ahmed; Edmondson, Richard; Darby, Stephen; Berchuck, Andrew; Laird, Peter W; Pearce, C Leigh; Ramus, Susan J; Jacobs, Ian J; Gayther, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    We used a functional complementation approach to identify tumor-suppressor genes and putative therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 18 in the ovarian cancer cell line TOV21G induced in vitro and in vivo neoplastic suppression. Gene expression microarray profiling in TOV21G+18 hybrids identified 14 candidate genes on chromosome 18 that were significantly overexpressed and therefore associated with neoplastic suppression. Further analysis of messenger RNA and protein expression for these genes in additional ovarian cancer cell lines indicated that EPB41L3 (erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1-like 3, alternative names DAL-1 and 4.1B) was a candidate ovarian cancer-suppressor gene. Immunoblot analysis showed that EPB41L3 was activated in TOV21G+18 hybrids, expressed in normal ovarian epithelial cell lines, but was absent in 15 (78%) of 19 ovarian cancer cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, 66% of 794 invasive ovarian tumors showed no EPB41L3 expression compared with only 24% of benign ovarian tumors and 0% of normal ovarian epithelial tissues. EPB41L3 was extensively methylated in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors compared with normal tissues (P = .00004), suggesting this may be the mechanism of gene inactivation in ovarian cancers. Constitutive reexpression of EPB41L3 in a three-dimensional multicellular spheroid model of ovarian cancer caused significant growth suppression and induced apoptosis. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated many similarities between EPB41L3-expressing cells and chromosome 18 donor-recipient hybrids, suggesting that EPB41L3 is the gene responsible for neoplastic suppression after chromosome 18 transfer. Finally, an inducible model of EPB41L3 expression in three-dimensional spheroids confirmed that reexpression of EPB41L3 induces extensive apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancers. PMID:20651987

  18. Prognostic value of numerical chromosome aberrations in multiple myeloma: A FISH analysis of 15 different chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Simón, J A; García-Sanz, R; Tabernero, M D; Almeida, J; González, M; Fernández-Calvo, J; Moro, M J; Hernández, J M; San Miguel, J F; Orfão, A

    1998-05-01

    Recent observations indicate that chromosome aberrations are important prognostic factors in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) treated with high-dose chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the inherent problems of conventional cytogenetics have hampered the systematic evaluation of this parameter in series of patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis is an attractive alternative for evaluation of numerical chromosomal changes. In the present study, we analyze the relationship between aneuploidies of 15 different chromosomes assessed by FISH and prognosis in a series of 63 patients with MM treated with conventional chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 61 months (range, 6 to 109), 49% of patients are still alive with a median survival of 33 months. The overall incidence of numerical chromosome abnormalities was 70%. This incidence significantly increased when seven or more chromosomes were analyzed (53 patients), reaching 81%. Trisomies of chromosomes 6, 9, and 17 were associated with prolonged survival (P = .033, P = .035, and P = .026, respectively); by contrast, overall survival (OS) was lower in cases with monosomy 13 (as assessed by deletion of Rb gene, P = .0012). From the clinical point of view, loss of Rb gene was associated with a poor performance status; low hemoglobin levels; high creatinine, C-reactive protein, and lactic dehydrogenase serum levels; high percentage of bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC); extensive bone lytic lesions; and advanced clinical stage. Other chromosome abnormalities such as trisomy of chromosome 9 and 17 were associated with good prognostic features including high hemoglobin levels, early clinical stage, beta2microglobulin less than 6 micro/mL, and low percentage of BMPC. A multivariate analysis for OS showed that S-phase PC greater than 3% (P = .010) and beta2microglobulin serum levels greater than 6 micro/mL (P = .024), together with monosomy of chromosome 13 (P = .031) and

  19. Genome-Wide Mapping of Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease Identifies a Novel Replicated Locus on Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Peden, John F; Olsson, Per G; Clarke, Robert; Hellenius, Mai-Lis; Rust, Stephan; Lagercrantz, Jacob; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Schulte, Helmut; Carey, Alisoun; Olsson, Gunnar; Assmann, Gerd; Tognoni, Gianni; Collins, Rory; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death world-wide, and most cases have a complex, multifactorial aetiology that includes a substantial heritable component. Identification of new genes involved in CAD may inform pathogenesis and provide new therapeutic targets. The PROCARDIS study recruited 2,658 affected sibling pairs (ASPs) with onset of CAD before age 66 y from four European countries to map susceptibility loci for CAD. ASPs were defined as having CAD phenotype if both had CAD, or myocardial infarction (MI) phenotype if both had a MI. In a first study, involving a genome-wide linkage screen, tentative loci were mapped to Chromosomes 3 and 11 with the CAD phenotype (1,464 ASPs), and to Chromosome 17 with the MI phenotype (739 ASPs). In a second study, these loci were examined with a dense panel of grid-tightening markers in an independent set of families (1,194 CAD and 344 MI ASPs). This replication study showed a significant result on Chromosome 17 (MI phenotype; p = 0.009 after adjustment for three independent replication tests). An exclusion analysis suggests that further genes of effect size λsib > 1.24 are unlikely to exist in these populations of European ancestry. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide linkage analysis to map, and replicate, a CAD locus. The region on Chromosome 17 provides a compelling target within which to identify novel genes underlying CAD. Understanding the genetic aetiology of CAD may lead to novel preventative and/or therapeutic strategies. PMID:16710446

  20. A follow-up study for left ventricular mass on chromosome 12p11 identifies potential candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Left ventricular mass (LVM) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previously we found evidence for linkage to chromosome 12p11 in Dominican families, with a significant increase in a subset of families with high average waist circumference (WC). In the present study, we use association analysis to further study the genetic effect on LVM. Methods Association analysis with LVM was done in the one LOD critical region of the linkage peak in an independent sample of 897 Caribbean Hispanics. Genotype data were available on 7085 SNPs from 23 to 53 MB on chromosome 12p11. Adjustment was made for vascular risk factors and population substructure using an additive genetic model. Subset analysis by WC was performed to test for a difference in genetic effects between the high and low WC subsets. Results In the overall analysis, the most significant association was found to rs10743465, downstream of the SOX5 gene (p = 1.27E-05). Also, 19 additional SNPs had nominal p < 0.001. In the subset analysis, the most significant difference in genetic effect between those with high and low WC occurred with rs1157480 (p = 1.37E-04 for the difference in β coefficients), located upstream of TMTC1. Twelve additional SNPs in or near 6 genes had p < 0.001. Conclusions The current study supports previously identified evidence by linkage for a genetic effect on LVM on chromosome 12p11 using association analysis in population-based Caribbean Hispanic cohort. SOX5 may play an important role in the regulation of LVM. An interaction of TMTC1 with abdominal obesity may contribute to phenotypic variation of LVM. PMID:21791083

  1. De novo balanced chromosome rearrangements and extra marker chromosomes identified at prenatal diagnosis: clinical significance and distribution of breakpoints.

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, D

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire sent to major cytogenetics laboratories in the United States and Canada over a 10-year period collected data on the frequency and outcome of cases with either apparently balanced de novo rearrangements or de novo supernumerary marker chromosomes detected at amniocentesis. Of 377,357 reported amniocenteses, approximately 1/2,000 had a de novo reciprocal translocation, 1/9,000 a Robertsonian translocation, 1/10,000 a de novo inversion, and 1/2,500 an extra structurally abnormal chromosome of unidentifiable origin. The risk of a serious congenital anomaly was estimated to be 6.1% (n = 163) for de novo reciprocal translocations, 3.7% (n = 51) for Robertsonian translocations, and 9.4% (n = 32) for inversions. The combined risk for reciprocal translocations and inversions was 6.7% (95% confidence limits 3.1%-10.3%). The risk of abnormality for extra nonsatellited marker chromosomes was 14.7% (n = 68), and that for satellited marker chromosomes was 10.9% (n = 55). In non-Robertsonian rearrangements, distribution of breakpoints among chromosomes was not as would be expected strictly on the basis of length. Most breaks were stated to occur within G-negative bands, but there was little evidence of particular hot spots among these bands. Nevertheless, there did appear to be a correlation between those bands in which breakage was observed most often and those bands where common or rare fragile sites have been described. PMID:1928105

  2. Multiplexed analysis of chromosome conformation at vastly improved sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O.J.; Telenius, Jelena M.; McGowan, Simon; Roberts, Nigel A.; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Douglas R.; Hughes, Jim R.

    2015-01-01

    Since methods for analysing chromosome conformation in mammalian cells are either low resolution or low throughput and are technically challenging they are not widely used outside of specialised laboratories. We have re-designed the Capture-C method producing a new approach, called next generation (NG) Capture-C. This produces unprecedented levels of sensitivity and reproducibility and can be used to analyse many genetic loci and samples simultaneously. Importantly, high-resolution data can be produced on as few as 100,000 cells and SNPs can be used to generate allele specific tracks. The method is straightforward to perform and should therefore greatly facilitate the task of linking SNPs identified by genome wide association studies with the genes they influence. The complete and detailed protocol presented here, with new publicly available tools for library design and data analysis, will allow most laboratories to analyse chromatin conformation at levels of sensitivity and throughput that were previously impossible. PMID:26595209

  3. A Scan of Chromosome 10 Identifies a Novel Locus Showing Strong Association with Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grupe, Andrew; Li, Yonghong; Rowland, Charles; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Smemo, Scott; Kauwe, John S. K.; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Cherny, Sara; Doil, Lisa; Tacey, Kristina; van Luchene, Ryan; Myers, Amanda; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Kaleem, Mona; Hollingworth, Paul; Jehu, Luke; Foy, Catherine; Archer, Nicola; Hamilton, Gillian; Holmans, Peter; Morris, Chris M.; Catanese, Joseph; Sninsky, John; White, Thomas J.; Powell, John; Hardy, John; O’Donovan, Michael; Lovestone, Simon; Jones, Lesley; Morris, John C.; Thal, Leon; Owen, Michael; Williams, Julie; Goate, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Strong evidence of linkage to late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) has been observed on chromosome 10, which implicates a wide region and at least one disease-susceptibility locus. Although significant associations with several biological candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial. We performed a chromosome 10–specific association study with 1,412 gene-based single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to identify susceptibility genes for developing LOAD. The scan included SNPs in 677 of 1,270 known or predicted genes; each gene contained one or more markers, about half (48%) of which represented putative functional mutations. In general, the initial testing was performed in a white case-control sample from the St. Louis area, with 419 LOAD cases and 377 age-matched controls. Markers that showed significant association in the exploratory analysis were followed up in several other white case-control sample sets to confirm the initial association. Of the 1,397 markers tested in the exploratory sample, 69 reached significance (P<.05). Five of these markers replicated at P<.05 in the validation sample sets. One marker, rs498055, located in a gene homologous to RPS3A (LOC439999), was significantly associated with Alzheimer disease in four of six case-control series, with an allelic P value of .0001 for a meta-analysis of all six samples. One of the case-control samples with significant association to rs498055 was derived from the linkage sample (P=.0165). These results indicate that variants in the RPS3A homologue are associated with LOAD and implicate this gene, adjacent genes, or other functional variants (e.g., noncoding RNAs) in the pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:16385451

  4. Haplotype kernel association test as a powerful method to identify chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Yi, Nengjun; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Kui; Gao, Guimin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Liu, Nianjun

    2013-09-01

    For most complex diseases, the fraction of heritability that can be explained by the variants discovered from genome-wide association studies is minor. Although the so-called "rare variants" (minor allele frequency [MAF] < 1%) have attracted increasing attention, they are unlikely to account for much of the "missing heritability" because very few people may carry these rare variants. The genetic variants that are likely to fill in the "missing heritability" include uncommon causal variants (MAF < 5%), which are generally untyped in association studies using tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or commercial SNP arrays. Developing powerful statistical methods can help to identify chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants, while bypassing the genome-wide or exome-wide next-generation sequencing. In this work, we propose a haplotype kernel association test (HKAT) that is equivalent to testing the variance component of random effects for distinct haplotypes. With an appropriate weighting scheme given to haplotypes, we can further enhance the ability of HKAT to detect uncommon causal variants. With scenarios simulated according to the population genetics theory, HKAT is shown to be a powerful method for detecting chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants. PMID:23740760

  5. Haplotype Kernel Association Test as a Powerful Method to Identify Chromosomal Regions Harboring Uncommon Causal Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-Yu; Yi, Nengjun; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Zhi, Degui; Zhang, Kui; Gao, Guimin; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Liu, Nianjun

    2014-01-01

    For most complex diseases, the fraction of heritability that can be explained by the variants discovered from genome-wide association studies is minor. Although the so-called ‘rare variants’ (minor allele frequency [MAF] < 1%) have attracted increasing attention, they are unlikely to account for much of the ‘missing heritability’ because very few people may carry these rare variants. The genetic variants that are likely to fill in the ‘missing heritability’ include uncommon causal variants (MAF < 5%), which are generally untyped in association studies using tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or commercial SNP arrays. Developing powerful statistical methods can help to identify chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants, while bypassing the genome-wide or exome-wide next-generation sequencing. In this work, we propose a haplotype kernel association test (HKAT) that is equivalent to testing the variance component of random effects for distinct haplotypes. With an appropriate weighting scheme given to haplotypes, we can further enhance the ability of HKAT to detect uncommon causal variants. With scenarios simulated according to the population genetics theory, HKAT is shown to be a powerful method for detecting chromosomal regions harboring uncommon causal variants. PMID:23740760

  6. A Family-Based Paradigm to Identify Candidate Chromosomal Regions for Isolated Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Arrington, Cammon B.; Bleyl, Steven B.; Matsunami, Nori; Bowles, Neil E.; Leppert, Tami I.; Demarest, Bradley L.; Osborne, Karen; Yoder, Bradley A.; Byrne, Janice L.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Null, Donald M.; DiGeronimo, Robert; Rollins, Michael; Faix, Roger; Comstock, Jessica; Camp, Nicola J.; Leppert, Mark F.; Yost, H. Joseph; Brunelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a developmental defect of the diaphragm that causes high newborn mortality. Isolated or non-syndromic CDH is considered a multifactorial disease, with strong evidence implicating genetic factors. As low heritability has been reported in isolated CDH, family-based genetic methods have yet to identify the genetic factors associated with the defect. Using the Utah Population Database, we identified distantly related patients from several extended families with a high incidence of isolated CDH. Using high-density genotyping, seven patients were analyzed by homozygosity exclusion rare allele mapping (HERAM) and phased haplotype sharing (HapShare), two methods we developed to map shared chromosome regions. Our patient cohort shared three regions not previously associated with CDH, i.e. 2q11.2-q12.1, 4p13 and 7q11.2, and two regions previously involved in CDH, i.e. 8p23.1 and 15q26.2. The latter regions contain GATA4 and NR2F2, two genes implicated in diaphragm formation in mice. Interestingly, three patients shared the 8p23.1 locus and one of them also harbored the 15q26.2 segment. No coding variants were identified in GATA4 or NR2F2, but a rare shared variant was found in intron 1 of GATA4. This work shows the role of heritability in isolated CDH. Our family-based strategy uncovers new chromosomal regions possibly associated with disease, and suggests that non-coding variants of GATA4 and NR2F2 may contribute to the development of isolated CDH. This approach could speed up the discovery of the genes and regulatory elements causing multifactorial diseases, such as isolated CDH. PMID:23165927

  7. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000). PMID:26659956

  8. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  9. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism…

  10. Analysis of B-genome chromosome introgression in interspecific hybrids of Brassica napus × B. carinata.

    PubMed

    Navabi, Zahra K; Stead, Kiersten E; Pires, J Chris; Xiong, Zhiyong; Sharpe, Andrew G; Parkin, Isobel A P; Rahman, M Habibur; Good, Allen G

    2011-03-01

    Brassica carinata, an allotetraploid with B and C genomes, has a number of traits that would be valuable to introgress into B. napus. Interspecific hybrids were created between B. carinata (BBCC) and B. napus (AACC), using an advanced backcross approach to identify and introgress traits of agronomic interest from the B. carinata genome and to study the genetic changes that occur during the introgression process. We mapped the B and C genomes of B. carinata with SSR markers and observed their introgression into B. napus through a number of backcross generations, focusing on a BC(3) and BC(3)S(1) sibling family. There was close colinearity between the C genomes of B. carinata and B. napus and we provide evidence that B. carinata C chromosomes pair and recombine normally with those of B. napus, suggesting that similar to other Brassica allotetraploids no major chromosomal rearrangements have taken place since the formation of B. carinata. There was no evidence of introgression of the B chromosomes into the A or C chromosomes of B. napus; instead they were inherited as whole linkage groups with the occasional loss of terminal segments and several of the B-genome chromosomes were retained across generations. Several BC(3)S(1) families were analyzed using SSR markers, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) assays, and chromosome counts to study the inheritance of the B-genome chromosome(s) and their association with morphological traits. Our work provides an analysis of the behavior of chromosomes in an interspecific cross and reinforces the challenges of introgressing novel traits into crop plants. PMID:21196520

  11. Chromosomal microarray testing identifies a 4p terminal region associated with seizures in Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome

    PubMed Central

    South, Sarah T; Lortz, Amanda; Hensel, Charles H; Sdano, Mallory R; Vanzo, Rena J; Martin, Megan M; Peiffer, Andreas; Lambert, Christophe G; Calhoun, Amy; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2016-01-01

    Background Wolf–Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving variable size deletions of the 4p16.3 region. Seizures are frequently, but not always, associated with WHS. We hypothesised that the size and location of the deleted region may correlate with seizure presentation. Methods Using chromosomal microarray analysis, we finely mapped the breakpoints of copy number variants (CNVs) in 48 individuals with WHS. Seizure phenotype data were collected through parent-reported answers to a comprehensive questionnaire and supplemented with available medical records. Results We observed a significant correlation between the presence of an interstitial 4p deletion and lack of a seizure phenotype (Fisher's exact test p=3.59e-6). In our cohort, there were five individuals with interstitial deletions with a distal breakpoint at least 751 kbp proximal to the 4p terminus. Four of these individuals have never had an observable seizure, and the fifth individual had a single febrile seizure at the age of 1.5 years. All other individuals in our cohort whose deletions encompass the terminal 751 kbp region report having seizures typical of WHS. Additional examples from the literature corroborate these observations and further refine the candidate seizure susceptibility region to a region 197 kbp in size, starting 368 kbp from the terminus of chromosome 4. Conclusions We identify a small terminal region of chromosome 4p that represents a seizure susceptibility region. Deletion of this region in the context of WHS is sufficient for seizure occurrence. PMID:26747863

  12. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Matthews, L H; Ashurst, J; Burton, J; Gilbert, J G; Jones, M; Stavrides, G; Almeida, J P; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Barlow, K F; Bates, K N; Beard, L M; Beare, D M; Beasley, O P; Bird, C P; Blakey, S E; Bridgeman, A M; Brown, A J; Buck, D; Burrill, W; Butler, A P; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M; Clark, G; Clark, L N; Clark, S Y; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Cobley, V E; Collier, R E; Connor, R; Corby, N R; Coulson, A; Coville, G J; Deadman, R; Dhami, P; Dunn, M; Ellington, A G; Frankland, J A; Fraser, A; French, L; Garner, P; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths, M N; Gwilliam, R; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Heath, P D; Ho, S; Holden, J L; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Jekosch, K; Johnson, C M; Johnson, D; Kay, M P; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lehvaslaiho, M H; Leversha, M; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Lovell, J D; Marsh, V L; Martin, S L; McConnachie, L J; McLay, K; McMurray, A A; Milne, S; Mistry, D; Moore, M J; Mullikin, J C; Nickerson, T; Oliver, K; Parker, A; Patel, R; Pearce, T A; Peck, A I; Phillimore, B J; Prathalingam, S R; Plumb, R W; Ramsay, H; Rice, C M; Ross, M T; Scott, C E; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M L; Soderlund, C; Steward, C A; Sulston, J E; Swann, M; Sycamore, N; Taylor, R; Tee, L; Thomas, D W; Thorpe, A; Tracey, A; Tromans, A C; Vaudin, M; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; Whitehead, S L; Whittaker, P; Willey, D L; Williams, L; Williams, S A; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Hubbard, T; Durbin, R M; Bentley, D R; Beck, S; Rogers, J

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes. PMID:11780052

  13. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  14. Identifying X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm by DNA content: retrospective perspectives and prospective opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.; Pinkel, D.; Garner, D.L.

    1982-03-05

    Theoretically, since DNA should be the most constant component, quantitatively, of normal sperm, then genotoxic agents arising from energy production and consumption, and chemical and physical mutagens, could be identified by measuring variability in the DNA content of individual sperm from exposed men or test animals. The difference between the DNA content of X and Y sperm seemed a biologically significant benchmark for the measurement technology. Several methods are available for determining the genetic activity of agents in male germ cells, but these tests are generally laborious. Sperm-based methods provide an attractive alternate since they are not invasive, and are directly applicable to the study of human exposure. Slide-based assay of DNA content suggests that human sperm with X, Y, or YY chromosome constitutions can be distinguished by their fluorescence with quinacrine. Subsequent measurement of the dry mass of human sperm heads is performed. Dry mass is proportional to DNA content. While the study showed that human sperm with none and one quinacrine-fluorescent spot are X- and Y-bearing, respectively, the dry mass measurements indicated that many of the sperm with two quinacrine-fluorescent spots are not YY-bearing. While several reports on the initial application of flow cytometry of sperm to the investigation of mammalian infertility have appeared recently, emphasis here has been on the development of an in vivo sperm-based flow cytometric bioassay for mutations, and has not centered on andrological applications. In this review, the ability to differentiate between two equally sized populations of sperm, one bearing X and the other Y chromosomes with mean DNA content differing by about 3 to 4% is described. It has direct application to the preselection of sex of offspring, and could likely have a profound impact on animal improvement. (ERB)

  15. Criticality accident dosimetry by chromosomal analysis.

    PubMed

    Voisin, P; Roy, L; Hone, P A; Edwards, A A; Lloyd, D C; Stephan, G; Romm, H; Groer, P G; Brame, R

    2004-01-01

    The technique of measuring the frequency of dicentric chromosomal aberrations in blood lymphocytes was used to estimate doses in a simulated criticality accident. The simulation consisted of three exposures; approximately 5 Gy with a bare source and 1 and 2 Gy with a lead-shielded source. Three laboratories made separate estimates of the doses. These were made by the iterative method of apportioning the observed dicentric frequencies between the gamma and neutron components, taking account of a given gamma/neutron dose ratio, and referring the separated dicentric frequencies to dose-response calibration curves. An alternative method, based on Bayesian ideas, was employed. This was developed for interpreting dicentric frequencies in situations where the gamma/neutron ratio is uncertain. Both methods gave very similar results. One laboratory produced dose estimates close to the eventual exercise reference doses and the other laboratories estimated slightly higher values. The main reason for the higher values was the calibration relationships for fission neutrons. PMID:15353688

  16. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Humphray, S J; Oliver, K; Hunt, A R; Plumb, R W; Loveland, J E; Howe, K L; Andrews, T D; Searle, S; Hunt, S E; Scott, C E; Jones, M C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Babbage, S; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Barker, D J; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Beasley, O; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Chen, Y; Clarke, G; Clark, S Y; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Crosier, M; Cummings, A T; Davies, J; Dhami, P; Dunn, M; Dutta, I; Dyer, L W; Earthrowl, M E; Faulkner, L; Fleming, C J; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; French, L; Fricker, D G; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Ghori, J; Gilbert, J G R; Glison, C; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Guy, J; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Henderson, C D; Hopkins, B L; Howard, P J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A A; Kay, M; Keenan, S; Kershaw, J K; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Leversha, M; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nisbett, J; Nordsiek, G; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Porter, K M; Pandian, R; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Povey, S; Ramsey, Y; Rand, V; Scharfe, M; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S K; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Swarbreck, D; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Thomas, D W; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Williams, S A; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Ashurst, J L; Coulson, A; Blöcker, H; Durbin, R; Sulston, J E; Hubbard, T; Jackson, M J; Bentley, D R; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Dunham, I

    2004-05-27

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6-8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the large heterochromatic block. We have annotated 1,149 genes, including genes implicated in male-to-female sex reversal, cancer and neurodegenerative disease, and 426 pseudogenes. The chromosome contains the largest interferon gene cluster in the human genome. There is also a region of exceptionally high gene and G + C content including genes paralogous to those in the major histocompatibility complex. We have also detected recently duplicated genes that exhibit different rates of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting natural selection. PMID:15164053

  17. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    Humphray, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Hunt, A. R.; Plumb, R. W.; Loveland, J. E.; Howe, K. L.; Andrews, T. D.; Searle, S.; Hunt, S. E.; Scott, C. E.; Jones, M. C.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Babbage, S.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Banerjee, R.; Barker, D. J.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Beasley, O.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burford, D.; Burrill, W.; Burton, J.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Chen, Y.; Clarke, G.; Clark, S. Y.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S.; Collier, R. E.; Corby, N.; Crosier, M.; Cummings, A. T.; Davies, J.; Dhami, P.; Dunn, M.; Dutta, I.; Dyer, L. W.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Faulkner, L.; Fleming, C. J.; Frankish, A.; Frankland, J. A.; French, L.; Fricker, D. G.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Ghori, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Glison, C.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S.; Griffiths, C.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Grocock, R.; Guy, J.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Harrison, E. S. I.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Henderson, C. D.; Hopkins, B. L.; Howard, P. J.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Joy, A. A.; Kay, M.; Keenan, S.; Kershaw, J. K.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Knights, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Leversha, M.; Lloyd, C.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; Matthews, L.; McLaren, S.; McLay, K. E.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Nickerson, T.; Nisbett, J.; Nordsiek, G.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Porter, K. M.; Pandian, R.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Povey, S.; Ramsey, Y.; Rand, V.; Scharfe, M.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Sims, S. K.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Swarbreck, D.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thorpe, A.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Thomas, D. W.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Williams, S. A.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Young, L.; Ashurst, J. L.; Coulson, A.; Blöcker, H.; Durbin, R.; Sulston, J. E.; Hubbard, T.; Jackson, M. J.; Bentley, D. R.; Beck, S.; Rogers, J.; Dunham, I.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6–8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the large heterochromatic block. We have annotated 1,149 genes, including genes implicated in male-to-female sex reversal, cancer and neurodegenerative disease, and 426 pseudogenes. The chromosome contains the largest interferon gene cluster in the human genome. There is also a region of exceptionally high gene and G + C content including genes paralogous to those in the major histocompatibility complex. We have also detected recently duplicated genes that exhibit different rates of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting natural selection. PMID:15164053

  18. Molecular analysis and breakpoint definition of a set of human chromosome 21 somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Graw, S.L.; Gardiner, K.; Hart, I.

    1995-11-01

    Rodent-human somatic cell hybrids containing single human chromosomes or chromosome fragments are extremely valuable in physical mapping, marker analysis, and disease mapping. Chromosome 21 has been extensively studied in this fashion, ans a single set of hybrids has been utilized in mapping the majority of chromosome 21 markets. The utility of a set of hybrids depends upon the definition of the human chromosome 21 markers in the preliminary analysis of YACs spanning chromosome 21q. We have used these same markers to evaluate the STS content of a set of 27 chromosome 21 somatic cell hybrids, resulting in the description of the breakpoints at the molecular level, as well as the definition of 35 {open_quotes}bins.{close_quotes} The detailed molecular definition of chromosome 21 content of the hybrids, in combination with the further analysis of chromosome 21 YACs (2), has resulted in the most detailed picture of chromosome 21 to date. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  20. Chromosome 16 in primary prostate cancer: a microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Osman, I; Scher, H; Dalbagni, G; Reuter, V; Zhang, Z F; Cordon-Cardo, C

    1997-05-16

    Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of prostate cancer specimens have revealed nonrandom chromosomal deletions, affecting chromosomes 7q, 8p, 10q and 16q. Based on these data, we designed this study to further characterize the altered region(s) on chromosome 16 by evaluating 16 microsatellite markers on a population composed of 32 paired normal and primary prostatic tumor samples. The 16 microsatellites selected mapped to 11 distinct loci on 16q and 5 loci on 16p. No alterations were identified affecting 16p. However, 16 of 31 (51%) informative cases showed molecular alterations in at least one of the loci analyzed on 16q, consisting of 18 deletions and 11 bandshifts. Moreover, most of the deletions clustered at 6 microsatellite loci, mapping to the 16q22.1-23.1 region. Our results suggest that microsatellite alterations on the long arm of chromosome 16 are frequent events in prostate cancer, and that the 16q22.1-23.1 region might harbor a tumor suppressor gene involved in prostate cancer. PMID:9178811

  1. A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

  2. Use of sample pooling in a genome-wide association study identifies chromosomal regions affecting incidence of bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesize that genome-wide association (GWA) based on high-density SNP arrays can be used to identify chromosomal regions affecting disease incidence using a case/control type approach. However, the large sample size required to map a lowly heritable trait like susceptibility to bovine respirat...

  3. Genomic In Situ Hybridization (GISH) as a Tool to Identify Chromosomes of Parental Species in Sunflower Interspecific Hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecific hybridization has been widely used to transfer genes from wild species into cultivated sunflower. Fluorescent genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) has been used to identify alien chromosomes or segments in other crops, but an equivalent technique for sunflower is lacking. The objective...

  4. Analysis of chromosome 22 markers in nine schizophrenia pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Holik, J.; Reimherr, F.

    1994-03-15

    Previous results of a genome-wide survey for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in nine multiplex families indicated a possible region of linkage on chromosome 22. We therefore tested for linkage using ten highly polymorphic chromosome 22 DNA markers. Lod score analyses were suggestive of linkage for several markers on the distal end of the chromosome; however, no lod score exceeded 3 assuming either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive transmission. The highest lod score was 2.09 (theta = 0.10) for marker D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Based on simulation analyses, this result is unlikely to represent a false positive. Analyses using information from affected individuals only resulted in reduced lod scores, with a maximum of 1.40 (theta = 0.05) for D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Two nonparametric methods, sib pair analysis and the Affected-Pedigree-Member method, also yielded suggestive but inconclusive findings; results were positive, but strict thresholds of significance were not met. Additionally, we tested one candidate gene, the Arylsulfatase A gene, located in the region of 22q13.31-qter. Results were again inconclusive, though the DNA marker available for this gene was a 2-allele RFLP with heterozygosity of 0.5, and therefore not maximally informative. Further investigation of this chromosomal region and this and other candidate genes may be warranted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13.

    PubMed

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Hersh, Craig P; Demeo, Dawn L; Himes, Blanca E; Sylvia, Jody S; Klanderman, Barbara J; Ziniti, John P; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Murray, Tanda; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Pillai, Sreekumar G; Kong, Xiangyang; Anderson, Wayne H; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen; Wouters, Emiel; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K

    2012-02-15

    The genetic risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of limited size have identified several novel risk loci for COPD at CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, HHIP and FAM13A; additional loci may be identified through larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (GenKOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and another nearby SNP in linkage disequilibrium (rs2604894) in 2859 subjects from the family-based International COPD Genetics Network study (ICGN) demonstrated supportive evidence for association for COPD (P = 0.28 and 0.11 for rs7937 and rs2604894), pre-bronchodilator FEV(1) (P = 0.08 and 0.04) and severe (GOLD 3&4) COPD (P = 0.09 and 0.017). This region includes RAB4B, EGLN2, MIA and CYP2A6, and has previously been identified in association with cigarette smoking behavior. PMID:22080838

  6. Analysis of protein gene products in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purpose of genetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkin, S.S.; Zakharov, S.F.; Gromov, P.S.; Shcheglova, M.V.; Kukharenko, V.I.; Shilov, A.G.; Matveeva, N.M.; Zhdanova, N.S.; Efimochkin, A.S.; Krokhina, T.B. |

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used for analyzing proteins in hybrid cells that contained single human chromosomes (chromosome 5, chromosome 21, or chromosomes 5 and 21) against the background of the mouse genome. By comparing the protein patterns of hybrid and parent cells (about 1000 protein fractions for each kind of cell), five fractions among proteins of hybrid cells were supposedly identified as human proteins. The genes of two of them are probably located on chromosome 5, and those of the other three on chromosome 21. Moreover, analysis of proteins in fibroblasts of patients with the cri-du-chat syndrome (5p-) revealed a decrease in the content of two proteins as compared with those in preparations of diploid fibroblasts. This fact was regarded as evidence that two corresponding genes are located on the short arm of chromosome 5. Methodological problems associated with the use of protein pattern analysis in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purposes of genetic mapping are discussed.

  7. Inheritance of coronary artery disease in men: an analysis of the role of the Y chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Charchar, Fadi J; Bloomer, Lisa DS; Barnes, Timothy A; Cowley, Mark J; Nelson, Christopher P; Wang, Yanzhong; Denniff, Matthew; Debiec, Radoslaw; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Nankervis, Scott; Dominiczak, Anna F; Bani-Mustafa, Ahmed; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; Erdmann, Jeanette; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Hengstenberg, Christian; Packard, Chris; Schunkert, Heribert; Ouwehand, Willem H; Ford, Ian; Goodall, Alison H; Jobling, Mark A; Samani, Nilesh J; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background A sexual dimorphism exists in the incidence and prevalence of coronary artery disease—men are more commonly affected than are age-matched women. We explored the role of the Y chromosome in coronary artery disease in the context of this sexual inequity. Methods We genotyped 11 markers of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome in 3233 biologically unrelated British men from three cohorts: the British Heart Foundation Family Heart Study (BHF-FHS), West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), and Cardiogenics Study. On the basis of this information, each Y chromosome was tracked back into one of 13 ancient lineages defined as haplogroups. We then examined associations between common Y chromosome haplogroups and the risk of coronary artery disease in cross-sectional BHF-FHS and prospective WOSCOPS. Finally, we undertook functional analysis of Y chromosome effects on monocyte and macrophage transcriptome in British men from the Cardiogenics Study. Findings Of nine haplogroups identified, two (R1b1b2 and I) accounted for roughly 90% of the Y chromosome variants among British men. Carriers of haplogroup I had about a 50% higher age-adjusted risk of coronary artery disease than did men with other Y chromosome lineages in BHF-FHS (odds ratio 1·75, 95% CI 1·20–2·54, p=0·004), WOSCOPS (1·45, 1·08–1·95, p=0·012), and joint analysis of both populations (1·56, 1·24–1·97, p=0·0002). The association between haplogroup I and increased risk of coronary artery disease was independent of traditional cardiovascular and socioeconomic risk factors. Analysis of macrophage transcriptome in the Cardiogenics Study revealed that 19 molecular pathways showing strong differential expression between men with haplogroup I and other lineages of the Y chromosome were interconnected by common genes related to inflammation and immunity, and that some of them have a strong relevance to atherosclerosis. Interpretation The human Y chromosome is

  8. Evaluation of an automated karyotyping system for chromosome aberration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prichard, Howard M.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is a promising complement to conventional radiation dosimetry, particularly in the complex radiation fields encountered in the space environment. The capabilities of a recently developed automated karyotyping system were evaluated both to determine current capabilities and limitations and to suggest areas where future development should be emphasized. Cells exposed to radiometric chemicals and to photon and particulate radiation were evaluated by manual inspection and by automated karyotyping. It was demonstrated that the evaluated programs were appropriate for image digitization, storage, and transmission. However, automated and semi-automated scoring techniques must be advanced significantly if in-flight chromosome aberration analysis is to be practical. A degree of artificial intelligence may be necessary to realize this goal.

  9. FISH Mapping of De Novo Apparently Balanced Chromosome Rearrangements Identifies Characteristics Associated with Phenotypic Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Fantes, J.A.; Boland, E.; Ramsay, J.; Donnai, D.; Splitt, M.; Goodship, J.A.; Stewart, H.; Whiteford, M.; Gautier, P.; Harewood, L.; Holloway, S.; Sharkey, F.; Maher, E.; van Heyningen, V.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Fitzpatrick, D.R.; Black, G.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    We report fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping of 152, mostly de novo, apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangement (ABCR) breakpoints in 76 individuals, 30 of whom had no obvious phenotypic abnormality (control group) and 46 of whom had an associated disease (case group). The aim of this study was to identify breakpoint characteristics that could discriminate between these groups and which might be of predictive value in de novo ABCR (DN-ABCR) cases detected antenatally. We found no difference in the proportion of breakpoints that interrupted a gene, although in three cases, direct interruption or deletion of known autosomal-dominant or X-linked recessive Mendelian disease genes was diagnostic. The only significant predictor of phenotypic abnormality in the group as a whole was the localization of one or both breakpoints to an R-positive (G-negative) band with estimated predictive values of 0.69 (95% CL 0.54–0.81) and 0.90 (95% CL 0.60–0.98), respectively. R-positive bands are known to contain more genes and have a higher guanine-cytosine (GC) content than do G-positive (R-negative) bands; however, whether a gene was interrupted by the breakpoint or the GC content in the 200kB around the breakpoint had no discriminant ability. Our results suggest that the large-scale genomic context of the breakpoint has prognostic utility and that the pathological mechanism of mapping to an R-band cannot be accounted for by direct gene inactivation. PMID:18374296

  10. A Tiling Microarray Expression Analysis of Rice Chromosome 4 Suggests a Chromosome-Level Regulation of TranscriptionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuling; Jia, Peixin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Su, Ning; Yu, Shuliang; Zhang, Dongfen; Ma, Ligeng; Feng, Qi; Jin, Zhaoqing; Li, Lei; Xue, Yongbiao; Cheng, Zhukuan; Zhao, Hongyu; Han, Bin; Deng, Xing Wang

    2005-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand the biology of this model cereal. An essential and necessary step in this effort is the determination of the coding information and expression patterns of each sequenced chromosome. Here, we report an analysis of the transcriptional activity of rice chromosome 4 using a tiling path microarray based on PCR-generated genomic DNA fragments. Six representative rice organ types were examined using this microarray to catalog the transcribed regions of rice chromosome 4 and to reveal organ- and developmental stage–specific transcription patterns. This analysis provided expression support for 82% of the gene models in the chromosome. Transcriptional activities in 1643 nonannotated regions were also detected. Comparison with cytologically defined chromatin features indicated that in juvenile-stage rice the euchromatic region is more actively transcribed than is the transposon-rich heterochromatic portion of the chromosome. Interestingly, increased transcription of transposon-related gene models in certain heterochromatic regions was observed in mature-stage rice organs and in suspension-cultured cells. These results suggest a close correlation between transcriptional activity and chromosome organization and the developmental regulation of transcription activity at the chromosome level. PMID:15863518

  11. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  12. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  13. Delimiting the Origin of a B Chromosome by FISH Mapping, Chromosome Painting and DNA Sequence Analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Duílio M. Z. de A.; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Cláudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism. PMID:24736529

  14. Genomic in situ hybridization analysis of Thinopyrum chromatin in a wheat-Th. intermedium partial amphiploid and six derived chromosome addition lines

    PubMed

    Chen; Conner; Laroche; Ji; Armstrong; Fedak

    1999-12-01

    The genomic origin of alien chromosomes present in a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid TAF46 (2n = 8x = 56) and six derived chromosome addition lines were analyzed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using S genomic DNA from Pseudoroegneria strigosa (2n = 2x = 14, SS) as a probe. The GISH analysis clearly showed that the chromosome complement of the partial amphiploid TAF46 consists of an entire wheat genome plus one synthetic genome consisting of a mixture of six S genome chromosomes and eight J (=E) genome chromosomes derived from Th. intermedium (2n = 6x = 42, JJJ(s)J(s)SS). There were no Js genome chromosomes present in TAF46. The J genome chromosomes present in TAF46 displayed a unique GISH hybridization pattern with the S genomic DNA probe, in which S genome DNA strongly hybridized at the terminal regions and weakly hybridized over the remaining parts of the chromosomes. This provides a diagnostic marker for distinguishing J genome chromosomes from Js or S genome or wheat ABD genome chromosomes. The genomic origin of the alien chromosomes present in the six derived chromosome addition lines were identified by their characteristic GISH hybridization patterns with S genomic DNA probe. GISH analysis showed that addition lines L1, L2, L3, and L5 carried one pair of J genome chromosomes, while addition lines L4 and L7 each carried one pair of S genome chromosomes. GISH patterns detected by the S genome probe on addition line of L1 were identical to those of the J genome chromosomes present in the partial amphiploid TAF46, suggesting that these chromosomes were not structurally altered when they were transferred from TAF46 to addition lines. PMID:10659790

  15. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F.; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G.; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  16. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F; Rappsilber, Juri; Earnshaw, William C

    2016-08-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  17. Variable escape from X-chromosome inactivation: identifying factors that tip the scales towards expression.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Samantha B; Cotton, Allison M; Brown, Carolyn J

    2014-08-01

    In humans over 15% of X-linked genes have been shown to 'escape' from X-chromosome inactivation (XCI): they continue to be expressed to some extent from the inactive X chromosome. Mono-allelic expression is anticipated within a cell for genes subject to XCI, but random XCI usually results in expression of both alleles in a cell population. Using a study of allelic expression from cultured lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, many of which showed substantial skewing of XCI, we recently reported that the expression of genes lies on a contiunuum between those that are subject to inactivation, and those that escape. We now review allelic expression studies from mouse, and discuss the variability in escape seen in both humans and mice in genic expression levels, between X chromosomes and between tissues. We also discuss current knowledge of the heterochromatic features, DNA elements and three-dimensional topology of the inactive X that contribute to the balance of expression from the otherwise inactive X chromosome. PMID:24913292

  18. Single exon-resolution targeted chromosomal microarray analysis of known and candidate intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Tracy; Zahir, Farah R; Griffith, Malachi; Delaney, Allen; Chai, David; Tsang, Erica; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Marra, Marco; Eydoux, Patrice; Langlois, Sylvie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Michaud, Jacques L; Friedman, Jan M

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability affects about 3% of individuals globally, with∼50% idiopathic. We designed an exonic-resolution array targeting all known submicroscopic chromosomal intellectual disability syndrome loci, causative genes for intellectual disability, and potential candidate genes, all genes encoding glutamate receptors and epigenetic regulators. Using this platform, we performed chromosomal microarray analysis on 165 intellectual disability trios (affected child and both normal parents). We identified and independently validated 36 de novo copy-number changes in 32 trios. In all, 67% of the validated events were intragenic, involving only exon 1 (which includes the promoter sequence according to our design), exon 1 and adjacent exons, or one or more exons excluding exon 1. Seventeen of the 36 copy-number variants involve genes known to cause intellectual disability. Eleven of these, including seven intragenic variants, are clearly pathogenic (involving STXBP1, SHANK3 (3 patients), IL1RAPL1, UBE2A, NRXN1, MEF2C, CHD7, 15q24 and 9p24 microdeletion), two are likely pathogenic (PI4KA, DCX), two are unlikely to be pathogenic (GRIK2, FREM2), and two are unclear (ARID1B, 15q22 microdeletion). Twelve individuals with genomic imbalances identified by our array were tested with a clinical microarray, and six had a normal result. We identified de novo copy-number variants within genes not previously implicated in intellectual disability and uncovered pathogenic variation of known intellectual disability genes below the detection limit of standard clinical diagnostic chromosomal microarray analysis. PMID:24253858

  19. Sensitized phenotypic screening identifies gene dosage sensitive region on chromosome 11 that predisposes to disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Olga; Piszczek, Lukasz; Luciani, Luisa; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ferreira, Tiago; Farley, Dominika; Rizzo, Stefania; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Al-Banchaabouchi, Mumna; Nerlov, Claus; Moriggl, Richard; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Gross, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    The identification of susceptibility genes for human disease is a major goal of current biomedical research. Both sequence and structural variation have emerged as major genetic sources of phenotypic variability and growing evidence points to copy number variation as a particularly important source of susceptibility for disease. Here we propose and validate a strategy to identify genes in which changes in dosage alter susceptibility to disease-relevant phenotypes in the mouse. Our approach relies on sensitized phenotypic screening of megabase-sized chromosomal deletion and deficiency lines carrying altered copy numbers of ∼30 linked genes. This approach offers several advantages as a method to systematically identify genes involved in disease susceptibility. To examine the feasibility of such a screen, we performed sensitized phenotyping in five therapeutic areas (metabolic syndrome, immune dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cancer and behaviour) of a 0.8 Mb reciprocal chromosomal duplication and deficiency on chromosome 11 containing 27 genes. Gene dosage in the region significantly affected risk for high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome, antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity, ApoE-induced atherosclerosis, and home cage activity. Follow up studies on individual gene knockouts for two candidates in the region showed that copy number variation in Stat5 was responsible for the phenotypic variation in antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity and metabolic syndrome. These data demonstrate the power of sensitized phenotypic screening of segmental aneuploidy lines to identify disease susceptibility genes. PMID:21204268

  20. Structural analysis and classification of human metaphase chromosomes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoaki; Okada, Takao

    1999-06-01

    We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the analysis and classification of metaphase chromosomes. Human chromosomes were isolated from blood and spread over a glass substrate. We found that air-dried and Giemsa stained chromosomes had a granular surface and the height of approximately 250 nm; however unstained chromosomes had a smooth surface and the height was approximately 100 nm. Giemsa staining caused swelling of the chromosome structure. For the structural analysis, chromosomes were treated with hyaluronidase or a citric acid buffer. The effects of the treatments on chromosomal components, spiral structure and 30-nm solenoid fiber were observed. Each step of G-banding treatments of chromosomes was also visualized by AFM. The trypsin treatment collapsed the chromosomes and subsequent Giemsa staining caused dramatically reswelling of the chromosomes. The height of the G-positive region was approximately 200 nm but the unstained region was approximately 50 nm. The difference in thickness observed was produced by binding of the dye. The AFM image of the banding patterns of treated chromosomes was clearer than the image obtained with an optical microscope. These images made it possible to visualize the karyotyping of chromosomes using AFM. Detection of in situ hybridization using AFM and microdissection of chromosomes using AFM were also investigated.

  1. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  2. Numerous Transitions of Sex Chromosomes in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  3. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  4. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  5. A molecular cytogenetic map of sorghum chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with mapped bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Childs, K L; Klein, P E; Hodnett, G; Menz, M A; Klein, R R; Rooney, W L; Mullet, J E; Stelly, D M; Price, H J

    2002-01-01

    We used structural genomic resources for Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench to target and develop multiple molecular cytogenetic probes that would provide extensive coverage for a specific chromosome of sorghum. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones containing molecular markers mapped across sorghum linkage group A were labeled as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Signals from single-, dual-, and multiprobe BAC-FISH to spreads of mitotic chromosomes and pachytene bivalents were associated with the largest sorghum chromosome, which bears the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). The order of individual BAC-FISH loci along the chromosome was fully concordant to that of marker loci along the linkage map. In addition, the order of several tightly linked molecular markers was clarified by FISH analysis. The FISH results indicate that markers from the linkage map positions 0.0-81.8 cM reside in the short arm of chromosome 1 whereas markers from 81.8-242.9 cM are located in the long arm of chromosome 1. The centromere and NOR were located in a large heterochromatic region that spans approximately 60% of chromosome 1. In contrast, this region represents only 0.7% of the total genetic map distance of this chromosome. Variation in recombination frequency among euchromatic chromosomal regions also was apparent. The integrated data underscore the value of cytological data, because minor errors and uncertainties in linkage maps can involve huge physical regions. The successful development of multiprobe FISH cocktails suggests that it is feasible to develop chromosome-specific "paints" from genomic resources rather than flow sorting or microdissection and that when applied to pachytene chromatin, such cocktails provide an especially powerful framework for mapping. Such a molecular cytogenetic infrastructure would be inherently cross-linked with other genomic tools and thereby establish a cytogenomics system with extensive utility in development and application

  6. Structural analysis and physical mapping of a pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tutois, S; Cloix, C; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Lafleuriel, J; Picard, G; Tourmente, S

    1999-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana CIC YAC 2D2, 510 kb long and containing a small block of 180 bp satellite units was subcloned after EcoR1 digestion in the pBluescript plasmid. One of these clones was mapped genetically in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 5. The analysis of 40 subclones of this YAC showed that they all contain repeated sequences with a high proportion of transposable elements. Three new retrotransposons, two Ty-3 Gypsy-like and one Ty-1 Copia, were identified in addition to two new tandem-repeat families. A physical map of the chromosome 5 pericentromeric region was established using CIC YAC clones, spanning around 1000 kb. This contig extends from the CIC YAC 9F5 and 7A2 positioned on the left arm of chromosome 5 to a 5S rDNA genes block localized by in-situ hybridization in the pericentromeric region. Hybridization of the subclones on the CIC YAC library showed that some of them are restricted to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 and represent specific markers of this region. PMID:10328626

  7. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. PMID:26911691

  8. Phylogenetic relationships and the primitive X chromosome inferred from chromosomal and satellite DNA analysis in Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Heslop-Harrison, John S

    2005-10-01

    The early phylogeny of the 137 species in the Bovidae family is difficult to resolve; knowledge of the evolution and relationships of the tribes would facilitate comparative mapping, understanding chromosomal evolution patterns and perhaps assist breeding and domestication strategies. We found that the study of the presence and organization of two repetitive DNA satellite sequences (the clone pOaKB9 from sheep, a member of the 1.714 satellite I family and the pBtKB5, a 1.715 satellite I clone from cattle) on the X and autosomal chromosomes by in situ hybridization to chromosomes from 15 species of seven tribes, was informative. The results support a consistent phylogeny, suggesting that the primitive form of the X chromosome is acrocentric, and has satellite I sequences at its centromere. Because of the distribution of the ancient satellite I sequence, the X chromosome from the extant Tragelaphini (e.g. oryx), rather than Caprini (sheep), line is most primitive. The Bovini (cow) and Tragelaphini tribes lack the 1.714 satellite present in the other tribes, and this satellite is evolutionarily younger than the 1.715 sequence, with absence of the 1.714 sequence being a marker for the Bovini and Tragelaphini tribes (the Bovinae subfamily). In the other tribes, three (Reduncini, Hippotragini and Aepycerotini) have both 1.714 and 1.715 satellite sequences present on both autosomes and the X chromosome. We suggest a parallel event in two lineages, leading to X chromosomes with the loss of 1.715 satellite from the Bovini, and the loss of both 1.714 and 1.715 satellites in a monophyletic Caprini and Alcelaphini lineage. The presence and X chromosome distribution of these satellite sequences allow the seven tribes to be distributed to four groups, which are consistent with current diversity estimates, and support one model to resolve points of separation of the tribes. PMID:16191610

  9. A Cytogenetic Analysis of Chromosomal Region 31 of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, N. J.; Whitehead, I. P.; Brock, J. K.; Sinclair, D. A.; Mottus, R.; Stromotich, G.; Harrington, M. J.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytogenetic region 31 of the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was screened for recessive lethal mutations. One hundred and thirty nine new recessive lethal alleles were isolated that fail to complement Df(2L)J2 (31A-32A). These new alleles, combined with preexisting mutations in the region, define 52 complementation groups, 35 of which have not previously been described. Among the new mutations were alleles of the cdc2 and mfs(2)31 genes. Six new deficiencies were also isolated and characterized identifying 16 deficiency subintervals within region 31. The new deficiencies were used to further localize three loci believed to encode non-histone chromosomal proteins. Suvar(2)1/Su(var)214, a dominant suppressor of position-effect variegation (PEV), maps to 31A-B, while the recessive suppressors of PEV mfs(2)31 and wdl were localized to regions 31E and 31F-32A, respectively. In addition, the cytological position of several mutations that interact with heterochromatin were more precisely defined. PMID:8514131

  10. Analysis of human spermatozoa for Y chromosomal nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapp, R.W. Jr.; Jacobson, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    The YFF sperm assay, which is a quantification of the incidence of sperm with two fluorescent bodies (YFF . two fluorescent bodies), was performed to measure Y chromosomal nondisjunction. Three categories of human subjects were analyzed: 1) nonexposed, 2) exposed to antineoplastic agents - ie, chemo- and radiation therapy, and 3) dibromochloropropane (DBCP)-exposed. The individuals exposed to antineoplastic agents showed a three- to four-fold increase in the incidence of YFF sperm three to six weeks after the initiation of exposure to Adriamycin and X-irradiation. The maximum percentages of YFF per 1,000 sperm for each individual in this exposed group was analyzed by Wilcoxon's distribution free rank sum test using a one-sided alternative. The exposed individuals' maximum YFF percentages were statistically significantly increased when compared to the maximum YFF values of the nonexposed controls. The individuals exposed to the nematocide DBCP also exhibited a statistically significant increase in the number of sperm containing two Y chromosomes as determined by chi-square analysis with one degree of freedom (P less than 0.01). Data presented herein show statistically significant increases in the incidence of double Y chromosomes as measured by the presence of YFF sperm following exposure to Adriamycin, X-irradiation, and DBCP. It is suggested that men who have a history of antineoplastic therapy could be evaluated for evidence of Y-Y nondisjunction with this method. In the event of an increased YFF sperm level, genetic counseling and amniocentesis should be made available to the spouse where pregnancy has occurred. Further, because this procedure measures gametic mutation, is relatively simple, and is noninvasive, it should be considered for inclusion as part of a battery of medical tests for monitoring industrial populations.

  11. A 15 Mb large paracentric chromosome 21 inversion identified in Czech population through a pair of flanking duplications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inversions are balanced structural chromosome rearrangements, which can influence gene expression and the risk of unbalanced chromosome constitution in offspring. Many examples of inversion polymorphisms exist in human, affecting both heterochromatic regions and euchromatin. Results We describe a novel, 15 Mb long paracentric inversion, inv(21)(q21.1q22.11), affecting more than a third of human 21q. Despite of its length, the inversion cannot be detected using karyotyping due to similar band patterns on the normal and inverted chromosomes, and is therefore likely to escape attention. Its identification was aided by the repeated observation of the same pair of 150 kb long duplications present in cis on chromosome 21 in three Czech families subjected to microarray analysis. The finding prompted us to hypothesise that this co-occurrence of two remote duplications could be associated with an inversion of the intervening segment, and this speculation turned out to be right. The inversion was confirmed in a series of FISH experiments which also showed that the second copy of each of the duplications was always located at the opposite end of the inversion. The presence of the same pair of duplications in additional individuals reported in public databases indicates that the inversion may also be present in other populations. Three out of the total of about 4000 chromosomes 21 examined in our sample carried the duplications and were inverted, corresponding to carrier frequency of about 1/660. Although the breakpoints affect protein-coding genes, the occurrence of the inversion in normal parents and siblings of our patients and the occurrence of the duplications in unaffected controls in databases indicate that this rare variant is rather non-pathogenic. The inverted segment carried an identical shared haplotype in the three families studied. The haplotypes, however, diverged very rapidly in the flanking regions, possibly pointing to an ancient founder event at

  12. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr.

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. IMACULAT — An Open Access Package for the Quantitative Analysis of Chromosome Localization in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2013-01-01

    The alteration in the location of the chromosomes within the nucleus upon action of internal or external stimuli has been implicated in altering genome function. The effect of stimuli at a whole genome level is studied by using two-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to delineate whole chromosome territories within a cell nucleus, followed by a quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of the chromosome. However, to the best of our knowledge, open access software capable of quantifying spatial distribution of whole chromosomes within cell nucleus is not available. In the current work, we present a software package that computes localization of whole chromosomes - Image Analysis of Chromosomes for computing localization (IMACULAT). We partition the nucleus into concentric elliptical compartments of equal area and the variance in the quantity of any chromosome in these shells is used to determine its localization in the nucleus. The images are pre-processed to remove the smudges outside the cell boundary. Automation allows high throughput analysis for deriving statistics. Proliferating normal human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to standard a two-dimensional FISH to delineate territories for all human chromosomes. Approximately 100 images from each chromosome were analyzed using IMACULAT. The analysis corroborated that these chromosome territories have non-random gene density based organization within the interphase nuclei of human fibroblasts. The ImageMagick Perl API has been used for pre-processing the images. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/imaculat.html. PMID:23577217

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of chromosome 11p in familial Wilms tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, P. N.; Pritchard, J.; Cowell, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    In the family reported here, a mother and both of her children developed a Wilms tumour, and all three tumours were of the relatively rare monomorphous epithelial histopathological subtype. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, both sibs were shown to inherit the same maternal allele from the 11p13 region but different maternal alleles from the 11p15 region. Using a combination of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing techniques, no mutations were identified in the WT1 tumour-suppressor gene from the 11p13 region, but a novel polymorphism was identified in exon 1. mRNA expression studies using the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene, located in 11p15, showed that there was no relaxation of imprinting at this locus. There was also no evidence of loss of heterozygosity on the long arm of chromosome 16. These findings indicate that the WT1 and IGF-II genes, together with the long arm of chromosome 16, are not directly implicated in tumorigenesis in this Wilms family, but that a recombination event has occurred on the short arm of chromosome 11. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7911030

  15. Genome-wide association analyses identifies a susceptibility locus for tuberculosis on chromosome 18q11.2

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunny H.; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Osei, Ivy; Gyapong, John; Sirugo, Giorgio; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Enimil, Anthony; Chinbuah, Margaret A.; Floyd, Sian; Warndorff, David K.; Sichali, Lifted; Malema, Simon; Crampin, Amelia C.; Ngwira, Bagrey; Teo, Yik Y.; Small, Kerrin; Rockett, Kirk; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Fine, Paul E.; Hill, Philip C.; Newport, Melanie; Lienhardt, Christian; Adegbola, Richard A.; Corrah, Tumani; Ziegler, Andreas; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyer, Christian G.

    2013-01-01

    We combined two tuberculosis (TB) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from Ghana and The Gambia with subsequent replication totalling 11,425 participants. A significant association with disease was observed at SNP rs4331426 located in a gene-poor region on chromosome 18q11.2 (P=6.8×10−9, OR=1.19, 95%CI=1.13-1.27). Our finding shows that GWAS can identify novel loci for infectious causes of mortality even in Africa where levels of linkage disequilibrium are particularly low. PMID:20694014

  16. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genomic heterogeneity at a nucleotide and chromosomal level in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Pengyuan; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Zhang, Jianmin; Luo, Wei; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Sabatini, Linda; Vedell, Peter; Xiong, Donghai; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin; Shen, He; Li, Yinwei; Omilian, Angela R.; Hill, Annette; Head, Karen; Guru, Khurshid; Kunnev, Dimiter; Leach, Robert; Eng, Kevin H.; Darlak, Christopher; Hoeflich, Christopher; Veeranki, Srividya; Glenn, Sean; You, Ming; Pruitt, Steven C.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Using complete genome analysis, we sequenced five bladder tumors accrued from patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) and identified a spectrum of genomic aberrations. In three tumors, complex genotype changes were noted. All three had tumor protein p53 mutations and a relatively large number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs; average of 11.2 per megabase), structural variants (SVs; average of 46), or both. This group was best characterized by chromothripsis and the presence of subclonal populations of neoplastic cells or intratumoral mutational heterogeneity. Here, we provide evidence that the process of chromothripsis in TCC-UB is mediated by nonhomologous end-joining using kilobase, rather than megabase, fragments of DNA, which we refer to as “stitchers,” to repair this process. We postulate that a potential unifying theme among tumors with the more complex genotype group is a defective replication–licensing complex. A second group (two bladder tumors) had no chromothripsis, and a simpler genotype, WT tumor protein p53, had relatively few SNVs (average of 5.9 per megabase) and only a single SV. There was no evidence of a subclonal population of neoplastic cells. In this group, we used a preclinical model of bladder carcinoma cell lines to study a unique SV (translocation and amplification) of the gene glutamate receptor ionotropic N-methyl D-aspertate as a potential new therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:24469795

  17. Genomewide Linkage Study in 1,176 Affected Sister Pair Families Identifies a Significant Susceptibility Locus for Endometriosis on Chromosome 10q26

    PubMed Central

    Treloar, Susan A.; Wicks, Jacqueline; Nyholt, Dale R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Bahlo, Melanie; Smith, Vicki; Dawson, Gary; Mackay, Ian J.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Bennett, Simon T.; Carey, Alisoun; Ewen-White, Kelly R.; Duffy, David L.; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Barlow, David H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kennedy, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease that affects up to 10% of women in their reproductive years. It causes pelvic pain, severe dysmenorrhea, and subfertility. The disease is defined as the presence of tissue resembling endometrium in sites outside the uterus. Its cause remains uncertain despite >50 years of hypothesis-driven research, and thus the therapeutic options are limited. Disease predisposition is inherited as a complex genetic trait, which provides an alternative route to understanding the disease. We seek to identify susceptibility loci, using a positional-cloning approach that starts with linkage analysis to identify genomic regions likely to harbor these genes. We conducted a linkage study of 1,176 families (931 from an Australian group and 245 from a U.K. group), each with at least two members—mainly affected sister pairs—with surgically diagnosed disease. We have identified a region of significant linkage on chromosome 10q26 (maximum LOD score [MLS] of 3.09; genomewide P = .047) and another region of suggestive linkage on chromosome 20p13 (MLS = 2.09). Minor peaks (with MLS > 1.0) were found on chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, and 17. This is the first report of linkage to a major locus for endometriosis. The findings will facilitate discovery of novel positional genetic variants that influence the risk of developing this debilitating disease. Greater understanding of the aberrant cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis should lead to better diagnostic methods and targeted treatments. PMID:16080113

  18. Comparison of genomes of eight species of sections Linum and Adenolinum from the genus Linum based on chromosome banding, molecular markers and RAPD analysis.

    PubMed

    Muravenko, Olga V; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Nosova, Inna V; Zelenina, Daria A; Volkov, Alexander A; Popov, Konstantin V; Zelenin, Alexander V

    2009-03-01

    Karyotypes of species sects. Linum and Adenolinum have been studied using C/DAPI-banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with 5S and 26S rDNA and RAPD analysis. C/DAPI-banding patterns enabled identification of all homologous chromosome pairs in the studied karyotypes. The revealed high similarity between species L. grandiflorum (2n = 16) and L. decumbens by chromosome and molecular markers proved their close genome relationship and identified the chromosome number in L. decumbens as 2n = 16. The similarity found for C/DAPI-banding patterns between species with the same chromosome numbers corresponds with the results obtained by RAPD-analysis, showing clusterization of 16-, 18- and 30-chromosome species into three separate groups. 5S rDNA and 26S rDNA were co-localized in NOR-chromosome 1 in the genomes of all species investigated. In 30-chromosome species, there were three separate 5S rDNA sites in chromosomes 3, 8 and 13. In 16-chromosome species, a separate 5S rDNA site was also located in chromosome 3, whereas in 18-chromosome species it was found in the long arm of NOR-chromosome 1. Thus, the difference in localization of rDNA sites in species with 2n = 16, 2n = 30 and 2n = 18 confirms taxonomists opinion, who attributed these species to different sects. Linum and Adenolinum, respectively. The obtained results suggest that species with 2n = 16, 2n = 18 and 2n = 30 originated from a 16-chromosome ancestor. PMID:18500654

  19. Multistudy Fine Mapping of Chromosome 2q Identifies XRCC5 as a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Craig P.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Zhu, Guohua; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Lazarus, Ross; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Donner, Claudio F.; Levy, Robert D.; Make, Barry J.; Paré, Peter D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Coon, Hilary; Hoidal, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. Objectives: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. Methods: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. Measurements and Main Results: Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 × 10−5 across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5. Conclusions: By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene. PMID:20463177

  20. Identifiability analysis in conceptual sewer modelling.

    PubMed

    Kleidorfer, M; Leonhardt, G; Rauch, W

    2012-01-01

    For a sufficient calibration of an environmental model not only parameter sensitivity but also parameter identifiability is an important issue. In identifiability analysis it is possible to analyse whether changes in one parameter can be compensated by appropriate changes of the other ones within a given uncertainty range. Parameter identifiability is conditional to the information content of the calibration data and consequently conditional to a certain measurement layout (i.e. types of measurements, number and location of measurement sites, temporal resolution of measurements etc.). Hence the influence of number and location of measurement sites on the number of identifiable parameters can be investigated. In the present study identifiability analysis is applied to a conceptual model of a combined sewer system aiming to predict the combined sewer overflow emissions. Different measurement layouts are tested and it can be shown that only 13 of the most sensitive catchment areas (represented by the model parameter 'effective impervious area') can be identified when overflow measurements of the 20 highest overflows and the runoff to the waste water treatment plant are used for calibration. The main advantage of this method is very low computational costs as the number of required model runs equals the total number of model parameters. Hence, this method is a valuable tool when analysing large models with a long runtime and many parameters. PMID:22864432

  1. Analysis of SINE and LINE repeat content of Y chromosomes in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Kortschak, R Daniel; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes feature an extraordinary sex-chromosome system that consists of five X and five Y chromosomes in males. These sex chromosomes share homology with bird sex chromosomes but no homology with the therian X. The genome of a female platypus was recently completed, providing unique insights into sequence and gene content of autosomes and X chromosomes, but no Y-specific sequence has so far been analysed. Here we report the isolation, sequencing and analysis of approximately 700 kb of sequence of the non-recombining regions of Y2, Y3 and Y5, which revealed differences in base composition and repeat content between autosomes and sex chromosomes, and within the sex chromosomes themselves. This provides the first insights into repeat content of Y chromosomes in platypus, which overall show similar patterns of repeat composition to Y chromosomes in other species. Interestingly, we also observed differences between the various Y chromosomes, and in combination with timing and activity patterns we provide an approach that can be used to examine the evolutionary history of the platypus sex-chromosome chain. PMID:19874720

  2. 40 CFR 798.5385 - In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... report. In addition to the reporting recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the... cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis. 798.5385 Section 798.5385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Genetic Toxicity § 798.5385 In vivo mammalian bone marrow cytogenetics tests: Chromosomal analysis....

  3. Genetic relationships of Asians and Northern Europeans, revealed by Y-chromosomal DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zerjal, T; Dashnyam, B; Pandya, A; Kayser, M; Roewer, L; Santos, F R; Schiefenhövel, W; Fretwell, N; Jobling, M A; Harihara, S; Shimizu, K; Semjidmaa, D; Sajantila, A; Salo, P; Crawford, M H; Ginter, E K; Evgrafov, O V; Tyler-Smith, C

    1997-01-01

    We have identified a new T-->C transition on the human Y chromosome. C-allele chromosomes have been found only in a subset of the populations from Asia and northern Europe and reach their highest frequencies in Yakut, Buryats, and Finns. Examination of the microsatellite haplotypes of the C-allele chromosomes suggests that the mutation occurred recently in Asia. The Y chromosome thus provides both information about population relationships in Asia and evidence for a substantial paternal genetic contribution of Asians to northern European populations such as the Finns. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9150165

  4. Fat element-a new marker for chromosome and genome analysis in the Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Paux, Etienne; Gay, Georges; Zoshchuk, Natalia V; Roger, Delphine; Zelenin, Alexander V; Bernard, Michel; Feuillet, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    Chromosomal distribution of the Fat element that was isolated from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences of wheat chromosome 3B was studied in 45 species representing eight genera of Poaceae (Aegilops, Triticum, Agropyron, Elymus, Secale, Hordeum, Avena and Triticale) using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). The Fat sequence was not present in oats and in two barley species, Hordeum vulgare and Hordeum spontaneum, that we investigated. Only very low amounts of the Fat element were detected on the chromosomes of two other barley species, Hordeum geniculatum and Hordeum chilense, with different genome compositions. The chromosomes of other cereal species exhibited distinct hybridisation patterns with the Fat probe, and labelling intensity varied significantly depending on the species or genome. The highest amount of hybridisation was detected on chromosomes of the D genome of Aegilops and Triticum and on chromosomes of the S genome of Agropyron. Despite the bioinformatics analysis of several BAC clones that revealed the tandem organisation of the Fat element, hybridisation with the Fat probe produces uneven, diffuse signals in the proximal regions of chromosomes. In some of the genomes we investigated, however, it also forms distinct, sharp clusters in chromosome-specific positions, and the brightest fluorescence was always observed on group 4 chromosomes. Thus, the Fat element represents a new family of Triticeae-specific, highly repeated DNA elements with a clustered-dispersed distribution pattern. These elements may have first emerged in cereal genomes at the time of divergence of the genus Hordeum from the last common ancestor. During subsequent evolution, the amount and chromosomal distribution of the Fat element changed due to amplification, elimination and re-distribution of this sequence. Because the labelling patterns that we detected were highly specific, the Fat element can be used as an accessory probe in FISH analysis for chromosome

  5. Annotation of human chromosome 21 for relevance to Down syndrome: gene structure and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Slavov, Dobromir; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel

    2002-06-01

    Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 and the resultant dosage-related overexpression of genes contained within it. To efficiently direct experiments to determine specific gene-phenotype correlations, it is necessary to identify all genes within 21q and assess their functional associations and expression patterns. Analysis of the complete finished sequence of 21q resulted in annotated 225 genes and gene models, most of which were incomplete and/or had little or no experimental verification. Here we correct or complete the genomic structures of 16 genes, 4 of which were not reported in the annotation of the complete sequence. Our data include the identification of six genes encoding short or ambiguous open reading frames; the identification of three cases in which alternative splicing produces two structurally unrelated protein sequences; and the identification of six genes encoding proteins with functional motifs, two genes with unusually low similarity to their orthologous mouse proteins, and four genes with significant conservation in Drosophila melanogaster. We further demonstrate that an additional nine gene models represent bona fide transcripts and develop expression patterns for these genes plus nine additional novel chromosome 21 genes and four paralogous genes mapping elsewhere in the human genome. These data have implications for generating complete transcript maps of chromosome 21 and for the entire human genome, and for defining expression abnormalities in Down syndrome and mouse models. PMID:12036298

  6. High Resolution Analysis of Meiotic Chromosome Structure and Behaviour in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Dylan; Nibau, Candida; Wnetrzak, Joanna; Jenkins, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal crossing over and independent assortment of chromosomes during meiosis generate most of the genetic variation in sexually reproducing organisms. In barley, crossovers are confined primarily to distal regions of the chromosomes, which means that a substantial proportion of the genes of this crop rarely, if ever, engage in recombination events. There is potentially much to be gained by redistributing crossovers to more proximal regions, but our ability to achieve this is dependent upon a far better understanding of meiosis in this species. This study explores the meiotic process by describing with unprecedented resolution the early behaviour of chromosomal domains, the progression of synapsis and the structure of the synaptonemal complex (SC). Using a combination of molecular cytogenetics and advanced fluorescence imaging, we show for the first time in this species that non-homologous centromeres are coupled prior to synapsis. We demonstrate that at early meiotic prophase the loading of the SC-associated structural protein ASY1, the cluster of telomeres, and distal synaptic initiation sites occupy the same polarised region of the nucleus. Through the use of advanced 3D image analysis, we show that synapsis is driven predominantly from the telomeres, and that new synaptic initiation sites arise during zygotene. In addition, we identified two different SC configurations through the use of super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). PMID:22761818

  7. Microscopes and computers combined for analysis of chromosomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. W.; Butler, M. K.; Stroud, A. N.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning machine CHLOE, developed for photographic use, is combined with a digital computer to obtain quantitative and statistically significant data on chromosome shapes, distribution, density, and pairing. CHLOE permits data acquisition about a chromosome complement to be obtained two times faster than by manual pairing.

  8. Evolutionary analysis of the female-specific avian W chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, Linnéa; Warmuth, Vera; Bolivar, Paulina; Uebbing, Severin; Burri, Reto; Suh, Alexander; Nater, Alexander; Bureš, Stanislav; Garamszegi, Laszlo Z.; Hogner, Silje; Moreno, Juan; Qvarnström, Anna; Ružić, Milan; Sæther, Stein-Are; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Török, Janos; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The typically repetitive nature of the sex-limited chromosome means that it is often excluded from or poorly covered in genome assemblies, hindering studies of evolutionary and population genomic processes in non-recombining chromosomes. Here, we present a draft assembly of the non-recombining region of the collared flycatcher W chromosome, containing 46 genes without evidence of female-specific functional differentiation. Survival of genes during W chromosome degeneration has been highly non-random and expression data suggest that this can be attributed to selection for maintaining gene dose and ancestral expression levels of essential genes. Re-sequencing of large population samples revealed dramatically reduced levels of within-species diversity and elevated rates of between-species differentiation (lineage sorting), consistent with low effective population size. Concordance between W chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic trees demonstrates evolutionary stable matrilineal inheritance of this nuclear–cytonuclear pair of chromosomes. Our results show both commonalities and differences between W chromosome and Y chromosome evolution. PMID:26040272

  9. Evolutionary analysis of the female-specific avian W chromosome.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Linnéa; Warmuth, Vera; Bolivar, Paulina; Uebbing, Severin; Burri, Reto; Suh, Alexander; Nater, Alexander; Bureš, Stanislav; Garamszegi, Laszlo Z; Hogner, Silje; Moreno, Juan; Qvarnström, Anna; Ružić, Milan; Sæther, Stein-Are; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Török, Janos; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The typically repetitive nature of the sex-limited chromosome means that it is often excluded from or poorly covered in genome assemblies, hindering studies of evolutionary and population genomic processes in non-recombining chromosomes. Here, we present a draft assembly of the non-recombining region of the collared flycatcher W chromosome, containing 46 genes without evidence of female-specific functional differentiation. Survival of genes during W chromosome degeneration has been highly non-random and expression data suggest that this can be attributed to selection for maintaining gene dose and ancestral expression levels of essential genes. Re-sequencing of large population samples revealed dramatically reduced levels of within-species diversity and elevated rates of between-species differentiation (lineage sorting), consistent with low effective population size. Concordance between W chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic trees demonstrates evolutionary stable matrilineal inheritance of this nuclear-cytonuclear pair of chromosomes. Our results show both commonalities and differences between W chromosome and Y chromosome evolution. PMID:26040272

  10. Flow analysis of human chromosome sets by means of mixing-stirring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenin, Valeri V.; Aksenov, Nicolay D.; Shatrova, Alla N.; Klopov, Nicolay V.; Cram, L. Scott; Poletaev, Andrey I.

    1997-05-01

    A new mixing and stirring device (MSD) was used to perform flow karyotype analysis of single human mitotic chromosomes analyzed so as to maintain the identity of chromosomes derived from the same cell. An improved method for cell preparation and intracellular staining of chromosomes was developed. The method includes enzyme treatment, incubation with saponin and separation of prestained cells from debris on a sucrose gradient. Mitotic cells are injected one by one in the MSD which is located inside the flow chamber where cells are ruptured, thereby releasing chromosomes. The set of chromosomes proceeds to flow in single file fashion to the point of analysis. The device works in a stepwise manner. The concentration of cells in the sample must be kept low to ensure that only one cell at a time enters the breaking chamber. Time-gated accumulation of data in listmode files makes it possible to separate chromosome sets comprising of single cells. The software that was developed classifies chromosome sets according to different criteria: total number of chromosomes, overall DNA content in the set, and the number of chromosomes of certain types. This approach combines the high performance of flow cytometry with the advantages of image analysis. Examples obtained with different human cell lines are presented.

  11. Paternal Transmission of Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosome 15 Identified in Prenatal Diagnosis Due to Advanced Maternal Age

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Bruna C. S.; Portocarrero, Ana; Alves, Cláudia; Sampaio, André; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The detection of supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs) in prenatal diagnosis is always a challenge. In this study, we report a paternally inherited case of a small SMC(15) that was identified in prenatal diagnosis due to advanced maternal age. A 39-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 16 weeks of gestation. A fetal abnormal karyotype – 47,XX,+mar – with one sSMC was detected in all metaphases. Since this sSMC was critical in the parental decision to continue or interrupt this pregnancy, we proceeded to study the fetus and their parents. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses revealed a fetal karyotype 47,XX,+mar pat.ish idic(15)(ql2)(D15Zl++,SNRPN−), in which the sSMC(15) was a paternally inherited inverted duplicated chromosome and did not contain the critical region of Prader–Willi/Angelman syndromes. Moreover, fetal uniparental disomy was excluded. Based on this information and normal obstetric ultrasounds, the parents decided to proceed with the pregnancy and a phenotypically normal girl was born at 39 weeks of gestation. In conclusion, the clinical effects of sSMCs need to be investigated, especially when sSMCs are encountered at prenatal diagnosis. Here, although the paternal sSMC(15) was not associated with an abnormal phenotype, its characterization allows more accurate genetic counseling for the family progeny. PMID:26523119

  12. Mouse genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms on chromosomes 4, 11, and 15 for age-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Berndt, Annerose; Sundberg, Beth A; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Cario, Clinton L; Richardson, Matthew A; Chase, Thomas H; Schofield, Paul N; Uitto, Jouni; Sundberg, John P

    2016-06-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis (DCC), also called epicardial and myocardial fibrosis and mineralization, has been detected in mice of a number of laboratory inbred strains, most commonly C3H/HeJ and DBA/2J. In previous mouse breeding studies between these DCC susceptible and the DCC-resistant strain C57BL/6J, 4 genetic loci harboring genes involved in DCC inheritance were identified and subsequently termed Dyscalc loci 1 through 4. Here, we report susceptibility to cardiac fibrosis, a sub-phenotype of DCC, at 12 and 20 months of age and close to natural death in a survey of 28 inbred mouse strains. Eight strains showed cardiac fibrosis with highest frequency and severity in the moribund mice. Using genotype and phenotype information of the 28 investigated strains, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and identified the most significant associations on chromosome (Chr) 15 at 72 million base pairs (Mb) (P < 10(-13)) and Chr 4 at 122 Mb (P < 10(-11)) and 134 Mb (P < 10(-7)). At the Chr 15 locus, Col22a1 and Kcnk9 were identified. Both have been reported to be morphologically and functionally important in the heart muscle. The strongest Chr 4 associations were located approximately 6 Mb away from the Dyscalc 2 quantitative trait locus peak within the boundaries of the Extl1 gene and in close proximity to the Trim63 and Cap1 genes. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism association was found on chromosome 11. This study provides evidence for more than the previously reported 4 genetic loci determining cardiac fibrosis and DCC. The study also highlights the power of GWAS in the mouse for dissecting complex genetic traits. PMID:27126641

  13. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  14. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  15. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  16. Chromosome microdissection and cloning in human genome and genetic disease analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Faten Eleanor Roosevelt Inst. for Cancer Research, Denver, CO ); Yu, Jingwei )

    1991-03-01

    A procedure has been described for microdissection and microcloning of human chromosomal DNA sequences in which universal amplification of the dissected fragments by Mbo I linker adaptor and polymerase chain reaction is used. A very large library comprising 700,000 recombinant plasmid microclones from 30 dissected chromosomes of human chromosome 21 was constructed. Colony hybridization showed that 42% of the clones contained repetitive sequences and 58% contained single or low-copy sequences. The insert sizes generated by complete Mbo I cleavage ranged from 50 to 1,100 base pairs with a mean of 416 base pairs. Southern blot analysis of microclones from the library confirmed their human origin and chromosome 21 specificity. Some of these clones have also been regionally mapped to specific sites of chromosome 21 by using a regional mapping panel of cell hybrids. This chromosome microtechnology can generate large numbers of microclones with unique sequences from defined chromosomal regions and can be used for processes such as (i) isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones with large inserts, (ii) screening various cDNA libraries for isolating expressed sequences, and (iii) constructing region-specific libraries of the entire human genome. The studies described here demonstrate the power of this technology for high-resolution genome analysis and explicate their use in an efficient search for disease-associated genes localized to specific chromosomal regions.

  17. In Vivo Enhancer Analysis Chromosome 16 Conserved NoncodingSequences

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Ahituv, Nadav; Moses, Alan M.; Nobrega,Marcelo; Prabhakar, Shyam; Shoukry, Malak; Minovitsky, Simon; Visel,Axel; Dubchak, Inna; Holt, Amy; Lewis, Keith D.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Akiyama, Jennifer; De Val, Sarah; Afzal, Veena; Black, Brian L.; Couronne, Olivier; Eisen, Michael B.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-02-01

    The identification of enhancers with predicted specificitiesin vertebrate genomes remains a significant challenge that is hampered bya lack of experimentally validated training sets. In this study, weleveraged extreme evolutionary sequence conservation as a filter toidentify putative gene regulatory elements and characterized the in vivoenhancer activity of human-fish conserved and ultraconserved1 noncodingelements on human chromosome 16 as well as such elements from elsewherein the genome. We initially tested 165 of these extremely conservedsequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 48percent (79/165) functioned reproducibly as tissue-specific enhancers ofgene expression at embryonic day 11.5. While driving expression in abroad range of anatomical structures in the embryo, the majority of the79 enhancers drove expression in various regions of the developingnervous system. Studying a set of DNA elements that specifically droveforebrain expression, we identified DNA signatures specifically enrichedin these elements and used these parameters to rank all ~;3,400human-fugu conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. The testingof the top predictions in transgenic mice resulted in a three-foldenrichment for sequences with forebrain enhancer activity. These datadramatically expand the catalogue of in vivo-characterized human geneenhancers and illustrate the future utility of such training sets for avariety of iological applications including decoding the regulatoryvocabulary of the human genome.

  18. Identifying marker typing incompatibilities in linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stringham, H.M.; Boehnke, M.

    1996-10-01

    A common problem encountered in linkage analyses is that execution of the computer program is halted because of genotypes in the data that are inconsistent with Mendelian inheritance. Such inconsistencies may arise because of pedigree errors or errors in typing. In some cases, the source of the inconsistencies is easily identified by examining the pedigree. In others, the error is not obvious, and substantial time and effort are required to identify the responsible genotypes. We have developed two methods for automatically identifying those individuals whose genotypes are most likely the cause of the inconsistencies. First, we calculate the posterior probability of genotyping error for each member of the pedigree, given the marker data on all pedigree members and allowing anyone in the pedigree to have an error. Second, we identify those individuals whose genotypes could be solely responsible for the inconsistency in the pedigree. We illustrate these methods with two examples: one a pedigree error, the second a genotyping error. These methods have been implemented as a module of the pedigree analysis program package MENDEL. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Functional genomic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in a compendium of 8000 cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Xi, Ruibin; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Park, Richard W.; Johnson, Mark D.; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    A large database of copy number profiles from cancer genomes can facilitate the identification of recurrent chromosomal alterations that often contain key cancer-related genes. It can also be used to explore low-prevalence genomic events such as chromothripsis. In this study, we report an analysis of 8227 human cancer copy number profiles obtained from 107 array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies. Our analysis reveals similarity of chromosomal arm-level alterations among developmentally related tumor types as well as a number of co-occurring pairs of arm-level alterations. Recurrent (“pan-lineage”) focal alterations identified across diverse tumor types show an enrichment of known cancer-related genes and genes with relevant functions in cancer-associated phenotypes (e.g., kinase and cell cycle). Tumor type-specific (“lineage-restricted”) alterations and their enriched functional categories were also identified. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm for detecting regions in which the copy number oscillates rapidly between fixed levels, indicative of chromothripsis. We observed these massive genomic rearrangements in 1%–2% of the samples with variable tumor type-specific incidence rates. Taken together, our comprehensive view of copy number alterations provides a framework for understanding the functional significance of various genomic alterations in cancer genomes. PMID:23132910

  20. An automated system for chromosome analysis. Volume 1: Goals, system design, and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Melnyk, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a complete system to produce karyotypes and chromosome measurement data from human blood samples, and a basis for statistical analysis of quantitative chromosome measurement data is described. The prototype was assembled, tested, and evaluated on clinical material and thoroughly documented.

  1. High resolution chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients referred for Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    Laboratory testing is helpful in the evaluation of patients suspected to have either Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) or Angelman syndrome (AS) because most of the patients have recognizable cytogenetic deletions of 15q11q13. Maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, identified by molecular genetic techniques, is found in about 20 to 25% of PWS patients. Paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 is seen in 2 to 3% of AS patients. Thus, PWS and AS represent the first examples in humans of genetic imprinting or the differential expression of genetic information depending on the parental origin. Herein, I report our experience with FISH and high resolution chromosome analysis in patients referred to confirm or rule out PWS or AS. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Reproductive outcome after chromosome analysis in couples with two or more miscarriages: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Maureen T M; Korevaar, Johanna C; van der Veen, Fulco; Leschot, Nico J; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Goddijn, Mariette

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare reproductive outcomes in couples carrying a structural chromosome abnormality and non-carrier couples referred for chromosome analysis after two or more miscarriages. Design Case-control study. Setting Six centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands. Participants 278 carrier couples and 427 non-carrier couples referred for chromosome analysis between 1992 and 2000 after two or more miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation. Couples were followed up for at least 24 months after chromosome analysis. Main outcome measures The birth of at least one healthy child, at least one more miscarriage, and viable offspring with unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities after parental chromosome analysis. Results Mean follow-up after chromosome analysis was 5.8 years. 120 of 247 (49%) carrier couples had one or more miscarriage after chromosome analysis compared with 122 of 409 (30%) non-carrier couples (difference 19%, 95% confidence interval 11% to 26%; P < 0.01). The percentage of couples with at least one healthy child was not significantly different in carrier couples (83%) and non-carrier couples (84%) (difference -1%, - 7% to 5%). Among 550 pregnancies in carrier couples, two viable unbalanced chromosome abnormalities were detected at prenatal diagnosis (0.4%) and the fetuses aborted and two children with an unbalanced karyotype were born (0.4%). Conclusions Couples whose carrier status was ascertained after two or more miscarriages have a low risk of viable offspring with unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities. Their chances of having a healthy child are as high as non-carrier couples, despite a higher risk of miscarriage. PMID:16495333

  3. Identifying related journals through log analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiyong; Xie, Natalie; Wilbur, W. John

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: With the explosion of biomedical literature and the evolution of online and open access, scientists are reading more articles from a wider variety of journals. Thus, the list of core journals relevant to their research may be less obvious and may often change over time. To help researchers quickly identify appropriate journals to read and publish in, we developed a web application for finding related journals based on the analysis of PubMed log data. Availability: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/IRET/Journals Contact: luzh@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19734155

  4. Two novel tumor suppressor gene loci on chromosome 6q and 15q in human osteosarcoma identified through comparative study of allelic imbalances in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Nathrath, Michaela H; Kuosaite, Virginija; Rosemann, Michael; Kremer, Marcus; Poremba, Christopher; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yanagi, Masayuki; Nathrath, Walter B J; Höfler, Heinz; Imai, Kenji; Atkinson, Michael J

    2002-08-29

    We have performed a comparative study of allelic imbalances in human and murine osteosarcomas to identify genetic changes critical for osteosarcomagenesis. Two adjacent but discrete loci on mouse chromosome 9 were found to show high levels of allelic imbalance in radiation-induced osteosarcomas arising in (BALB/cxCBA/CA) F1 hybrid mice. The syntenic human chromosomal regions were investigated in 42 sporadic human osteosarcomas. For the distal locus (OSS1) on mouse chromosome 9 the syntenic human locus was identified on chromosome 6q14 and showed allelic imbalance in 77% of the cases. Comparison between the human and mouse syntenic regions narrowed the locus down to a 4 Mbp fragment flanked by the marker genes ME1 and SCL35A1. For the proximal locus (OSS2) on mouse chromosome 9, a candidate human locus was mapped to chromosome 15q21 in a region showing allelic imbalance in 58% of human osteosarcomas. We have used a combination of synteny and microsatellite mapping to identify two potential osteosarcoma suppressor gene loci. This strategy represents a powerful tool for the identification of new genes important for the formation of human tumors. PMID:12185601

  5. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78-60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults. PMID:26874116

  6. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78–60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults. PMID:26874116

  7. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  8. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  9. Single-Molecule Analysis of Replicating Yeast Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Gallo, David; Wang, Gang; Yip, Christopher M; Brown, Grant W

    2016-02-01

    The faithful replication of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA occurs during S phase once per cell cycle. Replication is highly regulated and is initiated at special structures, termed origins, from which replication forks move out bidirectionally. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to study the features and kinetics of replication. Many of these, such as those based on flow cytometry and two-dimensional and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, give a population-level view of replication. However, an alternative approach, DNA fiber analysis, which was originally developed more than 50 years ago, has the advantage of revealing features of replication at the level of individual DNA fibers. Initially based on autoradiography, this technique has been superseded by immunofluorescence-based detection of incorporated halogenated thymidine analogs. Furthermore, derivations of this technique have been developed to distribute and stretch the labeled DNA fibers uniformly on optically clear surfaces. As described here, one such technique-DNA combing, in which DNA is combed onto silanized coverslips-has been used successfully to monitor replication fork progression and origin usage in budding yeast. PMID:26832692

  10. Method and apparatus for fringe-scanning chromosome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Norgren, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method are provided for analyzing sub-micron-sized features of microscopic particles. Two central features of the invention are (1) constraining microscopic particles to flow with substantially constant orientation through a predetermined interference fringe pattern, and (2) estimating particle structure by analyzing its fringe profile. The invention allows nearly an order of magnitude higher resolution of chromosome structure than possible with currently available flow system techniques. The invention allows rapid and accurate flow karyotyping of chromosomes.

  11. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Levy, D; Hahnfeldt, P; Hlatky, L

    2004-01-01

    We review chromosome aberration modeling and its applications, especially to biodosimetry and to characterizing chromosome geometry. Standard results on aberration formation pathways, randomness, dose-response, proximity effects, transmissibility, kinetics, and relations to other radiobiological endpoints are summarized. We also outline recent work on graph-theoretical descriptions of aberrations, Monte-Carlo computer simulations of aberration spectra, software for quantifying aberration complexity, and systematic links of apparently incomplete with complete or truly incomplete aberrations. PMID:15162028

  12. Method and apparatus for fringe-scanning chromosome analysis

    DOEpatents

    Norgren, R.M.; Gray, J.W.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1983-08-31

    Apparatus and method are provided for analyzing sub-micron-sized features of microscopic particles. Two central features of the invention are (1) constraining microscopic particles to flow with substantially constant orientation through a predetermined interference fringe pattern, and (2) estimating particle structure by analyzing its fringe profile. The invention allows nearly an order of magnitude higher resolution of chromosome structure than possible with currently available flow system techniques. The invention allows rapid and accurate flow karyotyping of chromosomes.

  13. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  14. Genetic instability in Drosophila melanogaster: cytogenetic analysis of MR-induced X-chromosome deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M M; Yamamoto, M T; Miklos, G L

    1987-01-01

    We present data that demonstrate that three MR elements isolated from wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster on two continents can cause large deletions of the X chromosome in males. The deleted chromosomes, termed mini-X chromosomes, are induced at a frequency of approximately 1:4000 in chromosomes that are initially free of P elements. In situ hybridizations using a cloned P sequence as a probe fail to reveal any sequences homologous to the nomadic P family at the deletion breakpoints. Genetic analysis of 12 such mini-X chromosomes also reveals that there are no "hotspots" of chromosome breakage and that there must have been a minimum of three distinct distal breakpoints and five different proximal breakpoints in the formation of these deleted chromosomes. In fact all 12 proximal and 12 distal breakpoints may well be unique. Our data show that MR elements generate essentially random breaks along the X chromosome. We emphasize that we find no involvement of P sequences in the chromosome breakage process, consonant with the notion that MR elements exert their influence on processes involved in mitotic crossing-over. Images PMID:3110770

  15. Meiotic Chromosome Analysis of the Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus

    PubMed Central

    Wisoram, Wijit; Saengthong, Pradit; Ngernsiri, Lertluk

    2013-01-01

    The giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae), a native species of Southeast Asia, is one of the largest insects belonging to suborder Heteroptera. In this study, the meiotic chromosome of L. indicus was studied in insect samples collected from Thailand, Myanmar, Loas, and Cambodia. Testicular cells stained with lacto-acetic orcein, Giemsa, DAPI, and silver nitrate were analyzed. The results revealed that the chromosome complement of L. indicus was 2n = 22A + neo-XY + 2m, which differed from that of previous reports. Each individual male contained testicular cells with three univalent patterns. The frequency of cells containing neo-XY chromosome univalent (∼5%) was a bit higher than that of cells with autosomal univalents (∼3%). Some cells (∼0.5%) had both sex chromosome univalents and a pair of autosomal univalents. None of the m-chromosome univalents were observed during prophase I. In addition, this report presents clear evidence about the existence of m-chromosomes in Belostomatidae. PMID:23895100

  16. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Zody, Michael C; Asakawa, Shuichi; Taudien, Stefan; Garber, Manuel; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Schueler, Mary G; Shimizu, Atsushi; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Asakawa, Teruyo; Blechschmidt, Karin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dooley, Kathleen T; Dorris, Lester; Engels, Reinhard; Glöckner, Gernot; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Ishikawa, Sabine K; Jaffe, David B; Kamat, Asha; Kudoh, Jun; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Lokitsang, Tashi; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Charles D; Mauceli, Evan; Menzel, Uwe; Mihalev, Atanas H; Minoshima, Shinsei; Murayama, Yuji; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Parker, Stephen C J; Polley, Andreas; Raymond, Christina K; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rodriguez, Joseph; Sasaki, Takashi; Schilhabel, Markus; Siddiqui, Roman; Smith, Cherylyn L; Sneddon, Tam P; Talamas, Jessica A; Tenzin, Pema; Topham, Kerri; Venkataraman, Vijay; Wen, Gaiping; Yamazaki, Satoru; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Rosenthal, Andre; Birren, Bruce W; Platzer, Matthias; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Lander, Eric S

    2006-01-19

    The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution. PMID:16421571

  17. A chromosomal analysis of eleven species of Gyrinidae (Coleoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Robert B.; Holloway, Teresa C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyotypes are presented for 10 species of Gyrinus Geoffroy, 1762: Gyrinus minutus Fabricius, 1798, Gyrinus caspius Ménétriés, 1832, Gyrinus paykulli Ochs, 1927, Gyrinus distinctus Aubé, 1836 var. fairmairei Régimbart, 1883, Gyrinus marinus Gyllenhal, 1808, Gyrinus natator (Linnaeus, 1758), Gyrinus opacus Sahlberg, 1819, Gyrinus substriatus Stephens, 1869, Gyrinus suffriani Scriba, 1855, Gyrinus urinator Illiger, 1807 and for Orectochilus villosus (Müller, 1776) (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae). The 10 Gyrinus species have karyotypes comprising 13 pairs of autosomes plus sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂), XX (♀), with the X chromosomes the longest in the nucleus. Orectochilus villosus has 16 pairs of autosomes plus X0, XX sex chromosomes. The data obtained by Saxod and Tetart (1967) and Tetart and Saxod (1968) for five of the Gyrinus species are compared with our results. Saxod and Tetart considered the X chromosome to be the smallest in the nucleus in all cases, and this is considered to result from confusion arising from uneven condensation of some of the chromosomes. Small differences between the chromosomes of different Gyrinus species have been detected, but not between Greenland and Swedish populations of Gyrinus opacus, nor between typical Gyrinus distinctus from France and Gyrinus distinctus var. fairmairei from Kuwait. PMID:27186347

  18. Autotriploid origin of Carassius auratus as revealed by chromosomal locus analysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qinbo; Wang, Juan; Hu, Min; Huang, Shengnan; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-06-01

    In the Dongting water system, the Carassius auratus (Crucian carp) complex is characterized by the coexistence of diploid forms (2n=100, 2nCC) and polyploid forms. Chromosomal and karyotypic analyses have suggested that the polyploid C. auratus has a triploid (3n=150, 3nCC) and a tetraploid origin (4n=200), respectively. However, there is a lack of direct genetic evidence to support this conclusion. In this paper, analysis of the 5S rDNA chromosomal locus revealed that the 3nCC is of triploid origin. Analysis of the species-specific chromosomal centromere locus revealed that 3nCC individuals possess three sets of C. auratus-derived chromosomes. Our results provide direct cytogenetic evidence suggesting that individuals with 150 chromosomes are of autotriploid origin within the C. auratus complex. It marks an important contribution to the study of polyploidization and the evolution of vertebrates. PMID:27084707

  19. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    PubMed

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  20. FISH analysis in the derivation of a 12, 15, 21 complex chromosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.K.; Muscolino, D.; Baird, N.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed for a couple referred for recurrent pregnancy loss. Routine GTG banded studies revealed a 46,XY karyotype for the husband, but in the woman, an apparently balanced complex rearrangement involving chromosomes 12, 15, and 21 was detected. The 46,XX,t(12;15)(q13.3;q23),t(12;21)(q21;q11.2) karyotype is the consequence of 2 translocation events resulting in 3 rearranged chromosomes: (1) a derivative 12 arising from the exchange of the short arms of 12 and 21; (2) a derivative chromosome 15 consisting of segments of the long arms of chromosomes 12 and 15; and (3) a complex derivative chromosome 21 which includes the short arm and centromere of 21, and portions of the long arms of both chromosomes 12 and 15. Because the 12;21 translocation occurred at the centromeric region on both chromosomes, it was not possible to cytogenetically differentiate the derivative chromosomes 12 and 21. To clarify this issue, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed utilizing a 13/21 alpha-satellite probe. The location of the FITC signal clearly indicated a chromosome 21 centromere present on the derivative containing portions of all three chromosomes. A family history of spontaneous fetal losses suggested the possibility of a familial translocation. However, the likelihood of transmission of such a complex set of translocations is low, leading to the hypothesis that only one of the translocations was inherited with the second a de novo event in this individual. Karyotype analysis of both parents revealed no cytogenetic anomalies. Therefore, the extremely unusual occurrence of two independent translocations involving 3 chromosomes arose de novo in this patient.

  1. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions. PMID:21869477

  2. Result and pedigree analysis of spontaneously abortion villus chromosome detecting by FISH.

    PubMed

    An, N; Li, L-L; Zhang, X-Y; Sun, W-T; Liu, M-H; Liu, R-Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between fetal karyotype and parental chromosomal abnormalities, and to provide a basis for clinical diagnosis and therapy in Northeast China. A total of 144 spontaneously aborted fetuses were analyzed by FISH to test for chromosome number and to recall couples for peripheral blood karyotype analysis. The rate of abnormal chorionic villus chromosomes was 35.42%. Villus chromosome abnormality rate of the first spontaneous abortion and repeated abortions were 40.54 and 33.64%, respectively (P < 0.05). The rate of chromosome abnormality in women with advanced maternal age and women younger than 35 years old were 46.43 and 32.76%, respectively (P < 0.05). In a recall of 112 couples for peripheral blood karyotype analysis, just 3 cases of 7 patients with peripheral blood chromosome abnormality showed abnormal FISH results in their abortion villi. Fetal chromosome number abnormality is a major cause of early abortion, and parental chromosomal abnormality is not the main factor in abnormal fetal karyotype. A complete evaluation and special treatment should be provided to couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage. PMID:26681012

  3. [Features of the B chromosome in Korean wood mice Apodemus peninsulae (Thomas, 1906) from Transbaikalia and the Far East identified by the FISH method].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Kartavtseva, I V; Roslik, G V; Karamysheva, T V; Pavlenko, M V; Iwasa, M A; Koh, H S

    2015-03-01

    Korean field mice (Apodemus peninsulae) are widely distributed throughout northeastern Asia, including the Russian Far East, northern China, the Korean peninsula, Sakhalin, and Hokkaido. This mouse species is characterized by a high frequency of animals with B chromosomes differing in their number, morphology, and DNA composition in different geographical regions. For the first time a comparative analysis of DNA probes from B chromosomes with metaphase chromosomes of mice from Transbaikalia, the Far East (including the Russian Far East), Japan, and South Korea was conducted by in situ hybridization. B chromosomes in mice from the Russian Far East were shown to exhibit low variability in DNA content; however, the DNA composition of B chromosomes in species from Transbaikalia and Japan were highly variable. B chromosomes in A. peninsulae from the South Korean population demonstrate minor differences from those from the Russian Far East. We discuss the origin of B chromosomes in the studied region in comparison with previously obtained data for mice from Siberia and the Baikal region, as well as the dispersal routes of the Korean field mouse. PMID:26027373

  4. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  5. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  6. An Extensive Analysis of Y-Chromosomal Microsatellite Haplotypes in Globally Dispersed Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Excoffier, Laurent; Dieltjes, Patrick; Corach, Daniel; Pascali, Vincente; Gehrig, Christian; Bernini, Luigi F.; Jespersen, Jørgen; Bakker, Egbert; Roewer, Lutz; de Knijff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The genetic variance at seven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci (or short tandem repeats [STRs]) was studied among 986 male individuals from 20 globally dispersed human populations. A total of 598 different haplotypes were observed, of which 437 (73.1%) were each found in a single male only. Population-specific haplotype-diversity values were .86–.99. Analyses of haplotype diversity and population-specific haplotypes revealed marked population-structure differences between more-isolated indigenous populations (e.g., Central African Pygmies or Greenland Inuit) and more-admixed populations (e.g., Europeans or Surinamese). Furthermore, male individuals from isolated indigenous populations shared haplotypes mainly with male individuals from their own population. By analysis of molecular variance, we found that 76.8% of the total genetic variance present among these male individuals could be attributed to genetic differences between male individuals who were members of the same population. Haplotype sharing between populations, ΦST statistics, and phylogenetic analysis identified close genetic affinities among European populations and among New Guinean populations. Our data illustrate that Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes are an ideal tool for the study of the genetic affinities between groups of male subjects and for detection of population structure. PMID:11254455

  7. Genetic Analysis of the Adenosine3 (Gart) Region of the Second Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, SYK.; Nash, D.

    1990-01-01

    The Gart gene of Drosophila melanogaster is known, from molecular biological evidence, to encode a polypeptide that serves three enzymatic functions in purine biosynthesis. It is located in polytene chromosome region 27D. One mutation in the gene (ade3(1)) has been described previously. We report here forty new ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations selected against a synthetic deficiency of the region from 27C2-9 to 28B3-4. The mutations were characterized cytogenetically and by complementation analysis. The analysis apparently identifies 12 simple complementation groups. In addition, two segments of the chromosome exhibit complex complementation behavior. The first, the 28A region, gave three recessive lethals and also contains three known visible mutants, spade (spd), Sternopleural (sp) and wingless (wg); a complex pattern of genetic interaction in the region incorporates both the new and the previously known mutants. The second region is at 27D, where seven extreme semilethal mutations give a complex complementation pattern that also incorporates ade3(1). Since ade3(1) is defective in one of the enzymatic functions encoded in the Gart gene, we assume the other seven also affect the gene. The complexity of the complementation pattern presumably reflects the functional complexity of the gene product. The phenotypic effects of the mutants at 27D are very similar to those described for ade2 mutations, which also interrupt purine biosynthesis. PMID:2108904

  8. A Chromosomal Rearrangement Hotspot Can Be Identified from Population Genetic Variation and Is Coincident with a Hotspot for Allelic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sarah J.; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Lupski, James R.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    Insights into the origins of structural variation and the mutational mechanisms underlying genomic disorders would be greatly improved by a genomewide map of hotspots of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Moreover, our understanding of sequence variation within the duplicated sequences that are substrates for NAHR lags far behind that of sequence variation within the single-copy portion of the genome. Perhaps the best-characterized NAHR hotspot lies within the 24-kb-long Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A)–repeats (REPs) that sponsor deletions and duplications that cause peripheral neuropathies. We investigated structural and sequence diversity within the CMT1A-REPs, both within and between species. We discovered a high frequency of retroelement insertions, accelerated sequence evolution after duplication, extensive paralogous gene conversion, and a greater than twofold enrichment of SNPs in humans relative to the genome average. We identified an allelic recombination hotspot underlying the known NAHR hotspot, which suggests that the two processes are intimately related. Finally, we used our data to develop a novel method for inferring the location of an NAHR hotspot from sequence variation within segmental duplications and applied it to identify a putative NAHR hotspot within the LCR22 repeats that sponsor velocardiofacial syndrome deletions. We propose that a large-scale project to map sequence variation within segmental duplications would reveal a wealth of novel chromosomal-rearrangement hotspots. PMID:17033965

  9. Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Salanoubat, M; Lemcke, K; Rieger, M; Ansorge, W; Unseld, M; Fartmann, B; Valle, G; Blöcker, H; Perez-Alonso, M; Obermaier, B; Delseny, M; Boutry, M; Grivell, L A; Mache, R; Puigdomènech, P; De Simone, V; Choisne, N; Artiguenave, F; Robert, C; Brottier, P; Wincker, P; Cattolico, L; Weissenbach, J; Saurin, W; Quétier, F; Schäfer, M; Müller-Auer, S; Gabel, C; Fuchs, M; Benes, V; Wurmbach, E; Drzonek, H; Erfle, H; Jordan, N; Bangert, S; Wiedelmann, R; Kranz, H; Voss, H; Holland, R; Brandt, P; Nyakatura, G; Vezzi, A; D'Angelo, M; Pallavicini, A; Toppo, S; Simionati, B; Conrad, A; Hornischer, K; Kauer, G; Löhnert, T H; Nordsiek, G; Reichelt, J; Scharfe, M; Schön, O; Bargues, M; Terol, J; Climent, J; Navarro, P; Collado, C; Perez-Perez, A; Ottenwälder, B; Duchemin, D; Cooke, R; Laudie, M; Berger-Llauro, C; Purnelle, B; Masuy, D; de Haan, M; Maarse, A C; Alcaraz, J P; Cottet, A; Casacuberta, E; Monfort, A; Argiriou, A; flores, M; Liguori, R; Vitale, D; Mannhaupt, G; Haase, D; Schoof, H; Rudd, S; Zaccaria, P; Mewes, H W; Mayer, K F; Kaul, S; Town, C D; Koo, H L; Tallon, L J; Jenkins, J; Rooney, T; Rizzo, M; Walts, A; Utterback, T; Fujii, C Y; Shea, T P; Creasy, T H; Haas, B; Maiti, R; Wu, D; Peterson, J; Van Aken, S; Pai, G; Militscher, J; Sellers, P; Gill, J E; Feldblyum, T V; Preuss, D; Lin, X; Nierman, W C; Salzberg, S L; White, O; Venter, J C; Fraser, C M; Kaneko, T; Nakamura, Y; Sato, S; Kato, T; Asamizu, E; Sasamoto, S; Kimura, T; Idesawa, K; Kawashima, K; Kishida, Y; Kiyokawa, C; Kohara, M; Matsumoto, M; Matsuno, A; Muraki, A; Nakayama, S; Nakazaki, N; Shinpo, S; Takeuchi, C; Wada, T; Watanabe, A; Yamada, M; Yasuda, M; Tabata, S

    2000-12-14

    Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes. PMID:11130713

  10. Analysis of X chromosome inactivation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaohong; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Toma, Claudio; Betancur, Catalina; Chaste, Pauline; Delorme, Richard; Durand, Christelle; Fauchereau, Fabien; Botros, Hany Goubran; Leboyer, Marion; Mouren-Simeoni, Marie-Christine; Nygren, Gudrun; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Rastam, Maria; Gillberg, I Carina; Gillberg, Christopher; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Carone, Simona; Nummela, Ilona; Rossi, Mari; Battaglia, Agatino; Jarvela, Irma; Maestrini, Elena; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders more frequently observed in males. Skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is observed in heterozygous females carrying gene mutations involved in several X-linked syndromes. In this study, we aimed to estimate the role of X-linked genes in the susceptibility to ASD by ascertaining the XCI pattern in a sample of 543 informative mothers of children with ASD and in a sample of 163 affected girls. The XCI pattern was also determined in two control groups (144 adult females and 40 young females) with a similar age distribution to the mothers sample and affected girls sample, respectively. We observed no significant excess of skewed XCI in families with ASD. Interestingly, two mothers and one girl carrying known mutations in X-linked genes (NLGN3, ATRX, MECP2) showed highly skewed XCI, suggesting that ascertainment of XCI could reveal families with X-linked mutations. Linkage analysis was carried out in the subgroup of multiplex families with skewed XCI (80:20) and a modest increased allele sharing was obtained in the Xq27-Xq28 region, with a peak Z-score of 1.75 close to rs719489. In summary, our results suggest that there is no major X-linked gene subject to XCI and expressed in blood cells conferring susceptibility to ASD. However, the possibility that rare mutations in X-linked genes could contribute to ASD cannot be excluded. We propose that the XCI profile could be a useful criteria to prioritize families for mutation screening of X-linked candidate genes. PMID:18361425

  11. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  12. Exploring the tertiary gene pool of bread wheat: sequence assembly and analysis of chromosome 5M(g) of Aegilops geniculata.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vijay K; Wang, Shichen; Danilova, Tatiana; Koo, Dal Hoe; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Hribova, Eva; Rawat, Nidhi; Kalia, Bhanu; Singh, Narinder; Friebe, Bernd; Doležel, Jaroslav; Akhunov, Eduard; Poland, Jesse; Sabir, Jamal S M; Gill, Bikram S

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides a powerful tool for the discovery of important genes and alleles in crop plants and their wild relatives. Despite great advances in NGS technologies, whole-genome shotgun sequencing is cost-prohibitive for species with complex genomes. An attractive option is to reduce genome complexity to a single chromosome prior to sequencing. This work describes a strategy for studying the genomes of distant wild relatives of wheat by isolating single chromosomes from addition or substitution lines, followed by chromosome sorting using flow cytometry and sequencing of chromosomal DNA by NGS technology. We flow-sorted chromosome 5M(g) from a wheat/Aegilops geniculata disomic substitution line [DS5M(g) (5D)] and sequenced it using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 system at approximately 50 × coverage. Paired-end sequences were assembled and used for structural and functional annotation. A total of 4236 genes were annotated on 5M(g) , in close agreement with the predicted number of genes on wheat chromosome 5D (4286). Single-gene FISH indicated no major chromosomal rearrangements between chromosomes 5M(g) and 5D. Comparing chromosome 5M(g) with model grass genomes identified synteny blocks in Brachypodium distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Chromosome 5M(g) -specific SNPs and cytogenetic probe-based resources were developed and validated. Deletion bin-mapped and ordered 5M(g) SNP markers will be useful to track 5M-specific introgressions and translocations. This study provides a detailed sequence-based analysis of the composition of a chromosome from a distant wild relative of bread wheat, and opens up opportunities to develop genomic resources for wild germplasm to facilitate crop improvement. PMID:26408103

  13. High-density sex-specific linkage maps of a European tree frog (Hyla arborea) identify the sex chromosome without information on offspring sex.

    PubMed

    Brelsford, A; Dufresnes, C; Perrin, N

    2016-02-01

    Identifying homology between sex chromosomes of different species is essential to understanding the evolution of sex determination. Here, we show that the identity of a homomorphic sex chromosome pair can be established using a linkage map, without information on offspring sex. By comparing sex-specific maps of the European tree frog Hyla arborea, we find that the sex chromosome (linkage group 1) shows a threefold difference in marker number between the male and female maps. In contrast, the number of markers on each autosome is similar between the two maps. We also find strongly conserved synteny between H. arborea and Xenopus tropicalis across 200 million years of evolution, suggesting that the rate of chromosomal rearrangement in anurans is low. Finally, we show that recombination in males is greatly reduced at the centers of large chromosomes, consistent with previous cytogenetic findings. Our research shows the importance of high-density linkage maps for studies of recombination, chromosomal rearrangement and the genetic architecture of ecologically or economically important traits. PMID:26374238

  14. Assessment of Turner's syndrome by molecular analysis of the X chromosome in growth-retarded girls.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Gaston, V; Cabrol, S; Le Bouc, Y

    1998-05-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) is a common disorder (1/2500 to 1/5000 female births) which is diagnosed at birth in approximately 20% of patients and during childhood or at puberty for the rest. Growth retardation is the most frequent clinical feature of TS, so we systematically searched for TS in female patients referred to our center because of short stature. Three hundred seventy-five female patients, 1 month to 18 yr old (mean +/- SD = 9(7/12) +/- 3(9/12), with growth retardation (less than -2 SD) and/or decreased height velocity were included in the study. Mean growth retardation was -2.57 SD +/- 0.79 (range: -1 to -7). Thirty-two percent of the patients had reached puberty. GH provocative tests were performed in 329 patients (87.7%), and 36 of these patients (11%) had impaired GH secretion (5 complete and 31 partial GH deficiency). TS was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of leukocyte DNA using a multiallelic polymorphic X chromosome marker (88% heterozygosity rate). Y chromosome PCR analysis was carried out if a pattern indicative of TS was obtained. Leukocyte DNA analysis produced an abnormal restriction pattern for 20 of the 375 cases (5.3%). There was a single hybridizing band in 13 cases, an allelic disproportion indicative of mosaicism in 6 cases, and 3 hybridizing bands in 1 case. One patient tested positive in the Y chromosome PCR analysis. Cytogenetic analysis showed 47 XXX trisomy in the patient with a 3-hybridizing-band pattern and confirmed the diagnosis of TS for 17 of the 19 suspected cases: 45 X: n = 7; 45 X/46 Xi(Xq): n = 4; 45 X/46 XX: n = 2; 46 Xi(Xq): n = 1; 45 X/46 Xr(X): n = 1; 45 X/46 XX/47 XXX: n = 1; 45 X/46 XY: n = 1. Cytogenetic analysis was normal (46 XX) for the 2 other patients. The TS phenotype is variable: dysmorphism is often missing or mild (particularly in cases of mosaicism), but growth is reduced in virtually all patients. Screening of 375 growth-retarded girls identified 18 cases of TS, of which 17 were diagnosed by molecular

  15. A Large-Scale Rheumatoid Arthritis Genetic Study Identifies Association at Chromosome 9q33.2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Monica; Rowland, Charles M.; Garcia, Veronica E.; Schrodi, Steven J.; Catanese, Joseph J.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Amos, Christopher I.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Seldin, Michael F.; Begovich, Ann B.

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease affecting both joints and extra-articular tissues. Although some genetic risk factors for RA are well-established, most notably HLA-DRB1 and PTPN22, these markers do not fully account for the observed heritability. To identify additional susceptibility loci, we carried out a multi-tiered, case-control association study, genotyping 25,966 putative functional SNPs in 475 white North American RA patients and 475 matched controls. Significant markers were genotyped in two additional, independent, white case-control sample sets (661 cases/1322 controls from North America and 596 cases/705 controls from The Netherlands) identifying a SNP, rs1953126, on chromosome 9q33.2 that was significantly associated with RA (ORcommon = 1.28, trend Pcomb = 1.45E-06). Through a comprehensive fine-scale-mapping SNP-selection procedure, 137 additional SNPs in a 668 kb region from MEGF9 to STOM on 9q33.2 were chosen for follow-up genotyping in a staged-approach. Significant single marker results (Pcomb<0.01) spanned a large 525 kb region from FBXW2 to GSN. However, a variety of analyses identified SNPs in a 70 kb region extending from the third intron of PHF19 across TRAF1 into the TRAF1-C5 intergenic region, but excluding the C5 coding region, as the most interesting (trend Pcomb: 1.45E-06 → 5.41E-09). The observed association patterns for these SNPs had heightened statistical significance and a higher degree of consistency across sample sets. In addition, the allele frequencies for these SNPs displayed reduced variability between control groups when compared to other SNPs. Lastly, in combination with the other two known genetic risk factors, HLA-DRB1 and PTPN22, the variants reported here generate more than a 45-fold RA-risk differential. PMID:18648537

  16. Comparative karyotype analysis and chromosome evolution in the genus Aplastodiscus (Cophomantini, Hylinae, Hylidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The frogs of the Tribe Cophomantini present, in general, 2n = 24 karyotype, but data on Aplastodiscus showed variation in diploid number from 2n = 24 to 2n = 18. Five species were karyotyped, one of them for the first time, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques, with the aim to perform a comprehensive comparative analysis towards the understanding of chromosome evolution in light of the phylogeny. Results Aplastodiscus perviridis showed 2n = 24, A. arildae and A. eugenioi, 2n = 22, A. callipygius, 2n = 20, and A. leucopygius, 2n = 18. In the metaphase I cells of two species only bivalents occurred, whereas in A. arildae, A. callipygius, and A. leucopygius one tetravalent was also observed besides the bivalents. BrdU incorporation produced replication bands especially in the largest chromosomes, and a relatively good banding correspondence was noticed among some of them. Silver impregnation and FISH with an rDNA probe identified a single NOR pair: the 11 in A. perviridis and A. arildae; the 6 in A. eugenioi; and the 9 in A. callipygius and A. leucopygius. C-banding showed a predominantly centromeric distribution of the heterochromatin, and in one of the species distinct molecular composition was revealed by CMA3. The telomeric probe hybridised all chromosome ends and additionally disclosed the presence of telomere-like sequences in centromeric regions of three species. Conclusions Based on the hypothesis of 2n = 24 ancestral karyotype for Aplastodiscus, and considering the karyotype differences and similarities, two evolutionary pathways through fusion events were suggested. One of them corresponded to the reduction of 2n = 24 to 22, and the other, the reduction of 2n = 24 to 20, and subsequently to 18. Regarding the NOR, two conditions were recognised: plesiomorphy, represented by the homeologous small-sized NOR-bearing pairs, and derivation, represented by the NOR in a medium-sized pair. In spite

  17. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines. PMID:19178083

  18. Quantitative analysis of chromosome in situ hybridization signal in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K; Sneige, N; Pandita, T K; Johnston, D A; Lee, J S; Emami, K; Hortobagyi, G N; Hittelman, W N

    1994-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetic analysis using chromosome-specific probes is increasingly being used to detect chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. However, quantitative analysis of the hybridization signal is confounded by the nuclear slicing that occurs during sectioning. To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of chromosome in situ hybridization for detecting numerical chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded sections, in situ hybridization was performed on sections derived from mixtures of cell populations with known frequencies of numerical chromosomal aberrations and the Chromosome Index (CI) was calculated (i.e., total number of signal spots/number of nuclei counted) as a quantitative measure of chromosome copy number. The presence of 25% or more monosomic or tetrasomic cells in a given population was easily detected as a change in CI (P < 0.05). Lower degrees of polysomy could be detected as a small percentage of nuclear fragments with > 2 signal spots. The CI was not significantly influenced by a change in section thickness from 4 to 8 microM, by an increase in cell size from 478 to 986 microM3, or by the choice of detection method (fluorescence vs. conventional bright-field microscopy). Comparative analysis of touch preparations and tissue sections from the corresponding breast tumors showed that CI accurately reflects the average copy number of chromosomes in intact nuclei and may actually be superior to in situ hybridization on whole nuclei for the detection of numerical chromosomal changes in defined histologic areas. This method is thus a sensitive and accurate means of studying genetic changes in premalignant and malignant tissue, and of assessing the genetic changes associated with specific phenotypes. PMID:7924678

  19. A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) reference FISH karyotype for chromosome and chromosome-arm identification, integration of genetic linkage groups and analysis of major repeat family distribution.

    PubMed

    Paesold, Susanne; Borchardt, Dietrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Dechyeva, Daryna

    2012-11-01

    We developed a reference karyotype for B. vulgaris which is applicable to all beet cultivars and provides a consistent numbering of chromosomes and genetic linkage groups. Linkage groups of sugar beet were assigned to physical chromosome arms by FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) using a set of 18 genetically anchored BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) markers. Genetic maps of sugar beet were correlated to chromosome arms, and North-South orientation of linkage groups was established. The FISH karyotype provides a technical platform for genome studies and can be applied for numbering and identification of chromosomes in related wild beet species. The discrimination of all nine chromosomes by BAC probes enabled the study of chromosome-specific distribution of the major repetitive components of sugar beet genome comprising pericentromeric, intercalary and subtelomeric satellites and 18S-5.8S-25S and 5S rRNA gene arrays. We developed a multicolor FISH procedure allowing the identification of all nine sugar beet chromosome pairs in a single hybridization using a pool of satellite DNA probes. Fiber-FISH was applied to analyse five chromosome arms in which the furthermost genetic marker of the linkage group was mapped adjacently to terminal repetitive sequences on pachytene chromosomes. Only on two arms telomere arrays and the markers are physically linked, hence these linkage groups can be considered as terminally closed making the further identification of distal informative markers difficult. The results support genetic mapping by marker localization, the anchoring of contigs and scaffolds for the annotation of the sugar beet genome sequence and the analysis of the chromosomal distribution patterns of major families of repetitive DNA. PMID:22775355

  20. Chromosomal analysis of Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada (Anura, Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Vittorazzi, Stenio Eder; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni; Solé, Mirco; Faria, Renato Gomes; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2016-01-01

    All the species of Physalaemus Fitzinger, 1826 karyotyped up until now have been classified as 2n = 22. The species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group analyzed by C-banding present a block of heterochromatin in the interstitial region of the short arm of pair 5. Physalaemus cicada Bokermann, 1966 has been considered to be a member of the Physalaemus cuvieri species group, although its interspecific phylogenetic relationships remain unknown. The PcP190 satellite DNA has been mapped on the chromosomes of most of the species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group. For two species, Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri (Reinhardt & Lütken, 1862), however, only the chromosome number and morphology are known. Given this, the objective of the present study was to analyze the chromosomes of Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri, primarily by C-banding and PcP190 mapping. The results indicate that Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada have similar karyotypes, which were typical of Physalaemus. In both species, the NORs are located on the long arm of pair 8, and the C-banding indicated that, among other features, Physalaemus kroyeri has the interstitial band on chromosome 5, which is however absent in Physalaemus cicada. Even so, a number of telomeric bands were observed in Physalaemus cicada. The mapping of the PcP190 satellite DNA highlighted areas of the centromeric region of the chromosomes of pair 1 in both species, although in Physalaemus kroyeri, heteromorphism was also observed in pair 3. The cytogenetic evidence does not support the inclusion of Physalaemus cicada in the Physalaemus cuvieri group. In the case of Physalaemus kroyeri, the interstitial band on pair 5 is consistent with the existence of a cytogenetic synapomorphy in the Physalaemus cuvieri species group. PMID:27551351

  1. Chromosomal analysis of Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada (Anura, Leptodactylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Vittorazzi, Stenio Eder; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni; Solé, Mirco; Faria, Renato Gomes; Recco-Pimentel, Shirlei Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All the species of Physalaemus Fitzinger, 1826 karyotyped up until now have been classified as 2n = 22. The species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group analyzed by C-banding present a block of heterochromatin in the interstitial region of the short arm of pair 5. Physalaemus cicada Bokermann, 1966 has been considered to be a member of the Physalaemus cuvieri species group, although its interspecific phylogenetic relationships remain unknown. The PcP190 satellite DNA has been mapped on the chromosomes of most of the species of the Physalaemus cuvieri group. For two species, Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri (Reinhardt & Lütken, 1862), however, only the chromosome number and morphology are known. Given this, the objective of the present study was to analyze the chromosomes of Physalaemus cicada and Physalaemus kroyeri, primarily by C-banding and PcP190 mapping. The results indicate that Physalaemus kroyeri and Physalaemus cicada have similar karyotypes, which were typical of Physalaemus. In both species, the NORs are located on the long arm of pair 8, and the C-banding indicated that, among other features, Physalaemus kroyeri has the interstitial band on chromosome 5, which is however absent in Physalaemus cicada. Even so, a number of telomeric bands were observed in Physalaemus cicada. The mapping of the PcP190 satellite DNA highlighted areas of the centromeric region of the chromosomes of pair 1 in both species, although in Physalaemus kroyeri, heteromorphism was also observed in pair 3. The cytogenetic evidence does not support the inclusion of Physalaemus cicada in the Physalaemus cuvieri group. In the case of Physalaemus kroyeri, the interstitial band on pair 5 is consistent with the existence of a cytogenetic synapomorphy in the Physalaemus cuvieri species group. PMID:27551351

  2. Prenatal Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Anomalies by High-Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijuan; Wu, Qingqing; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Yan, Yani; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Yan; Yao, Ling; Ma, Yuqing; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in the prenatal diagnosis of fetuses with central nervous system (CNS) anomalies but normal chromosomal karyotype. A total of 46 fetuses with CNS anomalies with or without other ultrasound anomalies but normal karyotypes were evaluated by array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The result showed that CNVs were detected in 17 (37.0%) fetuses. Of these, CNVs identified in 5 (5/46, 10.9%) fetuses were considered to be likely pathogenic, and CNVs detected in 3 (3/46, 6.5%) fetuses were defined as being of uncertain clinical significance. Fetuses with CNS malformations plus other ultrasound anomalies had a higher rate of pathogenic CNVs than those with isolated CNS anomalies (13.6% versus 8.3%), but there was no significant difference (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.05). Pathogenic CNVs were detected most frequently in fetuses with Dandy-Walker syndrome (2/6, 33.3%) when compared with other types of neural malformations, and holoprosencephaly (2/7, 28.6%) ranked the second. CMA is valuable in prenatal genetic diagnosis of fetuses with CNS anomalies. It should be considered as part of prenatal diagnosis in fetuses with CNS malformations and normal karyotypes. PMID:26064910

  3. Comparative chromosomal analysis and evolutionary considerations concerning two species of genus Tatia (Siluriformes, Auchenipteridae)

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Roberto Laridondo; Blanco, Daniel Rodrigues; Margarido, Vladimir Pavan; Troy, Waldo Pinheiro; Filho, Orlando Moreira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Auchenipteridae is divided in two subfamilies, Centromochlinae and Auchenipterinae. Centromochlinae has 31 valid species, from which 13 are included in the genus Tatia Miranda Ribeiro, 1911. Among these, Tatia jaracatia Pavanelli & Bifi, 2009 and Tatia neivai (Ihering, 1930) are the only two representative species from the Paraná-Paraguay basins. This study aimed to analyze cytogenetically these two species and thus provide the first chromosomal data for the genus. Although Tatia jaracatia and Tatia neivai presented 2n=58 chromosomes, some differences were observed in the karyotypic formula. The heterochromatin was dispersed in the centromeric and terminal regions of most chromosomes of Tatia jaracatia, and only in the terminal region of most chromosomes of Tatia neivai. The AgNORs were detected in the subtelocentric pair 28 for both species, which was confirmed by FISH with 18S rDNA probe. The 5S rDNA sites were detected in four chromosome pairs in Tatia jaracatia and three chromosome pairs in Tatia neivai. Both species of Tatia presented great chromosomal similarities among themselves; however, when compared to other species of Auchenipteridae, it was possible to identify some differences in the karyotype macrostructure, in the heterochromatin distribution pattern and in the number and position of 5S rDNA sites, which until now seems to be intrinsic to the genus Tatia. PMID:24260691

  4. Cytogenetic analysis of Aegilops chromosomes, potentially usable in triticale (X Triticosecale Witt.) breeding.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, M; Wiśniewska, H; Apolinarska, B

    2013-05-01

    Chromosome identification using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used in cytogenetic research. It is a diagnostic tool helpful in chromosome identification. It can also be used to characterize alien introgressions, when exercised in a combination with genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). This work aims to find chromosome identification of Aegilops species and Aegilops × Secale amphiploids, which can be used in cereal breeding as a source of favourable agronomic traits. Four diploid and two tetraploid Aegilops species and three Aegilops × Secale hybrids were analysed using FISH with pSc119.2, pAs1, 5S rDNA and 25S rDNA clones to differentiate the U-, M-, S(sh)- and D-subgenome chromosomes of Aegilops genus. Additionally, GISH for chromosome categorization was carried out. Differences in the hybridization patterns allowed to identify all U-, M-, S(sh)- and D-subgenome chromosomes. Some differences in localization of the rDNA, pSc119.2 and pAs1 sequences between analogue subgenomes in diploid and tetraploid species and Aegilops × Secale hybrids were detected. The hybridization pattern of the M and S genome was more variable than that of the U and D genome. An importance of the cytogenetic markers in plant breeding and their possible role in chromosome structure, function and evolution is discussed. PMID:23378244

  5. Parents' perceptions of the usefulness of chromosomal microarray analysis for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Marian; Giarelli, Ellen; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Easley, Ebony; Spinner, Nancy B; Sankar, Pamela L; Mulchandani, Surabhi

    2015-10-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for all children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We explored the test's perceived usefulness among parents of children with ASD who had undergone CMA, and received a result categorized as pathogenic, variant of uncertain significance, or negative. Fifty-seven parents participated in a semi-structured telephone interview, and 50 also completed a survey. Most parents reported that CMA was helpful for their child and family. Major themes regarding perceived usefulness were: medical care, educational and behavioral interventions, causal explanation, information for family members, and advancing knowledge. Limits to utility, uncertainties and negative outcomes were also identified. Our findings highlight the importance of considering both health and non-health related utility in genomic testing. PMID:26066358

  6. The Utility of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has emerged as a powerful new tool to identify genomic abnormalities associated with a wide range of developmental disabilities including congenital malformations, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. CMA includes array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, both of which are useful for detection of genomic copy number variants (CNV) such as microdeletions and microduplications. The frequency of disease-causing CNVs is highest (20%–25%) in children with moderate to severe intellectual disability accompanied by malformations or dysmorphic features. Disease-causing CNVs are found in 5%–10% of cases of autism, being more frequent in severe phenotypes. CMA has replaced Giemsa-banded karyotype as the first-tier test for genetic evaluation of children with developmental and behavioral disabilities. PMID:23311723

  7. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  8. Comparative analysis of high-resolution chromosome techniques for leukemic bone marrows

    SciTech Connect

    Yunis, J.J.

    1982-09-01

    High-resolution direct and synchronization culture techniques for chromosome analysis of leukemic bone marrow cells can now be utilized. In this article, three different techniques are quantitatively compared for their consistency in successful cytogenetic analysis, reliability in the detection of clones with chromosomal abnormalities, and usefulness for the precise delineation of break points involved in structural chromosomal rearrangements. Bone marrow samples from 15 consecutive patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were studied using an improved direct technique, amethopterin cell synchronization with thymidine release, and amethopterin cell synchronization with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) release. The results obtained with the amethopterin cell synchronization technique and thymidine release suggest that it should be the method of choice in the detection of chromosome defects in bone marrow of patients with ANLL.

  9. Development of an integrated computerized scheme for metaphase chromosome image analysis: a robustness experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Wood, Marc C.; Yuan, Chaowei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Our integrated computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme includes three basic modules. The first module detects whether a microscopic digital image depicts a metaphase chromosome cell. If a cell is detected, the scheme will justify whether it is analyzable with a decision tree. Once an analyzable cell is detected, the second module is applied to segment individual chromosomes and to compute two important features. Specifically, the scheme utilizes a modified thinning algorithm to identify the medial axis of a chromosome. By tracking perpendicular lines along the medial axis, the scheme computes four feature profiles, identifies centromeres, and assigns polarities of chromosomes based on a set of pre-optimized rules. The third module is followed to classify chromosomes into 24 types. In this module, each chromosome is initially represented by a vector of 31 features. A two-layer classifier with 8 artificial neural networks (ANN) is optimized by a genetic algorithm. A testing chromosome is first classified into one of the seven groups by the ANN in the first layer. Another ANN is then automatically selected from the seven ANNs in the second layer (one for each group) to further classify this chromosome into one of 24 types. To test the performance and robustness of this CAD scheme, we randomly selected and assembled an independent testing dataset. The dataset contains 100 microscopic digital images including 50 analyzable and 50 un-analyzable metphase cells identified by the experts. The centromere location, the corresponding polarity, and karyotype for each individual chromosome were recorded in the "truth" file. The performance of the CAD scheme applied to this image dataset is analyzed and compared with the results in the true file. The assessment accuracies are 93% for the first module, 90.8% for centromere identification and 93.2% for polarity assignment in the second module, over 96% for six chromosome groups and 81.8% for one group in the third module

  10. Genetic analysis of chromosomal loci affecting the content of insoluble glutenin in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huaibing; Wang, Zhaojun; Li, Da; Wu, Peipei; Dong, Zhengying; Rong, Chaowu; Liu, Xin; Qin, Huanju; Li, Huili; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Kunpu

    2015-09-20

    In common wheat, insoluble glutenin (IG) is an important fraction of flour glutenin macropolymers, and insoluble glutenin content (IGC) is positively associated with key end-use quality parameters. Here, we present a genetic analysis of the chromosomal loci affecting IGC with the data collected from 90 common wheat varieties cultivated in four environments. Statistical analysis showed that IGC was controlled mainly genetically and influenced by the environment. Among the major genetic components known to affect end-use quality, 1BL/1RS translocation had a significantly negative effect on IGC across all four environments. As to the different alleles of Glu-A1, -B1 and -D1 loci, Glu-A1a, Glu-B1b and Glu-D1d exhibited relatively strong positive effects on IGC in all environments. To identify new loci affecting IGC, association mapping with 1355 DArT markers was conducted. A total of 133 markers were found associated with IGC in two or more environments (P < 0.05), ten of which consistently affected IGC in all four environments. The phenotypic variance explained by the ten markers varied from 4.66% to 8.03%, and their elite alleles performed significantly better than the inferior counterparts in enhancing IGC. Among the ten markers, wPt-3743 and wPt-733835 reflected the action of Glu-D1, and wPt-664972 probably indicated the effect of Glu-A1. The other seven markers, forming three clusters on 2AL, 3BL or 7BL chromosome arms, represented newly identified genetic determinants of IGC. Our work provided novel insights into the genetic control of IGC, which may facilitate wheat end-use quality improvement through molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26408094

  11. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  12. Mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 at amniocentesis: prenatal diagnosis, molecular genetic analysis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chen, Ming; Su, Yi-Ning; Huang, Jian-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wu, Peih-Shan; Su, Jun-Wei; Chang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chen-Chi; Chen, Li-Feng; Pan, Chen-Wen; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-10-15

    We present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic analysis of mosaic small supernumerary marker chromosome 1 [sSMC(1)]. We review the literature of sSMC(1) at amniocentesis and chromosome 1p21.1-p12 duplication syndrome. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation of the involved genes of ALX3, RBM15, NTNG1, SLC25A24, GPSM2, TBX15 and NOTCH2 in this case. PMID:23933412

  13. Transposon Mutagenesis Identified Chromosomal and Plasmid Genes Essential for Adaptation of the Marine Bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae to Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Matthias; Laaß, Sebastian; Burghartz, Melanie; Petersen, Jörn; Koßmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic growth and survival are integral parts of the life cycle of many marine bacteria. To identify genes essential for the anoxic life of Dinoroseobacter shibae, a transposon library was screened for strains impaired in anaerobic denitrifying growth. Transposon insertions in 35 chromosomal and 18 plasmid genes were detected. The essential contribution of plasmid genes to anaerobic growth was confirmed with plasmid-cured D. shibae strains. A combined transcriptome and proteome approach identified oxygen tension-regulated genes. Transposon insertion sites of a total of 1,527 mutants without an anaerobic growth phenotype were determined to identify anaerobically induced but not essential genes. A surprisingly small overlap of only three genes (napA, phaA, and the Na+/Pi antiporter gene Dshi_0543) between anaerobically essential and induced genes was found. Interestingly, transposon mutations in genes involved in dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate reduction (napA, nasA) and corresponding cofactor biosynthesis (genomic moaB, moeB, and dsbC and plasmid-carried dsbD and ccmH) were found to cause anaerobic growth defects. In contrast, mutation of anaerobically induced genes encoding proteins required for the later denitrification steps (nirS, nirJ, nosD), dimethyl sulfoxide reduction (dmsA1), and fermentation (pdhB1, arcA, aceE, pta, acs) did not result in decreased anaerobic growth under the conditions tested. Additional essential components (ferredoxin, cccA) of the anaerobic electron transfer chain and central metabolism (pdhB) were identified. Another surprise was the importance of sodium gradient-dependent membrane processes and genomic rearrangements via viruses, transposons, and insertion sequence elements for anaerobic growth. These processes and the observed contributions of cell envelope restructuring (lysM, mipA, fadK), C4-dicarboxylate transport (dctM1, dctM3), and protease functions to anaerobic growth require further investigation to unravel the

  14. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  15. Genotyping Cancer-Associated Genes in Chordoma Identifies Mutations in Oncogenes and Areas of Chromosomal Loss Involving CDKN2A, PTEN, and SMARCB1

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Edwin; MacConaill, Laura E.; Cote, Gregory M.; Le, Long P.; Shen, Jacson K.; Nielsen, Gunnlaugur P.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Garraway, Levi A.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying chordoma pathogenesis are unknown. We therefore sought to identify novel mutations to better understand chordoma biology and to potentially identify therapeutic targets. Given the relatively high costs of whole genome sequencing, we performed a focused genetic analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer (Sequenom iPLEX genotyping). We tested 865 hotspot mutations in 111 oncogenes and selected tumor suppressor genes (OncoMap v. 3.0) of 45 human chordoma tumor samples. Of the analyzed samples, seven were identified with at least one mutation. Six of these were from fresh frozen samples, and one was from a paraffin embedded sample. These observations were validated using an independent platform using homogeneous mass extend MALDI-TOF (Sequenom hME Genotyping). These genetic alterations include: ALK (A877S), CTNNB1 (T41A), NRAS (Q61R), PIK3CA (E545K), PTEN (R130), CDKN2A (R58*), and SMARCB1 (R40*). This study reports on the largest comprehensive mutational analysis of chordomas performed to date. To focus on mutations that have the greatest chance of clinical relevance, we tested only oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been previously implicated in the tumorigenesis of more common malignancies. We identified rare genetic changes that may have functional significance to the underlying biology and potential therapeutics for chordomas. Mutations in CDKN2A and PTEN occurred in areas of chromosomal copy loss. When this data is paired with the studies showing 18 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at the locus for CDKN2A, 17 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at PTEN, and 3 of 4 chordoma samples displaying deletion at the SMARCB1 locus, we can infer that a loss of heterozygosity at these three loci may play a significant role in chordoma pathogenesis. PMID:24983247

  16. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  18. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. PMID:26561523

  19. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wu; Bai, Lin; Dai, Lyu-Xia; He, Xu; Zhou, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions. Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations. In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19. Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33 and 17p13.1-13.3. And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG). Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. PMID:26879013

  20. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations and recombination by allelic bias in RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Weissbein, Uri; Schachter, Maya; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability has profound effects on cellular phenotypes. Studies have shown that pluripotent cells with abnormal karyotypes may grow faster, differentiate less and become more resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we showed that microarray gene expression profiles can be utilized for the analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparing gene expression levels between normal and aneuploid samples. Here we adopted this method for RNA-Seq data and present eSNP-Karyotyping for the detection of chromosomal aberrations, based on measuring the ratio of expression between the two alleles. We demonstrate its ability to detect chromosomal gains and losses in pluripotent cells and their derivatives, as well as meiotic recombination patterns. This method is advantageous since it does not require matched diploid samples for comparison, is less sensitive to global expression changes caused by the aberration and utilizes already available gene expression profiles to determine chromosomal aberrations. PMID:27385103

  1. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations and recombination by allelic bias in RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Weissbein, Uri; Schachter, Maya; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability has profound effects on cellular phenotypes. Studies have shown that pluripotent cells with abnormal karyotypes may grow faster, differentiate less and become more resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we showed that microarray gene expression profiles can be utilized for the analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparing gene expression levels between normal and aneuploid samples. Here we adopted this method for RNA-Seq data and present eSNP-Karyotyping for the detection of chromosomal aberrations, based on measuring the ratio of expression between the two alleles. We demonstrate its ability to detect chromosomal gains and losses in pluripotent cells and their derivatives, as well as meiotic recombination patterns. This method is advantageous since it does not require matched diploid samples for comparison, is less sensitive to global expression changes caused by the aberration and utilizes already available gene expression profiles to determine chromosomal aberrations. PMID:27385103

  2. Sex-Specific Regulation of Mitochondrial DNA Levels: Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    López, Sonia; Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Casademont, Jordi; Blangero, John; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Lathrop, Mark; Almasy, Laura; Soria, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels have been associated with common diseases in humans. We investigated the genetic mechanism that controls mtDNA levels using genome-wide linkage analyses in families from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia Project (GAIT). We measure mtDNA levels by quantitative real-time PCR in 386 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. A variance component linkage method using 485 microsatellites was conducted to evaluate linkage and to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in the control of mtDNA levels. The heritalibility of mtDNA levels was 0.33 (p = 1.82e-05). We identified a QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD = 2.21) using all of the subjects, independently on their sex. When females and males were analysed separately, three QTLs were identified. Females showed the same QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD = 3.09), indicating that the QTL identified in the analysis using all of the subjects was a strong female QTL, and another one on Chromosome 3 (LOD = 2.67), whereas in males a QTL was identified on Chromosome 1 (LOD = 2.81). These QTLs were fine-mapped to find associations with mtDNA levels. The most significant SNP association was for the rs10888838 on Chromosome 1 in males. This SNP mapped to the gene MRPL37, involved in mitochondrial protein translation. The rs2140855 on Chromosome 2 showed association in the analysis using all of the subjects. It was near the gene CMPK2, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme of the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Our results provide evidence of a sex-specific genetic mechanism for the control of mtDNA levels and provide a framework to identify new genes that influence mtDNA levels. PMID:22916149

  3. Sex-specific regulation of mitochondrial DNA levels: genome-wide linkage analysis to identify quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    López, Sonia; Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Casademont, Jordi; Blangero, John; Martinez-Perez, Angel; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Lathrop, Mark; Almasy, Laura; Soria, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels have been associated with common diseases in humans. We investigated the genetic mechanism that controls mtDNA levels using genome-wide linkage analyses in families from the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia Project (GAIT). We measure mtDNA levels by quantitative real-time PCR in 386 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. A variance component linkage method using 485 microsatellites was conducted to evaluate linkage and to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in the control of mtDNA levels. The heritalibility of mtDNA levels was 0.33 (p=1.82e-05). We identified a QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD=2.21) using all of the subjects, independently on their sex. When females and males were analysed separately, three QTLs were identified. Females showed the same QTL on Chromosome 2 (LOD=3.09), indicating that the QTL identified in the analysis using all of the subjects was a strong female QTL, and another one on Chromosome 3 (LOD=2.67), whereas in males a QTL was identified on Chromosome 1 (LOD=2.81). These QTLs were fine-mapped to find associations with mtDNA levels. The most significant SNP association was for the rs10888838 on Chromosome 1 in males. This SNP mapped to the gene MRPL37, involved in mitochondrial protein translation. The rs2140855 on Chromosome 2 showed association in the analysis using all of the subjects. It was near the gene CMPK2, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme of the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Our results provide evidence of a sex-specific genetic mechanism for the control of mtDNA levels and provide a framework to identify new genes that influence mtDNA levels. PMID:22916149

  4. Examination of X chromosome markers in Rett syndrome: Exclusion mapping with a novel variation on multilocus linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, K.A.; Fill, C.P. ); Terwililger, J.; Percy, A.K.; Zobhbi, H. ); DeGennaro, L.J.; Ott, J. ); Anvret, M.; Martin-Gallardo, A. )

    1992-02-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurologic disorder characterized by early normal development followed by regression, acquired deceleration of head growth, autism, ataxia, and sterotypic hand movements. The exclusive occurrence of the syndrome in females and the occurrence of a few familial cases with inheritance through maternal lines suggest that this disorder is most likely secondary to a mutation on the X chromosome. To address this hypothesis and to identify candidate regions for the Rett syndrome gene locus, genotypic analysis was performed in two families with maternally related affected half-sisters by using 63 DNA markers from the X chromosome. Nineteen of the loci studied were chosen for multipoint linkage analysis because they have been previously genetically mapped using a large number of meioses from reference families. Using the exclusion criterion of a lod score less than [minus]2, the authors were able to exclude the region between the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and the DXS456 locus. This region extends from Xp21.2 to Xq21-q23. The use of the multipoint linkage analysis approach outlined in this study should allow the exclusion of additional regions of the X chromosome as new markers are analyzed.

  5. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of abnormalities in chromosome 21 in childhood osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Aguiar, Simone; de Jesus Girotto Zambaldi, Lilian; dos Santos, Adilson Manoel; Pinto, Walter; Brandalise, Silvia Regina

    2007-05-01

    Osteosarcomas (OS) are aggressive tumors of the bone and often have a poor prognosis. The tumors exhibit karyotypes with a high degree of complexity, which has made it difficult to determine whether any recurrent chromosomal aberrations characterize OS. To address inherent difficulties associated with classical cytogenetic analysis, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to OS tissue. Forty-one pediatric OS specimens were analyzed by a CGH technique: 24 female and 17 male patients, with a median age of 12 years and 4 months. Chromosomal abnormalities were highly diverse and variable, including gains of chromosome 1p, 2p, 3q, 5q, 5p, and 6p and losses of 14q (50% in 14q11.2), 15q, and 16p. A high level of losses of chromosome 21 was present (26/41 cases; P = 0.008), most often loss of the 21q11.2 approximately 21 region. These novel findings in chromosome 21 of pediatric OS tumors suggest that specific sequences mapping to these chromosomal regions are likely to play a role in the development of OS. PMID:17498555

  6. Identifying Peer Institutions Using Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boronico, Jess; Choksi, Shail S.

    2012-01-01

    The New York Institute of Technology's (NYIT) School of Management (SOM) wishes to develop a list of peer institutions for the purpose of benchmarking and monitoring/improving performance against other business schools. The procedure utilizes relevant criteria for the purpose of establishing this peer group by way of a cluster analysis. The…

  7. Chromosomal microarray analysis of consecutive individuals with autism spectrum disorders or learning disability presenting for genetic services.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Hovanes, Karine; Dasouki, Majed; Manzardo, Ann M; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis is now commonly used in clinical practice to identify copy number variants (CNVs) in the human genome. We report our experience with the use of the 105 K and 180K oligonucleotide microarrays in 215 consecutive patients referred with either autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or developmental delay/learning disability for genetic services at the University of Kansas Medical Center during the past 4 years (2009-2012). Of the 215 patients [140 males and 75 females (male/female ratio=1.87); 65 with ASD and 150 with learning disability], abnormal microarray results were seen in 45 individuals (21%) with a total of 49 CNVs. Of these findings, 32 represented a known diagnostic CNV contributing to the clinical presentation and 17 represented non-diagnostic CNVs (variants of unknown significance). Thirteen patients with ASD had a total of 14 CNVs, 6 CNVs recognized as diagnostic and 8 as non-diagnostic. The most common chromosome involved in the ASD group was chromosome 15. For those with a learning disability, 32 patients had a total of 35 CNVs. Twenty-six of the 35 CNVs were classified as a known diagnostic CNV, usually a deletion (n=20). Nine CNVs were classified as an unknown non-diagnostic CNV, usually a duplication (n=8). For the learning disability subgroup, chromosomes 2 and 22 were most involved. Thirteen out of 65 patients (20%) with ASD had a CNV compared with 32 out of 150 patients (21%) with a learning disability. The frequency of chromosomal microarray abnormalities compared by subject group or gender was not statistically different. A higher percentage of individuals with a learning disability had clinical findings of seizures, dysmorphic features and microcephaly, but not statistically significant. While both groups contained more males than females, a significantly higher percentage of males were present in the ASD group. PMID:24188901

  8. Identifying MMORPG Bots: A Traffic Analysis Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Ta; Jiang, Jhih-Wei; Huang, Polly; Chu, Hao-Hua; Lei, Chin-Laung; Chen, Wen-Chin

    2008-12-01

    Massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) have become extremely popular among network gamers. Despite their success, one of MMORPG's greatest challenges is the increasing use of game bots, that is, autoplaying game clients. The use of game bots is considered unsportsmanlike and is therefore forbidden. To keep games in order, game police, played by actual human players, often patrol game zones and question suspicious players. This practice, however, is labor-intensive and ineffective. To address this problem, we analyze the traffic generated by human players versus game bots and propose general solutions to identify game bots. Taking Ragnarok Online as our subject, we study the traffic generated by human players and game bots. We find that their traffic is distinguishable by 1) the regularity in the release time of client commands, 2) the trend and magnitude of traffic burstiness in multiple time scales, and 3) the sensitivity to different network conditions. Based on these findings, we propose four strategies and two ensemble schemes to identify bots. Finally, we discuss the robustness of the proposed methods against countermeasures of bot developers, and consider a number of possible ways to manage the increasingly serious bot problem.

  9. Identifying nonlinear biomechanical models by multicriteria analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srdjevic, Zorica; Cveticanin, Livija

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the methodology developed by Srdjevic and Cveticanin (International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 34 (2004) 307-318) for the nonbiased (objective) parameter identification of the linear biomechanical model exposed to vertical vibrations is extended to the identification of n-degree of freedom (DOF) nonlinear biomechanical models. The dynamic performance of the n-DOF nonlinear model is described in terms of response functions in the frequency domain, such as the driving-point mechanical impedance and seat-to-head transmissibility function. For randomly generated parameters of the model, nonlinear equations of motion are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The appropriate data transformation from the time-to-frequency domain is performed by a discrete Fourier transformation. Squared deviations of the response functions from the target values are used as the model performance evaluation criteria, thus shifting the problem into the multicriteria framework. The objective weights of criteria are obtained by applying the Shannon entropy concept. The suggested methodology is programmed in Pascal and tested on a 4-DOF nonlinear lumped parameter biomechanical model. The identification process over the 2000 generated sets of parameters lasts less than 20 s. The model response obtained with the imbedded identified parameters correlates well with the target values, therefore, justifying the use of the underlying concept and the mathematical instruments and numerical tools applied. It should be noted that the identified nonlinear model has an improved accuracy of the biomechanical response compared to the accuracy of a linear model.

  10. Identifying targets of selection in mosaic genomes with machine learning: applications in Anopheles gambiae for detecting sites within locally adapted chromosomal inversions.

    PubMed

    He, Qixin; Knowles, L Lacey

    2016-05-01

    Chromosomal inversions are important structural changes that may facilitate divergent selection when they capture co-adaptive loci in the face of gene flow. However, identifying selection targets within inversions can be challenging. The high degrees of differentiation between heterokaryotypes, as well as the differences in demographic histories of collinear regions compared with inverted ones, reduce the power of traditional outlier analyses for detecting selected loci. Here, we develop a new approach that uses discriminant functions informed from inversion-specific expectations to classify loci that are under selection (or drift). Analysis of RAD sequencing data we collected in a classic dipteran species with polymorphic inversion clines-Anopheles gambiae, a malaria vector species from sub-Saharan Africa-demonstrates the benefits of the approach compared with traditional outlier analyses. We focus specifically on two polymorphic inversions, the 2La and 2Rb arrangements that predominate in dry habitats and the 2L+(a) and 2R+(b) arrangements in wet habitats, which contrast with the minimal geographic structure of SNPs from collinear regions. With our approach, we identify two strongly selected regions within 2La associated with dry habitat. Moreover, we also show that the prevalence of selection is greater in the arrangement 2L+(a) that is associated with wet habitat (unlike presumed importance of selective divergence associated with the shift of the mosquitoes into dry habitats). We discuss the implications of these results with respect to studies of rapid adaptation in these malaria vectors, and in particular, the insights our newly developed approach offers for identifying not only potential targets of selection, but also the population that has undergone adaptive change. PMID:26994406

  11. A MOLECULAR CYTOGENETICS MAP OF SORGHUM CHROMOSOME 1: FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION ANALYSIS WITH MAPPED BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used structural genomic resources for sorghum to target and develop multiple molecular cytogenetic probes that would provide extensive coverage for a specific chromosome of sorghum. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing molecular markers mapped across sorghum linkage group A were labe...

  12. Discovery of Supernumerary B Chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bauerly, Elisabeth; Hughes, Stacie E.; Vietti, Dana R.; Miller, Danny E.; McDowell, William; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes are small, heterochromatic chromosomes that are transmitted in a non-Mendelian manner. We have identified a stock of Drosophila melanogaster that recently (within the last decade) acquired an average of 10 B chromosomes per fly. These B chromosomes are transmitted by both males and females and can be maintained for multiple generations in a wild-type genetic background despite the fact that they cause high levels of 4th chromosome meiotic nondisjunction in females. Most curiously, these B chromosomes are mitotically unstable, suggesting either the absence of critical chromosomal sites or the inability of the meiotic or mitotic systems to cope with many additional chromosomes. These B chromosomes also contain centromeres and are primarily composed of the heterochromatic AATAT satellite sequence. Although the AATAT sequence comprises the majority of the 4th chromosome heterochromatin, the B chromosomes lack most, if not all, 4th chromosome euchromatin. Presumably as a consequence of their heterochromatic content, these B chromosomes significantly modify position-effect variegation in two separate reporter systems, acting as enhancers of variegation in one case and suppressors in the other. The identification of B chromosomes in a genetically tractable organism like D. melanogaster will facilitate studies of chromosome evolution and the analysis of the mechanisms by which meiotic and mitotic processes cope with additional chromosomes. PMID:24478336

  13. Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Sharpe, Ted; Young, Sarah K; Rowen, Lee; O'Neill, Keith; Whittaker, Charles A; Kamal, Michael; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Abbasi, Nissa; Abouelleil, Amr; Arachchi, Harindra M; Baradarani, Lida; Birditt, Brian; Bloom, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Burke, Jeremy; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dorris, Lester; Dors, Monica; Eichler, Evan E; Engels, Reinhard; Fahey, Jessica; Fleetwood, Peter; Friedman, Cynthia; Gearin, Gary; Hall, Jennifer L; Hensley, Grace; Johnson, Ericka; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kaur, Amardeep; Locke, Devin P; Madan, Anuradha; Munson, Glen; Jaffe, David B; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Naylor, Jerome W; Nesbitt, Ryan; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Ratcliffe, Amber; Rounsley, Steven; She, Xinwei; Sneddon, Katherine M B; Stewart, Sandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Stone, Sabrina M; Topham, Kerri; Vincent, Dascena; Wang, Shunguang; Zimmer, Andrew R; Birren, Bruce W; Hood, Leroy; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-03-30

    Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome. PMID:16572171

  14. Analysis of two cosmid clones from chromosome 4 of Drosophila melanogaster reveals two new genes amid an unusual arrangement of repeated sequences.

    PubMed

    Locke, J; Podemski, L; Roy, K; Pilgrim, D; Hodgetts, R

    1999-02-01

    Chromosome 4 from Drosophila melanogaster has several unusual features that distinguish it from the other chromosomes. These include a diffuse appearance in salivary gland polytene chromosomes, an absence of recombination, and the variegated expression of P-element transgenes. As part of a larger project to understand these properties, we are assembling a physical map of this chromosome. Here we report the sequence of two cosmids representing approximately 5% of the polytenized region. Both cosmid clones contain numerous repeated DNA sequences, as identified by cross hybridization with labeled genomic DNA, BLAST searches, and dot matrix analysis, which are positioned between and within the transcribed sequences. The repetitive sequences include three copies of the mobile element Hoppel, one copy of the mobile element HB, and 18 DINE repeats. DINE is a novel, short repeated sequence dispersed throughout both cosmid sequences. One cosmid includes the previously described cubitus interruptus (ci) gene and two new genes: that a gene with a predicted amino acid sequence similar to ribosomal protein S3a which is consistent with the Minute(4)101 locus thought to be in the region, and a novel member of the protein family that includes plexin and met-hepatocyte growth factor receptor. The other cosmid contains only the two short 5'-most exons from the zinc-finger-homolog-2 (zfh-2) gene. This is the first extensive sequence analysis of noncoding DNA from chromosome 4. The distribution of the various repeats suggests its organization is similar to the beta-heterochromatic regions near the base of the major chromosome arms. Such a pattern may account for the diffuse banding of the polytene chromosome 4 and the variegation of many P-element transgenes on the chromosome. PMID:10022978

  15. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-01-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10−15) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  16. Genome-wide analysis of over 106 000 individuals identifies 9 neuroticism-associated loci.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Escott-Price, V; Davies, G; Bailey, M E S; Colodro-Conde, L; Ward, J; Vedernikov, A; Marioni, R; Cullen, B; Lyall, D; Hagenaars, S P; Liewald, D C M; Luciano, M; Gale, C R; Ritchie, S J; Hayward, C; Nicholl, B; Bulik-Sullivan, B; Adams, M; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Graham, N; Mackay, D; Evans, J; Smith, B H; Porteous, D J; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Holmans, P; McIntosh, A M; Pell, J P; Deary, I J; O'Donovan, M C

    2016-06-01

    Neuroticism is a personality trait of fundamental importance for psychological well-being and public health. It is strongly associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and several other psychiatric conditions. Although neuroticism is heritable, attempts to identify the alleles involved in previous studies have been limited by relatively small sample sizes. Here we report a combined meta-analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of neuroticism that includes 91 370 participants from the UK Biobank cohort, 6659 participants from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) and 8687 participants from a QIMR (Queensland Institute of Medical Research) Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMR) cohort. All participants were assessed using the same neuroticism instrument, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R-S) Short Form's Neuroticism scale. We found a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability estimate for neuroticism of ∼15% (s.e.=0.7%). Meta-analysis identified nine novel loci associated with neuroticism. The strongest evidence for association was at a locus on chromosome 8 (P=1.5 × 10(-15)) spanning 4 Mb and containing at least 36 genes. Other associated loci included interesting candidate genes on chromosome 1 (GRIK3 (glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 3)), chromosome 4 (KLHL2 (Kelch-like protein 2)), chromosome 17 (CRHR1 (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein Tau)) and on chromosome 18 (CELF4 (CUGBP elav-like family member 4)). We found no evidence for genetic differences in the common allelic architecture of neuroticism by sex. By comparing our findings with those of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortia, we identified a strong genetic correlation between neuroticism and MDD and a less strong but significant genetic correlation with schizophrenia, although not with bipolar disorder. Polygenic risk scores derived from the primary UK Biobank sample captured

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of inv dup(15) chromosomes observed in two patients with autistic disorder and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.L.; Bennett-Baker, P.E.; Gorski, J.L.

    1996-01-11

    A variety of distinct phenotypes has been associated with supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Although different cytogenetic rearrangements have been associated with distinguishable clinical syndromes, precise genotype-phenotype correlations have not been determined. However, the availability of chromosome 15 DNA markers provides a means to characterize inv dup(15) chromosomes in detail to facilitate the determination of specific genotype-phenotype associations. We describe 2 patients with an autistic disorder, mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, and supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed the chromosomal origin of the supernumerary chromosomes and showed that the duplicated region extended to at least band 15q13. An analysis of chromosome 15 microsatellite CA polymorphisms suggested a maternal origin of the inv dup(15) chromosomes and biparental inheritance of the two intact chromosome 15 homologs. The results of this study add to the existing literature which suggests that the clinical phenotype of patients with a supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome is determined not only by the extent of the duplicated region, but by the dosage of genes located within band 15q13 and the origin of the normal chromosomes 15. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Genomic structural analysis of porcine fatty acid desaturase cluster on chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Arakawa, Aisaku; Motoyama, Michiyo; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Nii, Masahiro; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid composition is an economically important trait in meat-producing livestock. To gain insight into the molecular genetics of fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genes in pigs, we investigated the genomic structure of the porcine FADS gene family on chromosome 2. We also examined the tissue distribution of FADS gene expression. The genomic structure of FADS family in mammals consists of three isoforms FADS1, FADS2 and FADS3. However, porcine FADS cluster in the latest pig genome assembly (Sscrofa 10.2) containing some gaps is distinct from that in other mammals. We therefore sought to determine the genomic structure, including the FADS cluster in a 200-kbp range by sequencing gap regions. The structure we obtained was similar to that in other mammals. We then investigated the porcine FADS1 transcription start site and identified a novel isoform named FADS1b. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three members of the FADS cluster were orthologous among mammals, whereas the various FADS1 isoforms identified in pigs, mice and cattle might be attributable to species-specific transcriptional regulation with alternative promoters. Porcine FADS1b and FADS3 isoforms were predominantly expressed in the inner layer of the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additional analyses will reveal the effects of these functionally unknown isoforms on fatty acid composition in pig fat tissues. PMID:25409917

  19. Reevaluating Human Gene Annotation: A Second-Generation Analysis of Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John E.; Goward, Melanie E.; Cole, Charlotte G.; Smink, Luc J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Knowles, Sarah; Bye, Jacqueline M.; Beare, David M.; Dunham, Ian

    2003-01-01

    We report a second-generation gene annotation of human chromosome 22. Using expressed sequence databases, comparative sequence analysis, and experimental verification, we have extended genes, fused previously fragmented structures, and identified new genes. The total length in exons of annotation was increased by 74% over our previously published annotation and includes 546 protein-coding genes and 234 pseudogenes. Thirty-two potential protein-coding annotations are partial copies of other genes, and may represent duplications on an evolutionary path to change or loss of function. We also identified 31 non-protein-coding transcripts, including 16 possible antisense RNAs. By extrapolation, we estimate the human genome contains 29,000–36,000 protein-coding genes, 21,300 pseudogenes, and 1500 antisense RNAs. We suggest that our revised annotation criteria provide a paradigm for future annotation of the human genome. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org. The sequence data from this study have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. , -3, , , -2, , , , , -8, -6, , -81, -81, , , , , -3, -2, -2, , , , , , , -5, , , , , -7, , -8, –. The following individuals kindly provided reagents, samples, or unpublished information as indicated in the paper: J. Seilhamer, L. Stuve, H. Roest-Crollius, A. Levine, G. Slater, and J. Kent.] PMID:12529303

  20. The human NACP/{alpha}-synuclein gene: Chromosome assignment to 4q21.3-q22 and TaqI RFLP analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Silva, H.A.R. de; Pettenati, M.J.

    1995-03-20

    NACP is a presynaptic protein that was originally identified as the precursor of NAC (non-A{beta} component of Alzheimer disease amyloid). It has a strong homology with groups of proteins called synuclein and PNP-14 that are brain-specific. The exact function of NACP remains unclear. Individuals with early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) were found to have a mutation in the APP gene that encodes the precursor of amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}). To evaluate the potential presence of mutation or polymorphism in NACP, information on its chromosome localization and RFLP will be essential. In the present study the chromosome localization of the NACP gene was determined using PCR and Southern blotting analyses of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosome hybridization. Further, a two-allele RFLP was identified by screening genomic DNA from unrelated Caucasian individuals by using Southern blot analysis. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Focal Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Identify CMTM8 and GPR177 as New Candidate Driver Genes in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Johannes; Schaap, Gerard R.; Baas, Frank; Ylstra, Bauke; Hulsebos, Theo J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone tumor that preferentially develops in adolescents. The tumor is characterized by an abundance of genomic aberrations, which hampers the identification of the driver genes involved in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. Our study aims to identify these genes by the investigation of focal copy number aberrations (CNAs, <3 Mb). For this purpose, we subjected 26 primary tumors of osteosarcoma patients to high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and identified 139 somatic focal CNAs. Of these, 72 had at least one gene located within or overlapping the focal CNA, with a total of 94 genes. For 84 of these genes, the expression status in 31 osteosarcoma samples was determined by expression microarray analysis. This enabled us to identify the genes of which the over- or underexpression was in more than 35% of cases in accordance to their copy number status (gain or loss). These candidate genes were subsequently validated in an independent set and furthermore corroborated as driver genes by verifying their role in other tumor types. We identified CMTM8 as a new candidate tumor suppressor gene and GPR177 as a new candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma. In osteosarcoma, CMTM8 has been shown to suppress EGFR signaling. In other tumor types, CMTM8 is known to suppress the activity of the oncogenic protein c-Met and GPR177 is known as an overexpressed upstream regulator of the Wnt-pathway. Further studies are needed to determine whether these proteins also exert the latter functions in osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. PMID:25551557

  2. Correlation Analysis between SNP and Expression Arrays in Gliomas Identify Potentially Relevant Targets Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Kotliarov, Yuri; Kotliarova, Svetlana; Charong, Nurdina; Li, Aiguo; Walling, Jennifer; Aquilanti, Elisa; Ahn, Susie; Steed, Mary Ellen; Su, Qin; Center, Angela; Zenklusen, Jean C; Fine, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are a major cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Therapy for gliomas, the most common type of primary brain tumors, remains suboptimal. The development of improved therapeutics will require greater knowledge of the biology of gliomas at both the genomic and transcriptional levels. We have previously reported whole genome profiling of chromosome copy number alterations (CNA) in gliomas, and now present our findings on how those changes may affect transcription of genes that may be involved in tumor induction and progression. By calculating correlation values of mRNA expression vs. DNA copy number average in a moving window around a given RNA probeset, biologically relevant information can be gained that is obscured by the analysis of a single data type. Correlation coefficients ranged from −0.6 to 0.7; highly significant when compared to previously studies. Most correlated genes are located on chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 10, 13, 14, 19, 20 and 22, chromosomes known to have genomic alterations in gliomas. Additionally, we were able to identify CNAs whose gene expression correlation suggests possible epigenetic regulation. This analysis revealed a number of interesting candidates such as CXCL12, PTER, LRRN6C, among others. The results have been verified using real-time PCR and methylation sequencing assays. These data will further help differentiate genes involved in the induction and/or maintenance of the tumorigenic process from those that are mere passenger mutations, thereby enriching for a population of potentially new therapeutic molecular targets. PMID:19190341

  3. C-Banding of Plant Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Jellen, Eric N

    2016-01-01

    C-banding is used to differentially stain metaphase chromosomes in organisms having appreciable amounts of constitutive heterochromatin. Its primary benefits are that it is an inexpensive and a relatively fast method of identifying individual chromosomes and morphological or karyotypic variation, including large chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidies. We currently employ this technique with considerable effect in genome analysis of oat (Avena sativa) and related grass species, though it has been most extensively used for chromosome analysis of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and its relatives of the Triticeae. PMID:27511162

  4. Analysis of chromosomal integration and deletions of yeast plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Philippsen, P; Davis, R W

    1977-01-01

    Plasmid DNAs from six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared. Three different plasmids were found, designated Scp 1, Scp 2 and Scp 3, with monomer lengths of 6.19, 6.06 and 5.97 kilobases as referenced to sequenced phiX174 DNA. DNA from each of the plasmids was inserted into a lambda vector DNA. Hybrid phage containing inserted DNA of the desired size were enriched by genetic selection and their DNAs analysed by rapid techniques. All three plasmids share the same organization, two unique sequences separated by two inverted repeats, and share basically the same DNA sequences. Scp 2 and Scp 3 differ from Scp 1 by missing a unique HpaI site and by having small overlapping deletions in the same region. The HpaI site in Scp 1 is, therefore, in a nonessential region and suitable for insertion of foreign DNA in the potential use of the yeast plasmid as a vector. Hybridization of labelled cloned plasmid DNA to restriction fragments of linear yeast DNA separated on agarose gels showed that the plasmid DNA was not stably integrated into the yeast chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:331256

  5. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, M; Wang, C; Saha, S; Hutmacher, R B; Stelly, D M; Jenkins, J N; Burke, J; Roberts, P A

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome substitution (CS) lines in plants are a powerful genetic resource for analyzing the contribution of chromosome segments to phenotypic variance. In this study, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) CS lines were used to identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode or fungal disease resistance traits. The CS lines were developed in the G. hirsutum L. TM-1 background with chromosome or chromosome segment substitutions from G. barbadense L. Pima 3-79 or G. tomentosum. Root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum) (races 1 and 4) resistance alleles and quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously placed on cotton chromosomes using SSR markers in two interspecific recombinant inbred line populations were chosen for testing. Phenotypic responses of increased resistance or susceptibility in controlled inoculation and infested field assays confirmed the resistance QTLs, based on substitution with the positive or negative allele for resistance. Lines CS-B22Lo, CS-B04, and CS-B18 showed high resistance to nematode root-galling, confirming QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 22 (long arm) with resistance alleles from Pima 3-79. Line CS-B16 had less fusarium race 1-induced vascular root staining and higher percent survival than the TM-1 parent, confirming a major resistance QTL on chromosome 16. Lines CS-B(17-11) and CS-B17 had high fusarium race 4 vascular symptoms and low survival due to susceptible alleles introgressed from Pima 3-79, confirming the localization on chromosome 17 of an identified QTL with resistance alleles from TM1 and other resistant lines. Analyses validated regions on chromosomes 11, 16, and 17 harboring nematode and fusarium wilt resistance genes and demonstrated the value of CS lines as both a germplasm resource for breeding programs and as a powerful genetic analysis tool for determining QTL effects for disease

  6. Molecular cloning, chromosomal location, and expression analysis of porcine CD14.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Gema; Pérez, Eva; Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Mompart, Florence; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2007-01-01

    CD14 is a membrane-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that binds lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria and enables LPS-dependent responses in a variety of cells. In this study a cDNA containing the porcine CD14 coding sequence has been cloned and its complete sequence determined. The amino acid sequence deduced from pig CD14 cDNA encodes a 373 amino acid polypeptide that exhibits 75%, 72%, 69%, 66%, 57% and 56% similarity to CD14 from cow, horse, human, rabbit, mouse and rat, respectively. Structural analysis showed that the porcine CD14 is a membrane glycoprotein with a GPI-anchor site and an extracellular domain containing 11 leucine-rich repeats. In addition, the LPS-binding regions identified in the human CD14 are highly conserved in the N-terminal domain of the porcine sequence. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to locate the CD14 gene on the pig chromosome 2, band q28. Expression analysis revealed that porcine CD14 transcripts were detected in all tissues and cells examined, suggesting that the expression of porcine CD14 gene is not restricted to myeloid cell lineage. Finally, we report that LPS stimulation significantly up-regulated CD14 gene expression in porcine alveolar macrophages. PMID:17169425

  7. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  8. Parents' Perceptions of the Usefulness of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiff, Marian; Giarelli, Ellen; Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Easley, Ebony; Spinner, Nancy B.; Sankar, Pamela L.; Mulchandani, Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for all children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We explored the test's perceived usefulness among parents of children with ASD who had undergone CMA, and received a result categorized as pathogenic, variant of uncertain significance, or negative. Fifty-seven parents…

  9. A tortoiseshell male cat: chromosome analysis and histologic examination of the testis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A S; Berg, L C; Almstrup, K; Thomsen, P D

    2014-01-01

    Tortoiseshell coat color is normally restricted to female cats due to X-linkage of the gene that encodes the orange coat color. Tortoiseshell male cats do, however, occur at a low frequency among tortoiseshell cats because of chromosome aberrations similar to the Klinefelter syndrome in man: the extra X chromosome of a 39,XXY karyotype introduces the possibility of an orange and a non-orange allele which produce the mixture of orange and non-orange coat spotting known as tortoiseshell. We analyzed the chromosome complement of a fibroblast culture and did histological examinations of testicular tissue from a tortoiseshell male cat referred to us. Chromosome analysis using RBA-banding consistently revealed a 39,XXY karyotype. Histological examinations of testis biopsies from this cat showed degeneration of the tubules, hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue, and complete loss of germ cells. Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. PMID:24335095

  10. High-resolution analysis of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Young, B D; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Sillar, R; Boyd, E

    1981-01-01

    A method for high-resolution analysis of the human karyotype by flow cytometry has been developed. Metaphase chromosomes are prepared from short-term peripheral blood cultures, stained with ethidium bromide, and analyzed on a standard fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-II). Flow karyotypes with up to 20 peaks can be obtained with coefficients of variation in the range 1-2%. At this level of resolution the contribution of many of the human chromosomes can be evaluated separately. Significant and reproducible differences between normal individuals have been detected and have been correlated with differences in the centric heterochromatin of certain chromosomes as revealed in their C-banded karyotypes. Images PMID:6950411

  11. Analysis of spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in neuroblasts of genetically unstable mutant lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Derzhavets, E.M.; Kim, A.I.; Aslanyan, M.M.

    1988-11-01

    The spectrum and frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the somatic cells of III instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster mutator line were studied using three of its derivatives (sbt, if, and w/sup a/) and line w as control. It has been demonstrated that the frequency of anaphases with bridges and acentric fragments increases in the neuroblast of flies of the mutator line as well as in the neuroblasts of the larvae of the lines sbt, if, and w/sup a/. The metaphase analysis revealed that the mutator line and its derivatives are characterized by higher frequencies of chromosomal aberrations as compared to the control. Chromatid breaks are predominant type of rearrangements. These results, suggest probably presence of the specific mutator factor or factors in the line studied, affecting chromosomal structure and, possibly, activating migration of the mobile genetic elements in the mutator line.

  12. A gene at 333 degrees on the Bacillus subtilis chromosome encodes the newly identified sigma B-dependent general stress protein GspA.

    PubMed Central

    Antelmann, H; Bernhardt, J; Schmid, R; Hecker, M

    1995-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, general stress proteins (Gsps) are induced in response to different stresses (heat, salt, or ethanol) or after nutrient starvation. The majority of the genes for the Gsps are organized in a very large stationary-phase or stress regulon which is controlled by alternative sigma factor sigma B. The most striking spots on Coomassie-stained two-dimensional gels belong to GsiB and GspA, which are synthesized at extremely high levels in response to different stresses. Therefore, we determined the N-terminal protein sequence of GspA, which exhibited total identity to a hypothetical 33.5-kDa protein of B. subtilis encoded by open reading frame 2 (ipa-12d) in the sacY-tyrS1 intergenic region. The GspA-encoding gene gspA and the upstream and downstream regions were cloned with the aid of the PCR technique. By primer extension experiments, one sigma B-dependent promoter immediately upstream of the coding region was identified. A putative factor-independent terminator closely followed the coding region. By Northern (RNA) blot analysis, a 0.95-kb transcript was detected which indicates a monocistronic transcriptional unit. The gspA mRNA was strongly induced by different stimuli like heat or salt stress and starvation for glucose. Analysis of RNA isolated from a sigma B deletion mutant revealed that the transcription of gspA is sigma B dependent. Insertional inactivation of the B. subtilis chromosomal gspA gene confirmed that the gspA gene is not essential for either vegetative growth or growth under the influence of different stresses. In gspA mutant cells, the level of flagellin was increased severalfold over that in wild-type cells. PMID:7768864

  13. Analysis of morphological markers of chromosomal instability in ascitic fluid.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ruchita; Dey, Pranab; Uppal, Radha; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal instability (CI) plays a major role in the carcinogenesis. Micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridges,and multipolar mitoses are the morphological markers of CI and have never been studied in routine cytological specimens. Aims of the study is to analyze the significance of morphological markers of CI in malignant and benign ascitic fluid smears. A total of sixty benign and 40 malignant ascitic fluid samples were selected for this study. All the cases with malignant ascitic fluid showed histopathological evidence of malignancy in ovary and omentum. Chromatin bridges, multipolar mitosis (MPM), micronuclei and nuclear budding were counted in 1000 cells in representative May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stained smears. The CI markers were correlated with the cytological diagnosis of effusion. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridge and multipolar mitoses found in malignant effusions were 13.2611.79, 10.1067.07, 2.5362.67, 1.964.5, respectively. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, anaphase bridges, and MPM found in benign effusion cases were 0.566761.07934, 0.516761.33, 0.66760.25, and 0, respectively. The student t test showed significant differences between malignant and benign ascitic fluid samples for each marker of CI. This is the first comprehensive study of morphological markers of CI in ascitic fluid smears. This study has shown strong correlation between markers of CI and cytological diagnosis of malignancy. In future, the knowledge of these markers can be applied to diagnose malignancy in suspected cases of effusion in difficult situations. PMID:25611316

  14. An intron capture strategy used to identify and map a lysyl oxidase-like gene on chromosome 9 in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Wydner, K.S.; Passmore, H.C.; Kim, Houngho; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    An intron capture strategy involving use of polymerase chain reaction was used to identify and map the mouse homologue of a human lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL). Oligonucleotides complementary to conserved domains within exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene were used to amplify the corresponding segment from mouse genomic DNA. Sequencing of the resulting mouse DNA fragment of approximately 1 kb revealed that the exon sequences at the ends of the amplified fragment are highly homologous (90% nucleotide identity) to exons 4 and 5 of the human lysyl oxidase-like gene. An AluI restriction site polymorphism within intron 4 was used to map the mouse lysyl oxidase-like gene (Loxl) to mouse Chromosome 9 in a region that shares linkage conservation with human chromosome 15q24, to which the LOXL was recently mapped. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Striatal transcriptome analysis of a congenic mouse line (chromosome 11: 50-60Mb) exhibiting reduced methamphetamine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Neema; Shen, Ying; Johnson, W Evan; Bryant, Camron D

    2016-06-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants such as Methamphetamine (MA) is a significant public health issue in the United States and currently, there are no FDA approved pharmacological interventions. Previously, using short term-selected mouse lines for high and low MA sensitivity that were derived from an F2 cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) strains, we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome (chr) 11 that influenced sensitivity to MA-induced locomotor activity (D2 < B6). Using interval-specific murine congenic lines containing various D2 allelic segments on a B6 background, we fine mapped the QTL to a 206 kb critical interval on chromosome 11. To investigate the neurobiological mechanism by which this QTL decreases MA sensitivity, we conducted transcriptome analysis in a 10 Mb congenic mouse (chromosome 11: 50-60 Mb) on whole-striatum brain tissue punches compared to wild-type B6 littermate controls [1]. The data from this study can be found in the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GSE66366). PMID:27222804

  16. Assembly and analysis of cosmid contigs in the CEA-gene family region of human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Tynan, K; Olsen, A; Trask, B; de Jong, P; Thompson, J; Zimmermann, W; Carrano, A; Mohrenweiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like genes are members of a large gene family which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The CEA family is divided into two major subgroups, the CEA-subgroup and the pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG)-subgroup. In the course of an effort to develop a set of overlapping cosmids spanning human chromosome 19, we identified 245 cosmids in a human chromosome 19 cosmid library (6-7X redundant) by hybridization with an IgC-like domain fragment of the CEA gene. A fluorescence-based restriction enzyme digest fingerprinting strategy was used to assemble 212 probe-positive cosmids, along with 115 additional cosmids from a collection of approximately 8,000 randomly selected cosmids, into five contigs. Two of the contigs contain CEA-subgroup genes while the remaining three contigs contain PSG-subgroup genes. These five contigs range in size from 100 kb to over 300 kb and span an estimated 1 Mb. The CEA-like gene family was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization to map in the q13.1-q13.2 region of human chromosome 19. Analysis of the two CEA-subgroup contigs provided verification of the contig assembly strategy and insight into the organization of 9 CEA-subgroup genes. PMID:1579453

  17. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  18. Comparison of mitotic cell death by chromosome fragmentation to premature chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mitotic cell death is an important form of cell death, particularly in cancer. Chromosome fragmentation is a major form of mitotic cell death which is identifiable during common cytogenetic analysis by its unique phenotype of progressively degraded chromosomes. This morphology however, can appear similar to the morphology of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and thus, PCC has been at times confused with chromosome fragmentation. In this analysis the phenomena of chromosome fragmentation and PCC are reviewed and their similarities and differences are discussed in order to facilitate differentiation of the similar morphologies. Furthermore, chromosome pulverization, which has been used almost synonymously with PCC, is re-examined. Interestingly, many past reports of chromosome pulverization are identified here as chromosome fragmentation and not PCC. These reports describe broad ranging mechanisms of pulverization induction and agree with recent evidence showing chromosome fragmentation is a cellular response to stress. Finally, biological aspects of chromosome fragmentation are discussed, including its application as one form of non-clonal chromosome aberration (NCCA), the driving force of cancer evolution. PMID:20959006

  19. The analysis of a large Danish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 11q24.

    PubMed

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Eiberg, Hans; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, Marie Luise

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary colorectal cancer accounts for approximately 30% of all colorectal cancers, but currently only 5% of these families can be explained by highly penetrant, inherited mutations. In the remaining 25% it is not possible to perform a gene test to identify the family members who would benefit from prophylactic screening. Consequently, all family members are asked to follow a screening program. The purpose of this study was to localize a new gene which causes colorectal cancer. We performed a linkage analysis using data from a SNP6.0 chip in one large family with 12 affected family members. We extended the linkage analysis with microsatellites (STS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and looked for the loss of heterozygosity in tumour tissue. Furthermore, we performed the exome sequencing of one family member and we sequenced candidate genes by use of direct sequencing. Major rearrangements were excluded after karyotyping. The linkage analysis with SNP6 data revealed three candidate areas, on chromosome 2, 6 and 11 respectively, with a LOD score close to two and no negative LOD scores. After extended linkage analysis, the area on chromosome 6 was excluded, leaving areas on chromosome 2 and chromosome 11 with the highest possible LOD scores of 2.6. Two other studies have identified 11q24 as a candidate area for colorectal cancer susceptibility and this area is supported by our results. PMID:25724759

  20. Spectral Karyotyping for identification of constitutional chromosomal abnormalities at a national reference laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping is a diagnostic tool that allows visualization of chromosomes in different colors using the FISH technology and a spectral imaging system. To assess the value of spectral karyotyping analysis for identifying constitutional supernumerary marker chromosomes or derivative chromosomes at a national reference laboratory, we reviewed the results of 179 consecutive clinical samples (31 prenatal and 148 postnatal) submitted for spectral karyotyping. Over 90% of the cases were requested to identify either small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) or chromosomal exchange material detected by G-banded chromosome analysis. We also reviewed clinical indications of those cases with marker chromosomes in which chromosomal origin was identified by spectral karyotyping. Our results showed that spectral karyotyping identified the chromosomal origin of marker chromosomes or the source of derivative chromosomal material in 158 (88%) of the 179 clinical cases; the identification rate was slightly higher for postnatal (89%) compared to prenatal (84%) cases. Cases in which the origin could not be identified had either a small marker chromosome present at a very low level of mosaicism (< 10%), or contained very little euchromatic material. Supplemental FISH analysis confirmed the spectral karyotyping results in all 158 cases. Clinical indications for prenatal cases were mainly for marker identification after amniocentesis. For postnatal cases, the primary indications were developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The most frequently encountered markers were of chromosome 15 origin for satellited chromosomes, and chromosomes 2 and 16 for non-satellited chromosomes. We were able to obtain pertinent clinical information for 47% (41/88) of cases with an identified abnormal chromosome. We conclude that spectral karyotyping is sufficiently reliable for use and provides a valuable diagnostic tool for establishing the origin of supernumerary marker

  1. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n = 13) and soft tissue (n = 5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  2. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Bu, X D; Rotter, J I

    1991-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, we show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, we have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11 +/- 0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus. PMID:1896469

  3. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  4. Slit-scanning analysis of dicentric chromosomes: Different approaches for an automated biological dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Beisker, W.; Weller, E.M.; Nuesse, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of dicentric chromosomes is an important method for applications in biological dosimetry. Automation using slit-scanning flow cytometric analysis requires a careful estimation of preparational and instrumental artifacts. As long as reliable techniques for FISH techniques or immunological kinetochore staining in suspension have not been developed, special interest is directed to methods for evaluating artifacts by instrumental or mathematical procedures. The authors present applications for detection of dicentric chromosomes in mammalian cell cultures as well as in human lymphocytes by multiparameter slit-scanning techniques. The improvement of the sensitivity by mathematical analysis of the profiles as well as by simultaneous use of different DNA dyes with multilaser fluorescence excitation is discussed.

  5. Toxicogenomic evaluation of chemically induced chromosomal imbalance using DNA image analysis.

    PubMed

    Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2013-06-01

    The study of carcinogenic potential of a variety of chemical agents such as food additives and drugs of abuse via the application of various in vitro methodologies constitutes the first step for the evaluation of their toxicogenomic profile. Considering the chromosomal theories of carcinogenesis, where it is stated that aneuploidy and chromosomal imbalance (instability) are among the main causes of carcinogenesis, chemicals capable to induce such changes in the cells could be considered as potential carcinogens. Chromosomal imbalance and aneuploidy directly affect the overall DNA content of the exposed cell as well as other cellular morpho- and densitometric features. These features can be measured by means of computerized DNA image analysis technologies and include DNA content (DNA Index), Proliferation Index, Ploidy Balance, Degree of Aneuploidy, Skewness and Kurtosis. Considering the enormous number of untested chemicals and drugs of abuse that follow non-genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis, the establishment of a reliable technology for the estimation of chemically induced chromosomal imbalance is of particular importance in toxicogenomic studies. In the present article and based on our previously published work, we highlight the advantages of the applications of DNA image analysis technology in an easy-to-use experimental model for the evaluation of the potential risk of various chemicals. The use of this technology for the detection of chemically induced chromosomal instability will contribute to the development of safer regulatory directives concerning the use of chemicals in food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as in the clarification of mechanisms of action of drugs of abuse. PMID:23215871

  6. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts after Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Kim, M. Y.; Elliott, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    It is a NASA requirement that biodosimetry analysis be performed on all US astronauts who participate in long duration missions of 3 months or more onboard the International Space Station. Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is the most sensitive and reliable biodosimetry method available at present, especially if chromosome damage is assessed before as well as after space flight. Results provide a direct measurement of space radiation damage in vivo that takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present data obtained from all twenty-five of the crewmembers who have participated in the biodosimetry program so far. The yield of chromosome exchanges, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with chromosome painting probes, increased after space flight for all these individuals. In vivo dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves of in vitro exposed cells from the same individual, and RBE was compared with individually measured physically absorbed dose and projected organ dose equivalents. Biodosimetry estimates using samples collected within a few weeks of return from space lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. For some of these individuals chromosome aberrations were assessed again several months after their respective missions and a temporal decline in stable exchanges was observed in some cases, suggesting that translocations are unstable with time after whole body exposure to space radiation. This may indicate complications with the use of translocations for retrospective dose reconstruction. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited data on the effect of repeat flights and shows a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  7. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  8. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rodrigo Dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-10-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  9. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe. PMID:16957681

  10. Allelic analysis of stripe rust resistance genes on wheat chromosome 2BS.

    PubMed

    Luo, P G; Hu, X Y; Ren, Z L; Zhang, H Y; Shu, K; Yang, Z J

    2008-11-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiormis Westend f. sp. tritici, is one of the most important foliar diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Stripe rust resistance genes Yr27, Yr31, YrSp, YrV23, and YrCN19 on chromosome 2BS confer resistance to some or all Chinese P. striiormis f. sp. tritici races CYR31, CYR32, SY11-4, and SY11-14 in the greenhouse. To screen microsatellite (SSR) markers linked with YrCN19, F1, F2, and F3 populations derived from cross Ch377/CN19 were screened with race CYR32 and 35 SSR primer pairs. Linkage analysis indicated that the single dominant gene YrCN19 in cultivar CN19 was linked with SSR markers Xgwm410, Xgwm374, Xwmc477, and Xgwm382 on chromosome 2BS with genetic distances of 0.3, 7.9, 12.3, and 21.2 cM, respectively. Crosses of CN19 with wheat lines carrying other genes on chromosome 2B showed that all were located at different loci. YrCN19 is thus different from the other reported Yr genes in chromosomal location and resistance response and was therefore named Yr41. Prospects and strategies of using Yr41 and other Yr genes in wheat improvement for stripe rust resistance are discussed. PMID:18956025

  11. Rapid Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Mouse B Lymphocytes by PNA-FISH

    PubMed Central

    Misenko, Sarah M.; Bunting, Samuel F.

    2014-01-01

    Defective DNA repair leads to increased genomic instability, which is the root cause of mutations that lead to tumorigenesis. Analysis of the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations in different cell types allows defects in DNA repair pathways to be elucidated. Understanding mammalian DNA repair biology has been greatly helped by the production of mice with knockouts in specific genes. The goal of this protocol is to quantify genomic instability in mouse B lymphocytes. Labeling of the telomeres using PNA-FISH probes (peptide nucleic acid - fluorescent in situ hybridization) facilitates the rapid analysis of genomic instability in metaphase chromosome spreads. B cells have specific advantages relative to fibroblasts, because they have normal ploidy and a higher mitotic index. Short-term culture of B cells therefore enables precise measurement of genomic instability in a primary cell population which is likely to have fewer secondary genetic mutations than what is typically found in transformed fibroblasts or patient cell lines. PMID:25177909

  12. Analysis of a 26,756 bp segment from the left arm of yeast chromosome IV.

    PubMed

    Wölfl, S; Hanemann, V; Saluz, H P

    1996-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 26.7 kb DNA segment from the left arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV is presented. An analysis of this segment revealed 11 open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 300 bp and one split gene. These ORFs include the genes encoding the large subunit of RNA polymerase II, the biotin apo-protein ligase, an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF 2), the 'L35'-ribosomal protein, a rho GDP dissociation factor, and the sequence encoding the protein phosphatase 2A. Further sequence analysis revealed a short ORF encoding the ribosomal protein YL41B, an intron in a 5' untranslated region and an extended homology with another cosmid (X83276) located on the same chromosome. The potential biological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:8972577

  13. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  14. polo Is Identified as a Suppressor of bubR1 Nondisjunction in a Deficiency Screen of the Third Chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Guimarães, Sofia; Sunkel, Claudio; Malmanche, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We have previously characterized an EMS-induced allele of the bubR1 gene (bubR1D1326N) that separates the two functions of BubR1, causing meiotic nondisjunction but retaining spindle assembly checkpoint activity during somatic cell division in Drosophila melanogaster. Using this allele, we demonstrate that bubR1 meiotic nondisjunction is dosage sensitive, occurs for both exchange and nonexchange homologous chromosomes, and is associated with decreased maintenance of sister chromatid cohesion and of the synaptonemal complex during prophase I progression. We took advantage of these features to perform a genetic screen designed to identify third chromosome deficiencies having a dominant effect on bubR1D1326N/bubR1rev1 meiotic phenotypes. We tested 65 deficiencies covering 60% of the third chromosome euchromatin. Among them, we characterized 24 deficiencies having a dominant effect on bubR1D1326N/bubR1rev1 meiotic phenotypes that we classified in two groups: (1) suppressor of nondisjunction and (2) enhancer of nondisjunction. Among these 24 deficiencies, our results show that deficiencies uncovering the polo locus act as suppressor of bubR1 nondisjunction by delaying meiotic prophase I progression and restoring chiasmata formation as observed by the loading of the condensin subunit SMC2. Furthermore, we identified two deficiencies inducing a lethal phenotype during embryonic development and thus affecting BubR1 kinase activity in somatic cells and one deficiency causing female sterility. Overall, our genetic screening strategy proved to be highly sensitive for the identification of modifiers of BubR1 kinase activity in both meiosis and mitosis. PMID:22384328

  15. XWAS: A Software Toolset for Genetic Data Analysis and Association Studies of the X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Chang, Diana; Biddanda, Arjun; Ma, Li; Guo, Yingjie; Zhou, Zilu; Keinan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    XWAS is a new software suite for the analysis of the X chromosome in association studies and similar genetic studies. The X chromosome plays an important role in human disease and traits of many species, especially those with sexually dimorphic characteristics. Special attention needs to be given to its analysis due to the unique inheritance pattern, which leads to analytical complications that have resulted in the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) either not considering X or mishandling it with toolsets that had been designed for non-sex chromosomes. We hence developed XWAS to fill the need for tools that are specially designed for analysis of X. Following extensive, stringent, and X-specific quality control, XWAS offers an array of statistical tests of association, including: 1) the standard test between a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and disease risk, including after first stratifying individuals by sex, 2) a test for a differential effect of a SNP on disease between males and females, 3) motivated by X-inactivation, a test for higher variance of a trait in heterozygous females as compared with homozygous females, and 4) for all tests, a version that allows for combining evidence from all SNPs across a gene. We applied the toolset analysis pipeline to 16 GWAS datasets of immune-related disorders and 7 risk factors of coronary artery disease, and discovered several new X-linked genetic associations. XWAS will provide the tools and incentive for others to incorporate the X chromosome into GWAS and similar studies in any species with an XX/XY system, hence enabling discoveries of novel loci implicated in many diseases and in their sexual dimorphism. PMID:26268243

  16. XWAS: A Software Toolset for Genetic Data Analysis and Association Studies of the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Chang, Diana; Biddanda, Arjun; Ma, Li; Guo, Yingjie; Zhou, Zilu

    2015-01-01

    XWAS is a new software suite for the analysis of the X chromosome in association studies and similar genetic studies. The X chromosome plays an important role in human disease and traits of many species, especially those with sexually dimorphic characteristics. Special attention needs to be given to its analysis due to the unique inheritance pattern, which leads to analytical complications that have resulted in the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) either not considering X or mishandling it with toolsets that had been designed for non-sex chromosomes. We hence developed XWAS to fill the need for tools that are specially designed for analysis of X. Following extensive, stringent, and X-specific quality control, XWAS offers an array of statistical tests of association, including: 1) the standard test between a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and disease risk, including after first stratifying individuals by sex, 2) a test for a differential effect of a SNP on disease between males and females, 3) motivated by X-inactivation, a test for higher variance of a trait in heterozygous females as compared with homozygous females, and 4) for all tests, a version that allows for combining evidence from all SNPs across a gene. We applied the toolset analysis pipeline to 16 GWAS datasets of immune-related disorders and 7 risk factors of coronary artery disease, and discovered several new X-linked genetic associations. XWAS will provide the tools and incentive for others to incorporate the X chromosome into GWAS and similar studies in any species with an XX/XY system, hence enabling discoveries of novel loci implicated in many diseases and in their sexual dimorphism. PMID:26268243

  17. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  18. Chromosome analysis of nuclear power plant workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Giemsa assay.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Grigorova, Mira; Nikolova, Teodora; Bulanova, Minka; Popova, Ljubomira; Staynova, Albena; Benova, Donka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in exposed Bulgarian nuclear power plant workers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes. Chromosome analysis using fluorescence in situ hybrydization (FISH) and Giemsa techniques was undertaken on 63 workers and 45 administrative staff controls from the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant. Using the Giemsa method, the frequencies of cells studied with chromosome aberrations, dicentrics plus rings and chromosome fragments in the radiation workers were significantly higher compared with the control group (P = 0.044, P = 0.014, and P = 0.033, respectively). A significant association between frequencies of dicentrics plus rings and accumulated doses was registered (P < 0.01). In the present study, a FISH cocktail of whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 4 and 11 was used. A significant association between frequency of translocations and accumulated doses was also observed (P < 0.001). Within the control group, a correlation was found between age and the spontaneous frequency of translocations. No correlation was found between smoking status and frequency of translocations. When compared with the control group, workers with accumulated doses up to 100 mSv showed no increase in genome translocation frequency, whereas workers with accumulated doses from 101 to 200 mSv showed a statistically significant doubling of genome translocation frequency (P = 0.009). Thus, in cases of chronic exposure and for purposes of retrospective dosimetry, the genome frequency of translocations is a more useful marker for evaluation of genotoxic effects than dicentric frequency. PMID:23536543

  19. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  20. Variance-component analysis of obesity in type 2 diabetes confirms loci on chromosomes 1q and 11q.

    PubMed

    van Tilburg, Jonathan H O; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk A; Strengman, Eric; Pearson, Peter L; van Haeften, Timon W; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2003-11-01

    To study genetic loci influencing obesity in nuclear families with type 2 diabetes, we performed a genome-wide screen with 325 microsatellite markers that had an average spacing of 11 cM and a mean heterozygosity of approximately 75% covering all 22 autosomes. Genotype data were obtained from 562 individuals from 178 families from the Breda Study Cohort. These families were determined to have at least two members with type 2 diabetes. As a measure of obesity, the BMI of each diabetes patient was determined. The genotypes were analyzed using variance components (VCs) analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER 2 to determine quantitative trait loci influencing BMI. The VC analysis revealed two genomic regions showing VC logarithm of odds (LOD) scores > or =1.0 on chromosome 1 and chromosome 11. The regions of interest on both chromosomes were further investigated by fine-mapping with additional markers, resulting in a VC LOD score of 1.5 on chromosome 1q and a VC LOD of 2.4 on chromosome 11q. The locus on chromosome 1 has been implicated previously in diabetes. The locus on chromosome 11 has been implicated previously in diabetes and obesity. Our study to determine linkage for BMI confirms the presence of quantitative trait loci influencing obesity in subjects with type 2 diabetes on chromosomes 1q31-q42 and 11q14-q24. PMID:14627748

  1. Linkage analysis with chromosome 9 markers in hereditary essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Conway, D; Bain, P G; Warner, T T; Davis, M B; Findley, L J; Thompson, P D; Marsden, C D; Harding, A E

    1993-07-01

    Hereditary essential tremor (ET) is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression and reduced penetrance. A tremor indistinguishable from ET may be observed in patients with autosomal dominant idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD), in which the disease locus has been mapped to 9q32-34 in some kindreds, tightly linked to the argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) locus. We performed linkage analysis in 15 families with ET containing 60 definitely affected individuals, using dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at the ASS locus and the Abelson locus (ABL). Cumulative lod scores were -19.5 for ASS and -10.8 for ABL at a recombination fraction of 0.01, and tight linkage to ASS was excluded individually in 11 of the families. These data indicate that the ET gene is not allelic to that causing ITD. PMID:8341306

  2. CAPER 3.0: A Scalable Cloud-Based System for Data-Intensive Analysis of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuai; Zhang, Xinlei; Diao, Lihong; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Zhongyang; Li, Honglei; Zheng, Junjie; Pan, Jingshan; Nice, Edouard C; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2015-09-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) aims to catalog genome-encoded proteins using a chromosome-by-chromosome strategy. As the C-HPP proceeds, the increasing requirement for data-intensive analysis of the MS/MS data poses a challenge to the proteomic community, especially small laboratories lacking computational infrastructure. To address this challenge, we have updated the previous CAPER browser into a higher version, CAPER 3.0, which is a scalable cloud-based system for data-intensive analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 uses cloud computing technology to facilitate MS/MS-based peptide identification. In particular, it can use both public and private cloud, facilitating the analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to help users transfer data, configure jobs, track progress, and visualize the results comprehensively. These features enable users without programming expertise to easily conduct data-intensive analysis using CAPER 3.0. Here, we illustrate the usage of CAPER 3.0 with four specific mass spectral data-intensive problems: detecting novel peptides, identifying single amino acid variants (SAVs) derived from known missense mutations, identifying sample-specific SAVs, and identifying exon-skipping events. CAPER 3.0 is available at http://prodigy.bprc.ac.cn/caper3. PMID:25794139

  3. Array CGH identifies distinct DNA copy number profiles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in chromosomal- and microsatellite-unstable sporadic colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lassmann, Silke; Weis, Roland; Makowiec, Frank; Roth, Jasmine; Danciu, Mihai; Hopt, Ulrich; Werner, Martin

    2007-03-01

    DNA copy number changes represent molecular fingerprints of solid tumors and are as such relevant for better understanding of tumor development and progression. In this study, we applied genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify gene-specific DNA copy number changes in chromosomal (CIN)- and microsatellite (MIN)-unstable sporadic colorectal cancers (sCRC). Genomic DNA was extracted from microdissected, matching normal colorectal epithelium and invasive tumor cells of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of 22 cases with colorectal cancer (CIN = 11, MIN = 11). DNA copy number changes were determined by aCGH for 287 target sequences in tumor cell DNAs, using pooled normal DNAs as reference. aCGH data of tumor cell DNAs was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genes on serial tissues as those used for aCGH. aCGH revealed DNA copy number changes previously described by metaphase CGH (gains 7, 8q, 13q, and 20q; losses 8p, 15q, 18q, and 17p). However, chromosomal regions 20q, 13q, 7, and 17p were preferentially altered in CIN-type tumors and included DNA amplifications of eight genes on chromosome 20q (TOP1, AIB1, MYBL2, CAS, PTPN1, STK15, ZNF217, and CYP24), two genes on chromosome 13q (BRCA2 and D13S25), and three genes on chromosome 7 (IL6, CYLN2, and MET) as well as DNA deletions of two genes on chromosome 17p (HIC1 and LLGL1). Finally, additional CIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were identified for EXT1 (8q24.11) and MYC (8q24.12) as well as DNA deletions for MAP2K5 (15q23) and LAMA3 (18q11.2). In contrast, distinct MIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were detected for E2F5 (8p22-q21.3), GARP (11q13.5-q14), ATM (11q22.3), KAL (Xp22.3), and XIST (Xq13.2) as well as DNA deletions for RAF1 (3p25), DCC (18q21.3), and KEN (21q tel). aCGH revealed distinct DNA copy number changes of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CIN- and MIN-type sporadic colorectal carcinomas. The identified candidate

  4. Linkage analysis of the Fanconi anemia gene FACC with chromosome 9q markers

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, A.D.; Shin, H.T.; Kaporis, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with at least four different complementation groups as determined by cell fusion studies. The gene for complementation group C, FACC, has been cloned and mapped to chromosome 9q22.3 by in situ hybridization, while linkage analysis has supported the placement of another gene on chromosome 20q. We have analyzed five microsatellite markers and one RFLP on chromosome 9q in a panel of FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) in order to place FACC on the genetic map. Polymorphisms were typed in 308 individuals from 51 families. FACC is tightly linked to both D9S151 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.025, Z{sub max}=7.75] and to D9S196 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.041, Z{sub max}=7.89]; multipoint analysis is in progress. We are currently screening a YAC clone that contains the entire FACC gene for additional microsatellite markers suitable for haplotype analysis of FA families.

  5. Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping in Domestic Dog Breeds Narrows the Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration (prcd) Interval and Identifies Ancestral Disease Transmitting Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Zangerl, Barbara; Pearce-Kelling, Sue; Sidjanin, Duska J.; Kijas, James W.; Felix, Jeanette; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2014-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a retinal disease previously mapped to a broad, gene-rich centromeric region of canine chromosome 9. As allelic disorders are present in multiple breeds, we used linkage disequilibrium (LD) to narrow the ∼6.4 Mb interval candidate region. Multiple dog breeds, each representing genetically isolated populations, were typed for SNPs and other polymorphisms identified from BACs. The candidate region was initially localized to a 1.5 Mb zero recombination interval between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) and SEC14-like 1 (SEC14L). A fine-scale haplotype of the region was developed which reduced the LD interval to 106 Kb, and identified a conserved haplotype of 98 polymorphisms present in all prcd-affected chromosomes from 14 different dog breeds. The findings strongly suggest that a common ancestor transmitted the prcd disease allele to many of the modern dog breeds, and demonstrate the power of LD approach in the canine model. PMID:16859891

  6. Recombinant chromosome 14 due to maternal pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Sliuzas, Vytautas; Utkus, Algirdas; Kucinskas, Vaidutis

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome 14 is often involved in various chromosome rearrangements, most of them balanced. Human chromosome 14 is acrocentric, so its pericentric inversions are extremely rare (only few cases have been described in the literature). Here we report on a boy with congenital malformations and recombinant chromosome 14 inherited from his mother carrying a pericentric inversion. The proband's G-banded chromosome analysis revealed derivative chromosome 14. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis identified duplication of the terminal part of chromosome 14q ish cgh dup(14)(q32.1qter). This abnormality has been confirmed by custom BAC FISH analysis. His mother's karyotype was 46,XX,inv(14)(p11.2q32.1). PMID:18436995

  7. Chromosome Compaction by Active Loop Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Goloborodko, Anton; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-05-24

    During cell division, chromosomes are compacted in length by more than a 100-fold. A wide range of experiments demonstrated that in their compacted state, mammalian chromosomes form arrays of closely stacked consecutive ∼100 kb loops. The mechanism underlying the active process of chromosome compaction into a stack of loops is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that chromosomes are compacted by enzymatic machines that actively extrude chromatin loops. When such loop-extruding factors (LEF) bind to chromosomes, they progressively bridge sites that are further away along the chromosome, thus extruding a loop. We demonstrate that collective action of LEFs leads to formation of a dynamic array of consecutive loops. Simulations and an analytically solved model identify two distinct steady states: a sparse state, where loops are highly dynamic but provide little compaction; and a dense state, where there are more stable loops and dramatic chromosome compaction. We find that human chromosomes operate at the border of the dense steady state. Our analysis also shows how the macroscopic characteristics of the loop array are determined by the microscopic properties of LEFs and their abundance. When the number of LEFs are used that match experimentally based estimates, the model can quantitatively reproduce the average loop length, the degree of compaction, and the general loop-array morphology of compact human chromosomes. Our study demonstrates that efficient chromosome compaction can be achieved solely by an active loop-extrusion process. PMID:27224481

  8. Genetic linkage analysis of schizophrenia using chromosome 11q13-24 markers in Israeli pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcrone, J.; Marchblanks, R.; Whatley, S.A.

    1995-04-24

    It is generally agreed that there is a genetic component in the etiology of schizophrenia which may be tested by the application of linkage analysis to multiply-affected families. One genetic region of interest is the long arm of chromosome 11 because of previously reported associations of genetic variation in this region with schizophrenia, and because of the fact that it contains the locus for the dopamine D2 receptor gene. In this study we have examined the segregation of schizophrenia with microsatellite dinucleotide repeat DNA markers along chromosome 11q in 5 Israeli families multiply-affected for schizophrenia. The hypothesis of linkage under genetic homogeneity of causation was tested under a number of genetic models. Linkage analysis provided no evidence for significant causal mutations within the region bounded by INT and D11S420 on chromosome 11q. It is still possible, however, that a gene of major effect exists in this region, either with low penetrance or with heterogeneity. 32 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of inv8 chromosome breakpoints associated with recombinant 8 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graw, S L; Sample, T; Bleskan, J; Sujansky, E; Patterson, D

    2000-03-01

    Rec8 syndrome (also known as "recombinant 8 syndrome" and "San Luis Valley syndrome") is a chromosomal disorder found in individuals of Hispanic descent with ancestry from the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Affected individuals typically have mental retardation, congenital heart defects, seizures, a characteristic facial appearance, and other manifestations. The recombinant chromosome is rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.1q22.1), and is derived from a parental pericentric inversion, inv(8)(p23.1q22.1). Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of the 8p23.1 and 8q22 breakpoints from the inversion 8 chromosome associated with Rec8 syndrome. Analysis of the breakpoint regions indicates that they are highly repetitive. Of 6 kb surrounding the 8p23.1 breakpoint, 75% consists of repetitive gene family members-including Alu, LINE, and LTR elements-and the inversion took place in a small single-copy region flanked by repetitive elements. Analysis of 3.7 kb surrounding the 8q22 breakpoint region reveals that it is 99% repetitive and contains multiple LTR elements, and that the 8q inversion site is within one of the LTR elements. PMID:10712224

  10. DNA linkage analysis of X chromosome-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Baehner, R L; Kunkel, L M; Monaco, A P; Haines, J L; Conneally, P M; Palmer, C; Heerema, N; Orkin, S H

    1986-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a disorder of phagocytes that is usually inherited as an X chromosome-linked trait. Previous family studies suggested that the CGD locus resides on the distal short arm (Xp22-Xpter). Using cloned, polymorphic DNA probes we have performed a linkage analysis within CGD families that suggests a more proximal location (Xp21). In addition, the CGD locus is proximal to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and lies within a broad region of Xp in which recombination appears to be greater than anticipated on the basis of physical distance between markers. Regional localization of the X chromosome CGD locus should facilitate molecular cloning of the CGD gene and molecular dissection of the phagocyte oxidase system. Images PMID:3010296

  11. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  12. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Comparative methylome analysis in solid tumors reveals aberrant methylation at chromosome 6p in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Cheng, Yue; Zheng, Hong; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Ng, Wai Tong; Lee, Anne Wing Mui; Yau, Chun Chung; Lee, Victor Ho Fu; Lung, Maria Li

    2015-01-01

    Altered patterns of DNA methylation are key features of cancer. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has the highest incidence in Southern China. Aberrant methylation at the promoter region of tumor suppressors is frequently reported in NPC; however, genome-wide methylation changes have not been comprehensively investigated. Therefore, we systematically analyzed methylome data in 25 primary NPC tumors and nontumor counterparts using a high-throughput approach with the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Comparatively, we examined the methylome data of 11 types of solid tumors collected by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In NPC, the hypermethylation pattern was more dominant than hypomethylation and the majority of de novo methylated loci were within or close to CpG islands in tumors. The comparative methylome analysis reveals hypermethylation at chromosome 6p21.3 frequently occurred in NPC (false discovery rate; FDR=1.33 × 10−9), but was less obvious in other types of solid tumors except for prostate and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer (FDR<10−3). Bisulfite pyrosequencing results further confirmed the aberrant methylation at 6p in an additional patient cohort. Evident enrichment of the repressive mark H3K27me3 and active mark H3K4me3 derived from human embryonic stem cells were found at these regions, indicating both DNA methylation and histone modification function together, leading to epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Our study highlights the importance of epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Polycomb Complex 2 (PRC2), responsible for H3K27 trimethylation, is a promising therapeutic target. A key genomic region on 6p with aberrant methylation was identified. This region contains several important genes having potential use as biomarkers for NPC detection. PMID:25924914

  14. Linkage analysis between manic-depressive illness and markers on the long arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Eiberg, H.

    1995-10-09

    The long arm of chromosome 11 is one of the most interesting regions in the search for major genes involved in the etiology of manic-depressive illness. Several candidate genes have been identified, including the gene encoding the dopamine D2 receptor, the M1 muscarinic receptor, and porfobillinogen deaminase. Furthermore, different families with co-segregation of psychiatric illness and structural chromosome abnormalities involving regions 11q21, 11q22.3, and 11q25 have been reported. Using narrow as well as broad phenotypic models, conservative genetic parameters, models with dominant or recessive modes of inheritance, and various methods to reduce misclassification, the present study did not find evidence for a major gene causing manic-depressive illness on the long arm of chromosome 11. In the broader phenotypic models multi-point analyses excluded at least 11q14 to 11q23.3, approximately 60 cM, even in one large family. Assuming homogeneity, close linkage to DRD2 was excluded for all dominant models, and also in the affecteds-only analyses in the large family alone. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Identifying signatures of sexual selection using genomewide selection components analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah P; Jones, Adam G

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection must affect the genome for it to have an evolutionary impact, yet signatures of selection remain elusive. Here we use an individual-based model to investigate the utility of genome-wide selection components analysis, which compares allele frequencies of individuals at different life history stages within a single population to detect selection without requiring a priori knowledge of traits under selection. We modeled a diploid, sexually reproducing population and introduced strong mate choice on a quantitative trait to simulate sexual selection. Genome-wide allele frequencies in adults and offspring were compared using weighted FST values. The average number of outlier peaks (i.e., those with significantly large FST values) with a quantitative trait locus in close proximity (“real” peaks) represented correct diagnoses of loci under selection, whereas peaks above the FST significance threshold without a quantitative trait locus reflected spurious peaks. We found that, even with moderate sample sizes, signatures of strong sexual selection were detectable, but larger sample sizes improved detection rates. The model was better able to detect selection with more neutral markers, and when quantitative trait loci and neutral markers were distributed across multiple chromosomes. Although environmental variation decreased detection rates, the identification of real peaks nevertheless remained feasible. We also found that detection rates can be improved by sampling multiple populations experiencing similar selection regimes. In short, genome-wide selection components analysis is a challenging but feasible approach for the identification of regions of the genome under selection. PMID:26257884

  16. Molecular analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1) on chromosome 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Qui, H.; Pufky, J.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects numerous different organ systems. There are two loci for TSC: one on chromosome 9q34 (TSC1) and another on chromosome 16p13.3 (TSC2). The chromosome 9 TSC1 gene has recently been localized between D9S10 proximally and D9S114 distally in a region spanning approximately 350 kb. Our research efforts are directed towards the isolation of TSC1 gene. Our primary aims are to: (1) construct a P1 and cosmid contig of the region, (2) generate a long-range physical map of the region, and (3) isolate cDNA clones from the region and test them as TSC1 candidate genes. We have started contig assembly of the region through the screening of P1 and cosmid libraries. We have isolated FISH-confirmed cosmids for D9S10 and D9S114. We have also isolated FISH-confirmed clones for D9S10 and adjacent P1 clones covering more than 120 kb of the TSC1 region. At present, we are chromosome-walking from D9S10 and D9S114 markers to complete the contig of the region. At the same time, we are constructing a long-range physical map of the region using pulse-field gel electrophoresis. We have isolated 17 cDNA clones from a fetal brain cDNA library using the D9S10 cosmid as a probe. Currently, we are in the process of analyzing these cDNA clones as TSC1 candidate genes by sequence analysis, Northern and Southern hybridization techniques. We are probing DNA blots from 104 individual TSC sporadic and familial cases with cDNA and genomic clones isolated from the region for possible deletions, duplications and other types of rearrangements. Moreover, we are also analyzing chromosome preparations from TSC sporadic and familial cases using FISH and cDNA and genomic clones as probes for chromosome rearrangements and/or abnormalities.

  17. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of monoecious hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivars reveals its karyotype variations and sex chromosomes constitution.

    PubMed

    Razumova, Olga V; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Divashuk, Mikhail G; Sukhorada, Tatiana I; Karlov, Gennady I

    2016-05-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L., 2n = 20) is a dioecious plant. Sex expression is controlled by an X-to-autosome balance system consisting of the heteromorphic sex chromosomes XY for males and XX for females. Genetically monoecious hemp offers several agronomic advantages compared to the dioecious cultivars that are widely used in hemp cultivation. The male or female origin of monoecious maternal plants is unknown. Additionally, the sex chromosome composition of monoecious hemp forms remains unknown. In this study, we examine the sex chromosome makeup in monoecious hemp using a cytogenetic approach. Eight monoecious and two dioecious cultivars were used. The DNA of 210 monoecious plants was used for PCR analysis with the male-associated markers MADC2 and SCAR323. All monoecious plants showed female amplification patterns. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the subtelomeric CS-1 probe to chromosomes plates and karyotyping revealed a lack of Y chromosome and presence of XX sex chromosomes in monoecious cultivars with the chromosome number 2n = 20. There was a high level of intra- and intercultivar karyotype variation detected. The results of this study can be used for further analysis of the genetic basis of sex expression in plants. PMID:26149370

  18. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, Layla Damasceno; Moreira, Lília Maria Azevedo; Riegel, Mariluce

    2016-01-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients' cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8)(p23) (3.5 Mb), considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ = 0.13) calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27144168

  19. A comparative chromosome banding analysis of the Ursidae and their relationship to other carnivores.

    PubMed

    Nash, W G; O'Brien, S J

    1987-01-01

    Trypsin G-banded karyotypes of eight species of Ursidae were prepared from retrovirus-transformed skin fibroblast cultures. The banding patterns of all bears are highly conserved, even though their diploid numbers range from 42 to 72. A comprehensive analysis of the homologous banding patterns within the Ursidae and with a hypothesized ancestral carnivore karyotype permitted the reconstruction of three significant chromosomal reorganization events that occurred during the evolution of the modern ursids. The first was a multichromosomal fissioning away from the biarmed (2n = 44) primitive carnivore karyotype, leading to six species of the Ursinae subfamily (2n = 78). The second was a comprehensive chromosome fusion in the lineage that led to the Ailuropodinae (giant panda) subfamily (2n = 44). The third event was a second, independent, but less extensive, centromeric fusion occurring in the line that led to the Tremarctinae (spectacled bear) subfamily (2n = 52). Ursidae karyotypes are not only highly conserved within the family but also exhibit extensive chromosome banding homology with other carnivore families. PMID:3691188

  20. Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in Six Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espirito Santo, Layla Damasceno; Moreira, Lília Maria Azevedo; Riegel, Mariluce

    2016-01-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The disease severity, levels of intellectual and developmental delay, and patient prognosis have been related to the size and position of the deletion. Aiming to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, we applied array-CGH to evaluate six patients carrying cytogenetically detected deletions of the short arm of chromosome 5 who were followed at a genetics community service. The patients' cytogenetic and clinical profiles were reevaluated. A database review was performed to predict additional genes and regulatory elements responsible for the characteristic phenotypic and behavioral traits of this disorder. Array-CGH analysis allowed for delineation of the terminal deletions, which ranged in size from approximately 11.2 Mb to 28.6 Mb, with breakpoints from 5p15.2 to 5p13. An additional dup(8)(p23) (3.5 Mb), considered to be a benign copy number variation, was also observed in one patient. The correlation coefficient value (ρ = 0.13) calculated indicated the presence of a weak relationship between developmental delay and deletion size. Genetic background, family history, epigenetic factors, quantitative trait locus polymorphisms, and environmental factors may also affect patient phenotype and must be taken into account in genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27144168

  1. Human sperm chromosome analysis after subzonal sperm insemination of hamster oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Sperm microinjection techniques, subzonal sperm insemination (SUZI) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), have achieved a wide spread clinical application for the treatment of male infertility. To date, only one study has focused on sperm karyotypes after microinjection. Martin et al. reported a very high incidence of abnormal human sperm complements after ICSI into hamster oocytes. In the present study, are reported the first human sperm karyotypes after SUZI of hamster oocytes. Spermatozoa from two control donors were treated by calcium ionophore A23187 and injected under the zona of hamster eggs. The microinjected eggs were then cultured for cytogenetic analysis of the pronuclei. Out of 47 analyzed sperm chromosome metaphases, 5 (10.6%) were abnormal, 4 (8.5%) were hypohaploid and 1 (2.1%) had a structural abnormality. The sex ratio was not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. Rates of chromosomal abnormalities in microinjected spermatozoa were similar to those observed in spermatozoa inseminated with zona free eggs, suggesting that SUZI procedure per se does not increase sperm chromosomal abnormalities.

  2. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  3. Can Comprehensive Chromosome Screening Technology Improve IVF/ICSI Outcomes? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Song

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) for preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has an effect on improving in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) outcomes compared to traditional morphological methods. Methods A literature search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and ClinicalTrials.gov up to May 2015. Two reviewers independently evaluated titles and abstracts, extracted data and assessed quality. We included studies that compared the IVF/ICSI outcomes of CCS-based embryo selection with those of the traditional morphological method. Relative risk (RR) values with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in RevMan 5.3, and subgroup analysis and Begg’s test were used to assess heterogeneity and potential publication bias, respectively. Results Four RCTs and seven cohort studies were included. A meta-analysis of the outcomes showed that compared to morphological criteria, euploid embryos identified by CCS were more likely to be successfully implanted (RCT RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47; cohort study RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.35–2.24). CCS-based PGS was also related to an increased clinical pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.83–1.93; cohort study RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.20–1.83), an increased ongoing pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.64–2.66; cohort study RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.30–2.00), and an increased live birth rate (RCT RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05–1.50; cohort study RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.85–2.13) as well as a decreased miscarriage rate (RCT RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.24–1.15; cohort study RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.21–0.46) and a decreased multiple pregnancy rate (RCT RR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00–0.26; cohort study RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.07–0.51). The results of the subgroup analysis also showed a significantly increased implantation rate in the CCS group. Conclusions The effectiveness of CCS-based PGS is comparable to that of traditional morphological methods, with better outcomes for women receiving IVF

  4. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Polyclonality by Combined Chromosome Banding and Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Manuel R; Tsarouha, Haroula; Kraggerud, Sigrid M; Pandis, Nikos; Dimitriadis, Euthymios; Andersen, Johan A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Heim, Sverre

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetically unrelated clones have been detected by chromosome banding analysis in many breast carcinomas. Because these karyotypic studies were performed on short-term cultured samples, it may be argued that in vitro selection occurred or that small clones may have arisen during culturing. To address this issue, we analyzed 37 breast carcinomas by G-banding and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a fluorescent in situ hybridization-based screening technique that does not require culturing or tumor metaphases. All but two of the 37 karyotypically abnormal cases presented copy number changes by CGH. The picture of genomic alterations revealed by the two techniques overlapped only partly. Sometimes the CGH analysis revealed genomic imbalances that belonged to cell populations not picked up by the cytogenetic analysis and in other cases, especially when the karyotypes had many markers and chromosomes with additional material of unknown origin, CGH gave a more reliable overall picture of the copy number gains and losses. However, besides sometimes revealing cell populations with balanced chromosome aberrations or unbalanced changes that nevertheless remained undetected by CGH, G-banding analysis was essential to understand how the genomic imbalances arose in the many cases in which both techniques detected the same clonal abnormalities. Furthermore, because CGH pictures only imbalances present in a significant proportion of the test sample, the very detection by this technique of imbalances belonging to apparently small, cytogenetically unrelated clones of cells proves that these clones must have been present in vivo. This constitutes compelling evidence that the cytogenetic polyclonality observed after short-term culturing of breast carcinomas is not an artifact. PMID:11494114

  5. A genome-wide association study of venous thromboembolism identifies risk variants in chromosomes 1q24.2 and 9q

    PubMed Central

    Heit, John A.; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Asmann, Yan W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Petterson, Tanya M.; de Andrade, Mariza

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease-susceptibility genes. Patients/Methods We performed in silico genome wide association (GWAS) analyses using genotype data imputed to ~2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from adults with objectively-diagnosed VTE (n=1503), and controls frequency-matched on age and sex (n=1459; discovery population). SNPs exceeding genome-wide significance were replicated in a separate population (VTE cases, n=1407; controls, n=1418). Genes associated with VTE were resequenced. Results Seven SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10-8); four on chromosome 1q24.2 (F5 rs6025 [Factor V Leiden], BLZF1 rs7538157, NME7 rs16861990 and SLC19A2 rs2038024) and three on chromosome 9q34.2 (ABO rs2519093 [ABO intron 1], rs495828, rs8176719 [ABO blood type O allele]). The replication study confirmed a significant association of F5, NME7, and ABO with VTE. However, F5 was the main signal on 1q24.2 as only ABO SNPs remained significantly associated with VTE after adjusting for F5 rs6025. This 1q24.2 region was shown to be inherited as a haplotype block. ABO resequencing identified 15 novel single nucleotide variations (SNV) in ABO intron 6 and the ABO 3’ UTR that were strongly associated with VTE (P < 10-4) and belonged to three distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks; none were in LD with ABO rs8176719 or rs2519093. Our sample size provided 80% power to detect odds ratios=2.0 and 1.51 for minor allele frequencies=0.05 and 0.5, respectively (α=1 × 10-8; 1% VTE prevalence). Conclusions Aside from F5 rs6025, ABO rs8176719 and rs2519093, and F2 rs1799963, additional common and high VTE-risk SNPs among whites are unlikely. PMID:22672568

  6. Identification of Stmm3 locus Conferring Resistance to Late-stage Chemically Induced Skin Papillomas on Mouse Chromosome 4 by Congenic Mappingand Allele-specific Alteration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Megumi; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kominami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance cancer susceptibility loci are located throughout the genome; however, a very limited number of genes have been identified so far. Using a forward genetics approach to map such loci in a mouse skin cancer model, we previously identified strong genetic loci conferring resistance to chemically induced skin papillomas on chromosome 4 and 7 with a large number of [(FVB/N × MSM/Ms) F1 × FVB/N] backcross mice. In this report, we describe a combination of congenic mapping and allele-specific alteration analysis of the loci on chromosome 4. We used linkage analysis and a congenic mouse strain, FVB.MSM-Stmm3 to refine the location of Stmm3 (Skin tumor modifier of MSM 3) locus within a physical interval of about 34 Mb on distal chromosome 4. In addition, we used patterns of allele-specific imbalances in tumors from N2 and N10 congenic mice to narrow down further the region of Stmm3 locus to a physical distance of about 25 Mb. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed papillomas from congenic mice had less proliferative activity. These results suggest that Stmm3 responsible genes may have an influence on papilloma formation in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis by regulating papilloma growth rather than development. PMID:25077764

  7. Gene identification and DNA sequence analysis in the GC-poor 20 megabase region of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Tong, S; Shen, Y; Kao, F T

    1997-06-24

    In contrast to the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 21, the proximal half of approximately 20 megabases of DNA, including 21q11-21 bands, is low in GC content, CpG islands, and identified genes. Despite intensive searches, very few genes and cDNAs have been found in this region. Since the 21q11-21 region is associated with certain Down syndrome pathologies like mental retardation, the identification of relevant genes in this region is important. We used a different approach by constructing microdissection libraries specifically for this region and isolating unique sequence microclones for detailed molecular analysis. We found that this region is enriched with middle and low-copy repetitive sequences, and is also heavily methylated. By sequencing and homology analysis, we identified a significant number of genes/cDNAs, most of which appear to belong to gene families. In addition, we used unique sequence microclones in direct screening of cDNA libraries and isolated 12 cDNAs for this region. Thus, although the 21q11-21 region is gene poor, it is not completely devoid of genes/cDNAs. The presence of high proportions of middle and low-copy repetitive sequences in this region may have evolutionary significance in the genome organization and function of this region. Since 21q11-21 is heavily methylated, the expression of genes in this region may be regulated by a delicate balance of methylation and demethylation, and the presence of an additional copy of chromosome 21 may seriously disturb this balance and cause specific Down syndrome anomalies including mental retardation. PMID:9192657

  8. Analysis of 22 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes and Y haplogroup distribution in Pathans of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Rakha, Allah; Sim, Jeong Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 22 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and five additional STRs (DYS388, DYS446, DYS447, DYS449 and DYS464), and Y chromosomal haplogroup distribution in 270 unrelated individuals from the Pathans residing in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan using in-house multiplex PCR systems. Each Y-STR showed diversities ranging from 0.2506 to 0.8538, and the discriminatory capacity (DC) was 73.7% with 199 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci. By the addition of 5 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 85.2% while showing 230 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 5 Y-STRs, DYS446, DYS447 and DYS449 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Pathans of this study showed significant differences from other Pathan populations as well as neighboring population sets. In Y-SNP analysis, a total of 12 Y chromosomal haplogroups were observed and the most frequent haplogroup was R1a1a with 49.3% frequency. To obtain insights on the origin of Pathans, the network analysis was performed for the haplogroups G and Q observed from the Pathans and the Jewish population groups including Ashkenazim and Sephardim, but little support for a Jewish origin could be found. In the present study, we report Y-STR population data in Pathans of Pakistan, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. PMID:24709582

  9. Is the rate of insertion and deletion mutation male biased?: Molecular evolutionary analysis of avian and primate sex chromosome sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sundström, Hannah; Webster, Matthew T; Ellegren, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The rate of mutation for nucleotide substitution is generally higher among males than among females, likely owing to the larger number of DNA replications in spermatogenesis than in oogenesis. For insertion and deletion (indel) mutations, data from a few human genetic disease loci indicate that the two sexes may mutate at similar rates, possibly because such mutations arise in connection with meiotic crossing over. To address origin- and sex-specific rates of indel mutation we have conducted the first large-scale molecular evolutionary analysis of indels in noncoding DNA sequences from sex chromosomes. The rates are similar on the X and Y chromosomes of primates but about twice as high on the avian Z chromosome as on the W chromosome. The fact that indels are not uncommon on the nonrecombining Y and W chromosomes excludes meiotic crossing over as the main cause of indel mutation. On the other hand, the similar rates on X and Y indicate that the number of DNA replications (higher for Y than for X) is also not the main factor. Our observations are therefore consistent with a role of both DNA replication and recombination in the generation of short insertion and deletion mutations. A significant excess of deletion compared to insertion events is observed on the avian W chromosome, consistent with gradual DNA loss on a nonrecombining chromosome. PMID:12750337

  10. Rapid generation of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.Y.; Meltzer, P.S.; Trent, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A strategy for rapid construction of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection has recently been developed. WCPs were prepared from 20 copies of each target chromosome microdissected from normal human metaphase chromosomes and then directly amplified by PCR using a universal primer. Fifteen WCPs, including chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, and X, have been generated using this strategy. The probe complexity and hybridization specificity of these WCPs have been characterized by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Analysis of WCPs constructed by chromosome microdissection indicated that microdissected WCPs invariably provide strong and uniform signal intensity with no cytologically apparent cross-hybridization. To demonstrate the application of WCPs generated from microdissection, the authors have used these probes to detect complex chromosome rearrangements in a melanoma cell line, UM93-007. Two different translocations involving three chromosomes [t(1;3;13) and t(1;7;13)] have been identified, both of which were undetectable by conventional banding analysis. Further application of these WCPs (including generation of WCPs from mouse and other species) should greatly facilitate the cytogenetic analysis of complex chromosome rearrangements. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP), regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA1 binding sites. PMID

  12. Plasmodium falciparum: analysis of chromosomes separated by contour-clamped homogenous electric fields.

    PubMed

    Gu, H; Inselburg, J W; Bzik, D J; Li, W B

    1990-08-01

    We have established improved conditions for separating the chromosomes of Plasmodium falciparum by pulsed field gradient gel electrophoresis (PFG) using a contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) apparatus. Thirteen clearly separable chromosomal bands were reproducibly isolated from the strain FCR3 and their sizes have been determined. Evidence that indicates one band may contain two chromosomes is presented. The relationship between the PFG separable DNA and the number of unique chromosomes in P. falciparum is considered. We have established a relationship between the maximum resolvable sizes of the chromosomes and the pulse times. The chromosomal location of twenty-seven P. falciparum DNA probes is also reported. PMID:2197113

  13. Pairwise Kinship Analysis by the Index of Chromosome Sharing Using High-Density Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Chie; Manabe, Sho; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kawai, Chihiro; Fujimoto, Shuntaro; Hamano, Yuya; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new approach for pairwise kinship analysis in forensic genetics based on chromosomal sharing between two individuals. Here, we defined “index of chromosome sharing” (ICS) calculated using 174,254 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci typed by SNP microarray and genetic length of the shared segments from the genotypes of two individuals. To investigate the expected ICS distributions from first- to fifth-degree relatives and unrelated pairs, we used computationally generated genotypes to consider the effect of linkage disequilibrium and recombination. The distributions were used for probabilistic evaluation of the pairwise kinship analysis, such as likelihood ratio (LR) or posterior probability, without allele frequencies and haplotype frequencies. Using our method, all actual sample pairs from volunteers showed significantly high LR values (i.e., ≥ 108); therefore, we can distinguish distant relationships (up to the fifth-degree) from unrelated pairs based on LR. Moreover, we can determine accurate degrees of kinship in up to third-degree relationships with a probability of > 80% using the criterion of posterior probability ≥ 0.90, even if the kinship of the pair is totally unpredictable. This approach greatly improves pairwise kinship analysis of distant relationships, specifically in cases involving identification of disaster victims or missing persons. PMID:27472558

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies a region on chromosome 11q14.3 associated with late rectal bleeding following radiation therapy for prostate cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N.; Blacksburg, Seth R.; Rath, Lynda; Vega, Ana; Fachal, Laura; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lammering, Guido; Parliament, Matthew; Blackshaw, Michael; Sia, Michael; Cesaretti, Jamie; Terk, Mitchell; Hixson, Rosetta; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ostrer, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rectal bleeding can occur following radiotherapy for prostate cancer and negatively impacts quality of life for cancer survivors. Treatment and clinical factors do not fully predict for rectal bleeding, and genetic factors may be important. Materials and Methods A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to identify SNPs associated with development of late rectal bleeding following radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Logistic regression was used to test association between 614,453 SNPs and rectal bleeding in a discovery cohort (79 cases, 289 controls), and top-ranking SNPs were tested in a replication cohort (108 cases, 673 controls) from four independent sites. Results rs7120482 and rs17630638, which tag a single locus on chromosome 11q14.3, reached genome-wide significance for association with rectal bleeding (combined p-values 5.4×10−8 and 6.9×10−7 respectively). Several other SNPs had p-values trending towards genome-wide significance, and a polygenic risk score including these SNPs shows a strong rank-correlation with rectal bleeding (Sommers’ d = 5.0×10−12 in the replication cohort). Conclusions This GWAS identified novel genetic markers of rectal bleeding following prostate radiotherapy. These findings could lead to development of a predictive assay to identify patients at risk for this adverse treatment outcome so that dose or treatment modality could be modified. PMID:23719583

  15. Mechanism of the t(14; 18) chromosomal translocation: structural analysis of both derivative 14 and 18 reciprocal partners

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshi, A.; Wright, J.J.; Graninger, W.; Seto, M.; Owens, J.; Cossman, J.; Jensen, J.P.; Goldman, P.; Korsmeyer, S.J.

    1987-04-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of the t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation found in follicular lymphoma, the authors examined the structure of both derivative (der) chromosomal breakpoints as well as their germ-line predecessors. They noted that chromosome segment 18q21 was juxtaposed with immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain gene diversity (D/sub H/) regions on all five der(18) chromosomes they examined, and they confirmed the juncture with immunoglobulin H-chain gene joining (J/sub H/) regions on the der(14) chromosome. However, the t(14;18) was not fully reciprocal in that chromosome 14 DNA between the D/sub H/ and J/sub H/ regions was deleted. Furthermore, extra nucleotides, reminiscent of N segments, were present at the der(14) and possibly der(18) junctions. This indicates that despite the mature B-cell phenotype of follicular lymphoma, the t(14;18) occurs during attempted D/sub H/-J/sub H/ joining, the earliest event in immunoglobulin rearrangement in a pre-B-cell. The detailed analysis of the germ-line 18q21 region indicated that most breakpoints clustered within a 150-base-pair major breakpoint region. A direct repeat duplication of chromosome 18 sequences was discovered at both chromosomal junctures, typical of the repair of a naturally occurring staggered double-stranded DNA break. These results prompt a translocation model with illegitimate pairing of a staggered double-stranded DNA break at 18q21 and an immunoglobulin endonuclease-mediated break at 14q32 and with N-segment addition, repair, and ligation to generate der(14) and der(18) chromosomes.

  16. BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE VECTOR ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES SARCOPENIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of muscle mass and water shifts between body compartments are contributing factors to frailty in the elderly. The body composition changes are especially pronounced in institutionalized elderly. We investigated the ability of single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to identify b...

  17. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  18. [The construction of the genetic map and QTL locating analysis on chromosome 2 in swine].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan-Chun; Deng, Chang-Yan; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu; Zheng, Rong; Yu, Li; Su, Yu-Hong; Liu, Gui-Lan

    2002-01-01

    The study constructed the genetic linkage map of porcine chromosome 2 and further analysis of quantitative trait loci was conducted. The results of the study demonstrated that all 7 microsatellite loci we chose were with relatively high polymorphism, and its polymorphic information content was from 0.40182 to 0.58477. The genetic map we constructed for resource family was 152.9 cM in length, with the order of all loci highly consistent with the USDA map. All marker intervals were longer than USDA map with the interval between marker Sw2516 and Sw1201 as an exception. Furthermore, we conducted QTLs locating analysis by combining the genetic map with the phenotypic data. QTLs affecting lively estimated traits such as lean meat percentage, were located at 60-65 cM on chromosome 2, while QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were located at 20 cM and 55 cM, respectively Among them, QTL for estimated lean meat percentage was significant at chromosome-wise level (P < 0.01) and was responsible for 21.55% of the phenotypic variance. QTLs for the height and marbling of Longissmus dorsi muscle were responsible for 10.12% and 10.97% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The additive and dominance effect of lively estimated traits were in the inverse tendency, while the QTL for the height of Longissmus dorsi muscle had its additive and dominance effect in the same tendency and was with advantageous allele in Large White. The QTLs we detected had relatively large effect on phenotype and built a basis for molecular marker assisted selection and breeding. PMID:12645259

  19. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis Identifies Loci for Physical Appearance Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanfa; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Sun, Yan; Yu, Xiaoqiong; Li, Peng; Wen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Physical appearance traits, such as feather-crested head, comb size and type, beard, wattles size, and feathered feet, are used to distinguish between breeds of chicken and also may be associated with economic traits. In this study, a genome-wide linkage analysis was used to identify candidate regions and genes for physical appearance traits and to potentially provide further knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that underlie these traits. The linkage analysis was conducted with an F2 population derived from Beijing-You chickens and a commercial broiler line. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed using the Illumina 60K Chicken SNP Beadchip. The data were used to map quantitative trait loci and genes for six physical appearance traits. A 10-cM/0.51-Mb region (0.0−10.0 cM/0.00−0.51 Mb) with 1% genome-wide significant level on LGE22C19W28_E50C23 linkage group (LGE22) for crest trait was identified, which is likely very closely linked to the HOXC8. A QTL with 5% chromosome-wide significant level for comb weight, which partly overlaps with a region identified in a previous study, was identified at 74 cM/25.55 Mb on chicken (Gallus gallus; GG) chromosome 3 (i.e., GGA3). For beard and wattles traits, an identical region 11 cM/2.23 Mb (0.0−11.0 cM/0.00−2.23 Mb) including WNT3 and GH genes on GGA27 was identified. Two QTL with 1% genome-wide significant level for feathered feet trait, one 9-cM/2.80-Mb (48.0-57.0/13.40-16.20 Mb) region on GGA13, and another 12-cM/1.45-Mb (41.0−53.0 cM/11.37−12.82 Mb) region on GGA15 were identified. These candidate regions and genes provide important genetic information for the physical appearance traits in chicken. PMID:26248982

  20. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  1. Chromosome localization analysis of genes strongly expressed in human visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Sheng; Song, Huai-Dong; Shi, Wen-Jing; Hu, Ren-Ming; Han, Ze-Guang; Chen, Jia-Lun

    2002-06-01

    To understand fully the physiologic functions of visceral adipose tissue and to provide a basis for the identification of novel genes related to obesity and insulin resistance, the gene expression profiling of human visceral adipose tissue was established by using cDNA array. The characterization and chromosome localization of 400 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue were analyzed by searching PubMed, UniGene, the Human Genome Draft Database, and Location Data Base. Two hundred eighty-nine clones were classified into known genes among the 400 ESTs strongly expressed in the tissue. Among them, <20% have been previously reported to be expressed in adipose tissue. The chromosome localization of 389 ESTs strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue showed that their relative abundance was significantly increased on chromosomes 1, 16, 19, 20, and 22 compared with the expected distribution of the same number of random genes. The intrachromosome distribution of the genes strongly expressed in visceral adipose tissue was concentrated in certain regions, such as 1p36.2-1p36.3, 6p21.3-6p22.1, 19p13.3 and 19q13.1. Among them, the region of 1p36.2-1p36.3 appeared to be specific for visceral adipose tissue. Interestingly, some genes playing an important role in the pathogenesis of insulin signal transduction and adipocyte differentiation, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors; CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteina; and phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit, polypeptide 2 (p85beta), were also localized in the concentrated regions, which may provide clues to identifying novel genes closely related to adipocyte function with potential pathophysiologic implications. PMID:12166625

  2. High resolution SNP array genomic profiling of peripheral T cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, identifies a subgroup with chromosomal aberrations affecting the REL locus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Gesk, Stefan; Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Bug, Stefanie; Vater, Inga; Döring, Claudia; Cogliatti, Sergio; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Kwiecinska, Anna; Porwit, Anna; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Hoefler, Gerald; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genomic aberrations in peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL NOS). We studied 47 PTCL NOS by 250k GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and detected genomic imbalances in 22 of the cases. Recurrent gains and losses were identified, including gains of chromosome regions 1q32-43, 2p15-16, 7, 8q24, 11q14-25, 17q11-21 and 21q11-21 (> or = 5 cases each) as well as losses of chromosome regions 1p35-36, 5q33, 6p22, 6q16, 6q21-22, 8p21-23, 9p21, 10p11-12, 10q11-22, 10q25-26, 13q14, 15q24, 16q22, 16q24, 17p11, 17p13 and Xp22 (> or = 4 cases each). Genomic imbalances affected several regions containing members of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling and genes involved in cell cycle control. Gains of 2p15-16 were confirmed in each of three cases analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and were associated with breakpoints at the REL locus in two of these cases. Three additional cases with gains of the REL locus were detected by FISH among 18 further PTCL NOS. Five of 27 PTCL NOS investigated showed nuclear expression of the REL protein by immunohistochemistry, partly associated with genomic gains of the REL locus. Therefore, in a subgroup of PTCL NOS gains/rearrangements of REL and expression of REL protein may be of pathogenetic relevance. PMID:19863542

  3. microRNA fingerprinting of CLL patients with chromosome 17p deletion identify a miR-21 score that stratifies early survival

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Barbarotto, Elisa; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Dimitri, Federica; Sampath, Deepa; Fabbri, Muller; Lerner, Susan; Barron, Lynn L.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Jiang, Li; Xiao, Lianchun; Hu, Jianhua; Secchiero, Paola; Zauli, Giorgio; Volinia, Stefano; Negrini, Massimo; Wierda, William; Kipps, Thomas J.; Plunkett, William; Coombes, Kevin R.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with clinical outcome in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To identify a powerful and easily assessable miRNA bio-marker of prognosis and survival, we performed quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) profiling in 104 CLL patients with a well-defined chromosome 17p status, and we validated our findings with miRNA microarray data from an independent cohort of 80 patients. We found that miR-15a, miR-21, miR-34a, miR-155, and miR-181b were differentially expressed between CLLs with chromosome 17p deletion and CLLs with normal 17p and normal karyotype, and that miR-181b was down-regulated in therapy-refractory cases. miR-21 expression levels were significantly higher in patients with poor prognosis and predicted overall survival (OS), and miR-181b expression levels significantly predicted treatment-free survival. We developed a 21FK score (miR-21 qRT-PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization, Karyotype) to stratify patients according to OS and found that patients with a low score had a significantly longer OS time. When we evaluated the relative power of the 21FK score with the most used prognostic factors, the score was the most significant in both CLL cohorts. We conclude that the 21FK score represents a useful tool for distinguishing between good-prognosis and poor-prognosis CLL patients. PMID:20393129

  4. AnaLysis of Expression on human chromosome 21, ALE-HSA21: a pilot integrated web resource.

    PubMed

    Scarpato, Margherita; Esposito, Roberta; Evangelista, Daniela; Aprile, Marianna; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Angelini, Claudia; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Costa, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome studies have shown the pervasive nature of transcription, demonstrating almost all the genes undergo alternative splicing. Accurately annotating all transcripts of a gene is crucial. It is needed to understand the impact of mutations on phenotypes, to shed light on genetic and epigenetic regulation of mRNAs and more generally to widen our knowledge about cell functionality and tissue diversity. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the other applications of the next-generation sequencing, provides precious data to improve annotations' accuracy, simultaneously creating issues related to the variety, complexity and the size of produced data. In this 'scenario', the lack of user-friendly resources, easily accessible to researchers with low skills in bioinformatics, makes difficult to retrieve complete information about one or few genes without browsing a jungle of databases. Concordantly, the increasing amount of data from 'omics' technologies imposes to develop integrated databases merging different data formats coming from distinct but complementary sources. In light of these considerations, and given the wide interest in studying Down syndrome-a genetic condition due to the trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21)-we developed an integrated relational database and a web interface, named ALE-HSA21 (AnaLysis of Expression on HSA21), accessible at http://bioinfo.na.iac.cnr.it/ALE-HSA21. This comprehensive and user-friendly web resource integrates-for all coding and noncoding transcripts of chromosome 21-existing gene annotations and transcripts identified de novo through RNA-Seq analysis with predictive computational analysis of regulatory sequences. Given the role of noncoding RNAs and untranslated regions of coding genes in key regulatory mechanisms, ALE-HSA21 is also an interesting web-based platform to investigate such processes. The 'transcript-centric' and easily-accessible nature of ALE-HSA21 makes this resource a valuable tool to rapidly retrieve data at

  5. Autoregressive Higher-Order Hidden Markov Models: Exploiting Local Chromosomal Dependencies in the Analysis of Tumor Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Michael; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Friedrich, Betty; Klink, Barbara; Deutsch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Changes in gene expression programs play a central role in cancer. Chromosomal aberrations such as deletions, duplications and translocations of DNA segments can lead to highly significant positive correlations of gene expression levels of neighboring genes. This should be utilized to improve the analysis of tumor expression profiles. Here, we develop a novel model class of autoregressive higher-order Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) that carefully exploit local data-dependent chromosomal dependencies to improve the identification of differentially expressed genes in tumor. Autoregressive higher-order HMMs overcome generally existing limitations of standard first-order HMMs in the modeling of dependencies between genes in close chromosomal proximity by the simultaneous usage of higher-order state-transitions and autoregressive emissions as novel model features. We apply autoregressive higher-order HMMs to the analysis of breast cancer and glioma gene expression data and perform in-depth model evaluation studies. We find that autoregressive higher-order HMMs clearly improve the identification of overexpressed genes with underlying gene copy number duplications in breast cancer in comparison to mixture models, standard first- and higher-order HMMs, and other related methods. The performance benefit is attributed to the simultaneous usage of higher-order state-transitions in combination with autoregressive emissions. This benefit could not be reached by using each of these two features independently. We also find that autoregressive higher-order HMMs are better able to identify differentially expressed genes in tumors independent of the underlying gene copy number status in comparison to the majority of related methods. This is further supported by the identification of well-known and of previously unreported hotspots of differential expression in glioblastomas demonstrating the efficacy of autoregressive higher-order HMMs for the analysis of individual tumor expression

  6. AnaLysis of Expression on human chromosome 21, ALE-HSA21: a pilot integrated web resource

    PubMed Central

    Scarpato, Margherita; Esposito, Roberta; Evangelista, Daniela; Aprile, Marianna; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Angelini, Claudia; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Costa, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome studies have shown the pervasive nature of transcription, demonstrating almost all the genes undergo alternative splicing. Accurately annotating all transcripts of a gene is crucial. It is needed to understand the impact of mutations on phenotypes, to shed light on genetic and epigenetic regulation of mRNAs and more generally to widen our knowledge about cell functionality and tissue diversity. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the other applications of the next-generation sequencing, provides precious data to improve annotations' accuracy, simultaneously creating issues related to the variety, complexity and the size of produced data. In this ‘scenario’, the lack of user-friendly resources, easily accessible to researchers with low skills in bioinformatics, makes difficult to retrieve complete information about one or few genes without browsing a jungle of databases. Concordantly, the increasing amount of data from ‘omics’ technologies imposes to develop integrated databases merging different data formats coming from distinct but complementary sources. In light of these considerations, and given the wide interest in studying Down syndrome—a genetic condition due to the trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21)—we developed an integrated relational database and a web interface, named ALE-HSA21 (AnaLysis of Expression on HSA21), accessible at http://bioinfo.na.iac.cnr.it/ALE-HSA21. This comprehensive and user-friendly web resource integrates—for all coding and noncoding transcripts of chromosome 21—existing gene annotations and transcripts identified de novo through RNA-Seq analysis with predictive computational analysis of regulatory sequences. Given the role of noncoding RNAs and untranslated regions of coding genes in key regulatory mechanisms, ALE-HSA21 is also an interesting web-based platform to investigate such processes. The ‘transcript-centric’ and easily-accessible nature of ALE-HSA21 makes this resource a valuable tool to

  7. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, Christopher G; Sarma, Devojit K; Hlaing, Thaung; Prakash, Anil; Maung Maung, Yan Naung; Somboon, Pradya; Mahanta, Jagadish; Walton, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in sequencing allow population-genomic data to be generated for virtually any species. However, approaches to analyse such data lag behind the ability to generate it, particularly in nonmodel species. Linkage disequilibrium (LD, the nonrandom association of alleles from different loci) is a highly sensitive indicator of many evolutionary phenomena including chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographical structure. Here, we present linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna), which accesses information on LD shared between multiple loci genomewide. In LD networks, vertices represent loci, and connections between vertices represent the LD between them. We analysed such networks in two test cases: a new restriction-site-associated DNA sequence (RAD-seq) data set for Anopheles baimaii, a Southeast Asian malaria vector; and a well-characterized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data set from 21 three-spined stickleback individuals. In each case, we readily identified five distinct LD network clusters (single-outlier clusters, SOCs), each comprising many loci connected by high LD. In A. baimaii, further population-genetic analyses supported the inference that each SOC corresponds to a large inversion, consistent with previous cytological studies. For sticklebacks, we inferred that each SOC was associated with a distinct evolutionary phenomenon: two chromosomal inversions, local adaptation, population-demographic history and geographic structure. LDna is thus a useful exploratory tool, able to give a global overview of LD associated with diverse evolutionary phenomena and identify loci potentially involved. LDna does not require a linkage map or reference genome, so it is applicable to any population-genomic data set, making it especially valuable for nonmodel species. PMID:25573196

  8. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, Christopher G; Sarma, Devojit K; Hlaing, Thaung; Prakash, Anil; Maung Maung, Yan Naung; Somboon, Pradya; Mahanta, Jagadish; Walton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing allow population-genomic data to be generated for virtually any species. However, approaches to analyse such data lag behind the ability to generate it, particularly in nonmodel species. Linkage disequilibrium (LD, the nonrandom association of alleles from different loci) is a highly sensitive indicator of many evolutionary phenomena including chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographical structure. Here, we present linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna), which accesses information on LD shared between multiple loci genomewide. In LD networks, vertices represent loci, and connections between vertices represent the LD between them. We analysed such networks in two test cases: a new restriction-site-associated DNA sequence (RAD-seq) data set for Anopheles baimaii, a Southeast Asian malaria vector; and a well-characterized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data set from 21 three-spined stickleback individuals. In each case, we readily identified five distinct LD network clusters (single-outlier clusters, SOCs), each comprising many loci connected by high LD. In A. baimaii, further population-genetic analyses supported the inference that each SOC corresponds to a large inversion, consistent with previous cytological studies. For sticklebacks, we inferred that each SOC was associated with a distinct evolutionary phenomenon: two chromosomal inversions, local adaptation, population-demographic history and geographic structure. LDna is thus a useful exploratory tool, able to give a global overview of LD associated with diverse evolutionary phenomena and identify loci potentially involved. LDna does not require a linkage map or reference genome, so it is applicable to any population-genomic data set, making it especially valuable for nonmodel species. PMID:25573196

  9. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS OF MUTAGEN EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Homologous chromosome synapsis and crossing-over at meiosis are basic to mammalian gamete development. hey achieve genetic recombination, regulate chromosome segregation, and are believed to function in repair and maturation. ynaptonemal complexes (SCs) are axial correlates of me...

  10. Genetic analysis of durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in the rice accession Gigante Vercelli identified two blast resistance loci.

    PubMed

    Urso, Simona; Desiderio, Francesca; Biselli, Chiara; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Crispino, Laura; Piffanelli, Pietro; Abbruscato, Pamela; Assenza, Federica; Guarnieri, Giada; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero

    2016-02-01

    Rice cultivars exhibiting durable resistance to blast, the most important rice fungal disease provoking up to 30 % of rice losses, are very rare and searching for sources of such a resistance represents a priority for rice-breeding programs. To this aim we analyzed Gigante Vercelli (GV) and Vialone Nano (VN), two temperate japonica rice cultivars in Italy displaying contrasting response to blast, with GV showing a durable and broad-spectrum resistance, whereas VN being highly susceptible. An SSR-based genetic map developed using a GV × VN population segregating for blast resistance identified two blast resistance loci, localized to the long arm of chromosomes 1 and 4 explaining more than 78 % of the observed phenotypic variation for blast resistance. The pyramiding of two blast resistance QTLs was therefore involved in the observed durable resistance in GV. Mapping data were integrated with information obtained from RNA-seq expression profiling of all classes of resistance protein genes (resistance gene analogs, RGAs) and with the map position of known cloned or mapped blast resistance genes to search candidates for the GV resistant response. A co-localization of RGAs with the LOD peak or the marker interval of the chromosome 1 QTL was highlighted and a valuable tool for selecting the resistance gene during breeding programs was developed. Comparative analysis with known blast resistance genes revealed co-positional relationships between the chromosome 1 QTL with the Pi35/Pish blast resistance alleles and showed that the chromosome 4 QTL represents a newly identified blast resistance gene. The present genetic analysis has therefore allowed the identification of two blast resistance loci in the durable blast-resistant rice cultivar GV and tools for molecular selection of these resistance genes. PMID:26141566

  11. Bioinformatic analysis of expression data to identify effector candidates.

    PubMed

    Reid, Adam J; Jones, John T

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens produce effectors that manipulate the host to the benefit of the pathogen. These effectors are often secreted proteins that are upregulated during the early phases of infection. These properties can be used to identify candidate effectors from genomes and transcriptomes of pathogens. Here we describe commonly used bioinformatic approaches that (1) allow identification of genes encoding predicted secreted proteins within a genome and (2) allow the identification of genes encoding predicted secreted proteins that are upregulated at important stages of the life cycle. Other approaches for bioinformatic identification of effector candidates, including OrthoMCL analysis to identify expanded gene families, are also described. PMID:24643549

  12. A microarray system for Y chromosomal and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in chimpanzee populations.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Olga; Rönn, Ann-Charlotte; Bonhomme, Maxime; Kellermann, Thomas; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Doxiadis, Gaby; Verschoor, Ernst J; Goossens, Benoît; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bruford, Michael W; Bosch, Montserrat; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2008-05-01

    Chimpanzee populations are diminishing as a consequence of human activities, and as a result this species is now endangered. In the context of conservation programmes, genetic data can add vital information, for instance on the genetic diversity and structure of threatened populations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are biallelic markers that are widely used in human molecular studies and can be implemented in efficient microarray systems. This technology offers the potential of robust, multiplexed SNP genotyping at low reagent cost in other organisms than humans, but it is not commonly used yet in wild population studies. Here, we describe the characterization of new SNPs in Y-chromosomal intronic regions in chimpanzees and also identify SNPs from mitochondrial genes, with the aim of developing a microarray system that permits the simultaneous study of both paternal and maternal lineages. Our system consists of 42 SNPs for the Y chromosome and 45 SNPs for the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate the applicability of this microarray in a captive population where genotypes accurately reflected its large pedigree. Two wild-living populations were also analysed and the results show that the microarray will be a useful tool alongside microsatellite markers, since it supplies complementary information about population structure and ecology. SNP genotyping using microarray technology, therefore, is a promising approach and may become an essential tool in conservation genetics to help in the management and study of captive and wild-living populations. Moreover, microarrays that combine SNPs from different genomic regions could replace microsatellite typing in the future. PMID:21585830

  13. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  15. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  16. Linkage analysis of the whirler deafness gene on mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.; Rogers, M.J.C.; Steel, K.P. ); Brown, S.D.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The whirler mouse harbors an autosomal recessive mutation on mouse chromosome 4 that causes deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the adult that is manifested as head-bobbing and circling behavior. Although there is no obvious human homologue for this mutation as yet, whirler is a potential mouse model for human autosomal recessive deafness. Many genetic markers for this region of mouse chromosome 4 are now available, and the authors have used these to construct genetic linkage maps in both inter- and intraspecific backcrosses as the first step toward the cloning of the whirler gene. A total of 19 loci were analyzed in these crosses, giving the following gene orders: Interspecific cross, centromere-(D4Mit5, D4Mit38)-D4Mit6-(Lv,Tzn,D4Mit44)-wi-Hxb-(D4Mit25, D4Nds9)-(D4Mit7, D4Ler2)-b-D4Mit45-(D4Wsm1, D4Mit27b)-(D4Rck65, D4Mit15), and intraspecific cross, centromere-(Mup-1, wi, Hxb)-b-D4Wsm1. This analysis has positioned the wi locus in the interval between the genes for [delta]-aminolevulinate dehydratase (Lv) and hexabrachion (Hxb). The human homologues of these genes, ALAD and HXB, both lie on human chromosome 9q32-q34. They therefore predict that a human homologue of the wi gene, involved in autosomal recessive deafness, lies in this region of conserved homology on 9q32-q34. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The multiethnic ancestry of Bolivians as revealed by the analysis of Y-chromosome markers.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Jorge Mario; Heinz, Tanja; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Taboada-Echalar, Patricia; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the specific male genetic component of 226 Bolivians recruited in five different regions ("departments"), La Paz, Cochabamba, Pando, Beni, and Santa Cruz. To evaluate the effect of geography on the distribution of genetic variability, the samples were also grouped into three main eco-geographical regions, namely, Andean, Sub-Andean, and Llanos. All the individuals were genotyped for 17 Y-STR and 32 Y-SNP markers. The average Y-chromosome Native American component in Bolivians is 28%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup Q1a3a, while the average Y-chromosome European ancestry is 65%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup R1b1-P25. The data indicate that there exists significant population sub-division in the country in terms of continental ancestry. Thus, the partition of ancestries in Llanos, Sub-Andean, and Andean regions is as follows (respectively): (i) Native American ancestry: 47%, 7%, and 19%, (ii) European ancestry: 46%, 86%, and 75%, and (iii) African ancestry: 7%, 7%, and 6%. The population sub-structure in the country is also well mirrored when inferred from an AMOVA analysis, indicating that among-population variance in the country reaches 9.74-11.15%. This suggests the convenience of using regional datasets for forensic applications in Bolivia, instead of using a global and single country database. By comparing the Y-chromosome patterns with those previously reported on the same individuals on autosomal SNPs and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it becomes clear that Bolivians show a strong gender-bias. PMID:25450796

  18. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  19. The Role of Fusion in Ant Chromosome Evolution: Insights from Cytogenetic Analysis Using a Molecular Phylogenetic Approach in the Genus Mycetophylax

    PubMed Central

    das Graças Pompolo, Silvia; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Among insect taxa, ants exhibit one of the most variable chromosome numbers ranging from n = 1 to n = 60. This high karyotype diversity is suggested to be correlated to ants diversification. The karyotype evolution of ants is usually understood in terms of Robertsonian rearrangements towards an increase in chromosome numbers. The ant genus Mycetophylax is a small monogynous basal Attini ant (Formicidae: Myrmicinae), endemic to sand dunes along the Brazilian coastlines. A recent taxonomic revision validates three species, Mycetophylax morschi, M. conformis and M. simplex. In this paper, we cytogenetically characterized all species that belongs to the genus and analyzed the karyotypic evolution of Mycetophylax in the context of a molecular phylogeny and ancestral character state reconstruction. M. morschi showed a polymorphic number of chromosomes, with colonies showing 2n = 26 and 2n = 30 chromosomes. M. conformis presented a diploid chromosome number of 30 chromosomes, while M. simplex showed 36 chromosomes. The probabilistic models suggest that the ancestral haploid chromosome number of Mycetophylax was 17 (Likelihood framework) or 18 (Bayesian framework). The analysis also suggested that fusions were responsible for the evolutionary reduction in chromosome numbers of M. conformis and M. morschi karyotypes whereas fission may determines the M. simplex karyotype. These results obtained show the importance of fusions in chromosome changes towards a chromosome number reduction in Formicidae and how a phylogenetic background can be used to reconstruct hypotheses about chromosomes evolution. PMID:24489918

  20. The role of fusion in ant chromosome evolution: insights from cytogenetic analysis using a molecular phylogenetic approach in the genus mycetophylax.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Danon Clemes; das Graças Pompolo, Silvia; Cristiano, Maykon Passos; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Among insect taxa, ants exhibit one of the most variable chromosome numbers ranging from n = 1 to n = 60. This high karyotype diversity is suggested to be correlated to ants diversification. The karyotype evolution of ants is usually understood in terms of Robertsonian rearrangements towards an increase in chromosome numbers. The ant genus Mycetophylax is a small monogynous basal Attini ant (Formicidae: Myrmicinae), endemic to sand dunes along the Brazilian coastlines. A recent taxonomic revision validates three species, Mycetophylax morschi, M. conformis and M. simplex. In this paper, we cytogenetically characterized all species that belongs to the genus and analyzed the karyotypic evolution of Mycetophylax in the context of a molecular phylogeny and ancestral character state reconstruction. M. morschi showed a polymorphic number of chromosomes, with colonies showing 2n = 26 and 2n = 30 chromosomes. M. conformis presented a diploid chromosome number of 30 chromosomes, while M. simplex showed 36 chromosomes. The probabilistic models suggest that the ancestral haploid chromosome number of Mycetophylax was 17 (Likelihood framework) or 18 (Bayesian framework). The analysis also suggested that fusions were responsible for the evolutionary reduction in chromosome numbers of M. conformis and M. morschi karyotypes whereas fission may determines the M. simplex karyotype. These results obtained show the importance of fusions in chromosome changes towards a chromosome number reduction in Formicidae and how a phylogenetic background can be used to reconstruct hypotheses about chromosomes evolution. PMID:24489918

  1. Genome-wide linkage analysis of congenital heart defects using MOD score analysis identifies two novel loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart defects (CHD) is the most common cause of death from a congenital structure abnormality in newborns and is often associated with fetal loss. There are many types of CHD. Human genetic studies have identified genes that are responsible for the inheritance of a particular type of CHD and for some types of CHD previously thought to be sporadic. However, occasionally different members of the same family might have anatomically distinct defects — for instance, one member with atrial septal defect, one with tetralogy of Fallot, and one with ventricular septal defect. Our objective is to identify susceptibility loci for CHD in families affected by distinct defects. The occurrence of these apparently discordant clinical phenotypes within one family might hint at a genetic framework common to most types of CHD. Results We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis using MOD score analysis in families with diverse CHD. Significant linkage was obtained in two regions, at chromosome 15 (15q26.3, Pempirical = 0.0004) and at chromosome 18 (18q21.2, Pempirical = 0.0005). Conclusions In these two novel regions four candidate genes are located: SELS, SNRPA1, and PCSK6 on 15q26.3, and TCF4 on 18q21.2. The new loci reported here have not previously been described in connection with CHD. Although further studies in other cohorts are needed to confirm these findings, the results presented here together with recent insight into how the heart normally develops will improve the understanding of CHD. PMID:23705960

  2. Identifying influential factors of business process performance using dependency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzstein, Branimir; Leitner, Philipp; Rosenberg, Florian; Dustdar, Schahram; Leymann, Frank

    2011-02-01

    We present a comprehensive framework for identifying influential factors of business process performance. In particular, our approach combines monitoring of process events and Quality of Service (QoS) measurements with dependency analysis to effectively identify influential factors. The framework uses data mining techniques to construct tree structures to represent dependencies of a key performance indicator (KPI) on process and QoS metrics. These dependency trees allow business analysts to determine how process KPIs depend on lower-level process metrics and QoS characteristics of the IT infrastructure. The structure of the dependencies enables a drill-down analysis of single factors of influence to gain a deeper knowledge why certain KPI targets are not met.

  3. A Multiway Analysis for Identifying High Integrity Bovine BACs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In large genomics projects involving many different types of analyses of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), such as fingerprinting, end sequencing (BES) and full BAC sequencing there are many opportunities for the identities of BACs to become confused. However, by comparing the results from t...

  4. Using factor analysis to identify neuromuscular synergies during treadmill walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, L. A.; Layne, C. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Zhang, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    Neuroscientists are often interested in grouping variables to facilitate understanding of a particular phenomenon. Factor analysis is a powerful statistical technique that groups variables into conceptually meaningful clusters, but remains underutilized by neuroscience researchers presumably due to its complicated concepts and procedures. This paper illustrates an application of factor analysis to identify coordinated patterns of whole-body muscle activation during treadmill walking. Ten male subjects walked on a treadmill (6.4 km/h) for 20 s during which surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was obtained from the left side sternocleidomastoid, neck extensors, erector spinae, and right side biceps femoris, rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, and medial gastrocnemius. Factor analysis revealed 65% of the variance of seven muscles sampled aligned with two orthogonal factors, labeled 'transition control' and 'loading'. These two factors describe coordinated patterns of muscular activity across body segments that would not be evident by evaluating individual muscle patterns. The results show that factor analysis can be effectively used to explore relationships among muscle patterns across all body segments to increase understanding of the complex coordination necessary for smooth and efficient locomotion. We encourage neuroscientists to consider using factor analysis to identify coordinated patterns of neuromuscular activation that would be obscured using more traditional EMG analyses.

  5. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  6. Analysis of Plasmid and Chromosomal DNA of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, S.; Kariuki, S.; Mamun, K. Z.; Beeching, N. J.; Hart, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular analysis of chromosomal DNA from 193 multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from 1990 to 1995 from Pakistan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Bangladesh, and India produced a total of five major different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Even within a particular country MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi DNA was found to be in different PFGE groups. Similar self-transferable 98-MDa plasmids belonging to either incompatibility group incHI1 or incHI1/FIIA were implicated in the MDR phenotype in S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates from all the locations except Quetta, Pakistan, where the majority were of incFIA. A total of five different PFGE genotypes with six different plasmids, based on incompatibility and restriction endonuclease analysis groups, were found among these MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates. PMID:10747124

  7. Genomic in situ hybridization identifies parental chromosomes in hybrid scallop (Bivalvia, Pectinoida, Pectinidae) between female Chlamys farreri and male Argopecten irradians irradians

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoting; Bi, Ke; Lu, Wei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interspecific crossing was artificially carried out between Chlamys farreri (Jones & Preston, 1904) ♀ and Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck, 1819) ♂, two of the dominant cultivated scallop species in China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to examine the chromosome constitution and variation in hybrids at early embryonic stage. The number of chromosomes in 66.38% of the metaphases was 2n = 35 and the karyotype was 2n = 3 m + 5 sm + 16 st + 11 t. After GISH, two parental genomes were clearly distinguished in hybrids, most of which comprised 19 chromosomes derived from their female parent (Chlamys farreri) and 16 chromosomes from their male parent (Argopecten irradians irradians). Some chromosome elimination and fragmentation was also observed in the hybrids. PMID:26140161

  8. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  9. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  10. The significance of Y chromosome microdeletion analysis in subfertile men with clinical variocele

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Hamit; Ozok, Ugur; Eraslan, Asir; Yararbas, Kanay; Goktug, Goksel; Tukun, Ajlan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of study is determining the cost-effectiveness of detection analysis in the presence of exceptional patients who have mild semen disorders, and beware of unnecessary varicocele repairs; and to ascertain whether patients with clinical varicocele should undergo Y chromosome (Yq) microdeletion analysis as a routine procedure. Material and methods Varicocele with reflux was diagnosed in 51 male patients with subfertility symptoms upon physical examination (PE), confirmed by scrotal colour-Doppler ultrasound (CDU). After cytogenetic examination, Yq microdeletion analysis was performed on the peripheral blood samples using Promega Y Chromosome Deletion Detection System Version 2. Varicocele repair was performed under general anaesthesia with optical magnification (3-fold) through a subinguinal approach. Results The mean age of the patients was 27.9. Values of semen concentration ranged from 0 to 72 million/ml, motility from 0 to 65% (A + B) and Kruger from 0% to 18%. The PE revealed normal size and consistency in the bilateral testicles. All patients were cytogenetically normal. However, Yq microdeletion was detected in 2 patients, 1 with mild oligoteratozoospermia and partial AZFb deletion (sY121) and the second patient with severe oligozoospermia and partial AZFc deletion (sY254 and sY255), and they were not subjected to varicocelectomy. Conclusions The routine performance of pre-operative Yq microdeletion analysis in patients with clinical varicocele does not seem to be cost-effective but the omission of patients with mild oligozoospermia would have subjected them to an unnecessary varicocelectomy and/or further ICSI applications and also would have caused the failure of referral for genetic counselling. PMID:22371775

  11. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae) sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakovin, Nickolay A.; Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Razumova, Olga V.; Soloviev, Alexander A.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2) of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH) using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, Humulus japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to Humulus lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in Humulus japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction. PMID:25610546

  12. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information.

    PubMed

    Wise, Alison S; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  13. Chromosomal microarray analysis, or comparative genomic hybridization: A high throughput approach

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad; Gelowani, Violet; Beaudet, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological copy number variants (CNVs) and point mutations are major genetic causes of hundreds of disorders. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) also known as chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is the best available tool to detect copy number variations in chromosomal make up. We have optimized several different protocols and introduce a high-throughput approach to perform a cost-effective, fast, high-throughput and high-quality CMA. We managed to reach to high quality arrays with 17 ± 0.04 (mean ± SD, n = 90) Derivative Log Ratio (DLR) spread, a measure of array quality (<0.20 considered as excellent) for our arrays. High-throughput and high-quality arrays are gaining more attention and the current manuscript is a step forward to this increasing demand.•This manuscript introduces a low cost, fast, efficient, high throughput and high-quality aCGH protocol;•This protocol provides specific instructions and crucial detail for processing up to 24 slides which is equal to 48, 96, or 192 arrays by only one person in one day;•This manuscript is accompanied with a step-by-step video. PMID:26862485

  14. Analysis of Chromosome 17 miRNAs and Their Importance in Medulloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    López-Ochoa, Sebastian; Ramírez-García, Marina

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small sequences of nucleotides that regulate posttranscriptionally gene expression. In recent years they have been recognized as very important general regulators of proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell death, and others. In some cases, the characteristic presence of miRNAs reflects some of the cellular pathways that may be altered. Particularly medulloblastomas (MB) represent entities that undergo almost characteristic alterations of chromosome 17: from loss of discrete fragments and isochromosomes formation to complete loss of one of them. An analysis of the major loci on this chromosome revealed that it contains at least 19 genes encoding miRNAs which may regulate the development and differentiation of the brain and cerebellum. miRNAs are regulators of real complex networks; they can regulate from 100 to over 300 messengers of various proteins. In this review some miRNAs are considered to be important in MB studies. Some of them are miRNA-5047, miRNA-1253, miRNA-2909, and miRNA-634. Everyone can significantly affect the development, growth, and cell invasion of MB, and they have not been explored in this tumor. In this review, we propose some miRNAs that can affect some genes in MB, and hence the importance of its study. PMID:25866804

  15. Analysis and Dynamics of the Chromosomal Complements of Wild Sparkling-Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Dolors; Carro, David; Fernández-Larrea, Juan; Piña, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains that are able to carry out the second fermentation of sparkling wine from spontaneously fermenting musts in El Penedès (Spain) by specifically designed selection protocols. All of them (26 strains) showed one of two very similar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction patterns, whereas their karyotypes differed. These strains showed high rates of karyotype instability, which were dependent on both the medium and the strain, during vegetative growth. In all cases, the mtDNA restriction pattern was conserved in strains kept under the same conditions. Analysis of different repetitive sequences in their genomes suggested that ribosomal DNA repeats play an important role in the changes in size observed in chromosome XII, whereas SUC genes or Ty elements did not show amplification or transposition processes that could be related to rearrangements of the chromosomes showing these sequences. Karyotype changes also occurred in monosporidic diploid derivatives. We propose that these changes originated mainly from ectopic recombination between repeated sequences interspersed in the genome. None of the rearranged karyotypes provided a selective advantage strong enough to allow the strains to displace the parental strains. The nature and frequency of these changes suggest that they may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the genetic diversity observed in S. cerevisiae wild populations. PMID:10103269

  16. Analysis of a transgenic Oct4 enhancer reveals high fidelity long-range chromosomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Mingyang; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Peilin; An, Woojin; Shi, Jiandang; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wange

    2015-01-01

    Genome structure or nuclear organization has fascinated researchers investigating genome function. Recently, much effort has gone into defining relationships between specific genome structures and gene expression in pluripotent cells. We previously analyzed chromosomal interactions of the endogenous Oct4 distal enhancer in pluripotent cells. Here, we derive ES and iPS cells from a transgenic Oct4 distal enhancer reporter mouse. Using sonication-based Circularized Chromosome Conformation Capture (4C) coupled with next generation sequencing, we determined and compared the genome-wide interactome of the endogenous and transgenic Oct4 distal enhancers. Integrative genomic analysis indicated that the transgenic enhancer binds to a similar set of loci and shares similar key enrichment profiles with its endogenous counterpart. Both the endogenous and transgenic Oct4 enhancer interacting loci were enriched in the open nucleus compartment, which is associated with active histone marks (H3K4me1, H3K27ac, H3K4me3 and H3K9ac), active cis-regulatory sequences (DNA hypersensitivity sites (DHS)), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmc), and early DNA replication domains. In addition, binding of some pluripotency-related transcription factors was consistently enriched in our 4C sites, and genes in those sites were generally more highly expressed. Overall, our work reveals critical features that may function in gene expression regulation in mouse pluripotent cells. PMID:26435056

  17. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May

    2014-06-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. PMID:23702536

  18. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alison S.; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  19. Genetic analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs haplotypes of Chinese Tibetan ethnic minority group.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhou; Jun, Wang; XingBo, Song; XiaoJun, Lu; Liu, Ding; BinWu, Ying

    2010-03-01

    We have co-amplified and analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STRs loci (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) in 132 healthy unrelated autochthonous male individuals of Chinese Tibetan ethnic group residing in Lassa area of China. The gene diversity values for the Y-STRs loci ranged from a minimum 0.206 for DYS391 locus to a maximum of 0.912 for DYS385a/b locus in the populations. A total of 123 haplotypes were identified, among which 115 were unique and 8 occurred more than once. The overall haplotype diversity for 17 Y-STRs loci was 0.998. Research results will be valuable for forensic use in the regions and for Chinese population genetic study. PMID:20116321

  20. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL). To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum) has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF) in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions that flank regions

  1. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies new endometriosis risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Nyholt, Dale R.; Low, Siew-Kee; Anderson, Carl A.; Painter, Jodie N.; Uno, Satoko; Morris, Andrew P.; MacGregor, Stuart; Gordon, Scott D.; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Kennedy, Stephen H.; Treloar, Susan A.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Adachi, Sosuke; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Zondervan, Krina T.; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Montgomery, Grant W.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 4,604 endometriosis cases and 9,393 controls of Japanese1 and European2 ancestry. We show that rs12700667 on chromosome 7p15.2, previously found in Europeans, replicates in Japanese (P = 3.6 × 10−3), and confirm association of rs7521902 on 1p36.12 near WNT4. In addition, we establish association of rs13394619 in GREB1 on 2p25.1 and identify a novel locus on 12q22 near VEZT (rs10859871). Excluding European cases with minimal or unknown severity, we identified additional novel loci on 2p14 (rs4141819), 6p22.3 (rs7739264) and 9p21.3 (rs1537377). All seven SNP effects were replicated in an independent cohort and produced P < 5 × 10−8 in a combined analysis. Finally, we found a significant overlap in polygenic risk for endometriosis between the European and Japanese GWA cohorts (P = 8.8 × 10−11), indicating that many weakly associated SNPs represent true endometriosis risk loci and risk prediction and future targeted disease therapy may be transferred across these populations. PMID:23104006

  2. Loss of chromosome 9 in tissue sections of transitional cell carcinomas as detected by interphase cytogenetics. A comparison with RFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, P J; Bringuier, P P; Vallinga, M; Schalken, J A; Ramaekers, F C; Hopman, A H

    1996-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetics by in situ hybridization (ISH) using a panel of centromere-associated DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, and 18 was performed on 5 microns thick frozen tissue sections of transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs) of the urinary bladder. By this approach, chromosome ploidy, numerical chromosome aberrations, imbalance between chromosomes, and heterogeneity of aberrations within individual tumours were determined. In 15 of 24 TCCs, loss or underrepresentation of chromosome 9, compared with the ISH copy numbers of at least five other chromosomes, was demonstrated. Independently, RFLP analysis were performed on the same cases to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome loci 9q34, 11p15, 16q22-24, 17p13, and 18q21. LOH was found in 9 of 19 informative cases for chromosome locus 9q34. Comparison of the ISH and RFLP results showed no correlation between numerical aberration and LOH for the loci on chromosomes 11, 16, 17, and 18. However, numerical loss of chromosome 9 was found in 89 per cent (eight of nine cases) with LOH for 9q34. Conversely, LOH at 9q34 was observed in only 67 per cent (eight of 12 cases) with underrepresentation of chromosome 9. Moreover, in 60 per cent of the non-informative cases (three of five cases), underrepresentation for chromosome 9 was observed. These results indicate that the heterochromatin probe for chromosome 9 can be reliably used in TCC tissue sections for the detection of chromosomal loss. In aneuploid TCCs, this DNA probe can be used for the detection of chromosomal underrepresentation only in combination with other centromere-associated DNA probes. PMID:8758209

  3. High-Throughput Live-Cell Microscopy Analysis of Association Between Chromosome Domains and the Nucleolus in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Renjie; Normand, Christophe; Gadal, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Spatial organization of the genome has important impacts on all aspects of chromosome biology, including transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Frequent interactions of some chromosome domains with specific nuclear compartments, such as the nucleolus, are now well documented using genome-scale methods. However, direct measurement of distance and interaction frequency between loci requires microscopic observation of specific genomic domains and the nucleolus, followed by image analysis to allow quantification. The fluorescent repressor operator system (FROS) is an invaluable method to fluorescently tag DNA sequences and investigate chromosome position and dynamics in living cells. This chapter describes a combination of methods to define motion and region of confinement of a locus relative to the nucleolus in cell's nucleus, from fluorescence acquisition to automated image analysis using two dedicated pipelines. PMID:27576709

  4. Evolution of a Distinct Genomic Domain in Drosophila: Comparative Analysis of the Dot Chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Cordonnier, Taylor; Wong, Jeannette; Itano, Michelle S.; Slawson Tempel, Elizabeth E.; Kellmann, Elmer; Desruisseau, David Michael; Cain, Carolyn; Carrasquillo, Robert; Chusak, Tien M.; Falkowska, Katazyna; Grim, Kelli D.; Guan, Rui; Honeybourne, Jacquelyn; Khan, Sana; Lo, Louis; McGaha, Rebecca; Plunkett, Jevon; Richner, Justin M.; Richt, Ryan; Sabin, Leah; Shah, Anita; Sharma, Anushree; Singhal, Sonal; Song, Fine; Swope, Christopher; Wilen, Craig B.; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The distal arm of the fourth (“dot”) chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster is unusual in that it exhibits an amalgamation of heterochromatic properties (e.g., dense packaging, late replication) and euchromatic properties (e.g., gene density similar to euchromatic domains, replication during polytenization). To examine the evolution of this unusual domain, we undertook a comparative study by generating high-quality sequence data and manually curating gene models for the dot chromosome of D. virilis (Tucson strain 15010–1051.88). Our analysis shows that the dot chromosomes of D. melanogaster and D. virilis have higher repeat density, larger gene size, lower codon bias, and a higher rate of gene rearrangement compared to a reference euchromatic domain. Analysis of eight “wanderer” genes (present in a euchromatic chromosome arm in one species and on the dot chromosome in the other) shows that their characteristics are similar to other genes in the same domain, which suggests that these characteristics are features of the domain and are not required for these genes to function. Comparison of this strain of D. virilis with the strain sequenced by the Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium (Tucson strain 15010–1051.87) indicates that most genes on the dot are under weak purifying selection. Collectively, despite the heterochromatin-like properties of this domain, genes on the dot evolve to maintain function while being responsive to changes in their local environment. PMID:20479145

  5. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  6. Towards a Methodology for Identifying Program Constraints During Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romo, Lilly; Gates, Ann Q.; Della-Piana, Connie Kubo

    1997-01-01

    Requirements analysis is the activity that involves determining the needs of the customer, identifying the services that the software system should provide and understanding the constraints on the solution. The result of this activity is a natural language document, typically referred to as the requirements definition document. Some of the problems that exist in defining requirements in large scale software projects includes synthesizing knowledge from various domain experts and communicating this information across multiple levels of personnel. One approach that addresses part of this problem is called context monitoring and involves identifying the properties of and relationships between objects that the system will manipulate. This paper examines several software development methodologies, discusses the support that each provide for eliciting such information from experts and specifying the information, and suggests refinements to these methodologies.

  7. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  8. Current Practice and Utility of Chromosome Microarray Analysis in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jason R.; Kavarana, Minoo N.; Chowdhury, Shahryar M.; Scheurer, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traditionally, karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used for cytogenetic testing of infants with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery at our institution. Recently, chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) has been performed in lieu of the traditional tests. A standardized approach to cytogenetic testing does not exist in this population. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of CMA based on our current ordering practice. Design We reviewed the records of all infants (< 1 year old) who underwent cardiac surgery at our institution from January 2010 to June 2013. Data included results of all cytogenetic testing performed. Diagnostic yield was calculated as the percentage of significant abnormal results obtained by each test modality. Patients were grouped by classification of congenital heart disease (CHD). Results Two hundred and seventy-five (51%) of 535 infants who underwent cardiac surgery had cytogenetic testing. Of those tested, 154 (56%) had multiple tests performed and at least 18% were redundant or overlapping. The utilization of CMA has increased each year since its implementation. The diagnostic yield for karyotype, FISH and CMA was 10%, 12% and 14% respectively. CMA yield was significantly higher in patients with septal defects (33%, p = 0.01) compared to all other CHD classes. CMA detected abnormalities of unknown clinical significance in 13% of infants tested. Conclusions In our center, redundant cytogenetic testing is frequently performed in infants undergoing cardiac surgery. The utilization of chromosome microarray analysis has increased over time and abnormalities of unknown clinical significance are detected in an important subset of patients. A screening algorithm that risk-stratifies based on classification of CHD and clinical suspicion may provide a practical, data-driven approach to genetic testing in this population and limit unnecessary resource utilization. PMID:25494910

  9. Univariate and Bivariate Linkage Analysis Identifies Pleiotropic Loci Underlying Lipids and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, Sandra J; Hanis, Craig L; Elbein, Steven C

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dyslipidemia frequently co-occurs with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and with obesity. To investigate whether the co-occurrence is due to pleiotropic genes, we performed univariate linkage analysis of lipid levels and bivariate linkage analysis of pairs of lipid levels and of lipid levels paired with T2D, body mass index (BMI), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) in the African American subset of the Genetics of NIDDM (GENNID) sample. We obtained significant evidence for a pleiotropic low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)–T2D locus on chromosome 1 at 16–19 megabases (MB) (bivariate lod = 4.41), as well as a non-pleiotropic triglyceride (TG) locus on chromosome 20 at 28–34 MB (univariate lod = 3.57). In addition, near-significant evidence supported TG–T2D loci on chromosome 2 at 81–101 MB (bivariate lod = 4.23) and 232–239 MB (bivariate lod = 4.27) and on chromosome 7 at 147–151 MB (univariate lod = 3.08 for TG with P = 0.041 supporting pleiotropy with T2D), as well as an LDL-C–BMI locus on chromosome 3 at 137–147 MB (bivariate lod score = 4.25). These finding provide evidence that at least some of the co-occurrence of dyslipidemia with T2D and obesity is due to common underlying genes. PMID:20597901

  10. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of multi-ancestry cohorts identifies new loci influencing intraocular pressure and susceptibility to glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Hysi, Pirro G; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Springelkamp, Henriët; Macgregor, Stuart; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Wojciechowski, Robert; Vitart, Veronique; Nag, Abhishek; Hewitt, Alex W; Höhn, René; Venturini, Cristina; Mirshahi, Alireza; Ramdas, Wishal D; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vithana, Eranga; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Stefansson, Arni B; Liao, Jiemin; Haines, Jonathan L; Amin, Najaf; Wang, Ya Xing; Wild, Philipp S; Ozel, Ayse B; Li, Jun Z; Fleck, Brian W; Zeller, Tanja; Staffieri, Sandra E; Teo, Yik-Ying; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Luo, Xiaoyan; Allingham, R Rand; Richards, Julia E; Senft, Andrea; Karssen, Lennart C; Zheng, Yingfeng; Bellenguez, Céline; Xu, Liang; Iglesias, Adriana I; Wilson, James F; Kang, Jae H; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Ennis, Sarah; Moroi, Sayoko E; Martin, Nicholas G; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Yazar, Seyhan; Tai, E-Shyong; Amouyel, Philippe; Kirwan, James; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Hauser, Michael A; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leo, Paul; Loomis, Stephanie J; Fogarty, Rhys; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Kearns, Lisa; Lackner, Karl J; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Simpson, Claire L; Pennell, Craig E; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Saw, Seang-Mei; Lotery, Andrew J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Maubaret, Cécilia; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Young, Terri L; Pasquale, Louis R; Delcourt, Cécile; Spector, Timothy D; Klaver, Caroline C W; Small, Kerrin S; Burdon, Kathryn P; Stefansson, Kari; Wong, Tien-Yin; Viswanathan, Ananth; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Wiggs, Janey L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J; Aung, Tin

    2014-10-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is an important risk factor in developing glaucoma, and variability in IOP might herald glaucomatous development or progression. We report the results of a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 18 population cohorts from the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium (IGGC), comprising 35,296 multi-ancestry participants for IOP. We confirm genetic association of known loci for IOP and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and identify four new IOP-associated loci located on chromosome 3q25.31 within the FNDC3B gene (P = 4.19 × 10(-8) for rs6445055), two on chromosome 9 (P = 2.80 × 10(-11) for rs2472493 near ABCA1 and P = 6.39 × 10(-11) for rs8176693 within ABO) and one on chromosome 11p11.2 (best P = 1.04 × 10(-11) for rs747782). Separate meta-analyses of 4 independent POAG cohorts, totaling 4,284 cases and 95,560 controls, showed that 3 of these loci for IOP were also associated with POAG. PMID:25173106

  12. Genome-wide analysis of multiethnic cohorts identifies new loci influencing intraocular pressure and susceptibility to glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitart, Veronique; Nag, Abhishek; Hewitt, Alex W; Höhn, René; Venturini, Cristina; Mirshahi, Alireza; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vithana, Eranga; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Stefansson, Arni B; Liao, Jiemin; Haines, Jonathan L; Amin, Najaf; Wang, Ya Xing; Wild, Philipp S; Ozel, Ayse B; Li, Jun Z; Fleck, Brian W; Zeller, Tanja; Staffieri, Sandra E; Teo, Yik-Ying; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Luo, Xiaoyan; Allingham, R Rand; Richards, Julia E; Senft, Andrea; Karssen, Lennart C; Zheng, Yingfeng; Bellenguez, Céline; Xu, Liang; Iglesias, Adriana I; Wilson, James F; Kang, Jae H; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Despriet, Dominiek D.G.; Ennis, Sarah; Moroi, Sayoko E; Martin, Nicholas G; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Yazar, Seyhan; Tai, E-Shyong; Amouyel, Philippe; Kirwan, James; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M.E.; Hauser, Michael A; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leo, Paul; Loomis, Stephanie J; Fogarty, Rhys; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Kearns, Lisa; Lackner, Karl J; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Simpson, Claire L; Pennell, Craig E; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Saw, Seang-Mei; Lotery, Andrew J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Maubaret, Cécilia; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wolfs, Roger C.W.; Lemij, Hans G; Young, Terri L; Pasquale, Louis R; Delcourt, Cécile; Spector, Timothy D; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Small, Kerrin S; Burdon, Kathryn P; Stefansson, Kari; Wong, Tien-Yin; Viswanathan, Ananth; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Wiggs, Janey L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J; Aung, Tin

    2014-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is an important risk factor in developing glaucoma and IOP variability may herald glaucomatous development or progression. We report the results of a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 18 population cohorts from the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium (IGGC), comprising 35,296 multiethnic participants for IOP. We confirm genetic association of known loci for IOP and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and identify four new IOP loci located on chromosome 3q25.31 within the FNDC3B gene (p=4.19×10−08 for rs6445055), two on chromosome 9 (p=2.80×10−11 for rs2472493 near ABCA1 and p=6.39×10−11 for rs8176693 within ABO) and one on chromosome 11p11.2 (best p=1.04×10−11 for rs747782). Separate meta-analyses of four independent POAG cohorts, totaling 4,284 cases and 95,560 controls, show that three of these IOP loci are also associated with POAG. PMID:25173106

  13. Sex chromosome analysis in Turner Syndrome by a pentaplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Pelotti, S; Bini, C; Ceccardi, S; Ferri, G; Abbondanza, A; Greggio, N A; Ponzano, E; Caenazzo, L

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we describe a pentaplex PCR to determine the parental origin of the X chromosome and the presence of mosaicism, via amplification of four polymorphic markers located along the X chromosome (DXS10011, DXS6807, HUMARA, DXS101) and the X-Y amelogenin marker, in 41 families having a daughter with Turner Syndrome. Our results confirmed the cytogenetic findings and we found that the parental origin of the single X chromosome to be maternal in 84% of cases. PMID:14642001

  14. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; Lupski, James R; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Bugalter, Boris E; Butler, Jonathan; Chang, Jean L; Chen, Chao-Kung; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; Cuomo, Christina A; de Jong, Pieter J; DeCaprio, David; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael; Gilbert, James; Gibson, Richard; Gnerre, Sante; Goldstein, Steven; Grafham, Darren V; Grocock, Russell; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hart, Elizabeth; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Humphray, Sean; Jaffe, David B; Jones, Matt; Kamal, Michael; Khodiyar, Varsha K; LaButti, Kurt; Laird, Gavin; Lehoczky, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Loveland, Jane; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Lucy; Mauceli, Evan; McCarroll, Steven A; Mihalev, Atanas H; Mudge, Jonathan; Nguyen, Cindy; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Schwartz, David C; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steward, Charles; Swarbreck, David; Venkataraman, Vijay; Whittaker, Charles A; Yang, Xiaoping; Zimmer, Andrew R; Bradley, Allan; Hubbard, Tim; Birren, Bruce W; Rogers, Jane; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-04-20

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome. PMID:16625196

  15. FISH analysis reveals aneuploidy and continual generation of chromosomal mosaicism in Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Sterkers, Yvon; Lachaud, Laurence; Crobu, Lucien; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel

    2011-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania is generally considered to be diploid, although a few chromosomes have been described as aneuploid. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we determined the number of homologous chromosomes per individual cell in L. major (i) during interphase and (ii) during mitosis. We show that, in Leishmania, aneuploidy appears to be the rule, as it affects all the chromosomes that we studied. Moreover, every chromosome was observed in at least two ploidy states, among monosomic, disomic or trisomic, in the cell population. This variable chromosomal ploidy among individual cells generates intra-strain heterogeneity, here precisely chromosomal mosaicism. We also show that this mosaicism, hence chromosome ploidy distribution, is variable among clones and strains. Finally, when we examined dividing nuclei, we found a surprisingly high rate of asymmetric chromosome allotments, showing that the transmission of genetic material during mitosis is highly unstable in this 'divergent' eukaryote: this leads to continual generation of chromosomal mosaicism. Using these results, we propose a model for the occurrence and persistence of this mosaicism. We discuss the implications of this additional unique feature of Leishmania for its biology and genetics, in particular as a novel genetic mechanism to generate phenotypic variability from genomic plasticity. PMID:20964798

  16. A chromosomal analysis of three species of Timarcha (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae)

    PubMed Central

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The karyotypes of three species of Timarcha Latreille, 1829 have been analysed. Timarcha (Metallotimarcha) metallica (Laicharting, 1781), has 18 + Xyp male meioformula and 2n = 38 chromosomes, similar to those found in the two species of subgenus Americanotimarcha Jolivet, 1948, in agreement with morphological and molecular phylogenetic grounds. Timarcha (Timarcha) carmelenae Petitpierre, 2013 displays 9 + Xyp and 2n = 20 chromosomes as in morphologically related Andalusian species, whereas Timarcha (Timarcha) parvicollis ssp. seidlitzi Kraatz, 1879 shows 11 + Xyp and 2n = 24 chromosomes, clearly differing from the previous species. These results are discussed in order to get an insight into the main trends of the chromosomal evolution in Timarcha. PMID:27186335

  17. Meta-analysis of association between the genetic polymorphisms on chromosome 11q and Alzheimer’s disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weidong; Xu, Lanling; Zhou, Haiyun; Wang, Suishan; Fang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease mostly occurred in the elderly. Genetic mutation is one of well-established risk factors for AD. Several polymorphisms on chromosome 11q were reported to be associated with AD susceptibility. Hence we performed a meta-analysis to systematically assess the association between the most-reported polymorphisms on chromosome 11q (rs10793294, rs7115850, rs7101429, rs4945261, rs2373115, rs670142, rs610932, rs541458 and rs3851179) and AD risk. A comprehensive literature search in the electronic databases was performed to identify all eligible studies. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to evaluate the association between 11q variants and AD risk by using the allelic model. Sensitivity analysis was carried out to analyze the influence of single study on the overall results. Begg’s funnel plots and Egger’s test were used to assess the publication biases among studies. All the statistical analyses were conducted by using STATA 12.0 Software (Stata Corp, College Station, TX, USA). A total of 35 eligible articles were included in our meta-analysis. Our data showed that the polymorphism of rs610932 were significantly associated with lower AD risk with a pooled OR of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.92, P=0.005). The other SNPs of rs494526 (OR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.65-1.00, P<0.001), rs2373115 (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.75-0.95, P<0.001) and rs670139 (OR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.05-1.12, P=0.554) were shown to be correlated with lower AD risk. Subgroup analysis revealed a similar result in Caucasians. But only the rs610932 polymorphism was found to be associated with lower AD risk in Asians. The polymorphism of rs610932 was shown to be a risk factor for AD while the other three genetic variants (rs494526, rs2373115 and rs610932) may act as protective factors against AD. PMID:26770425

  18. Horizontal transfer of chromosomal DNA between the marine bacterium Vibrio furnissii and Escherichia coli revealed by sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Charbit, A; Autret, N

    1998-01-01

    Previous in silico analysis of the 67.4-76.0 minutes region of the Escherichia coli genome led to the identification of a gene cluster (named aga) comprising five genes encoding homologs of the mannose transporter of E. coli, a member of the sugar-specific phosphoenolypyruvate/sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the present work, we compared the aga gene cluster of E. coli, which has been considered to be involved in N-acetylgalactosamine or N-acetylmannosamine transport and metabolism, to the region comprising the recently identified mannose transporter of the marine bacterium Vibrio furnissii. Our analysis revealed that the proteins encoded by three genes (agaV, agaW, and agaA), located in the proximal portion of the aga gene cluster, shared striking similarities with the proteins encoded by the manX (IIBMan), manY (IICMan), and manD (a putative deacetylase) genes of V. furnissii, respectively (70%-82.3% identity among the three pairs of proteins). Moreover, we found that the two following aga genes (agaS and agaY) were homologous to the sequences flanking the mannose operon of V. furnissii. These observations strongly support the idea of a horizontal transfer of the chromosomally encoded man operon of V. furnissii into the E. coli genome. PMID:9697096

  19. Twelve type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci identified through large-scale association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura J; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; McCarroll, Steve A; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M; Dupuis, Josée; Qi, Lu; Segrè, Ayellet V; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noisël P; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Amanda L; Erdos, Michael R; Fox, Caroline S; Franklin, Christopher S; Ganser, Martha; Gieger, Christian; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H L; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proença, Christine; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparsø, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M; van Haeften, Timon W; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S; Gloyn, Anna L; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A; Hitman, Graham A; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barroso, Inês; Florez, Jose C; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Wilson, James F; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-01-01

    By combining genome-wide association data from 8,130 individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 38,987 controls of European descent and following up previously unidentified meta-analysis signals in a further 34,412 cases and 59,925 controls, we identified 12 new T2D association signals with combinedP < 5 × 10−8. These include a second independent signal at the KCNQ1 locus; the first report, to our knowledge, of an X-chromosomal association (near DUSP9); and a further instance of overlap between loci implicated in monogenic and multifactorial forms of diabetes (at HNF1A). The identified loci affect both beta-cell function and insulin action, and, overall, T2D association signals show evidence of enrichment for genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also show that a high proportion of T2D susceptibility loci harbor independent association signals influencing apparently unrelated complex traits. PMID:20581827

  20. Mutation in KERA Identified by Linkage Analysis and Targeted Resequencing in a Pedigree with Premature Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Capelleveen, Julian C.; Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C.; van Eck, Miranda; Jolley, Jennifer; Kuiper, Johan; Stephens, Jonathon; Albers, Cornelius A.; Vosmeer, C. Ruben; Kruize, Heleen; Geerke, Daan P.; van der Wal, Allard C.; van der Loos, Chris M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Trip, Mieke D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Genetic factors explain a proportion of the inter-individual variation in the risk for atherosclerotic events, but the genetic basis of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis in families with Mendelian forms of premature atherosclerosis is incompletely understood. We set out to unravel the molecular pathology in a large kindred with an autosomal dominant inherited form of premature atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Parametric linkage analysis was performed in a pedigree comprising 4 generations, of which a total of 11 members suffered from premature vascular events. A parametric LOD-score of 3.31 was observed for a 4.4 Mb interval on chromosome 12. Upon sequencing, a non-synonymous variant in KERA (c.920C>G; p.Ser307Cys) was identified. The variant was absent from nearly 28,000 individuals, including 2,571 patients with premature atherosclerosis. KERA, a proteoglycan protein, was expressed in lipid-rich areas of human atherosclerotic lesions, but not in healthy arterial specimens. Moreover, KERA expression in plaques was significantly associated with plaque size in a carotid-collar Apoe−/− mice (r2 = 0.69; p<0.0001). Conclusion A rare variant in KERA was identified in a large kindred with premature atherosclerosis. The identification of KERA in atherosclerotic plaque specimen in humans and mice lends support to its potential role in atherosclerosis. PMID:24879339

  1. Phage cluster relationships identified through single gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic comparison of bacteriophages requires whole genome approaches such as dotplot analysis, genome pairwise maps, and gene content analysis. Currently mycobacteriophages, a highly studied phage group, are categorized into related clusters based on the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences. With the recent explosion of phage isolation, a simple method for phage cluster prediction would facilitate analysis of crude or complex samples without whole genome isolation and sequencing. The hypothesis of this study was that mycobacteriophage-cluster prediction is possible using comparison of a single, ubiquitous, semi-conserved gene. Tape Measure Protein (TMP) was selected to test the hypothesis because it is typically the longest gene in mycobacteriophage genomes and because regions within the TMP gene are conserved. Results A single gene, TMP, identified the known Mycobacteriophage clusters and subclusters using a Gepard dotplot comparison or a phylogenetic tree constructed from global alignment and maximum likelihood comparisons. Gepard analysis of 247 mycobacteriophage TMP sequences appropriately recovered 98.8% of the subcluster assignments that were made by whole-genome comparison. Subcluster-specific primers within TMP allow for PCR determination of the mycobacteriophage subcluster from DNA samples. Using the single-gene comparison approach for siphovirus coliphages, phage groupings by TMP comparison reflected relationships observed in a whole genome dotplot comparison and confirm the potential utility of this approach to another widely studied group of phages. Conclusions TMP sequence comparison and PCR results support the hypothesis that a single gene can be used for distinguishing phage cluster and subcluster assignments. TMP single-gene analysis can quickly and accurately aid in mycobacteriophage classification. PMID:23777341

  2. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Weidinger, Stephan; Eberlein, Bernadette; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kunz, Manfred; Ike, Robert; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Mroweitz, Ulrich; Lim, Henry W.; Voorhees, John J.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Weichenthal, Michael; Franke, Andre; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel psoriasis susceptibility loci, we carried out a meta-analysis of two recent genome-wide association studies 1,2, yielding a discovery sample of 1,831 cases and 2,546 controls. 102 of the most promising loci in the discovery analysis were followed up in a three-stage replication study using 4,064 cases and 4,685 controls from Michigan, Toronto, Newfoundland, and Germany. Association at a genome-wide level of significance for the combined discovery and replication samples was found for three genomic regions. One contains NOS2 (rs4795067, p = 4 × 10−11), another contains FBXL19 (rs10782001, p = 9 × 10−10), and a third contains PSMA6 and NFKBIA (rs12586317, p = 2 × 10−8). All three loci were also strongly associated with the subphenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and purely cutaneous psoriasis. Finally, we confirmed a recently identified3 association signal near RNF114. PMID:20953189

  3. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    PubMed Central

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  4. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in a Cohort of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders from a Highly Consanguineous Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Mamari, Watfa; Al-Saegh, Abeer; Al-Kindy, Adila; Bruwer, Zandre; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Thihli, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders are a complicated group of disorders characterized with heterogeneous genetic etiologies. The genetic investigations for this group of disorders have expanded considerably over the past decade. In our study we designed a tired approach and studied the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis on patients…

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  6. Proteomic analysis of the soybean symbiosome identifies new symbiotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Victoria C; Loughlin, Patrick C; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M; Day, David A; Smith, Penelope M C

    2015-05-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  7. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF A 1 MB REGION NEAR THE TELOMERE OF HESSIAN FLY CHROMOSOME X2 AND AVIRULENCE GENE VH13

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome walking and FISH were utilized to identify a contig of 50 BAC clones near the telomere of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome X2 and near the avirulence gene vH13. These clones enabled us to correlate physical and genetic distance in this region of the Hessian fly genome. Sequence da...

  8. Analysis of root-knot nematode and fusarium wilt disease resistance in cotton (Gossypium spp.) using chromosome substitution lines from two alien species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To Identify a new germplasm resource, and to validate chromosomal regions and favorable alleles associated with nematode and fungal disease resistance traits, a series of interspecific cotton (Gossypium spp.) chromosome substitution (CS) lines were used in this study. The CS lines were developed in ...

  9. [Transmission analysis of the B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria migratorioides R. et F. (Orthoptera, Acrididae) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lepinasse, R

    1977-02-23

    In a African grasshopper population of Locusta migratoria migratorioides reared in the laboratory, B chromosome transmission is analysed in progeny of pairs taken at radom from the population. An accumulation mechanism of Bs exists in the females which presumably results from preferential egregation of the Bs in the female pronucleus. The analysis also shows B chromosome elimination during embryonic and larval development by means of mitotic non-kisjunction: these non-disjunctions induce interfollicular variations in the number of Bs but all the cells of a follicle have the same number of Bs. The frequency of animals with B chromosome rises from 34% to 75% as the diurnal temperature rises from 27 degrees C to 35 degrees C. Thus frequency is controlled by genetic and environmental factors. PMID:837806

  10. [Effect of gametocidal chromosome 4S' on the phenotype segregation ratio in genetic analysis of common wheat lines].

    PubMed

    Vdovichenko, Zh V; Antoniuk, M Z; Ternovskaia, T K

    2003-01-01

    Using experimental data on genetic analysis of introgressive lines for the character "hairy leaf sheath" controlled by the "cuckoo" chromosome 4S1, the algorithm for calculation of the theoretical segregation ratio in F2 was developed. Segregation distortion is caused by non-viability of the majority of gametes lacking the chromosome 4S1. The frequency of functioning gametes without the chromosome 4S1 is determined by the probability p versus the theoretically expected ratio 7 nonviable: 9 viable ones. Since segregation involves two characters, gamete viability and hairiness, the ratio 15 hairy: 1 hairless was used as a basis for search of the frequency p by maximum-likelihood method using 16 populations F2 from crossing the lines differing in the character studied. PMID:14650327

  11. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared with stable GC-matched regions, GGA28 is highly enriched in CpG islands, as are break-prone intervals identified elsewhere in the chicken genome; evolutionary breakpoints are further enriched in GC content and CpG islands, highlighting a potential role for these features in genome instability. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome rearrangements have not occurred randomly over the course of vertebrate evolution but are focused preferentially within “fragile” regions with unusual DNA sequence characteristics. PMID:17921355

  12. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction. PMID:25864414

  13. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  14. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer. PMID:27135401

  15. Sequence and analysis of the human ABL gene, the BCR gene, and regions involved in the Philadelphia chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Burian, D.; Clifton, S.W.; Crabtree, J.

    1995-05-01

    The complete human BCR gene (152j-141 nt) on chromosome 22 and greater than 80% of the human ABL gene (179-512 nt) on chromosome 9 have been sequenced from mapped cosmid and plasmid clones via a shotgun strategy. Because these two chromosomes are translocated with breakpoints within the BCR and ABL genes in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, knowledge of these sequences also might provide insight into the validity of various theories of chromosomal rearrangements. Comparison of these genes with their cDNA sequences reveal the positions of 23 BCR exons and putative alternative BCR first and second exons, as well as the common ABL exons 2-11, respectively. Additionally, these regions include the alternative ABL first exons 1b and 1a, a new gene 5` to the first ABL exon, and an open reading frame with homology to an EST within the BCR fourth intron. Further analysis reveals an Alu homology of 38.83 and 39.35% for the BCR and ABL genes, respectively, with other repeat elements present to a lesser extent. Four new Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoints from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients also were sequenced, and the positions of these and several other previously sequenced breakpoints now have been mapped precisely, although no consistent breakpoint features immediately were apparent. Comparative analysis of genomic sequences encompassing the murine homologues to the human ABL exons 1b and 1a, as well as regions encompassing the ABL exons 2 and 3, reveals that although there is a high degree of homology in their corresponding exons and promoter regions, these two vertebrate species show a striking lack of homology outside these regions. 122 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Identifying chromosomal selection-sweep regions in facial eczema selection-line animals using an ovine 50K-SNP array.

    PubMed

    Phua, S H; Brauning, R; Baird, H J; Dodds, K G

    2014-04-01

    Facial eczema (FE) is a hepato-mycotoxicosis found mainly in New Zealand sheep and cattle. When genetics was found to be a factor in FE susceptibility, resistant and susceptible selection lines of Romney sheep were established to enable further investigations of this disease trait. Using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip, we conducted a selection-sweep experiment on these FE genetic lines. Two analytical methods were used to detect selection signals, namely the Peddrift test (Dodds & McEwan, 1997) and fixation index FST (Weir & Hill, 2002). Of 50 975 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers tested, there were three that showed highly significant allele frequency differences between the resistant and susceptible animals (Peddrift nominal P < 0.000001). These SNP loci are located on chromosomes OAR1, OAR11 and OAR12 that coincide precisely with the three highest genomic FST peaks. In addition, there are nine less significant Peddrift SNPs (nominal P ≤ 0.000009) on OAR6 (n = 2), OAR9 (n = 2), OAR12, OAR19 (n = 2), OAR24 and OAR26. In smoothed FST (five-SNP moving average) plots, the five most prominent peaks are on OAR1, OAR6, OAR7, OAR13 and OAR19. Although these smoothed FST peaks do not coincide with the three most significant Peddrift SNP loci, two (on OAR6 and OAR19) overlap with the set of less significant Peddrift SNPs above. Of these 12 Peddrift SNPs and five smoothed FST regions, none is close to the FE candidate genes catalase and ABCG2; however, two on OAR1 and one on OAR13 fall within suggestive quantitative trait locus regions identified in a previous genome screen experiment. The present studies indicated that there are at least eight genomic regions that underwent a selection sweep in the FE lines. PMID:24521158

  17. Substitution mapping in dahl rats identifies two distinct blood pressure quantitative trait loci within 1.12- and 1.25-mb intervals on chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Jin; Liu, Jun; Westcott, Allison M; Vieth, Joshua A; DeRaedt, Sarah J; Yang, Siming; Joe, Bina; Cicila, George T

    2006-12-01

    Substitution mapping was used to refine the localization of blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait loci (QTL) within the congenic region of S.R-Edn3 rats located at the q terminus of rat chromosome 3 (RNO3). An F2(SxS.R-Edn3) population (n=173) was screened to identify rats having crossovers within the congenic region of RNO3 and six congenic substrains were developed that carry shorter segments of R-rat-derived RNO3. Five of the six congenic substrains had significantly lower BP compared to the parental S rat. The lack of BP lowering effect demonstrated by the S.R(ET3x5) substrain and the BP lowering effect retained by the S.R(ET3x2) substrain together define the RNO3 BP QTL-containing region as approximately 4.64 Mb. Two nonoverlapping substrains, S.R(ET3x1) and S.R(ET3x6), had significantly lower BP compared to the S strain, indicating the presence of two distinct BP QTL in the RNO3 q terminus. The RNO3 q terminus was fine mapped with newly developed polymorphic markers to characterize the extent of the congenic regions. The two RNO3 BP QTL regions were thus defined as within intervals of 0.05-1.12 and 0.72-1.25 Mb, respectively. Also important was our difficulty in fine mapping and marker placement in this portion of the rat genome (and thus candidate gene identification) using the available genomic data, including the rat genome sequence. PMID:17028336

  18. Three tumor-suppressor regions on chromosome 11p identified by high-resolution deletion mapping in human non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bepler, G; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1994-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women in the industrialized nations. Identification of regions for genes involved in its pathogenesis has been difficult. Data presented here show three distinct regions identified on chromosome 11p. Two regions on 11p13 distal to the Wilms tumor gene WT1 and on 11p15.5 between the markers HBB and D11S860 are described. The third region on the telomere of 11p15.5 has been previously described and is further delineated in this communication. By high-resolution mapping the size of each of these regions was estimated to be 2-3 megabases. The frequency of somatic loss of genetic information in these regions (57%, 71%, and 45%, respectively) was comparable to that seen in heritable tumors such as Wilms tumor (55%) and retinoblastoma (70%) and suggests their involvement in pathogenesis of non-small-cell lung cancer. Gene dosage analyses revealed duplication of the remaining allele in the majority of cases in the 11p13 and the proximal 11p15.5 region but rarely in the distal 11p15.5 region. In tumors with loss of heterozygosity in all three regions any combination of duplication or simple deletion was observed, suggesting that loss of heterozygosity occurs independently and perhaps at different points in time. These results provide a basis for studies directed at cloning potential tumor-suppressor genes in these regions and for assessing their biological and clinical significance in non-small-cell lung cancer. Images PMID:8202519

  19. Construction and analysis of an hn-cDNA library derived from the p-arm of pig chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Anderson Dear, D V; Miller, J R

    1996-09-01

    Our aim is to find unidentified genes on specific pig chromosomes or chromosome fragments. Our approach has involved the construction of a heterogeneous nuclear complementary (hn-c) DNA library of the p-arm of pig Chromosome (Chr) 12, the only pig chromosome present in the pig x hamster hybrid cell line 8990. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and first-strand synthesis of hn-cDNA carried out with random and oligo dT primers. Pig hn-cDNA was isolated by amplification of first-strand synthesized hn-cDNA with primers specific for Short Interspersed Repeat Elements (SINEs) via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hn-cDNAs were size selected and cloned in E. coli XL-1 blue cells with PCR-Script as the vector. The library consisted of 6000 clones. Clone inserts were amplified by PCR with vector-specific primers, and randomly picked inserts greater than 600 bp were sequenced. Homology searches were carried out with the FASTA search program on the GenEmbl database. Thirty clones were sequenced, and of these three showed strong homologies to GenEmbl sequences: (1) to sheep, mouse, human, and rat mammary gland factor (MGF); (2) to MLN-50, a gene that is amplified in human familial breast cancer and is present on human Chr 17; the latter is homologous to pig chromosome 12; (3) to a family of unassigned overlapping human ESTs. Of the other sequenced clones, seven were over 80% homologous with pig SINE sequences; three were over 75% homologous to human LINE sequences; six displayed open reading frames over a mean distance equivalent to 50 amino acids, although these showed no significant similarities with sequences in the databases. Using this approach, we have been able to identify several new genes on the p-arm of pig Chr 12. This is the first report of gene isolation from a library derived from a pig chromosome fragment. PMID:8703117

  20. Comparative genomic in situ hybridization (cGISH) analysis on plant chromosomes revealed by labelled Arabidopsis DNA.

    PubMed

    Zoller, J F; Yang, Y; Herrmann, R G; Hohmann, U

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for comparative cytogenetic banding analysis of plant chromosomes has been established. The comparative GISH (cGISH) technique is universally applicable to various complex genomes of Monocotyledonae (Triticum aestivum, Agropyron elongatum, Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare, Allium cepa, Muscari armenaticum and Lilium longiflorum) and Dicotyledonae (Vicia faba, Beta vulgaris, Arabidopsis thaliana). Labelled total genomic DNA of A. thaliana generates signals at conserved chromosome regions. The nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) containing the majority of tandemly repeated rDNA sequences, N-band regions containing satellite DNA, conserved homologous sequences at telomeres and additional chromosome-characteristic markers were detected in heterologous FISH experiments. Multicolour FISH analysis with repetitive DNA probes simultaneously revealed the chromosome assignment of 56 cGISH signals in rye and 61 cGISH signals in barley. Further advantages of this technique are: (1) the fast and straightforward preparation of the probe; (2) the generation of signals with high intensity and reproducibility even without signal amplification; and (3) no requirement of species-specific sequences suitable for molecular karyotype analysis. Hybridization can be performed without competitive DNA. Signal detection without significant background is possible under low stringency conditions. The universal application of this fast and simple one-step fluorescence banding technique for plant cytogenetic and plant genome evolution is discussed. PMID:11448038

  1. [Comparative FISH analysis of C-positive regions of chromosomes of wood mice (Rodentia, Muridae, Sylvaemus)].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Karamysheva, T V; Bogdanov, A S; Likhoshvaĭ, T V; Kartavtseva, I V

    2011-09-01

    The homology of DNA of C-positive centromeric regions of chromosomes in wood mice of the genus Sylvaemus (S. uralensis, S. fulvipectus, S. sylvaticus, S. flavicollis, and S. ponticus) was estimated for the first time. DNA probes were generated by microdissection from the centromeric regions of individual autosomes of each species, and their fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with metaphase chromosomes of representatives of all studied wood mouse species was carried out. Unlike in the chromosomal forms and races of S. uralensis, changes in the DNA composition of the chromosomal centromeric regions in the wood mouse species of the genus Sylvaemus (including closely related S. flavicollis and S. ponticus) are both quantitative and qualitative. The patterns of FISH signals after in situ hybridization of the microdissection DNA probes with chromosomes of the species involved in the study demonstrate significant differences between C-positive regions of wood mouse chromosomes in the copy number and the level of homology of repetitive sequences as well as in the localization of homologous repetitive sequences. It was shown that C-positive regions of wood mouse chromosomes can contain both homologous and distinct sets of repetitive sequences. Regions enriched with homologous repeats were detected either directly in C-positive regions of individual chromosomes or only on the short arms of acrocentrics, or at the boundary of C-positive and C-negative regions. PMID:22117409

  2. Molecular analysis of chromosomal rearrangements using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Many human genetic diseases, including some cancers, are characterized by consistent chromosome abnormalities, such as deletions and translocations. Analyses of these mutations often prove crucial to the eventual cloning and characterization of the gene(s) responsible for the disease. Two methods for analyzing these chromosome abnormalities have been developed in recent years: somatic cell hybridization and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Somatic cell hybridization is a technique for segregating an aberrant chromosome from its normal homologue in a cell derived from an unrelated species, which is usually a rodent. Demonstrations of these analytic techniques are presented, using as an example chromosomal abnormalities involving human chromosome band 11p13, the locus for the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormality, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome.

  3. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed. PMID:26370196

  4. Archetypal TRMM Radar Profiles Identified Through Cluster Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    It is widely held that identifiable 'convective regimes' exist in nature, although precise definitions of these are elusive. Examples include land / Ocean distinctions, break / monsoon beahvior, seasonal differences in the Amazon (SON vs DJF), etc. These regimes are often described by differences in the realized local convective spectra, and measured by various metrics of convective intensity, depth, areal coverage and rainfall amount. Objective regime identification may be valuable in several ways: regimes may serve as natural 'branch points' in satellite retrieval algorithms or data assimilation efforts; one example might be objective identification of regions that 'should' share a similar 2-R relationship. Similarly, objectively defined regimes may provide guidance on optimal siting of ground validation efforts. Objectively defined regimes could also serve as natural (rather than arbitrary geographic) domain 'controls' in studies of convective response to environmental forcing. Quantification of convective vertical structure has traditionally involved parametric study of prescribed quantities thought to be important to convective dynamics: maximum radar reflectivity, cloud top height, 30-35 dBZ echo top height, rain rate, etc. Individually, these parameters are somewhat deficient as their interpretation is often nonunique (the same metric value may signify different physics in different storm realizations). Individual metrics also fail to capture the coherence and interrelationships between vertical levels available in full 3-D radar datasets. An alternative approach is discovery of natural partitions of vertical structure in a globally representative dataset, or 'archetypal' reflectivity profiles. In this study, this is accomplished through cluster analysis of a very large sample (0[107) of TRMM-PR reflectivity columns. Once achieved, the rainconditional and unconditional 'mix' of archetypal profile types in a given location and/or season provides a description

  5. Using Text Analysis to Identify Functionally Coherent Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schütze, Hinrich; Altman, Russ B.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of large-scale genomic information (such as sequence data or expression patterns) frequently involves grouping genes on the basis of common experimental features. Often, as with gene expression clustering, there are too many groups to easily identify the functionally relevant ones. One valuable source of information about gene function is the published literature. We present a method, neighbor divergence, for assessing whether the genes within a group share a common biological function based on their associated scientific literature. The method uses statistical natural language processing techniques to interpret biological text. It requires only a corpus of documents relevant to the genes being studied (e.g., all genes in an organism) and an index connecting the documents to appropriate genes. Given a group of genes, neighbor divergence assigns a numerical score indicating how “functionally coherent” the gene group is from the perspective of the published literature. We evaluate our method by testing its ability to distinguish 19 known functional gene groups from 1900 randomly assembled groups. Neighbor divergence achieves 79% sensitivity at 100% specificity, comparing favorably to other tested methods. We also apply neighbor divergence to previously published gene expression clusters to assess its ability to recognize gene groups that had been manually identified as representative of a common function. PMID:12368251

  6. Social network analysis in identifying influential webloggers: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasmuni, Noraini; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, second generation of internet-based services such as weblog has become an effective communication tool to publish information on the Web. Weblogs have unique characteristics that deserve users' attention. Some of webloggers have seen weblogs as appropriate medium to initiate and expand business. These webloggers or also known as direct profit-oriented webloggers (DPOWs) communicate and share knowledge with each other through social interaction. However, survivability is the main issue among DPOW. Frequent communication with influential webloggers is one of the way to keep survive as DPOW. This paper aims to understand the network structure and identify influential webloggers within the network. Proper understanding of the network structure can assist us in knowing how the information is exchanged among members and enhance survivability among DPOW. 30 DPOW were involved in this study. Degree centrality and betweenness centrality measurement in Social Network Analysis (SNA) were used to examine the strength relation and identify influential webloggers within the network. Thus, webloggers with the highest value of these measurements are considered as the most influential webloggers in the network.

  7. Three Systems of Insular Functional Connectivity Identified with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pitskel, Naomi B.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite much research on the function of the insular cortex, few studies have investigated functional subdivisions of the insula in humans. The present study used resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to parcellate the human insular lobe based on clustering of functional connectivity patterns. Connectivity maps were computed for each voxel in the insula based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data and segregated using cluster analysis. We identified 3 insular subregions with distinct patterns of connectivity: a posterior region, functionally connected with primary and secondary somatomotor cortices; a dorsal anterior to middle region, connected with dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, along with other regions of a previously described control network; and a ventral anterior region, primarily connected with pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. Applying these regions to a separate task data set, we found that dorsal and ventral anterior insula responded selectively to disgusting images, while posterior insula did not. These results demonstrate that clustering of connectivity patterns can be used to subdivide cerebral cortex into anatomically and functionally meaningful subregions; the insular regions identified here should be useful in future investigations on the function of the insula. PMID:21097516

  8. Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

    2011-01-14

    This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009

  9. Characterization of three de novo derivative chromosomes 16 by [open quotes]Reverse Chromosome Painting[close quotes] and molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, K.A.; Harris, P.C.; MacCarthy, A.B.; Boone, R.; Raynham, H.; Buckle, V.J. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors have analyzed three de novo chromosome 16 rearrangements-two with a 16p+ chromosome and one a 16q+-none of which could be fully characterized by conventional cytogenetics. In each case, flow karyotypes have been produced, and the aberrant chromosome has been isolated by flow sorting. The origin of the additional material has been ascertained by amplifying and labeling the DNA of the abnormal chromosome by degenerate-oligonucleotide-primer-PCR and hybridizing it in situ to normal metaphase spreads (reverse chromosome painting). Both 16p+ chromosomes contain more than 30 Mb of DNA from the short arm of chromosome 9 (9p21.2-pter), while the 16q+ contains approximately 9 Mb of DNA from 2q37. The breakpoints on chromosome 16 have been localized in each case; the two breakpoints on the short arm are at different points within the terminal band, 16p13.3. The breakpoint on the long arm of chromosome 16 is very close to (within 230 kb of) the 16q telomere. Determination of the regions of monosomy and trisomy allowed the observed phenotypes to be compared with other reported cases involving aneuploidy for these regions. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Segregation analysis in a man heterozygous for a pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (p13; q36) by sperm chromosome studies

    SciTech Connect

    Navarror, J.; Benet, J.; Martorell, M.R.; Templado, C.; Egozcue, J. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have analyzed 140 sperm chromosome complements from a subfertile man heterozygous for an inv(7)(p13;q36). Seventy-five percent of the chromosome complements were not recombinant: 37.9% contained the normal chromosome 7, and 37.1% contained the inverted chromosome 7. Twenty-five percent of the 140 were recombinant: 7.1% carried a recombinant chromosome 7 with a duplication p and deletion q, 17.1% carried a recombinant chromosome 7 with a duplication q and deletion p, and 0.7% carried both recombinant chromosomes. The frequency of structural chromosomal aberrations unrelated to the inversion was 11.4%, and the frequency of aneuploidy was 2.9%. Both frequencies were not significantly different from those in control donors. Two sperm complements with a second independent, contiguous inversion involving one of the original breakpoints (q36) were observed (1.4%). The risk of producing chromosomally abnormal offspring or spontaneous abortions would be 34.3%. The proportion of X-bearing and Y-bearing sperm was 46.8% and 53.2%, respectively, not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  12. Microarray Analysis of Copy Number Variants on the Human Y Chromosome Reveals Novel and Frequent Duplications Overrepresented in Specific Haplogroups

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Martin M.; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Larmuseau, Maarten H. D.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A.; Agartz, Ingrid; Jazin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background The human Y chromosome is almost always excluded from genome-wide investigations of copy number variants (CNVs) due to its highly repetitive structure. This chromosome should not be forgotten, not only for its well-known relevance in male fertility, but also for its involvement in clinical phenotypes such as cancers, heart failure and sex specific effects on brain and behaviour. Results We analysed Y chromosome data from Affymetrix 6.0 SNP arrays and found that the signal intensities for most of 8179 SNP/CN probes in the male specific region (MSY) discriminated between a male, background signals in a female and an isodicentric male containing a large deletion of the q-arm and a duplication of the p-arm of the Y chromosome. Therefore, this SNP/CN platform is suitable for identification of gain and loss of Y chromosome sequences. In a set of 1718 males, we found 25 different CNV patterns, many of which are novel. We confirmed some of these variants by PCR or qPCR. The total frequency of individuals with CNVs was 14.7%, including 9.5% with duplications, 4.5% with deletions and 0.7% exhibiting both. Hence, a novel observation is that the frequency of duplications was more than twice the frequency of deletions. Another striking result was that 10 of the 25 detected variants were significantly overrepresented in one or more haplogroups, demonstrating the importance to control for haplogroups in genome-wide investigations to avoid stratification. NO-M214(xM175) individuals presented the highest percentage (95%) of CNVs. If they were not counted, 12.4% of the rest included CNVs, and the difference between duplications (8.9%) and deletions (2.8%) was even larger. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that currently available genome-wide SNP platforms can be used to identify duplications and deletions in the human Y chromosome. Future association studies of the full spectrum of Y chromosome variants will demonstrate the potential involvement of gain or loss of Y

  13. Genome-wide association study of osteochondrosis in the tarsocrural joint of Dutch Warmblood horses identifies susceptibility loci on chromosomes 3 and 10.

    PubMed

    Orr, N; Hill, E W; Gu, J; Govindarajan, P; Conroy, J; van Grevenhof, E M; Ducro, B J; van Arendonk, J A M; Knaap, J H; van Weeren, P R; Machugh, D E; Ennis, S; Brama, P A J

    2013-08-01

    Equine osteochondrosis is a developmental joint disease that is a significant source of morbidity affecting multiple breeds of horse. The genetic variants underlying osteochondrosis susceptibility have not been established. Here, we describe the results of a genome-wide association study of osteochondrosis using 90 cases and 111 controls from a population of Dutch Warmblood horses. We report putative associations between osteochondrosis and loci on chromosome 3 (BIEC2-808543; P = 5.03 × 10(-7) ) and chromosome 10 (BIEC2-121323; P = 2.62 × 10(-7) ). PMID:23278111

  14. Chromosome I duplications in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, K.S.; Rose, A.M. )

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized 76 duplications of chromosome I in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. The region studied is the 20 map unit left half of the chromosome. Sixty-two duplications were induced with gamma radiation and 14 arose spontaneously. The latter class was apparently the result of spontaneous breaks within the parental duplication. The majority of duplications behave as if they are free. Three duplications are attached to identifiable sequences from other chromosomes. The duplication breakpoints have been mapped by complementation analysis relative to genes on chromosome I. Nineteen duplication breakpoints and seven deficiency breakpoints divide the left half of the chromosome into 24 regions. We have studied the relationship between duplication size and segregational stability. While size is an important determinant of mitotic stability, it is not the only one. We observed clear exceptions to a size-stability correlation. In addition to size, duplication stability may be influenced by specific sequences or chromosome structure. The majority of the duplications were stable enough to be powerful tools for gene mapping. Therefore the duplications described here will be useful in the genetic characterization of chromosome I and the techniques we have developed can be adapted to other regions of the genome.

  15. Chromosomal differences in populations of Anopheles nuneztovari

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, J. B.; Kreutzer, R. D.; Tallaferro, E.

    1973-01-01

    Anopheles nuneztovari from 3 localities in Brazil, 2 in Venezuela, and 1 in Colombia were subjected to chromosome analysis. The Venezuelan and Colombian populations, responsible for malaria transmission in certain areas of these countries, differ in an X-chromosome arrangement from the Brazilian specimens, the difference apparently being due to the fixation of an inversion in the homozygous state in one population. It was possible to identify 216 specimens from Venezuela and Colombia and 190 from Brazil by the X-chromosome. A. nuneztovari and its close relatives may be easily distinguished in this way. Diagnostic descriptions of the chromosomes and a standard map, based on the Brazilian population, are provided. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4543549

  16. Human bradykinin B2 receptor: Nucleotide sequence analysis and assignment to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, S.J.; Slynn, G.; Thomas, C.; Hopkins, B.; Briggs, I.; Graham, A. )

    1993-02-01

    Functional cDNA clones for human bradykinin B2 receptor were isolated from uterus RNA by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method and by screening a human cosmid library with rat bradykinin B2 receptor probe. We isolated several overlapping clones from the cosmid library, each of which encodes the entire protein-coding sequence. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene codes for a 364-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 41,442 Da that is highly homologous to rat bradykinin B2 receptor cDNA (81%). The entire human cDNA sequence was cloned into an expression vector and mRNA was synthesised by in vitro transcription. Applications of bradykinin caused membrane current responses in Xenopus oocytes injected with the in vitro-synthesized mRNA. Preincubation with the potent B2 antagonist, HOE140, prevented this response. The genomic clone is intronless, and we have identified an upstream promoter region and a downstream polyadenylation signal. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 14 using PCR to specifically amplify DNA from somatic cell hybrids. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Analysis of spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster bearing deletions for Y-chromosome fertility genes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, R W; Tokuyasu, K T; Lindsley, D L

    1981-01-01

    The effects of spermatogenesis of a series of continguous non-overlapping Y-chromosome deficiencies were examined using both the light and electron microscope. The deficiencies were constructed by combining elements of different X-Y translocations; they subdivide the Y into seven segments, six of which are required for male fertility (four in the long arm and two in the short arm). Spermatogenesis was examined from the primary spermatocyte through to the formation of mature sperm and the earliest departures from normal development identified. Two deficiencies result in the absence of the same structure from the axoneme of the sperm tail--the dynein-containing outer arm extending from the A subtubule of the peripheral doublet; they also result in the absence from primary spermatocyte nuclei of aggregates of tubuli in one case and reticular material in the other. A third deficiency causes the appearance in the primary spermatocyte of the crystals characteristic of X0 males and the irregular distribution during meiosis of nuclear and cytoplasmic elements to the spermatids. The fourth deficiency results in the misalignment of the developing axoneme with the mitochondrial derivatives and is first detectable in the onion nebenkern stage of the spermatid. Finally for two deficiencies the first abnormalities detected were during later stages and comprise a syndrome found in most of the steriles. We attribute this phenotype to the indirect effects of earlier lesions. PMID:6794995

  18. Chromosomal Analysis of Couples with Repeated Spontaneous Abortions in Northeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaey, Saeedeh; Keify, Fatemeh; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Maleki, Masumeh; Tootian, Semiramis; Ahadian, Mitra; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic study of reproductive wastage is an important aspect in determining the genetic background of early embryogenesis. Approximately 15 to 20% of all pregnancies in humans are terminated as recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSAs). The aim of this study was to detect chromosome abnormalities in couples with RSAs and to compare our results with those reported previously. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated during a six-year period from 2005 to 2011. The population under study was 728 couples who attended genetic counseling services for their RSAs at Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory, Mashhad, Iran. Results In this study, about 11.7% of couples were carriers of chromosomal aberrations. The majority of abnormalities were found in couples with history of abortion, without stillbirth or livebirth. Balanced reciprocal translocations, Robertsonian translocations, inversions and sex chromosome aneuploidy were seen in these cases. Balanced reciprocal translocations were the most frequent chromosomal anomalies (62.7%) detected in current study. Conclusion These findings suggest that chromosomal abnormalities can be one of the important causes of RSAs. In addition, cytogenetic study of families who experienced RSAs may prevent unnecessary treatment if RSA are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. The results of cytogenetic studies of RSA cases will provide a standard protocol for the genetic counselors in order to follow up and to help these families. PMID:25918592

  19. Analysis of chromosome segregation during mammalian meiosis using combined immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hubridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, P.A.; Embury, P.B.; Mroz, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Meiotic non-disjunction is thought to occur in 10-20% of all human oocytes, making this the most common genetic abnormality in our species. Aberrant recombination has been implicated in the genesis of these errors; however, direct studies of the meiotic process have been hampered by the lack of material and appropriate technology. We have developed a technique for the evaluation of meiosis in intact mammalian oocytes that combines immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This allows for simultaneous, 3-dimensional visualization of the meiotic spindle, the alignment of the chromosomes on the spindle, and the placement of specific chromosomes. We have used this technology to follow meiotic progression in oocytes from XO female mice to evaluate the behavior of an unsynapsed chromosome during mammalian meiosis. Perturbations in chromosome behavior are evident early in meiosis: during the formation of the first meiotic spindle, the univalent X chromosome is properly positioned. With the onset of anaphase, the single X chromosome most commonly segregates as an intact chromosome, although equational segregation of the X chromatids is seen in a significant minority (approximately 20%) of oocytes. These observations demonstrate that failure of pairing/recombination can result in segregation of sister chromatids at meiosis I. This has obvious implications for human non-disjunction, much of which is thought to be due to recombination deficiencies; accordingly, we are now extending our studies to include analyses of human oocytes.

  20. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Petitpierre, Eduard; Elgueta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864) show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864) has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of Henicotherus porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily. PMID:24260673

  1. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Petitpierre, Eduard; Elgueta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864) show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864) has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of Henicotherus porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily. PMID:24260673

  2. Electroretinogram analysis of relative spectral sensitivity in genetically identified dichromatic macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Mikami, Akichika; Angelika, Puti Sulistyo; Takenaka, Osamu; Goto, Shunji; Onishi, Akishi; Koike, Satoshi; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Kato, Keichiro; Kondo, Aya; Suryobroto, Bambang; Farajallah, Achmad; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2001-01-01

    The retinas of macaque monkeys usually contain three types of photopigment, providing them with trichromatic color vision homologous to that of humans. However, we recently used molecular genetic analysis to identify several macaques with a dichromatic genotype. The affected X chromosome of these animals contains a hybrid gene of long-wavelength-sensitive (L) and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M) photopigments instead of separate genes encoding L and M photopigments. The product of the hybrid gene exhibits a spectral sensitivity close to that of M photopigment; consequently, male monkeys carrying the hybrid gene are genetic protanopes, effectively lacking L photopigment. In the present study, we assessed retinal expression of L photopigment in monkeys carrying the hybrid gene. The relative sensitivities to middle-wavelength (green) and long-wavelength (red) light were measured by electroretinogram flicker photometry. We found the sensitivity to red light to be extremely low in protanopic male monkeys compared with monkeys with the normal genotype. In female heterozygotes, sensitivity to red light was intermediate between the genetic protanopes and normal monkeys. Decreased sensitivity to long wavelengths was thus consistent with genetic loss of L photopigment. PMID:11427736

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Megan H; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P; Menezes, Manoj P; Ryan, Monique M; Farrar, Michelle A; Mowat, David; Subramanian, Gopinath M; Young, Helen K; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a 78 kb Insertion from Chromosome 8 as the Cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy CMTX3

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Megan H.; Chaudhry, Rabia; Qi, Jessica; Kidambi, Aditi; Drew, Alexander P.; Ryan, Monique M.; Subramanian, Gopinath M.; Young, Helen K.; Zuchner, Stephan; Reddel, Stephen W.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Kennerson, Marina L.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of whole exome sequencing, cases where no pathogenic coding mutations can be found are increasingly being observed in many diseases. In two large, distantly-related families that mapped to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy CMTX3 locus at chromosome Xq26.3-q27.3, all coding mutations were excluded. Using whole genome sequencing we found a large DNA interchromosomal insertion within the CMTX3 locus. The 78 kb insertion originates from chromosome 8q24.3, segregates fully with the disease in the two families, and is absent from the general population as well as 627 neurologically normal chromosomes from in-house controls. Large insertions into chromosome Xq27.1 are known to cause a range of diseases and this is the first neuropathy phenotype caused by an interchromosomal insertion at this locus. The CMTX3 insertion represents an understudied pathogenic structural variation mechanism for inherited peripheral neuropathies. Our finding highlights the importance of considering all structural variation types when studying unsolved inherited peripheral neuropathy cases with no pathogenic coding mutations. PMID:27438001

  5. Directional reflectance analysis for identifying counterfeit drugs: Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Koprowski, Robert; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-05-30

    The WHO estimates that up to 10% of drugs on the market may be counterfeit. In order to prevent intensification of the phenomenon of drug counterfeiting, the methods for distinguishing genuine medicines from fake ones need to be developed. The aim of this study was to try to develop simple, reproducible and inexpensive method for distinguishing between original and counterfeit medicines based on the measurement of directional reflectance. The directional reflectance of 6 original Viagra(®) tablets (Pfizer) and 24 (4 different batches) counterfeit tablets (imitating Viagra(®)) was examined in six spectral bands: from 0.9 to 1.1 μm, from 1.9 to 2.6 μm, from 3.0 to 4.0 μm, from 3.0 to 5.0 μm, from 4.0 to 5.0 μm, from 8.0 to 12.0 μm, and for two angles of incidence, 20° and 60°. Directional hemispherical reflectometer was applied to measure directional reflectance. Significant statistical differences between the directional reflectance of the original Viagra(®) and counterfeit tablets were registered. Any difference in the value of directional reflectance for any spectral band or angle of incidence identifies the drug as a fake one. The proposed method of directional reflectance analysis enables to differentiate between the real Viagra(®) and fake tablets. Directional reflectance analysis is a fast (measurement time under 5s), cheap and reproducible method which does not require expensive equipment or specialized laboratory staff. It also seems to be an effective method, however, the effectiveness will be assessed after the extension of research. PMID:26977587

  6. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  7. Identifying aquifer type in fractured rock aquifers using harmonic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahi, Khayyun A; Halihan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Determining aquifer type, unconfined, semi-confined, or confined, by drilling or performing pumping tests has inherent problems (i.e., cost and complex field issues) while sometimes yielding inconclusive results. An improved method to cost-effectively determine aquifer type would be beneficial for hydraulic mapping of complex aquifer systems like fractured rock aquifers. Earth tides are known to influence water levels in wells penetrating confined aquifers or unconfined thick, low-porosity aquifers. Water-level fluctuations in wells tapping confined and unconfined aquifers are also influenced by changes in barometric pressure. Harmonic analyses of water-level fluctuations of a thick (~1000 m) carbonate aquifer located in south-central Oklahoma (Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer) were utilized in nine wells to identify aquifer type by evaluating the influence of earth tides and barometric-pressure variations using signal identification. On the basis of the results, portions of the aquifer responded hydraulically as each type of aquifer even though there was no significant variation in lithostratigraphy. The aquifer type was depth dependent with confined conditions becoming more prevalent with depth. The results demonstrate that harmonic analysis is an accurate and low-cost method to determine aquifer type. PMID:22463080

  8. Global secretome analysis identifies novel mediators of bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Mario Andres; LeRoy, Gary; Khan, Zia; Alečković, Maša; Zee, Barry M; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    Bone is the one of the most common sites of distant metastasis of solid tumors. Secreted proteins are known to influence pathological interactions between metastatic cancer cells and the bone stroma. To comprehensively profile secreted proteins associated with bone metastasis, we used quantitative and non-quantitative mass spectrometry to globally analyze the secretomes of nine cell lines of varying bone metastatic ability from multiple species and cancer types. By comparing the secretomes of parental cells and their bone metastatic derivatives, we identified the secreted proteins that were uniquely associated with bone metastasis in these cell lines. We then incorporated bioinformatic analyses of large clinical metastasis datasets to obtain a list of candidate novel bone metastasis proteins of several functional classes that were strongly associated with both clinical and experimental bone metastasis. Functional validation of selected proteins indicated that in vivo bone metastasis can be promoted by high expression of (1) the salivary cystatins CST1, CST2, and CST4; (2) the plasminogen activators PLAT and PLAU; or (3) the collagen functionality proteins PLOD2 and COL6A1. Overall, our study has uncovered several new secreted mediators of bone metastasis and therefore demonstrated that secretome analysis is a powerful method for identification of novel biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets. PMID:22688892

  9. Multi-stage genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility locus for testicular germ cell tumour on chromosome 3q25

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Sultana, Razvan; Renwick, Anthony; Dudakia, Darshna; Seal, Sheila; Ramsay, Emma; Powell, Silvana; Elliott, Anna; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Eeles, Rosalind; Peto, Julian; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Nsengimana, Jeremie; Stratton, Michael R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Huddart, Robert A.; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Pugh, J.; Linger, R.; Marke, J.; Hughes, D.; Pernet, D.; Hall, P.; Easton, D.F.; Berchuck, A.; Eeles, R.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Dennis, J.; Dunning, A.M.; Lee, A.; Dicks, E.; Easton, D.F.; Benitez, J.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Simard, J.; Tessier, D.C.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; LaBoissière, S.; Robidoux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Cunningham, J.M.; Windebank, S.A.; Hilker, C.A.; Meyer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent meta-analyses have identified over 25 SNPs at 18 loci, together accounting for >15% of the genetic susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT). To identify further common SNPs associated with TGCT, here we report a three-stage experiment, involving 4098 cases and 18 972 controls. Stage 1 comprised previously published GWAS analysis of 307 291 SNPs in 986 cases and 4946 controls. In Stage 2, we used previously published customised Illumina iSelect genotyping array (iCOGs) data across 694 SNPs in 1064 cases and 10 082 controls. Here, we report new genotyping of eight SNPs showing some evidence of association in combined analysis of Stage 1 and Stage 2 in an additional 2048 cases of TGCT and 3944 controls (Stage 3). Through fixed-effects meta-analysis across three stages, we identified a novel locus at 3q25.31 (rs1510272) demonstrating association with TGCT [per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.27; P = 1.2 × 10−9]. PMID:25281660

  10. Multi-stage genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility locus for testicular germ cell tumour on chromosome 3q25.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Sultana, Razvan; Renwick, Anthony; Dudakia, Darshna; Seal, Sheila; Ramsay, Emma; Powell, Silvana; Elliott, Anna; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Eeles, Rosalind; Peto, Julian; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Nsengimana, Jeremie; Stratton, Michael R; Easton, Douglas F; Bishop, D Timothy; Huddart, Robert A; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-02-15

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent meta-analyses have identified over 25 SNPs at 18 loci, together accounting for >15% of the genetic susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT). To identify further common SNPs associated with TGCT, here we report a three-stage experiment, involving 4098 cases and 18 972 controls. Stage 1 comprised previously published GWAS analysis of 307 291 SNPs in 986 cases and 4946 controls. In Stage 2, we used previously published customised Illumina iSelect genotyping array (iCOGs) data across 694 SNPs in 1064 cases and 10 082 controls. Here, we report new genotyping of eight SNPs showing some evidence of association in combined analysis of Stage 1 and Stage 2 in an additional 2048 cases of TGCT and 3944 controls (Stage 3). Through fixed-effects meta-analysis across three stages, we identified a novel locus at 3q25.31 (rs1510272) demonstrating association with TGCT [per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.27; P = 1.2 × 10(-9)]. PMID:25281660

  11. QTL Location and Epistatic Effect Analysis of 100-Seed Weight Using Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rongsheng; Hu, Jiahui; Han, Heyu; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Chunyan; Chen, Qingshan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the yield of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) is a main aim of soybean breeding. The 100-seed weight is a critical factor for soybean yield. To facilitate genetic analysis of quantitative traits and to improve the accuracy of marker-assisted breeding in soybean, a valuable mapping population consisting of 194 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) was developed. In these lines, different chromosomal segments of the Chinese cultivar Suinong 14 were substituted into the genetic background of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) ZYD00006. Based on these CSSLs, a genetic map covering the full genome was generated using 121 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In the quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, twelve main effect QTLs (qSW-B1-1/2/3, qSW-D1b-1/2, qSW-D2-1/2, qSW-G-1/2/3, qSW-M-2 and qSW-N-2) underlying 100-seed weight were identified in 2011 and 2012. The epistatic effects of pairwise interactions between markers were analyzed in 2011 and 2012. The results clearly demonstrated that these CSSLs could be used to identify QTLs, and that an epistatic analysis was able to detect several sites with important epistatic effects on 100-seed weight. Thus, we identified loci that will be valuable for improving soybean 100-seed weight. These results provide a valuable foundation for identifying the precise location of genes of interest, and for designing cloning and marker-assisted selection breeding strategies targeting the 100-seed weight of soybean. PMID:26934088

  12. Parents' Perspectives on Variants of Uncertain Significance from Chromosome Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lesli A; Owens, Kailey M; Yashar, Beverly M; Schuette, Jane L

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) for unexplained anomalies and developmental delay has improved diagnosis rates, but results classified as variants of uncertain significance (VUS) may challenge both clinicians and families. We explored the impact of such results on families, including parental knowledge, understanding and interpretation. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with parents (N = 14) who received genetic counseling for a VUS in their child. Transcripts were analyzed through an iterative coding process. Participants demonstrated a range of recall and personal interpretation regarding whether test results provided a causal explanation for their children's health issues. Participants maintained contradictory interpretations, describing results as answers while maintaining that little clarification of their child's condition had been provided. Reported benefits included obtaining medical services and personal validation. Parents described adaptation/coping processes similar to those occurring after positive test results. Recall of terminology, including "VUS" and precise CMA abnormalities, was poor. However, most demonstrated conceptual understanding of scientific uncertainty. All participants expressed intentions to return for recommended genetics follow-up but had misconceptions about how this would occur. These results provide insight into the patient-and-family experience when receiving uncertain genomic findings, emphasize the importance of exploring uncertainty during the communication process, and highlight areas for potential attention or improvement in the clinical encounter. PMID:25983052

  13. Systematic Triple Mutant Analysis Uncovers Functional Connectivity Between Pathways Involved in Chromosome Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.; Braberg, Hannes; Wu, Qiuqin; Alexander, Richard; Haase, Julian; Ryan, Colm; Lipkin-Moore, Zach; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Johnson, Tasha; Shales, Michael; Lenstra, Tineke L.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bloom, Kerry; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic interactions reveal the functional relationships between pairs of genes. In this study, we describe a method for the systematic generation and quantitation of triple mutants, termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). We have used this approach to interrogate partially redundant pairs of genes in S. cerevisiae, including ASF1 and CAC1, two histone chaperones. After subjecting asf1Δ cac1Δ to TMA, we found that the Swi/Snf Rdh54 protein, compensates for the absence of Asf1 and Cac1. Rdh54 more strongly associates with the chromatin apparatus and the pericentromeric region in the double mutant. Moreover, Asf1 is responsible for the synthetic lethality observed in cac1Δ strains lacking the HIRA-like proteins. A similar TMA was carried out after deleting both CLB5 and CLB6, cyclins that regulate DNA replication, revealing a strong functional connection to chromosome segregation. This approach can reveal functional redundancies that cannot be uncovered using traditional double mutant analyses. PMID:23746449

  14. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations. PMID:19414523

  15. Surface antigen expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clustering analysis, interrelationships and effects of chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hulkkonen, J; Vilpo, L; Hurme, M; Vilpo, J

    2002-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a phenotypically distinguishable form of B-lymphoid leukemias. The regularity of surface membrane antigen expression patterns, their interrelationships as well as the effects of the three frequent chromosomal aberrations, ie 11q deletion, 13q deletion and trisomy 12, were investigated in 35 classic CLL cases by flow cytometry. The two-way cluster analysis of 31 individual antigens revealed three expression patterns: (1) most cells in most cases positive (CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, CD27, CD40, CD45, CD45RA); (2) most cells in most cases negative (CD10, CD14, CD34, CD122, CD154, mIgG); and (3) a mixed pattern with a variable number of positive cases and a variable percentage of positive cells in individual cases (CD11c, CD21, CD22, CD25, CD38, CD45RO, CD79b, CD80, CD95, CD124, CD126, CD130, FMC7, mIgD, mIgkappa, mIglambda, mIgM). The expressions of several antigens were strongly interdependent, even when antigens belonged to entirely different gene families. Such antigen pairs were: CD11c/CD21; CD19/CD45; CD19/CD79b; CD22/CD45RA; CD23/Igkappa; CD25/mIgM; CD27/CD45; CD45/CD79b; CD45RA/Igkappa. In contrast, the expression of some antigens was mutually exclusive, the best examples being CD45RA/CD45RO, CD38/CD80 and CD45RA/CD80. Deletion of chromosome arm 11q attenuated expression of splicing variant CD45RA, but enhanced CD45RO expression. In contrast, cases of trisomy 12 were associated with enhanced CD45RA and attenuated CD45RO expression. Similarly, trisomy 12 was associated with enhanced CD27 and mIgkappa expression. The variable levels of signaling surface membrane antigens, their interactions and interference by genetic aberrations are likely to affect the clinical progression and drug response of CLL. PMID:11840283

  16. Analysis of 5S rDNA arrays in Arabidopsis thaliana: physical mapping and chromosome-specific polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Cloix, C; Tutois, S; Mathieu, O; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Picard, G; Tourmente, S

    2000-05-01

    A physical map of a pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 containing a 5S rDNA locus and spanning approximately 1000 kb was established using the CIC YAC clones. Three 5S rDNA arrays were resolved in this YAC contig by PFGE analysis and we have mapped different types of sequences between these three blocks. 5S rDNA units from each of these three arrays of chromosome 5, and from chromosomes 3 and 4, were isolated by PCR. A total of 38 new DNA sequences were obtained. Two types of 5S rDNA repeated units exist: the major variant with 0.5-kb repeats and one with short repeats (251 bp) only detected on YAC 11A3 from chromosome 3. Although the 38 sequences displayed noticeable heterogeneity, we were able to group them according to their 5S array origin. The presence of 5S array-specific variants was confirmed with the restriction polymorphism study of all the YACs carrying 5S units. PMID:10810091

  17. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  19. Molecular genetic investigation of sporadic renal cell carcinoma: analysis of allele loss on chromosomes 3p, 5q, 11p, 17 and 22.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K.; Crossey, P. A.; Cairns, P.; Hetherington, J. W.; Richards, F. M.; Jones, M. H.; Bentley, E.; Affara, N. A.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Maher, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the role of tumour-suppressor genes on the short arm of chromosome 3 in the mechanism of tumorigenesis in non-familial renal cell carcinoma, we analysed 55 paired blood-tumour DNA samples for allele loss on chromosome 3p and in the region of known or putative tumour-suppressor genes on chromosomes 5, 11, 17 and 22. Sixty-four per cent (35/55) of informative tumours showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of at least one locus on the short arm of chromosome 3, compared with only 13% at the p53 tumour-suppressor gene and 6% at 17q21. LOH at chromosome 5q21 and 22q was uncommon (2-3%). Detailed analysis of the regions of LOH on chromosome 3p suggested that, in addition to the VHL gene in chromosome 3p25-p26, mutations in one or more tumour-suppressor genes in chromosome 3p13-p24 may be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We also confirmed previous suggestions that chromosome 3p allele loss is not a feature of papillary RCC (P < 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8297719

  20. X chromosome aneuploidy in infertile women: Analysis by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Moix, I.; Mermillod, B.

    1994-09-01

    Up to 1 in 3 couples have a problem of infertility at some time in their lives. Sex chromosome anomalies are found in 5-10% of couples, with mosaic aneuploidy being a common finding in primary infertility. Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA), in contrast, is frequently associated with autosomal structural anomalies. We hypothesized that low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy was associated with primary infertility but not with RSA. Three groups were studied: women from couples with primary infertillity (n=26); women with three or more spontaneous abortions (n=22); and age-matched normally fertile women (at least two pregnancies; n=28). Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine X chromosome ploidy in 100 nuclei per patient, using a contig of three cosmids from MAO locus (kindly donated by W. Berger, Nijmegen). A control probe (chr. 15 centromere) was simultaneously hybridized, and only nuclei containing two control signals were scored for the X chromosome. The mean numbers of nuclei with two X chromosome signals were the same in all groups (Welch equality of means test: p>0.97). However, there is a significant difference between the variances of the primary infertile and RSA groups (Levene`s test: p=0.025 after Bonferrone correction for multiple testing). This provides preliminary support for the hypothesis of an association between primary infertility and low-level mosaic X chromosome aneuploidy.

  1. Molecular analysis of the nondisjoined chromosome in trisomy 21 with and without endocardial cushion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zittergruen, M.M.; Murray, J.C.; Lauer, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Congenital heart disease is found in approximately 40% of patients with Down syndrome (DS), with endocardial cushion defects (ECDs) comprising one-third of the defects. Sixteen highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were typed in two groups (Group 1: DS with ECD, n=43, and Group 2: DS without ECD, n=52) to determine: (1) the parental origin of the extra chromosome, (2) the presence or absence of disomic homozygosity (reduced) or heterozygosity (nonreduced) of the markers along 21q, and (3) the presence or absence of recombination in the nondisjoined chromosome. The association of these three factors with the presence of ECD in DS was then determined. The origin of the nondisjoined chromosome was maternal in 86.3% of the total cases with no significant differences between groups 1 and 2. The most centromeric marker was nonreduced in 77% of the maternally-derived trisomies (indicative of a meiosis II nondisjunction) with no significant differences between groups 1 and 2. The most telomeric markers showed no differences in the number of reduced or nonreduced markers between maternally and paternally derived chromosomes or between groups 1 and 2. Recombination was significantly decreased in group 1 (28%) compared to group 2 (56%) (chi-square 7.45, p < 0.01) with similar values for both paternally and maternally-derived trisomies. Overall, recombination was present in 43.2% of the nondisjoined chromosomes which is similar to the 42.3% recombination reported in nondisjoined chromosomes in trisomy 21.

  2. The prevalence of chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinyong; Chu, Yuxin; Song, Qibin; Yao, Yi; Yang, Weihong; Huang, Shiang

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in China. Bone marrow samples were collected from multiple cities in China. Metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were initially used to test chromosomal lesions. Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip platform performed a genome-wide detection of chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal gain was identified in 76 patients; the most prevalent was trisomy 8(17.9 %). New chromosomal gain was detected on chromosome 9, 19p, and X. Chromosomal loss was detected in 101 patients. The most frequent was loss 5q (21.0 %). Some loss and gain were not identified by MC or FISH but identified by genechip. UPD was solely identified by genechip in 51 patients; the most prevalent were UPD 7q (4.94 %) and UPD 17p (4.32 %). Furthermore, complex chromosomal aberrations were detected in 56 patients. In conclusion, Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip was more precise than MC and FISH in detection of cryptic chromosomal aberrations relevant to MDS. Analysis of the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations in China may improve strategies for MDS diagnosis and therapies. PMID:27225263

  3. Large scale replication and meta-analysis of variants on chromosome 4q25 associated with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kääb, Stefan; Darbar, Dawood; van Noord, Charlotte; Dupuis, Josée; Pfeufer, Arne; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Schnabel, Renate; Makino, Seiko; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Beckmann, Britt M.; Choudry, Subbarao; Donahue, Brian S.; Heeringa, Jan; Perz, Siegfried; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Larson, Martin G.; Levy, Daniel; MacRae, Calum A.; Ruskin, Jeremy N.; Wacker, Annette; Schömig, Albert; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Meitinger, Thomas; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Roden, Dan M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims A recent genome-wide association study identified a haplotype block on chromosome 4q25 associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to replicate this association in four independent cohorts. Methods and results The Framingham Heart Study and Rotterdam Study are community-based longitudinal studies. The Vanderbilt AF Registry and German AF Network (AFNet) are case–control studies. Participants with AF (n = 3508) were more likely to be male and were older than referent participants (n = 12 173; Framingham 82 ± 10 vs. 71 ± 13 years; Rotterdam 73 ± 8 vs. 69 ± 9 years; Vanderbilt 54 ± 14 vs. 57 ± 14 years; AFNet 62 ± 12 vs. 49 ± 14 years). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2200733 was associated with AF in all four cohorts, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.37 in Rotterdam [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18–1.59; P = 3.1 × 10−5] to 2.52 in AFNet (95% CI 2.22–2.8; P = 1.8 × 10−49). There also was a significant association between AF and rs10033464 in Framingham (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.03–1.75; P = 0.031) and AFNet (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.13–1.51; P = 0.0002), but not Vanderbilt (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.86–1.56; P = 0.33). A meta-analysis of the current and prior AF studies revealed an OR of 1.90 (95% CI 1.60–2.26; P = 3.3 × 10−13) for rs2200733 and of 1.36 (95% CI 1.26–1.47; P = 6.7 × 10−15) for rs10033464. Conclusion The non-coding SNPs rs2200733 and rs10033464 are strongly associated with AF in four cohorts of European descent. These results confirm the significant relations between AF and intergenic variants on chromosome 4. PMID:19141561

  4. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Weese, Scott J.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Whitehead, Ashley E.; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and

  5. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M; Weese, Scott J; Parreira, Valeria R; Whitehead, Ashley E; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and

  6. Combined Analysis of Genome Scans of Dutch and Finnish Families Reveals a Susceptibility Locus for High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol on Chromosome 16q

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, Päivi; Allayee, Hooman; Krass, Kelly L.; Kuraishy, Ali; Soro, Aino; Lilja, Heidi E.; Mar, Rebecca; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Nuotio, Ilpo; Laakso, Markku; Rotter, Jerome I.; de Bruin, Tjerk W. A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Peltonen, Leena

    2003-01-01

    Several genomewide screens have been performed to identify novel loci predisposing to unfavorable serum lipid levels and coronary heart disease (CHD). We hypothesized that the accumulating data of these screens in different study populations could be combined to verify which of the identified loci truly harbor susceptibility genes. The power of this strategy has recently been demonstrated with other complex diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. We assessed the largely unknown genetic background of CHD by investigating the most common dyslipidemia predisposing to CHD, familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL), affecting 1%–2% of Western populations and 10%–20% of families with premature CHD. To be able to perform a combined data analysis, we unified the diagnostic criteria for FCHL and its component traits and combined the data from two genomewide scans performed in two populations, the Finns and the Dutch. As a result of our pooled data analysis, we identified three chromosomal regions, on chromosomes 2p25.1, 9p23, and 16q24.1, exceeding the statistical significance level of a LOD score >2.0. The 2p25.1 region was detected for the FCHL trait, and the 9p23 and 16q24.1 regions were detected for the low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) trait. In addition, the previously recognized 1q21 region also obtained additional support in the other study sample, when the triglyceride trait was used. Analysis of the 16q24.1 region resulted in a statistically significant LOD score of 3.6 when the data from Finnish families with low HDL-C were included in the analysis. To search for the underlying gene in the 16q24.1 region, we investigated a novel functional and positional candidate gene, helix/forkhead transcription factor (FOXC2), by sequencing and by genotyping of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the families. PMID:12638083

  7. Evaluation of genotoxicity of clofazimine, an antileprosy drug, in mice in vivo. I. Chromosome analysis in bone marrow and spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Das, R K; Roy, B

    1990-06-01

    Clofazimine, an antileprosy drug, was tested for its cytogenetic effect in mouse bone marrow and testis. Bone marrow metaphase analysis in adults treated directly for different periods (1, 2 and 4 weeks, 40 mg/kg/day) and with different doses (4, 20 and 40 mg/kg/day for 7 days) as well as in young animals exposed through lactation for different periods (2, 3, and 4 weeks) revealed significant increases in chromosomal aberrations over the controls. Analysis of diakinesis-metaphase I stages also exhibited a significantly elevated incidence of chromosome aberrations over controls after treatment for different periods. On the basis of the present result the drug may be considered a potential clastogen in mice. PMID:2161076

  8. Interchromosomal Duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y Chromosome Imply a Distinct Evolutionary Origin of the Sex Chromosomes Compared to Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M.; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R.; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    Background Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. Conclusions/Significance The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the

  9. Identifying Phytoplankton Classes In California Reservoirs Using HPLC Pigment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, S.; Peacock, M. B.; Kudela, R. M.; Negrey, K.

    2014-12-01

    Few bodies of water are routinely monitored for phytoplankton composition due to monetary and time constraints, especially the less accessible bodies of water in central and southern California. These lakes and estuaries are important for economic reasons such as tourism and fishing. This project investigated the composition of phytoplankton present using pigment analysis to identify dominant phytoplankton groups. A total of 28 different sites with a wide range of salinity (0 - 60) in central and southern California were examined. These included 13 different bodies of water in central California: 6 in the Sierras, 7 in the San Francisco Bay Estuary, and 15 from southern California. The samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the pigments present (using retention time and the spectral thumbprint). Diagnostic pigments were used to indicate the phytoplankton class composition, focusing on diatoms, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes, and cyanobacteria - all key phytoplankton groups indicative of the health of the sampled reservoir. Our results indicated that cyanobacteria dominated four of the seven bodies of central California water (Mono Lake, Bridgeport Reservoir, Steamboat Slough, and Pinto Lake); cryptophytes and nannoflagellates dominated two of the central California bodies of water (Mare Island Strait and Topaz Lake); and diatoms and dinoflagellates dominated one central California body of water, Oakland Inner Harbor, comprising more than 70% of the phytoplankton present. We expect the bodies of water from Southern California to be as disparate. Though this data is only a snapshot, it has significant implications in comparing different ecosystems across California, and it has the potential to provide valuable insight into the composition of phytoplankton communities.

  10. [Study on chromosomes aberration in wheat-rye disomics addition lines induced by the gametocidal chromosome 2C].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-Ping; Wang, Zhan-Bin; Xu, Xiang-Ling; Li, Ji-Lin

    2004-11-01

    In the present study,Chinese Spring-Imperial (1 R-7R) wheat-rye disomic addition lines were hybridized with Chinese Spring-2C (derived from Aegilops cylindrica) disomic addition lines. The F1 hybrids were examined by mitotic and meiotic analysis. There were observed abnormal chromosome configurations. A total of 430 F2 plants were obtained by self-pollination. Chromosomes aberrations, such as translocation, deletions, isobrachial and dicentromere chromosomes, are identified in F2 individual plants by C-banding combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, chromosome spontaneous substitutions such as 2C substituting for wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B and 2D were also observed. The rule and frequency of chromosome aberration in F2 are the following: 22 out of 430 F2 plants (5.11%) were found involving aberration rye chromosomes. Among them, 10 plants were identified as wheat-rye chromosome translocation lines comprising 2.3%. Rye chromosome deletions comprised 12 of them (2.79%). 3 isobrachial aberrations were detected (about 0.7%), too. Most of the translocation lines are with wheat centromere, only one of them is with rye centromere. Rye chromosome aberrations occurred unevenly among homoeologous groups. There were 5 in 1R, 3 in 2R, 1 in 3R, 3 in 4R, 6 in 5R and 4 in 6R. The majority of the translocation lines are terminal translocation. 54 out of the total 430 progenies are wheat deletions,and 27 are distributed in the A group, 20 in the B group and 7 in the D group respectively. Finally,we discussed the possible cause for the uneven chromosome aberration among homoeologous groups in wheat and rye as well as the effect characteristics of 2C on wheat and rye chromosome. PMID:15651680

  11. Y-chromosome analysis reveals genetic divergence and new founding native lineages in Athapaskan- and Eskimoan-speaking populations

    PubMed Central

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Owings, Amanda C.; Gaieski, Jill B.; Vilar, Miguel G.; Andre, Alestine; Lennie, Crystal; Mackenzie, Mary Adele; Kritsch, Ingrid; Snowshoe, Sharon; Wright, Ruth; Martin, James; Gibson, Nancy; Andrews, Thomas D.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Adhikarla, Syama; Adler, Christina J.; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Clarke, Andrew C.; Comas, David; Cooper, Alan; Der Sarkissian, Clio S. I.; GaneshPrasad, ArunKumar; Haak, Wolfgang; Haber, Marc; Hobbs, Angela; Javed, Asif; Jin, Li; Kaplan, Matthew E.; Li, Shilin; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.; Melé, Marta; Merchant, Nirav C.; Mitchell, R. John; Parida, Laxmi; Pitchappan, Ramasamy; Platt, Daniel E.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Renfrew, Colin; Lacerda, Daniela R.; Royyuru, Ajay K.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Soodyall, Himla; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Swamikrishnan, Pandikumar; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santhakumari, Arun Varatharajan; Vieira, Pedro Paulo; Wells, R. Spencer; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Ziegle, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the peopling of the Americas has been explored through the analysis of uniparentally inherited genetic systems in Native American populations and the comparison of these genetic data with current linguistic groupings. In northern North America, two language families predominate: Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene. Although the genetic evidence from nuclear and mtDNA loci suggest that speakers of these language families share a distinct biological origin, this model has not been examined using data from paternally inherited Y chromosomes. To test this hypothesis and elucidate the migration histories of Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations, we analyzed Y-chromosomal data from Inuvialuit, Gwich’in, and Tłįchǫ populations living in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Over 100 biallelic markers and 19 chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to produce a high-resolution dataset of Y chromosomes from these groups. Among these markers is an SNP discovered in the Inuvialuit that differentiates them from other Aboriginal and Native American populations. The data suggest that Canadian Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations are genetically distinct from one another and that the formation of these groups was the result of two population expansions that occurred after the initial movement of people into the Americas. In addition, the population history of Athapaskan speakers is complex, with the Tłįchǫ being distinct from other Athapaskan groups. The high-resolution biallelic data also make clear that Y-chromosomal diversity among the first Native Americans was greater than previously recognized. PMID:22586127

  12. Linkage analyses of chromosome 18 markers do not identify a major susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder in the Old Order Amish

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, D.L.; Paul, S.M. |; Allen, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    Previously reported linkage of bipolar affective disorder to DNA markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 18 was reexamined in a larger homogeneous sample of Old Order Amish families. Four markers (D18S21, D18S53, D18S44, and D18S40) were examined in three kindreds containing 31 bipolar I (BP I) individuals. Although linkage findings were replicated in the one previously studied Amish pedigree containing four BP I individuals, linkage to this region was excluded in the larger sample. If a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is located in this region of chromosome 18, it is of minor significance in this population. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  13. Polarity and Temporality of High-Resolution Y-Chromosome Distributions in India Identify Both Indigenous and Exogenous Expansions and Reveal Minor Genetic Influence of Central Asian Pastoralists

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; King, Roy; Mehdi, S. Q.; Edmonds, Christopher A.; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Lin, Alice A.; Mitra, Mitashree; Sil, Samir K.; Ramesh, A.; Usha Rani, M. V.; Thakur, Chitra M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Majumder, Partha P.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Although considerable cultural impact on social hierarchy and language in South Asia is attributable to the arrival of nomadic Central Asian pastoralists, genetic data (mitochondrial and Y chromosomal) have yielded dramatically conflicting inferences on the genetic origins of tribes and castes of South Asia. We sought to resolve this conflict, using high-resolution data on 69 informative Y-chromosome binary markers and 10 microsatellite markers from a large set of geographically, socially, and linguistically representative ethnic groups of South Asia. We found that the influence of Central Asia on the pre-existing gene pool was minor. The ages of accumulated microsatellite variation in the majority of Indian haplogroups exceed 10,000–15,000 years, which attests to the antiquity of regional differentiation. Therefore, our data do not support models that invoke a pronounced recent genetic input from Central Asia to explain the observed genetic variation in South Asia. R1a1 and R2 haplogroups indicate demographic complexity that is inconsistent with a recent single history. Associated microsatellite analyses of the high-frequency R1a1 haplogroup chromosomes indicate independent recent histories of the Indus Valley and the peninsular Indian region. Our data are also more consistent with a peninsular origin of Dravidian speakers than a source with proximity to the Indus and with significant genetic input resulting from demic diffusion associated with agriculture. Our results underscore the importance of marker ascertainment for distinguishing phylogenetic terminal branches from basal nodes when attributing ancestral composition and temporality to either indigenous or exogenous sources. Our reappraisal indicates that pre-Holocene and Holocene-era—not Indo-European—expansions have shaped the distinctive South Asian Y-chromosome landscape. PMID:16400607

  14. Method of identifying hairpin DNA probes by partial fold analysis

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Strohsahl, Christopher M.

    2009-10-06

    Method of identifying molecular beacons in which a secondary structure prediction algorithm is employed to identify oligonucleotide sequences within a target gene having the requisite hairpin structure. Isolated oligonucleotides, molecular beacons prepared from those oligonucleotides, and their use are also disclosed.

  15. Method of identifying hairpin DNA probes by partial fold analysis

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Strohsahl, Christopher M.

    2008-10-28

    Methods of identifying molecular beacons in which a secondary structure prediction algorithm is employed to identify oligonucleotide sequences within a target gene having the requisite hairpin structure. Isolated oligonucleotides, molecular beacons prepared from those oligonucleotides, and their use are also disclosed.

  16. Quantified effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope attachments on 3D organization of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    We use a combined experimental and computational approach to study the effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments on the 3D genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) salivary gland nuclei. We consider 3 distinct models: a Null model - without specific Chr-NE attachments, a 15-attachment model - with 15 previously known Chr-NE attachments, and a 48-attachment model - with 15 original and 33 recently identified Chr-NE attachments. The radial densities of chromosomes in the models are compared to the densities observed in 100 experimental images of optically sectioned salivary gland nuclei forming "z-stacks." Most of the experimental z-stacks support the Chr-NE 48-attachment model suggesting that as many as 48 chromosome loci with appreciable affinity for the NE are necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed distribution of chromosome density in fruit fly nuclei. Next, we investigate if and how the presence and the number of Chr-NE attachments affect several key characteristics of 3D genome organization: chromosome territories and gene-gene contacts. This analysis leads to novel insight about the possible role of Chr-NE attachments in regulating the genome architecture. Specifically, we find that model nuclei with more numerous Chr-NE attachments form more distinct chromosome territories and their chromosomes intertwine less frequently. Intra-chromosome and intra-arm contacts are more common in model nuclei with Chr-NE attachments compared to the Null model (no specific attachments), while inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts are less common in nuclei with Chr-NE attachments. We demonstrate that Chr-NE attachments increase the specificity of long-range inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts. The predicted effects of Chr-NE attachments are rationalized by intuitive volume vs. surface accessibility arguments. PMID:26068134

  17. Molecular phylogenetic analyses identify Alpine differentiation and dysploid chromosome number changes as major forces for the evolution of the European endemic Phyteuma (Campanulaceae).

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Gerald M; Pachschwöll, Clemens; Tribsch, Andreas; Schönswetter, Peter; Barfuss, Michael H J; Esfeld, Korinna; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Thiv, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Phyteuma is a chromosomally and ecologically diverse vascular plant genus and constitutes an excellent system for studying both the role of chromosomal change for species diversification and the evolution of high-mountain biota. This kind of research is, however, hampered by the lack of a sound phylogenetic framework exacerbated by the notoriously low predictive power of traditional taxonomy with respect to phylogenetic relationships in Campanulaceae. Based on a comprehensive taxon sampling and analyses of nuclear and plastid sequence and AFLP fingerprint data, Phyteuma is confirmed as a monophyletic group sister to the monotypic Physoplexis, which is in line with their peculiar flower morphologies. Within Phyteuma two clades, largely corresponding to previously recognized sections, are consistently found. The traditional circumscription of taxonomic series is largely rejected. Whereas distinctness of the currently recognized species is mostly corroborated, some interspecific relationships remain ambiguous due to incongruences between nuclear and plastid data. Major forces for diversification and evolution of Phyteuma are descending dysploidy (i.e., a decrease in chromosome base number) as well as allopatric and ecological differentiation within the Alps, the genus' center of species diversity. PMID:23891952

  18. Phylogeographical analysis of the dominant multidrug-resistant H58 clade of Salmonella Typhi identifies inter- and intracontinental transmission events

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vanessa K; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek J; Parkhill, Julian; Page, Andrew J; Feasey, Nicholas A; Kingsley, Robert A; Thomson, Nicholas R; Keane, Jacqueline A; Weill, François-Xavier; Edwards, David J; Hawkey, Jane; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Cain, Amy K; Hadfield, James; Hart, Peter J; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Glinos, Dafni A; Breiman, Robert F; Watson, Conall H; Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S; Okoro, Chinyere; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Edmunds, W John; Msefula, Chisomo; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Kama, Mike; Jenkins, Kylie; Dutta, Shanta; Marks, Florian; Campos, Josefina; Thompson, Corinne; Obaro, Stephen; MacLennan, Calman A; Dolecek, Christiane; Keddy, Karen H; Smith, Anthony M; Parry, Christopher M; Karkey, Abhilasha; Mulholland, E Kim; Campbell, James I; Dongol, Sabina; Basnyat, Buddha; Dufour, Muriel; Bandaranayake, Don; Naseri, Take Toleafoa; Singh, Shalini Pravin; Hatta, Mochammad; Newton, Paul; Onsare, Robert S; Isaia, Lupeoletalalei; Dance, David; Davong, Viengmon; Thwaites, Guy; Wijedoru, Lalith; Crump, John A; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Nilles, Eric J; Thanh, Duy Pham; Turner, Paul; Soeng, Sona; Valcanis, Mary; Powling, Joan; Dimovski, Karolina; Hogg, Geoff; Farrar, Jeremy; Holt, Kathryn E; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) typhoid is a major global health threat affecting many countries where the disease is endemic. Here whole-genome sequence analysis of 1,832 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) identifies a single dominant MDR lineage, H58, that has emerged and spread throughout Asia and Africa over the last 30 years. Our analysis identifies numerous transmissions of H58, including multiple transfers from Asia to Africa and an ongoing, unrecognized MDR epidemic within Africa itself. Notably, our analysis indicates that H58 lineages are displacing antibiotic-sensitive isolates, transforming the global population structure of this pathogen. H58 isolates can harbor a complex MDR element residing either on transmissible IncHI1 plasmids or within multiple chromosomal integration sites. We also identify new mutations that define the H58 lineage. This phylogeographical analysis provides a framework to facilitate global management of MDR typhoid and is applicable to similar MDR lineages emerging in other bacterial species. PMID:25961941

  19. Phylogeographical analysis of the dominant multidrug-resistant H58 clade of Salmonella Typhi identifies inter- and intracontinental transmission events.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vanessa K; Baker, Stephen; Pickard, Derek J; Parkhill, Julian; Page, Andrew J; Feasey, Nicholas A; Kingsley, Robert A; Thomson, Nicholas R; Keane, Jacqueline A; Weill, François-Xavier; Edwards, David J; Hawkey, Jane; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Cain, Amy K; Hadfield, James; Hart, Peter J; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Glinos, Dafni A; Breiman, Robert F; Watson, Conall H; Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S; Okoro, Chinyere; Jacobs, Jan; Lunguya, Octavie; Edmunds, W John; Msefula, Chisomo; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Kama, Mike; Jenkins, Kylie; Dutta, Shanta; Marks, Florian; Campos, Josefina; Thompson, Corinne; Obaro, Stephen; MacLennan, Calman A; Dolecek, Christiane; Keddy, Karen H; Smith, Anthony M; Parry, Christopher M; Karkey, Abhilasha; Mulholland, E Kim; Campbell, James I; Dongol, Sabina; Basnyat, Buddha; Dufour, Muriel; Bandaranayake, Don; Naseri, Take Toleafoa; Singh, Shalini Pravin; Hatta, Mochammad; Newton, Paul; Onsare, Robert S; Isaia, Lupeoletalalei; Dance, David; Davong, Viengmon; Thwaites, Guy; Wijedoru, Lalith; Crump, John A; De Pinna, Elizabeth; Nair, Satheesh; Nilles, Eric J; Thanh, Duy Pham; Turner, Paul; Soeng, Sona; Valcanis, Mary; Powling, Joan; Dimovski, Karolina; Hogg, Geoff; Farrar, Jeremy; Holt, Kathryn E; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) typhoid is a major global health threat affecting many countries where the disease is endemic. Here whole-genome sequence analysis of 1,832 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) identifies a single dominant MDR lineage, H58, that has emerged and spread throughout Asia and Africa over the last 30 years. Our analysis identifies numerous transmissions of H58, including multiple transfers from Asia to Africa and an ongoing, unrecognized MDR epidemic within Africa itself. Notably, our analysis indicates that H58 lineages are displacing antibiotic-sensitive isolates, transforming the global population structure of this pathogen. H58 isolates can harbor a complex MDR element residing either on transmissible IncHI1 plasmids or within multiple chromosomal integration sites. We also identify new mutations that define the H58 lineage. This phylogeographical analysis provides a framework to facilitate global management of MDR typhoid and is applicable to similar MDR lineages emerging in other bacterial species. PMID:25961941

  20. Identifying Ecosystem Services of Rivers and Streams Through Content Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    While much ecosystem services research focuses on analysis such as mapping and/or valuation, fewer research efforts are directed toward in-depth understanding of the specific ecological quantities people value. Ecosystem service monitoring and analysis efforts and communications ...

  1. [Comparative chromosomal analysis of populations of phytophilous chironomidae Glyptotendipes glaucus (Mg.) from Chernobyl-affected territory].

    PubMed

    Belianina, S I

    2014-09-01

    The karyopools of the phytophilous chiromomid species of Glyptotendipes glaucus (Mg.) were studied. Chironomids originated from a number of reservoirs located in the Novozybkovsky rayon of the Bryansk region, which was affected by the Chernobyl radioactive release, and two reservoirs located in the Saratov region. Differences in the inversion spectrum and frequencies, both among Bryansk and between Bryansk and Saratov populations, were found. There were no new inversions in the Novozybkovsky populations; however, structurally small rearrangements in long chromosomes were noted. Typical abnormalities included mosaicism of the chromosome morphotypes in cells of the same saline gland, which was especially distinctive in the larvae from the forbidden zone; decondensation of the telomere regions of chromosomes; and mosaic asynapsis of the chromosome IV homologs (up to complete disjunction). Also, several larvae were polyploids. Other species of Glyptotendipes inhabiting the Novozybkovsky reservoirs were represented by the single species of G. paripes (near the Korchy settlement). The karyotypes of its several larvae were represented by an unorganized chromosomal substance. The other Glyptotendipes species seem to have lower adaptive abilities under the conditions in question and were eliminated from precatastrophe biotopes, while G. glaucus succeeded in adaptating to the new environment. PMID:25735132

  2. Integrating subpathway analysis to identify candidate agents for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiye; Li, Mi; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xiaoping

    2