Science.gov

Sample records for analysis program energy

  1. Statistical Energy Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R. C.; Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.; Nygaard, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is powerful tool for estimating highfrequency vibration spectra of complex structural systems and incorporated into computer program. Basic SEA analysis procedure divided into three steps: Idealization, parameter generation, and problem solution. SEA computer program written in FORTRAN V for batch execution.

  2. Statistical energy analysis computer program, user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1981-01-01

    A high frequency random vibration analysis, (statistical energy analysis (SEA) method) is examined. The SEA method accomplishes high frequency prediction of arbitrary structural configurations. A general SEA computer program is described. A summary of SEA theory, example problems of SEA program application, and complete program listing are presented.

  3. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, ``Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,`` part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program`s researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  4. Energy Analysis Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Energy Analysis Program has played an active role in the analysis and discussion of energy and environmental issues at several levels. (1) at the international level, with programs as developing scenarios for long-term energy demand in developing countries and organizing leading an analytic effort, Energy Efficiency, Developing Countries, and Eastern Europe,'' part of a major effort to increase support for energy efficiency programs worldwide; (2) at national level, the Program has been responsible for assessing energy forecasts and policies affecting energy use (e.g., appliance standards, National Energy Strategy scenarios); and (3) at the state and utility levels, the Program has been a leader in promoting integrated resource utility planning; the collaborative process has led to agreement on a new generation of utility demand-site programs in California, providing an opportunity to use knowledge and analytic techniques of the Program's researchers. We continue to place highest on analyzing energy efficiency, with particular attention given to energy use in buildings. The Program continues its active analysis of international energy issues in Asia (including China), the Soviet Union, South America, and Western Europe. Analyzing the costs and benefits of different levels of standards for residential appliances continues to be the largest single area of research within the Program. The group has developed and applied techniques for forecasting energy demand (or constructing scenarios) for the United States. We have built a new model of industrial energy demand, are in the process of making major changes in our tools for forecasting residential energy demand, have built an extensive and documented energy conservation supply curve of residential energy use, and are beginning an analysis of energy-demand forecasting for commercial buildings.

  5. Energy Analysis Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    With the new federal Administration in place, we have observed increasing attention in the areas of research and analysis that have been central to our interests. Energy efficiency is once again a very high priority in the national agenda. This increased emphasis on energy efficiency was already apparent prior to the national elections in the contents of the National Energy Policy Act (EPACT), passed by Congress in 1992. The Climate Change Action Plan, released by the White House in October 1993, strengthens the federal government`s leadership role in the design and implementation of energy-efficiency programs. Budget submissions show energy efficiency and renewable energy programs among the relatively small number of discretionary programs at the federal level that are expected to receive large percentage increases.

  6. Energy analysis program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This report provides an energy analysis overview. The following topics are described: building energy analysis; urban and energy environmental issues; appliance energy efficiency standards; utility planning and policy; energy efficiency, economics, and policy issues; and international energy and environmental issues.

  7. DOE-2 Building Energy Analysis Program

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.B.; Birdsall, B.; Buhl, W.F.; Erdem, E.; Eto, J.; Hirsch, J.J.; Olson, K.H.; Winkelmann, F.C.

    1984-04-01

    The DOE-2 Building Energy Analysis Program was designed to allow engineers and architects to perform design studies of whole-building energy use under actual weather conditions. Its development was guided by several objectives: (1) that the description of the building entered by the user be readily understood by non-computer scientists, (2) that, when available, the calculations be based upon well established algorithms, (3) that it permit the simulation of commonly available heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment, (4) that the computer costs of the program be minimal, and (5) that the predicted energy use of a building be acceptably close to measured values. These objectives have been met. An overview of the program upon completion of the DOE-2.1C edition is given.

  8. Energy Analysis Program. 1992 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Program became deeply involved in establishing 4 Washington, D.C., project office diving the last few months of fiscal year 1942. This project office, which reports to the Energy & Environment Division, will receive the majority of its support from the Energy Analysis Program. We anticipate having two staff scientists and support personnel in offices within a few blocks of DOE. Our expectation is that this office will carry out a series of projects that are better managed closer to DOE. We also anticipate that our representation in Washington will improve and we hope to expand the Program, its activities, and impact, in police-relevant analyses. In spite of the growth that we have achieved, the Program continues to emphasize (1) energy efficiency of buildings, (2) appliance energy efficiency standards, (3) energy demand forecasting, (4) utility policy studies, especially integrated resource planning issues, and (5) international energy studies, with considerate emphasis on developing countries and economies in transition. These continuing interests are reflected in the articles that appear in this report.

  9. Analysis of state-energy-program capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, J.; Clifford, D.; Gunnison, F.; Humphrey, B.

    1981-05-01

    This report assesses the potential effects on state energy programs of a reduction in the financial assistance available through the State and Local Assistance Programs and the distribution of those effects. The assessment is based on a survey of nine state energy offices (SEOs), which were selected on the basis of state support of energy programs weighted by state energy consumption. The nine SEOs surveyed were the Arizona Energy Office, Arkansas Department of Energy, California Energy Commission, Florida Governor's Energy Office, Illinois Institute of Natural Resources, Minnesota Energy Agency, New Jersey Department of Energy, South Carolina Governor's Division of Energy Resources, and Washington State Energy Office.

  10. Energy analysis program. 1995 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    This year the role of energy technology research and analysis supporting governmental and public interests is again being challenged at high levels of government. This situation is not unlike that of the early 1980s, when the Administration questioned the relevance of a federal commitment to applied energy research, especially for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Then Congress continued to support such activities, deeming them important to the nation`s interest. Today, Congress itself is challenging many facets of the federal role in energy. The Administration is also selectively reducing its support, primarily for the pragmatic objective of reducing federal expenditures, rather than because of principles opposing a public role in energy. this report is divided into three sections: International Energy and the global environment; Energy, economics, markets, and policy; and Buildings and their environment.

  11. Residual energy applications program systems analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Yngve, P.W.

    1980-10-01

    Current DOE plans call for building an Energy Applied Systems Test (EAST) Facility at the Savannah River Plant in close proximity to the 140 to 150/sup 0/F waste heat from one of several operating nuclear reactors. The waste water flow from each reactor, approximately 165,000 gpm, provides a unique opportunity to test the performance and operating characteristics of large-scale waste heat power generation and heat pump system concepts. This report provides a preliminary description of the potential end-use market, parametric data on heat pump and the power generation system technology, a preliminary listing of EAST Facility requirements, and an example of an integrated industrial park utilizing the technology to maximize economic pay back. The parametric heat pump analysis concluded that dual-fluid Rankine cycle heat pumps with capacities as high as 400 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h, can utilize large sources of low temperature residual heat to provide 300/sup 0/F saturatd steam for an industrial park. The before tax return on investment for this concept is 36.2%. The analysis also concluded that smaller modular heat pumps could fulfill the same objective while sacrificing only a moderate rate of return. The parametric power generation analysis concluded that multi-pressure Rankine cycle systems not only are superior to single pressure systems, but can also be developed for large systems (approx. = 17 MW/sub e/). This same technology is applicable to smaller systems at the sacrifice of higher investment per unit output.

  12. NECAP - NASA's Energy Cost Analysis Program. Operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the NASA'S ENERGY COST ANALYSIS PROGRAM (NECAP) is described. Supplementary information on new capabilities and program options is also provided. The Control Data Corporation (CDC) NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEM (NOS) is discussed. The basic CDC NOS instructions which are required to successfully operate NECAP are provided.

  13. Overview of Energy Systems` safety analysis report programs. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The primary purpose of an Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is to provide a basis for judging the adequacy of a facility`s safety. The SAR documents the safety analyses that systematically identify the hazards posed by the facility, analyze the consequences and risk of potential accidents, and describe hazard control measures that protect the health and safety of the public and employees. In addition, some SARs document, as Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs, which include Technical Specifications and Operational Safety Requirements), technical and administrative requirements that ensure the facility is operated within prescribed safety limits. SARs also provide conveniently summarized information that may be used to support procedure development, training, inspections, and other activities necessary to facility operation. This ``Overview of Energy Systems Safety Analysis Report Programs`` Provides an introduction to the programs and processes used in the development and maintenance of the SARs. It also summarizes some of the uses of the SARs within Energy Systems and DOE.

  14. Overview of Energy Systems' safety analysis report programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The primary purpose of an Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is to provide a basis for judging the adequacy of a facility's safety. The SAR documents the safety analyses that systematically identify the hazards posed by the facility, analyze the consequences and risk of potential accidents, and describe hazard control measures that protect the health and safety of the public and employees. In addition, some SARs document, as Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs, which include Technical Specifications and Operational Safety Requirements), technical and administrative requirements that ensure the facility is operated within prescribed safety limits. SARs also provide conveniently summarized information that may be used to support procedure development, training, inspections, and other activities necessary to facility operation. This Overview of Energy Systems Safety Analysis Report Programs'' Provides an introduction to the programs and processes used in the development and maintenance of the SARs. It also summarizes some of the uses of the SARs within Energy Systems and DOE.

  15. Program for energy analysis of residences (PEAR) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Corin, N.

    1989-01-01

    PEAR is an interactive program for residential building energy analysis utilizing a comprehensive DOE-2.1 data base for residential buildings. The extensive data base is used by PEAR to estimate the annual energy use of houses with typical conservation measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation, different window types and glazing layers, infiltration levels, and equipment efficiency. It also allows the user to include the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heat absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night setback. Software Description: The software is written in the Turbo Pascal programming language for implementation on an IBM PC microcomputer using MS-DOS operating system. Software requires 128K of memory and a hard disk or two floppy disk drives with either a monochrome or color monitor. A graphics adapter is needed to implement the Bar Chart option.

  16. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: Utility Bill Analysis on Homes Participating in Austin Energy's Program

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.; Mosey, G.; Plympton, P.; Dagher, L.

    2007-07-01

    Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a jointly managed program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This program focuses on improving energy efficiency in existing homes via a whole-house approach to assessing and improving a home's energy performance, and helping to protect the environment. As one of HPwES's local sponsors, Austin Energy's HPwES program offers a complete home energy analysis and a list of recommendations for efficiency improvements, along with cost estimates. To determine the benefits of this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a statistical analysis using energy consumption data of HPwES homes provided by Austin Energy. This report provides preliminary estimates of average savings per home from the HPwES Loan Program for the period 1998 through 2006. The results from this preliminary analysis suggest that the HPwES program sponsored by Austin Energy had a very significant impact on reducing average cooling electricity for participating households. Overall, average savings were in the range of 25%-35%, and appear to be robust under various criteria for the number of households included in the analysis.

  17. PEAR: a microcomputer program for residential energy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.; Huang, Y.J.; Byrne, S.; Turiel, I.; Bull, J.

    1985-11-01

    We have designed a software package called PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences), which is written with user-friendly input and output and runs on the IBM PC. PEAR provides an easy-to-use and very fast compilation and extrapolation of a comprehensive DOE-2.1 database for residential buildings. The current version, which covers five residential building prototypes in over 800 locations, estimates energy and cost savings resulting from typical conversion measures such as ceiling, wall and floor insulation, window type and glazing layers, infiltration levels, and equipment efficiency. It also allows the user to adjust for optional measures including roof or wall color, movable insulation, whole-house fans, night temperature setback, reflective or heat absorbing glass, thermal mass in exterior walls, and two attached sunspace options. The program is designed to be used as a research tool by energy and policy analysts, and as a non-technical energy calculation method by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.

  18. Current Work in Energy Analysis (Energy Analysis Program -1996 Annual Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Energy Analysis Program

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work that Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been doing most recently. One of our proudest accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. This analysis played a key role in shaping the U.S. position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. Our participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. We are also especially proud of our study of ''leaking electricity,'' which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of U.S. residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the following pages summarize results of research. activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China. These are the intellectual endeavors of a talented team of researchers dedicated to public service.

  19. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of October 2004 to April 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameters tested for CFL models in Cycle Six are 1000-hour Lumen Maintenance, Lumen Maintenance at 40% Rated Life, and Interim Life Test, along with a series of parameters verified, such as ballast electrical parameters and Energy Star label.

  20. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Four and Cycle Five of PEARL program during the period of October 2003 to April 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Four is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Five are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  1. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three and Cycle Four of PEARL program during the period of April 2003 to October 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle three is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Four are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  2. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle 6 and Reflector CFL In-situ Testing of PEARL program during the period of April 2005 to October 2005, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC performed testing for the fixture samples in Cycle 6 against Energy Star residential fixture specifications during this period of time. LRC subcontracted the Reflector CFL In-situ Testing to Luminaire Testing Laboratories located at Allentown PA, and supervised this test.

  3. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-05-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure of Cycle 7 of PEARL program during the period of October 2005 to March 2006, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC administered the purchasing of CFL samples to test in Cycle 7, performed 100-hour seasoning for most of the CFL samples received by March 2006, and performed sphere testing for some of the CFL samples at 100 hours of life (initial measurement).

  4. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three of PEARL program during the period of October 2002 to April 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The products tested are 20 models of screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) of various types and various wattages made or marketed by 12 different manufacturers, and ten models of residential lighting fixtures from eight different manufacturers.

  5. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Five and Cycle Six of PEARL program during the period of April 2004 to October 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Five is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Six are Efficacy, CCT, CRI, Power Factor, Start Time, Warm-up Time, and Rapid Cycle Stress Test for CFLs.

  6. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2007-12-31

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This final report summarizes the experimental procedure and results of all cycles (Cycles 1 through 8) of PEARL program from the beginning of year 2000 to the end of 2007, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. In each cycle of PEARL program, PEARL Board selects a list of Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) and Residential Lighting Fixture (RLF) models that are Energy Star qualified. In Cycle 5, Cycle 7, and Cycle 8, no fixture models were selected. After that PEARL sponsors procure product samples for each selected model from different stores and locations in the retail market and send them to LRC for testing. LRC then receive and select the samples, and test them against Energy Star specifications. After the testing LRC analyze and report the results to PEARL Board. Totally 185 models of CFL and 52 models of RLF were tested in PEARL program. Along with the evolution of the Energy Star specifications from year 2000 to 2003, parameters that were required by Energy Star changed during the eight years of PEARL program. The testing parameters and number of samples tested in PEARL program also changed during this time. For example, in Cycle 1, three samples of each models were tested

  7. Evaluating energy and non-energy impacts of energy conservation programs: A supply curve framework of analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Harris, J.

    1989-06-01

    Historically, the evaluation of energy conservation programs has focused primarily on energy savings and costs. The recent, increased interest in global environmental problems (e.g., acid rain, ozone depletion, and the greenhouse effect), has made decision makers, as well as program evaluators, sensitive to the environmental impacts of all programs, including energy conservation programs. Economic impacts of programs remain important policy concerns. Many state and local jurisdictions are concerned with the net effects of energy policies on economic growth, jobs, and tax revenues, as well as the impacts of growth and development on local energy issues (e.g., construction of new power plants). Consequently, policy makers need a methodology to compare easily the energy and non-energy impacts of a specific program in a consistent way, for both retrospective analysis and for prospective planning. We present the general concepts of a proposed new approach to multi-attribute analysis, as an extension of the concept of ''supply curves of conserved energy.'' In their simplest form, energy conservation supply curves rank and display the savings from conservation measures in order of their cost-effectiveness. This simple concept is extended to reflect multiple decision criteria and some important linkages between energy and non-energy policy decisions (e.g., a ''supply curve of reduced carbon emissions, ''or a ''supply curve of net local job-creation''). The framework is flexible enough, so that policy makers can weigh and compare each of the impacts to reflect their concerns, and see the results in terms of program rankings. The advantages of this analysis framework are that it is simple to use, flexible, and replicable. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  8. NECAP: NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program. Part 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, R. H. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The NECAP is a sophisticated building design and energy analysis tool which has embodied within it all of the latest ASHRAE state-of-the-art techniques for performing thermal load calculation and energy usage predictions. It is a set of six individual computer programs which include: response factor program, data verification program, thermal load analysis program, variable temperature program, system and equipment simulation program, and owning and operating cost program. Each segment of NECAP is described, and instructions are set forth for preparing the required input data and for interpreting the resulting reports.

  9. Office of Nuclear Energy Knowledge Management Program Situational Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge management (KM) has been a high priority for the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the past several years. NE Programs are moving toward well-established knowledge management practices and a formal knowledge management program has been established. Knowledge management is being practiced to some level within each of the NE programs. Although it continues to evolve as NE programs evolve, a formal strategic plan that guides the implementation of KM has been developed. Despite the acceptance of KM within DOE NE, more work is necessary before the NE KM program can be considered fully successful. Per Dr. David J. Skyrme[1], an organization typically moves through the following evolutionary phases: (1) Ad-hoc - KM is being practiced to some level in some parts of the organization; (2) Formal - KM is established as a formal project or program; (3) Expanding - the use of KM as a discipline grows in practice across different parts of the organization; (4) Cohesive - there is a degree of coordination of KM; (5) Integrated - there are formal standards and approaches that give every individual access to most organizational knowledge through common interfaces; and (6) Embedded - KM is part-and-parcel of everyday tasks; it blends seamlessly into the background. According to the evolutionary phases, the NE KM program is operating at the two lower levels, Ad-hoc and Formal. Although KM is being practiced to some level, it is not being practiced in a consistent manner across the NE programs. To be fully successful, more emphasis must be placed on establishing KM standards and processes for collecting, organizing, sharing and accessing NE knowledge. Existing knowledge needs to be prioritized and gathered on a routine basis, its existence formally recorded in a knowledge inventory. Governance to ensure the quality of the knowledge being used must also be considered. For easy retrieval, knowledge must be organized according to a taxonomy that

  10. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Worms Military Community, West Germany, revised executive summary. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    1986-08-01

    This document is the Executive Summary of the Phase II Energy Report for the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) for the Worms, West Germany Military Community. The purpose of this document is to present analysis of potential energy conservation projects at each of the sites.

  11. NECAP 4.1: NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program input manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer program NECAP (NASA's Energy Cost Analysis Program) is described. The program is a versatile building design and energy analysis tool which has embodied within it state of the art techniques for performing thermal load calculations and energy use predictions. With the program, comparisons of building designs and operational alternatives for new or existing buildings can be made. The major feature of the program is the response factor technique for calculating the heat transfer through the building surfaces which accounts for the building's mass. The program expands the response factor technique into a space response factor to account for internal building temperature swings; this is extremely important in determining true building loads and energy consumption when internal temperatures are allowed to swing.

  12. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Wuerzburg Military Community. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-06-01

    This final report is submitted in accordance with the Schedule of Title I Services for Contract DACA 90-81-C-0094 Energy Engineering Analysis Program FY 81 OMA, EEAP 007, Aschaffenburg, Wuerzburg, and Schweinfurt Military Communities, and as amended by Addenda Nos. 1, 2, and 3 to Appendix A and the resume of Negotiations. The purpose of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) is to develop a comprehensive plan for the use of energy and to identify energy conservation projects at each of the military communities.

  13. Analysis to develop a program for energy-integrated farm systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Clark, M.A.; Inaba, L.K.; Johnson, K.I.

    1981-09-01

    A program to use renewable energy resources and possibly develop decentralization of energy systems for agriculture is discussed. The purpose of the research presented is to establish the objective of the program and identify guidelines for program development. The program's objective is determined by: (1) an analysis of the technologies that could be utilized to transform renewable farm resources to energy by the year 2000, (2) the quantity of renewable farm resources that are available, and (3) current energy-use patterns. Individual research, development, and demonstration projects are fit into a national program of energy-integrated farm systems on the basis of: (1) market need, (2) conversion potential, (3) technological opportunities, and (4) acceptability. Quantification of these factors for the purpose of establishing program guidelines is conducted using the following four precepts: (1) market need is identified by current use of energy for agricultural production; (2) conversion potential is determined by the availability of renewable resources; and (3) technological opportunities are determined by the state-of-the-art methods, techniques, and processes that can convert renewable resources into farm energy. Each of these factors is analyzed in Chapters 2 to 4. Chapter 5 draws on the analysis of these factors to establish the objective of the program and identify guidelines for the distribution of program funds. Chapter 6 then discusses the acceptability of integrated farm systems, which can not be quantified like the other factors.

  14. NECAP 4.1: NASA's energy-cost analysis program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. N.; Henninger, R. H.; Miner, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Enery Cost Analysis Program (NECAP) is a powerful computerized method to determine and to minimize building energy consumption. The program calculates hourly heat gain or losses taking into account the building thermal resistance and mass, using hourly weather and a "response factor' method. Internal temperatures are allowed to vary in accordance with thermostat settings and equipment capacity. A simplified input procedure and numerous other technical improvements are presented. This Users Manual describes the program and provides examples.

  15. Overview of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, Version 2. 1D

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E.; Winkelmann, F.C.

    1990-02-01

    The DOE-2 building energy analysis program was designed to assist engineers and architects in the performance of design studies of whole-building energy use under actual weather conditions. Program development was guided by several objectives: (1) that the description of the building entered by the user be readily understood by non-computer scientists; (2) that the calculations be based upon well-established algorithms; (3) that the program permit the simulation of commonly available heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment; (4) that the costs of running the program be minimal; and (5) that the predicted energy use of a building be acceptably close to measured values. These objectives have been met. We present here an overview of the DOE-21D version of the program. An annotated example of DOE-2 input and output is shown in the Appendix. 9 refs., 12 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Pilot project for a commercial buildings Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Capehart, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    Commercial energy use costs businesses around $70 billion annually. Many of these businesses are small and medium sized organizations that do not have the resources to help themselves, or to pay for professional engineering services to help reduce their energy costs and improve their economic competitiveness. Energy cost reduction actions with payback times of around two years could save the commercial sector 15--20%, or $10--$15 billion per year. This project was initially intended to evaluate the feasibility of performing commercial energy audits as an adjunct to the industrial audit program run by the US Department of Energy Industrial Office. This program is housed in 30 universities throughout the United States. Formerly known as Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers (EADC`s), the university programs are now called Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC`s) to reflect their expansion from energy use analyses to include waste and productivity analyses. The success of the EADC/IAC program in helping the manufacturing sector provides an excellent model for a similar program in the commercial buildings sector. This project has investigated using the EADC/IAC approach to performing energy audits for the commercial sector, and has determined that such an approach is feasible and cost effective.

  17. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), limited energy study - lighting, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-23

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 95 representative buildings at Fort Campbell, categorized as Korean War Barracks, Airfield Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior lighting, and indoor lighting controls. Cost estimates were prepared using MeansData for Windows Spreadsheets, Version 2.Oa. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for four Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The total of the four projects that were developed represent $385,283 in annual savings with a simple payback of 6.37 years and a saving to investment ratio (SIR) of 1.89.

  18. NECAP 4.1: NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program fast input manual and example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. N.; Miner, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program (NECAP) is a powerful computerized method to determine and to minimize building energy consumption. The program calculates hourly heat gain or losses taking into account the building thermal resistance and mass, using hourly weather and a response factor method. Internal temperatures are allowed to vary in accordance with thermostat settings and equipment capacity. NECAP 4.1 has a simplified input procedure and numerous other technical improvements. A very short input method is provided. It is limited to a single zone building. The user must still describe the building's outside geometry and select the type of system to be used.

  19. Federal Assistance Program Quarterly Project Progress Report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information Dissemination, Public Outreach, and Technical Analysis Activities. Reporting Period: January 1 - March 31, 2001 [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, John W.

    2002-03-22

    The final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association and the Washington State University Energy Program.

  20. SERI Wind Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Noun, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The SERI Wind Energy Program manages the areas or innovative research, wind systems analysis, and environmental compatibility for the U.S. Department of Energy. Since 1978, SERI wind program staff have conducted in-house aerodynamic and engineering analyses of novel concepts for wind energy conversion and have managed over 20 subcontracts to determine technical feasibility; the most promising of these concepts is the passive blade cyclic pitch control project. In the area of systems analysis, the SERI program has analyzed the impact of intermittent generation on the reliability of electric utility systems using standard utility planning models. SERI has also conducted methodology assessments. Environmental issues related to television interference and acoustic noise from large wind turbines have been addressed. SERI has identified the causes, effects, and potential control of acoustic noise emissions from large wind turbines.

  1. Diffusion of Energy Efficient Technology in Commercial Buildings: An Analysis of the Commercial Building Partnerships Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi Argyro

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication of green building measures by Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners' replication efforts of green building approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization's building portfolio, and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States. Findings from this study provided insight into motivations and objectives CBP partners had for program participation. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The optimized approach to the CBP program allows partners to develop green building parameters that fit the specific uses of their building, resulting in greater motivation for replication. In addition, the diffusion model developed

  2. Energy Assurance Technical Training and Awareness Program/Energy Infrastructure Training and Analysis Center

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara McCabe

    2005-11-15

    This report covers the work completed during Year One (Year One has a 16 month project period) of a five- year Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC26-03NT41895) between the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This final technical report is being submitted, as required by the Cooperative Agreement, within 90 (calendar) days after the project period ends (December 31, 2004). The resources allocated to Year One of the Cooperative Agreement were adequate for the completion of the required deliverables. All deliverables have been completed and sent to AAD Document Control as directed in the cooperative agreement. The allocation for Year One required 20-25 trainers to be trained in each of five Train-the-Trainer courses and a total of 6,000 workers trained throughout the country. Through cost savings employed for the scheduling and conduct of Train-the-Trainer, instructor refreshers, and direct training classes, 3171 workers have been trained to date. This total incorporates 159 trainers and members from management, local, county, state and federal organizations identified in the Strategic Plan. The largest percentage of personnel trained is heavy equipment operators, and building engineers, which is the largest targeted population identified under this cooperative agreement. The OENHP, using existing curriculum as appropriate, has modified and developed new training modules that have been used to establish four different levels of training courses. The four courses are: (1) EA 500 Energy Assurance Train-the-Trainer, (2) EA 400 Energy Assurance Instructor Refresher, (3) EA 300 Energy Assurance, and (4) EA 100 Energy Assurance Awareness. Training modules cover topics, such as, but not limited to, facility vulnerability and vulnerability assessment, physical security- heating, ventilation, air conditioning, terrorism awareness, weapons of mass

  3. Comparative analysis of economic models in selected solar energy computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.; Barnes, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The economic evaluation models in five computer programs widely used for analyzing solar energy systems (F-CHART 3.0, F-CHART 4.0, SOLCOST, BLAST, and DOE-2) are compared. Differences in analysis techniques and assumptions among the programs are assessed from the point of view of consistency with the Federal requirements for life cycle costing (10 CFR Part 436), effect on predicted economic performance, and optimal system size, case of use, and general applicability to diverse systems types and building types. The FEDSOL program developed by the National Bureau of Standards specifically to meet the Federal life cycle cost requirements serves as a basis for the comparison. Results of the study are illustrated in test cases of two different types of Federally owned buildings: a single family residence and a low rise office building.

  4. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis. State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, Eric

    2010-05-01

    This report relies on six in-depth interviews with loan program administrators to provide descriptions of existing programs. Findings from the interviews are combined with a review of relevant literature to elicit best practices and lessons learned from existing loan programs. Data collected from each of the loan programs profiled are used to quantify the impacts of these specific loan programs on the commonly cited, overarching state clean energy goals of energy security, economic development, and environmental protection.

  5. Energy engineering analysis program at New Cumberland Army Depot, PA. Volume 1: Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-03-01

    This is the Corrected Final Report on Increments A through G of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) at New Cumberland Army Depot (NCAD). This project has been conducted under the Norfolk District, Corps of Engineers Contract No. DACA 65-8O-C-0O14, by PRC Systems Services, Cocoa Beach, FL. During Increments A and B, four modification projects were recommended for funding under the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP). Increment G resulted in three recommended projects and Increment E determined the feasibility of a new, coal-fired central steam plant. Studies conducted during Increments C, D, and F concluded that none of the proposed work was economically feasible under applicable guidelines. Actual energy consumption at NCAD was determined from electricity billings and from fuel oil delivery records. Costs were taken. from contracts and service agreements that were in force at the times the various increments were undertaken. Using conversion factors specified in the Army Facilities Energy Plan and prices in effect during the year, the following summarizes the total energy picture for fiscal year (FY) 83.

  6. Energy-Related Technology Programs in Community and Junior Colleges: An Analysis of Existing and Planned Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doggette, John R.

    This study was conducted to provide a basis for planning for needed energy-related occupational technology programs in two-year educational institutions. A questionnaire was sent to 1,152 junior, community, and technical colleges in fall 1975; 774 (67%) responded. The survey identified 62 existing one- and two-year energy-related programs and 132…

  7. Energy efficiency buildings program, FY 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    A separate abstract was prepared on research progress in each group at LBL in the energy efficient buildings program. Two separate abstracts were prepared for the Windows and Lighting Program. Abstracts prepared on other programs are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program; DOE-21 Building Energy Analysis; and Building Energy Data Compilation, Analysis, and Demonstration. (MCW)

  8. Detailed analysis of low energy plasma data under the Voyager Uranus data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Belcher, John W.; Bagenal, Frances; Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Research effort included the PLS data analysis program where modifications to the data fitting procedure and elimination of possible noise and electron contamination were made. The analysis code corrections were used in checking the Neptune data gathered during the Voyager 2 encounter and for analyzing selected plasma spectra from the warm Io torus. A major task accomplished was the summary of Uranus-related research in the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics for the 1987 - 1990 quadrennium. A limited amount of work was accomplished on assessing the Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere and comparing it with inferred values from shielding by the Uranian ring current. Under this grant there has been a great deal of effort expended on identifying and classifying plasma waves and oscillations in the magnetosheath and solar wind downstream from Uranus. Large amplitude oscillations in plasma parameters are found in the magnetosheath, with density changes of up to a factor of ten occurring on times scales of minutes. New algorithms developed for analyzing the inbound bow shock crossing of Neptune will probably be applied to a more detailed analysis of the Uranus shock in the near future.

  9. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort Polk, Louisiana. Final executive summary, increment `f`

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    Executive Order 12003, dated 19 July 1977, initiated the U.S. Army`s energy conservation effort. Specifically, the Executive Order led to the development of the Army Facilities Energy Plan which directs Army Staff and Major Army Commands to develop detailed implementation plans for energy conservation. As a result of these directives, the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted for an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The EEAP included Increments `A`, `B`, `E`, and `G`. To accomplish the intent of Increment `P`, namely, providing low cost/no cost energy savings recommendations in the form of specific, practical instructions for use by the Facility Engineer, the following general steps were taken: (1) Consider treasures identified in Detailed Scope of Work. (2) identify other potential Low Cost/No Cost energy Conservation Measures (ECM) through discussions with Fort Polk personnel and field surveys by Graham Associates engineers. (3) Review Increments `A`, `B`, and `G` for ECM`s within the Facility Engineer`s funding authority; $200,000 for alteration projects and $1,000,000 for maintenance and repair type work. (4) Evaluate ECM`s using relevant data for other Increments of the ESAP, and develop new data where appropriate.

  10. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

  11. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Daniel; Porro, Gian; Goldberg, Marshall

    2012-04-09

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  12. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Daniel; Porro, Gian; Goldberg, Marshall

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  13. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.

    2010-05-01

    High initial costs can impede the deployment of clean energy technologies. Financing can reduce these costs. And, state, municipal, and utility-sponsored loan programs have emerged to fill the gap between clean energy technology financing needs and private sector lending. In general, public loan programs are more favorable to clean energy technologies than are those offered by traditional lending institutions; however, public loan programs address only the high up-front costs of clean energy systems, and the technology installed under these loan programs rarely supports clean energy production at levels that have a notable impact on the broader energy sector. This report discusses ways to increase the impact of these loan programs and suggests related policy design considerations.

  14. User's Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP). [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  15. Data analysis, analytical support, and technology transfer support for the Federal Energy Management Program Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy Department of Energy. Final technical report, August 8, 1987--August 7, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tremper, C.

    1992-12-31

    Activities included the collecting, reporting, and analysis of Federal energy usage and cost data; development of program guidance and policy analysis of Federal energy usage and cost data; development of program guidance and policy analysis; inter-agency liaison; promotion of energy efficiency initiatives; and extensive technology transfer and outreach activities.

  16. School Energy Management: An Analysis of Energy Conservation Measures under the Schools and Hospitals Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen (Shirley J.) Associates, Inc., Lake Jackson, TX.

    This report analyzes a 1981 survey of public school districts receiving energy conservation measure (ECM) grants under the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, Title III, Cycle 1. The report contains charts of data, analyses of projects, and sections presenting study design, data treatment, findings, and conclusions. The survey's purpose was…

  17. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, K. H.

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains listings of publicly available reports, journal articles, and published conference papers sponsored by the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and published between 1987 and mid-1993. The topics of the bibliography include: analysis and evaluation; building equipment research; building thermal envelope systems and materials; district heating; residential and commercial conservation program; weatherization assistance program; existing buildings research program; ceramic technology project; alternative fuels and propulsion technology; microemulsion fuels; industrial chemical heat pumps; materials for advanced industrial heat exchangers; advanced industrial materials; tribology; energy-related inventions program; electric energy systems; superconducting technology program for electric energy systems; thermal energy storage; biofuels feedstock development; biotechnology; continuous chromatography in multicomponent separations; sensors for electrolytic cells; hydropower environmental mitigation; environmental control technology; and continuous fiber ceramic composite technology.

  18. Energy Engineering Analysis Program study Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 4, Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    Appendix I contains Computer Energy Simulation Data for fifteen representative buildings at Ft. Leonard Wood. Each representative building contains the following data: Energy Constant Calculation sheets; Building Heating Load Calculation sheet; Building Internal Load Calculation sheets (People, Lights, and Equipment); Computer Energy Simulations from BEACON and TRACE energy computer programs. Sample computer simulation sheets on the following pages show how building energy use is extracted from the output reports of BEACON and TRACE.

  19. 2009 Technical Risk and Uncertainty Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics R&D

    SciTech Connect

    McVeigh, J.; Lausten, M.; Eugeni, E.; Soni, A.

    2010-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) conducted a 2009 Technical Risk and Uncertainty Analysis to better assess its cost goals for concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV) systems, and to potentially rebalance its R&D portfolio. This report details the methodology, schedule, and results of this technical risk and uncertainty analysis.

  20. Renewable Energy Certificate Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gwendolyn S. Andersen

    2012-07-17

    This project was primarily to develop and implement a curriculum which will train undergraduate and graduate students at the University seeking a degree as well as training for enrollees in a special certification program to prepare individuals to be employed in a broad range of occupations in the field of renewable energy and energy conservation. Curriculum development was by teams of Saint Francis University Faculty in the Business Administration and Science Departments and industry experts. Students seeking undergraduate and graduate degrees are able to enroll in courses offered within these departments which will combine theory and hands-on training in the various elements of wind power development. For example, the business department curriculum areas include economic modeling, finance, contracting, etc. The science areas include meteorology, energy conversion and projection, species identification, habitat protection, field data collection and analysis, etc.

  1. Basewide energy studies in support of Energy Engineering Analysis Program for Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, Parsons, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-07-01

    The Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, a Government-owned Contractor-Operated military industrial installation under jurisdiction of Headquarters, U.S. Army Armament Material Readiness Command, is assigned responsibility to manufacture explosives (Lead Azide) and related products; and load, assemble, and pack ammunition items as directed; operation and maintenance of active facilities, and maintenance and/or layaway of standby facilities in such condition to permit rehabilitation and resumption of production within time limitations prescribed; procurement, receipt, storage, and issue of necessary supplies, equipment, components, and materials; receipt, surveillance, maintenance, renovation, demilitarization, salvage, storage, inventory, and issue of Field Service Stocks as directed; Industrial Preparedness Planning and Emergency Mobilization Planning. The present population at Kansas AAP consists of 830 Contractor personnel and 30 Government personnel. Under full mobilization the population would increase to 4,477 Contractor personnel and 115 Government personnel. The basic survey data for this energy engineering analysis was gathered during November, 1981, and furnished as an appendix to the preliminary submittal. An executive summary is included as a part of this report. It summarizes and explains the conclusions reached on energy conservation measures that were analyzed under Phase II of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program.

  2. Energy savings opportunity survey, Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort Gordon, Georgia: Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    This is the pre-final submittal of an Energy Savings Opportunity Survey (ESOS) performed at Fort Gordon, GA. This report presents potential energy conservation projects for this Installation. These projects, consisting of Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs), are summarized in Tables 1 and 2. The projects were developed based on project packaging instructions from the Installation and on follow-up phone calls with The Directorate of Installation Support (DIS). The ECOs have been extended to include buildings similar to those surveyed by the architect/engineer. Similarity was based on instructions from the Installation and on follow-up phone calls with DIS. Table 3 lists the buildings surveyed. Thirty nine buildings were surveyed totaling approximately 800,000 square feet. Of these, one was an example of Family Housing and 38 were examples of non-housing buildings. Over one hundred ECOs were considered at Fort Gordon. Of these 39 were applicable in non-housing and 5 in Family Housing.

  3. Energy storage benefits and market analysis handbook : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, James M.; Corey, Garth P.; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr.

    2004-12-01

    This Guide describes a high level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric utility-related applications. In the United States use of electricity storage to support and optimize transmission and distribution (T&D) services has been limited due to high storage system cost and by limited experience with storage system design and operation. Recent improvement of energy storage and power electronics technologies, coupled with changes in the electricity marketplace, indicate an era of expanding opportunity for electricity storage as a cost-effective electric resource. Some recent developments (in no particular order) that drive the opportunity include: (1) states adoption of the renewables portfolio standard (RPS), which may increased use of renewable generation with intermittent output, (2) financial risk leading to limited investment in new transmission capacity, coupled with increasing congestion on some transmission lines, (3) regional peaking generation capacity constraints, and (4) increasing emphasis on locational marginal pricing (LMP).

  4. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii`s energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii`s energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  5. Energy star product specification development framework: Using data and analysis to make program decisions

    SciTech Connect

    McWhinney, Marla; Fanara, Andrew; Clark, Robin; Hershberg, Craig; Schmeltz, Rachel; Roberson, Judy

    2003-09-12

    The Product Development Team (PD) in the US Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR Labeling Program fuels the long-term market transformation process by delivering new specifications. PD's goal is to expand the reach and visibility of ENERGY STAR as well as the market for new energy-efficient products. Since 2000, PD has launched nine new ENERGY STAR specifications and continues to evaluate new program opportunities. To evaluate the ENERGY STAR carbon savings potential for a diverse group of products, PD prepared a framework for developing new and updating existing specifications that rationalizes new product opportunities and draws upon the expertise and resources of other stakeholders, including manufacturers, utilities, environmental groups and other government agencies. By systematically reviewing the potential of proposed product areas, PD makes informed decisions as to whether or not to proceed with developing a specification. In support of this strategy, PD ensures that new product specifications are consistent with the ENERGY STAR guidelines and that these guidelines are effectively communicated to stakeholders during the product development process. To date, the framework has been successful in providing consistent guidance on collecting the necessary information on which to base sound program decisions. Through the application of this framework, PD increasingly recognizes that each industry has unique market and product characteristics that can require reconciliation with the ENERGY STAR guidelines. The new framework allows PD to identify where reconciliation is needed to justify program decisions.

  6. Geothermal energy program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained within the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost-effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy - the heat of the Earth - is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40 percent of the total U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma (the four types of geothermal energy), still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  7. Geothermal Energy Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained with the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost- effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy -- the heat of the Earth -- is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40% of the total US energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma ( the four types of geothermal energy) still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  8. Energy savings opportunity survey, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Campbell, Kentucky, final report - phase I. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-12

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 98 buildings, fifteen chiller plants, and roadway lighting. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were lighting efficiency improvements, instantaneous water heaters, heat recovery from hot refrigerant gases, absorption chiller replacements, and ground water coupled heat pumps. Cost estimates were prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The projects that were developed represent $2,257,000 in annual savings with favorable simple paybacks and saving to investment ratios (SIRs).

  9. Programs in Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Our nation faces significant challenges as we enter the 1990s: securing a reliable supply of competitively priced energy, improving the quality of our environment, and increasing our share of foreign markets for goods and services. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Programs in Renewable Energy are working toward meeting these challenges by developing the technologies that make use of our nation's largest energy resource: renewable energy. The sunlight, wind biomass, flowing water, ocean energy, and geothermal energy that make up the renewable energy resource can be found throughout our nation. These resources can provide all the forms of energy our nation needs: liquid fuels, electricity, and heating and cooling. Renewable energy meets about 10% of our need for these forms of energy today, yet the potential contribution is many times greater. DOE's Programs in Renewable Energy are working side-by-side with American industry to develop the technologies that convert renewable energy resources into practical, cost-competitive energy. After a decade of progress in research, several of these technologies are poised to make large contributions during the 1990s and beyond. This booklet provides an overview of the renewable energy programs and their plans for FY 1990. Sources of additional information are listed at the back of the booklet. 48 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Programs in Renewable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Our nation faces significant challenges as we enter the 1990s: securing a reliable supply of competitively priced energy, improving the quality of our environment, and increasing our share of foreign markets for goods and services. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Programs in Renewable Energy are working toward meeting these challenges by developing the technologies that make use of our nation's largest energy resource: renewable energy. The sunlight, wind biomass, flowing water, ocean energy, and geothermal energy that make up the renewable energy resource can be found throughout our nation. These resources can provide all the forms of energy our nation needs: liquid fuels, electricity, and heating and cooling. Renewable energy meets about 10 percent of our need for these forms of energy today, yet the potential contribution is many times greater. DOE's Programs in Renewable Energy are working side-by-side with American industry to develop the technologies that convert renewable energy resources into practical, cost-competitive energy. After a decade of progress in research, several of these technologies are poised to make large contributions during the 1990s and beyond. This booklet provides an overview of the renewable energy programs and their plans for FY 1990. Sources of additional information are listed at the back of the booklet.

  11. Review of second law analysis techniques applicable to the Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Thermal Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; Zaworski, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    This report describes a review of second law analysis emphasizing techniques applicable to basic research in the thermal sciences. Second law analysis is a class of thermodynamic analysis techniques that has become increasingly popular in the design of thermal systems. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted this review in l987 for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program. The primary goal is to determine whether second law techniques can be used in guiding or contributing to basic research in the thermal sciences. 35 refs.

  12. User's Guide for the NREL Force and Loads Analysis Program. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of and instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP, version 2.2). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for two- or three-bladed rigid hub wind turbines. The effects of turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed rigid hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  13. Ocean energy program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost-effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now. 13 figs.

  14. Ocean energy program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71 percent of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now.

  15. PEAR 2. 1 (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences): User's manual. [Report contains diskette; program uses DOE-2. 1 data base

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This document provides descriptions of the data screens that make up PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences), together with step-by-step instructions for using the microcomputer program diskette. PEAR is entirely contained on a single 5-1/4 inch diskette that can be used by IBM or all IBM-compatible personal computers having at least 128K memory. The program will operate on either a hard disk or a two disk drive system, with either a monochromatic or color monitor. However, a graphics adapter is needed to implement the Bar Chart Option. It is strongly recommended that a backup copy of the PEAR program be made for everyday use and that the original program diskette be stored in a safe place. A diskette for data storage is not needed in order to run the PEAR program. PEAR is an interactive program for residential building energy analysis utilizing a comprehensive DOE-2.1 database for residential buildings. This database was compiled by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory with over 10,000 computer simulations covering five residential buildings in 45 geographical locations. 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. A comparison group analysis of DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

    1993-06-01

    Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program`s impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

  17. Federal Wind Energy Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Office of Program Analysis (OPA) undertook an assessment of 55 research projects sponsored by the Federal Wind Energy Research Program. This report summarizes the results of that review. In accordance with statue and policy guidance, the program's research has targeted the sciences of wind turbine dynamics and the development of advanced components and systems. Wind turbine research has focused on atmospheric fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and structural dynamics. Rating factors including project scientific and technical merit, appropriateness and level of innovation of the technical approach, quality of the project team, productivity, and probable impact on the program's mission. Each project was also given an overall evaluation supported with written comments. 1 fig.

  18. A comparison group analysis of DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

    1993-06-01

    Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program's impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

  19. Energy conversion and storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemical and chemical engineering principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels; (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy storage; (4) characterization of complex chemical processes; and (5) the application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, and advanced methods of analysis. The following five areas are discussed: electrochemical energy storage and conversion; microstructured materials; biotechnology; fossil fuels; and high temperature superconducting processing. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Program analysis for documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lolmaugh, G. H.

    1970-01-01

    A program analysis for documentation (PAD) written in FORTRAN has three steps: listing the variables, describing the structure and writing the program specifications. Technical notes on editing criteria for reviewing program documentation, technical notes for PAD, and FORTRAN program analyzer for documentation are appended.

  1. ENergy and Power Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    In the late 1970s, national and international attention began to focus on energy issues. Efforts were initiated to design and test analytical tools that could be used to assist energy planners in evaluating energy systems, particularly in developing countries. In 1984, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory`s Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) to incorporate a set of analytical tools into a personal computer-based package for distribution in developing countries. The package developed by DIS staff, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), covers the range of issues that energy planners must face: economic development, energy demand projections, supply-and-demand balancing, energy system expansion, and environmental impact analysis. Following the original DOE-supported development effort, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the assistance from the US Department of State (DOS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), provided ENPEP training, distribution, and technical support to many countries. ENPEP is now in use in over 60 countries and is an international standard for energy planning tools. More than 500 energy experts have been trained in the use of the entire ENPEP package or some of its modules during the international training courses organized by the IAEA in collaboration with Argonne`s Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division and the Division of Educational Programs (DEP). This report contains the ENPEP program which can be download from the internet. Described in this report is the description of ENPEP Program, news, forums, online support and contacts.

  2. State Energy Program Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

    1999-03-17

    The State Energy Program Operations Manual is a reference tool for the states and the program officials at the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and Regional Support Offices as well as State Energy Offices. The Manual contains information needed to apply for and administer the State Energy Program, including program history, application rules and requirements, and program administration and monitoring requirements.

  3. Empirical validation of building energy-analysis simulation programs: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; Burch, J.

    1982-09-01

    Under the auspices of the DOE Passive/Hybrid Solar Division Class A Monitoring and Validation Program, SERI has engaged in several areas of research in fiscal year 1982. This research has included: (1) development of a validation methodology, (2) development of a performance monitoring methodology designed to meet the specific data needs for validation of analysis/design tools, (3) construction and monitoring of a 1000-ft/sup 2/ multizone skin-load-dominated test facility, (4) construction and monitoring of a two-zone test cell, and (5) sample validation studies using the DOE-2.1, BLAST-3.0, and SERIRES-1.0 computer programs. The status of these activities is reported and the validation methodology and the Class A data acquisition capabilities at SERI are described briefly.

  4. Evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program: An empirical analysis of 204 inventions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Morell, J.A.; Snell, S.; Soderstrom, E.J.; Friggle, W.

    1987-03-01

    This report is an evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). It assesses the program's effectiveness and impacts, characterizes participating inventions and inventors, and identifies correlates of successful commercialization in order to suggest possible improvements. Seventy of the 204 ERIP inventions that were studied were successfully introduced into the market, accounting for more than $200M in sales from 1976 through 1984. During 1984, 921 full-time equivalent employees were supported directly by ERIP inventors or their licensees. (Estimates of indirect economic impacts are also contained in the report.) Data on patterns of fund raising clearly show a need for assistance by programs like ERIP. Commercially successful inventors shared several traits. They had less formal education, fewer patents, more work experience in small firms, more outside funding early in their work, more shared responsibility with others for invention development, more management experience, and greater previous experience with starting new businesses. Recommendations are made regarding: priorities for allocating ERIP grants; improved efficiency of the NBS/DOE operations; delivery of technical and commercialization assistance to grant recipients; and further evaluation research.

  5. Evaluation of Energy-Related Inventions Program: An Empirical Analysis of 204 Inventions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). It assesses the program's effectiveness and impacts, characterizes participating inventions and inventors, and identifies correlates of successful commercialization in order to suggest possible improvements. Seventy of the 204 ERIP inventions that were studied were successfully introduced into the market, accounting for more than $200M in sales from 1976 through 1984. During 1984, 921 full-time equivalent employees were supported directly by ERIP inventors or their licensees. (Estimates of indirect economic impacts are also contained in the report.) Data on patterns of fund raising clearly show a need for assistance by programs like ERIP. Commercially successful inventors shared several traits. They had less formal education, fewer patents, more work experience in small firms, more outside funding early in their work, more shared responsibility with others for invention development, more management experience, and greater previous experience with starting new businesses. Recommendations are made regarding: (1) priorities for allocating ERIP grants; (2) improved efficiency of the NBS/DOE operations; (3) delivery of technical and commercialization assistance to grant recipients; and (4) further evaluation research.

  6. State Energy Program in Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-04-01

    The State Energy Program in Kentucky summarizes the important renewable energy and energy efficiency projects and recent successes of the Kentucky Division of Energy, which is the state energy office in the Kentucky.

  7. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, E. J.

    1993-06-01

    This report is the 1992 annual progress report for the Energy Conversion and Storage Program, a part of the Energy and Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Work described falls into three broad areas: electrochemistry; chemical applications; and materials applications. The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies principles of chemistry and materials science to solve problems in several areas: (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species, and (5) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Chemical applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing product and waste streams from synfuel plants, coal gasifiers, and biomass conversion processes. Materials applications research includes evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as development of novel preparation techniques. For example, techniques such as sputtering, laser ablation, and poised laser deposition are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  8. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  9. Department of Energy (DOE) research program in structural analysis of vertical-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    The Darrieus-type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) presents a variety of unusual structural problems to designers. The level of understanding of these structural problems governs, to a large degree, the success or failure of today's rotor designs. A survey is presented of the technology available for rotor structural design with emphasis on the DOE research program now underway. Itemizations are included of the major strucural issues unique to the VAWT along with discussion of available analysis techniques for each problem area. It is concluded that tools are available to at least approximately address the most important problems. However, experimental data for confirmation is rather limited in terms of volume and the range of rotor configurations tested.

  10. Geothermal energy program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Geothermal Technology Division (GTD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The GTD R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. It is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. This volume, Volume 2, contains a detailed compilation of each GTD-funded R D activity performed by national laboratories or under contract to industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions.

  11. The NASA Energy Conservation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, G. P.

    1977-01-01

    Large energy-intensive research and test equipment at NASA installations is identified, and methods for reducing energy consumption outlined. However, some of the research facilities are involved in developing more efficient, fuel-conserving aircraft, and tradeoffs between immediate and long-term conservation may be necessary. Major programs for conservation include: computer-based systems to automatically monitor and control utility consumption; a steam-producing solid waste incinerator; and a computer-based cost analysis technique to engineer more efficient heating and cooling of buildings. Alternate energy sources in operation or under evaluation include: solar collectors; electric vehicles; and ultrasonically emulsified fuel to attain higher combustion efficiency. Management support, cooperative participation by employees, and effective reporting systems for conservation programs, are also discussed.

  12. LULU analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, H.J.; Lindstrom, P.J.

    1983-06-01

    Our analysis program LULU has proven very useful in all stages of experiment analysis, from prerun detector debugging through final data reduction. It has solved our problem of having arbitrary word length events and is easy enough to use that many separate experimenters are now analyzing with LULU. The ability to use the same software for all stages of experiment analysis greatly eases the programming burden. We may even get around to making the graphics elegant someday.

  13. Evaluation of the long-term energy analysis program used for the 1978 EIA Administrator's Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R. W.; Weisbin, C. R.; Alsmiller, Jr., R. G.

    1981-10-01

    An evaluation of the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP), a computer model of the energy portion of the US economy that was used for the 1995-2020 projections in its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, is presented. An overview of the 1978 version, LEAP Model 22C, is followed by an analysis of the important results needed by its users. The model is then evaluated on the basis of: (1) the adequacy of its documentation; (2) the local experience in operating the model; (3) the adequacy of the numerical techniques used; (4) the soundness of the economic and technical foundations of the model equations; and (5) the degree to which the computer program has been verified. To show which parameters strongly influence the results and to approach the question of whether the model can project important results with sufficient accuracy to support qualitative conclusions, the numerical sensitivities of some important results to model input parameters are described. The input data are categorized and discussed, and uncertainties are given for some parameters as examples. From this background and from the relation of LEAP to other available approaches for long-term energy modeling, an overall evaluation is given of the model's suitability for use by the EIA.

  14. Metabolic balance analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rombach, J.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program calculates 28 day diet for life support consumables requirements and waste removal. Equations representing food breakdown into carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, modified to account for digestive materials and indigestible crude fibers, formulate total energy consumption. Program applications are listed.

  15. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  16. Methodology and assumptions for evaluating heating and cooling energy requirements in new single-family residential buildings: Technical support document for the PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) microcomputer program

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Byrne, S.; Turiel, I.; Wilson, D.; Hsui, C.; Foley, D.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides technical documentation for a software package called PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) developed by LBL. PEAR offers an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy savings associated with various energy conservation measures used in site-built, single-family homes. This program was designed for use by non-technical groups such as home builders, home buyers or others in the buildings industry, and developed as an integral part of a set of voluntary guidelines entitled Affordable Housing Through Energy Conservation: A Guide to Designing and Constructing Energy Efficient Homes. These guidelines provide a method for selecting and evaluating cost-effective energy conservation measures based on the energy savings estimated by PEAR. This work is part of a Department of Energy program aimed at conducting research that will improve the energy efficiency of the nation's stock of conventionally-built and manufactured homes, and presenting the results to the public in a simplified format.

  17. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  19. Energy Program annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.

    1988-02-01

    The national economy is particularly dependent on efficient electrical generation and transportation. Electrical demand continues to grow and will increasingly rely on coal and nuclear fuels. The nuclear power industry still has not found a solution to the problem of disposing of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. Although coal is in ample supply and the infrastructure is in place for its utilization, environmental problems and improved conversion processes remain technical challenges. In the case of transportation, the nation depends almost exclusively on liquid fuels with attendant reliance on imported oil. Economic alternates---synfuels from coal, natural gas, and oil shale, or fuel cells and batteries---have yet to be developed or perfected so as to impact the marketplace. Inefficiencies in energy conversion in almost all phases of resource utilization remain. These collective problems are the focus of the Energy Program.

  20. A statistical analysis of the energy policy act of 2005, its changes to the daylight saving program, and impact on residential energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Patrick L.

    Government programs designed to decrease resource consumption, improve productivity and capitalize on extended daylight hours in the summer have been developed and implemented throughout the world for nearly three hundred years. In 2005, The United States government adopted an extended daylight savings program that increases the number of weeks where the country observes Daylight Saving Time (DST) from 31 to 35 weeks. The program took effect in March 2007. Arguments in support of DST programs highlight the portion of electricity consumption attributed to residential lighting in the evening hours. Adjusting clocks forward by one hour in summer months is believed to reduce electricity consumption due to lighting and therefore significantly reduce residential energy consumption during the period of DST. This paper evaluates the efficacy of the changes to DST resulting from the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The study focuses on changes to household electricity consumption during the extended four weeks of DST. Arizona, one of two states that continue to opt out of DST serves as the study's control for a comparison with neighboring states, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Utah. Results from the regression analysis of a Difference in Difference model indicate that contrary to evaluations by Congress and the Department of Energy, the four week period of Extended Daylight Saving Time does not produce a significant decrease in per capita electricity consumption in Southwestern states.

  1. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-09-30

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and results of Cycle Seven of PEARL program during the period of April 2006 to September 2006, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC continued receiving the CFL samples purchased by sponsors and finished performing the sphere testing for all CFL models at 100 hours of life. After that LRC aged the CFL samples to 1000 hours of life, and then performed sphere testing for all CFL models at 1000 hours of life. Then the CFLs were placed on the test rack to be aged to 40% of their rated life. Rapid Cycle Stress Test was also performed for all models using different sets of CFL samples.

  2. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conan O'Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2007-03-31

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and results of Cycle Seven and Cycle Eight of PEARL program during the period of October 2006 to March 2007, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. LRC finished performing the sphere testing for all CFL models in Cycle Seven at 40% of their rated life. LRC also performed re-test of Rapid Cycle Stress Test, under the request of DOE, for five CFL models that failed the Rapid Cycle Stress Test in Cycle Seven. From January 2007 to March 2007, LRC coordinated the procuring efforts for the CFL models that were selected for Cycle Eight.

  3. FEMP Renewable Energy Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-14

    Fact sheet describing how the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides Federal agencies with information, guidance, and assistance in using renewable energy.

  4. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  5. Program risk analysis handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    NASA regulations specify that formal risk analysis be performed on a program at each of several milestones. Program risk analysis is discussed as a systems analysis approach, an iterative process (identification, assessment, management), and a collection of techniques. These techniques, which range from extremely simple to complex network-based simulation, are described in this handbook in order to provide both analyst and manager with a guide for selection of the most appropriate technique. All program risk assessment techniques are shown to be based on elicitation and encoding of subjective probability estimates from the various area experts on a program. Techniques to encode the five most common distribution types are given. Then, a total of twelve distinct approaches to risk assessment are given. Steps involved, good and bad points, time involved, and degree of computer support needed are listed. Why risk analysis should be used by all NASA program managers is discussed. Tools available at NASA-MSFC are identified, along with commercially available software. Bibliography (150 entries) and a program risk analysis check-list are provided.

  6. Bolt Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Brandon E.

    2004-01-01

    In designing and testing bolted joints there are multiple parameters to be considered and calculations that must be performed to predict the joint behavior. Each different set of parameters may call for a different set of equations. Determining every parameter in each bolted joint is impractical and in many cases impossible. On the other hand, it is much easier to reduce these calculations to a universal set that can be used for all bolted joints. This is the purpose of the Bolt Analysis Program. My project under the Mechanical and Rotating Systems branch of the Engineering Development and Analysis Division was to take the Bolt Analysis Program Version 2.0 and update the program to a modem and user-friendly format. Version 2.0 of the Bolt Analysis Program is a useful program, but lacks the dynamic capabilities that are needed for current applications. Version 2.0 of the Bolt Analysis Program was written in 1993 using the Pascal programming language in a DOS format. This program allows you to input data in a step-by-step format, calculates the data, and then on a final screen displays the input and the output fiom the calculations. Version 2.0 is still applicable for all bolted joint anaiysis, but has updates that are desired. First, the program runs in DOS format. With the applications available today, my mentor decided it would be best to update the program into Excel using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). This would allow the program to have multiple Graphical User Interfaces (GUI s) while retaining all functions of the previous program. Version 2.0 only allows you to input data in a step-by-step process. If you make a mistake and need to go back, you must run through the entire program before you can return to fix your error. This becomes tedious when needing to change one parameter or test multiple sets of data. In Version 3.0, the program allows you to enter and change data at any time while displaying real-time output data. If you realize an error, it is

  7. Energy efficiency buildings program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    Progress is reported in developing techniques for auditing the energy performance of buildings. The ventilation of buildings and indoor air quality is discussed from the viewpoint of (1) combustion generated pollutants; (2) organic contaminants; (3) radon emanation, measurements, and control; (4) strategies for the field monitoring of indoor air quality; and (5) mechanical ventilation systems using air-to-air heat exchanges. The development of energy efficient windows to provide optimum daylight with minimal thermal losses in cold weather and minimum thermal gain in hot weather is considered as well as the production of high frequency solid state ballasts for fluorescent lights to provide more efficient lighting at a 25% savings over conventional core ballasts. Data compilation, analysis, and demonstration activities are summarized.

  8. Cosmic physics data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, R. Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    A data analysis program was carried out to investigate the intensity, propagation, and origin of primary Cosmic Ray Galactic electrons. Scanning was carried out on two new balloon flight experiments as well as the border area of previous experiments. The identification and evaluation of the energies of the primary electrons were carried out. A new analysis of these data were incorporated into an overall evaluation of the roll of electrons in the problem of the origin of cosmic rays. Recent measurements indicate that the earth may be within the expanding Geminga supernova shock wave which is expected to have a major effect upon the propagation and the energy spectrum of galactic electrons. Calculations with the Geminga model indicate that the cut-off energy may be very close to the observed highest energy electrons in our analysis.

  9. HEAP: Heat Energy Analysis Program, a computer model simulating solar receivers. [solving the heat transfer problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program which can distinguish between different receiver designs, and predict transient performance under variable solar flux, or ambient temperatures, etc. has a basic structure that fits a general heat transfer problem, but with specific features that are custom-made for solar receivers. The code is written in MBASIC computer language. The methodology followed in solving the heat transfer problem is explained. A program flow chart, an explanation of input and output tables, and an example of the simulation of a cavity-type solar receiver are included.

  10. Energy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    1981-01-01

    The Aquatic Center at Corvallis (Oregon) is analyzed for energy use. Energy conservation in the building would be accomplished best through heavy insulation of exterior surfaces and the maximization of passive solar gain. (Author/MLF)

  11. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program. Bibliography, 1993 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, K.H.

    1993-06-01

    The Bibliography contains listings of publicly available reports, journal articles, and published conference papers sponsored by the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and published between 1987 and mid-1993. The topics of Bibliography include: analysis and evaluation; building equipment research; building thermal envelope systems and materials; district heating; residential and commercial conservation program; weatherization assistance program; existing buildings research program; ceramic technology project; alternative fuels and propulsion technology; microemulsion fuels; industrial chemical heat pumps; materials for advanced industrial heat exchangers; advanced industrial materials; tribology; energy-related inventions program; electric energy systems; superconducting technology program for electric energy systems; thermal energy storage; biofuels feedstock development; biotechnology; continuous chromatography in multicomponent separations; sensors for electrolytic cells; hydropower environmental mitigation; environmental control technology; continuous fiber ceramic composite technology.

  12. Integrated Analysis Capability Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Greg, J.; Frisch, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) software system intended to provide highly effective, interactive analysis tool for integrated design of large structures. Supports needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems. Developed to serve as software interface between computer programs from fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and dynamics of systems on one hand and executive software system and data base on other hand to yield highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention given to such users' requirements as handling data and online assistance with operational features and ability to add new modules of user's choice at future date. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-03-31

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

  14. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  15. Timeline Analysis Program (TLA-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Timeline Analysis Program (TLA-1) was described. This program is a crew workload analysis computer program that was developed and expanded from previous workload analysis programs, and is designed to be used on the NASA terminal controlled vehicle program. The following information is described: derivation of the input data, processing of the data, and form of the output data. Eight scenarios that were created, programmed, and analyzed as verification of this model were also described.

  16. Biomedical systems analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Biomedical monitoring programs which were developed to provide a system analysis context for a unified hypothesis for adaptation to space flight are presented and discussed. A real-time system of data analysis and decision making to assure the greatest possible crew safety and mission success is described. Information about man's abilities, limitations, and characteristic reactions to weightless space flight was analyzed and simulation models were developed. The predictive capabilities of simulation models for fluid-electrolyte regulation, erythropoiesis regulation, and calcium regulation are discussed.

  17. Data acquisition and analysis in the DOE/NASA Wind Energy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Four categories of data systems, each responding to a distinct information need are presented. The categories are: control, technology, engineering and performance. The focus is on the technology data system which consists of the following elements: sensors which measure critical parameters such as wind speed and direction, output power, blade loads and strains, and tower vibrations; remote multiplexing units (RMU) mounted on each wind turbine which frequency modulate, multiplex and transmit sensor outputs; the instrumentation available to record, process and display these signals; and centralized computer analysis of data. The RMU characteristics and multiplexing techniques are presented. Data processing is illustrated by following a typical signal through instruments such as the analog tape recorder, analog to digital converter, data compressor, digital tape recorder, video (CRT) display, and strip chart recorder.

  18. Fossil energy program. Summary document

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    This program summary document presents a comprehensive overview of the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities that will be performed in FY 1981 by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy (ASFE), US Department of Energy (DOE). The ASFE technology programs for the fossil resources of coal, petroleum (including oil shale) and gas have been established with the goal of making substantive contributions to the nation's future supply and efficienty use of energy. On April 29, 1977, the Administration submitted to Congress the National Energy Plan (NEP) and accompanying legislative proposals designed to establish a coherent energy policy structure for the United States. Congress passed the National Energy Act (NEA) on October 15, 1978, which allows implementation of the vital parts of the NEP. The NEP was supplemented by additional energy policy statements culminating in the President's address on July 15, 1979, presenting a program to further reduce dependence on imported petroleum. The passage of the NEA-related energy programs represent specific steps by the Administration and Congress to reorganize, redirect, and clarify the role of the Federal Government in the formulation and execution of national energy policy and programs. The energy technology RD and D prog4rams carried out by ASFE are an important part of the Federal Government's effort to provide the combination and amounts of energy resources needed to ensure national security and continued economic growth.

  19. Fossil energy program. Progress report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McNeese, L. E.

    1980-10-01

    This report - the seventy-second of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component development and process evaluation, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process and program analysis, fossil energy environmental analysis, coal preparation and waste utilization, coal preparation plant automation, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, technical support to the TVA fluidized bed combustion demonstration plant program, fossil energy applications assessments, performance assurance system support for fossil energy projects, international assessment of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion technology, and PFBC systems analysis.

  20. Deep space network energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesema, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    If the Deep Space Network is to exist in a cost effective and reliable manner in the next decade, the problems presented by international energy cost increases and energy availability must be addressed. The Deep Space Network Energy Program was established to implement solutions compatible with the ongoing development of the total network.

  1. Utility green pricing programs: A statistical analysis of program effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Olson, Scott; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

    2004-02-01

    Development of renewable energy. Such programs have grown in number in recent years. The design features and effectiveness of these programs varies considerably, however, leading a variety of stakeholders to suggest specific marketing and program design features that might improve customer response and renewable energy sales. This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs. Statistical analysis is performed on both the residential and non-residential customer segments. Data comes from information gathered through a questionnaire completed for 66 utility green pricing programs in early 2003. The questionnaire specifically gathered data on residential and non-residential participation, amount of renewable energy sold, program length, the type of renewable supply used, program price/cost premiums, types of consumer research and program evaluation performed, different sign-up options available, program marketing efforts, and ancillary benefits offered to participants.

  2. Quarterly report on the safety analysis and review system for the Department of Energy's fossil energy programs: phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.T.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this quarterly report is to summarize work performed to date by A.F. Meyer and Associates, Inc. (AFMA) under DOE Contract DE-AC01-80ET13650.002 in support of SARS implementation. Under this contract, AFMA is providing technical assistance to DOE to: analyze SARS data and develop recommended milestones for the Headquarters review requirements; analyze and recommend alternative procedures for conduct of such reviews and develop costs thereon; and support such Headquarters reviews and evaluate SARS activities at project and field analysis and review levels.

  3. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  4. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R. L.

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heat absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.

  5. Geothermal energy: 1992 program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Geothermal energy is described in general terms with drawings illustrating the technology. A map of known and potential geothermal resources in the US is included. The 1992 program activities are described briefly. (MHR)

  6. Wind energy systems: program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  7. Energy-Systems Economic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, J.; Slonski, M. L.; Borden, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Energy Systems Economic Analysis (ESEA) program is flexible analytical tool for rank ordering of alternative energy systems. Basic ESEA approach derives an estimate of those costs incurred as result of purchasing, installing and operating an energy system. These costs, suitably aggregated into yearly costs over lifetime of system, are divided by expected yearly energy output to determine busbar energy costs. ESEA, developed in 1979, is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  8. CTAS data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank; Erzberger, Heinz; Schueller, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis program (AN) is specifically designed to produce graphic and tabular information to aid in the design and checkout of the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS). To best reveal CTAS operation and possible problems, data are plotted in many different ways both in detail and summary form. AN has been designed to analyze both radar surveillance data and output data from CTAS. AN has been extensively used to debug and refine CTAS. It is also being used in the field to monitor and assess CTAS performance. AN is continuously refined to keep up with changing needs. The present version of AN grew out of analysis of Denver Center data. However, the AN software has been written to be adaptable to any other facility Center or TRACON. Presently, one can select Denver Stapleton, Denver International, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, and Dallas Love Field.

  9. Geothermal energy program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This document reviews Geothermal Energy Technology and the steps necessary to place it into service. Specific topics covered are: four types of geothermal resources; putting the resource to work; power generation; FY 1989 accomplishments; hard rock penetration; conversion technology; and geopressured brine research. 16 figs. (FSD)

  10. Energy Conservation Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, John G., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Seven papers suggest ways in which theory informs evaluation research in the area of energy conservation. Perspectives of epistemology and methodology and political and bureaucratic issues are addressed. Examples show how theoretically informed concepts and propositions about personal choice and organizational process contribute to knowledge about…

  11. Energy savings opportunity survey, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Phase I, volume 1, sections 1-4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-12

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 98 buildings, fifteen chiller plants, and roadway lighting. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were lighting efficiency improvements, instantaneous water heaters, heat recovery from hot refrigerant gases, absorption chiller replacements, and ground water coupled heat pumps. Cost estimates were prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The projects that were developed represent $2,257,000 in annual savings with favorable simple paybacks and saving to investment ratios (SIRs).

  12. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  13. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program designed to demonstrate the storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis using heat or cold available from waste or other sources during a surplus period is described. Factors considered include reduction of peak period demand and electric utility load problems and establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. The initial thrust of the STES Program toward utilization of ground water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage is emphasized.

  14. Aquifer thermal energy storage program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Demonstration Program is to stimulate the interest of industry by demonstrating the feasibility of using a geological formation for seasonal thermal energy storage, thereby, reducing crude oil consumption, minimizing thermal pollution, and significantly reducing utility capital investments required to account for peak power requirements. This purpose will be served if several diverse projects can be operated which will demonstrate the technical, economic, environmental, and institutional feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage systems.

  15. Thermal energy storage program description

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, E.

    1989-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored applied research, development, and demonstration of technologies aimed at reducing energy consumption and encouraging replacement of premium fuels (notably oil) with renewable or abundant indigenous fuels. One of the technologies identified as being able to contribute to these goals is thermal energy storage (TES). Based on the potential for TES to contribute to the historic mission of the DOE and to address emerging energy issues related to the environment, a program to develop specific TES technologies for diurnal, industrial, and seasonal applications is underway. Currently, the program is directed toward three major application targets: (1) TES development for efficient off-peak building heating and cooling, (2) development of advanced TES building materials, and (3) TES development to reduce industrial energy consumption.

  16. Program Theory Evaluation: Logic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Program theory evaluation, which has grown in use over the past 10 years, assesses whether a program is designed in such a way that it can achieve its intended outcomes. This article describes a particular type of program theory evaluation--logic analysis--that allows us to test the plausibility of a program's theory using scientific knowledge.…

  17. Final report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities. April 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. USDOE Grant No. DE-FG01-99-EE35098

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, John W.

    2002-03-22

    This is the final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach, and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association, and the Washington State University Energy Program.

  18. Energy from Municipal Waste Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-05-01

    Each year Americans throw away 3 quads of energy in the form of municipal waste and pay 6 billion dollars for the privilege. Only about 21 percent of our municipal wastes are used productively to generate electricity or produce new products by recycling. In 1990, waste-to-energy (WTE) plants and recycling efforts contributed roughly half a quad of energy in the form of electricity and reduced energy use. This productive use of waste avoided the disposal of about 50 million tons of wastes to landfills in that year. The Administration National Energy Strategy (NES) estimates that with proper Federal, State, local, and private action the electric generating capacity of WTE facilities could increase 600 percent by 2010 and by over 1200 percent by 2030, compared to 1990 capacity. This would result in about 55 gigawatts (GW) of capacity by 2030, up from roughly 4 GW today. The Department of Energy (DOE) supports an integrated approach to waste management that includes source reduction, WTE, recycling, and landfilling as complementary pieces of a solution to the municipal waste disposal problem. The Energy from Municipal Waste Program, described in this plan, seeks to minimize the productive use of municipal waste as an energy resource to improving its economic and environmental characteristics. While the Program focuses on WTE systems, it is conducted as part of a larger Federal effort that includes source reduction and recycling of wastes to save energy.

  19. Wind energy technology program summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of the Federal Wind Energy Technology Program is to perform research that will enable the private sector to develop and utilize safe, reliable, and efficient wind energy systems. Generic research will provide the technology base and scientific understanding necessary to allow industry to develop wind energy systems competitive with conventional energy sources. The goal of the DOE wind program is to improve the basic understanding of aerodynamics and structural dynamics in order to more accurately predict wind turbine aerodynamic performance, natural resonance frequencies, and structural loads. Areas included in the research plan being developed for the next five years include: advanced fluid dynamics, aerodynamics research, structural dynamics research, and advanced components and systems research, including multimegawatt (MOD-5) development.

  20. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  1. Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

  2. Energy Efficient Engine: Combustor component performance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Combustor Component Performance analysis as developed under the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) program are presented. This study was conducted to demonstrate the aerothermal and environmental goals established for the EEE program and to identify areas where refinements might be made to meet future combustor requirements. In this study, a full annular combustor test rig was used to establish emission levels and combustor performance for comparison with those indicated by the supporting technology program. In addition, a combustor sector test rig was employed to examine differences in emissions and liner temperatures obtained during the full annular performance and supporting technology tests.

  3. Energy Industry Powers CTE Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khokhar, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Michael Fields is a recent graduate of Buckeye Union High School in Buckeye, Arizona. Fields is enrolled in the Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) Get Into Energy program, which means he is well on his way to a promising career. Specializing in power plant technology, in two years he will earn a certificate that will all but guarantee a…

  4. Wind Energy Career Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gwen Andersen

    2012-03-29

    Saint Francis University has developed curriculum in engineering and in business that is meeting the needs of students and employers (Task 1) as well as integrating wind energy throughout the curriculum. Through a variety of approaches, the University engaged in public outreach and education that reached over 2,000 people annually (Task 2). We have demonstrated, through the success of these programs, that students are eager to prepare for emerging jobs in alternative energy, that employers are willing to assist in developing employees who understand the broader business and policy context of the industry, and that people want to learn about wind energy.

  5. Estimating environmental benefits of energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M.C.; Schrock, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Three national reporting programs that either collect or report information on energy savings and the associated emissions reductions from DSM programs are the Conservation Verification Protocols (CVP), the Greenhouse Gas Voluntary Reporting Program (VRP), and the Green Lights Program. The CVP were enacted to report the atmospheric emissions reductions of S0{sub 2} and N0{sub 2}. The VRP was mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) Section 1605(b) to report CO{sub 2}, emissions reductions. Green Lights is a program designed to reduce emissions by encouraging energy-efficient lighting. In this paper we concentrate on how the verification methods, default emission factors and reporting mechanisms affect the accuracy of the reported energy and emissions savings. Additionally, we focus on the dynamic nature of predicted emissions reductions to gauge the accuracy of predictions over time. If conservation programs are designed to affect existing powerplants, if no load growth is anticipated, and if existing plants will not require replacement, a simple static analysis based on an existing resource mix may be acceptable. This approach is enhanced by defining base case, intermediate, and peak resources. However, if today`s decisions will affect tomorrow`s resource decisions, or if the estimates will be used to establish important milestones (such as emission credits), it is prudent to conduct an analysis that captures most incumbent uncertainties. These uncertainties include future resource decisions and the regional character of energy resources, which may not be captured by national estimates and simple extrapolation techniques. While some estimation methods, such as use of default emission factors, produce reasonable national average numbers, the estimates may not be applicable to specific regions. The environmental and economic value of programs may be misstated.

  6. Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

  7. Collector-Output Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandorf, D. R.; Phillips, Robert F., II

    1986-01-01

    Collector-Output Analysis Program (COAP) programmer's aid for analyzing output produced by UNIVAC collector (MAP processor). COAP developed to aid in design of segmentation structures for programs with large memory requirements and numerous elements but of value in understanding relationships among components of any program. Crossreference indexes and supplemental information produced. COAP written in FORTRAN 77.

  8. Artificial-Satellite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Johnny H.

    1989-01-01

    Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is general orbit-predicting computer program incorporating sufficient orbit-modeling accuracy for design and planning of missions and analysis of maneuvers. Suitable for study of planetary-orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Not written for specific mission and intended use for almost any planetary orbiting mission. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  9. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  10. Energy conversion & storage program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program investigates state-of-the-art electrochemistry, chemistry, and materials science technologies for: (1) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (2) development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; (3) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; (4) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  11. Sandia Infrared Analysis Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-05-11

    SandIR is a sophisticated Windows2000/WindowsXP program for the capture and analysis of thermal images in real time. It is a 32-bit, 5 thread C++ OOP application that rests on Microsoft’s MFC and DirectDraw libraries, the DT3152LS driver functions and the LabEngine link libraries of Origin 4.1 for full functionality. Images may be loaded in from saved files or viewed live by connection to a FLIR (Inframetrics) 600 or 760 IR camera or a video cassettemore » recorder playing tapes recorded from a FLIR (Inframetrlcs) 600 or 760 IR camera- At this time, no other IR camera formats are supported. The raw radiosity data used by SandiR is derived from the 8-bit, 256 level, RS-170 (grayscale) NTSC camera signal. The FLIR camera images contain 175x131 pixels of real IR data. SandIR displays these data in a 604x410 image. The maximum matrix size is 640x452 Including VIR and grayscale. Live IR images can be frozen and then stored to computer disk. An incrementing save command makes It easy to save a sequence of images with a series of related file names. These files can then be loaded into SandIR at a later time for anatysis by a number of predefined tools or data probes. Multiple pseudo-color palettes containing 64 colors are available as well as a 256 level grayscale palette for image colorizing. SandtR always processes all the data in the ROt for each acquired image; so a complete temperature matrix is always available for any frozen image. SandIR performs nearly 7 million temperature calculations per second and updates the image display through Direct Draw over the PCI bus at frequencies of 30 Hz. 3-d surface plots, projections, wire maps or contour plots of absolute temperatures are also updated at 20 to 30 Hz which approaches the real-time acquisition rate of the camera, These plots may be viewed full-screen or frozen in separate windows for comparison to later images. The full set of both 2-d and 3-d Origin plotting tools can be used to manipulate the attached plots

  12. Sandia Infrared Analysis Program

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2004-05-11

    SandIR is a sophisticated Windows2000/WindowsXP program for the capture and analysis of thermal images in real time. It is a 32-bit, 5 thread C++ OOP application that rests on Microsoft’s MFC and DirectDraw libraries, the DT3152LS driver functions and the LabEngine link libraries of Origin 4.1 for full functionality. Images may be loaded in from saved files or viewed live by connection to a FLIR (Inframetrics) 600 or 760 IR camera or a video cassette recorder playing tapes recorded from a FLIR (Inframetrlcs) 600 or 760 IR camera- At this time, no other IR camera formats are supported. The raw radiosity data used by SandiR is derived from the 8-bit, 256 level, RS-170 (grayscale) NTSC camera signal. The FLIR camera images contain 175x131 pixels of real IR data. SandIR displays these data in a 604x410 image. The maximum matrix size is 640x452 Including VIR and grayscale. Live IR images can be frozen and then stored to computer disk. An incrementing save command makes It easy to save a sequence of images with a series of related file names. These files can then be loaded into SandIR at a later time for anatysis by a number of predefined tools or data probes. Multiple pseudo-color palettes containing 64 colors are available as well as a 256 level grayscale palette for image colorizing. SandtR always processes all the data in the ROt for each acquired image; so a complete temperature matrix is always available for any frozen image. SandIR performs nearly 7 million temperature calculations per second and updates the image display through Direct Draw over the PCI bus at frequencies of 30 Hz. 3-d surface plots, projections, wire maps or contour plots of absolute temperatures are also updated at 20 to 30 Hz which approaches the real-time acquisition rate of the camera, These plots may be viewed full-screen or frozen in separate windows for comparison to later images. The full set of both 2-d and 3-d Origin plotting tools can be used to manipulate the attached plots. M plots

  13. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  14. NATIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    GAP Analysis is a rapid conservation evaluation method for assessing the current status of biodiversity at large spatial scales. GAP Analysis provides a systematic approach for evaluating the protection afforded biodiversity in given areas. It uses Geographic Information System (...

  15. Interactive analysis program activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.; Frisch, H. P.; Jones, G. K.; Walker, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an analysis software system capable of performing interdisciplinary preliminary design analyses of large space structure configurations is discussed. Disciplines such as thermal, structures, and controls are to be integrated into a highly user oriented analysis capability. The key feature of the integrated analysis capability, a rapid and efficient system that will minimize solution turnaround time, is discussed.

  16. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - State Energy Program Helps States Plan and Implement Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-01

    State energy offices use SEP funds to develop state plans that identify opportunities for adopting renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, and implementing programs to improve energy sustainability.

  17. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) boiler and chiller study at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-18

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at Fort Sam Houston (FSH) in San Antonio, Texas, between November 28, 1994 and June 15, 1995. The site survey, data collection and analysis was performed by John Carter, E.I.T, Tom Holthaus, P.E., Walter H. Williams III, P.E., and C.A. Pieper, P.E.. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility.

  18. Muon data analysis program RUMDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.

    1994-07-01

    There are currently two data analysis programs available for muon users at ISIS. Both programs can be used for analyzing MuSR and EMU data and can be run on (MUSR01), (EMU01) or set-up to run on a user's account. RUMDA - 'Reading University Muon Data Analysis' was originally from Reading University and is now controlled at ISIS. At present (mid 1994) this suite of programs is run using VAX/VMS and the ISIS plotting package 'GENIE'. It is possible to fit data to any function with a maximum of 10 variables. UDA - 'mu Data Analysis' is a dashboard driven program which allows the user to plot and fit data files on the screen or as hard copies. It is possible to fit data to a combination of Gaussian and/or Lorentzian line shapes. A manual describing this program can be found in the back of the MuSR User Guide.

  19. Long- vs. short-term energy storage technologies analysis : a life-cycle cost study : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenung, Susan M.; Hassenzahl, William V.

    2003-08-01

    This report extends an earlier characterization of long-duration and short-duration energy storage technologies to include life-cycle cost analysis. Energy storage technologies were examined for three application categories--bulk energy storage, distributed generation, and power quality--with significant variations in discharge time and storage capacity. More than 20 different technologies were considered and figures of merit were investigated including capital cost, operation and maintenance, efficiency, parasitic losses, and replacement costs. Results are presented in terms of levelized annual cost, $/kW-yr. The cost of delivered energy, cents/kWh, is also presented for some cases. The major study variable was the duration of storage available for discharge.

  20. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  3. 77 FR 14509 - State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program; Request for Information AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of the General Counsel... mechanisms by grantees of the State Energy Program (SEP) and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

  4. The SURE Reliability Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The SURE program is a new reliability analysis tool for ultrareliable computer system architectures. The program is based on computational methods recently developed for the NASA Langley Research Center. These methods provide an efficient means for computing accurate upper and lower bounds for the death state probabilities of a large class of semi-Markov models. Once a semi-Markov model is described using a simple input language, the SURE program automatically computes the upper and lower bounds on the probability of system failure. A parameter of the model can be specified as a variable over a range of values directing the SURE program to perform a sensitivity analysis automatically. This feature, along with the speed of the program, makes it especially useful as a design tool.

  5. Building energy analysis tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  6. Multi-state 4-H energy program

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, U.B.; Garthe, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    Through Agricultural Engineering 4-H Energy Programs, youth can be educated to gain knowledge, increase hands on skills, and incorporate energy-saving techniques into their lifestyle. In a pilot multi-state energy program tested by 13 states, youth increased their energy awareness.

  7. Ocean energy systems: Multiyear program plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    Specific planned activities to be conducted by the Department of Energy in connection with the Ocean Energy System Program for FY 1979 through FY 1984 are described. Program funding is presently 95 percent OTEC, with 5 percent directed toward alternate energy sources such as salinity gradients waves and currents, technical status, ocean energy systems resource requirements, issues, and a management plan are discussed.

  8. Managing state energy conservation programs - The Minnesota experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.; Armstrong, J. R.

    1980-11-01

    The development and operation of energy conservation programs in the Minnesota Energy Agency (MEA) are discussed. The MEA has responsibility for voluntary conservation efforts, regulating energy efficient devices, and grant programs to audit and retrofit public buildings. The MEA has developed the plan under which the Minnesota utilities will provide conservation services to residential customers, including an on-site home energy audit. The relation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and state energy offices in implementing programs is considered. The DOE has provided technical assistance to the states through the development of a model audit. Steps are discussed to reduce the burdens imposed on the states by program planning, funding, and management responsibilities, including the consolidation of several existing state conservation programs. Improved policy analysis is suggested to correct inefficiencies in government programs.

  9. Developing an Undergraduate Program in Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanchi, John

    2010-10-01

    Texas Christian University (TCU) is developing an undergraduate program in engineering that prepares students to become engineers with an emphasis in energy systems. Courses in the program include an overview of energy in society that is suitable for the general student population; a technical overview of traditional energy (coal, oil and gas), nuclear energy, and renewable energy; and courses that cover more specialized energy topics. Students participating in this program will improve their understanding of energy systems; be introduced to outstanding scientific and engineering problems; learn about the role of energy in a global and societal context; and evaluate contemporary issues associated with energy. The energy systems curriculum will improve student understanding of activities that are a major component of the economy. As engineering students graduate with an energy systems emphasis, they will take their places in society with a much more sophisticated understanding of energy-related issues affecting their community. This talk will present the status of the new program.

  10. Second program on energy research and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-10-01

    The second major energy research and development program is described. Renewable and nonrenewable energy resources are presented which include nuclear technology and future energy sources, like fusion. The current status and outlook for future progress are given.

  11. Renewable Energy Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Fact sheet describing how the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides Federal agencies with information, guidance, and assistance in using renewable energy.

  12. Second program on energy research and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The second major energy research and development program is described. Renewable and nonrenewable energy resources are presented which include nuclear technology and future energy sources, like fusion. The current status and outlook for future progress are given.

  13. Mars Data Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, George E.

    2004-01-01

    Grant NAGS12158 addressed a major NASA objective concerning the possibility of a palm ocean or large lake in the northern lowlands of Mars. Our overall approach for this study was an analysis of the graben-bounded giant polygons of Utopia Planitia, but specifically those grabens that define circles rather than open polygons. These circular grabens overlie buried impact craters, and the grabens form because of differential compaction of the overlying material over crater rims and floors. Several years ago, I predicted that the graben circles would bound depressions, and that the depths of these depressions would scale with the diameters of the graben circles. These predictions have been verified by earlier analysis. During this one-year grant (with one-year no-cost extension) we greatly increased the sample size and validated the earlier research robustly. What remained unexplained was why most of the graben circles in Utopia Planitia were double. A new model, involving volumetric compaction rather than simply 2-D compaction, satisfactorily explains the double rings and also provides a measure of relative thickness of the cover material burying the craters as a function of radial distance from the center of the Utopia Basin. Only two materials are likely candidates for the compacting cover material: volcanic ash, or wet sediment. The water in the wet sediment is largely responsible for the volumetric compaction; dry ash will compact vertically but experiences very limited lateral shrinkage. Thus the depressions within the circular grabens and the model explaining the double rings strongly favor wet sediment and thus provide evidence in favor of a past body of standing water in the northern lowlands. Publications supported entirely or in part by this grant are listed below.

  14. Programming models for energy-aware systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haitao

    Energy efficiency is an important goal of modern computing, with direct impact on system operational cost, reliability, usability and environmental sustainability. This dissertation describes the design and implementation of two innovative programming languages for constructing energy-aware systems. First, it introduces ET, a strongly typed programming language to promote and facilitate energy-aware programming, with a novel type system design called Energy Types. Energy Types is built upon a key insight into today's energy-efficient systems and applications: despite the popular perception that energy and power can only be described in joules and watts, real-world energy management is often based on discrete phases and modes, which in turn can be reasoned about by type systems very effectively. A phase characterizes a distinct pattern of program workload, and a mode represents an energy state the program is expected to execute in. Energy Types is designed to reason about energy phases and energy modes, bringing programmers into the optimization of energy management. Second, the dissertation develops Eco, an energy-aware programming language centering around sustainability. A sustainable program built from Eco is able to adaptively adjusts its own behaviors to stay on a given energy budget, avoiding both deficit that would lead to battery drain or CPU overheating, and surplus that could have been used to improve the quality of the program output. Sustainability is viewed as a form of supply and demand matching, and a sustainable program consistently maintains the equilibrium between supply and demand. ET is implemented as a prototyped compiler for smartphone programming on Android, and Eco is implemented as a minimal extension to Java. Programming practices and benchmarking experiments in these two new languages showed that ET can lead to significant energy savings for Android Apps and Eco can efficiently promote battery awareness and temperature awareness in real

  15. Prospective benefits analysis of the DOE Nuclear Energy portfolio: NE R&D program data assumptions, approach, & results

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Vatsal; Friley, Paul; Lee, John; Reisman, Ann

    2006-10-31

    The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) leads the U.S. Government’s efforts to develop new nuclear energy generation technologies to meet energy and climate goals, and to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel technologies that maximize energy from nuclear fuel; contributes to the R&D for a possible transition to a hydrogen economy; and maintains and enhances the national nuclear technology infrastructure. NE serves the present and future energy needs of the Nation by managing the safe operation and maintenance of the Department of Energy (DOE) critical nuclear in frastructure, providing nuclear technology goods and services, and conducting R&D.

  16. The NASA trend analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, J. Larry; Weinstock, Robert

    1990-01-01

    The four main areas of the NASA trend analysis program (problem/reliability, performance, supportability, and programmatic trending) are defined and illustrated with examples from Space Shuttle applications. Emphasis is on the programmatic-trending component of the program and several of the statistical techniques used. Also described is the NASA safety, reliability, maintainability, and quality assurance management information center, used to focus management attention on key near-term launch concerns and long-range mission trend issues.

  17. Equity implications of utility energy conservation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1994-03-15

    This paper uses the Residential Energy Consumption Survey undertaken by the Energy Information Administration in 1990 to estimate the statistical association between household income and participation in electric utility energy conservation programs and the association between participation and the electricity consumption. The results indicate that utility rebates, energy audits, load management programs and other conservation measures tend to be undertaken at greater frequency by high income households than by low income households. Participants in conservation programs tend to occupy relatively new and energy efficient residences and undertake conservation measures other than utility programs, which suggests that utility sponsored programs are substitutes for other conservation investments. Electricity consumption during 1990 is not significantly less for households participating in utility programs than for nonparticipants, which also implies that utility conservation programs are displacing other conservation investments. Apparently, utility programs are not avoiding costs of new construction and instead are transferring wealth, particularly to high income participating households.

  18. Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    This report explains the goals, methods, and results of a probabilistic analysis of technical risk for a portfolio of R&D projects in the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program (The Program). The analysis is a task by Princeton Energy Resources International, LLC, in support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory on behalf of the Program. The main challenge in the analysis lies in translating R&D results to a quantitative reflection of technical risk for a key Program metric: levelized cost of energy (LCOE).

  19. Photovoltaic Energy Program overview, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Photovoltaic Energy Program fosters the widespread acceptance of photovoltaic (PV) technology and accelerates commercial use of US PV products. The Program is founded on a collaborative strategy involving industry, the research and development community, potential users, utilities, and state and federal agencies. There are three main Program elements: Systems Engineering and Applications, Technology Development, and Research and Development.

  20. Fossil Energy Program semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers progress made during the period October 1, 1990, through March 31, 1991, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, the DOE Fossil Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The Fossil, Energy Program organization chart is shown in the appendix. Topics include: alloys, ceramics and composite research and development; corrosion and erosion research; environmental analysis and information systems; coal conversion development; mild gasification product characterization; coal combustion research; strategic petroleum reserve planning and modeling; and coal structure and chemistry.

  1. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM Chapter from the Energy and Environment Division Annual Report 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    1981-05-01

    The aim of the Energy Efficient Buildings Program is to conduct theoretical and experimental research on various aspects of building technology that will permit such gains in energy efficiency without decreasing occupants' comfort or adversely affecting indoor air quality. To accomplish this goal, we have developed five major research groups. The foci of these groups are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality; Building Energy Analysis; Energy Efficient Windows and Lighting; and Building Energy Data, Analysis and Demonstration.

  2. Energy conversion & storage program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1996-06-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Energy Conversion and Storage (EC&S) Program. The report is divided into three categories: electrochemistry, chemical applications, and material applications. Research performed in each category during 1995 is described. Specific research topics relate to the development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, the development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion, the characterization of new chemical processes and complex chemical species, and the study and application of novel materials related to energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials and deposition technologies, and advanced methods of analysis.

  3. Wind-energy program: FY 1982 second quarterly review

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.; Noun, R.J.; Flaim, T.; Deutsch, M.; Jacobs, E.; Hock, S.; Sklar, H.; Kelley, N.D.

    1982-05-01

    Progress on the following tasks is summarized: program management and planning; WECS applications in nongenerating utilities; technical feasibility of stand-alone SWECS; WECS/storage assessment and options; WECS performance/value analysis; wind energy industry analysis; wind systems coordination; wind workshops; noise and television interference studies; and advanced and innovative wind energy concepts. (MHR)

  4. The energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The United states housing industry is undergoing a metamorphosis from hand built to factory built products. Virtually all new housing incorporates manufactured components; indeed, an increasing percentage is totally assembled in a factory. The factory-built process offers the promise of houses that are more energy efficient, of higher quality, and less costly. To ensure that this promise can be met, the US industry must begin to develop and use new technologies, new design strategies, and new industrial processes. However, the current fragmentation of the industry makes research by individual companies prohibitively expensive, and retards innovation. This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: the formation of a steering committee; the development of a multiyear research plan; analysis of the US industrialized housing industry; assessment of foreign technology; assessment of industrial applications; analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools; and assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. Our goal is to develop techniques to produce marketable industrialized housing that is 25% more energy efficient that the most stringent US residential codes now require, and that costs less. Energy efficiency is the focus of the research, but it is viewed in the context of production and design. 63 refs.

  5. Revitalize Electrical Program with Renewable Energy Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karns, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starting a renewable energy technology (RET) program can be as simple as shifting the teaching and learning focus of a traditional electricity program toward energy production and energy control systems. Redirecting curriculum content and delivery to address photovoltaic solar (PV solar) technology and small wind generation systems is a natural…

  6. Making an Energy Conservation Program Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rump, Erwin E.; Hunter, James L.

    The first step of an energy conservation program is to monitor energy consumption. A system is explained that, in order to determine which buildings are energy efficient (considering all types of energy that a building might use), monitors total energy consumption. All such consumptions can be reduced to a common denominator: Barrels of Energy…

  7. Institutional analysis for energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Cole, R.J.

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes principles, techniques, and other information for doing institutional analyses in the area of energy policy. The report was prepared to support DOE's Regional Issues Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program. RIIA identifies environmental, health, safety, socioeconomic, and institutional issues that could accompany hypothetical future scenarios for energy consumption and production on a regional basis. Chapter 1 provides some theoretical grounding in institutional analysis. Chapter 2 provides information on constructing institutional maps of the processes for bringing on line energy technologies and facilities contemplated in RIIA scenarios. Chapter 3 assesses the institutional constraints, opportunities, and impacts that affect whether these technologies and facilities would in fact be developed. Chapters 4 and 5 show how institutional analysis can support use of exercises such as RIIA in planning institutional change and making energy policy choices.

  8. About the Federal Energy Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Kidd

    2009-04-23

    Richard Kidd, Program Manager for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), presents a discussion on FEMP direction and its future role, federal funding trends, future financing trends, and Earth Day observations.

  9. US Department of Energy education programs catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Missions assigned to DOE by Congress include fundamental scientific research, research and development of energy technologies, energy conservation, strategic weapons development and production, energy regulation, energy data collection and analysis, federal power marketing, and education in science and technology. Contributing to mathematics and science education initiatives are nine DOE national laboratories and more than 30 additional specialized research facilities. Within their walls, some of the most exciting research in contemporary science is conducted. The Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory, lasers, electron microscopes, advanced robotics and supercomputers are examples of some of the unique tools that DOE employs in exploring research frontiers. Nobel laureates and other eminent scientists employed by DOE laboratories have accomplished landmark work in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, and other disciplines. The Department oversees an unparalleled collection of scientific and technical facilities and equipment with extraordinary potential for kindling in students and the general public a sense of excitement about science and increasing public science literacy. During 1991, programs funded by DOE and its contractors reached more than one million students and educators. This document is a catalog of these education programs.

  10. US Department of Energy education programs catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Missions assigned to DOE by Congress include fundamental scientific research, research and development of energy technologies, energy conservation, strategic weapons development and production, energy regulation, energy data collection and analysis, federal power marketing, and education in science and technology. Contributing to mathematics and science education initiatives are nine DOE national laboratories and more than 30 additional specialized research facilities. Within their walls, some of the most exciting research in contemporary science is conducted. The Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory, lasers, electron microscopes, advanced robotics and supercomputers are examples of some of the unique tools that DOE employs in exploring research frontiers. Nobel laureates and other eminent scientists employed by DOE laboratories have accomplished landmark work in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, and other disciplines. The Department oversees an unparalleled collection of scientific and technical facilities and equipment with extraordinary potential for kindling in students and the general public a sense of excitement about science and increasing public science literacy. During 1991, programs funded by DOE and its contractors reached more than one million students and educators. This document is a catalog of these education programs.

  11. WATER QUALITY ANALYSIS SIMULATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP6), an enhancement of the original WASP (Di Toro et al., 1983; Connolly and Winfield,1984; Ambrose, R.B. et al.,1988). This model helps users interpret and predict water quality responses to natural phenomena and man-made polluti...

  12. Pilot States Program report: Home energy ratings systems and energy-efficient mortgages

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.

    2000-04-04

    This report covers the accomplishments of the home energy ratings systems/energy-efficient mortgages (HERS/EEMs) pilot states from 1993 through 1998, including such indicators as funding, ratings and EEMs achieved, active raters, and training and marketing activities. A brief description of each HERS program's evolution is included, as well as their directors' views of the programs' future prospects. Finally, an analysis is provided of successful HERS program characteristics and factors that appear to contribute to HERS program success.

  13. Chemical mass balance modeling for air quality analysis near a waste-to-energy facility in a complex urban area: Program design

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.; Watson, J.; Woy, J. van

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an ambient monitoring and receptor modeling study to evaluate air quality impacts from a state-of-the-art municipal waste management facility in a major urban area. The Robbins Resource Recovery Facility (RRRF), located in the Chicago metropolitan area, processes municipal solid waste (MSW) to recover recyclables, process the residual waste to create refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and burns the RDF to reduce the residual waste volume and recover energy. The RRRF is cooperating with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) and the Illinois Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to analyze air quality and facility impacts in the plant vicinity. An ambient monitoring program began one year before plant operation and will continue for five years after startup. Because the impacts of the RRRF are projected to be very low, and because the Chicago area includes a complex mix of existing industrial, commercial, and residential activity, the ambient data will be analyzed using Version 7.0 of the USEPA s Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model to estimate the extent of the RRRF`s impact on air quality in the area. The first year of pre-operational ambient data is currently under analysis. This paper describes the study design considerations, ambient monitoring program, emission data acquisition, background source data needs, and data analysis procedures developed to conduct CMB modeling in a complex industrialized area.

  14. Space station interior noise analysis program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stusnick, E.; Burn, M.

    1987-02-01

    Documentation is provided for a microcomputer program which was developed to evaluate the effect of the vibroacoustic environment on speech communication inside a space station. The program, entitled Space Station Interior Noise Analysis Program (SSINAP), combines a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) prediction of sound and vibration levels within the space station with a speech intelligibility model based on the Modulation Transfer Function and the Speech Transmission Index (MTF/STI). The SEA model provides an effective analysis tool for predicting the acoustic environment based on proposed space station design. The MTF/STI model provides a method for evaluating speech communication in the relatively reverberant and potentially noisy environments that are likely to occur in space stations. The combinations of these two models provides a powerful analysis tool for optimizing the acoustic design of space stations from the point of view of speech communications. The mathematical algorithms used in SSINAP are presented to implement the SEA and MTF/STI models. An appendix provides an explanation of the operation of the program along with details of the program structure and code.

  15. Space station interior noise analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stusnick, E.; Burn, M.

    1987-01-01

    Documentation is provided for a microcomputer program which was developed to evaluate the effect of the vibroacoustic environment on speech communication inside a space station. The program, entitled Space Station Interior Noise Analysis Program (SSINAP), combines a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) prediction of sound and vibration levels within the space station with a speech intelligibility model based on the Modulation Transfer Function and the Speech Transmission Index (MTF/STI). The SEA model provides an effective analysis tool for predicting the acoustic environment based on proposed space station design. The MTF/STI model provides a method for evaluating speech communication in the relatively reverberant and potentially noisy environments that are likely to occur in space stations. The combinations of these two models provides a powerful analysis tool for optimizing the acoustic design of space stations from the point of view of speech communications. The mathematical algorithms used in SSINAP are presented to implement the SEA and MTF/STI models. An appendix provides an explanation of the operation of the program along with details of the program structure and code.

  16. Program Instrumentation and Trace Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Goldberg, Allen; Filman, Robert; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several attempts have been made recently to apply techniques such as model checking and theorem proving to the analysis of programs. This shall be seen as a current trend to analyze real software systems instead of just their designs. This includes our own effort to develop a model checker for Java, the Java PathFinder 1, one of the very first of its kind in 1998. However, model checking cannot handle very large programs without some kind of abstraction of the program. This paper describes a complementary scalable technique to handle such large programs. Our interest is turned on the observation part of the equation: How much information can be extracted about a program from observing a single execution trace? It is our intention to develop a technology that can be applied automatically and to large full-size applications, with minimal modification to the code. We present a tool, Java PathExplorer (JPaX), for exploring execution traces of Java programs. The tool prioritizes scalability for completeness, and is directed towards detecting errors in programs, not to prove correctness. One core element in JPaX is an instrumentation package that allows to instrument Java byte code files to log various events when executed. The instrumentation is driven by a user provided script that specifies what information to log. Examples of instructions that such a script can contain are: 'report name and arguments of all called methods defined in class C, together with a timestamp'; 'report all updates to all variables'; and 'report all acquisitions and releases of locks'. In more complex instructions one can specify that certain expressions should be evaluated and even that certain code should be executed under various conditions. The instrumentation package can hence be seen as implementing Aspect Oriented Programming for Java in the sense that one can add functionality to a Java program without explicitly changing the code of the original program, but one rather writes an

  17. Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Gregory K; Sanchez, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-11-15

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates from the use ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2009, annual forecasts for 2010 and 2011, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2009 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2010 through 2015. Through 2009 the program saved 9.5 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 170 million metric tons carbon (MMTC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 11.5 Quads or primary energy saved and 202 MMTC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 110 MMTC and 231 MMTC (1993 to 2009) and between 130 MMTC and 285 MMTC (2010 to 2015).

  18. An analysis of the energy efficiency, range, and attributable emissions of electric vehicles, and an assessment of the United States Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program from 1976-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Kathryn G.

    Over the last decade, much attention has focused on the efforts of the federal government and private industry working together through public-private partnerships to develop electric and hybrid vehicle technologies. These efforts have taken place principally through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Generally not appreciated is the extent of federal government investment in electric and hybrid vehicle research and development (R&D) that predates the USABC and PNGV ventures. The U.S. Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program (EHV Program) was established through an act of Congress in 1976 and has operated continuously since that time. The EHV Program has made significant contributions to the development of advanced battery technology. The program has funded research in fourteen distinct battery chemistries, has helped to establish a technology infrastructure in the field of battery development. This thesis has two guiding questions. First, what is it that makes developing adequate batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles so challenging? Second, what can and should the federal government do to hasten development of battery technologies for these advanced vehicles? In response to the first question, an analysis of the energy requirements of electric vehicles is presented, estimating vehicle range, efficiency, and emissions benefits based on available technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are considered, and compared to conventional heat engine vehicles to estimate the potential reductions in transportation sector emissions. To address the second question, a review of technology policy since the Ford administration is presented. This discussion provides a background necessary to interpret the waxing and waning fortunes of the EHV Program over more than a quarter century. Reviews of government documents and

  19. Biomass energy systems program summary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Research programs in biomass which were funded by the US DOE during fiscal year 1978 are listed in this program summary. The conversion technologies and their applications have been grouped into program elements according to the time frame in which they are expected to enter the commercial market. (DMC)

  20. NANA Strategic Energy Plan & Energy Options Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Hermanson; Brian Yanity

    2008-12-31

    Biomass Feasibility analysis in the upper Kobuk; • Run of the river hydroelectric development for the Upper Kobuk; • Solar photovoltaic (PV) power demonstration projects for Noatak, Ambler, Selawik, Kiana, and Noorvik; • Heat Recovery for several communities; In September 2008, the NRC team participated at the Alaska Rural Energy Conference in Girdwood, Alaska In November 2008, the NRC team gave a presentation on the NANA regional energy plans at a DOE Tribal Energy Program conference in Denver, Colorado. In January 2009, the final SEP report was submitted to NRC.

  1. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  2. Assessing the Sustainability of Japan's Foreign Aid Program: An Analysis of Development Assistance to Energy Sectors of Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Hideka

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the effect of Japan's official development assistance (ODA) over 10 years that proposed to facilitate environmental conservation in developing countries. Special emphasis is given to ODA disbursements in the energy sector to evaluate whether Japan's foreign aid has shifted its policy toward more environmentally sound goals.…

  3. Appraisal and analysis of opportunities for a joint DOE/DOD energy demonstration program. Final report. [Includes possible site information

    SciTech Connect

    Ziem, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The basic objective of this study was to assess the potential for cooperative projects between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) in areas concerned with the development of Total Energy (TE) Systems and to do the groundwork and liaison necessary to initiate those projects. The scope of the potential joint projects includes cooperative effort in the development and test of a variety of heat engines (prime movers) capable of utilizing coal as well as synthetic liquid fuels derived from coal and oil shale; as well as the indication of potential Military Department sites which would be suitable for the demonstration of TE systems based on a variety of such prime movers. In order to accomplish the objective of the study, it was necessary to review a large number of DOD studies and plans and to discuss the objective of the TETAS studies with a large number of Military Department people. The DOD recognizes the requirement for an assured energy supply and the need to learn how to use the synthetic fuels from coal and shale being developed by the DOE. The need to modify engine systems to adapt them to differing fuel characteristics and make those engines more flexible relative to the range of fuels they will accept is clear. What is not so clear is the fact that the DOD has a much greater opportunity to conserve energy in now inefficient facility operations than it has in mobility operations which must continue to stress mission and high performance. This report indicates guidelines for the conduct of joint projects between the DOE and the DOD which can aid both in meeting their energy objective.

  4. Overview of Federal wind energy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancona, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives and strategies of the Federal wind energy program are described. Changes in the program structure and some of the additions to the program are included. Upcoming organizational changes and some budget items are discussed, with particular emphasis on recent significant events regarding new approvals.

  5. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  6. Ocean energy program summary. Volume 2: Research summaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71 percent of the earth's surface, this stored energy is realized as waves, currents, and thermal salinity gradients. The purpose of the Federal Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy in a cost effective and environmentally acceptable manner. The OET Program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where the commercial sector can assess whether applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives or supplements to systems. Past studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) as the largest potential contributor to United States energy supplies from the ocean resource. As a result, the OET Program concentrates on research to advance OTEC technology. Current program emphasis has shifted to open-cycle OTEC power system research because the closed-cycle OTEC system is at a more advanced stage of development and has already attracted industrial interest. During FY 1989, the OET Program focused primarily on the technical uncertainties associated with near-shore open-cycle OTEC systems ranging in size from 2 to 15 MW(sub e). Activities were performed under three major program elements: thermodynamic research and analysis, experimental verification and testing, and materials and structures research. These efforts addressed a variety of technical problems whose resolution is crucial to demonstrating the viability of open-cycle OTEC technology. This publications is one of a series of documents on the Renewable Energy programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. An overview of all the programs is available, entitled Programs in Renewable Energy.

  7. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide. [Contains special sections on analytical energy forecasting, renewable energy resource assessment, demand-side energy management, energy vulnerability assessment, and energy strategy integration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii's energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii's energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  8. Energy project: petroleum and natural gas in Egypt; Linear-programming analysis of the use of natural gas in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    Natural gas use in Egypt, although still in its infancy, has risen rapidly during the past few years and even larger increases are expected. The extent to which natural gas usage can improve Egypt's foreign-exchange position by allowing greater exports of oil is herein examined. A linear-programming model is used to identify shadow prices for natural gas production and transportation costs and for the world market costs of other fuels. The model thus determines the minimum foreign exchange costs needed to operate the Egyptian natural gas industry and other Egyptian sectors that have the option of using natural gas (the fertilizer, electric power generation, Helwan iron and steel, cement, and residential and commercial sectors). Only existing production facilities are considered. Results show that the most important application for natural gas is in the manufacture of cement; use in iron and steel production is indicated when electricity demand is low or coal prices are high. A 17-item bibliography (1972-1982) is appended.

  9. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.; Jackson, R.

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences.

  10. Base Program on Energy Related Research

    SciTech Connect

    Western Research Institute

    2008-06-30

    The main objective of the Base Research Program was to conduct both fundamental and applied research that will assist industry in developing, deploying, and commercializing efficient, nonpolluting fossil energy technologies that can compete effectively in meeting the energy requirements of the Nation. In that regard, tasks proposed under the WRI research areas were aligned with DOE objectives of secure and reliable energy; clean power generation; development of hydrogen resources; energy efficiency and development of innovative fuels from low and no-cost sources. The goal of the Base Research Program was to develop innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources--coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the overall Base Program. This document represents a stand-alone Final Report for the entire Program. It should be noted that an interim report describing the Program achievements was prepared in 2003 covering the progress made under various tasks completed during the first five years of this Program.

  11. A FORTRAN Program for Discrete Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, James O.; Brewer, James K.

    1976-01-01

    A Fortran program is presented for discriminant analysis of discrete variables. The program assumes discrete, nominal data with no distributional, variance-covariance assumptions. The program handles a maximum of fifty predictor variables and twelve outcome groups. (Author/JKS)

  12. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the start up and take off portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the start up transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because of the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable, and also because the cyclic elastic viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies. One element of the structures program is developing improved time varying thermal mechanical load models for the entire engine mission cycle from start up to shutdown. Another major part of the program is the development of new and improved nonlinear 3-D finite elements and associated structural analysis programs, including the development of temporal elements with time dependent properties to account for creep effects in the materials and components.

  13. NET-ZERO ENERGY BUILDING OPERATOR TRAINING PROGRAM (NZEBOT)

    SciTech Connect

    Brizendine, Anthony; Byars, Nan; Sleiti, Ahmad; Gehrig, Bruce; Lu, Na

    2012-12-31

    topics in the primary five-day Building Energy/Sustainability Management Certificate program in five training modules, namely: 1) Strategic Planning, 2) Sustainability Audits, 3) Information Analysis, 4) Energy Efficiency, and 5) Communication. Training Program 2 addresses the following technical topics in the two-day Building Technologies workshop: 1) Energy Efficient Building Materials, 2) Green Roofing Systems, 3) Energy Efficient Lighting Systems, 4) Alternative Power Systems for Buildings, 5) Innovative Building Systems, and 6) Application of Building Performance Simulation Software. Program 3 is a seminar which provides an overview of elements of programs 1 and 2 in a seminar style presentation designed for the general public to raise overall public awareness of energy and sustainability topics.

  14. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  15. Preliminary Technical Risk Analysis for the Geothermal Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    McVeigh, J.; Cohen, J.; Vorum, M.; Porro, G.; Nix, G.

    2007-03-01

    This report explains the goals, methods, and results of a probabilistic analysis of technical risk for a portfolio of R&D projects in the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program ('the Program'). The analysis is a task by Princeton Energy Resources International, LLC (PERI), in support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on behalf of the Program. The main challenge in the analysis lies in translating R&D results to a quantitative reflection of technical risk for a key Program metric: levelized cost of energy (LCOE). This requires both computational development (i.e., creating a spreadsheet-based analysis tool) and a synthesis of judgments by a panel of researchers and experts of the expected results of the Program's R&D.

  16. Calendar Year 2008 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, GregoryK; Sanchez, Marla; Brown, RichardE; Lai, Judy

    2010-08-24

    This paper presents current and projected savings for ENERGY STAR labeled products, and details the status of the model as implemented in the September 2009 spreadsheets. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency labeling program operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products, and currently labels more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, heating, cooling and ventilation equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with stakeholders. This report presents savings estimates for ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of energy, dollar, and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2008, annual forecasts for 2009 and 2010, and cumulative savings estimates for the period 1993 through 2008 and cumulative forecasts for the period 2009 through 2015. Through 2008 the program saved 8.8 Quads of primary energy and avoided the equivalent of 158 metric tones carbon (MtC). The forecast for the period 2009-2015 is 18.1 Quads or primary energy saved and 316 MtC emissions avoided. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 104 MtC and 213 MtC (1993 to 2008) and between 206 MtC and 444 MtC (2009 to 2015). In this report we address the following questions for ENERGY STAR labeled products: (1) How are ENERGY STAR impacts quantified; (2) What are the ENERGY STAR achievements; and (3) What are the limitations to our method?

  17. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this inventory, some of which has been placed into a searchable spreadsheet, is to support the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and to research cost information in state-mandated energy efficiency program evaluations – e.g., for use in updating analytic and modeling assumptions used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

  18. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla Christine; Homan, Gregory; Brown, Richard

    2008-10-31

    ENERGY STAR is a voluntary energy efficiency-labeling program operated jointly by the United States Department of Energy and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Since the program inception in 1992, ENERGY STAR has become a leading international brand for energy efficient products. ENERGY STAR's central role in the development of regional, national, and international energy programs necessitates an open process whereby its program achievements to date as well as projected future savings are shared with committed stakeholders. Through 2007, the program saved 7.1 Quads of primary energy and avoided 128 MtC equivalent. The forecast shows that the program is expected to save 21.2 Quads of primary energy and avoid 375 MtC equivalent over the period 2008-2015. The sensitivity analysis bounds the best estimate of carbon avoided between 84 MtC and 172 MtC (1993 to 2007) and between 243 MtC and 519 MtC (2008 to 2015).

  19. Conducting a SWOT Analysis for Program Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a teacher education program, or any program, can be the driving force for implementing change. A SWOT analysis is used to assist faculty in initiating meaningful change in a program and to use the data for program improvement. This tool is useful in any undergraduate or degree…

  20. Hawaii's energy self-sufficiency program from renewable energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    The need for public support for incentives to accelerate commercialization of renewable energy sources is discussed from the viewpoint of the Hawaiian program to use the state's wind, solar, geothermal, and OTEC resources to achieve energy self-sufficiency. The objectives and major events in the research, development and demonstration and implementation programs and related activities are described. (LEW)

  1. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), limited energy study-lighting Fort Campbell, Kentucky: Volume 1-sections 1-5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-23

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 95 representative buildings at Fort Campbell, categorized as Korean War Barracks, Airfield Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior lighting, and indoor lighting controls. Cost estimates were prepared.

  2. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Limited Energy Study - Lighting, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Volume 2, section 6 and appendices A-D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this project is to replace existing interior lighting with high efficiency fixtures and lamps at the Korean War Barracks. The replacement of the existing lighting will reduce energy consumption and life cycle operating costs for the Barracks in accordance with the Army Energy Resources Management Plan (ERMP) and Executive Order 12759.

  3. Energy efficient engine component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments in the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development and Integration program during the period of April 1, 1981 through September 30, 1981 are discussed. The major topics considered are: (1) propulsion system analysis, design, and integration; (2) engine component analysis, design, and development; (3) core engine tests; and (4) integrated core/low spool testing.

  4. Wind Energy Education and Training Programs (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce to support it. The Wind Powering America website features a map of wind energy education and training program locations at community colleges, universities, and other institutions in the United States. The map includes links to contacts and program details. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for wind energy education and training programs episodes.

  5. Safeguard Vulnerability Analysis Program (SVAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.M.; Dittmore, M.H.; Orvis, W.J.; Wahler, P.S.

    1980-06-23

    This report gives an overview of the Safeguard Vulnerability Analysis Program (SVAP) developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. SVAP was designed as an automated method of analyzing the safeguard systems at nuclear facilities for vulnerabilities relating to the theft or diversion of nuclear materials. SVAP addresses one class of safeguard threat: theft or diversion of nuclear materials by nonviolent insiders, acting individually or in collusion. SVAP is a user-oriented tool which uses an interactive input medium for preprocessing the large amounts of safeguards data. Its output includes concise summary data as well as detailed vulnerability information.

  6. Planetary Protection Bioburden Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudet, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This program is a Microsoft Access program that performed statistical analysis of the colony counts from assays performed on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft to determine the bioburden density, 3-sigma biodensity, and the total bioburdens required for the MSL prelaunch reports. It also contains numerous tools that report the data in various ways to simplify the reports required. The program performs all the calculations directly in the MS Access program. Prior to this development, the data was exported to large Excel files that had to be cut and pasted to provide the desired results. The program contains a main menu and a number of submenus. Analyses can be performed by using either all the assays, or only the accountable assays that will be used in the final analysis. There are three options on the first menu: either calculate using (1) the old MER (Mars Exploration Rover) statistics, (2) the MSL statistics for all the assays, or This software implements penetration limit equations for common micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems. Allowable MMOD risk is formulated in terms of the probability of penetration (PNP) of the spacecraft pressure hull. For calculating the risk, spacecraft geometry models, mission profiles, debris environment models, and penetration limit equations for installed shielding configurations are required. Risk assessment software such as NASA's BUMPERII is used to calculate mission PNP; however, they are unsuitable for use in shield design and preliminary analysis studies. The software defines a single equation for the design and performance evaluation of common MMOD shielding configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems, along with a description of their validity range and guidelines for their application. Recommendations are based on preliminary reviews of fundamental assumptions, and accuracy in predicting experimental impact test results. The software

  7. Fossil-energy program. Progress report for June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    This report - the eighty-third of series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, chemical research and development, materials technology, component development and process evaluation, technical support to major liquefaction projects, process analysis and engineering evaluations, fossil energy environmental analysis, flue gas desulfurization, coal preparation waste utilization, atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor for cogeneration, TVA FBC demonstration plant program technical support, PFBC systems analysis, fossil fuel applications assessments, performance assurance system support for fossil energy projects, international energy technology assessment, generalized equilibrium models for liquid and gaseous fuel supplies, analyses of coal production goals, and fossil energy information center.

  8. Personal Computer Transport Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Frank, III; Wobick, Craig; Chapman, Kirt; McCloud, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Personal Computer Transport Analysis Program (PCTAP) is C++ software used for analysis of thermal fluid systems. The program predicts thermal fluid system and component transients. The output consists of temperatures, flow rates, pressures, delta pressures, tank quantities, and gas quantities in the air, along with air scrubbing component performance. PCTAP s solution process assumes that the tubes in the system are well insulated so that only the heat transfer between fluid and tube wall and between adjacent tubes is modeled. The system described in the model file is broken down into its individual components; i.e., tubes, cold plates, heat exchangers, etc. A solution vector is built from the components and a flow is then simulated with fluid being transferred from one component to the next. The solution vector of components in the model file is built at the initiation of the run. This solution vector is simply a list of components in the order of their inlet dependency on other components. The component parameters are updated in the order in which they appear in the list at every time step. Once the solution vectors have been determined, PCTAP cycles through the components in the solution vector, executing their outlet function for each time-step increment.

  9. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) State Energy Program (SEP) was established in 1996 by merging the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP) and the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP), both of which had been in existence since 1976 (U.S. DOE 2001a). The SEP provides financial and technical assistance for a wide variety of energy efficiency and renewable energy activities undertaken by the states and territories. SEP provides money to each state and territory according to a formula that accounts for population and energy use. In addition to these ''Formula Grants'', SEP ''Special Project'' funds are made available on a competitive basis to carry out specific types of energy efficiency and renewable energy activities (U.S. DOE 2003c). The resources provided by DOE typically are augmented by money and in-kind assistance from a number of sources, including other federal agencies, state and local governments, and the private sector. The states SEP efforts include several mandatory activities, such as establishing lighting efficiency standards for public buildings, promoting car and vanpools and public transportation, and establishing policies for energy-efficient government procurement practices. The states and territories also engage in a broad range of optional activities, including holding workshops and training sessions on a variety of topics related to energy efficiency and renewable energy, providing energy audits and building retrofit services, offering technical assistance, supporting loan and grant programs, and encouraging the adoption of alternative energy technologies. The scope and variety of activities undertaken by the various states and territories is extremely broad, and this reflects the diversity of conditions and needs found across the country and the efforts of participating states and territories to respond to them. The purpose of this report is to present estimates of the energy and cost savings and emissions reductions associated with

  10. The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klineberg, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program is to accelerate the development of advanced technology for more energy-efficient subsonic transport aircraft. This program will have application to current transport derivatives in the early 1980s and to all-new aircraft of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Six major technology projects were defined that could result in fuel savings in commercial aircraft: (1) Engine Component Improvement, (2) Energy Efficient Engine, (3) Advanced Turboprops, (4) Energy Efficiency Transport (aerodynamically speaking), (5) Laminar Flow Control, and (6) Composite Primary Structures.

  11. Rural Energy Savings Program Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Merkley, Jeff [D-OR

    2010-03-10

    06/17/2010 Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Subcommittee on Energy. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Rural Energy Savings Program Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Clyburn, James E. [D-SC-6

    2010-03-09

    09/20/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

  14. NASA-OAST photovoltaic energy conversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. P.; Loria, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA program in photovoltaic energy conversion research is discussed. Solar cells, solar arrays, gallium arsenides, space station and spacecraft power supplies, and state of the art devices are discussed.

  15. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  16. The National Geothermal Energy Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The continuous demand for energy and the concern for shortages of conventional energy resources have spurred the nation to consider alternate energy resources, such as geothermal. Although significant growth in the one natural steam field located in the United States has occurred, a major effort is now needed if geothermal energy, in its several forms, is to contribute to the nation's energy supplies. From the early informal efforts of an Interagency Panel for Geothermal Energy Research, a 5-year Federal program has evolved whose objective is the rapid development of a commercial industry for the utilization of geothermal resources for electric power production and other products. The Federal program seeks to evaluate the realistic potential of geothermal energy, to support the necessary research and technology needed to demonstrate the economic and environmental feasibility of the several types of geothermal resources, and to address the legal and institutional problems concerned in the stimulation and regulation of this new industry.

  17. Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This is the second annual report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program which began on March 2, 1992, under a Cooperative Agreement (FCO3-92F19l68) with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The HES program is scheduled for completion by December 31, 1994. As outlined in the Statement of Joint Objectives. The purpose of the study is to develop an integrated State of Hawaii energy strategy, including an assessment of the State`s fossil fuel reserve requirements and the most effective way to meet those needs, the availability and practicality of increasing the use of native energy resources, potential alternative fossil energy technologies such as coal gasification and potential energy efficiency measures which could lead to demand reduction. This work contributes to the (US)DOE mission, will reduce the State`s vulnerability to energy supply disruptions and contributes to the public good.

  18. ASAP- ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is a general orbit prediction program which incorporates sufficient orbit modeling accuracy for mission design, maneuver analysis, and mission planning. ASAP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. ASAP uses Cowell's method in the numerical integration of the equations of motion. The orbital mechanics calculation contains perturbations due to non-sphericity (up to a 40 X 40 field) of the planet, lunar and solar effects, and drag and solar radiation pressure. An 8th order Runge-Kutta integration scheme with variable step size control is used for efficient propagation. The input includes the classical osculating elements, orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficient, gravitational constants, and planet radius, rotation rate, etc. The printed output contains Cartesian coordinates, velocity, equinoctial elements, and classical elements for each time step or event step. At each step, selected output is added to a plot file. The ASAP package includes a program for sorting this plot file. LOTUS 1-2-3 is used in the supplied examples to graph the results, but any graphics software package could be used to process the plot file. ASAP is not written to be mission-specific. Instead, it is intended to be used for most planetary orbiting missions. As a consequence, the user has to have some basic understanding of orbital mechanics to provide the correct input and interpret the subsequent output. ASAP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible computer operating under MS-DOS. The ASAP package requires a math coprocessor and a minimum of 256K RAM. This program was last

  19. Advanced solar energy research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozik, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    Photobiology, photochemical conversion and storage, photoelectrochemistry, and materials research are reported. Three areas of photobiological research under investigation are discussed: in vitro energy conversion, microbiological hydrogen production, and algal hydrocarbon production. Sensitizers for solar photochemistry, redox catalysis, coupled systems, and inorganic photochemistry are reviewed. Theory and modeling of the energetics of semiconductor/electrolyte junctions and the effects of inversion are reported as well as new semiconductor electrode materials and work on photoelectrodialysis. The mechanisms affecting materials performance in solar energy conversion systems and development of new materials that improve system efficiency, reliability and economics are reported.

  20. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  1. ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-02

    Root Cause Analysis (RCA) identifies the cause of an adverse condition that, if corrected, will preclude recurrence or greatly reduce the probability of recurrence of the same or similar adverse conditions and thereby protect the health and safety of the public, the workers, and the environment. This procedure sets forth the requirements for management determination and the selection of RCA methods and implementation of RCAs that are a result of significant findings from Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) violations, occurrences/events, Significant Adverse Conditions, and external oversight Corrective Action Requests (CARs) generated by the Office of Enforcement (PAAA headquarters), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and other oversight entities against Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Performance of an RCA may result in the identification of issues that should be reported in accordance with the Issues Management Program Manual.

  2. An improved viscous characteristics analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1978-01-01

    An improved two dimensional characteristics analysis program is presented. The program is built upon the foundation of a FORTRAN program entitled Analysis of Supersonic Combustion Flow Fields With Embedded Subsonic Regions. The major improvements are described and a listing of the new program is provided. The subroutines and their functions are given as well as the input required for the program. Several applications of the program to real problems are qualitatively described. Three runs obtained in the investigation of a real problem are presented to provide insight for the input and output of the program.

  3. Programs in energy conservation: Inventions and Innovation Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    DOE's Inventions and Innovation Programs--the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) and the Innovative Concepts Program (ICP)--are a unique federal response to the needs of individual and small businesses with creative ideas that could make a difference in our national use of energy. ERIP was established by Congress in 1974 to focus and nourish the creative powers of American inventors, no matter what the level of sophistication of the technology or its creator. This strategy, developed to recognize the potential contributions inherent in independent inventors and small businesses, has successfully supported innovators whose ideas are not yet attracting private investors but have technical and commercial potential. ERIP is, above all, a process. An unusual feature of the program is its joint operation by DOE and the US Department of Commerce through its National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST (formerly NBS, the National Bureau of Standards). This process involves increasing the awareness of ERIP in the community of inventors; NIST performing technical evaluations and feasibility studies; and DOE awarding grants, holding commercialization workshops, and performing periodic program evaluations. These activities are directed toward developing energy-related inventions closer to the stage where the private sector is willing to finance development and commercialization.

  4. Current work in energy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the work performed at Berkeley Lab most recently. One of the Labs accomplishments is the publication of Scenarios of US Carbon Reductions, an analysis of the potential of energy technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. This analysis is described and played a key role in shaping the US position on climate change in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations. The Labs participation in the fundamental characterization of the climate change issue by the IPCC is described. Described also is a study of leaking electricity, which is stimulating an international campaign for a one-watt ceiling for standby electricity losses from appliances. This ceiling has the potential to save two-thirds of the 5% of US residential electricity currently expended on standby losses. The 54 vignettes contained in the report summarize results of research activities ranging in scale from calculating the efficacy of individual lamp ballasts to estimating the cost-effectiveness of the national Energy Star{reg_sign} labeling program, and ranging in location from a scoping study of energy-efficiency market transformation in California to development of an energy-efficiency project in the auto parts industry in Shandong Province, China.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents an analysis of the technical performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) funded during FY 1979 by the U.S. Department of Energy. Chapter 1 gives an analytic framework with which to evaluate the systems. Chapter 2 consists of a review of each of the nine projects, including project technical overviews, estimates of energy savings, and results of economic analysis. Chapter 3 summarizes technical, economic, and institutional barriers that are likely to inhibit widespread dissemination of SWECS technology.

  6. Use of Some "Discriminant Analysis" Computer Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the outputs of selected computer programs often used to carry out a "discriminant analysis" with respect to two purposes of such an analysis, discrimination and classification. The programs selected are three BMD programs. (Author/JKS)

  7. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Kailash; Doyle, Edward; Becker, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    Completely integrated thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power sources in the range of 100 to 500 watts are being developed. The technical approach taken in this project focuses on optimizing the integrated performance of the primary subsystems in order to yield high energy conversion efficiency and cost effectiveness. An important aspect of the approach is the use of a narrow band fibrous emitter radiating to a bandgap matched photovoltaic array to minimize thermal and optical recuperation requirements, as well as the non-recoverable heat losses. For the prototype system, fibrous ytterbia emitters radiating in a narrow band centered at 980 nm are matched with high efficiency silicon photoconverters. The integrated system includes a dielectric stack filter for optical energy recovery and a ceramic recuperator for thermal energy recovery. The prototype TPV system uses a rapid mix distributed fuel delivery system with controlled feeding of the fuel and heated air into a flame at the surface of the emitter. This makes it possible to operate at air preheat temperatures well above the auto-ignition temperature of the fuel thereby substantially increasing the system efficiency. The system has been operated with air preheat temperatures up to 1367 K and has produced a uniform narrow band radiation over the surface of the emitter with this approach. The design of the system is described and test data for the system and some of the key components are presented. The results from a system model, which show the impact of various parameters on system performance, are also discussed.

  8. Who Should Administer Energy-Efficiency Programs?

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Goldman, Charles; Barbose, Galen L.

    2003-05-01

    The restructuring of the electric utility industry in the US created a crisis in the administration of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs. Before restructuring, nearly all energy-efficiency programs in the US were administered by utilities and funded from utility rates. Restructuring called these arrangements into question in two ways. First, the separation of generation from transmission and distribution undermined a key rationale for utility administration. This was the Integrated Resource Planning approach in which the vertically integrated utility was given incentives to provide energy services at least cost. Second, questions were raised as to whether funding through utility rates could be sustained in a competitive environment and most states that restructured their electricity industry adopted a system benefits charge. The crisis in administration of energy-efficiency programs produced a variety of responses in the eight years since restructuring in the US began in earn est. These responses have included new rationales for energy-efficiency programs, new mechanisms for funding programs, and new mechanisms for program administration and governance. This paper focuses on issues related to program administration. It describes the administrative functions and some of the options for accomplishing them. Then it discusses criteria for choosing among the options. Examples are given that highlight some of the states that have made successful transitions to new governance and/or administration structures. Attention is also given to California where large-scale energy-efficiency programs have continued to operate, despite the fact that many of the key governance/administration issues remain unresolved. The conclusion attempts to summarize lessons learned.

  9. Computer Programming in a Spatial Analysis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesler, Wilbert; Kaplan, Abram

    1993-01-01

    Contends that students in spatial analysis courses generally are familiar with computer use and programs but lack basic computer programing skills. Describes four exercises in which students learn programing using BASIC and dBASE. Asserts that programming exercises help students clarify concepts, understand the rationale behind calculations, use…

  10. SLC Energy Upgrade Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Allen, M.A.; Cassel, R.L.; Dean, N.R.; Konrad, G.T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lebacqz, J.V.

    1985-03-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. This paper describes the energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals. It includes a discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators.